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Sample records for active damping function

  1. Active constrained layer damping of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of functionally graded plates using piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Satyajit; Ray, M. C.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a geometrically nonlinear dynamic analysis has been presented for functionally graded (FG) plates integrated with a patch of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment and subjected to a temperature field. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of the piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composite (PFRC) material. The temperature field is assumed to be spatially uniform over the substrate plate surfaces and varied through the thickness of the host FG plates. The temperature-dependent material properties of the FG substrate plates are assumed to be graded in the thickness direction of the plates according to a power-law distribution while the Poisson's ratio is assumed to be a constant over the domain of the plate. The constrained viscoelastic layer of the ACLD treatment is modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. Based on the first-order shear deformation theory, a three-dimensional finite element model has been developed to model the open-loop and closed-loop nonlinear dynamics of the overall FG substrate plates under the thermal environment. The analysis suggests the potential use of the ACLD treatment with its constraining layer made of the PFRC material for active control of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of FG plates in the absence or the presence of the temperature gradient across the thickness of the plates. It is found that the ACLD treatment is more effective in controlling the geometrically nonlinear vibrations of FG plates than in controlling their linear vibrations. The analysis also reveals that the ACLD patch is more effective for controlling the nonlinear vibrations of FG plates when it is attached to the softest surface of the FG plates than when it is bonded to the stiffest surface of the plates. The effect of piezoelectric fiber orientation in the active constraining PFRC layer on the damping characteristics of the overall FG plates is also discussed.

  2. A soft damping function for dispersion corrections with less overfitting.

    PubMed

    Ucak, Umit V; Ji, Hyunjun; Singh, Yashpal; Jung, Yousung

    2016-11-07

    The use of damping functions in empirical dispersion correction schemes is common and widespread. These damping functions contain scaling and damping parameters, and they are usually optimized for the best performance in practical systems. In this study, it is shown that the overfitting problem can be present in current damping functions, which can sometimes yield erroneous results for real applications beyond the nature of training sets. To this end, we present a damping function called linear soft damping (lsd) that suffers less from this overfitting. This linear damping function damps the asymptotic curve more softly than existing damping functions, attempting to minimize the usual overcorrection. The performance of the proposed damping function was tested with benchmark sets for thermochemistry, reaction energies, and intramolecular interactions, as well as intermolecular interactions including nonequilibrium geometries. For noncovalent interactions, all three damping schemes considered in this study (lsd, lg, and BJ) roughly perform comparably (approximately within 1 kcal/mol), but for atomization energies, lsd clearly exhibits a better performance (up to 2-6 kcal/mol) compared to other schemes due to an overfitting in lg and BJ. The number of unphysical parameters resulting from global optimization also supports the overfitting symptoms shown in the latter numerical tests.

  3. A soft damping function for dispersion corrections with less overfitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucak, Umit V.; Ji, Hyunjun; Singh, Yashpal; Jung, Yousung

    2016-11-01

    The use of damping functions in empirical dispersion correction schemes is common and widespread. These damping functions contain scaling and damping parameters, and they are usually optimized for the best performance in practical systems. In this study, it is shown that the overfitting problem can be present in current damping functions, which can sometimes yield erroneous results for real applications beyond the nature of training sets. To this end, we present a damping function called linear soft damping (lsd) that suffers less from this overfitting. This linear damping function damps the asymptotic curve more softly than existing damping functions, attempting to minimize the usual overcorrection. The performance of the proposed damping function was tested with benchmark sets for thermochemistry, reaction energies, and intramolecular interactions, as well as intermolecular interactions including nonequilibrium geometries. For noncovalent interactions, all three damping schemes considered in this study (lsd, lg, and BJ) roughly perform comparably (approximately within 1 kcal/mol), but for atomization energies, lsd clearly exhibits a better performance (up to 2-6 kcal/mol) compared to other schemes due to an overfitting in lg and BJ. The number of unphysical parameters resulting from global optimization also supports the overfitting symptoms shown in the latter numerical tests.

  4. Active Damping Using Distributed Anisotropic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Quinones, Juan D.; Wier, Nathan C.

    2010-01-01

    A helicopter structure experiences substantial high-frequency mechanical excitation from powertrain components such as gearboxes and drive shafts. The resulting structure-borne vibration excites the windows which then radiate sound into the passenger cabin. In many cases the radiated sound power can be reduced by adding damping. This can be accomplished using passive or active approaches. Passive treatments such as constrained layer damping tend to reduce window transparency. Therefore this paper focuses on an active approach utilizing compact decentralized control units distributed around the perimeter of the window. Each control unit consists of a triangularly shaped piezoelectric actuator, a miniature accelerometer, and analog electronics. Earlier work has shown that this type of system can increase damping up to approximately 1 kHz. However at higher frequencies the mismatch between the distributed actuator and the point sensor caused control spillover. This paper describes new anisotropic actuators that can be used to improve the bandwidth of the control system. The anisotropic actuators are composed of piezoelectric material sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes, which enables the application of the electric field in a preferred in-plane direction. When shaped correctly the anisotropic actuators outperform traditional isotropic actuators by reducing the mismatch between the distributed actuator and point sensor at high frequencies. Testing performed on a Plexiglas panel, representative of a helicopter window, shows that the control units can increase damping at low frequencies. However high frequency performance was still limited due to the flexible boundary conditions present on the test structure.

  5. Active damping of spacecraft structural appendage vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An active vibration damper system, for bending in two orthogonal directions and torsion, in each of three mutually perpendicular axes is located at the extremities of the flexible appendages of a space platform. The system components for each axis includes: an accelerometer, filtering and signal processing apparatus, and a DC motor-inertia wheel torquer. The motor torquer, when driven by a voltage proportional to the relative vibration tip velocity, produces a reaction torque for opposing and therefore damping a specific modal velocity of vibration. The relative tip velocity is obtained by integrating the difference between the signal output from the accelerometer located at the end of the appendage with the output of a usually carried accelerometer located on a relatively rigid body portion of the space platform. A selector switch, with sequential stepping logic or highest modal vibration energy logic, steps to another modal tip velocity channel and receives a signal voltage to damp another vibration mode. In this manner, several vibration modes can be damped with a single sensor/actuator pair. When a three axis damper is located on each of the major appendages of the platform, then all of the system vibration modes can be effectively damped.

  6. Bridge feedback for active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Lurie, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for broadband damping augmentation of a structural system in which the active members (with feedback control) were developed such that their mechanical input impedance can be electrically adjusted to maximize the energy dissipation rate in the structural system. The active member consists of sensors, an actuator, and a control scheme. A mechanical/electrical analogy is described to model the passive structures and the active members in terms of their impedance representation. As a result, the problem of maximizing dissipative power is analogous to the problem of impedance matching in the electrical network. Closed-loop performance was demonstrated for single- and multiple-active-member controlled truss structure.

  7. Active damping of the SOFIA Telescope assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keas, Paul J.; Dunham, Edward; Lampater, Ulrich; Pfüller, Enrico; Teufel, Stefan; Roeser, Hans-Peter; Wiedemann, Manuel; Wolf, Jürgen

    2012-09-01

    The NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) employs a 2.5-meter reflector telescope in a Boeing 747SP. The telescope is housed in an open cavity and is subjected to aeroacoustic and inertial disturbances in flight. To meet pointing requirements, SOFIA must achieve a pointing stability of approximately 0.5 arcseconds RMS. An active damping control system is being developed for SOFIA to reduce image jitter and image degradation due to resonance of the telescope assembly. Our paper discusses the history of the active damping design for SOFIA, from early concepts to the current implementation which has recently completed a ground and flight testing for proof-of-concept. We describe some milestones in the analysis and testing of the telescope assembly which guided the development of the vibration control system. The control synthesis approach and current implementation of the active damping control system is presented. Finally, we summarize the performance observed in early flight tests and the steps that are currently foreseen to completing the development of this system.

  8. Active Vibration Damping of Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Gunar; Baier, Horst; Grillebeck, Anton; Scharfeld, Frank; Hunger, Joseph; Abou-El-Ela, A.; Lohberg, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Current generations of large solar array panels are lightweight and flexible constructions to reduce net masses. They undergo strong vibrations during launch. The active vibration damping is one convenient option to reduce vibration responses and limit stresses in facesheets. In this study, two actuator concepts are used for vibration damping. A stack interface actuator replaces a panel hold down and is decoupled from bending moments and shear forces. Piezoelectric patch actuators are used as an alternative, where the number, position and size of actuators are mainly driven by controllability analyses. Linear Quadratic Gaussian control is used to attenuate vibrations of selected mode shapes with both actuators. Simulations as well as modal and acoustic tests show the feasibility of selected actuator concepts.

  9. Active member bridge feedback control for damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Lurie, Boris J.

    1992-01-01

    An active damping augmentation approach using active members in a structural system is described. The problem of maximizing the vibration damping in a lightly damped structural system is considered using the analogy of impedance matching between the load and source impedances in an electrical network. The proposed active damping augmentation approach therefore consists of finding the desired active member impedances that maximize the vibration damping, and designing a feedback control in order to achieve desired active member impedances. This study uses a bridge feedback concept that feeds back a combination of signals from sensors of the axial force and relative velocity across the active member to realize the desired active member impedance. The proposed active damping augmentation approach and bridge feedback concept were demonstrated on a three-longeron softly suspended truss structure.

  10. Vibration control through passive constrained layer damping and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Inman, Daniel J.; Saunders, William R.

    1997-05-01

    To add damping to systems, viscoelastic materials (VEM) are added to structures. In order to enhance the damping effects of the VEM, a constraining layer is attached. When this constraining layer is an active element, the treatment is called active constrained layer damping (ACLD). Recently, the investigation of ACLD treatments has shown it to be an effective method of vibration suppression. In this paper, the treatment of a beam with a separate active element and passive constrained layer (PCLD) element is investigated. A Ritz- Galerkin approach is used to obtain discretized equations of motion. The damping is modeled using the GHM method and the system is analyzed in the time domain. By optimizing on the performance and control effort for both the active and passive case, it is shown that this treatment is capable of lower control effort with more inherent damping, and is therefore a better approach to damp vibration.

  11. Active vibration damping using smart material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baras, John S.; Yan, Zhuang

    1994-01-01

    We consider the modeling and active damping of an elastic beam using distributed actuators and sensors. The piezoelectric ceramic material (PZT) is used to build the actuator. The sensor is made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). These materials are glued on both sides of the beam. For the simple clamped beam, the closed loop controller has been shown to be able to extract energy from the beam. The shape of the actuator and its influence on the closed loop system performance are discussed. It is shown that it is possible to suppress the selected mode by choosing the appropriate actuator layout. It is also shown that by properly installing the sensor and determining the sensor shape we can further extract and manipulate the sensor signal for our control need.

  12. Effect of in-structure damping uncertainty on semi-active control performance: a modeling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthanpurayil, Arun M.; Reynolds, Paul; Nyawako, Donald

    2013-04-01

    The mathematical model of a vibrating structure includes mass, damping and stiffness; out of which mass and stiffness could be defined as a function of the system geometry, whereas damping is more of an observed phenomenon. Despite having a large literature on the subject, the underlying physics is only known in a phenomenological ad-hoc manner, making damping an overall mystery in the general dynamic analysis of structures. A major reason of this could be the fact that there is no single universally accepted model for damping. Common practice is to use the classical viscous damping model originated by Rayleigh, through his famous `Rayleigh dissipation function', with a preconceived damping ratio, irrespective of the purpose or type of analysis involved. This paper investigates the effect of this modelling uncertainty on the analytical prediction of the required control force in a semi-active control application for civil structures. Global classical Rayleigh damping models and global non-viscous damping models are used in the present study. Responses of a laboratory slab strip are simulated and are compared with experimental responses. The comparisons emphasises the fact that the choice of in-structure damping models has a significant effect in the computation of the required control force. The comparison also clearly indicates that mathematically sophisticated models have better prediction capability as compared to the classical Rayleigh model.

  13. Microscale damping using thin film active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrigan, Catherine A.; Ho, Ken K.; Mohanchandra, K. P.; Carman, Gregory P.

    2007-04-01

    This paper focuses on understanding and developing a new approach to dampen MEMS structures using both experiments and analytical techniques. Thin film Nitinol and thin film Terfenol-D are evaluated as a damping solution to the micro scale damping problem. Stress induced twin boundary motion in Nitinol is used to passively dampen potentially damaging vibrations. Magnetic domain wall motion is used to passively dampen vibration in Terfenol-D. The thin films of Nitinol, Nitinol/Silicon laminates and Nitinol/Terfenol-D/Nickel laminates have been produced using a sputter deposition process and damping properties have been evaluated. Dynamic testing shows substantial damping (tan δ) measurable in each case. Nitinol film samples were tested in the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to determine phase transformation temperatures. The twin boundary mechanism by which energy absorption occurs is present at all points below the Austenite start temperature (approximately 69°C in our film) and therefore allows damping at cold temperatures where traditional materials fail. Thin film in the NiTi/Si laminate was found to produce substantially higher damping (tan δ = 0.28) due to the change in loading condition. The NiTi/Si laminate sample was tested in bending allowing the twin boundaries to be reset by cyclic tensile and compressive loads. The thin film Terfenol-D in the Nitinol/Terfenol-D/Nickel laminate was shown to produce large damping (tan δ = 0.2). In addition to fabricating and testing, an analytical model of a heterogeneous layered thin film damping material was developed and compared to experimental work.

  14. Experiences with active damping and impedance-matching compensators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betros, Robert S.; Alvarez, Oscar S.; Bronowicki, Allen J.

    1993-09-01

    TRW has been implementing active damping compensators on smart structures for the past five years. Since that time there have been numerous publications on the use of impedance matching techniques for structural damping augmentation. The idea of impedance matching compensators came about by considering the flow of power in a structure undergoing vibration. The goal of these compensators is to electronically dissipate as much of this flowing power as possible. This paper shows the performance of impedance matching compensators used in smart structures to be comparable to that of active damping compensators. Theoretical comparisons between active damping and impedance matching methods are made using PZT actuators and sensors. The effects of these collocated and non-collocated PZT sensors and actuators on the types of signals they sense and actuate are investigated. A method for automatically synthesizing impedance matching compensators is presented. Problems with implementing broad band active damping and impedance matching compensators on standard Digital Signal Processing (DSP) chips are discussed. Simulations and measurements that compare the performance of active damping and impedance matching techniques for a lightly damped cantilevered beam are shown.

  15. An Active Damping at Blade Resonances Using Piezoelectric Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Duffy, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing an active damping at blade resonances using piezoelectric structure to reduce excessive vibratory stresses that lead to high cycle fatigue (HCF) failures in aircraft engine turbomachinery. Conventional passive damping work was shown first on a nonrotating beam made by Ti-6A1-4V with a pair of identical piezoelectric patches, and then active feedback control law was derived in terms of inductor, resister, and capacitor to control resonant frequency only. Passive electronic circuit components and adaptive feature could be easily programmable into control algorithm. Experimental active damping was demonstrated on two test specimens achieving significant damping on tip displacement and patch location. Also a multimode control technique was shown to control several modes.

  16. Local structural modeling for implementation of optimal active damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaurock, Carl A.; Miller, David W.

    1993-09-01

    Local controllers are good candidates for active control of flexible structures. Local control generally consists of low order, frequency benign compensators using collocated hardware. Positive real compensators and plant transfer functions ensure that stability margins and performance robustness are high. The typical design consists of an experimentally chosen gain on a fixed form controller such as rate feedback. The resulting compensator performs some combination of damping (dissipating energy) and structural modification (changing the energy flow paths). Recent research into structural impedance matching has shown how to optimize dissipation based on the local behavior of the structure. This paper investigates the possibility of improving performance by influencing global energy flow, using local controllers designed using a global performance metric.

  17. Active damping performance of the KAGRA seismic attenuation system prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yoshinori; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Aso, Yoichi; Barton, Mark; Erasmo Peña Arellano, Fabián; Shoda, Ayaka; Akutsu, Tomotada; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Hirata, Naoatsu; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Okutomi, Koki; Miyamoto, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Hideki; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2016-05-01

    The Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope (formerly LCGT now KAGRA) is presently under construction in Japan. This May we assembled a prototype of the seismic attenuation system (SAS) for the beam splitter and the signal recycling mirrors of KAGRA, which we call Type-B SAS, and evaluated its performance at NAOJ (Mitaka, Toyko). We investigated its frequency response, active damping performance, vibration isolation performance and long-term stability both in and out of vacuum. From the frequency response test and the active damping performance test, we confirmed that the SAS worked as we designed and that all mechanical resonances which could disturb lock acquisition and observation are damped within 1 minute, which is required for KAGRA, by the active controls.

  18. a Global Model for Long-Range Interaction `DAMPING Functions'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myatt, Philip Thomas; McCourt, Frederick R. W.; Le Roy, Robert J.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, `damping functions', which characterize the weakening of inverse-power-sum long-range interatomic interaction energies with increasing electron overlap, have become an increasing important component of models for diatomic molecule interaction potentials. However, a key feature of models for damping functions, their portability, has received little scrutiny. The present work set out to examine all available ab initio induction and dispersion damping function data and to attempt to devise a `global' scheme for diatomic molecule damping functions. It appears that while neutral (H, He, Li, and Ne, homonuclear and mixed) and anion (H^- with H, He and Li) species obey (approximately) one common rule, proton plus neutral (H^+ with H, He and Li) and non-proton-cation plus neutral systems (He^+ and Li^+ with H, He and Li), must each be treated separately. However, for all three cases, a version of the Douketis-Scoles-Thakkar (ionization potential)power factor is a key scaling parameter. R.J. Le Roy, C. C. Haugen, J. Tao and Hui Li, Mol. Phys. 109,435 (2011). P.J. Knowles and W.J. Meath,J. Mol. Phys. 60, 1143 (1987); R.J. Wheatley and W.J. Meath,J. Mol. Phys. 80, 25 (1993); R.J. Wheatley and W.J. Meath J. Chem. Phys. 179, 341 (1994); R.J. Wheatley and W.J. Meath,J. Chem. Phys. 203, 209 (1996). C. Douketis,G. Scoles, S. Marchetti, M. Zen and A. J. Thakkar, J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982).

  19. Active Constrained Layer Damping of Thin Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RAY, M. C.; OH, J.; BAZ, A.

    2001-03-01

    The effectiveness of the active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is presented. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. Experiments are performed to verify the numerical predictions. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  20. Six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Leonard S.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed during the period 1 Jan. - 31 Mar. 1993 on six degree of freedom active vibration damping for space application is presented. A performance and cost report is included. Topics covered include: actuator testing; mechanical amplifier design; and neural network control system development and experimental evaluation.

  1. Spectral damping scaling factors for shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Bozorgnia, Yousef; Idriss, I.M.; Campbell, Kenneth; Abrahamson, Norman; Silva, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for elastic response spectra, including the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) models, are typically developed at a 5% viscous damping ratio. In reality, however, structural and non-structural systems can have damping ratios other than 5%, depending on various factors such as structural types, construction materials, level of ground motion excitations, among others. This report provides the findings of a comprehensive study to develop a new model for a Damping Scaling Factor (DSF) that can be used to adjust the 5% damped spectral ordinates predicted by a GMPE to spectral ordinates with damping ratios between 0.5 to 30%. Using the updated, 2011 version of the NGA database of ground motions recorded in worldwide shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions (i.e., the NGA-West2 database), dependencies of the DSF on variables including damping ratio, spectral period, moment magnitude, source-to-site distance, duration, and local site conditions are examined. The strong influence of duration is captured by inclusion of both magnitude and distance in the DSF model. Site conditions are found to have less significant influence on DSF and are not included in the model. The proposed model for DSF provides functional forms for the median value and the logarithmic standard deviation of DSF. This model is heteroscedastic, where the variance is a function of the damping ratio. Damping Scaling Factor models are developed for the “average” horizontal ground motion components, i.e., RotD50 and GMRotI50, as well as the vertical component of ground motion.

  2. Transfer function modeling of damping mechanisms in viscoelastic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, J. C.; Inman, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    This work formulates a method for the modeling of material damping characteristics in plates. The Sophie German equation of classical plate theory is modified to incorporate hysteresis effects represented by complex stiffness using the transfer function approach proposed by Golla and Hughes, (1985). However, this procedure is not limited to this representation. The governing characteristic equation is decoupled through separation of variables, yielding a solution similar to that of undamped classical plate theory, allowing solution of the steady state as well as the transient response problem.

  3. Transfer function modeling of damping mechanisms in distributed parameter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, J. C.; Inman, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    This work formulates a method for the modeling of material damping characteristics in distributed parameter models which may be easily applied to models such as rod, plate, and beam equations. The general linear boundary value vibration equation is modified to incorporate hysteresis effects represented by complex stiffness using the transfer function approach proposed by Golla and Hughes. The governing characteristic equations are decoupled through separation of variables yielding solutions similar to those of undamped classical theory, allowing solution of the steady state as well as transient response. Example problems and solutions are provided demonstrating the similarity of the solutions to those of the classical theories and transient responses of nonviscous systems.

  4. Smart actuators: a novel technique for active damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, Michael; Moldovan, Klaus; Goetz, Bernt

    1995-05-01

    Sensors are important components for any automatic process. Their function is to measure physical variables, and thus to allow automatic actions in a technical process, for example in a manufacturing sequence or a measurement. Selecting a sensor for a process, it is mostly overlooked that actuators used in a process also have sensory properties. The reactions of actuators to the state of a process give the possibility to extract relevant information out of the process with actuators. In using the sensory properties of actuators the costs for additional sensors can be saved. Even more important, under some circumstances it may not even be possible to place a special sensor directly at the location of interest: In that case the information about the physical variable is only accessible by analyzing the return signal of the actuator. An example of such a smart actuator combining active and sensory properties is demonstrated in a simple experiment. This experiment shows a steel ball supported as a pendulum. The steel ball can be pushed off, and on swinging back it can be caught in a single pass without any bounce. The actuator uses the piezoelectric effect which shows the underlying principle most clearly: Application of the reversibility of physical effects. In this case mechanical energy can either be produced or absorbed. This experiment is means as a demonstration model for students. It is also used for preliminary investigations developing a fast, actively damped tipping mechanism (optical scanner).

  5. Active vibration damping of the Space Shuttle remote manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Michael A.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of providing active damping augmentation of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) following normal payload handling operations is investigated. The approach used in the analysis is described, and the results for both linear and nonlinear performance analysis of candidate laws are presented, demonstrating that significant improvement in the RMS dynamic response can be achieved through active control using measured RMS tip acceleration data for feedback.

  6. Active vibration damping of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Michael A.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of providing active damping augmentation of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) following normal payload-handling operations is investigated. The approach used in the analysis is described and the results from both linear and nonlinear performance analyses of candidate laws are presented, demonstrating that significant improvement in the RMS dynamic response can be achieved through active control using measured RMS tip acceleration data for feedback.

  7. Vibration control of cylindrical shells using active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Manas C.; Chen, Tung-Huei; Baz, Amr M.

    1997-05-01

    The fundamentals of controlling the structural vibration of cylindrical shells treated with active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments are presented. The effectiveness of the ACLD treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. The FEM is used to predict the natural frequencies and the modal loss factors of shells which are partially treated with patches of the ACLD treatments. The predictions of the FEM are validated experimentally using stainless steel cylinders which are 20.32 cm in diameter, 30.4 cm in length and 0.05 cm in thickness. The cylinders are treated with ACLD patches of different configurations in order to target single or multi-modes of lobar vibrations. The ACLD patches used are made of DYAD 606 visco-elastic layer which is sandwiched between two layers of PVDF piezo-electric films. Vibration attenuations of 85% are obtained with maximum control voltage of 40 volts. Such attenuations are attributed to the effectiveness of the ACLD treatment in increasing the modal damping ratios by about a factor of four over those of conventional passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) treatments. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  8. Vibration and damping characteristics of cylindrical shells with active constrained layer damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ling; Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Yi

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the application of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments is extended to the vibration control of cylindrical shells. The governing equation of motion of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments is derived on the basis of the constitutive equations of elastic, piezoelectric and visco-elastic materials and an energy approach. The damping of a visco-elastic layer is modeled by the complex modulus formula. A finite element model is developed to describe and predict the vibration characteristics of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments. A closed-loop control system based on proportional and derivative feedback of the sensor voltage generated by the piezo-sensor of the ACLD patches is established. The dynamic behaviors of cylindrical shells with ACLD treatments such as natural frequencies, loss factors and responses in the frequency domain are further investigated. The effects of several key parameters such as control gains, location and coverage of ACLD treatments on vibration suppression of cylindrical shells are also discussed. The numerical results indicate the validity of the finite element model and the control strategy approach. The potential of ACLD treatments in controlling vibration and sound radiation of cylindrical shells used as major critical structures such as cabins of aircraft, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles is thus demonstrated.

  9. Active vibration control using an inertial actuator with internal damping.

    PubMed

    Paulitsch, Christoph; Gardonio, Paolo; Elliott, Stephen J

    2006-04-01

    Collocated direct velocity feedback with ideal point force actuators mounted on structures is unconditionally stable and generates active damping. When inertial actuators are used to generate the control force, the system can become unstable even for moderate velocity feedback gains due to an additional -180 degree phase lag introduced by the fundamental axial resonant mode of the inertial actuator. In this study a relative velocity sensor is used to implement an inner velocity feedback loop that generates internal damping in a lightweight, electrodynamic, inertial actuator. Simulation results for a model problem with the actuator mounted on a clamped plate show that, when internal relative velocity feedback is used in addition to a conventional external velocity feedback loop, there is an optimum combination of internal and external velocity feedback gains, which, for a given gain margin, maximizes vibration reduction. These predictions are validated in experiments with a specially built lightweight inertial actuator.

  10. Experimental investigation and CFD simulation of active damping mechanism for propellant slosh in spacecraft launch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuva, Dhawal

    2011-07-01

    Motion of propellant in the liquid propellant tanks due to inertial forces transferred from actions like stage separation and trajectory correction of the launch vehicle is known as propellant slosh. If unchecked, propellant slosh can reach resonance and lead to complete loss of the spacecraft stability, it can change the trajectory of the vehicle or increase consumption of propellant from the calculated requirements, thereby causing starvation of the latter stages of the vehicle. Predicting the magnitude of such slosh events is not trivial. Several passive mechanisms with limited operating range are currently used to mitigate the effects of slosh. An active damping mechanism concept developed here can operate over a large range of slosh frequencies and is much more effective than passive damping devices. Spherical and cylindrical tanks modeled using the ANSYS CFX software package considers the free surface of liquid propellant exposed to atmospheric pressure. Hydrazine is a common liquid propellant and since it is toxic, it cannot be used in experiment. But properties of hydrazine are similar to the properties of water; therefore water is substituted as propellant for experimental study. For close comparison of the data, water is substituted as propellant in CFD simulation. The research is done in three phases. The first phase includes modeling free surface slosh using CFD and validation of the model by comparison to previous experimental results. The second phase includes developing an active damping mechanism and simulating the behavior using a CFD model. The third phase includes experimental development of damping mechanism and comparing the CFD simulation to the experimental results. This research provides an excellent tool for low cost analysis of damping mechanisms for propellant slosh as well as proves that the concept of an active damping mechanism developed here, functions as expected.

  11. Modeling active constrained-layer damping using Golla-Hughes-McTavish approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Saunders, William R.; Inman, Daniel J.

    1995-05-01

    Viscoelastic material (VEM) adds damping to structures. In order to enhance the damping effects of the viscoelastic material, a constraining layer is attached. If this constraining layer is a piezoelectric patch, the system is said to have active constrained layer damping (ACLD). In this paper, the damping effects due to viscoelastic material which has an active constraining layer is modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) damping method. The piezoelectric patch and structure are modeled using a Galerkin approach in order to account for the effect of the constraining layer on the beam.

  12. Damping scaling factors for elastic response spectra for shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions: "average" horizontal component

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Bozorgnia, Yousef; Idriss, I.M.; Abrahamson, Norman; Campbell, Kenneth; Silva, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for elastic response spectra are typically developed at a 5% viscous damping ratio. In reality, however, structural and nonstructural systems can have other damping ratios. This paper develops a new model for a damping scaling factor (DSF) that can be used to adjust the 5% damped spectral ordinates predicted by a GMPE for damping ratios between 0.5% to 30%. The model is developed based on empirical data from worldwide shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions. Dependencies of the DSF on potential predictor variables, such as the damping ratio, spectral period, ground motion duration, moment magnitude, source-to-site distance, and site conditions, are examined. The strong influence of duration is captured by the inclusion of both magnitude and distance in the DSF model. Site conditions show weak influence on the DSF. The proposed damping scaling model provides functional forms for the median and logarithmic standard deviation of DSF, and is developed for both RotD50 and GMRotI50 horizontal components. A follow-up paper develops a DSF model for vertical ground motion.

  13. Integrated structures/controls optimization of a smart composite plate with segmented active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beri, Rajan; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Nam, Changho

    2000-06-01

    A rigorous multi-objective optimization procedure, is developed to address the integrated structures/control design of composite plates with surface bonded segmented active constrained layer (ACL) damping treatment. The Kresselmeier- Steinhauser function approach is used to formulate this multidisciplinary problem. The goal is to control vibration without incorporating a weight penalty. Objective functions and constraints include damping ratios, structural weight and natural frequencies. Design variables include the ply stacking sequence, dimensions and placement of segmented ACL. The optimal designs show improved plate vibratory characteristics and reduced structural weight. The results of the multi- objective optimization problem are compared to those of a single objective optimization with vibration control as the objective. Results establish the necessity for developing the integrated structures/controls optimization procedure.

  14. Variations of hybrid damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Inman, Daniel J.; Saunders, William R.

    1998-06-01

    Damping is important to structures and can be achieved through the addition of viscoelastic materials (VEM). The damping of the VEM is enhanced if a constraining layer is attached to the VEM. If this constraining layer is active, the treatment is called active constrained layer damping (ACLD). In the last few years, ACLD has proven to be superior in vibration control to active or passive damping. The active element makes ACLD more effective than passive constrained layer damping. It also provides a fail-safe in case of breakdown of the active element that is not present for purely active control. It is shown that the control effort needed to damp vibration using ACLD can be significantly higher than purely active control. In order to combine the inherent damping of passive control with the effectiveness of the active element, this paper will explore different variations of active, passive and hybrid damping. Some of the variations include: passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) separate from active element but on the same side of beam, PCLD separate from active on the opposite side of the beam, and active element underneath PCLD. The discretized system equations will be obtained using assumed modes method and Lagrange's equation. The damping will be modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. The optimal placement and size of the active, passive, ACLD and hybrid treatments will be found using different schemes. The issue of overshoot and settling time of the output and control force using LQR will be addressed, as well as the control effort, passive and active vibration suppression, and LQR cost function. It will be shown that the hybrid treatments are capable of greater vibration control for lower control effort for different optimization schemes. 31

  15. Comparative Study of Popular Objective Functions for Damping Power System Oscillations in Multimachine System

    PubMed Central

    Niamul Islam, Naz; Hannan, M. A.; Shareef, Hussain; Mohamed, Azah; Salam, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Power oscillation damping controller is designed in linearized model with heuristic optimization techniques. Selection of the objective function is very crucial for damping controller design by optimization algorithms. In this research, comparative analysis has been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of popular objective functions used in power system oscillation damping. Two-stage lead-lag damping controller by means of power system stabilizers is optimized using differential search algorithm for different objective functions. Linearized model simulations are performed to compare the dominant mode's performance and then the nonlinear model is continued to evaluate the damping performance over power system oscillations. All the simulations are conducted in two-area four-machine power system to bring a detailed analysis. Investigated results proved that multiobjective D-shaped function is an effective objective function in terms of moving unstable and lightly damped electromechanical modes into stable region. Thus, D-shape function ultimately improves overall system damping and concurrently enhances power system reliability. PMID:24977210

  16. Comparative study of popular objective functions for damping power system oscillations in multimachine system.

    PubMed

    Islam, Naz Niamul; Hannan, M A; Shareef, Hussain; Mohamed, Azah; Salam, M A

    2014-01-01

    Power oscillation damping controller is designed in linearized model with heuristic optimization techniques. Selection of the objective function is very crucial for damping controller design by optimization algorithms. In this research, comparative analysis has been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of popular objective functions used in power system oscillation damping. Two-stage lead-lag damping controller by means of power system stabilizers is optimized using differential search algorithm for different objective functions. Linearized model simulations are performed to compare the dominant mode's performance and then the nonlinear model is continued to evaluate the damping performance over power system oscillations. All the simulations are conducted in two-area four-machine power system to bring a detailed analysis. Investigated results proved that multiobjective D-shaped function is an effective objective function in terms of moving unstable and lightly damped electromechanical modes into stable region. Thus, D-shape function ultimately improves overall system damping and concurrently enhances power system reliability.

  17. Active damping of capillary oscillations on liquid columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, David B.; Wei, Wei; Marston, Philip L.

    2002-05-01

    Active control of acoustic radiation pressure and of electrostatic stresses on liquid columns has been demonstrated to overcome the Rayleigh-Plateau instability that normally causes long liquid columns to break [M. J. Marr-Lyon et al., J. Fluid Mech. 351, 345 (1997); Phys. Fluids 12, 986-995 (2000)]. Though originally demonstrated for liquid-liquid systems in plateau tanks, the electrostatic method also works on columns in air in reduced gravity [D. B. Thiessen, M. J. Marr-Lyon, and P. L. Marston, ``Active electrostatic stabilization of liquid bridges in low gravity,'' J. Fluid Mech. (in press)]. In new research, the electrostatic stresses are applied in proportion to the velocity of the surface of the column so as to actively dampen capillary oscillations of the surface. The mode amplitude is optically sensed and the rate-of-change is electronically determined. Plateau tank measurements and theory both show that the change in damping rate is proportional to the feedback gain. The results suggest that either active control of electrostatic stresses or of acoustic radiation stresses can be used to suppress the response of interfaces to vibration. [Work supported by NASA.

  18. Damping MEMS Devices in Harsh Environments Using Active Thin Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-17

    properties of the layers was developed. Damping properties in Nitinol thin film due only to residual stresses was measured to be as high as tan delta...0.17 for large strain (0.9%). At lower strain levels a Nitinol /Silicon laminate was tested in a cantilever load frame. The damping value of the...film was measured to be 0.28 (at 0.27% strain). A Nitinol /Terfenol-D/Nickel laminate was fabricated and tested in a cantilever loading. The damping

  19. Real-time RMS active damping augmentation: Heavy and very light payload evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Lepanto, Janet A.; Flueckiger, Karl W.; Bains, Elizabeth M.; Jensen, Mary C.

    1994-01-01

    Controls-Structures Integration Technology has been applied to the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) to improve on-orbit performance. The objective was to actively damp undesired oscillatory motions of the RMS following routine payload maneuvering and Shuttle attitude control thruster firings. Simulation of active damping was conducted in the real-time, man-in-the-loop Systems Engineering Simulator at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The simulator was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative data on active damping performance from astronaut operators. Using a simulated three-axis accelerometer mounted on the RMS, 'sensed' vibration motions were used to generate joint motor commands that reduced the unwanted oscillations. Active damping of the RMS with heavy and light attached payloads was demonstrated in this study. Five astronaut operators examined the performance of active damping following operator commanded RMS maneuvers and Shuttle thruster firings. Noticeable improvements in the damping response of the RMS with the heavy, Hubble Space Telescope payload and the very light, astronaut in Manipulator Foot Restraint payload were observed. The potential of active damping to aid in precisely maneuvering payloads was deemed significant.

  20. Aeromechanical stability augmentation of helicopters using enhanced active constrained layer damping treatment on rotor flex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badre Alam, Askari

    This thesis presents a study conducted to explore the feasibility of employing Enhanced Active Constrained Layer (EACL) damping treatment in helicopter rotor systems to alleviate aeromechanical instability. The central idea is to apply the EACL treatment on the flexbeams of soft in-plane bearingless main rotors (BMRs) and increase the damping of the first lag mode. In this research, it is explored whether EACL damping treatment can provide sufficient damping in rotor system without exceeding the physical design limits of actuators. To study the feasibility of the EACL damping treatment, a finite element based mathematical model of a rotor with EACL damping treatment on flexbeam is developed. A bench top experiment is conducted to verify the mathematical model. It is shown that the experimental results correlate well with the analytical results. A derivative controller, with control voltage based on the flexbeam tip transverse velocity, is used in this investigation. A filter is developed to remove 1/rev component of the feedback signal. An optimization study is conducted to understand the influence of EACL design parameters on the performance of the damping treatment. A study is conducted to analyze delamination of EACL damping treatment. In this study, a new finite element model is developed that is capable of accurately predicting both, the performance and interlaminar stresses in EACL damping treatment. A new configuration of PCL damping treatment is developed by tapering the constraining layer at the free ends. As compared to a conventional PCL, this configuration has significantly lower interlaminar stresses and similar damping performance. A study is conducted to compare ACL with purely active configuration. It was shown that in ACL configuration, the interlaminar stresses are an-order-of-magnitude lower than the purely active configuration for similar damping levels. A new ACL configuration is designed by changing the poling direction of the PZT constraining

  1. Human-in-the-loop evaluation of RMS Active Damping Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Lepanto, Janet A.; Bains, Elizabeth M.; Jensen, Mary C.

    1993-01-01

    Active Damping Augmentation is the insertion of Controls-Structures Integration Technology to benefit the on-orbit performance of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. The goal is to reduce the vibration decay time of the Remote Manipulator System following normal payload maneuvers and operations. Simulation of Active Damping Augmentation was conducted in the realtime human-in-the-loop Systems Engineering Simulator at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The objective of this study was to obtain a qualitative measure of operational performance improvement from astronaut operators and to obtain supporting quantitative performance data. Sensing of vibratory motions was simulated using a three-axis accelerometer mounted at the end of the lower boom of the Remote Manipulator System. The sensed motions were used in a feedback control law to generate commands to the joint servo mechanisms which reduced the unwanted oscillations. Active damping of the Remote Manipulator System with an attached 3990 lb. payload was successfully demonstrated. Six astronaut operators examined the performance of an Active Damping Augmentation control law following single-joint and coordinated six-joint translational and rotational maneuvers. Active Damping Augmentation disturbance rejection of Orbiter thruster firings was also evaluated. Significant reductions in the dynamic response of the 3990 lb. payload were observed. Astronaut operators recommended investigation of Active Damping Augmentation benefits to heavier payloads where oscillations are a bigger problem (e.g. Space Station Freedom assembly operators).

  2. Active damping of modal vibrations by force apportioning. [for spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallauer, W. L., Jr.; Barthelemy, J.-F. M.

    1980-01-01

    The theory and numerical simulation of active structural damping is described which requires few discrete control thrusters positioned on the structure. A particular apportioning of coherently phased control forces is applied for each vibration mode which is to be damped; this strongly affects the damped vibration mode, while minimally exciting all other modes. The force apportioning used is that which would tune a target mode if the structure was being shaken in a model vibration test. In contrast to model testing, the forces are varied temporally so as to dampen, rather than excite, the target mode(s).

  3. Non-symmetrical semi-active vibration control based on synchronized switching damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao; Zhang, Jin; Nie, Hong; Cheng, Li

    2014-04-01

    An unsymmetrical switch circuit is designed for semi-active control method based on synchronized switching damping principle of piezoelectric actuators. A bypass capacitor and an additional switch are used to realize unsymmetrical bipolar voltage. The control logic of the switches is introduced in detail and the switched voltages, which directly influence the control performance, are derived as functions of the vibration amplitude and the outputs of the voltage sources. Simulations were carried out to verify the design circuit and the theoretical results of the switched voltage. The voltage ratio increases with increasing bypass capacitance, but its increasing rate decreases. The results show that large bypass capacitor is needed to realize a voltage ratio of 3, which is common in some piezoelectric actuator such as MFC.

  4. An asymptotic expansion of the Kontorovich-Lebedev transform of damped oscillatory functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, D.

    2002-08-01

    An asymptotic expansion valid for large positive values of s is constructed for the integral transformwhere Kis(x) denotes the modified Bessel function of the third kind of purely imaginary order. The expansion applies to functions f(x) that are analytic in the sector arg(x)[less-than-or-equals, slant][pi]/4 and that are exponentially damped and oscillatory as x-->[infinity] in this sector.

  5. Active damping of oscillations in a long compliant manipulator link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, C. P.; Evans, M. S.; Trudnowski, D. J.; Magee, D. P.

    1993-07-01

    A flexible manipulator test bed consisting of a fifteen foot long fixed-free compliant beam (representing a compliant manipulator link) with a Shilling Titan II dextrous manipulator mounted on its free end has been constructed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A comprehensive dynamic model which includes flexible body effects has been developed at PNL using a commercially available multibody dynamics code. A linearized version of the model is used to develop control strategies which use inertial forces generated by movements of the dextrous manipulator to damp out induced oscillations in the beam. These control strategies are tested on the model and shown to be feasible, and then implemented in the flexible manipulator testbed. Results from the hardware experiments are analyzed and compared with the model results.

  6. Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels using Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid passive/active noise control system utilizing constrained layer damping and model predictive feedback control is presented. This system is used to control the sound radiation of panels due to broadband disturbances. To facilitate the hybrid system design, a methodology for placement of constrained layer damping which targets selected modes based on their relative radiated sound power is developed. The placement methodology is utilized to determine two constrained layer damping configurations for experimental evaluation of a hybrid system. The first configuration targets the (4,1) panel mode which is not controllable by the piezoelectric control actuator, and the (2,3) and (5,2) panel modes. The second configuration targets the (1,1) and (3,1) modes. The experimental results demonstrate the improved reduction of radiated sound power using the hybrid passive/active control system as compared to the active control system alone.

  7. Acoustic radiation from the submerged circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li-Yun; Xiang, Yu; Lu, Jing; Jiang, Hong-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Based on the transfer matrix method of exploring the circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping (i.e., ACLD), combined with the analytical solution of the Helmholtz equation for a point source, a multi-point multipole virtual source simulation method is for the first time proposed for solving the acoustic radiation problem of a submerged ACLD shell. This approach, wherein some virtual point sources are assumed to be evenly distributed on the axial line of the cylindrical shell, and the sound pressure could be written in the form of the sum of the wave functions series with the undetermined coefficients, is demonstrated to be accurate to achieve the radiation acoustic pressure of the pulsating and oscillating spheres respectively. Meanwhile, this approach is proved to be accurate to obtain the radiation acoustic pressure for a stiffened cylindrical shell. Then, the chosen number of the virtual distributed point sources and truncated number of the wave functions series are discussed to achieve the approximate radiation acoustic pressure of an ACLD cylindrical shell. Applying this method, different radiation acoustic pressures of a submerged ACLD cylindrical shell with different boundary conditions, different thickness values of viscoelastic and piezoelectric layer, different feedback gains for the piezoelectric layer and coverage of ACLD are discussed in detail. Results show that a thicker thickness and larger velocity gain for the piezoelectric layer and larger coverage of the ACLD layer can obtain a better damping effect for the whole structure in general. Whereas, laying a thicker viscoelastic layer is not always a better treatment to achieve a better acoustic characteristic. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11162001, 11502056, and 51105083), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. 2012GXNSFAA053207), the Doctor Foundation of Guangxi

  8. Active Damping of the E-P Instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Assadi, S.; Byrd, J.M.; Deibele, C.E.; Henderson, S.D.; Lee, S.Y.; McCrady, R.C.; Pivi, M.F.T.; Plum, M.A.; Walbridge, S.B.; Zaugg, T.J.; /Los Alamos

    2008-03-17

    A prototype of an analog, transverse (vertical) feedback system for active damping of the two-stream (e-p) instability has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). This system was able to improve the instability threshold by approximately 30% (as measured by the change in RF buncher voltage at instability threshold). The feedback system configuration, setup procedures, and optimization of performance are described. Results of several experimental tests of system performance are presented including observations of instability threshold improvement and grow-damp experiments, which yield estimates of instability growth and damping rates. A major effort was undertaken to identify and study several factors limiting system performance. Evidence obtained from these tests suggests that performance of the prototype was limited by higher instability growth rates arising from beam leakage into the gap at lower RF buncher voltage and the onset of instability in the horizontal plane, which had no feedback.

  9. Active damping of the e-p instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R. J.; Assadi, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Deibele, C. E.; Henderson, S. D.; Lee, S. Y.; McCrady, R. C.; Pivi, M. F. T.; Plum, M. A.; Walbridge, S. B.; Zaugg, T. J.

    2007-12-15

    A prototype of an analog, transverse (vertical) feedback system for active damping of the two-stream (e-p) instability has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). This system was able to improve the instability threshold by approximately 30% (as measured by the change in RF buncher voltage at instability threshold). The feedback system configuration, setup procedures, and optimization of performance are described. Results of several experimental tests of system performance are presented including observations of instability threshold improvement and grow-damp experiments, which yield estimates of instability growth and damping rates. A major effort was undertaken to identify and study several factors limiting system performance. Evidence obtained from these tests suggests that performance of the prototype was limited by higher instability growth rates arising from beam leakage into the gap at lower RF buncher voltage and the onset of instability in the horizontal plane, which had no feedback.

  10. Effects of Active Sting Damping on Common Research Model Data Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acheson, Michael J.; Balakrishna, S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent tests using the Common Research Model (CRM) at the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) and the Ames 11-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel (11' TWT) produced large sets of data that have been used to examine the effects of active damping on transonic tunnel aerodynamic data quality. In particular, large statistically significant sets of repeat data demonstrate that the active damping system had no apparent effect on drag, lift and pitching moment repeatability during warm testing conditions, while simultaneously enabling aerodynamic data to be obtained post stall. A small set of cryogenic (high Reynolds number) repeat data was obtained at the NTF and again showed a negligible effect on data repeatability. However, due to a degradation of control power in the active damping system cryogenically, the ability to obtain test data post-stall was not achieved during cryogenic testing. Additionally, comparisons of data repeatability between NTF and 11-ft TWT CRM data led to further (warm) testing at the NTF which demonstrated that for a modest increase in data sampling time, a 2-3 factor improvement in drag, and pitching moment repeatability was readily achieved not related with the active damping system.

  11. Solar attitude control including active nutation damping in a fixed-momentum wheel satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azor, Ruth

    1992-08-01

    In geostationary cruise of a momentum biased satellite, it is necessary to stabilize the roll/yaw attitude due to disturbances, caused mainly by solar pressure. This work presents a roll/yaw control, which is obtained by the use of solar arrays and fixed flaps as actuators, with a horizon sensor for roll measurement. The design also includes an active nutation damping.

  12. Solar sail attitude control including active nutation damping in a fixed-momentum wheel satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth

    1992-01-01

    In geostationary cruise of a momentum biased satellite, it is necessary to stabilize the roll/yaw attitude due to disturbances, caused mainly by solar radiation pressure. This work presents a roll/yaw control which is obtained by the use of solar arrays and fixed flaps as actuators, with a horizon sensor for roll measurement. The design also includes an active nutation damping.

  13. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF AN FPGA-BASED ACTIVE FEEDBACK DAMPING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zaipeng; Schulte, Mike; Deibele, Craig Edmond

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a high-intensity proton-based accelerator that produces neutron beams for neutronscattering research. As the most powerful pulsed neutron source in the world, the SNS accelerator has experienced an unprecedented beam instability that has a wide bandwidth (0 to 300MHz) and fast growth time (10 to100 s). In this paper, we propose and analyze several FPGA-based designs for an active feedback damping system. This signal processing system is the first FPGA-based design for active feedback damping of wideband instabilities in high intensity accelerators. It can effectively mitigate instabilities in highintensity protons beams, reduce radiation, and boost the accelerator s luminosity performance. Unlike existing systems, which are designed using analog components, our FPGA-based active feedback damping system offers programmability while maintaining high performance. To meet the system throughput and latency requirements, our proposed designs are guided by detailed analysis of resource and performance tradeoffs. These designs are mapped onto a reconfigurable platform that includes Xilinx Virtex-II Pro FPGAs and high-speed analog-to-digital and digital-toanalog converters. Our results show that our FPGA-based active feedback damping system can provide increased flexibility and improved signal processing performance that are not feasible with existing analog systems.

  14. A Lanczos-chain driven approach for calculating damped vibrational configuration interaction response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter; Győrffy, Werner; Christiansen, Ove

    2010-09-01

    We present an approach based on the Lanczos method for calculating the vibrational configuration interaction response functions necessary for evaluating the pure vibrational contributions to the polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of molecules. The method iteratively builds a tridiagonal representation of the central response matrix, which is subsequently used for solving the response equations. From the same chain, the response functions can be evaluated approximately for any frequency as well as using any complex damping factor. Applications to formaldehyde, cyclopropene, and uracil illustrate the concepts presented.

  15. A generalized plasma dispersion function for electron damping in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Phillips, C. K.; Lau, C. H.; Bertelli, N.; Green, D. L.

    2016-10-01

    Radio frequency wave propagation in finite temperature, magnetized plasmas exhibits a wide range of physics phenomena. The plasma response is nonlocal in space and time, and numerous modes are possible with the potential for mode conversions and transformations. In addition, diffraction effects are important due to finite wavelength and finite-size wave launchers. Multidimensional simulations are required to describe these phenomena, but even with this complexity, the fundamental plasma response is assumed to be the uniform plasma response with the assumption that the local plasma current for a Fourier mode can be described by the "Stix" conductivity. However, for plasmas with non-uniform magnetic fields, the wave vector itself is nonlocal. When resolved into components perpendicular (k⊥) and parallel (k||) to the magnetic field, locality of the parallel component can easily be violated when the wavelength is large. The impact of this inconsistency is that estimates of the wave damping can be incorrect (typically low) due to unresolved resonances. For the case of ion cyclotron damping, this issue has already been addressed by including the effect of parallel magnetic field gradients. In this case, a modified plasma response (Z function) allows resonance broadening even when k|| = 0, and this improves the convergence and accuracy of wave simulations. In this paper, we extend this formalism to include electron damping and find improved convergence and accuracy for parameters where electron damping is dominant, such as high harmonic fast wave heating in the NSTX-U tokamak, and helicon wave launch for off-axis current drive in the DIII-D tokamak.

  16. A generalized plasma dispersion function for electron damping in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Phillips, C. K.; Lau, C. H.; Bertelli, N.; Green, D. L.

    2016-10-14

    Radio frequency wave propagation in finite temperature, magnetized plasmas exhibits a wide range of physics phenomena. The plasma response is nonlocal in space and time, and numerous modes are possible with the potential for mode conversions and transformations. Additionally, diffraction effects are important due to finite wavelength and finite-size wave launchers. Multidimensional simulations are required to describe these phenomena, but even with this complexity, the fundamental plasma response is assumed to be the uniform plasma response with the assumption that the local plasma current for a Fourier mode can be described by the Stix conductivity. But, for plasmas with non-uniform magnetic fields, the wave vector itself is nonlocal. When resolved into components perpendicular (k ) and parallel (k ||) to the magnetic field, locality of the parallel component can easily be violated when the wavelength is large. The impact of this inconsistency is that estimates of the wave damping can be incorrect (typically low) due to unresolved resonances. For the case of ion cyclotron damping, this issue has already been addressed by including the effect of parallel magnetic field gradients. In this case, a modified plasma response (Z function) allows resonance broadening even when k || = 0, and this improves the convergence and accuracy of wave simulations. In our paper, we extend this formalism to include electron damping and find improved convergence and accuracy for parameters where electron damping is dominant, such as high harmonic fast wave heating in the NSTX-U tokamak, and helicon wave launch for off-axis current drive in the DIII-D tokamak.

  17. A generalized plasma dispersion function for electron damping in tokamak plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Phillips, C. K.; ...

    2016-10-14

    Radio frequency wave propagation in finite temperature, magnetized plasmas exhibits a wide range of physics phenomena. The plasma response is nonlocal in space and time, and numerous modes are possible with the potential for mode conversions and transformations. Additionally, diffraction effects are important due to finite wavelength and finite-size wave launchers. Multidimensional simulations are required to describe these phenomena, but even with this complexity, the fundamental plasma response is assumed to be the uniform plasma response with the assumption that the local plasma current for a Fourier mode can be described by the Stix conductivity. But, for plasmas with non-uniformmore » magnetic fields, the wave vector itself is nonlocal. When resolved into components perpendicular (k ) and parallel (k ||) to the magnetic field, locality of the parallel component can easily be violated when the wavelength is large. The impact of this inconsistency is that estimates of the wave damping can be incorrect (typically low) due to unresolved resonances. For the case of ion cyclotron damping, this issue has already been addressed by including the effect of parallel magnetic field gradients. In this case, a modified plasma response (Z function) allows resonance broadening even when k || = 0, and this improves the convergence and accuracy of wave simulations. In our paper, we extend this formalism to include electron damping and find improved convergence and accuracy for parameters where electron damping is dominant, such as high harmonic fast wave heating in the NSTX-U tokamak, and helicon wave launch for off-axis current drive in the DIII-D tokamak.« less

  18. Damping Control of Liquid Container by Swing-type Active Vibration Reducer on Mobile Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Masafumi; Taniguchi, Takao

    This paper proposes a damping control of sloshing in a cylindrical container with a swing-type active vibration reducer on a wheeled mobile robot (WMR). The WMR runs along a straight path on a horizontal plane. The container is mounted on the active vibration reducer. A laser displacement sensor is used to observe the liquid level in the container. The container can be tilted in the running direction by the active vibration reducer. A sloshing model is obtained from a spherical pendulum-type sloshing model, which approximately expresses (1, 1)-mode sloshing. The sloshing model is used to design a damping control system. The control system of the active vibration reducer is designed with an inverse model of sloshing and an optimal regulator with a Kalman filter. The WMR is driven by an acceleration pattern designed with an input shaping method. The usefulness of the proposed method is demonstrated through simulation and experimental results.

  19. An enhanced nonlinear damping approach accounting for system constraints in active mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venanzi, Ilaria; Ierimonti, Laura; Ubertini, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    Active mass dampers are a viable solution for mitigating wind-induced vibrations in high-rise buildings and improve occupants' comfort. Such devices suffer particularly when they reach force saturation of the actuators and maximum extension of their stroke, which may occur in case of severe loading conditions (e.g. wind gust and earthquake). Exceeding actuators' physical limits can impair the control performance of the system or even lead to devices damage, with consequent need for repair or substitution of part of the control system. Controllers for active mass dampers should account for their technological limits. Prior work of the authors was devoted to stroke issues and led to the definition of a nonlinear damping approach, very easy to implement in practice. It consisted of a modified skyhook algorithm complemented with a nonlinear braking force to reverse the direction of the mass before reaching the stroke limit. This paper presents an enhanced version of this approach, also accounting for force saturation of the actuator and keeping the simplicity of implementation. This is achieved by modulating the control force by a nonlinear smooth function depending on the ratio between actuator's force and saturation limit. Results of a numerical investigation show that the proposed approach provides similar results to the method of the State Dependent Riccati Equation, a well-established technique for designing optimal controllers for constrained systems, yet very difficult to apply in practice.

  20. Generalized plasma dispersion function: One-solve-all treatment, visualizations, and application to Landau damping

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Hua-Sheng

    2013-09-15

    A unified, fast, and effective approach is developed for numerical calculation of the well-known plasma dispersion function with extensions from Maxwellian distribution to almost arbitrary distribution functions, such as the δ, flat top, triangular, κ or Lorentzian, slowing down, and incomplete Maxwellian distributions. The singularity and analytic continuation problems are also solved generally. Given that the usual conclusion γ∝∂f{sub 0}/∂v is only a rough approximation when discussing the distribution function effects on Landau damping, this approach provides a useful tool for rigorous calculations of the linear wave and instability properties of plasma for general distribution functions. The results are also verified via a linear initial value simulation approach. Intuitive visualizations of the generalized plasma dispersion function are also provided.

  1. Finding Limit Cycles in self-excited oscillators with infinite-series damping functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debapriya; Banerjee, Dhruba; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a simple method for finding the location of limit cycles of self excited oscillators whose damping functions can be represented by some infinite convergent series. We have used standard results of first-order perturbation theory to arrive at amplitude equations. The approach has been kept pedagogic by first working out the cases of finite polynomials using elementary algebra. Then the method has been extended to various infinite polynomials, where the fixed points of the corresponding amplitude equations cannot be found out. Hopf bifurcations for systems with nonlinear powers in velocities have also been discussed.

  2. Green's functions of the forced vibration of Timoshenko beams with damping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Zhao, X.; Li, Y. H.

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamic solutions for forced vibrations of Timoshenko beams in a systematical manner. Damping effects on the vibrations of the beam are taken into consideration by introducing two characteristic parameters. Laplace transform method is applied in the present study and corresponding Green's functions are presented explicitly for beams with various boundaries. The present solutions can be readily reduced to those for others classical beam models by setting corresponding parameters to zero or infinite. Numerical calculations are performed to validate the present solutions and the effects of various important physical parameters are investigated.

  3. Adaptive Damping and Positioning Using Intelligent Composite Active Structures (ADPICAS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    previous applications for optimal actuator placement were based on structures themselves and overlooked the effects of the applied control law . In fact, the...optimal gain matrix K such that the state-feedback law u = -Kx minimizes the quadratic cost function, J(u), as: J(u) = f(xTQx + uTRu)dt (4.46) 0 where Q...account. The second improvement lays in the combination of the optimization technique (i.e. GAs) with the control law in the entire optimization process

  4. High-damping-performance magnetorheological material for passive or active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Taixiang; Yang, Ke; Yan, Hongwei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Xu, Yangguang

    2016-10-01

    Optical assembly and alignment system plays a crucial role for the construction of high-power or high-energy laser facility, which attempts to ignite fusion reaction and go further to make fusion energy usable. In the optical assembly and alignment system, the vibration control is a key problem needs to be well handled and a material with higher damping performance is much desirable. Recently, a new kind of smart magneto-sensitive polymeric composite material, named magnetorheological plastomer (MRP), was synthesized and reported as a high-performance magnetorheological material and this material has a magneto-enhanced high-damping performance. The MRP behaves usually in an intermediate state between fluid-like magnetorheological fluid and solid-like magnetorheological elastomer. The state of MRP, as well as the damping performance of MRP, can be tuned by adjusting the ratio of hard segments and soft segments, which are ingredients to synthesize the polymeric matrix. In this work, a series of MRP are prepared by dispersing micron-sized, magneto-sensitive carbonyl iron powders with related additives into polyurethane-based, magnetically insensitive matrix. It is found that the damping performance of MRP depends much on magnetic strength, shear rate, carbonyl iron content and shear strain amplitude. Especially, the damping capacity of MRP can be tuned in a large range by adjusting external magnetic field. It is promising that the MRP will have much application in passive and active vibration control, such as vibration reduction in optical assembly and alignment system, vibration isolation or absorption in vehicle suspension system, etc.

  5. Active lower order mode damping for the four rod LHC crab cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, A. C.; Burt, G.; Apsimon, R.

    2017-02-01

    The high luminosity upgrade planned for the LHC requires crab cavities to rotate bunches into alignment at the interaction points. They compensate for a crossing angle near 500 μ r ad . It is anticipated that four crab cavities in succession will be utilized to achieve this rotation on either side of each IP in a local crossing scheme. A crab cavity operates in a dipole mode but always has an accelerating mode that may be above or below the frequency of the operating mode. Crab cavities are given couplers to ensure that unwanted acceleration modes are strongly damped however employing standard practice these unwanted modes will always have some level of excitation. Where this excitation has a random phase it might promote bunch growth and limit beam lifetime. This paper sets out a method for active control of the phase and amplitude of the unwanted lowest accelerating mode in the crab cavities. The paper investigates the level of suppression that can be achieved as a function cavity quality factor and proximity to resonance.

  6. Solar sail attitude control including active nutation damping in a fixed-momentum wheel satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azor, Ruth

    1992-02-01

    In the geostationary cruise of a momentum biased satellite, it is necessary to stabilize the roll/yaw attitude due to disturbances caused by solar radiation pressure. This work presents a roll/yaw control system with a horizon sensor for roll measurement. Roll/yaw control is obtained by the use of solar arrays and fixed flaps as actuators. The design also includes an active nutation damping method.

  7. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.

  8. Multilayer Active Control For Structural Damping And Optical-Path Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zahidul H.; Spanos, John T.; Fanson, James L.

    1995-01-01

    Two active-control concepts incorporated into system for suppression of vibrations in truss structure and regulation of length of optical path on structure to nanometer level. Optical-path-length-control subsystem contains two feedback control loops to obtain active damping in wide amplitude-and-frequency range. Concept described in more detail in number of previous articles, including "Stabilizing Optical-Path Length on a Vibrating Structure" (NPO-19040), "Controllable Optical Delay Line for Stellar Interferometry" (NPO-18686), "Test Bed for Control of Optical-Path Lengths" (NPO-18487).

  9. A study on actuation power flow produced in an active damping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horodinca, Mihaita

    2013-08-01

    This paper aims to present some new features of the experimental research in dynamics of a closed-loop actively controlled mechanical system with collocated PZT sensor and actuator and a proportional-derivative regulator. The evolution of active electrical power absorbed by the actuator is mainly used. A fraction of this power is converted into mechanical real power and delivered by the actuator to the mechanical system. This paper highlights the fact that derivative gain in the regulator produces a directly proportional synthetic damping (positive or negative) in the mechanical system, due to the fact that a directly proportional flow of active electrical power (negative or positive) absorbed by the actuator is generated. The paper proves that the active power flow evolution is very useful to describe the behavior of the actuator for some dynamic regimes (more useful than the magnitude of the electrical impedance). The research was done on a setup that consists of an aluminium cantilever beam equipped with two PZT collocated transducers - rectangular laminar design - closely glued by the rigidly fixed end of the beam. The feedback between sensor and actuator is provided by a regulator which produces a tunable phase difference between input and output (equivalent to a proportional-derivative feedback). The electrical current and the voltage generated by the regulator and applied to the actuator are used for finding the values of the active electrical power absorbed by the actuator, the magnitude of the electrical impedance and the values of some dynamic parameters of the cantilever (e.g. damping ratio, damped modal frequency, etc.) due to an external excitation of first bending mode. A computer assisted data acquisition system and some new data processing techniques are used for these purposes.

  10. Transfer function method for frequency response and damping effect of multilayer PCLD on cylindrical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Q.; Fang, Z. P.; Wan, H. C.; Zheng, L.

    2013-07-01

    Based on the Donnell assumptions and linear visco-elastic theory, the constitutive equations of the cylindrical shell with multilayer Passive Constrained Layer Damping (PCLD) treatments are described. The motion equations and boundary conditions are derived by Hamilton principle. After trigonometric series expansion and Laplace transform, the state vector is introduced and the dynamic equations in state space are established. The transfer function method is used to solve the state equation. The dynamic performance including the natural frequency, the loss factor and the frequency response of clamped-clamped multi-layer PCLD cylindrical shell is obtained. The results show that multi-layer PCLD cylindrical shell is more effective than the traditional three-layer PCLD cylindrical shell in suppressing vibration and noise if the same amount of material is applied. It demonstrates a potential application of multi-layer PCLD treatments in many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  11. Vibrational absorption spectra from vibrational coupled cluster damped linear response functions calculated using an asymmetric Lanczos algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Bo; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter; Christiansen, Ove

    2012-03-01

    We report the theory and implementation of vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) damped response functions. From the imaginary part of the damped VCC response function the absorption as function of frequency can be obtained, requiring formally the solution of the now complex VCC response equations. The absorption spectrum can in this formulation be seen as a matrix function of the characteristic VCC Jacobian response matrix. The asymmetric matrix version of the Lanczos method is used to generate a tridiagonal representation of the VCC response Jacobian. Solving the complex response equations in the relevant Lanczos space provides a method for calculating the VCC damped response functions and thereby subsequently the absorption spectra. The convergence behaviour of the algorithm is discussed theoretically and tested for different levels of completeness of the VCC expansion. Comparison is made with results from the recently reported [P. Seidler, M. B. Hansen, W. Györffy, D. Toffoli, and O. Christiansen, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 164105 (2010)] vibrational configuration interaction damped response function calculated using a symmetric Lanczos algorithm. Calculations of IR spectra of oxazole, cyclopropene, and uracil illustrate the usefulness of the new VCC based method.

  12. Vibrational absorption spectra from vibrational coupled cluster damped linear response functions calculated using an asymmetric Lanczos algorithm.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Bo; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter; Christiansen, Ove

    2012-03-28

    We report the theory and implementation of vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) damped response functions. From the imaginary part of the damped VCC response function the absorption as function of frequency can be obtained, requiring formally the solution of the now complex VCC response equations. The absorption spectrum can in this formulation be seen as a matrix function of the characteristic VCC Jacobian response matrix. The asymmetric matrix version of the Lanczos method is used to generate a tridiagonal representation of the VCC response Jacobian. Solving the complex response equations in the relevant Lanczos space provides a method for calculating the VCC damped response functions and thereby subsequently the absorption spectra. The convergence behaviour of the algorithm is discussed theoretically and tested for different levels of completeness of the VCC expansion. Comparison is made with results from the recently reported [P. Seidler, M. B. Hansen, W. Györffy, D. Toffoli, and O. Christiansen, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 164105 (2010)] vibrational configuration interaction damped response function calculated using a symmetric Lanczos algorithm. Calculations of IR spectra of oxazole, cyclopropene, and uracil illustrate the usefulness of the new VCC based method.

  13. Piezoelectric Stewart platform for general purpose active damping interface and precision control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Hanieh, A.; Preumont, A.; Loix, N.

    2001-09-01

    This paper discloses a stiff active interface wherein a six degree of freedom Stewart platform, a standard hexapod with a cubic architecture, is used to actively increase the structural damping of flexible systems attached to it. It can also be used to rigidly connect arbitrary substructures while damping them. Each leg of the active interface consists of a linear piezo electric actuator, a collocated force sensor and flexible tips for the connections with the two end plates. By providing the legs with strain or elongation sensors, this active interface can also be used as an interface with infinite stiffness at low frequency (i.e. for machine tools), a 6 d.o.f. positioning and steering device for space applications as well as a microvibration isolator. The translation and rotation strokes of the interface are 90, 103 and 95 μm in the x, y and z directions respectively and 1300, 1150 and 700 μrad around the x, y and z directions respectively.

  14. Testing of an actively damped boring bar featuring structurally integrated PZT stack actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Barney, P.

    1998-06-01

    This paper summarizes the results of cutting tests performed using an actively damped boring bar to minimize chatter in metal cutting. A commercially available 2 inch diameter boring bar was modified to incorporate PZT stack actuators for controlling tool bending vibrations encountered during metal removal. The extensional motion of the actuators induce bending moments in the host structure through a two-point preloaded mounting scheme. Cutting tests performed at various speeds and depths of cuts on a hardened steel workpiece illustrate the bar`s effectiveness toward eliminating chatter vibrations and improving workpiece surface finish.

  15. Implementation of an active vibration damping system for the SOFIA telescope assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, Paul C.; Keas, Paul J.

    2014-07-01

    The NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) employs a 2.5-meter reflector telescope in a Boeing 747SP. The image stability goal for SOFIA is 0.2 arc-seconds. An active damping control system is being developed for SOFIA to reduce image jitter and degradation due to resonance of the telescope assembly. We describe the vibration control system design and implementation in hardware and software. The system's unique features enabling system testing, control system design, and online health monitoring will also be presented.

  16. Temperature-activated interfacial friction damping in carbon nanotube polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Suhr, Jonghwan; Zhang, Wei; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Koratkar, Nikhil A

    2006-02-01

    Effect of temperature on interfacial sliding in single-walled carbon nanotube polycarbonate composites is investigated experimentally. We show that interfacial slip at the tube-polymer interfaces can be activated at relatively low dynamic strain levels ( approximately 0.35%) by raising temperature to approximately 90 degrees C. We attribute this to increased mobility of the polymer chain backbones at elevated temperatures and thermal relaxation of the radial compressive stresses at the tube-polymer interfaces. These results show the potential of polymer nanocomposites as high-temperature damping materials for vibration and acoustic suppression in a variety of dynamic systems.

  17. Semi-active control of helicopter vibration using controllable stiffness and damping devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat

    Semi-active concepts for helicopter vibration reduction are developed and evaluated in this dissertation. Semi-active devices, controllable stiffness devices or controllable orifice dampers, are introduced; (i) in the blade root region (rotor-based concept) and (ii) between the rotor and the fuselage as semi-active isolators (in the non-rotating frame). Corresponding semi-active controllers for helicopter vibration reduction are also developed. The effectiveness of the rotor-based semi-active vibration reduction concept (using stiffness and damping variation) is demonstrated for a 4-bladed hingeless rotor helicopter in moderate- to high-speed forward flight. A sensitivity study shows that the stiffness variation of root element can reduce hub vibrations when proper amplitude and phase are used. Furthermore, the optimal semi-active control scheme can determine the combination of stiffness variations that produce significant vibration reduction in all components of vibratory hub loads simultaneously. It is demonstrated that desired cyclic variations in properties of the blade root region can be practically achieved using discrete controllable stiffness devices and controllable dampers, especially in the flap and lag directions. These discrete controllable devices can produce 35--50% reduction in a composite vibration index representing all components of vibratory hub loads. No detrimental increases are observed in the lower harmonics of blade loads and blade response (which contribute to the dynamic stresses) and controllable device internal loads, when the optimal stiffness and damping variations are introduced. The effectiveness of optimal stiffness and damping variations in reducing hub vibration is retained over a range of cruise speeds and for variations in fundamental rotor properties. The effectiveness of the semi-active isolator is demonstrated for a simplified single degree of freedom system representing the semi-active isolation system. The rotor

  18. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  19. Test rig with active damping control for the simultaneous evaluation of vibration control and energy harvesting via piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetto, S.; Rohlfing, J.; Infante, F.; Mayer, D.; Herold, S.

    2016-09-01

    Piezoelectric transducers can be used to harvest electrical energy from structural vibrations in order to power continuously operating condition monitoring systems local to where they operate. However, excessive vibrations can compromise the safe operation of mechanical systems. Therefore, absorbers are commonly used to control vibrations. With an integrated device, the mechanical energy that otherwise would be dissipated can be converted via piezoelectric transducers. Vibration absorbers are designed to have high damping factors. Hence, the integration of transducers would lead to a low energy conversion. Efficient energy harvesters usually have low damping capabilities; therefore, they are not effective for vibration suppression. Thus, the design of an integrated device needs to consider the two conflicting requirements on the damping. This study focuses on the development of a laboratory test rig with a host structure and a vibration absorber with tunable damping via an active relative velocity feedback. A voice coil actuator is used for this purpose. To overcome the passive damping effects of the back electromagnetic force a novel voltage feedback control is proposed, which has been validated both in simulation and experimentally. The aim of this study is to have a test rig ready for the introduction of piezo-transducers and available for future experimental evaluations of the damping effect on the effectiveness of vibration reduction and energy harvesting efficiency.

  20. An active damping control of robot manipulators with oscillatory bases by singular perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Huang, Z. Z.; Huang, P. H.

    2007-07-01

    This paper deals with active damping control problems of robot manipulators with oscillatory bases. A first investigation of two-time scale fuzzy logic controller with vibration stabilizer for such structures has been proposed, where the dynamics of a robotic system is strongly affected by disturbances due to the base oscillation. Under the assumption of two-time scale, its stability and design procedures are presented for a multiple link manipulator with multiple dimension oscillation. The fast-subsystem controller will damp out the vibration of the oscillatory bases using a PD control method. Hence, the slow-subsystem fuzzy logic controller dominates the trajectory tracking. It can be guaranteed the stability of the internal dynamics by adding a boundary-layer correction based on singular perturbations approach. Experimental results have shown that the proposed control model offers several implementation advantages such as reduced effect of overshoot and chattering, smaller steady state error, and a fast convergent rate. The results of this study can be feasible to various mechanical systems, such as mobile robot, gantry cranes, underwater robot, and other dynamic systems mounted on oscillatory bases.

  1. The Modelling and Vibration Control of Beams with Active Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, Y. M.; LI, Z. F.; HUA, H. X.; FU, Z. F.; LIU, T. X.

    2001-08-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is combined with the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) model of viscoelastic materials (VEM) to model a cantilever beam with active constrained layer damping treatments. This approach avoids time-consuming iteration in solving modal frequencies, modal damping ratios and responses. But the resultant finite element (FE) model has too many degrees of freedom (d.o.f.s) from the point of view of control, nor is it observable and controllable. A new model reduction procedure is proposed. An iterative dynamic condensation is performed in the physical space, and Guyan condensation is taken as an initial iteration approximation. A reduced order model (ROM) of suitable size emerges, but it is still not observable and controllable. Accordingly, a robust model reduction method is then employed in the state space. A numerical example proves that this procedure reduces the model and assures the stability, controllability and observability of the final reduced order model (FROM). Finally, a controller is designed by linear-quadratic Gaussian (LQG) method based on the FROM. The vibration attenuation is evident

  2. Active Damping of a Piezoelectric Tube Scanner using Self-Sensing Piezo Actuation

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, S.; Schitter, G.

    2010-01-01

    In most Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM), a piezoelectric tube scanner is used to position the sample underneath the measurement probe. Oscillations stemming from the weakly damped resonances of the tube scanner are a major source of image distortion, putting a limitation on the achievable imaging speed. This paper demonstrates active damping of these oscillations in multiple scanning axes without the need for additional position sensors. By connecting the tube scanner in a capacitive bridge circuit the scanner oscillations can be measured in both scanning axes, using the same piezo material as an actuator and sensor simultaneously. In order to compensate for circuit imbalance caused by hysteresis in the piezo element, an adaptive balancing circuit is used. The obtained measurement signal is used for feedback control, reducing the resonance peaks in both scanning axes by 18 dB and the cross-coupling at those frequencies by 30 dB. Experimental results demonstrate a significant reduction in scanner oscillations when applying the typical triangular scanning signals, as well as a strong reduction in coupling induced oscillations. Recorded AFM images show a considerable reduction in image distortion due to the proposed control method, enabling artifact free AFM imaging at a speed of 122 lines per second with a standard piezoelectric tube scanner. PMID:26412944

  3. Active Damping of a Piezoelectric Tube Scanner using Self-Sensing Piezo Actuation.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, S; Schitter, G

    2010-09-01

    In most Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM), a piezoelectric tube scanner is used to position the sample underneath the measurement probe. Oscillations stemming from the weakly damped resonances of the tube scanner are a major source of image distortion, putting a limitation on the achievable imaging speed. This paper demonstrates active damping of these oscillations in multiple scanning axes without the need for additional position sensors. By connecting the tube scanner in a capacitive bridge circuit the scanner oscillations can be measured in both scanning axes, using the same piezo material as an actuator and sensor simultaneously. In order to compensate for circuit imbalance caused by hysteresis in the piezo element, an adaptive balancing circuit is used. The obtained measurement signal is used for feedback control, reducing the resonance peaks in both scanning axes by 18 dB and the cross-coupling at those frequencies by 30 dB. Experimental results demonstrate a significant reduction in scanner oscillations when applying the typical triangular scanning signals, as well as a strong reduction in coupling induced oscillations. Recorded AFM images show a considerable reduction in image distortion due to the proposed control method, enabling artifact free AFM imaging at a speed of 122 lines per second with a standard piezoelectric tube scanner.

  4. Active sensor/actuator assemblies for vibration damping, compensation, measurement, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryaboy, Vyacheslav M.; Kasturi, Prakash S.

    2010-04-01

    The vibration control module known as IQ damper had been developed as part of active vibration damping system for optical tables and other precision vibration isolated platforms. The present work describes steps to expand the application of these units to other tasks, namely, (1) dynamic testing of structures and (2) compensation of forced vibration in local areas. The sensor-actuator assembly, including signal conditioning circuits, is designed as a compact dynamically symmetric module with mechanical interface to an optical table. The test data show that the vibration control modules can be used to measure dynamic compliance characteristics of optical tables with precision comparable to that of dedicated vibration measurement systems. Stable concerted work of active vibration control modules compensating forced harmonic vibration is demonstrated experimentally.

  5. DAMPs from Cell Death to New Life

    PubMed Central

    Vénéreau, Emilie; Ceriotti, Chiara; Bianchi, Marco Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Our body handles tissue damage by activating the immune system in response to intracellular molecules released by injured tissues [damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs)], in a similar way as it detects molecular motifs conserved in pathogens (pathogen-associated molecular patterns). DAMPs are molecules that have a physiological role inside the cell, but acquire additional functions when they are exposed to the extracellular environment: they alert the body about danger, stimulate an inflammatory response, and finally promote the regeneration process. Beside their passive release by dead cells, some DAMPs can be secreted or exposed by living cells undergoing a life-threatening stress. DAMPs have been linked to inflammation and related disorders: hence, inhibition of DAMP-mediated inflammatory responses is a promising strategy to improve the clinical management of infection- and injury-elicited inflammatory diseases. However, it is important to consider that DAMPs are not only danger signals but also central players in tissue repair. Indeed, some DAMPs have been studied for their role in tissue healing after sterile or infection-associated inflammation. This review is focused on two exemplary DAMPs, HMGB1 and adenosine triphosphate, and their contribution to both inflammation and tissue repair. PMID:26347745

  6. Passive damping to enhance active positioning of a prototype lithography platen

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, D.J.; Kipp, R.L.; Gregory, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    A viscoelastic tuned-mass damper was used to suppress specific structural modes of a prototype lithography platen. The platen is magnetically levitated and it is repositioned and held in position by a closed-loop feedback control system. Important capabilities of the platen control system are precise positioning and rapid repositioning, which tend to require high frequency bandwidth. The high bandwidth excites structural vibration modes which are disruptive to the control system. The present work was to develop and demonstrate a means to suppress these modes using passive vibration damping techniques. The motivation is to increase the robustness of the platen positioning and control system by reducing unwanted modal accelerations excited by high control system bandwidth. Activities performed and discussed in this paper include the analytical design of viscoelastic tuned-mass dampers and the demonstration/testing of their effectiveness on the platen while levitated and controlled.

  7. Active Damping of the E-P Instability at the LANL PSR

    SciTech Connect

    McCrady, R.; Macek, R.J.; Zaugg, T.; Assadi, S.; Deibele, C.; Henderson, S.; Plum, M.; Lee, S.V.; Walbridge, S.; Byrd, J.M.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2007-11-14

    A prototype of an analog, transverse (vertical) feedback system for active damping of the two-stream (e-p) instability has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Storage Ring (PSR). This system was able to improve the instability threshold by approximately 30% (as measured by the change in RF buncher voltage at instability threshold). Evidence obtained from these tests suggests that further improvement in performance is limited by beam leakage into the gap at lower RF buncher voltage and the onset of instability in the horizontal plane, which had no feedback. Here we describe the present system configuration, system optimization, results of several recent experimental tests, and results from studies of factors limiting its performance.

  8. NASA Common Research Model Test Envelope Extension With Active Sting Damping at NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Melissa B.; Balakrishna, S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Common Research Model (CRM) high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnel testing program was established to generate an experimental database for applied Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation studies. During transonic wind tunnel tests, the CRM encounters large sting vibrations when the angle of attack approaches the second pitching moment break, which can sometimes become divergent. CRM transonic test data analysis suggests that sting divergent oscillations are related to negative net sting damping episodes associated with flow separation instability. The National Transonic Facility (NTF) has been addressing remedies to extend polar testing up to and beyond the second pitching moment break point of the test articles using an active piezoceramic damper system for both ambient and cryogenic temperatures. This paper reviews CRM test results to gain understanding of sting dynamics with a simple model describing the mechanics of a sting-model system and presents the performance of the damper under cryogenic conditions.

  9. Simultaneous active and passive control for eigenstructure assignment in lightly damped systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richiedei, Dario; Trevisani, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    The assignment of the eigenstructure (i.e. eigenvalues and eigenvectors) in vibrating systems is an effective way to improve their dynamic performances. System controllability ensures that the poles of the controlled system are exactly assigned but it does not allow to assign arbitrary desired eigenvectors. To this purpose, this paper proposes a novel method for vibration control in lightly damped systems through the concurrent synthesis of passive structural modifications and active state (or state derivative) feedback control gains. Indeed, the suitable modification of the inertial and elastic parameters allows to enlarge the range of assignable eigenvectors. The problem is formulated as an optimization problem, where constraints are introduced to assure the feasibility of the physical system modifications while avoiding spillover phenomena. The experimental application to the eigenstructure assignment on a manipulator proves the method effectiveness.

  10. Quadratic Damping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2012-01-01

    Quadratic friction involves a discontinuous damping term in equations of motion in order that the frictional force always opposes the direction of the motion. Perhaps for this reason this topic is usually omitted from beginning texts in differential equations and physics. However, quadratic damping is more realistic than viscous damping in many…

  11. Stiffening and damping capacity of an electrostatically tuneable functional composite cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginés, R.; Bergamini, A.; Motavalli, M.; Ermanni, P.

    2015-09-01

    The damping capacity of a novel composite film, designed to exhibit high dielectric strength and a high friction coefficient for an electrostatic tuneable friction damper, is tested on a cantilever beam. Such a system consists of a carbon fibre reinforced polymer stiffening element which is reversibly laminated onto a host structure with a dielectric material by means of electrostatic fields. Damping is achieved when the maximum shear at the interface between the stiffening element and structure exceeds the shear strength of the electrostatically laminated interface. The thin films tested consist of barium titanate particles and alumina platelets in an epoxy matrix. Their high dielectric constant and high coefficient of friction compared to a commercial available polymer film, polyvinylidene fluoride, lead to a reduction of the required electric field to stiffen and damp the cantilever beam. Reducing the operating voltage affects different aspects of the studied damper. The cost of possible applications of the frictional damper can be reduced, as the special components necessary at high voltages become redundant. Furthermore, the enhanced security positively affects the damping system’s appeal as an alternative damping method.

  12. Multi-DOF rotor model based measurement of stiffness and damping for active magnetic bearing using multi-frequency excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kejian; Zhu, Changsheng; Chen, Liangliang; Qiao, Xiaoli

    2015-08-01

    To represent the support characteristic of active magnetic bearings (AMB), the commonly used parameters are the equivalent stiffness and the equivalent damping, which inherit the parameters of the stiffness and the damping from traditional mechanical bearings. First, by analyzing the diversity and the similarity between traditional mechanical bearing and AMB, the prior condition for applying the parametric representation of equivalent stiffness and equivalent damping to AMB is illuminated. Then, a method for measuring the equivalent stiffness and the equivalent damping of AMB-rotor system is proposed with multi-frequency excitation. One of its outstanding features is that the proposed method is based on the multi-degree of freedom (DOF) rotor model, not the single- DOF model, because the single DOF model cannot be suitably applied to the multi-DOF AMB-rotor systems. Otherwise, in order to decrease the identification error, the multi-frequency excitation can achieve the lowest peak value by means of appropriate selection for the relative phasing of each component, so that the possibility of the rotor displacement exceeding clearances of AMB and the magnetic force reaching saturation is minimized. Finally, the experiments, which are carried out on an AMB-rotor test rig with a vertical shaft, indicate that the proposed method can efficiently reduce the peak value for the superimposed multi-frequency excitation and correctly identify the equivalent stiffness and equivalent damping of AMB-rotor system.

  13. Finite Element Formulation and Active Vibration Control Study on Beams Using Smart Constrained Layer Damping (scld) Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BALAMURUGAN, V.; NARAYANAN, S.

    2002-01-01

    This work deals with the active vibration control of beams with smart constrained layer damping (SCLD) treatment. SCLD design consists of viscoelastic shear layer sandwiched between two layers of piezoelectric sensors and actuator. This composite SCLD when bonded to a vibrating structure acts as a smart treatment. The sensor piezoelectric layer measures the vibration response of the structure and a feedback controller is provided which regulates the axial deformation of the piezoelectric actuator (constraining layer), thereby providing adjustable and significant damping in the structure. The damping offered by SCLD treatment has two components, active action and passive action. The active action is transmitted from the piezoelectric actuator to the host structure through the viscoelastic layer. The passive action is through the shear deformation in the viscoelastic layer. The active action apart from providing direct active control also adjusts the passive action by regulating the shear deformation in the structure. The passive damping component of this design eliminates spillover, reduces power consumption, improves robustness and reliability of the system, and reduces vibration response at high-frequency ranges where active damping is difficult to implement. A beam finite element model has been developed based on Timoshenko's beam theory with partially covered SCLD. The Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method has been used to model the viscoelastic layer. The dissipation co-ordinates, defined using GHM approach, describe the frequency-dependent viscoelastic material properties. Models of PCLD and purely active systems could be obtained as a special case of SCLD. Using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control, the effects of the SCLD on vibration suppression performance and control effort requirements are investigated. The effects of the viscoelastic layer thickness and material properties on the vibration control performance are investigated.

  14. Introduction to the scientific application system of DAMPE (On behalf of DAMPE collaboration)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a high energy particle physics experiment satellite, launched on 17 Dec 2015. The science data processing and payload operation maintenance for DAMPE will be provided by the DAMPE Scientific Application System (SAS) at the Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) of Chinese Academy of Sciences. SAS is consisted of three subsystems - scientific operation subsystem, science data and user management subsystem and science data processing subsystem. In cooperation with the Ground Support System (Beijing), the scientific operation subsystem is responsible for proposing observation plans, monitoring the health of satellite, generating payload control commands and participating in all activities related to payload operation. Several databases developed by the science data and user management subsystem of DAMPE methodically manage all collected and reconstructed science data, down linked housekeeping data, payload configuration and calibration data. Under the leadership of DAMPE Scientific Committee, this subsystem is also responsible for publication of high level science data and supporting all science activities of the DAMPE collaboration. The science data processing subsystem of DAMPE has already developed a series of physics analysis software to reconstruct basic information about detected cosmic ray particle. This subsystem also maintains the high performance computing system of SAS to processing all down linked science data and automatically monitors the qualities of all produced data. In this talk, we will describe all functionalities of whole DAMPE SAS system and show you main performances of data processing ability.

  15. General methodology to optimize damping functions to account for charge penetration effects in electrostatic calculations using multicentered multipolar expansions.

    PubMed

    Werneck, Araken S; Filho, Tarcísio M Rocha; Dardenne, Laurent E

    2008-01-17

    We developed a methodology to optimize exponential damping functions to account for charge penetration effects when computing molecular electrostatic properties using the multicentered multipolar expansion method (MME). This methodology is based in the optimization of a damping parameter set using a two-step fast local fitting procedure and the ab initio (Hartree-Fock/6-31G** and 6-31G**+) electrostatic potential calculated in a set of concentric grid of points as reference. The principal aspect of the methodology is a first local fitting step which generates a focused initial guess to improve the performance of a simplex method avoiding the use of multiple runs and the choice of initial guesses. Three different strategies for the determination of optimized damping parameters were tested in the following studies: (1) investigation of the error in the calculation of the electrostatic interaction energy for five hydrogen-bonded dimers at standard and nonstandard hydrogen-bonded geometries and at nonequilibrium geometries; (2) calculation of the electrostatic molecular properties (potential and electric field) for eight small molecular systems (methanol, ammonia, water, formamide, dichloromethane, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide, and acetonitrile) and for the 20 amino acids. Our results show that the methodology performs well not only for small molecules but also for relatively larger molecular systems. The analysis of the distinct parameter sets associated with different optimization strategies show that (i) a specific parameter set is more suitable and more general for electrostatic interaction energy calculations, with an average absolute error of 0.46 kcal/mol at hydrogen-bond geometries; (ii) a second parameter set is more suitable for electrostatic potential and electric field calculations at and outside the van der Waals (vdW) envelope, with an average error decrease >72% at the vdW surface. A more general amino acid damping parameter set was constructed from the

  16. Active-passive hybrid vibration control study in plates using enhanced smart constrained layer damping (ESCLD) treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, V.; Narayanan, S.

    2003-10-01

    In the present paper, the active-passive hybrid vibration control performance due to Enhanced Smart Constrained Layer Damping (ESCLD) treatment as proposed by Liao and Wang on plate like structures has been considered. This treatment consists of a viscoelastic layer constrained between a smart piezoelectric layer and the base structure being controlled. Also, the smart constraining layer is clamped to the base structure. This type of damping treatment has got both active and passive component of damping. The passive damping is through cyclic shearing of viscoelastic constrained layer which is further enhanced by activating the smart piezoelectric constraining layer and the active component of the damping is through the transfer of control moments from the piezoelectric layer to the base structure through the viscoelastic layer and also bypassed through the clamps. A plate finite element has been formulated using first order shear deformation theory, including the effect of transverse shear and rotary inertia. The effect of the viscoelastic shear layer and piezoelectric constraining layer on the mass and stiffness has been included in the model. The viscoelastic shear layer is modeled usig Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method, which is a time domain approach. The clamps (edge elements) are modeled as equivalent springs connecting the smart piezoelectric constraining layer with the structure to be controlled. LQR optimal control strategy is used to obtain optimal control gains. The effect of the viscoelastic material properties (shear modulus and loss factor) on the hybrid vibration control performance is studied for both SCLD (without edge elements) and ESCLD systems.

  17. A robust active control system for shimmy damping in the presence of free play and uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Calogero; Alaimo, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Shimmy vibration is the oscillatory motion of the fork-wheel assembly about the steering axis. It represents one of the major problem of aircraft landing gear because it can lead to excessive wear, discomfort as well as safety concerns. Based on the nonlinear model of the mechanics of a single wheel nose landing gear (NLG), electromechanical actuator and tire elasticity, a robust active controller capable of damping shimmy vibration is designed and investigated in this study. A novel Decline Population Swarm Optimization (PDSO) procedure is introduced and used to select the optimal parameters for the controller. The PDSO procedure is based on a decline demographic model and shows high global search capability with reduced computational costs. The open and closed loop system behavior is analyzed under different case studies of aeronautical interest and the effects of torsional free play on the nose landing gear response are also studied. Plant parameters probabilistic uncertainties are then taken into account to assess the active controller robustness using a stochastic approach.

  18. [Calmodulin can induce and control damping oscillations in the plasma membrane Ca2+ -ATPase activity: a kinetic model].

    PubMed

    Gol'dshtein, B N; Aksirov, A M; Zakrzhevskaia, D T

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase is the calcium pump that extrudes calcium ions from cells using ATP hydrolisis for the maintenance of low Ca2+ concentrations in the cell. Calmodulin stimulates Ca2+-ATPase by binding to the autoinhibitory enzyme domain, which allows the access of cytoplasmic ATP and Ca2+ to the active and transport cites. Our kinetic model predicts damped oscillations in the enzyme activity and interprets the known nonmonotonous kinetic behavior of the enzyme in the presence of calmodulin. For the parameters close to the experimental ones, the kinetic model explains the changes in frequency and damping factor of the oscillatory enzyme activity, as dependent on calmodulin concentration. The calculated pre-steady-state curves fit well the known experimental data. The kinetic analysis allows us to assign Ca2+-ATPase to the hysteretic enzymes exhibiting activity oscillations in open systems.

  19. Active power control of solar PV generation for large interconnection frequency regulation and oscillation damping

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yong; Zhu, Lin; Zhan, Lingwei; ...

    2015-06-23

    Because of zero greenhouse gas emission and decreased manufacture cost, solar photovoltaic (PV) generation is expected to account for a significant portion of future power grid generation portfolio. Because it is indirectly connected to the power grid via power electronic devices, solar PV generation system is fully decoupled from the power grid, which will influence the interconnected power grid dynamic characteristics as a result. In this study, the impact of solar PV penetration on large interconnected power system frequency response and inter-area oscillation is evaluated, taking the United States Eastern Interconnection (EI) as an example. Furthermore, based on the constructedmore » solar PV electrical control model with additional active power control loops, the potential contributions of solar PV generation to power system frequency regulation and oscillation damping are examined. The advantages of solar PV frequency support over that of wind generator are also discussed. Finally, simulation results demonstrate that solar PV generations can effectively work as ‘actuators’ in alleviating the negative impacts they bring about.« less

  20. Active power control of solar PV generation for large interconnection frequency regulation and oscillation damping

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Zhu, Lin; Zhan, Lingwei; Gracia, Jose R.; King, Thomas Jr.; Liu, Yilu

    2015-06-23

    Because of zero greenhouse gas emission and decreased manufacture cost, solar photovoltaic (PV) generation is expected to account for a significant portion of future power grid generation portfolio. Because it is indirectly connected to the power grid via power electronic devices, solar PV generation system is fully decoupled from the power grid, which will influence the interconnected power grid dynamic characteristics as a result. In this study, the impact of solar PV penetration on large interconnected power system frequency response and inter-area oscillation is evaluated, taking the United States Eastern Interconnection (EI) as an example. Furthermore, based on the constructed solar PV electrical control model with additional active power control loops, the potential contributions of solar PV generation to power system frequency regulation and oscillation damping are examined. The advantages of solar PV frequency support over that of wind generator are also discussed. Finally, simulation results demonstrate that solar PV generations can effectively work as ‘actuators’ in alleviating the negative impacts they bring about.

  1. Non-linear modelling and control of semi-active suspensions with variable damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huang; Long, Chen; Yuan, Chao-Chun; Jiang, Hao-Bin

    2013-10-01

    Electro-hydraulic dampers can provide variable damping force that is modulated by varying the command current; furthermore, they offer advantages such as lower power, rapid response, lower cost, and simple hardware. However, accurate characterisation of non-linear f-v properties in pre-yield and force saturation in post-yield is still required. Meanwhile, traditional linear or quarter vehicle models contain various non-linearities. The development of a multi-body dynamics model is very complex, and therefore, SIMPACK was used with suitable improvements for model development and numerical simulations. A semi-active suspension was built based on a belief-desire-intention (BDI)-agent model framework. Vehicle handling dynamics were analysed, and a co-simulation analysis was conducted in SIMPACK and MATLAB to evaluate the BDI-agent controller. The design effectively improved ride comfort, handling stability, and driving safety. A rapid control prototype was built based on dSPACE to conduct a real vehicle test. The test and simulation results were consistent, which verified the simulation.

  2. Characterization of the active Tollmien-Schlichting wave damping process using phase-locked PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Armin; Duchmann, Alexander; Widmann, Alexander; Grundmann, Sven; Tropea, Cameron

    2011-11-01

    The interaction of artificially excited 2-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves and a body force, in this case created by a DBD plasma actuator, has been investigated experimentally. To enable the visualization of TS-waves in a laminar boundary layer, which have an amplitude in the order of the measured background noise, a phase-locked particle image velocimetry (PIV) method has been developed. The experiments were carried out on a flat plate setup with negligible pressure gradient at a free-stream velocity of 16 m/s. Active wave control (AWC) is applied by driving the actuator in a pulsed mode of operation. The field data is obtained using a conventional PIV system. It could be demonstrated successfully that the spatial and the temporal evolution of the velocity fluctuations in the flow, as well as the flow structures induced by the body force, can be reconstructed for discrete phase angles with respect to the wave-excitation signal. Therefore the wave damping process can be analyzed. With this technique a tool is at hand to simultaneously measure two velocity components in close vicinity of any flow control actuator subject to periodic flow conditions.

  3. Double panel with skyhook active damping control units for control of sound radiation.

    PubMed

    Gardonio, Paolo; Alujević, Neven

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on decentralized velocity feedback control on a double panel consisting of an external aluminum panel and a honeycomb trim panel. The decentralized feedback loops are formed by a 3x3 array of coil-magnet electrodynamic actuators that react off the trim panel and a lightweight stiff frame structure located in the air gap between the two panels. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometers are located on the opposite side of the trim panel in correspondence to the electrodynamic actuators. The grid structure is designed to provide an inertial reference to the actuators. In this way the velocity feedback control loops produce skyhook active damping on the double panel, which minimizes the vibrational response and sound radiation of the trim panel at low audio frequencies. Two configurations are considered where the grid structure is either weakly coupled or strongly coupled to the external panel. Both stability and control performance of the two configurations are analyzed experimentally. The study shows that the control configuration with the weakly coupled grid structure enables the implementation of larger stable feedback control gains, which lead to reductions of the sound radiated by the trim panel between 10 and 30 dB for the first seven resonance peaks.

  4. Modification of spastic gait through mechanical damping.

    PubMed

    Maki, B E; Rosen, M J; Simon, S R

    1985-01-01

    The effect of dissipative mechanical loads on spastic gait has been studied, to evaluate the feasibility of using mechanically damped orthoses to effect functional improvements in the gait of spastic patients. This concept is based on a hypothesis citing uninhibited, velocity-dependent stretch reflexes as a possible causal factor in spastic gait abnormalities, such as equinus and back-kneeing. In order to screen potential experimental subjects and to quantify velocity-dependent reflex behaviour, ankle rotation experiments and filmed gait analysis were performed. The results supported the existence of a velocity threshold. Orthosis simulation experiments were performed with one spastic subject, using a wearable, computer-controlled, electromechanical, below-knee orthosis simulator to apply a variety of damping loads to the ankle as the subject walked. Results indicated that appropriate damping can improve local joint kinematics. The damping causes a reduction in muscle stretch velocity which apparently results in reduced spastic reflex activity.

  5. Coulomb Damping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2012-01-01

    Viscous damping is commonly discussed in beginning differential equations and physics texts but dry friction or Coulomb friction is not despite dry friction being encountered in many physical applications. One reason for avoiding this topic is that the equations involve a jump discontinuity in the damping term. In this article, we adopt an energy…

  6. Determination of plasma frequency, damping constant, and size distribution from the complex dielectric function of noble metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza Herrera, Luis J.; Arboleda, David Muñetón; Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B.

    2014-12-21

    This paper develops a novel method for simultaneously determining the plasma frequency ω{sub P}   and the damping constant γ{sub free} in the bulk damped oscillator Drude model, based on experimentally measured real and imaginary parts of the metal refractive index in the IR wavelength range, lifting the usual approximation that restricts frequency values to the UV-deep UV region. Our method was applied to gold, silver, and copper, improving the relative uncertainties in the final values for ω{sub p} (0.5%–1.6%) and for γ{sub free} (3%–8%), which are smaller than those reported in the literature. These small uncertainties in ω{sub p} and γ{sub free} determination yield a much better fit of the experimental complex dielectric function. For the case of nanoparticles (Nps), a series expansion of the Drude expression (which includes ω{sub p} and γ{sub free} determined using our method) enables size-dependent dielectric function to be written as the sum of three terms: the experimental bulk dielectric function plus two size corrective terms, one for free electron, and the other for bound-electron contributions. Finally, size distribution of nanometric and subnanometric gold Nps in colloidal suspension was determined through fitting its experimental optical extinction spectrum using Mie theory based on the previously determined dielectric function. Results are compared with size histogram obtained from Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

  7. Analysis of active damping of LCL filter used in single-phase PV system in discrete domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ningyun; Tang, Houjun; Yao, Chen

    2015-06-01

    Sampling and computational delay are necessary in digital control, though they may alter the characteristics of the actual controlled plant when considered in the discrete domain. Accordingly, this article establishes a mathematical model of a single-phase grid-connected inverter with an LCL filter in the discrete domain. Three active damping control delay times: 0, ?, ? are analysed, considering the influences introduced by digital control of the plant. Further, the range of the capacitor current feedback coefficient used in active damping control is derived to guarantee that the controlled plant does not have poles outside the unit circle. Using Nyquist diagrams, the proper proportional-resonant (PR) controller parameters can be intuitively determined. The theoretical analysis is verified using MATLAB and a 3 kW laboratory prototype based on a digital signal processor (TMS320F2808).

  8. Laminar flow control with distributed surface actuation: damping Tollmien-Schlichting waves with active surface displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldin, Nikolas; King, Rudibert; Pätzold, Andreas; Nitsche, Wolfgang; Haller, Daniel; Woias, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Control strategies for laminar flow control above an unswept wing are investigated. An actuation method based on a flexible membrane displaced by multiple piezo-polymer composite elements is developed for wind tunnel experiments. A model predictive control algorithm is applied to control the multi-bar actuator. The direct negative superposition method of damping Tollmien-Schlichting waves is compared to a biomimetic approach imitating the damping mechanisms of a compliant skin. In both cases, a model predictive control algorithm is applied to control the multi-bar actuator segments. For the biomimetic approach, reduced, real-time solvable models of compliant surfaces are developed and parametrized by direct optimization and according to numerically generated optimal wall properties. Damping results of up to 85 % RMS value are achieved, shifting the onset of transition about 100 mm downstream with a single actuation membrane. Additional experiments with cascaded multiple membranes show the potential for a further shift.

  9. Longitudinal beam-transfer-function measurements at the SLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.G.; Zimmermann, F.

    1997-05-01

    A longitudinal single-bunch instability in the damping rings at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is thought to contribute to pulse-to-pulse orbit variations in downstream accelerator sections. To better understand this instability, the authors measured the beam phase and bunch length under harmonic modulations of the rf phase and rf voltage. For small phase-modulations the measured response can be explained by interaction of the beam with the cavity fundamental mode. For larger excitations, they observed bifurcation and hysteresis effects. The response to an rf voltage modulation revealed two peaks near the quadrupole-mode frequency, one of which appears to be related to the longitudinal instability. In this paper they present the experimental results.

  10. [DAMP and ADHD as "hidden" functional disabilities. Carefully prepared care of children at risk is beneficial for an optimal development].

    PubMed

    Kadesjö, B; Kadesjö, C

    1999-03-24

    A current study of seven-year-olds in Karlstad showed the incidence of DAMP (deficits in attention, motor function and perception) to be 1.7 per cent, and that of ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) to be 2.0 per cent, figures consistent with those obtained in previous studies. A further 4.9 per cent were found to have milder forms of DAMP. Research during the past few decades has yielded comprehensive knowledge of the effect of such disability on the child's development. Manifestation of the child's problems is dependent on how the child is treated by others, and on the understanding and help deriving from the family and from the preschool or school. It is essential to evolve a well considered management programme of health care for which the school or preschool is responsible. The programme should include methods for early detection, access to a competent investigatory team, support and treatment facilities for the child and the parents, and assistance at school or preschool.

  11. Semi-active vibration control based on unsymmetrical synchronized switch damping: Analysis and experimental validation of control performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao; Cheng, Li; Nie, Hong

    2016-05-01

    In semi-active synchronized switch damping (SSD) approaches for structural vibration control, the damping effect is achieved by properly switching the voltage on the piezoelectric actuators. Unsymmetrical SSD switch circuit has been designed in the previous paper to increase the effective voltage range on the PZT actuator for improvement of the control performance. In this study, analysis and experimental validation of control performance of a synchronized switch damping system based on the unsymmetrical switch circuit are carried out. First the model of an unsymmetrical SSD system is presented and the working principle is introduced. The general expression of the switched voltage on the piezoelectric actuator is derived. Based on its periodicity in steady-state control, the harmonic components of the actuator voltage are derived using Fourier series expansion. Next, the displacement response of the system is derived under combined actions of the excitation and switched voltage. Finally, a setup of a flexible beam with unsymmetrical switch circuit is used to demonstrate the control performance under different voltage sources and to verify the theoretical results. The results show that the control performance mainly depends on the voltage range on the PZT. A higher effective voltage range can be generated in unsymmetrical SSDV than in symmetrical SSDV and better control performance can be achieved at the same negative actuator voltage. The unsymmetrical SSDV makes better utilization of the actuator capability.

  12. Integration of Thermal Energy Harvesting in Semi-Active Piezoelectric Shunt-Damping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubieniecki, Michał; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    The opportunities to energize a broad range of devices by use of energy available almost anywhere and in many forms are almost unlimited. A major advantage of energy harvesting is the manufacture of small autonomous electronic devices with no need for power supply and maintenance. Shunt damping circuits, although unfavorably affected by the size and mass of bulky coil inductors, started to base on synthetic inductors losing their passivity. In this paper we report a study of the feasibility of powering shunt damping circuits by use of thermal energy otherwise irrevocably lost from a bearing. The heat generated in the bearing is converted thermoelectrically into electric energy which is then used to power synthetic inductance circuitry. We show that the power demand of such circuit can be satisfied by use of a thermoelectric generator paired with a moderately loaded bearing.

  13. Nonlinear damping model for flexible structures. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Weijian

    1990-01-01

    The study of nonlinear damping problem of flexible structures is addressed. Both passive and active damping, both finite dimensional and infinite dimensional models are studied. In the first part, the spectral density and the correlation function of a single DOF nonlinear damping model is investigated. A formula for the spectral density is established with O(Gamma(sub 2)) accuracy based upon Fokker-Planck technique and perturbation. The spectral density depends upon certain first order statistics which could be obtained if the stationary density is known. A method is proposed to find the approximate stationary density explicitly. In the second part, the spectral density of a multi-DOF nonlinear damping model is investigated. In the third part, energy type nonlinear damping model in an infinite dimensional setting is studied.

  14. Antagonistic active knee prosthesis. A metabolic cost of walking comparison with a variable-damping prosthetic knee.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C; Mooney, Luke; Elliott, Grant; Herr, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of a biomimetic active knee prosthesis on the metabolic costs associated with a unilateral transfemoral amputee walking at self selected speed. In this study we compare the antagonistic active knee prosthesis developed at MIT to an electronically controlled, variable-damping commercial knee prosthesis, the Otto Bock C-leg. Use of the active knee prosthesis resulted in both, a 17% increase in an amputee's average self selected walking speed from 1.12 m/s to 1.31 m/s, and a 6.8% reduction in metabolic cost. The results of this study suggest that an agonist-antagonist active knee prosthesis design with variable impedance control can offer walking energetic advantages over commercially available systems.

  15. Attenuation of empennage buffet response through active control of damping using piezoelectric material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Miller, Jonathan M.; Doggett, Robert V., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Dynamic response and damping data obtained from buffet studies conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel by using a simple, rigid model attached to spring supports are presented. The two parallel leaf spring supports provided a means for the model to respond in a vertical translation mode, thus simulating response in an elastic first bending mode. Wake-induced buffeting flow was created by placing an airfoil upstream of the model of that the wake of the airfoil impinged on the model. Model response was sensed by a strain gage mounted on one of the springs. The output signal from the strain gage was fed back through a control law implemented on a desktop computer. The processed signals were used to 'actuate' a piezoelectric bending actuator bonded to the other spring in such a way as to add damping as the model responded. The results of this 'proof-of-concept' study show that the piezoelectric actuator was effective in attenuating the wake-induced buffet response over the range of parameters investigated.

  16. A forced damped oscillation framework for undulatory swimming provides new insights into how propulsion arises in active and passive swimming.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce E; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental issue in locomotion is to understand how muscle forcing produces apparently complex deformation kinematics leading to movement of animals like undulatory swimmers. The question of whether complicated muscle forcing is required to create the observed deformation kinematics is central to the understanding of how animals control movement. In this work, a forced damped oscillation framework is applied to a chain-link model for undulatory swimming to understand how forcing leads to deformation and movement. A unified understanding of swimming, caused by muscle contractions ("active" swimming) or by forces imparted by the surrounding fluid ("passive" swimming), is obtained. We show that the forcing triggers the first few deformation modes of the body, which in turn cause the translational motion. We show that relatively simple forcing patterns can trigger seemingly complex deformation kinematics that lead to movement. For given muscle activation, the forcing frequency relative to the natural frequency of the damped oscillator is important for the emergent deformation characteristics of the body. The proposed approach also leads to a qualitative understanding of optimal deformation kinematics for fast swimming. These results, based on a chain-link model of swimming, are confirmed by fully resolved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Prior results from the literature on the optimal value of stiffness for maximum speed are explained.

  17. Long-Range Corrected Hybrid Density Functionals with Damped Atom-Atom Dispersion Corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Jeng-Da; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-06-14

    We report re-optimization of a recently proposed long-range corrected (LC) hybrid density functionals [J.-D. Chai and M. Head-Gordon, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 084106 (2008)] to include empirical atom-atom dispersion corrections. The resulting functional, {omega}B97X-D yields satisfactory accuracy for thermochemistry, kinetics, and non-covalent interactions. Tests show that for non-covalent systems, {omega}B97X-D shows slight improvement over other empirical dispersion-corrected density functionals, while for covalent systems and kinetics, it performs noticeably better. Relative to our previous functionals, such as {omega}B97X, the new functional is significantly superior for non-bonded interactions, and very similar in performance for bonded interactions.

  18. Damping measurements using operational data

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H.; Carne, T.G.; Veers, P.S.

    1996-08-01

    The authors have measured modal damping using strain-gauge data from an operating wind turbine. This new technique for measuring modal damping is easier and less expensive than previously used methods. Auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions of the strain-gauge data have been shown to consist of decaying sinusoids which correspond to the modal frequencies and damping ratios of the wind turbine. The authors have verified the method by extracting damping values from an analytically generated data set. Actual operating response data from the DOE/Sandia 34-m Test Bed has been used to calculate modal damping ratios as a function of rotor rotation rate. This capability will allow more accurate fatigue life prediction and control.

  19. Multi-objective optimization of an active constrained layer damping treatment for vibration control of a rotating flexible arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau, L. C.; Fung, E. H. K.; Yau, D. T. W.

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the use of the multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) to solve an integrated optimization problem of a rotating flexible arm with active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment. The arm is rotating in a horizontal plane with triangular velocity profiles. The ACLD patch is placed at the clamped end of the arm. The design objectives are to minimize the total treatment weight, the control voltage and the tip displacement of the arm, as well as to maximize the passive damping characteristic of the arm. Design variables include the control gains, the maximum angular velocity, the shear modulus of the viscoelastic layer, the thickness of the piezoelectric constraining and viscoelastic layers, and the length of the ACLD patch. In order to evaluate the effect of different combinations of design variables on the system, the finite element method, in conjunction with the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method, is employed to model the flexible arm with ACLD treatment to predict its dynamic behavior, in which the effects of centrifugal stiffening due to the rotation of flexible arm are taken into account. As a result of optimization, reasonable Pareto solutions are successfully obtained. It is shown that the MOGA is applicable to the present integrated optimization problem.

  20. Dielectric Function for Gold in Plasmonics Applications: Size Dependence of Plasmon Resonance Frequencies and Damping Rates for Nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Derkachova, Anastasiya; Kolwas, Krystyna; Demchenko, Iraida

    Realistic representation of the frequency dependence of dielectric function of noble metals has a significant impact on the accuracy of description of their optical properties and farther applications in plasmonics, nanoscience, and nanotechnology. Drude-type models successfully used in describing material properties of silver, for gold are known to be not perfect above the threshold energy at 1.8 eV. We give the improved, simple dielectric function for gold which accounts for the frequency dependence of the interband transitions over 1.8 eV and, in addition, for the finite size effects in gold nanoparticles. On that basis, we provide the improved characterization of the spectral performance of gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, we give the direct size dependence of the resonance frequencies and total damping rates of localized surface plasmons of gold nanoparticles (retardation effects are taken into full account) in diverse dielectric environments. The results are compared to the data obtained experimentally for gold monodisperse colloidal nanospheres, as well with the experimental results of other authors.

  1. Spectral Function and Quasiparticle Damping of Interacting Bosons in Two Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sinner, Andreas; Kopietz, Peter; Hasselmann, Nils

    2009-03-27

    We employ the functional renormalization group to study dynamical properties of the two-dimensional Bose gas. Our approach is free of infrared divergences, which plague the usual diagrammatic approaches, and is consistent with the exact Nepomnyashchy identity, which states that the anomalous self-energy vanishes at zero frequency and momentum. We recover the correct infrared behavior of the propagators and present explicit results for the spectral line shape, from which we extract the quasiparticle dispersion and dampi0008.

  2. Hybrid Damping System for an Electronic Equipment Mounting Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David; Kolkailah, Faysal A.; Cavalli, J. R.; Elghandour, Eltahry

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and construct a vibration control system for an electronic equipment shelf to be evaluated in the NASA Dryden FTF-11. The vibration control system was a hybrid system which included passive and active damping techniques. Passive damping was fabricated into the equipment shelf using ScothDamp(trademark) damping film and aluminum constraining layers. Active damping was achieved using a two channel active control circuit employing QuickPack(trademark) sensors and actuators. Preliminary Chirp test results indicated passive damping smoothed the frequency response while active damping reduced amplitudes of the frequency response for most frequencies below 500Hz.

  3. Hybrid Damping System for an Electronic Equipment Mounting Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David; Kolkailah, Faysal A.; Cavalli, J. R.; Elghandour, Eltahry

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and construct a vibration control system for an electronic equipment shelf to be evaluated in the NASA Dryden FTF-II. The vibration control system was a hybrid system which included passive and active damping techniques. Passive damping was fabricated into the equipment shelf using ScothDamp(trademark) damping film and aluminum constraining layers. Active damping was achieved using a two channel active control circuit employing QuickPack(trademark) sensors and actuators. Preliminary Chirp test results indicated passive damping smoothed the frequency response while active damping reduced amplitudes of the frequency response for most frequencies below 500Hz.

  4. The effect of mechanical damping loads on disabling action tremor.

    PubMed

    Aisen, M L; Arnold, A; Baiges, I; Maxwell, S; Rosen, M

    1993-07-01

    Patients with severe action tremor have uncontrollable, relatively rapid oscillatory motion super-imposed on otherwise useable slower voluntary motor activity. Because a mechanical damper produces an opposing force proportional to velocity, applying damping loads to tremorous limbs should attenuate the (high-velocity) tremor component of movement while permitting the slower purposeful portion to proceed relatively unopposed. In this study, the effect of upper extremity damping in three degrees of freedom was examined in 10 patients with cerebellar action tremor due to multiple sclerosis or traumatic brain injury. Variable amounts of damping were applied by prototype energy-dissipating orthoses which generated resistive viscous loads by means of computer-controlled magnetic particle brakes. All patients experienced statistically and functionally significant tremor reduction with the application of damping.

  5. The DAMPE Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhang; Tao, Ma; Yongyi, Huang

    2016-07-01

    The first Chinese space observatory DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) was successfully launched on Dec. 17th, 2015. One major scientific object of DAMPE is to measure electrons between 5GeV to 10TeV with excellent energy resolution (1.5% at 800GeV) to search for possible dark matter signatures. The detector consists of four subsystems: a plastic scintillator detector (PSD), a silicon-tungsten tracker (STK), a BGO calorimeter (BGO), and a neutron detector (NUD). The NUD on board DAMPE is designed to detect moderated neutrons via the boron capture of thermal neutrons in boron-doped plastics. Given the fact that hadron showers initiated in the BGO calorimeter by incident nuclei tend to be followed by significantly more neutron activities comparing to electromagnetic cascades triggered by electrons, the NUD provides an additional order of magnitude hadron rejection capability to improve the overall e/p discrimination of DAMPE up to 10 ^{5}. Preliminary analysis of the in-orbit data is given, together with comparisons to the results obtained by a detailed GEANT4 simulation of the NUD instrument.

  6. Nutational Damping Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. A.; Sharma, I.

    2000-10-01

    Motivated by the recent detection of complex rotational states for several asteroids and comets, as well as by the ongoing and planned spacecraft missions to such bodies, which should allow their rotational states to be accurately determined, we revisit the problem of the nutational damping of small solar system bodies. The nutational damping of asteroids has been approximately analyzed by Prendergast (1958), Burns and Safronov (1973), and Efroimsky and Lazarian (2000). Many other similar dynamical studies concern planetary wobble decay (e.g., Peale 1973; Yoder and Ward 1979), interstellar dust grain alignment (e.g., Purcell 1979; Lazarian and Efroimsky 1999) and damping of Earth's Chandler wobble (Lambeck 1980). Recall that rotational energy loss for an isolated body aligns the body's angular momentum vector with its axis of maximum inertia. Assuming anelastic dissipation, simple dimensional analysis determines a functional form of the damping timescale, on which all the above authors agree. However, the numerical coefficients of published results are claimed to differ by orders of magnitude. Differences have been ascribed to absent physics, to solutions that fail to satisfy boundary conditions perfectly, and to unphysical choices for the Q parameter. The true reasons for the discrepancy are unclear since, despite contrary claims, the full 3D problem (nutational damping of an anelastic ellipsoid) is analytically intractable so far. To move the debate forward, we compare the solution of a related 2D problem to the expressions found previously, and we present results from a finite element model. On this basis, we feel that previous rates for the decay of asteroidal tumbling (Harris 1994), derived from Burns and Safronov (1973), are likely to be accurate, at least to a factor of a few. Funded by NASA.

  7. Landau damping in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Summers, Danny

    1991-01-01

    The Landau damping of electrostatic Langmuir waves and ion-acoustic waves in a hot, isotropic, nonmagnetized, generalized Lorentzian plasma is analyzed using the modified plasma dispersion function. Numerical solutions for the real and imaginary parts of the wave frequency omega sub 0 - (i)(gamma) have been obtained as a function of the normalized wave number (k)(lambda sub D), where lambda sub D is the electron Debye length. For both particle distributions the electrostatic modes are found to be strongly damped at short wavelengths. At long wavelengths, this damping becomes less severe, but the attenuation of Langmuir waves is much stronger for a generalized Lorentzian plasma than for a Maxwellian plasma. It is concluded that Landau damping of ion-acoustic waves is only slightly affected by the presence of a high energy tail, but is strongly dependent on the ion temperature.

  8. Damping measurements using operational data

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H.; Carne, T.G.; Veers, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    We have measured modal damping using strain-gauge data from an operating wind turbine. Previously, such measurements were difficult and expensive. Auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions of the strain-gauge data have been shown to consist of decaying sinusoids which correspond to the modal frequencies and damping ratios of the wind turbine. We have verified the method by extracting damping values from an analytically generated data set. Actual operating response data from the DOE/Sandia 34-meter Test Bed has been used to calculate modal damping ratios as a function of rotor rotation rate. This capability will allow more accurate fatigue life prediction and control. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Reliable fuzzy H∞ control for active suspension of in-wheel motor driven electric vehicles with dynamic damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xinxin; Naghdy, Fazel; Du, Haiping

    2017-03-01

    A fault-tolerant fuzzy H∞ control design approach for active suspension of in-wheel motor driven electric vehicles in the presence of sprung mass variation, actuator faults and control input constraints is proposed. The controller is designed based on the quarter-car active suspension model with a dynamic-damping-in-wheel-motor-driven-system, in which the suspended motor is operated as a dynamic absorber. The Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model is used to model this suspension with possible sprung mass variation. The parallel-distributed compensation (PDC) scheme is deployed to derive a fault-tolerant fuzzy controller for the T-S fuzzy suspension model. In order to reduce the motor wear caused by the dynamic force transmitted to the in-wheel motor, the dynamic force is taken as an additional controlled output besides the traditional optimization objectives such as sprung mass acceleration, suspension deflection and actuator saturation. The H∞ performance of the proposed controller is derived as linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) comprising three equality constraints which are solved efficiently by means of MATLAB LMI Toolbox. The proposed controller is applied to an electric vehicle suspension and its effectiveness is demonstrated through computer simulation.

  10. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, James M.; Barney, Patrick S.; Parker, Gordon G.; Smith, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof.

  11. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.; Parker, G.G.; Smith, D.A.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof. 38 figs.

  12. Application of Semi Active Control Techniques to the Damping Suppression Problem of Solar Sail Booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adetona, O.; Keel, L. H.; Whorton, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Solar sails provide a propellant free form for space propulsion. These are large flat surfaces that generate thrust when they are impacted by light. When attached to a space vehicle, the thrust generated can propel the space vehicle to great distances at significant speeds. For optimal performance the sail must be kept from excessive vibration. Active control techniques can provide the best performance. However, they require an external power-source that may create significant parasitic mass to the solar sail. However, solar sails require low mass for optimal performance. Secondly, active control techniques typically require a good system model to ensure stability and performance. However, the accuracy of solar sail models validated on earth for a space environment is questionable. An alternative approach is passive vibration techniques. These do not require an external power supply, and do not destabilize the system. A third alternative is referred to as semi-active control. This approach tries to get the best of both active and passive control, while avoiding their pitfalls. In semi-active control, an active control law is designed for the system, and passive control techniques are used to implement it. As a result, no external power supply is needed so the system is not destabilize-able. Though it typically underperforms active control techniques, it has been shown to out-perform passive control approaches and can be unobtrusively installed on a solar sail boom. Motivated by this, the objective of this research is to study the suitability of a Piezoelectric (PZT) patch actuator/sensor based semi-active control system for the vibration suppression problem of solar sail booms. Accordingly, we develop a suitable mathematical and computer model for such studies and demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach with computer simulations.

  13. ICAN/DAMP-integrated composite analyzer with damping analysis capabilities: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitrious A.; Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1992-01-01

    This manual describes the use of the computer code ICAN/DAMP (Integrated Composite Analyzer with Damping Analysis Capabilities) for the prediction of damping in polymer-matrix composites. The code is written in FORTRAN 77 and is a version of the ICAN (Integrated Composite ANalyzer) computer program. The code incorporates a new module for synthesizing the material damping from micromechanics to laminate level. Explicit micromechanics equations based on hysteretic damping are programmed relating the on-axis damping capacities to the fiber and matrix properties and fiber volume ratio. The damping capacities of unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis loading are synthesized from on-axis damping values. The hygrothermal effect on the damping performance of unidirectional composites caused by temperature and moisture variation is modeled along with the damping contributions from interfacial friction between broken fibers and matrix. The temperature rise is continuously vibrating composite plies and composite laminates is also estimated. The ICAN/DAMP user's manual provides descriptions of the damping analysis module's functions, structure, input requirements, output interpretation, and execution requirements. It only addresses the changes required to conduct the damping analysis and is used in conjunction with the 'Second Generation Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) Computer Code' user's manual (NASA TP-3290).

  14. Multi-objective optimization of an active constrained layer damping treatment for shape control of flexible beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau, L. C.; Fung, E. H. K.

    2004-08-01

    This work presents the use of a multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) to solve an integrated optimization problem for the shape control of flexible beams with an active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment. The design objectives are to minimize the total weight of the system, the input voltages and the steady-state error between the achieved and desired shapes. Design variables include the thickness of the constraining and viscoelastic layers, the arrangement of the ACLD patches, as well as the control gains. In order to set up an evaluator for the MOGA, the finite element method (FEM), in conjunction with the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method, is employed to model a clamped-free beam with ACLD patches to predict the dynamic behaviour of the system. As a result of the optimization, reasonable Pareto solutions are successfully obtained. It is shown that ACLD treatment is suitable for shape control of flexible structures and that the MOGA is applicable to the present integrated optimization problem.

  15. Application of simultaneous active and reactive power modulation of superconducting magnetic energy storage unit to damp turbine-generator subsynchronous oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chijui; Lee, Yuangshung )

    1993-03-01

    An active and reactive power (P-Q) simultaneous control scheme which is based on a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit is designed to damp out the subsynchronous resonant (SSR) oscillations of a turbine-generator unit. In order to suppress unstable torsional mode oscillations, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is employed to modulate the active and reactive power input/output of the SMES unit according to speed deviation of the generator shaft. The gains of the proposed PID controller are determined by pole assignment approach based on modal control theory. Eigenvalue analysis of the studied system shows that the PID controller is quite effective over a wide range of operating conditions. Dynamic simulations using the nonlinear system model are also performed to demonstrate the damping effect of the proposed control scheme under disturbance conditions.

  16. Quasienergy formulation of damped response theory.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Kasper; Kauczor, Joanna; Kjaergaard, Thomas; Jørgensen, Poul

    2009-07-28

    We present a quasienergy-based formulation of damped response theory where a common effective lifetime parameter has been introduced for all excited states in terms of complex excitation energies. The introduction of finite excited state lifetimes leads to a set of (complex) damped response equations, which have the same form to all orders in the perturbation. An algorithm is presented for solving the damped response equations in Hartree-Fock theory and Kohn-Sham density functional theory. The use of the quasienergy formulation allows us to obtain directly the computationally simplest expressions for damped response functions by applying a set of response parameter elimination rules, which minimize the total number of damped response equations to be solved. In standard response theory broadened absorption spectra are obtained by ad hoc superimposing lineshape functions onto the absorption stick spectra, whereas an empirical lineshape function common to all excitations is an integrated part of damped response theory. By superimposing the lineshape functions inherent in damped response theory onto the stick spectra of standard response theory, we show that the absorption spectra obtained in standard and damped response theory calculations are identical. We demonstrate that damped response theory may be applied to obtain absorption spectra in all frequency ranges, also those that are not readily addressed using standard response theory. This makes damped response theory an effective tool, e.g., for determining absorption spectra for large molecules, where the density of the excited states may be very high, and where standard response theory therefore is not applicable in practice. A thorough comparison is given between our formulation of damped response theory and the formulation by Norman et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 194103 (2005)].

  17. Damped transverse oscillations of interacting coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Roberto; Luna, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Damped transverse oscillations of magnetic loops are routinely observed in the solar corona. This phenomenon is interpreted as standing kink magnetohydrodynamic waves, which are damped by resonant absorption owing to plasma inhomogeneity across the magnetic field. The periods and damping times of these oscillations can be used to probe the physical conditions of the coronal medium. Some observations suggest that interaction between neighboring oscillating loops in an active region may be important and can modify the properties of the oscillations. Here we theoretically investigate resonantly damped transverse oscillations of interacting nonuniform coronal loops. We provide a semi-analytic method, based on the T-matrix theory of scattering, to compute the frequencies and damping rates of collective oscillations of an arbitrary configuration of parallel cylindrical loops. The effect of resonant damping is included in the T-matrix scheme in the thin boundary approximation. Analytic and numerical results in the specific case of two interacting loops are given as an application.

  18. Hybrid Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels with Constrained Layer Damping and Model Predictive Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2000-01-01

    make the controller adaptive. For example, a mathematical model of the plant could be periodically updated as the plant changes, and the feedback gains recomputed from the updated model. To be practical, this approach requires a simple plant model that can be updated quickly with reasonable computational requirements. A recent paper by the authors discussed one way to simplify a feedback controller, by reducing the number of actuators and sensors needed for good performance. The work was done on a tensioned aircraft-style panel excited on one side by TBL flow in a low speed wind tunnel. Actuation was provided by a piezoelectric (PZT) actuator mounted on the center of the panel. For sensing, the responses of four accelerometers, positioned to approximate the response of the first radiation mode of the panel, were summed and fed back through the controller. This single input-single output topology was found to have nearly the same noise reduction performance as a controller with fifteen accelerometers and three PZT patches. This paper extends the previous results by looking at how constrained layer damping (CLD) on a panel can be used to enhance the performance of the feedback controller thus providing a more robust and efficient hybrid active/passive system. The eventual goal is to use the CLD to reduce sound radiation at high frequencies, then implement a very simple, reduced order, low sample rate adaptive controller to attenuate sound radiation at low frequencies. Additionally this added damping smoothes phase transitions over the bandwidth which promotes robustness to natural frequency shifts. Experiments were conducted in a transmission loss facility on a clamped-clamped aluminum panel driven on one side by a loudspeaker. A generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm, which is suited to online adaptation of its parameters, was used in single input-single output and multiple input-single output configurations. Because this was a preliminary look at the potential

  19. Magnetic Damping For Maglev

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Rote, D. M.; ...

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic damping is one of the important parameters that control the response and stability of maglev systems. An experimental study to measure magnetic damping directly is presented. A plate attached to a permanent magnet levitated on a rotating drum was tested to investigate the effect of various parameters, such as conductivity, gap, excitation frequency, and oscillation amplitude, on magnetic damping. The experimental technique is capable of measuring all of the magnetic damping coefficients, some of which cannot be measured indirectly.

  20. Damped leaf flexure hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage.

  1. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    SciTech Connect

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej Hernandez, Stephanie

    2015-05-07

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ∼0.03.

  2. Material Damping Experiments at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Marie; White, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    A unique experimental facility has been designed to measure damping of materials at cryogenic temperatures. The test facility pays special attention to removing other sources of damping in the measurement by avoiding frictional interfaces, decoupling the test specimen from the support system, and by using a non-contacting measurement device; Damping data is obtained for materials (AI, GrEp, Be, Fused Quartz), strain amplitudes (less than 10-6 ppm), frequencies (20Hz-330Hz) and temperatures (20K-293K) relevant to future precision optical space missions. The test data shows a significant decrease in viscous damping at cryogenic temperatures and can be as low as 10-4%, but the amount of the damping decrease is a function of frequency and material. Contrary to the other materials whose damping monotonically decreased with temperature, damping of Fused Quartz increased substantially at cryo, after reaching a minimum at around l50 K. The damping is also shown to be insensitive to strain for low strain levels. At room temperatures, the test data correlates well to the analytical predictions of the Zener damping model. Discrepancies at cryogenic temperatures between the model predictions and the test data are observed.

  3. [Physical activity and brain function].

    PubMed

    Kempermann, G

    2012-06-01

    Physical activity has direct and indirect effects on brain function in health and disease. Findings demonstrating that physical activity improves cognitive and non-cognitive functions and is preventive for several neuropsychiatric disorders have attracted particular interest. This short review focuses on sports and physical exercise in normal brain function and summarizes which mechanisms might underlie the observed effects, which methodological problems exist, which relationships exist to concepts of plasticity and neural reserves and what evolutionary relevance the initially surprising finding that physical exercise is good for the brain has.

  4. Damping of the wrist joint during voluntary movement.

    PubMed

    Milner, T E; Cloutier, C

    1998-10-01

    Damping characteristics of the musculoskeletal system were investigated during rapid voluntary wrist flexion movements. Oscillations about the final position were induced by introducing a load with the characteristics of negative damping, which artificially reduced the damping of the wrist. Subjects responded to increases in the negatively damped load by stronger cocontraction of wrist flexor and extensor muscles during the stabilization phase of the movement. However, their ability to counteract the effects of the negatively damped load diminished as the negative damping increased. Consequently, the number and frequency of oscillations increased. The oscillations were accompanied by phase-locked muscle activity superimposed on underlying tonic muscle activation. The wrist stiffness and damping coefficient increased with the increased cocontraction that accompanied more negatively damped loads, although changes in the damping coefficient were less systematic than the stiffness. Analysis of successive half-cycles of the oscillation revealed that the wrist stiffness and damping coefficient increased, despite decreasing muscle activation, as oscillation amplitude and velocity declined. This indicates that the inverse dependence of the damping coefficient on oscillation velocity contributes significantly to damping of joint motion. It is suggested that this property helps to offset a negative contribution to damping from the stretch reflex.

  5. Red cell DAMPs and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Rafaela; Silveira, Angélica A A; Conran, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular hemolysis, or the destruction of red blood cells in the circulation, can occur in numerous diseases, including the acquired hemolytic anemias, sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, as well as during some transfusion reactions, preeclampsia and infections, such as those caused by malaria or Clostridium perfringens. Hemolysis results in the release of large quantities of red cell damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) into the circulation, which, if not neutralized by innate protective mechanisms, have the potential to activate multiple inflammatory pathways. One of the major red cell DAMPs, heme, is able to activate converging inflammatory pathways, such as toll-like receptor signaling, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and inflammasome formation, suggesting that this DAMP both activates and amplifies inflammation. Other potent DAMPs that may be released by the erythrocytes upon their rupture include heat shock proteins (Hsp), such as Hsp70, interleukin-33 and Adenosine 5' triphosphate. As such, hemolysis represents a major inflammatory mechanism that potentially contributes to the clinical manifestations that have been associated with the hemolytic diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension and leg ulcers, and likely plays a role in specific complications of sickle cell disease such as endothelial activation, vaso-occlusive processes and tissue injury.

  6. Calculation of the magnetic circular dichroism B term from the imaginary part of the Verdet constant using damped time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Seth, Michael; Ziegler, Tom; Autschbach, Jochen

    2007-12-01

    A time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) formalism with damping for the calculation of the magnetic optical rotatory dispersion and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) from the complex Verdet constant is presented. For a justification of such an approach, we have derived the TDDFT analog of the sum-over-states formula for the Verdet constant. The results of the MCD calculations by this method for ethylene, furan, thiophene, selenophene, tellurophene, and pyrrole are in good agreement with our previous theoretical sum-over-states MCD spectra. For the π →π* transition of propene, we have obtained a positive Faraday B term. It is located between the two negative B terms. This finding is in agreement with experiment in the range of 6-8eV.

  7. Landau damping of auroral hiss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, D. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, J. D.; Winningham, J. D.; Burch, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Auroral hiss is observed to propagate over distances comparable to an Earth radius from its source in the auroral oval. The role of Landau damping is investigated for upward propagating auroral hiss. By using a ray tracing code and a simplified model of the distribution function, the effect of Landau damping is calculated for auroral hiss propagation through the environment around the auroral oval. Landau damping is found to be the likely mechanism for explaining some of the one-sided auroral hiss funnels observed by Dynamics Explorer 1. It is also found that Landau damping puts a lower limit on the wavelength of auroral hiss. Poleward of the auroral oval, Landau damping is found in a typical case to limit omega/k(sub parallel) to values of 3.4 x 10(exp 4) km/s or greater, corresponding to resonance energies of 3.2 keV or greater and wavelengths of 2 km or greater. For equatorward propagation, omega/k(sub parallel) is limited to values greater than 6.8 x 10(exp 4) km/s, corresponding to resonance energies greater than 13 keV and wavelengths greater than 3 km. Independent estimates based on measured ratios of the magnetic to electric field intensity also show that omega/k(sub parallel) corresponds to resonance energies greater than 1 keV and wavelengths greater than 1 km. These results lead to the difficulty that upgoing electron beams sufficiently energetic to directly generate auroral hiss of the inferred wavelength are not usually observed. A partial transmission mechanism utilizing density discontinuities oblique to the magnetic field is proposed for converting auroral hiss to wavelengths long enough to avoid damping of the wave over long distances. Numerous reflections of the wave in an upwardly flared density cavity could convert waves to significantly increased wavelengths and resonance velocities.

  8. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mice and mice transfused with Syk inhibitor-treated platelets . Platelet lodging was remarkably decreased in lungs of mice transfused with Syk...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet ...30September2012–29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  9. Aerospace Structures Technology Damping Design Guide. Volume 3. Damping Material Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    1.1 DAMPING MATERIAL PROPERTIES 1 3 1.2 THE STANDARIZED MATERIAL DATA I 1.2.1 Nomogram Cover Sheet 3 ’ 1.2.2 The Reduced Nomogram 4 1.2.3 Reading...MATERIALS 6 2 DAMPING MATERIAL PROPERTY DATA 14 3 STRUCTURAL EPOXIES AND OTHER MATERIALS 469 3.1 STRUCTURAL EPOXIES 469 3.2 STRUCTURAL PLASTICS 477 3.3...Data Listing II 6 Temperature Shift Function and Its Properties 12 7 Typical TCA Plot 13 8 Quick Reference Chart for Damping Materials 15 9 Damping vs

  10. Engineered damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J.; Ray, Manas C.; Baz, Amr M.

    2001-07-01

    Engineered Damping Treatments (EDT) that have high damping characteristics per unit volume are presented. The EDT's under consideration, consist of cellular viscoelastic damping matrices with optimally selected cell configuration, size and distribution. The cellular topology of the EDT's is designed using Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) strategies and the obtained optimal configurations will be manufactured using the state-of-the-art technology of Rapid Prototyping (RP). The EDT's are modeled using the finite element method in an attempt to determine the optimal topologies that maximize the strain energy, maximize the damping characteristics and minimize the total weight. The CAD files of the prototypes of the EDT's. The damping characteristics of the manufactured EDT's are evaluated and compared with the corresponding characteristics obtained by conventional solid damping treatments in order to emphasize the importance of using optimally configured damping treatment to achieve high damping characteristics. The presented procedures are invaluable for designing efficient damping treatments for many military and civilian structures whose vibrations and noise must be effectively controlled.

  11. Critically damped quantum search.

    PubMed

    Mizel, Ari

    2009-04-17

    Although measurement and unitary processes can accomplish any quantum evolution in principle, thinking in terms of dissipation and damping can be powerful. We propose a modification of Grover's algorithm in which the idea of damping plays a natural role. Remarkably, we find that there is a critical damping value that divides between the quantum O(sqrt[N]) and classical O(N) search regimes. In addition, by allowing the damping to vary in a fashion we describe, one obtains a fixed-point quantum search algorithm in which ignorance of the number of targets increases the number of oracle queries only by a factor of 1.5.

  12. Swept sine testing of rotor-bearing system for damping estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, N. Harish; Sekhar, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Many types of rotating components commonly operate above the first or second critical speed and they are subjected to run-ups and shutdowns frequently. The present study focuses on developing FRF of rotor bearing systems for damping estimation from swept-sine excitation. The principle of active vibration control states that with increase in angular acceleration, the amplitude of vibration due to unbalance will reduce and the FRF envelope will shift towards the right (or higher frequency). The frequency response function (FRF) estimated by tracking filters or Co-Quad analyzers was proved to induce an error into the FRF estimate. Using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm and stationary wavelet transform (SWT) decomposition FRF distortion can be reduced. To obtain a theoretical clarity, the shifting of FRF envelope phenomenon is incorporated into conventional FRF expressions and validation is performed with the FRF estimated using the Fourier Transform approach. The half-power bandwidth method is employed to extract damping ratios from the FRF estimates. While deriving half-power points for both types of responses (acceleration and displacement), damping ratio (ζ) is estimated with different approximations like classical definition (neglecting damping ratio of order higher than 2), third order (neglecting damping ratios with order higher than 4) and exact (no assumptions on damping ratio). The use of stationary wavelet transform to denoise the noise corrupted FRF data is explained. Finally, experiments are performed on a test rotor excited with different sweep rates to estimate the damping ratio.

  13. Decoherence and Landau-Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The terminologies, decoherence and Landau damping, are often used concerning the damping of a collective instability. This article revisits the difference and relation between decoherence and Landau damping. A model is given to demonstrate how Landau damping affects the rate of damping coming from decoherence.

  14. A Resonant Damping Study Using Piezoelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Duffy, K. P.; Choi, B. B.; Morrison, C. R.; Jansen, R. H.; Provenza, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue (HCF) problems requiring damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery blade research, a feasibility study of resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches with passive and active control techniques has been conducted on cantilever beam specimens. Test results for the passive damping circuit show that the optimum resistive shunt circuit reduces the third bending resonant vibration by almost 50%, and the optimum inductive circuit reduces the vibration by 90%. In a separate test, active control reduced vibration by approximately 98%.

  15. Experimental investigation of the dynamic elastic modulus and vibration damping in MoSi{sub 2}-30%Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as a function of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, G.T.; Wolfenden, A.; Hebsur, M.G.

    2000-02-01

    The dynamic elastic modulus, E, and vibration damping of molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) with 30% volume addition of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) were measured at varying temperatures using the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique (PUCOT). The value of the elastic modulus of the composite was observed to decrease as temperature, T, was increased. The value of dE/dT of MoSi{sub 2} was determined to be {minus}0.03 GPa/K. The vibration damping of MoSi{sub 2}-30%Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} increased as temperature was increased, with an effective activation energy of 0.076 eV/atom. This was an average over the entire temperature range, but two distinct slopes were observed in the plot of damping versus inverse temperature.

  16. Turbine blade damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Research results and progress on the performance of bladed systems is reported the different topics discussed include: the study of turbine blade damping; forced vibrations of friction damped beam moistures in two dimensions; and a users manual for a computer program for dynamic analysis of bladed systems.

  17. Transient analysis for damping identification in rotating composite beams with integral damping layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Clifford B.; Wereley, Norman M.

    1996-10-01

    The first objective of this paper is to evaluate the performance of damping identification algorithms. The second objective is to determine the feasibility of damping augmentation in rotating composite beams via passive constrained layer damping (PCLD). Damping identification schemes were applied to four rectangular cross-section laminated composite beams with cocured integral damping layers over the span of the beam. The cocured beam consisted of a twenty-ply balanced and symmetric cross-ply Gr/Ep composite host structure, a top and bottom damping layer of viscoelastic material (VEM), and a 2-ply Gr/Ep constraining layer sandwiching the viscoelastic material to the host structure. Four VEM thicknesses were considered: 0, 5, 10, and 15 mils. The cantilevered beams were tested at rotational speeds ranging from 0 to 900 RPM in a vacuum chamber. Excitation in bending was provided using piezo actuators, and the bending response was measured using full strain gauge bridges. Transient data were analysed using logarithmic decrement, a Hilbert transform technique, and an FFT- based moving block analysis. When compared to the beam with no VEM, a 19.2% volume fraction (15 mil layer) of viscoelastic in the beam produced a 400% increase in damping ratio in the non-rotating case, while at 900 RPM, the damping ratio increased only 360%. Overall structural damping was reduced as a function of RPM, due to centrifugal stiffening.

  18. Turbojet engine blade damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, A. V.; Cutts, D. G.; Sridhar, S.

    1981-01-01

    The potentials of various sources of nonaerodynamic damping in engine blading are evaluated through a combination of advanced analysis and testing. The sources studied include material hysteresis, dry friction at shroud and root disk interfaces as well as at platform type external dampers. A limited seris of tests was conducted to evaluate damping capacities of composite materials (B/AL, B/AL/Ti) and thermal barrier coatings. Further, basic experiments were performed on titanium specimens to establish the characteristics of sliding friction and to determine material damping constants J and n. All the tests were conducted on single blades. Mathematical models were develthe several mechanisms of damping. Procedures to apply this data to predict damping levels in an assembly of blades are developed and discussed.

  19. Wigner distribution function and entropy of the damped harmonic oscillator within the theory of the open quantum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isar, Aurelian

    1995-01-01

    The harmonic oscillator with dissipation is studied within the framework of the Lindblad theory for open quantum systems. By using the Wang-Uhlenbeck method, the Fokker-Planck equation, obtained from the master equation for the density operator, is solved for the Wigner distribution function, subject to either the Gaussian type or the delta-function type of initial conditions. The obtained Wigner functions are two-dimensional Gaussians with different widths. Then a closed expression for the density operator is extracted. The entropy of the system is subsequently calculated and its temporal behavior shows that this quantity relaxes to its equilibrium value.

  20. Material damping experiments at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Marie B.; White, Christopher

    2003-12-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be operating at temperatures below 40K to image in the infrared. The 7-m class telescope will require nanometric jitter stability of the optical elements such as the primary and secondary mirrors. Of particular concern is the vibration response of these cryogenic systems when subjected to on-board disturbance sources such as the reaction wheels, the amplitude of which is governed by damping. Unfortunately there is relatively little data available for flight grade materials at these temperatures and within the frequency bands of interest. The paper will describe the experimental setup designed to measure viscous damping to values as low 10^-4%. The tests measure damping from room temperature all the way down to 20K in a controlled thermal and disturbance free environment. Data is obtained for strain levels of about 0.1 micro-strain down to nano-strains to verify vibration level effects on material damping. Damping is also measured for several frequencies in the range of 20Hz to 300Hz to assess the trend of damping as a function of vibrational frequency. Data for several materials, such as Aluminum, Beryllium, Quartz, and various composites are presented. The data is compared to analytical predictions using the Zener damping theory and is shown to match well at room temperature but to disagree at colder temperatures.

  1. Structure-function relationship of the foam-like pomelo peel (Citrus maxima)-an inspiration for the development of biomimetic damping materials with high energy dissipation.

    PubMed

    Thielen, M; Schmitt, C N Z; Eckert, S; Speck, T; Seidel, R

    2013-06-01

    The mechanical properties of artificial foams are mainly determined by the choice of bulk materials and relative density. In natural foams, in contrast, variation to optimize properties is achieved by structural optimization rather than by conscious substitution of bulk materials. Pomelos (Citrus maxima) have a thick foam-like peel which is capable of dissipating considerable amounts of kinetic energy and thus this fruit represents an ideal role model for the development of biomimetic impact damping structures. This paper focuses on the analysis of the biomechanics of the pomelo peel and on its structure-function relationship. It deals with the determination of the onset strain of densification of this foam-like tissue and on how this property is influenced by the arrangement of vascular bundles. It was found here that the vascular bundles branch in a very regular manner-every 16.5% of the radial peel thickness-and that the surrounding peel tissue (pericarp) attains its exceptional thickness mainly by the expansion of existing interconnected cells causing an increasing volume of the intercellular space, rather than by cell division. These findings lead to the discussion of the pomelo peel as an inspiration for fibre-reinforced cast metallic foams with the capacity for excellent energy dissipation.

  2. The impact damped harmonic oscillator in free decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; North, C. M.

    1987-01-01

    The impact-damped oscillator in free decay is studied by using time history solutions. A large range of oscillator amplitude is covered. The amount of damping is correlated with the behavior of the impacting mass. There are three behavior regimes: (1) a low amplitude range with less than one impact per cycle and very low damping, (2) a useful middle amplitude range with a finite number of impacts per cycle, and (3) a high amplitude range with an infinite number of impacts per cycle and progressively decreasing damping. For light damping the impact damping in the middle range is: (1) proportional to impactor mass, (2) additive to proportional damping, (3) a unique function of vibration amplitude, (4) proportional to 1-epsilon, where epsilon is the coefficient of restitution, and (5) very roughly inversely proportional to amplitude. The system exhibits jump phenomena and period doublings. An impactor with 2 percent of the oscillator's mass can produce a loss factor near 0.1.

  3. Simplified Model of Nonlinear Landau Damping

    SciTech Connect

    N. A. Yampolsky and N. J. Fisch

    2009-07-16

    The nonlinear interaction of a plasma wave with resonant electrons results in a plateau in the electron distribution function close to the phase velocity of the plasma wave. As a result, Landau damping of the plasma wave vanishes and the resonant frequency of the plasma wave downshifts. However, this simple picture is invalid when the external driving force changes the plasma wave fast enough so that the plateau cannot be fully developed. A new model to describe amplification of the plasma wave including the saturation of Landau damping and the nonlinear frequency shift is proposed. The proposed model takes into account the change of the plasma wave amplitude and describes saturation of the Landau damping rate in terms of a single fluid equation, which simplifies the description of the inherently kinetic nature of Landau damping. A proposed fluid model, incorporating these simplifications, is verified numerically using a kinetic Vlasov code.

  4. Electrorheologically damped impact system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardt, Lee R.

    1991-05-01

    An impact switch is described having a housing containing a rigid coaxial conductor entering one end. An inner cylindrical contact extends axially inward from and beyond the in housing end of an outer tubular contact which has a spiral spring extending axially from within a recess therein. The free end of the spring supports a mass spaced from the end of the inner contact. The contacts, spring and mass are enclosed within a flexible shroud spaced from the inner wall of the housing. The space between the shroud and housing contains an electrorheological fluid, the viscosity of which is a function of the voltage supplied by two electrodes extending through the housing and into the fluid. The voltage controlled viscosity permits control of damping of the shroud, mass, and spring movements in response to impact caused switch deceleration and control of time for switch closure and fuze delay by means of mass contact with the inner cylindrical contact, or spring contact with the outer tubular contact.

  5. Excitation and Damping of Low-Degree Solar p-Modes during Activity Cycle 23: Analysis of GOLF and VIRGO Sun Photometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Reyes, S. J.; García, R. A.; Jiménez, A.; Chaplin, W. J.

    2003-09-01

    We have used observations made by the Global Oscillations at Low Frequency (GOLF) and the Variability of Irradiance and Gravity Oscillations Sun Photometer (VIRGO/SPM) instruments on board the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory satellite to study variations in the excitation and damping of low angular degree (low-l) solar p-modes on the rising phase of activity cycle 23. Our analysis includes a correction procedure that for the first time allows GOLF data to be ``treated'' as a single homogeneous set, thereby compensating for the change of operational configuration partway through the mission. Over the range 2.5<=ν<=3.5mHz, we uncover an increase in damping and decrease in mode power that is consistent with previous findings. Furthermore, an excellent level of agreement is found between the variations extracted from the GOLF and VIRGO/SPM data. We find no net long-term changes to the modal energy supply rate. However, an analysis of the residuals uncovers the presence of a quasi-periodic signature of period ~1.5 yr (most pronounced for SPM). While it is true that several workers claim to have uncovered similar periodicities in other phenomena related to the near-surface layers of the Sun here, we are at present more inclined to attribute our finding to an artifact of the mode-fitting procedure. We also uncover a significant change in the asymmetry of mode peaks in the GOLF data, as found in previous studies of much longer data sets. These assumed that the dominant contribution to this arose from the switch in operating configuration partway through the mission (which altered the depth in the solar atmosphere sampled by the instrument). However, our preliminary analysis of data collected over the 100 day period beginning 2002 November 19-when the instrument switched back to its original configuration-suggests that this change may have a solar cycle component.

  6. DAMP production by human islets under low oxygen and nutrients in the presence or absence of an immunoisolating-capsule and necrostatin-1

    PubMed Central

    Paredes-Juarez, Genaro A.; Sahasrabudhe, Neha M.; Tjoelker, Reina S.; de Haan, Bart J.; Engelse, Marten A.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In between the period of transplantation and revascularization, pancreatic islets are exposed to low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions. In the present study we mimicked those conditions in vitro to study the involvement of different cell death processes, release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMP), and associated in vitro immune activation. Under low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions, apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis occur in human islets. Necroptosis is responsible for DAMP-release such as dsDNA, uric acid, and HMGB1. The sensors of the innate immune system able to recognize these DAMPs are mainly TLR, NOD receptors, and C-type lectins. By using cell-lines with a non-functional adaptor molecule MyD88, we were able to show that the islet-derived DAMPs signal mainly via TLR. Immunoisolation in immunoprotective membranes reduced DAMP release and immune activation via retention of the relative large DAMPs in the capsules. Another effective strategy was suppressing necroptosis using the inhibitor nec-1. Although the effect on cell-survival was minor, nec-1 was able to reduce the release of HMGB1 and its associated immune activation. Our data demonstrate that in the immediate post-transplant period islets release DAMPs that in vitro enhance responses of innate immune cells. DAMP release can be reduced in vitro by immunoisolation or intervention with nec-1. PMID:26419792

  7. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  8. Acoustic transducer with damping means

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.; Adamson, Gerald E.

    1976-11-02

    An ultrasonic transducer specifically suited to high temperature sodium applications is described. A piezoelectric active element is joined to the transducer faceplate by coating the faceplate and juxtaposed active element face with wetting agents specifically compatible with the bonding procedure employed to achieve the joint. The opposite face of the active element is fitted with a backing member designed to assure continued electrical continuity during adverse operating conditions which can result in the fracturing of the active element. The fit is achieved employing a spring-loaded electrode operably arranged to electrically couple the internal transducer components, enclosed in a hermetically sealed housing, to accessory components normally employed in transducer applications. Two alternative backing members are taught for assuring electrical continuity. The first employs a resilient, discrete multipoint contact electrode in electrical communication with the active element face. The second employs a resilient, elastomeric, electrically conductive, damped member in electrical communication with the active element face in a manner to effect ring-down of the transducer. Each embodiment provides continued electrical continuity within the transducer in the event the active element fractures, while the second provides the added benefit of damping.

  9. Four-Component Damped Density Functional Response Theory Study of UV/Vis Absorption Spectra and Phosphorescence Parameters of Group 12 Metal-Substituted Porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Saue, Trond; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    The influences of group 12 (Zn, Cd, Hg) metal-substitution on the valence spectra and phosphorescence parameters of porphyrins (P) have been investigated in a relativistic setting. In order to obtain valence spectra, this study reports the first application of the damped linear response function, or complex polarization propagator, in the four-component density functional theory framework [as formulated in Villaume et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2010 , 133 , 064105 ]. It is shown that the steep increase in the density of states as due to the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling yields only minor changes in overall computational costs involved with the solution of the set of linear response equations. Comparing single-frequency to multifrequency spectral calculations, it is noted that the number of iterations in the iterative linear equation solver per frequency grid-point decreases monotonously from 30 to 0.74 as the number of frequency points goes from one to 19. The main heavy-atom effect on the UV/vis-absorption spectra is indirect and attributed to the change of point group symmetry due to metal-substitution, and it is noted that substitutions using heavier atoms yield small red-shifts of the intense Soret-band. Concerning phosphorescence parameters, the adoption of a four-component relativistic setting enables the calculation of such properties at a linear order of response theory, and any higher-order response functions do not need to be considered-a real, conventional, form of linear response theory has been used for the calculation of these parameters. For the substituted porphyrins, electronic coupling between the lowest triplet states is strong and results in theoretical estimates of lifetimes that are sensitive to the wave function and electron density parametrization. With this in mind, we report our best estimates of the phosphorescence lifetimes to be 460, 13.8, 11.2, and 0.00155 s for H2P, ZnP, CdP, and HgP, respectively, with the corresponding transition

  10. Damping in Space Constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vreugd, Jan; de Lange, Dorus; Winters, Jasper; Human, Jet; Kamphues, Fred; Tabak, Erik

    2014-06-01

    Monolithic structures are often used in optomechanical designs for space applications to achieve high dimensional stability and to prevent possible backlash and friction phenomena. The capacity of monolithic structures to dissipate mechanical energy is however limited due to the high Q-factor, which might result in high stresses during dynamic launch loads like random vibration, sine sweeps and shock. To reduce the Q-factor in space applications, the effect of constrained layer damping (CLD) is investigated in this work. To predict the damping increase, the CLD effect is implemented locally at the supporting struts in an existing FE model of an optical instrument. Numerical simulations show that the effect of local damping treatment in this instrument could reduce the vibrational stresses with 30-50%. Validation experiments on a simple structure showed good agreement between measured and predicted damping properties. This paper presents material characterization, material modeling, numerical implementation of damping models in finite element code, numerical results on space hardware and the results of validation experiments.

  11. Non-Linear Slosh Damping Model Development and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Propellant tank slosh dynamics are typically represented by a mechanical model of spring mass damper. This mechanical model is then included in the equation of motion of the entire vehicle for Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) analysis. For a partially-filled smooth wall propellant tank, the critical damping based on classical empirical correlation is as low as 0.05%. Due to this low value of damping, propellant slosh is potential sources of disturbance critical to the stability of launch and space vehicles. It is postulated that the commonly quoted slosh damping is valid only under the linear regime where the slosh amplitude is small. With the increase of slosh amplitude, the critical damping value should also increase. If this nonlinearity can be verified and validated, the slosh stability margin can be significantly improved, and the level of conservatism maintained in the GN&C analysis can be lessened. The purpose of this study is to explore and to quantify the dependence of slosh damping with slosh amplitude. Accurately predicting the extremely low damping value of a smooth wall tank is very challenging for any Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool. One must resolve thin boundary layers near the wall and limit numerical damping to minimum. This computational study demonstrates that with proper grid resolution, CFD can indeed accurately predict the low damping physics from smooth walls under the linear regime. Comparisons of extracted damping values with experimental data for different tank sizes show very good agreements. Numerical simulations confirm that slosh damping is indeed a function of slosh amplitude. When slosh amplitude is low, the damping ratio is essentially constant, which is consistent with the empirical correlation. Once the amplitude reaches a critical value, the damping ratio becomes a linearly increasing function of the slosh amplitude. A follow-on experiment validated the developed nonlinear damping relationship. This discovery can

  12. Circulating Mitochondrial DAMPs Cause Inflammatory Responses to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qin; Raoof, Mustafa; Chen, Yu; Sumi, Yuka; Sursal, Tolga; Junger, Wolfgang; Brohi, Karim; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Hauser, Carl J.

    2009-01-01

    Injury causes a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) clinically much like sepsis 1. Microbial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) activate innate immunocytes through pattern recognition receptors 2. Similarly, cellular injury can release endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that activate innate immunity 3. Mitochondria are evolutionary endosymbionts that were derived from bacteria 4 and so might bear bacterial molecular motifs. We show here that injury releases mitochondrial DAMPs (MTD) into the circulation with functionally important immune consequences. MTD include formyl peptides and mitochondrial DNA. These activate human neutrophils (PMN) through formyl peptide receptor-1 and TLR9 respectively. MTD promote PMN Ca2+ flux and phosphorylation of MAP kinases, thus leading to PMN migration and degranulation in vitro and in vivo. Circulating MTD can elicit neutrophil-mediated organ injury. Cellular disruption by trauma releases mitochondrial DAMPs with evolutionarily conserved similarities to bacterial PAMPs into the circulation. These can then signal through identical innate immune pathways to create a sepsis-like state. The release of such mitochondrial ‘enemies within’ by cellular injury is a key link between trauma, inflammation and SIRS. PMID:20203610

  13. Damped flexible seal

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, Neil J.; Amaral, Antonio M.

    1992-10-27

    A damped flexible seal assembly for a torpedo isolates the tailcone thereof rom vibrational energy present in the drive shaft assembly. A pair of outside flanges, each of which include an inwardly facing groove and an O-ring constrained therein, provide a watertight seal against the outer non-rotating surface of the drive shaft assembly. An inside flange includes an outwardly-facing groove and an O-ring constrained therein, and provides a watertight seal against the inner surface of the tail cone. Two cast-in-place elastomeric seals provide a watertight seal between the flanges and further provide a damping barrier between the outside flanges and the inside flanges for damping vibrational energy present in the drive shaft assembly before the energy can reach the tailcone through the seal assembly.

  14. Research on damping properties optimization of variable-stiffness plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-kai, QI; Xian-tao, YIN; Cheng, SHEN

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates damping optimization design of variable-stiffness composite laminated plate, which means fibre paths can be continuously curved and fibre angles are distinct for different regions. First, damping prediction model is developed based on modal dissipative energy principle and verified by comparing with modal testing results. Then, instead of fibre angles, the element stiffness and damping matrixes are translated to be design variables on the basis of novel Discrete Material Optimization (DMO) formulation, thus reducing the computation time greatly. Finally, the modal damping capacity of arbitrary order is optimized using MMA (Method of Moving Asymptotes) method. Meanwhile, mode tracking technique is employed to investigate the variation of modal shape. The convergent performance of interpolation function, first order specific damping capacity (SDC) optimization results and variation of modal shape in different penalty factor are discussed. The results show that the damping properties of the variable-stiffness plate can be increased by 50%-70% after optimization.

  15. Intelligent damping layer under a plate subjected to a pair of masses moving in opposite directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajer, Czesław; Pisarski, Dominik; Szmidt, Tomasz; Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej

    2017-04-01

    Reducing displacements of a plate vibrating under a pair of masses traveling in opposite directions can be improved by adding a smart subsoil instead of a classical damping layer. We propose a material that acts according to the instantaneous state of the plate, i.e., its displacements and velocity. Such an intelligent damping layer reduces vertical displacements even by 40%-60%, depending on the type of load and the assumed objective function. Existing materials enable the application of the proposed layer in a semi-active mode. The passive mode can be applied with materials exhibiting direction-dependent viscosity.

  16. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  17. Radiation damping on cryoprobes.

    PubMed

    Shishmarev, Dmitry; Otting, Gottfried

    2011-12-01

    Radiation damping on 600 and 800 MHz cryoprobes was investigated. The phase angle β between a vector 90° phase shifted to the precessing magnetization and the rf field induced in the coil was found to depend markedly on whether an FID was being acquired or not. The magnitude of the radiation damping field was sufficiently strong to restore 95% of the equilibrium water magnetization of a 90% H2O sample in a 5 mm sample tube within about 5 ms following a 165° pulse. This can be exploited in water flip-back versions of NOESY and TOCSY experiments of proteins, but care must be taken to limit the effect of the radiation damping field from the water on the Ha protons. Long water-selective pulses can be applied only following corrections. We developed a program for correcting pulse shapes if β is non-zero. The WATERGATE scheme is shown to be insensitive to imperfections introduced by radiation damping.

  18. Enhanced damping for bridge cables using a self-sensing MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. H.; Lam, K. H.; Ni, Y. Q.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates enhanced damping for protecting bridge stay cables from excessive vibration using a newly developed self-sensing magnetorheological (MR) damper. The semi-active control strategy for effectively operating the self-sensing MR damper is formulated based on the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control by further considering a collocated control configuration, limited measurements and nonlinear damper dynamics. Due to its attractive feature of sensing-while-damping, the self-sensing MR damper facilitates the collocated control. On the other hand, only the sensor measurements from the self-sensing device are employed in the feedback control. The nonlinear dynamics of the self-sensing MR damper, represented by a validated Bayesian NARX network technique, are further accommodated in the control formulation to compensate for its nonlinearities. Numerical and experimental investigations are conducted on stay cables equipped with the self-sensing MR damper operated in passive and semi-active control modes. The results verify that the collocated self-sensing MR damper facilitates smart damping for inclined cables employing energy-dissipative LQG control with only force and displacement measurements at the damper. It is also demonstrated that the synthesis of nonlinear damper dynamics in the LQG control enhances damping force tracking efficiently, explores the features of the self-sensing MR damper, and achieves better control performance over the passive MR damping control and the Heaviside step function-based LQG control that ignores the damper dynamics.

  19. Macrophage Biochemistry, Activation and Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    glucoeidase +8 . . Sulfatase c +8 Modified from Morahan, 1980. b(+)Exhibit@ activity; (-) lacks activity; (+) weak or marginal activity. ’References: (1...endoplasmic reticulum enzymes, sulfatase c and alkaline a-glucosidase. Dissociation of the lysosomal enzyme patterns from sulfatase c and alkaline r...1974; Beaufay et al., 1974). Peritoneal macrophages are deficient or contain inauf- • -𔃼 :’- 41 ficient quantities of the classical constituents to be

  20. Spatial damping identification in the frequency domain-A theoretical and experimental comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumat, Matija; Slavič, Janko; Boltežar, Miha

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with spatial damping identification methods. In contrast to the commonly used damping methods (modal, proportional) the spatial damping information improves structural models with a known location of the damping sources. The Lee-Kim, Chen-Ju-Tsuei, Fritzen IV and local equation of motion methods were theoretically and experimentally compared. Experimentally, the spatial damping identification was tested against: modal and spatial incompleteness, differences in viscous and hysteretic damping models, the performance of identification methods and the effect of damping treatments. It was found that for a structure with a known equation of motion (beam, plate) the local equation of motion method is more efficient and gives a more precise location of the damping. Full frequency response function (FRF) matrix methods can also identify the spatial damping, but are more demanding because the numerical and measurement effort increases with n2, where n is the number of measurement points and, consequently, the size of the FRF matrix.

  1. Damping and spectral formation of upstream whistlers

    SciTech Connect

    Orlowski, D.S.; Russell, C.T.; Krauss-Varban, D.

    1995-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that damping rates of upstream whistlers strongly depend on the details of the electron distribution function. Moreover, detailed analysis of Doppler shift and the whistler dispersion relation indicate that upstream whistlers propagate obliquely in a finite band of frequencies. In this paper we present results of a kinetic calculation of damping lengths of wideband whistlers using the sum of seven drifting bi-Maxwellian electron distributions as a best fit to the ISEE 1 electron data. For two cases, when upstream whistlers are observed, convective damping lengths derived from ISEE magnetic field and ephemeris data are compared with theoretical results. We find that the calculated convective damping lengths are consistent with the data and that upstream whistlers remain marginally stable. We also show that the slope of plasma frame spectra of upstream whistlers, obtained by direct fitting of the observed spectra, is between 5 and 7. The overall spectral, wave, and particle characteristics, proximity to the shock, as well as propagation and damping properties indicated that these waves cannot be generated locally. Instead, the observed upstream whistlers arise in the shock ramp, most likely by a variety of cross-field drift and/or anisotropy driven instabilities. 57 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Multimorbidity, cognitive function, and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D

    2016-02-01

    Previous research demonstrates that both physical activity and multimorbidity are associated with cognitive function. However, the extent to which physical activity may moderate the relationship between multimorbidity and cognitive function has not been thoroughly evaluated. Data from the 1999-2002 NHANES were used (60+ years; N = 2157). A multimorbidity index variable was created based on physician diagnosis of a multitude of chronic diseases. Physical activity was self-reported and cognitive function was evaluated from the digit symbol substitution test. Multimorbidity was inversely associated with cognitive function for the unadjusted and adjusted models. However, generally, multimorbidity was no longer associated with cognitive function for the majority of older adults who achieved the minimum recommended physical activity level (≥2000 MET-min-month), as issued by the United States Department of Health and Human Services. In this national sample of older adults, there was some evidence to suggest that physical activity moderates the relationship between multimorbidity and cognitive function.

  3. Inflammatory and fibrotic responses of cardiac fibroblasts to myocardial damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs).

    PubMed

    Turner, Neil A

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts (CF) are well-established as key regulators of extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover in the context of myocardial remodelling and fibrosis. Recently, this cell type has also been shown to act as a sensor of myocardial damage by detecting and responding to damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) upregulated with cardiac injury. CF express a range of innate immunity pattern recognition receptors (TLRs, NLRs, IL-1R1, RAGE) that are stimulated by a host of different DAMPs that are evident in the injured or remodelling myocardium. These include intracellular molecules released by necrotic cells (heat shock proteins, high mobility group box 1 protein, S100 proteins), proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1α), specific ECM molecules up-regulated in response to tissue injury (fibronectin-EDA, tenascin-C) or molecules modified by a pathological environment (advanced glycation end product-modified proteins observed with diabetes). DAMP receptor activation on fibroblasts is coupled to altered cellular function including changes in proliferation, migration, myofibroblast transdifferentiation, ECM turnover and production of fibrotic and inflammatory paracrine factors, which directly impact on the heart's ability to respond to injury. This review gives an overview of the important role played by CF in responding to myocardial DAMPs and how the DAMP/CF axis could be exploited experimentally and therapeutically.

  4. The role of DAMPS in ALA-PDT for skin squamous cell carcinoma (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Xiaojie; Ji, Jie; Zhang, Haiyan; Shi, Lei

    2016-03-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) is an established local approach for skin squamous cell carcinoma. It is believed that dangerous signals damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) play an important role in ALA-PDT. In this study, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo expressions of major DAMPs, calreticulin (CRT), heat shock proteins 70 (HSP70), and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), induced by ALA-PDT using immunohistochemistry, western blot, and ELISA in a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) mouse model. The role of DAMPs in the maturation of DCs potentiated by ALA-PDT-treated tumor cells was detected by FACS and ELISA. Our results showed that ALA-PDT enhanced the expression of CRT, HSP70, and HMGB1. These induced DAMPs played an important role in activating DCs by PDT-treated tumor cells, including phenotypic maturation (upregulation of surface expression of MHC-II, CD80, and CD86) and functional maturation (enhanced capability to secrete IFN-γ and IL-12). Furthermore, injecting ALA-PDT-treated tumor cells into naïve mice resulted in complete protection against cancer cells of the same origin. Our findings indicate that ALA-PDT can upregulate DAMPs and enhance tumor immunogenicity, providing a promising strategy for inducing a systemic anticancer immune response.

  5. Cobalt Alloy Implant Debris Induces Inflammation and Bone Loss Primarily through Danger Signaling, Not TLR4 Activation: Implications for DAMP-ening Implant Related Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Samelko, Lauryn; Landgraeber, Stefan; McAllister, Kyron; Jacobs, Joshua; Hallab, Nadim James

    2016-01-01

    Cobalt alloy debris has been implicated as causative in the early failure of some designs of current total joint implants. The ability of implant debris to cause excessive inflammation via danger signaling (NLRP3 inflammasome) vs. pathogen associated pattern recognition receptors (e.g. Toll-like receptors; TLRs) remains controversial. Recently, specific non-conserved histidines on human TLR4 have been shown activated by cobalt and nickel ions in solution. However, whether this TLR activation is directly or indirectly an effect of metals or secondary endogenous alarmins (danger-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs) elicited by danger signaling, remains unknown and contentious. Our study indicates that in both a human macrophage cell line (THP-1) and primary human macrophages, as well as an in vivo murine model of inflammatory osteolysis, that Cobalt-alloy particle induced NLRP3 inflammasome danger signaling inflammatory responses were highly dominant relative to TLR4 activation, as measured respectively by IL-1β or TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, tissue histology and quantitative bone loss measurement. Despite the lack of metal binding histidines H456 and H458 in murine TLR4, murine calvaria challenge with Cobalt alloy particles induced significant macrophage driven in vivo inflammation and bone loss inflammatory osteolysis, whereas LPS calvaria challenge alone did not. Additionally, no significant increase (p<0.05) in inflammation and inflammatory bone loss by LPS co-challenge with Cobalt vs. Cobalt alone was evident, even at high levels of LPS (i.e. levels commiserate with hematogenous levels in fatal sepsis, >500pg/mL). Therefore, not only do the results of this investigation support Cobalt alloy danger signaling induced inflammation, but under normal homeostasis low levels of hematogenous PAMPs (<2pg/mL) from Gram-negative bacteria, seem to have negligible contribution to the danger signaling responses elicited by Cobalt alloy metal implant debris. This suggests the

  6. Inertia-Wheel Vibration-Damping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromechanical system would damp vibrations in large, flexible structure. In active vibration-damping system motors and reaction wheels at tips of appendages apply reaction torques in response to signals from accelerometers. Velocity signal for vibrations about one axis processes into control signal to oppose each of n vibrational modes. Various modes suppressed one at a time. Intended primarily for use in spacecraft that has large, flexible solar panels and science-instrument truss assembly, embodies principle of control interesting in its own right and adaptable to terrestrial structures, vehicles, and instrument platforms.

  7. Delay of Transition Using Forced Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, Reginald J.

    2014-01-01

    Several experiments which have reported a delay of transition are analyzed in terms of the frequencies of the induced disturbances generated by different flow control elements. Two of the experiments employed passive stabilizers in the boundary layer, one leading-edge bluntness, and one employed an active spark discharge in the boundary layer. It is found that the frequencies generated by the various elements lie in the damping region of the associated stability curve. It is concluded that the creation of strong disturbances in the damping region stabilizes the boundary-layer and delays the transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  8. A Physical Molecular Mechanics Method for Damped Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pragya; Wang, Bo; Fernandez, Laura E; Truhlar, Donald G

    2017-03-22

    Damped dispersion can be a significant component of the interaction energy in many physical and chemical processes, for example, physisorption and noncovalent complexation. For physically interpreting and modeling such processes, it is convenient to have an analytic method to calculate damped dispersion that is readily applicable across the entire periodic table. Of the available methods to calculate damped dispersion energy for interacting systems with overlapping charge distributions, we select symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) as providing a reasonable definition, and of the possible analytic forms, we choose the D3(BJ) method. However, the available parameterizations of D3(BJ) include not only damped dispersion energy but also corrections for errors in specific exchange-correlation functionals. Here we present a parameterization that provides a physical measure of damped dispersion without such density functional corrections. The method generalizes an earlier method of Pernal and coworkers to all elements from hydrogen to plutonium.

  9. Damping of Electron Density Structures and Implications for Interstellar Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Terry, P. W.

    2011-04-01

    The forms of electron density structures in kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) turbulence are studied in connection with scintillation. The focus is on small scales L ~ 108-1010 cm where the KAW regime is active in the interstellar medium, principally within turbulent H II regions. Scales at 10 times the ion gyroradius and smaller are inferred to dominate scintillation in the theory of Boldyrev et al. From numerical solutions of a decaying KAW turbulence model, structure morphology reveals two types of localized structures, filaments and sheets, and shows that they arise in different regimes of resistive and diffusive damping. Minimal resistive damping yields localized current filaments that form out of Gaussian-distributed initial conditions. When resistive damping is large relative to diffusive damping, sheet-like structures form. In the filamentary regime, each filament is associated with a non-localized magnetic and density structure, circularly symmetric in cross section. Density and magnetic fields have Gaussian statistics (as inferred from Gaussian-valued kurtosis) while density gradients are strongly non-Gaussian, more so than current. This enhancement of non-Gaussian statistics in a derivative field is expected since gradient operations enhance small-scale fluctuations. The enhancement of density gradient kurtosis over current kurtosis is not obvious, yet it suggests that modest density fluctuations may yield large scintillation events during pulsar signal propagation. In the sheet regime the same statistical observations hold, despite the absence of localized filamentary structures. Probability density functions are constructed from statistical ensembles in both regimes, showing clear formation of long, highly non-Gaussian tails.

  10. Vibrational modes and damping in the cochlear partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    It has been assumed in models of cochlear mechanics that the primary role of the cochlear active process is to counteract the damping of the basilar membrane, the vibration of which is much larger in a living animal than post mortem. Recent measurements of the relative motion between the reticular lamina and basilar membrane imply that this assumption is incorrect. We propose that damping is distributed throughout the cochlear partition rather than being concentrated in the basilar membrane. In the absence of significant damping, the cochlear partition possesses three modes of vibration, each associated with its own locus of Hopf bifurcations. Hair-cell activity can amplify any of these modes if the system's operating point lies near the corresponding bifurcation. The distribution of damping determines which mode of vibration predominates. For physiological levels of damping, only one mode produces a vibration pattern consistent with experimental measurements of relative motion and basilar-membrane motion.

  11. Torsional and axial damping properties of the AZ31B-F magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anes, V.; Lage, Y. E.; Vieira, M.; Maia, N. M. M.; Freitas, M.; Reis, L.

    2016-10-01

    Damping properties for the AZ31B-F magnesium alloy were evaluated for pure axial and pure shear loading conditions at room temperature. Hysteretic damping results were measured through stress-strain controlled tests. Moreover, the magnesium alloy viscous damping was measured with frequency response functions and free vibration decay, both results were obtained by experiments. The axial and shear damping ratio (ASDR) has been identified and described, specifically for free vibration conditions.

  12. Translational damping on high-frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Perry A.

    Flapping fliers such as insects and birds depend on passive translational and rotational damping to terminate quick maneuvers and to provide a source of partial stability in an otherwise unstable dynamic system. Additionally, passive translational and rotational damping reduce the amount of active kinematic changes that must be made to terminate maneuvers and maintain stability. The study of flapping-induced damping phenomena also improves the understanding of micro air vehicle (MAV) dynamics needed for the synthesis of effective flight control strategies. Aerodynamic processes which create passive translational and rotational damping as a direct result of symmetric flapping with no active changes in wing kinematics have been previously studied and were termed flapping counter-force (FCF) and flapping counter-torque (FCT), respectively. In this first study of FCF measurement in air, FCF generation is measured using a pendulum system designed to isolate and measure the relationship of translational flapping-induced damping with wingbeat frequency for a 2.86 gram mechanical flapper equipped with real cicada wings. Analysis reveals that FCF generation and wingbeat frequency are directly proportional, as expected from previous work. The quasi-steady FCF model using Blade-Element-Theory is used as an estimate for translational flapping-induced damping. In most cases, the model proves to be accurate in predicting the relationship between flapping-induced damping and wingbeat frequency. "Forward-backward" motion proves to have the strongest flapping-induced damping while "up-down" motion has the weakest.

  13. On damping mechanisms in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Inman, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    A partial differential equation model of a cantilevered beam with a tip mass at its free end is used to study damping in a composite. Four separate damping mechanisms consisting of air damping, strain rate damping, spatial hysteresis and time hysteresis are considered experimentally. Dynamic tests were performed to produce time histories. The time history data is then used along with an approximate model to form a sequence of least squares problems. The solution of the least squares problem yields the estimated damping coefficients. The resulting experimentally determined analytical model is compared with the time histories via numerical simulation of the dynamic response. The procedure suggested here is compared with a standard modal damping ratio model commonly used in experimental modal analysis.

  14. On damping mechanisms in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Inman, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    A partial differential equation model of a cantilevered beam with a tip mass at its free end is used to study damping in a composite. Four separate damping mechanisms consisting of air damping, strain rate damping, spatial hysteresis and time hysteresis are considered experimentally. Dynamic tests were performed to produce time histories. The time history data is then used along with an approximate model to form a sequence of least squares problems. The solution of the least squares problem yields the estimated damping coefficients. The resulting experimentally determined analytical model is compared with the time histories via numerical simulation of the dynamic response. The procedure suggested here is compared with a standard modal damping ratio model commonly used in experimental modal analysis.

  15. Magnetically Damped Furnace (MDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Magnetically Damped Furnace (MDF) breadboard is being developed in response to NASA's mission and goals to advance the scientific knowledge of microgravity research, materials science, and related technologies. The objective of the MDF is to dampen the fluid flows due to density gradients and surface tension gradients in conductive melts by introducing a magnetic field during the sample processing. The MDF breadboard will serve as a proof of concept that the MDF performance requirements can be attained within the International Space Station resource constraints.

  16. The Joint Damping Experiment (JDX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkman, Steven L.; Bingham, Jeff G.; Crookston, Jess R.; Dutson, Joseph D.; Ferney, Brook D.; Ferney, Greg D.; Rowsell, Edwin A.

    1997-01-01

    The Joint Damping Experiment (JDX), flown on the Shuttle STS-69 Mission, is designed to measure the influence of gravity on the structural damping of a high precision three bay truss. Principal objectives are: (1) Measure vibration damping of a small-scale, pinjointed truss to determine how pin gaps give rise to gravity-dependent damping rates; (2) Evaluate the applicability of ground and low-g aircraft tests for predicting on-orbit behavior; and (3) Evaluate the ability of current nonlinear finite element codes to model the dynamic behavior of the truss. Damping of the truss was inferred from 'Twang' tests that involve plucking the truss structure and recording the decay of the oscillations. Results are summarized as follows. (1) Damping, rates can change by a factor of 3 to 8 through changing the truss orientation; (2) The addition of a few pinned joints to a truss structure can increase the damping by a factor as high as 30; (3) Damping is amplitude dependent; (4) As gravity induced preloads become large (truss long axis perpendicular to gravity vector) the damping is similar to non-pinjointed truss; (5) Impacting in joints drives higher modes in structure; (6) The torsion mode disappears if gravity induced preloads are low.

  17. Metallic adhesion layer induced plasmon damping and molecular linker as a nondamping alternative.

    PubMed

    Habteyes, Terefe G; Dhuey, Scott; Wood, Erin; Gargas, Daniel; Cabrini, Stefano; Schuck, P James; Alivisatos, A Paul; Leone, Stephen R

    2012-06-26

    Drastic chemical interface plasmon damping is induced by the ultrathin (∼2 nm) titanium (Ti) adhesion layer; alternatively, molecular adhesion is implemented for lithographic fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures without significant distortion of the plasmonic characteristics. As determined from the homogeneous linewidth of the resonance scattering spectrum of individual gold nanorods, an ultrathin Ti layer reduces the plasmon dephasing time significantly, and it reduces the plasmon scattering amplitude drastically. The increased damping rate and decreased plasmon amplitude are due to the dissipative dielectric function of Ti and the chemical interface plasmon damping where the conduction electrons are transferred across the metal-metal interface. In addition, a pronounced red shift due to the Ti adhesion layer, more than predicted using electromagnetic simulation, suggests the prevalence of interfacial reactions. By extending the experiment to conductively coupled ring-rod nanostructures, it is shown that a sharp Fano-like resonance feature is smeared out due to the Ti layer. Alternatively, vapor deposition of (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane on gently cleaned and activated lithographic patterns functionalizes the glass surface sufficiently to link the gold nanostructures to the surface by sulfur-gold chemical bonds without observable plasmon damping effects.

  18. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  19. Surge-damping vacuum valve

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jack C.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve having a mechanism for damping out flow surges in a vacuum system which utilizes a slotted spring-loaded disk positioned adjacent the valve's vacuum port. Under flow surge conditions, the differential pressure forces the disk into sealing engagement with the vacuum port, thereby restricting the flow path to the slots in the disk damping out the flow surge.

  20. Experimental Observations on Material Damping at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Chia-Yen; Levine, Marie; Shido, Lillian; Leland, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a unique experimental facility designed to measure damping of materials at cryogenic temperatures for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The test facility removes other sources of damping in the measurement by avoiding frictional interfaces, decoupling the test specimen from the support system, and by using a non-contacting measurement device. Damping data reported herein are obtained for materials (Aluminum, Aluminum/Terbium/Dysprosium, Titanium, Composites) vibrating in free-free bending modes with low strain levels (< 10(exp -6) ppm). The fundamental frequencies of material samples are ranged from 14 to 202 Hz. To provide the most beneficial data relevant to TPF-like precision optical space missions, the damping data are collected from room temperatures (around 293 K) to cryogenic temperatures (below 40 K) at unevenly-spaced intervals. More data points are collected over any region of interest. The test data shows a significant decrease in viscous damping at cryogenic temperatures. The cryogenic damping can be as low as 10(exp -4) %, but the amount of the damping decrease is a function of frequency and material. However, Titanium 15-3-3-3 shows a remarkable increase in damping at cryogenic temperatures. It demonstrates over one order of magnitude increase in damping in comparison to Aluminum 6061-T6. Given its other properties (e.g., good stiffness and low conductivity) this may prove itself to be a good candidate for the application on TPF. At room temperatures, the test data are correlated well with the damping predicted by the Zener theory. However, large discrepancies at cryogenic temperatures between the Zener theory and the test data are observed.

  1. Utilising HVDC to damp power oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Smed, T.; Andersson, G. . Dept. of Electric Power Systems)

    1993-04-01

    In this paper, damping of slow oscillations with active and reactive power modulation of HVDC-links is analyzed with the aim of gaining a physical insight into the problem. The analysis shows that active power modulation is efficient when applied to a short mass-scaled electrical distance from one of the swinging machines, and reactive power modulation is most efficient when there exists a well-defined power flow direction and the modulation is made at a point close to the electrical midpoint between the swinging machines. It is shown that the intuitively appealing feedback signals frequency and derivative of the voltage are appropriate for active and reactive power modulation, respectively. The impact of the constraints imposed by the HVDC equations are analyzed, and it is determined when the implicit reactive power modulation resulting from constant [gamma] control may be detrimental for the damping.

  2. Damping induced by ferrofluid seals in ironless loudspeaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, M.; Génevaux, J. M.; Dauchez, N.; Brouard, B.; Collas, P.; Mézière, H.

    2014-04-01

    Damping induced by ferrofluid seals in ironless loudspeakers is investigated in this paper. The magnetic field is steady but not spatially constant. A model to determine the viscous damping coefficient induced by the ferrofluid seal is derived. It is a function of geometrical parameters and local viscosity of the ferrofluid in which dependence from magnetic field, shear rate and frequency is accounted for. Comparison with experimental results shows a good agreement for the thinner seals. An overestimation of the damping is observed for higher volumes. This discrepancy comes from geometric irregularities of the magnet assembly made out of several tiles.

  3. Nonlinear damping and quasi-linear modelling.

    PubMed

    Elliott, S J; Ghandchi Tehrani, M; Langley, R S

    2015-09-28

    The mechanism of energy dissipation in mechanical systems is often nonlinear. Even though there may be other forms of nonlinearity in the dynamics, nonlinear damping is the dominant source of nonlinearity in a number of practical systems. The analysis of such systems is simplified by the fact that they show no jump or bifurcation behaviour, and indeed can often be well represented by an equivalent linear system, whose damping parameters depend on the form and amplitude of the excitation, in a 'quasi-linear' model. The diverse sources of nonlinear damping are first reviewed in this paper, before some example systems are analysed, initially for sinusoidal and then for random excitation. For simplicity, it is assumed that the system is stable and that the nonlinear damping force depends on the nth power of the velocity. For sinusoidal excitation, it is shown that the response is often also almost sinusoidal, and methods for calculating the amplitude are described based on the harmonic balance method, which is closely related to the describing function method used in control engineering. For random excitation, several methods of analysis are shown to be equivalent. In general, iterative methods need to be used to calculate the equivalent linear damper, since its value depends on the system's response, which itself depends on the value of the equivalent linear damper. The power dissipation of the equivalent linear damper, for both sinusoidal and random cases, matches that dissipated by the nonlinear damper, providing both a firm theoretical basis for this modelling approach and clear physical insight. Finally, practical examples of nonlinear damping are discussed: in microspeakers, vibration isolation, energy harvesting and the mechanical response of the cochlea.

  4. Turbine blade friction damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A lumped parameter method, implemented on a VAX 11/780 computer shows that the primary parameters affecting the performance of the friction damper of the first stage turbine of the SSME high pressure fuel pump are: the damper-blade coefficient of friction; the normal force applied to the friction interface; the amplitude of the periodic forcing function; the relative phase angle of the forcing functions for adjacent blades bridged by a damper (effectively, the engine order of the forcing function); and the amount of hysteretic damping that acts to limit the vibration amplitude of the blade in its resonance modes. The low order flexural resonance vibration modes of HPFTP blades without dampers, with production dampers, and with two types of lightweight experimental dampers were evaluated in high speed spin pit tests. Results agree with those of the analytical study in that blades fitted with production friction dampers experienced the airfoil-alone flexural resonance mode, while those without dampers or with lighter weight dampers did not. No blades fitted with dampers experienced the whole blade flexural resonance mode during high speed tests, while those without dampers did.

  5. Resistor-damped electromechanical lever blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, Lorenzo; Genequand, Pierre M.; Kjelberg, Ivar

    1998-06-01

    The paper presents an innovative technical solution which provides a combined damping and isolation interface with the appropriate transmissibility characteristics between a vibrating base and a sensitive payload, typically an optical terminal/telescope. The novelty of the solution is primarily found in the implementation of uncoupling and magnification of the incurred vibrations by means of flexures combined with the implementation of energy dissipation by means of a linear electro-magnetic actuator to constitute a passive integrated resistor-damped electromechanic lever block. By means of frictionless flexible lever systems, the amplitude of the payload vibrations is adapted to the optimal range of the actuator with a magnification by a factor ranging typically between 10 and 30. Passive viscous damping is obtained by simply short-circuiting the electro-magnetic motor and can be adapted by setting the impedance of the shorting connection. The desired stiffness is provided by the passive springs of the elastic motor suspension and by the stiffness of the lever flexure blades. The mobile mass of the motors also provide a reaction mass which, like damping and stiffness, is amplified by the square of the lever factor. A theoretical model of resistor-damped electromechanical lever blocks has been established. A particular property is it the good attenuation of excited vibrations only over a set frequency range. Above this range the interface properties rejoin the ones of a rigid connection. This performance makes this type of isolators particularly suitable for integration into multi-layer vibration control systems where sensitive equipment is protected by a mix of passive and active damping/isolation devices acting optimally at different frequency ranges. Experiments performed with a dummy load (80 Kg) representative of a satellite based optical terminal demonstrated the efficiency of the system in protecting the payload by passive damping for vibration excitations

  6. Landau damping of Langmuir twisted waves with kappa distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, Kashif Aman-ur-Rehman; Mahmood, Shahzad

    2015-11-15

    The kinetic theory of Landau damping of Langmuir twisted modes is investigated in the presence of orbital angular momentum of the helical (twisted) electric field in plasmas with kappa distributed electrons. The perturbed distribution function and helical electric field are considered to be decomposed by Laguerre-Gaussian mode function defined in cylindrical geometry. The Vlasov-Poisson equation is obtained and solved analytically to obtain the weak damping rates of the Langmuir twisted waves in a nonthermal plasma. The strong damping effects of the Langmuir twisted waves at wavelengths approaching Debye length are also obtained by using an exact numerical method and are illustrated graphically. The damping rates of the planar Langmuir waves are found to be larger than the twisted Langmuir waves in plasmas which shows opposite behavior as depicted in Fig. 3 by J. T. Mendoça [Phys. Plasmas 19, 112113 (2012)].

  7. SPATIAL DAMPING OF PROPAGATING KINK WAVES IN PROMINENCE THREADS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2011-01-10

    Transverse oscillations and propagating waves are frequently observed in threads of solar prominences/filaments and have been interpreted as kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. We investigate the spatial damping of propagating kink MHD waves in transversely nonuniform and partially ionized prominence threads. Resonant absorption and ion-neutral collisions (Cowling's diffusion) are the damping mechanisms taken into account. The dispersion relation of resonant kink waves in a partially ionized magnetic flux tube is numerically solved by considering prominence conditions. Analytical expressions of the wavelength and damping length as functions of the kink mode frequency are obtained in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. For typically reported periods of thread oscillations, resonant absorption is an efficient mechanism for the kink mode spatial damping, while ion-neutral collisions have a minor role. Cowling's diffusion dominates both the propagation and damping for periods much shorter than those observed. Resonant absorption may explain the observed spatial damping of kink waves in prominence threads. The transverse inhomogeneity length scale of the threads can be estimated by comparing the observed wavelengths and damping lengths with the theoretically predicted values. However, the ignorance of the form of the density profile in the transversely nonuniform layer introduces inaccuracies in the determination of the inhomogeneity length scale.

  8. Damping and energy dissipation in soft tissue vibrations during running.

    PubMed

    Khassetarash, Arash; Hassannejad, Reza; Enders, Hendrik; Ettefagh, Mir Mohammad

    2015-01-21

    It has been well accepted that the vibrations of soft tissue cannot be simulated by a single sinusoidal function. In fact, these vibrations are a combination of several vibration modes. In this study, these modes are extracted applying a recently developed method namely, partly ensemble empirical mode decomposition (PEEMD). Then, a methodology for estimating the damping properties and energy dissipation caused by damping for each mode is used. Applying this methodology on simulated signals demonstrates high accuracy. This methodology is applied to the acceleration signals of the gastrocnemius muscle during sprinting and the differences between the damping properties of different vibration modes were identified. The results were 1) the damping property of high-frequency mode was higher than that for low-frequency modes. 2) All identified modes were in under damped condition, therefore, the vibrations had an oscillatory nature. 3) The damping ratios of lower modes are about 100% increased compared to higher modes. 4) The energy dissipation occurred in lower modes were much more than that for higher mode; According to the power spectrum of the ground reaction force (GRF), which is the input force into the body, the recent finding supports the muscle tuning paradigm. It is suggested that the damping properties and energy dissipation can be used to distinguish between different running conditions (surface, fatigue, etc.).

  9. Atomistic Mechanisms for Viscoelastic Damping in Inorganic Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathan, Raghavan

    Viscoelasticity, a ubiquitous material property, can be tuned to engineer a wide range of fascinating applications such as mechanical dampers, artificial tissues, functional foams and optoelectronics, among others. Traditionally, soft matter such as polymers and polymer composites have been used extensively for viscoelastic damping applications, owing to the inherent viscous nature of interactions between polymer chains. Although this leads to good damping characteristics, the stiffness in these materials is low, which in turn leads to limitations. In this context, hard inorganic materials and composites are promising candidates for enhanced damping, owing to their large stiffness and, in some cases large loss modulus. Viscoelasticity in these materials has been relatively unexplored and atomistic mechanisms responsible for damping are not apparent. Therefore, the overarching goal of this work is to understand mechanisms for viscoelastic damping in various classes of inorganic composites and alloys at an atomistic level from molecular dynamics simulations. We show that oscillatory shear deformation serves as a powerful probe to explain mechanisms for exceptional damping in hitherto unexplored systems. The first class of inorganic materials consists of crystalline phases of a stiff inclusion in a soft matrix. The two crystals within the composite, namely the soft and a stiff phase, individually show a highly elastic behavior and a very small loss modulus. On the other hand, a composite with the two phases is seen to exhibit damping that is about 20 times larger than predicted theoretical bounds. The primary reason for the damping is due to large anharmonicity in phonon-phonon coupling, resulting from the composite microstructure. A concomitant effect is the distribution of shear strain, which is observed to be highly inhomogeneous and mostly concentrated in the soft phase. Interestingly, the shear frequency at which the damping is greatest is observed to scale with

  10. Self-Damping Sprung Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Self-damping sprung wheel provides shock-absorbing suspension for wheelchair, reducing user's discomfort when traversing rough terrain or obstacles. Pair of self-damping sprung wheels installed in place of conventional large rear wheels of standard wheelchair, which user operates in conventional manner. Rim deflects in vicinity of contact with ground or floor. Includes inner and outer hoops bending when obstacle encountered. Shear deformation of elastomeric hoop between them absorbs energy. Thus, three hoops act together as damping spring. Alternative version of wheel designed for bicycle.

  11. Bearing-Cartridge Damping Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggins, David G.; Scharrer, Joseph K.; Chen, Wei C.

    1991-01-01

    In proposed design for improved ball-bearing cartridge, damping seal in form of thin-layer fluid journal bearing incorporated into cartridge. Damping seal acts as auxiliary bearing, relieving bearing balls of significant portions of both static and dynamic bearing loads. Damping from seal reduces dynamic loads even further by reducing amplitude of vibrations in second vibrational mode of rotor, which mode occurs when rotor turning at nearly full operating speed. Intended for use in high-pressure-oxygen turbopump of Space Shuttle main engine, also applicable to other turbomachinery bearings.

  12. Design, analysis, and testing of high frequency passively damped struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yiu, Y. C.; Davis, L. Porter; Napolitano, Kevin; Ninneman, R. Rory

    1993-01-01

    Objectives of the research are: (1) to develop design requirements for damped struts to stabilize control system in the high frequency cross-over and spill-over range; (2) to design, fabricate and test viscously damped strut and viscoelastically damped strut; (3) to verify accuracy of design and analysis methodology of damped struts; and (4) to design and build test apparatus, and develop data reduction algorithm to measure strut complex stiffness. In order to meet the stringent performance requirements of the SPICE experiment, the active control system is used to suppress the dynamic responses of the low order structural modes. However, the control system also inadvertently drives some of the higher order modes unstable in the cross-over and spill-over frequency range. Passive damping is a reliable and effective way to provide damping to stabilize the control system. It also improves the robustness of the control system. Damping is designed into the SPICE testbed as an integral part of the control-structure technology.

  13. Opiates and cerebral functional activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Trusk, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral activity was measured using the free-fatty acid (1-/sup 14/C) octanoate as a fast functional tracer in conscious, unrestrained rats 5 minutes after intravenous injection of heroin, cocaine or saline vehicle. Regional changes of octanoate labeling density in the autoradiograms relative to saline-injected animals were used to determine the functional activity effects of each drug. Heroin and cocaine each produced a distinctive pattern of activity increases and suppression throughout the rat brain. Similar regional changes induced by both drugs were found in limbic brain regions implicated in drug reinforcement. Labeled octanoate autoradiography was used to measure the cerebral functional response to a tone that had previously been paired to heroin injections. Rats were trained in groups of three consisting of one heroin self-administration animal, and two animals receiving yoked infusion of heroin or saline. A tone was paired with each infusion during training. Behavioral experiments in similarly trained rats demonstrated that these training conditions impart secondary reinforcing properties to the tone in animals previously self-administering heroin, while the tone remains behaviorally neutral in yoked-infusion rats. Cerebral functional activity was measured during presentation of the tone without drug infusion. Octanoate labeling density changed in fifteen brain areas in response to the tone previously paired to heroin without response contingency. Labeling density was significantly modified in sixteen regions as a result of previously pairing the tone to response-contingent heroin infusions.

  14. Cerebral blood flow response to functional activation

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Olaf B; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rostrup, Egill; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Pelligrino, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate are normally coupled, that is an increase in metabolic demand will lead to an increase in flow. However, during functional activation, CBF and glucose metabolism remain coupled as they increase in proportion, whereas oxygen metabolism only increases to a minor degree—the so-called uncoupling of CBF and oxidative metabolism. Several studies have dealt with these issues, and theories have been forwarded regarding the underlying mechanisms. Some reports have speculated about the existence of a potentially deficient oxygen supply to the tissue most distant from the capillaries, whereas other studies point to a shift toward a higher degree of non-oxidative glucose consumption during activation. In this review, we argue that the key mechanism responsible for the regional CBF (rCBF) increase during functional activation is a tight coupling between rCBF and glucose metabolism. We assert that uncoupling of rCBF and oxidative metabolism is a consequence of a less pronounced increase in oxygen consumption. On the basis of earlier studies, we take into consideration the functional recruitment of capillaries and attempt to accommodate the cerebral tissue's increased demand for glucose supply during neural activation with recent evidence supporting a key function for astrocytes in rCBF regulation. PMID:19738630

  15. Functional activities of the amygdala: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Rasia-Filho, A A; Londero, R G; Achaval, M

    2000-01-01

    Research to date into the amygdala shows that it has an integrative role in behavioural, vegetative and endocrine activities of animals in their relation with their environment. Animal studies show that amygdala has a role in emotional response, integrating input signals and initiating activities related to them. Different nuclei seem to have different effects. A complete picture of the functional roles of the amygdala is unavailable, and it has been suggested that the amygdala is functionally and anatomically heterogeneous. Amygdaloid subnuclei appear to have a role in the modulation of fear, in memory and attention, and in some sexual and sex-related behaviour of rats. In humans, functional magnetic resonance imaging shows that the amygdala responds preferentially to emotionally charged stimuli. Bilateral amygdala damage in humans can compromise the recognition of fear in facial expressions, an important ability in social judgement. Future study of the amygdala promises to shed light on emotional disorders in humans. PMID:10721680

  16. Simple suppression of radiation damping.

    PubMed

    Khitrin, A K; Jerschow, Alexej

    2012-12-01

    Radiation damping is known to cause line-broadening and frequency shifts of strong resonances in NMR spectra. While several techniques exist for the suppression of these effects, many require specialized hardware, or are only compatible with the presence of few strong resonances. We describe a simple pulse sequence for radiation damping suppression in spectra with many strong resonances. The sequence can be used as-is to generate simple spectra or as a signal excitation part in more advanced experiments.

  17. Turbomachinery rotor support with damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, George L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Damping seals, damping bearings, and a support sleeve are presented for the ball bearings of a high speed rotor. The ball bearings consist of a duplex set having the outer races packaged tightly within the sleeve while the sleeve provides a gap with a support member so that the bearings may float with the sleeve. The sleeve has a web extending radially between the pair of outer races and acts in conjunction with one or more springs to apply an axial preload to the outer races. The sleeves have a series of slits which provide the sleeve with a spring-like quality so that the spring acts to center the rotor upon which the bearings are mounted during start up and shut down. A damping seal or a damping bearing may be used in conjunction with the ball bearings and supporting sleeve, the damping seal and damping bearing having rotor portions including rigid outer surfaces mounted within the bore of a stator portion having triangular shaped pockets on the surface facing the rotor. Axial gates are provided between adjacent pockets in sections of the stator permitting fluid to flow with less resistance axially relative to the flow of fluids circumferentially between the rotor and the stator.

  18. Damping characterization in large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, Fidelis O.; Eke, Estelle M.

    1991-01-01

    This research project has as its main goal the development of methods for selecting the damping characteristics of components of a large structure or multibody system, in such a way as to produce some desired system damping characteristics. The main need for such an analytical device is in the simulation of the dynamics of multibody systems consisting, at least partially, of flexible components. The reason for this need is that all existing simulation codes for multibody systems require component-by-component characterization of complex systems, whereas requirements (including damping) often appear at the overall system level. The main goal was met in large part by the development of a method that will in fact synthesize component damping matrices from a given system damping matrix. The restrictions to the method are that the desired system damping matrix must be diagonal (which is almost always the case) and that interbody connections must be by simple hinges. In addition to the technical outcome, this project contributed positively to the educational and research infrastructure of Tuskegee University - a Historically Black Institution.

  19. Mooring Line Damping Estimation for a Floating Wind Turbine

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic responses of mooring line serve important functions in the station keeping of a floating wind turbine (FWT). Mooring line damping significantly influences the global motions of a FWT. This study investigates the estimation of mooring line damping on the basis of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 MW offshore wind turbine model that is mounted on the ITI Energy barge. A numerical estimation method is derived from the energy absorption of a mooring line resulting from FWT motion. The method is validated by performing a 1/80 scale model test. Different parameter changes are analyzed for mooring line damping induced by horizontal and vertical motions. These parameters include excitation amplitude, excitation period, and drag coefficient. Results suggest that mooring line damping must be carefully considered in the FWT design. PMID:25243231

  20. Mooring line damping estimation for a floating wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic responses of mooring line serve important functions in the station keeping of a floating wind turbine (FWT). Mooring line damping significantly influences the global motions of a FWT. This study investigates the estimation of mooring line damping on the basis of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 MW offshore wind turbine model that is mounted on the ITI Energy barge. A numerical estimation method is derived from the energy absorption of a mooring line resulting from FWT motion. The method is validated by performing a 1/80 scale model test. Different parameter changes are analyzed for mooring line damping induced by horizontal and vertical motions. These parameters include excitation amplitude, excitation period, and drag coefficient. Results suggest that mooring line damping must be carefully considered in the FWT design.

  1. Influence of damping on quantum interference - An exactly soluble model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldeira, A. O.; Leggett, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports the result of a calculation which shows the effect of damping on the quantum interference of two Gaussian wave packets in a harmonic potential. The influence-functional method, which seems to be the most appropriate one for this kind of calculation, is used. It is shown that quantum-interference effects are severely diminished by the presence of damping even when its influence on the system is only light. The corrections to the undamped formulas are always expressible in terms of the phenomenological damping constant, the temperature (in the high-temperature limit), the cutoff frequency of the reservoir oscillators, and the mean number of quanta of energy intially present in the system. Both weakly and strongly damped systems are analyzed in the regime of low and high temperatures.

  2. Deep Neural Networks with Multistate Activation Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chenghao; Xu, Yanyan; Ke, Dengfeng; Su, Kaile

    2015-01-01

    We propose multistate activation functions (MSAFs) for deep neural networks (DNNs). These MSAFs are new kinds of activation functions which are capable of representing more than two states, including the N-order MSAFs and the symmetrical MSAF. DNNs with these MSAFs can be trained via conventional Stochastic Gradient Descent (SGD) as well as mean-normalised SGD. We also discuss how these MSAFs perform when used to resolve classification problems. Experimental results on the TIMIT corpus reveal that, on speech recognition tasks, DNNs with MSAFs perform better than the conventional DNNs, getting a relative improvement of 5.60% on phoneme error rates. Further experiments also reveal that mean-normalised SGD facilitates the training processes of DNNs with MSAFs, especially when being with large training sets. The models can also be directly trained without pretraining when the training set is sufficiently large, which results in a considerable relative improvement of 5.82% on word error rates. PMID:26448739

  3. Inverse design of nonlinearity in energy harvesters for optimum damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandchi Tehrani, Maryam; Elliott, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the inverse design method for the nonlinearity in an energy harvester in order to achieve an optimum damping. A single degree-of-freedom electromechanical oscillator is considered as an energy harvester, which is subjected to a harmonic base excitation. The harvester has a limited throw due to the physical constraint of the device, which means that the amplitude of the relative displacement between the mass of the harvester and the base cannot exceed a threshold when the device is driven at resonance and beyond a particular amplitude. This physical constraint requires the damping of the harvester to be adjusted for different excitation amplitudes, such that the relative displacement is controlled and maintained below the limit. For example, the damping can be increased to reduce the amplitude of the relative displacement. For high excitation amplitudes, the optimum damping is, therefore, dependent on the amplitude of the base excitation, and can be synthesised by a nonlinear function. In this paper, a nonlinear function in the form of a bilinear is considered to represent the damping model of the device. A numerical optimisation using Matlab is carried out to fit a curve to the amplitude-dependent damping in order to determine the optimum bilinear model. The nonlinear damping is then used in the time-domain simulations and the relative displacement and the average harvested power are obtained. It is demonstrated that the proposed nonlinear damping can maintain the relative displacement of the harvester at its maximum level for a wide range of excitation, therefore providing the optimum condition for power harvesting.

  4. Collisional damping rates for plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigik, S. F.; Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-06-01

    The distinction between the plasma dynamics dominated by collisional transport versus collective processes has never been rigorously addressed until recently. A recent paper [P. H. Yoon et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 033203 (2016)] formulates for the first time, a unified kinetic theory in which collective processes and collisional dynamics are systematically incorporated from first principles. One of the outcomes of such a formalism is the rigorous derivation of collisional damping rates for Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves, which can be contrasted to the heuristic customary approach. However, the results are given only in formal mathematical expressions. The present brief communication numerically evaluates the rigorous collisional damping rates by considering the case of plasma particles with Maxwellian velocity distribution function so as to assess the consequence of the rigorous formalism in a quantitative manner. Comparison with the heuristic ("Spitzer") formula shows that the accurate damping rates are much lower in magnitude than the conventional expression, which implies that the traditional approach over-estimates the importance of attenuation of plasma waves by collisional relaxation process. Such a finding may have a wide applicability ranging from laboratory to space and astrophysical plasmas.

  5. Vestibular Function and Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Harun, Aisha; Semenov, Yevgeniy R.; Agrawal, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Vestibular dysfunction increases with age and is associated with mobility difficulties and fall risk in older individuals. We evaluated whether vestibular function influences the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). Method: We analyzed the 1999 to 2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of adults aged older than 40 years (N = 5,017). Vestibular function was assessed with the Modified Romberg test. We evaluated the association between vestibular function and difficulty level in performing specific basic and instrumental ADLs, and total number of ADL impairments. Results: Vestibular dysfunction was associated with significantly higher odds of difficulty with nine ADLs, most strongly with difficulty managing finances (odds ratio [OR] = 2.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.18, 5.90]). In addition, vestibular dysfunction was associated with a significantly greater number of ADL impairments (β = .21, 95% CI = [0.09, 0.33]). This effect size was comparable with the influence of heavy smoking (β = .21, 95% CI = [0.06, 0.36]) and hypertension (β = .10, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.18]) on the number of ADL impairments. Conclusion: Vestibular dysfunction significantly influences ADL difficulty, most strongly with a cognitive rather than mobility-based task. These findings underscore the importance of vestibular inputs for both cognitive and physical daily activities. PMID:26753170

  6. Damping mechanisms of a pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolfo, Gilles; Castex, Daniel; Vigué, Jacques

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the damping mechanisms of a pendulum. The originality of our setup is the use of a metal strip suspension and the development of extremely sensitive electric measurements of the pendulum velocity and position. Their sensitivity is absolutely necessary for a reliable measurement of the pendulum damping time constant because this measurement is possible only for very low oscillation amplitudes, when air friction forces quadratic in velocity have a negligible contribution to the observed damping. We have thus carefully studied damping by air friction forces, which is the dominant mechanism for large values of the Reynolds number Re but which is negligible in the Stokes regime, {Re} ∼ 1. In this last case, we have found that the dominant damping is due to internal friction in the metal strip, a universal effect called anelasticity, and, for certain frequencies, to resonant coupling to the support of the pendulum. All our measurements are well explained by theory. We believe this paper would be of interest to students in an undergraduate classical mechanics course.

  7. Functions for diverse metabolic activities in heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xue Bessie; Pillus, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that metabolism and chromatin dynamics are not separate processes but that they functionally intersect in many ways. For example, the lysine biosynthetic enzyme homocitrate synthase was recently shown to have unexpected functions in DNA damage repair, raising the question of whether other amino acid metabolic enzymes participate in chromatin regulation. Using an in silico screen combined with reporter assays, we discovered that a diverse range of metabolic enzymes function in heterochromatin regulation. Extended analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Gdh1) revealed that it regulates silent information regulator complex recruitment to telomeres and ribosomal DNA. Enhanced N-terminal histone H3 proteolysis is observed in GDH1 mutants, consistent with telomeric silencing defects. A conserved catalytic Asp residue is required for Gdh1’s functions in telomeric silencing and H3 clipping. Genetic modulation of α-ketoglutarate levels demonstrates a key regulatory role for this metabolite in telomeric silencing. The metabolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase thus has important and previously unsuspected roles in regulating chromatin-related processes. PMID:26936955

  8. Functions for diverse metabolic activities in heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Su, Xue Bessie; Pillus, Lorraine

    2016-03-15

    Growing evidence demonstrates that metabolism and chromatin dynamics are not separate processes but that they functionally intersect in many ways. For example, the lysine biosynthetic enzyme homocitrate synthase was recently shown to have unexpected functions in DNA damage repair, raising the question of whether other amino acid metabolic enzymes participate in chromatin regulation. Using an in silico screen combined with reporter assays, we discovered that a diverse range of metabolic enzymes function in heterochromatin regulation. Extended analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Gdh1) revealed that it regulates silent information regulator complex recruitment to telomeres and ribosomal DNA. Enhanced N-terminal histone H3 proteolysis is observed in GDH1 mutants, consistent with telomeric silencing defects. A conserved catalytic Asp residue is required for Gdh1's functions in telomeric silencing and H3 clipping. Genetic modulation of α-ketoglutarate levels demonstrates a key regulatory role for this metabolite in telomeric silencing. The metabolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase thus has important and previously unsuspected roles in regulating chromatin-related processes.

  9. Damping filter method for obtaining spatially localized solutions.

    PubMed

    Teramura, Toshiki; Toh, Sadayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Spatially localized structures are key components of turbulence and other spatiotemporally chaotic systems. From a dynamical systems viewpoint, it is desirable to obtain corresponding exact solutions, though their existence is not guaranteed. A damping filter method is introduced to obtain variously localized solutions and adapted in two typical cases. This method introduces a spatially selective damping effect to make a good guess at the exact solution, and we can obtain an exact solution through a continuation with the damping amplitude. The first target is a steady solution to the Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is a representative of bistable systems in which localized solutions coexist and a model for spanwise-localized cases. Not only solutions belonging to the well-known snaking branches but also those belonging to isolated branches known as "isolas" are found with continuation paths between them in phase space extended with the damping amplitude. This indicates that this spatially selective excitation mechanism has an advantage in searching spatially localized solutions. The second target is a spatially localized traveling-wave solution to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, which is a model for streamwise-localized cases. Since the spatially selective damping effect breaks Galilean and translational invariances, the propagation velocity cannot be determined uniquely while the damping is active, and a singularity arises when these invariances are recovered. We demonstrate that this singularity can be avoided by imposing a simple condition, and a localized traveling-wave solution is obtained with a specific propagation speed.

  10. Magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jianliang; Coffey, H.

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems, focusing on the Holloman maglev rocket system. The paper also discusses simulating the damping plate, which is attached to the superconducting magnet by two short-circuited loop coils in the guideway. Closed-form formulas for the magnetic damping coefficient as functions of heave-and-sway displacements are derived by using a dynamic circuit model. These formulas are useful for dynamic stability studies.

  11. Exercise Sandals Increase Lower Extremity Electromyographic Activity During Functional Activities

    PubMed Central

    Hirth, Christopher J.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Anecdotal evidence suggests that use of Exercise Sandals results in a number of positive clinical outcomes. However, little research has been conducted to determine their efficacy objectively. Our purposes were to determine the effect of Exercise Sandals on lower leg electromyography (EMG) during activities in the Exercise Sandals and to compare EMG associated with Exercise Sandals with traditional lower extremity rehabilitation exercises. Design and Setting: Two within-subjects, repeated-measures designs were used to identify differences in lower extremity EMG: (1) between activities with and without Exercise Sandals and (2) between Exercise Sandals activities and traditional rehabilitation activities. All data were collected in the Sports Medicine Research Laboratory. Subjects: Eighteen subjects involved in rehabilitation using Exercise Sandals for at least 2 weeks within the year before data collection. Measurements: Mean EMG amplitudes from the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, soleus, and lateral gastrocnemius muscles were measured during single-leg stance, side stepping, and “high knees,” all performed with and without the Exercise Sandals, as well as single-leg stance on a foam surface and T-band kicks in the sagittal and frontal planes. Results: Exercise Sandals increased lower leg EMG activity, particularly in the ankle invertors and evertors. Also, activities involving the Exercise Sandals resulted in EMG activity similar to or exceeding that associated with traditional ankle-rehabilitation exercises. Conclusions: These results, coupled with the fact that Exercise Sandals are used in a functional closed kinetic chain manner, suggest that they are an effective means of increasing lower extremity muscle activity. PMID:14608427

  12. Increased damping in irregular resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapoval, Bernard; Asch, Mark; Felix, Simon; Filoche, Marcel

    2005-04-01

    The relation between shape and damping of shallow acoustical cavities has been studied numerically in the case where the dissipation occurs only on the cavity walls. It is first found that whatever the type of geometrical irregularity, many, but not all the modes are localized. It is shown that the localization mechanism is what is called weak localization. The more irregular, the smaller the quality factors are found. However this effect is very different for the non-localized and the localized modes. For non-localized modes the damping increases roughly proportionally to the cavity surface. The localized modes are even more damped. These results generalize the results already obtained both numerically and experimentally on prefractal acoustical cavities. [B. Sapoval, O. Haeberle, and S. Russ, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 2014-2019 (1997); B. Hebert, B. Sapoval, and S. Russ, ibid. 105, 1567-1576 (1999)].

  13. Increased damping of irregular resonators.

    PubMed

    Russ, S; Sapoval, B

    2002-03-01

    It is shown that fractal drums and jagged geometry resonators may be more damped than ordinary Euclidean systems. Several damping mechanisms are examined and studied by numerical calculations. The results depend on the dissipation mechanisms but globally they increase with localization, frequency, and the irregularity of the resonator. The increased dissipation is due to the uneven spatial distribution of the vibrational amplitude in two different ways. First, it is related to the partial confinement of the vibrational modes. Secondly, increased dissipation may be due to singularities in the amplitude distribution. This is the case when a few points exist where the vibration is pinned to zero inducing local logarithmic singularities. This last effect can be spectacular: a single defect can dominate the surface damping by viscous forces of a square drum.

  14. Liquid culture production of microsclerotia and submerged conidia by Trichoderma harzianum active against damping-off disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Nilce N; Mascarin, Gabriel M; Jackson, Mark A; Schisler, David A

    2015-04-01

    Media and culturing protocols were identified that supported the formation of submerged conidia and microsclerotia (MS) by Trichoderma harzianum Rifai strain T-22 using liquid culture fermentation. Liquid media with a higher carbon concentration (36 g L(-1)) promoted MS formation at all C:N ratios tested. Hyphae aggregated to form MS after 2 d growth and after 7 d MS were fully melanized. This is the first report of MS formation by T. harzianum or any species of Trichoderma. Furthermore, submerged conidia formation was induced by liquid culture media, but yields, desiccation tolerance, and storage stability varied with C:N ratio and carbon rate. Air-dried MS granules (<4% moisture) retained excellent shelf life under cool and unrefrigerated storage conditions with no loss in conidial production. A low-cost complex nitrogen source based on cottonseed flour effectively supported high MS yields. Amending potting mix with dried MS formulations reduced or eliminated damping-off of melon seedlings caused by Rhizoctonia solani. Together, the results provide insights into the liquid culture production, stabilization process, and bioefficacy of the hitherto unreported MS of T. harzianum as a potential biofungicide for use in integrated management programs against soilborne diseases.

  15. Characteristics of recursive backstepping algorithm and active damping of oscillations in feedback linearization for electromechanical system with extended stability analysis and perturbation rejection.

    PubMed

    Anand, V; Narendran, R

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a technique for estimation of state variables and control of a class of electromechanical system is proposed. Initially, an attempt is made on rudimentary pole placement technique for the control of rotor position and angular velocity profiles of Permanent Magnet Stepper Motor. Later, an alternative approach is analyzed using feedback linearization method to reduce the error in tracking performances. A damping control scheme was additionally incorporated into the feedback linearization system in order to nullify the persistent oscillations present in the system. Furthermore, a robust backstepping controller with high efficacy is put forth to enhance the overall performance and to carry out disturbance rejection. The predominant advantage of this control technique is that it does not require the DQ Transformation of the motor dynamics. A Lyapunov candidate was employed to ensure global asymptotical stability criterion. Also, a nonlinear observer is presented to estimate the unknown states namely load torque and rotor angular velocity, even under load uncertainty conditions. Finally, the performances of all the aforementioned control schemes and estimation techniques are compared and analyzed extensively through simulation.

  16. Analytical modeling of squeeze air film damping of biomimetic MEMS directional microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishfaque, Asif; Kim, Byungki

    2016-08-01

    Squeeze air film damping is introduced in microelectromechanical systems due to the motion of the fluid between two closely spaced oscillating micro-structures. The literature is abundant with different analytical models to address the squeeze air film damping effects, however, there is a lack of work in modeling the practical sensors like directional microphones. Here, we derive an analytical model of squeeze air film damping of first two fundamental vibration modes, namely, rocking and bending modes, of a directional microphone inspired from the fly Ormia ochracea's ear anatomy. A modified Reynolds equation that includes compressibility and rarefaction effects is used in the analysis. Pressure distribution under the vibrating diaphragm is derived by using Green's function. From mathematical modeling of the fly's inspired mechanical model, we infer that bringing the damping ratios of both modes in the critical damping range enhance the directional sensitivity cues. The microphone parameters are varied in derived damping formulas to bring the damping ratios in the vicinity of critical damping, and to show the usefulness of the analytical model in tuning the damping ratios of both modes. The accuracy of analytical damping results are also verified by finite element method (FEM) using ANSYS. The FEM results are in full compliance with the analytical results.

  17. Radiation damping in closed expanding universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernui, Armando

    The dynamics of a coupled model (harmonic oscillator-relativistic scalar field) in Conformal Robertson-Walker (k = +1) spacetimes is investigated. The exact radiation-reaction equation of the source-including the retarded radiation terms due to the closed space geometry - is obtained and analyzed. A suitable family of Lyapunov functions is constructed to show that, if the spacetime expands monotonely, then the source's energy damps. A numerical simulation of this equation for expanding Universes, with and without Future Event Horizon, is performed.

  18. K- and L-edge X-ray absorption spectrum calculations of closed-shell carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds using damped four-component density functional response theory.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Burdakova, Daria; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-21

    X-ray absorption spectra of carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds have been investigated by means of damped four-component density functional response theory. It is demonstrated that a reliable description of relativistic effects is obtained at both K- and L-edges. Notably, an excellent agreement with experimental results is obtained for L2,3-spectra-with spin-orbit effects well accounted for-also in cases when the experimental intensity ratio deviates from the statistical one of 2 : 1. The theoretical results are consistent with calculations using standard response theory as well as recently reported real-time propagation methods in time-dependent density functional theory, and the virtues of different approaches are discussed. As compared to silane and silicon tetrachloride, an anomalous error in the absolute energy is reported for the L2,3-spectrum of silicon tetrafluoride, amounting to an additional spectral shift of ∼1 eV. This anomaly is also observed for other exchange-correlation functionals, but it is seen neither at other silicon edges nor at the carbon K-edge of fluorine derivatives of ethene. Considering the series of molecules SiH4-XFX with X = 1, 2, 3, 4, a gradual divergence from interpolated experimental ionization potentials is observed at the level of Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT), and to a smaller extent with the use of Hartree-Fock. This anomalous error is thus attributed partly to difficulties in correctly emulating the electronic structure effects imposed by the very electronegative fluorines, and partly due to inconsistencies in the spurious electron self-repulsion in DFT. Substitution with one, or possibly two, fluorine atoms is estimated to yield small enough errors to allow for reliable interpretations and predictions of L2,3-spectra of more complex and extended silicon-based systems.

  19. Influence of composition and heat treatment on damping and magnetostrictive properties of Fe-18%(Ga+Al) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Golovin, I S; Palacheva, V V; Zadorozhnyy, V Yu; Zhu, J; Jiang, H; Cifre, J; Lograsso, Thomas A

    2014-10-01

    The structure, magnetostriction and damping properties of Fe82Ga(18?x)Alx(x = 0, 5, 8, 12) alloys were analyzed. The anelastic response of Fe–18(Ga + Al) alloys was studied as a function of temperature (from 0 to 600 ?C), frequency (from 0.01 to 200 Hz) and amplitude (from 0.0004% to 0.2%) of forced vibrations. The origin of the relatively high damping capacity of Fe–Ga–Al alloy at room temperature was determined by applying a magnetic field and different heat treatment regimes. The substitution of Ga by Al in Fe–18% Ga alloys was found to decrease magnetostriction and damping. The heat treatment of alloys influences the damping capacity of alloys more than variations of their chemical compositions. Thermally activated frequency and temperature-dependent anelastic effects in Fe– Ga–Al alloys were analyzed and the corresponding activation parameters for relaxation processes were evaluated. Internal friction effects caused by structural transformations were recorded and were found to be consistent with the A2 ! D03! L12reaction. The physical mechanisms for all anelastic effects are discussed

  20. Influence of composition and heat treatment on damping and magnetostrictive properties of Fe–18%(Ga + Al) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Golovin, I. S.; Palacheva, V. V.; Zadorozhnyy, V. Yu.; Zhu, J.; Jiang, H.; Cifre, J.; Lograsso, T. A.

    2014-07-16

    The structure, magnetostriction and damping properties of Fe82Ga(18–x)Alx (x = 0, 5, 8, 12) alloys were analyzed. The anelastic response of Fe–18(Ga + Al) alloys was studied as a function of temperature (from 0 to 600 °C), frequency (from 0.01 to 200 Hz) and amplitude (from 0.0004% to 0.2%) of forced vibrations. The origin of the relatively high damping capacity of Fe–Ga–Al alloy at room temperature was determined by applying a magnetic field and different heat treatment regimes. The substitution of Ga by Al in Fe–18% Ga alloys was found to decrease magnetostriction and damping. The heat treatment of alloys influences the damping capacity of alloys more than variations of their chemical compositions. Thermally activated frequency and temperature-dependent anelastic effects in Fe–Ga–Al alloys were analyzed and the corresponding activation parameters for relaxation processes were evaluated. Internal friction effects caused by structural transformations were recorded and were found to be consistent with the A2 → D03 → L12 reaction. Thus, the physical mechanisms for all anelastic effects are discussed.

  1. Influence of composition and heat treatment on damping and magnetostrictive properties of Fe–18%(Ga + Al) alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Golovin, I. S.; Palacheva, V. V.; Zadorozhnyy, V. Yu.; ...

    2014-07-16

    The structure, magnetostriction and damping properties of Fe82Ga(18–x)Alx (x = 0, 5, 8, 12) alloys were analyzed. The anelastic response of Fe–18(Ga + Al) alloys was studied as a function of temperature (from 0 to 600 °C), frequency (from 0.01 to 200 Hz) and amplitude (from 0.0004% to 0.2%) of forced vibrations. The origin of the relatively high damping capacity of Fe–Ga–Al alloy at room temperature was determined by applying a magnetic field and different heat treatment regimes. The substitution of Ga by Al in Fe–18% Ga alloys was found to decrease magnetostriction and damping. The heat treatment of alloysmore » influences the damping capacity of alloys more than variations of their chemical compositions. Thermally activated frequency and temperature-dependent anelastic effects in Fe–Ga–Al alloys were analyzed and the corresponding activation parameters for relaxation processes were evaluated. Internal friction effects caused by structural transformations were recorded and were found to be consistent with the A2 → D03 → L12 reaction. Thus, the physical mechanisms for all anelastic effects are discussed.« less

  2. The quadratically damped oscillator: A case study of a non-linear equation of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. R.

    2012-09-01

    The equation of motion for a quadratically damped oscillator, where the damping is proportional to the square of the velocity, is a non-linear second-order differential equation. Non-linear equations of motion such as this are seldom addressed in intermediate instruction in classical dynamics; this one is problematic because it cannot be solved in terms of elementary functions. Like all second-order ordinary differential equations, it has a corresponding first-order partial differential equation, whose independent solutions constitute the constants of the motion. These constants readily provide an approximate solution correct to first order in the damping constant. They also reveal that the quadratically damped oscillator is never critically damped or overdamped, and that to first order in the damping constant the oscillation frequency is identical to the natural frequency. The technique described has close ties to standard tools such as integral curves in phase space and phase portraits.

  3. Validation of High-Resolution CFD Method for Slosh Damping Extraction of Baffled Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The predicted slosh damping values from Loci-Stream-VOF agree with experimental data very well for all fill levels in the vicinity of the baffle. Grid refinement study is conducted and shows that the current predictions are grid independent. The increase of slosh damping due to the baffle is shown to arise from: a) surface breakup; b) cascade of energy from the low order slosh mode to higher modes; and c) recirculation inside liquid phase around baffle. The damping is a function of slosh amplitude, consistent with previous observation. Miles equation under predicts damping in the upper dome section.

  4. Cardiovascular function following reduced aerobic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, P. B.; Welch-O'Connor, R. M.; Shi, X.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a sustained reduction of physical activity (deconditioning) would alter the cardiovascular regulatory function. METHODS: Nineteen young, healthy volunteers participated in physical deconditioning for a period of 8 wk. Before (pre) and following (post) physical deconditioning, the responses of heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP, measured by Finapres), central venous pressure (CVP), stroke volume (SV, Doppler), and forearm blood flow (FBF, plethysmography) were determined during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The carotid baroreflex (CBR) function was assessed using a train of pulsatile neck pressure (NP) and suction, and the aortic baroreflex control of HR was assessed during steady-state phenylephrine (PE) infusion superimposed by LBNP and NP to counteract the PE increased CVP and carotid sinus pressure, respectively. RESULTS: Active physical deconditioning significantly decreased maximal oxygen uptake (-7%) and LBNP tolerance (-13%) without a change in baseline hemodynamics. Plasma volume (-3% at P = 0.135), determined by Evans Blue dilution, and blood volume (-4% at P = 0.107) were not significantly altered. During LBNP -20 to -50 torr, there was a significantly greater drop of SV per unit decrease in CVP in the post- (14.7 +/- 1.6%/mm Hg) than predeconditioning (11.2 +/- 0.7%/mm Hg) test accompanied by a greater tachycardia. Deconditioning increased the aortic baroreflex sensitivity (pre vs post: -0.61 +/- 0.12 vs -0.84 +/- 0.14 bpm.mm-1 Hg, P = 0.009) and the slope of forearm vascular resistance (calculated from [MAP-CVP]/FBF) to CVP (-2.75 +/- 0.26 vs -4.94 +/- 0.97 PRU/mm Hg, P = 0.086). However, neither the CBR-HR (-0.28 +/- 0.03 VS -0.39 +/- 0.10 bpm.mm-1 Hg) nor the CBR-MAP (-0.37 +/- 0.16 vs -0.25 +/- 0.07 mm Hg/mm Hg) gains were statistically different between pre- and postdeconditioning. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that the functional modification of the cardiac pressure

  5. Vibration Damping Circuit Card Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Ronald Allen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibration damping circuit card assembly includes a populated circuit card having a mass M. A closed metal container is coupled to a surface of the populated circuit card at approximately a geometric center of the populated circuit card. Tungsten balls fill approximately 90% of the metal container with a collective mass of the tungsten balls being approximately (0.07) M.

  6. Surfactant damping of water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary S.; Dowling, David R.; Schultz, William W.

    1997-11-01

    The most well known and perhaps most important distinguishing characteristic of a water surface laden with surfactant is the profound increase in small-wave damping with the addition of even small amounts of surfactant material. It would seem to follow that damping increases with increasing surfactant concentration. This is undoubtedly true for some surfactants, however our experiments with a soluble surfactant show that it is possible to increase surfactant concentration and measure a decrease in damping. While the increased concentration is accompanied by a dramatic decrease in measured static surface tension, some of the capillary-wave frequency regime is less damped. Experimental measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the wave speed are compared with existing theory where at least one other physical quantity besides surface tension is needed to properly model the interface. Our on-going work with insoluble surfactants may also provide an example of this type of behavior for materials that do not readily transfer to and from the bulk water. [Supported by the Office of Naval Research

  7. Dealing with damping-off

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Damping-off is a common disease that rots and kills both seeds and recently germinated seedlings. The disease is caused by number of different soilborne pathogens, including true fungi (Botrytis, Fusarium, and Rhizoctonia species) and oomycetes (Phytophthora and Pythium species). The seedlings of mo...

  8. Damped Oscillator with Delta-Kicked Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1996-01-01

    Exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation for quantum damped oscillator subject to frequency delta-kick describing squeezed states are obtained. The cases of strong, intermediate, and weak damping are investigated.

  9. BK channel activation: structural and functional insights

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Urvi S.; Cui, Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The voltage and Ca2+ activated K+ (BK) channels are involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Structurally, BK channels are homologous to voltage- and ligand-gated K+ channels, having a voltage sensor and pore as the membrane-spanning domain and a cytosolic domain containing metal binding sites. Recently published electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallographic structures of the BK channel provided the first look into the assembly of these domains, corroborating the close interactions among these domains during channel gating that have been suggested by functional studies. This review discusses these latest findings and an emerging new understanding about BK channel gating and implications for diseases such as epilepsy, in which mutations in BK channel genes have been associated. PMID:20663573

  10. Squeezed states of damped oscillator chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1993-01-01

    The Caldirola-Kanai model of one-dimensional damped oscillator is extended to the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping. The correlated and squeezed states for the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping are constructed. Based on the concept of the integrals of motion, it is demonstrated how squeezing phenomenon arises due to parametric excitation.

  11. Exact Damping for Relativistic Plasma Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, D. G.

    2000-10-01

    The damping coefficient for a relativistic plasma may be reduced to a single integral with no approximations through use of the Newberger sum rules when k_z=0. Expanding the integral in a series, the leading term agrees with the leading term of the weak relativistic function F_7/2(z), but the remaining terms are not alike. The single expansion parameter is proportional to λ z, indicating that the result may NOT be accurately expressed as a series involving products of Bessel functions of argument λ times functions F_q(z). Expressions for the imaginary parts of all dielectric tensor elements will be presented. The real parts of the tensor elements are not as simple, but because the elements are analytic, they must likewise be modified.

  12. Density functional theory studies on the oxidation of 5'-dGMP and 5'-dAMP by a platinum(IV) complex.

    PubMed

    Ariafard, Alireza; Tabatabaie, Elham S; Aghmasheh, Simin; Najaflo, Sahar; Yates, Brian F

    2012-08-06

    Density functional theory has been used to investigate the oxidation of a guanine nucleotide by platinum(IV), a process that can be important in the degradation of DNA. For the first time, we have provided a comprehensive mechanism for all of the steps in this process. A number of intermediates are predicted to occur but with short lifetimes that would make them difficult to observe experimentally. A key step in the mechanism is electron transfer from guanine to platinum(IV), and we show that this is driven by the loss of a chloride ligand from the platinum complex after nucleophilic attack of 5'-phosphate to C8 of guanine. We have investigated several different initial platinum(IV) guanine adducts and shown that the adduct formed from replacement of an axial chlorine ligand in the platinum(IV) complex undergoes oxidation more easily. We have studied adenine versus guanine adducts, and our results show that oxidation of the former is more difficult because of disruption of the aromatic π system that occurs during the process. Finally, our results show that the acidic hydrolysis step to form the final oxidized product occurs readily via an initial protonation of N7 of the guanine.

  13. Cocured damped layers in composite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rotz, C.A. ); Barrett, D.J. )

    1992-01-01

    A study was made on the feasibility of laminating and cocuring graphite fiber-epoxy prepreg with plies of commercially available damping materials for form beams and hat-stiffened panels. Experiments showed that cocuring did not adversely affect the damping materials and that excellent structural damping properties could be obtained. The construction of the hat-stiffened panels proved that complex parts containing damping materials could be fabricated. Dynamic testing of these components showed that internal architectural features could be designed to promote damping in primary structure.

  14. Pre-emergence Damping Off of Beta vulgaris by Rhizopus stolonifer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizopus stolonifer (Rs), a cool temperature zygomycete that can cause a post-harvest rot on sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris), also causes pre-emergence damping off in other crops. We are interested in its potential pre-emergence damping off activity in sugarbeet. Sugarbeets are quite susceptible to seedli...

  15. Damping Performance of Taut Cables with Passive Absorbers Incorporating Inerters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiannan; Jiang, Jason Zheng; Macdonald, John H. G.

    2016-09-01

    As stay cables are prone to vibrations due to their low inherent damping, a common method to limit unwanted vibrations is to install a viscous damper normal to the cable near one of its supports. This paper investigates the potential performance improvement that can be delivered by a numbers of candidate absorbers that incorporate inerters. The inerter device is the true network dual of a spring, with the property that the force is proportional to the relative acceleration between its two terminals. A finite element taut cable model is used for this study. A specific cost function indicating the damping performance of a cable with an absorber attached is proposed. An optimisation of the performance is then carried out. Based on optimisation results, the best damping performance for each of the candidate absorber structures against a specific range of inertance values is presented.

  16. The improved damping of superconductor bearings for 35 kWh superconductor flywheel energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. H.; Park, B. J.; Jung, S. Y.; Han, S. C.; Lee, W. R.; Bae, Y. C.

    2013-02-01

    A 35 kWh Superconductor Flywheel Energy Storage system (SFES) using hybrid bearing sets, which is composed of a high temperature superconductor (HTS) bearing and an active magnet damper (AMD), has been developed at KEPCO Research Institute (KEPRI). Damping is a source of energy loss but necessary for the stability of the flywheel system. We found that the damping of HTS bearings can be improved by thermal insulating bolts, which play a role of passive type external damper. To investigate the source of the increased damping, damping coefficients were measured with HTS bearings using insulating bolts made of three kinds of polymer materials. The damping coefficient was raised over 3000 N s/m in the case of PEEK bolts. The value was almost a quarter of the AMD. In this study, thermoelastic and Coulomb friction damping mechanisms are discussed. The main damping mechanism was the thermoelastic damping of the bolts themselves. And interfacial gap between the insulating bolt and metal chamber, which increased during the cooling process, was considered to be the cause of the anisotropic damping coefficients. Finally, the effects of the HTS bearings on the first critical speed are shown.

  17. Radiation damping in real time.

    PubMed

    Mendes, A C; Takakura, F I

    2001-11-01

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of a charge interacting with its own radiation, which originates the radiation damping. The real-time equation of motion for the charge and the associated Langevin equation is found in classical limit. The equation of motion for the charge allows one to obtain the frequency-dependent coefficient of friction. In the lowest order we find that although the coefficient of static friction vanishes, there is dynamical dissipation represented by a non-Markovian dissipative kernel.

  18. Active structural subsystem of the OISI interferometry testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döngi, Frank; Johann, Ulrich; Szerdahelyi, Laszlo

    1999-12-01

    An adaptive truss structure has been realized for active vibration damping within a laboratory testbed for future spaceborne optical and infra-red interferometers. The active elements are based on piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The paper first surveys configuration scenarios for space interferometers that aim at nanometre accuracy of optical pathlengths. It then focuses on the function of active structural control. For the laboratory truss, practical design considerations as well as analytical approaches for modelling and system identification, placement of active elements and design of active damping control are discussed in detail. Experimental results of the active damping performance achieved with integral feedback of strut force signals are compared with analytical predictions. The combined effects of active damping and passive vibration isolation are presented, and conclusions are drawn regarding further activities towards nanometre stabilization of optical pathlengths.

  19. Spin-Damping in an RF atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem, Orang; Romalis, Michael V.; Sauer, Karen L.

    2009-05-01

    Optically pumped atomic magnetometers have demonstrated an improved sensitivity over standard tuned coils for frequencies less than 50 MHz, making these radio-frequency (RF) magnetometers attractive for low-field NMR (for example, Budker and Romalis, Nature Physics 3, April 2007). Such magnetometers are often plagued by transient effects resulting in decreased sensitivity. The decay time of these transients, or ringing, can last for milliseconds, which is particularly detrimental for rapidly decaying NMR signals. We have found that actively damping the ringing of the atomic spins can significantly reduce such dead time. This spin-damping of the atomic transients is achieved through a negative feedback mechanism in which part of the optical signal during ringing is used to apply an RF field forcing the realignment of the atomic spins with the static magnetic field. We have successfully implemented spin-damping in 100 μs and recovered our femto-Tesla signal previously obscured by the ringing.

  20. Dynamic Stiffness and Damping Characteristics of a High-Temperature Air Foil Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Heshmat, Hooshang

    2001-01-01

    Using a high-temperature optically based displacement measurement system, a foil air bearing's stiffness and damping characteristics were experimentally determined. Results were obtained over a range of modified Sommerfeld Number from 1.5E6 to 1.5E7, and at temperatures from 25 to 538 C. An Experimental procedure was developed comparing the error in two curve fitting functions to reveal different modes of physical behavior throughout the operating domain. The maximum change in dimensionless stiffness was 3.0E-2 to 6.5E-2 over the Sommerfeld Number range tested. Stiffness decreased with temperature by as much as a factor of two from 25 to 538 C. Dimensionless damping was a stronger function of Sommerfeld Number ranging from 20 to 300. The temperature effect on damping being more qualitative, showed the damping mechanism shifted from viscous type damping to frictional type as temperature increased.

  1. Variable structure controller design for spacecraft nutation damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sira-Ramirez, Hebertt; Dwyer, Thomas A. W., III

    1987-01-01

    Variable structure systems theory is used to design an automatic controller for active nutation damping in momentum biased stabilized spacecraft. Robust feedback stabilization of roll and yaw angular dynamics is achieved with prescribed qualitative characteristics which are totally independent of the spacecraft defining parameters.

  2. Quantifying acoustic damping using flame chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boujo, E.; Denisov, A.; Schuermans, B.; Noiray, N.

    2016-12-01

    Thermoacoustic instabilities in gas turbines and aeroengine combustors falls within the category of complex systems. They can be described phenomenologically using nonlinear stochastic differential equations, which constitute the grounds for output-only model-based system identification. It has been shown recently that one can extract the governing parameters of the instabilities, namely the linear growth rate and the nonlinear component of the thermoacoustic feedback, using dynamic pressure time series only. This is highly relevant for practical systems, which cannot be actively controlled due to a lack of cost-effective actuators. The thermoacoustic stability is given by the linear growth rate, which results from the combination of the acoustic damping and the coherent feedback from the flame. In this paper, it is shown that it is possible to quantify the acoustic damping of the system, and thus to separate its contribution to the linear growth rate from the one of the flame. This is achieved by post-processing in a simple way simultaneously acquired chemiluminescence and acoustic pressure data. It provides an additional approach to further unravel from observed time series the key mechanisms governing the system dynamics. This straightforward method is illustrated here using experimental data from a combustion chamber operated at several linearly stable and unstable operating conditions.

  3. Active vibration control of functionally graded beams with piezoelectric layers based on higher order shear deformation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendine, K.; Boukhoulda, F. B.; Nouari, M.; Satla, Z.

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports on a study of active vibration control of functionally graded beams with upper and lower surface-bonded piezoelectric layers. The model is based on higher-order shear deformation theory and implemented using the finite element method (FEM). The proprieties of the functionally graded beam (FGB) are graded along the thickness direction. The piezoelectric actuator provides a damping effect on the FGB by means of a velocity feedback control algorithm. A Matlab program has been developed for the FGB model and compared with ANSYS APDL. Using Newmark's method numerical solutions are obtained for the dynamic equations of FGB with piezoelectric layers. Numerical results show the effects of the constituent volume fraction and the influence the feedback control gain on the frequency and dynamic response of FGBs.

  4. Nonlinear damping identification from transient data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Clifford B.; Wereley, Norman M.

    1999-06-01

    To study new damping augmentation methods for helicopter rotor systems, accurate and reliable nonlinear damping identification techniques are needed. For example, current studies on applications of magnetorheological (MR) dampers for rotor stability augmentation suggest that a strong Coulomb damping characteristic will be manifested as the field applied to the MR fluid is maximized. Therefore, in this work, a single degree of freedom (SDOF) system having either nonlinear Coulomb or quadratic damping is considered. This paper evaluates three analyses for identifying damping from transient test data; an FFT-based moving block analysis, an analysis based on a periodic Fourier series decomposition, and a Hilbert transform based technique. Analytical studies are used to determine the effects of block length, noise, and error in identified modal frequency on the accuracy of the identified damping level. The FFT-based moving block has unacceptable performance for systems with nonlinear damping. These problems were remedied in the Fourier series based analysis and acceptable performance is obtained for nonlinear damping identification from both this technique and the Hilbert transform based method. To more closely simulate a helicopter rotor system test, these techniques were then applied to a signal composed of two closely spaced modes. This data was developed to simulate a response containing the first lag and 1/rev modes. The primary mode of interest (simulated lag mode) had either Coulomb or quadratic damping, and the close mode (1/rev) was either undamped or had a specified viscous damping level. A comprehensive evaluation of the effects of close mode amplitude, frequency, and damping level was performed. A classifier was also developed to identify the dominant damping mechanism in a signal of 'unknown' composition. This classifier is based on the LMS error of a fit of the analytical envelope expression to the experimentally identified envelope signal. In most

  5. Hybrid damping models using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish method with internally balanced model reduction and output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Inman, Daniel J.; Saunders, William R.

    2000-06-01

    Viscoelastic materials (VEMs) are used to increase passive damping in structures. The damping capabilities of the VEM can be enhanced by attaching a constraining layer to the VEM. If this constraining layer is active, the treatment is called active constrained layer damping (ACLD). In the last few years, ACLD has proven to be superior in vibration control to active or passive damping. The active element allows for more effective vibration suppression than purely passive constrained layer damping. On the other hand, the VEM provides a fail-safe in case of breakdown of the active element that is not present for purely active control. It has been shown that the control effort needed to damp vibration using ACLD can be significantly higher than purely active control. In order to combine the inherent damping of passive control with the effectiveness of the active element, different variations of active, passive and hybrid damping are explored. Some of the variations included in this paper are passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) separate from the active element, but on the same side of beam and PCLD separate from the active element on the opposite side of the beam. The discretized system equations are obtained using the assumed modes method and Lagrange's equation. The damping is modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. This method adds `dissipation coordinates' to the structure in order to account for the damping present. These additional modes are eliminated using a reduction method, rendering the method more practical. A linear quadratic regulator and output feedback are used to actively control vibration.

  6. Introduction to DAMPE event reconstruction (On behalf of DAMPE collaboration)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a high energy particle physics experiment satellite, launched on 17 Dec 2015. To measure basic attributes of cosmic ray particles, DAMPE is equipped with four sub-detectors, BGO calorimeter (BGO), plastic scintillator detector (PSD), silicon tungsten tracker (STK) and neutron detector (NUD). On orbit, the high energy particle data are acquired and recorded by well-designed Data Acquisition system. After that, a series of elaborate event reconstruction algorithms are implemented to determine the energy, direction and particle ID of each event. The energy reconstruction algorithm firstly treats the sum of the BGO crystal energy as the overall energy estimator and various corrections are performed to calculate energy leakage from side and back of the calorimeter. The track reconstruction starts with cluster finding in STK, then shower axis of BGO and barycentre of clusters are used to extract seed of tracks. These seeds will be projected on the next layer by Kalman Filter method which will finally give location and direction of particle tracks. Based on shower development in BGO and tracks reconstructed by STK, we also combine data from PSD and NUD and developed a series of algorithms to evaluate particle's charge and identification. In this talk, we will describe technical strategies of event reconstruction and provide their basic performance.

  7. Vitreous Enamel Damping Material Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    PROCEDURES 3 2.1. EXPERIMENTAL 3 2.1.1. GLASS PREPARATION 3 2.1.2. METHOD OF COATING APPLICATION 3 2.1.3. VIBRATION DAMPING MEASUREMENTS 3 2.2. CALCULATION OF...discussion in this report. fL 2 SECTION II TECHNICAL PROCEDURES 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL 2.1.1 Glass Preparation All of the compositions, except the standard...After heat treatments of composition "B", a- cristobalite and devitrite (Na20.3CaO-6SiO 2) appear as crystalline phases; a- cristobalite being the major

  8. Determination of blade stresses under constant speed and transient conditions with nonlinear damping

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, J.S.; Vyas, N.S.

    1996-04-01

    Determination of resonant stresses is an important step in the life estimation of turbomachine blades. Resonance may occur either at a steady operating speed or under transient conditions of operation when the blade passes through a critical speed. Damping plays a significant role in limiting the amplitudes of vibration and stress values. The blade damping mechanism is very complex in nature, because of interfacial slip, material hysteresis, and gas dynamic damping occurring simultaneously. In this paper, a numerical technique to compute the stress response of a turbine blade with nonlinear damping characteristics, during steady and transient operations of the rotor, is presented. Damping is defined as a function of vibratory mode, rotor speed, and strain amplitude. The technique is illustrated by computing the stress levels at resonant rotor speeds for typical operation of a turbomachine.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF DAMPING IN BOLTED LAP JOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    C. MALONEY; D. PEAIRS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    The dynamic response of a jointed beam was measured in laboratory experiments. The data were analyzed and the system was mathematically modeled to establish plausible representations of joint damping behavior. Damping is examined in an approximate, local linear framework using log decrement and half power bandwidth approaches. in addition, damping is modeled in a nonlinear framework using a hybrid surface irregularities model that employs a bristles-construct. Experimental and analytical results are presented.

  10. Radiation damping in metal nanoparticle pairs.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Christian; Schmidt, Benjamin; von Plessen, Gero

    2007-02-01

    The radiation damping rate of plasmon resonances in pairs of spherical gold nanoparticles is calculated. The radiative line width of the plasmon resonance indicates significant far-field coupling between the nanoparticles over distances many times the particle diameter. The radiation damping of the coupled particle-plasmon mode alternates between superradiant and subradiant behavior when the particle spacing is varied. At small particle spacings where near-field coupling occurs, the radiation damping rate lies far below that of an isolated particle.

  11. Hysteretic damping in rotordynamics: An equivalent formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genta, Giancarlo; Amati, Nicola

    2010-10-01

    The hysteretic damping model cannot be applied to time domain dynamic simulations: this is a well-known feature that has been discussed in the literature since the time when analog computers were widespread. The constant equivalent damping often introduced to overcome this problem is also discussed, and its limitations are stated, in particular those linked with its application in rotordynamics to simulate rotating damping. An alternative model based on the nonviscous damping (NVD) model, but with a limited number of additional degrees of freedom, is proposed, and the relevant equations are derived. Some examples show applications to the rotordynamics field.

  12. Viscous damped space structure for reduced jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James F.; Davis, L. Porter

    1987-01-01

    A technique to provide modal vibration damping in high performance space structures was developed which uses less than one once of incompressible fluid. Up to 50 percent damping can be achieved which can reduce the settling times of the lowest structural mode by as much as 50 to 1. This concept allows the designers to reduce the weight of the structure while improving its dynamic performance. Damping by this technique is purely viscous and has been shown by test to be linear over 5 orders of input magnitude. Amplitudes as low as 0.2 microinch were demonstrated. Damping in the system is independent of stiffness and relatively insensitive to temperature.

  13. Vibrational reduction in integral-damped composite fan blades: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmatka, John B.; Mehmed, Oral

    1998-06-01

    The experimental behavior of spinning laminated composite pretwisted plates (turbo-fan blade-like) with small (less than 10% by volume) integral viscoelastic damping patches is investigated. Two different plate sets were examined. The first set investigated tailoring patch locations and definitions to damp specific modes on spinning flat graphite/epoxy plates as a function of rotational speed. The second set investigated damping patch size and location on specific modes of pretwisted (30 degrees) graphite/epoxy plates. The results reveal that: (1) significant amount of damping can be added using a small amount of damping material, (2) the damped plates experienced no failures up to the tested 28,000 g's and 750,000 cycles, (3) centrifugal loads caused an increase in bending frequencies and corresponding reductions in bending damping levels that are proportional to the bending stiffness increase, and (4) the centrifugal loads caused a decrease in torsion natural frequency and increase in damping levels of pretwisted composite plates.

  14. Optimum vibration absorber (tuned mass damper) design for linear damped systems subjected to random loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigli, Omer F.

    2012-06-01

    Optimum design of dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs) installed on linear damped systems that are subjected to random loads is studied and closed-form design formulas are provided. Three cases are considered in the optimization process: Minimizing the variance of the displacement, velocity and acceleration of the main mass. Exact optimum design parameters for the velocity case, which to the best knowledge of the author do not exist in the literature, are derived for the first time. Exact solutions are found to be directly applicable for practical use with no simplification needed. For displacement and acceleration cases, a solution for the optimum absorber frequency ratio is obtained as a function of optimum absorber damping ratio. Numerical simulations indicate that optimum absorber damping ratio is not significantly related to the structural damping, especially when the displacement variance is minimized. Therefore, optimum damping ratio derived for undamped systems is proposed for damped systems for the displacement case. When acceleration variance is minimized, however, the optimum damping ratio derived for undamped systems is found not as accurate for damped systems. Therefore, a more accurate approximate expression is derived. Numerical comparisons with published approximate expressions at the same level of complexity indicated that proposed design formula yield more accurate estimates. Another important finding of the paper is that for specific applications where all of the response parameters are desired to be minimized simultaneously, DVAs designed per velocity criteria provide the best overall performance with the least complexity in the design equations.

  15. Coherent states and uncertainty relations for the damped harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeon, Kyu-Hwang; Um, Chung-In; George, Thomas F.; Pandey, Lakshmi N.

    1993-01-01

    Starting with evaluations of propagator and wave function for the damped harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency, exact coherent states are constructed. These coherent states satisfy the properties which coherent states should generally have.

  16. Superconductive material and magnetic field for damping and levitation support and damping of cryogenic instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A superconductive load bearing support without a mechanical contact and vibration damping for cryogenic instruments in space is presented. The levitation support and vibration damping is accomplished by the use of superconducting magnets and the 'Meissner' effect. The assembly allows for transfer of vibration energy away from the cryogenic instrument which then can be damped by the use of either an electronic circuit or conventional vibration damping mean.

  17. Magnetomechanical damping and magnetoelastic hysteresis in permalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercuta, A.; Mihalca, I.

    2002-11-01

    The inverse Wiedemann effect (IWE) consisting in longitudinal magnetization reversals was detected with a cylindrical permalloy layer subjected to circular DC magnetic fields while performing low frequency (~1 Hz) free torsion oscillations. Hysteresis occurring in the magnetization vs elastic strain dependence (the `magnetoelastic hysteresis') suggested irreversible processes activated mechanically. Joint vibration and magnetization time records were carried out by means of an experimental set-up including inverted pendulum and conventional integrating fluxmeter, in order to compare the relative energy losses ascribed to the magnetomechanical damping (MMD) and to the magnetoelastic hysteresis, respectively. The experimental results clearly pointed out a close connection between IWE and MMD providing evidence that, when simultaneously examined, both effects reflect the same basic phenomenon: the irreversible magnetization changes induced by the elastic strain.

  18. Damped Lyman-α Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjean, P.; Ledoux, C.

    Recently, Prochaska & Wolfe (1997) have used Keck spectra of 17 DLA absorbers to investigate the kinematics of the neutral gas using unsaturated low excitation transitions such as Si iiλ 1808. They show that the absorption profiles are inconsistent with models of galactic haloes with random motions, spherically infalling gas and slowly rotating hot disks. The CDM model (Kauffmann 1996) is rejected as it produces disks with rotation velocities too small to account for the large observed velocity broadening of the absorption lines. Models of thick disks (h ~0.3 R, where h is the vertical scale and R the radius) with large rotational velocity (v 225kms-1) can reproduce the data. By combining new data on five damped systems with information gathered in the literature, we study the kinematics of the low and high-ionization phases in a sample of 26 damped Lyman-α systems in the redshift range 1.17 - 4.38. We show that the broader the line the more asymmetric, as expected in case rotation dominates the line broadening. However this correlation does not hold for velocities larger than 150 km/s indicating that evidence for rotational motions if any is restricted to velocity broadenings Δ V < 150kms-1. The systems with Δ V > 200kms-1 are peculiar with kinematics consistent with random motions. They show sub-systems as those expected if the objects are in the process of merging.

  19. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  20. Modeling and experimental study of a honeycomb beam filled with damping particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nazeer; Ranganath, R.; Ghosal, Ashitava

    2017-03-01

    Honeycomb sandwich laminates which are the basic structural element of spacecraft have inherently low damping. In this paper, we propose to improve the damping characteristics of such structures by adding damping particles in the cells of the honeycomb. This paper presents modeling of a cantilever beam constructed with honeycomb structure with the hexagonal honeycomb cells, filled with particles. The beam is subjected to external dynamic loads and the interactions of damping particles with the walls of the cells and its overall effect on the frequency response function (FRF) and the damping of the beam are obtained. The discrete-element-method (DEM) is used to model the dynamics of the particles in conjunction with the governing equations of motion of the beam and the cell-walls. The particle-particle and particle-wall impact is modeled using Hertz's non-linear dissipative contact model for normal component and Coulomb's laws of friction for tangential component. Contiguous block of cells near the tip of the cantilever beam were filled with the damping particles and the beam was excited with a random signal near the fixed end. The damping and transfer functions obtained experimentally are compared to those obtained from the mathematical model and they are found to match very well. Further the model was used to study the effect of fill fraction, mass ratio, and the level of excitation signal on transfer function. Depending on the mass ratio and fill fraction, significant reductions in vibration levels are observed.

  1. Tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for damped structures under random load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    The classical problem for the application of a tuned vibration absorber is to minimize the response of a structural system, such as displacement, velocity, acceleration or to maximize the energy dissipated by tuned vibration absorber. The development of explicit optimal absorber parameters is challenging for a damped structural system since the fixed points no longer exist in the frequency response curve. This paper aims at deriving a set of simple design formula of tuned vibration absorber with nonlinear viscous damping based on the frequency tuning for harmonic load for a damped structural system under white noise excitation. The vibration absorbers being considered include tuned mass damper (TMD) and liquid column vibration absorber (LCVA). Simple approximate expression for the standard deviation velocity response of tuned vibration absorber for damped primary structure is also derived in this study to facilitate the estimation of the damping coefficient of TMD with nonlinear viscous damping and the head loss coefficient of LCVA. The derived results indicate that the higher the structural inherent damping the smaller the supplementary damping provided by a tuned vibration absorber. Furthermore, the optimal damping of tuned vibration absorber is shown to be independent of structural damping when it is tuned using the frequency tuning for harmonic load. Finally, the derived closed-form expressions are demonstrated to be capable of predicting the optimal parameters of tuned vibration absorbers with sufficient accuracy for preliminary design of tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for a damped primary structure.

  2. Measurement of functional activities in older adults in the community.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, R I; Kurosaki, T T; Harrah, C H; Chance, J M; Filos, S

    1982-05-01

    Two measures of social function designed for community studies of normal aging and mild senile dementia were evaluated in 195 older adults who underwent neurological, cognitive, and affective assessment. An examining and a reviewing neurologist and a neurologically trained nurse independently rated each on a Scale of Functional Capacity. Interrater reliability was high (examining vs. reviewing neurologist, r = .97; examining neurologist vs. nurse, tau b = .802; p less than .001 for both comparisons). Estimates correlated well with an established measure of social function and with results of cognitive tests. Alternate informants evaluated participants on the Functional Activities Questionnaire and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale. The Functional Activities Questionnaire was superior to the Instrumental Activities of Daily scores. Used alone as a diagnostic tool, the Functional Activities Questionnaire was more sensitive than distinguishing between normal and demented individuals.

  3. Experimental Vibration Damping Characteristics of the Third-stage Rotor of a Three-stage Transonic Axial-flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    Rotor blade aerodynamic damping is experimentally determined in a three-stage transonic axial flow compressor having design aerodynamic performance goals of 4.5:1 pressure ratio and 65.5 lbm/sec weight flow. The combined damping associated with each mode is determined by a least squares fit of a single degree of freedom system transfer function to the nonsynchronous portion of the rotor blade strain gage output power spectra. The combined damping consists of the aerodynamic damping and the structural and mechanical damping. The aerodynamic damping varies linearly with the inlet total pressure for a given corrected speed, weight flow, and pressure ratio while the structural and mechanical damping is assumed to remain constant. The combined damping is determined at three inlet total pressure levels to obtain the aerodynamic damping. The third-stage rotor blade aerodynamic damping is presented and discussed for the design equivalent speed with the stator blades reset for maximum efficiency. The compressor overall preformance and experimental Campbell diagrams for the third-stage rotor blade row are also presented.

  4. Hydrogen adsorption on functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X B; Xiao, B; Fletcher, A J; Thomas, K M

    2005-05-12

    There is considerable interest in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes and porous carbons as a method of storage for transport and related energy applications. This investigation has involved a systematic investigation of the role of functional groups and porous structure characteristics in determining the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of porous carbons. Suites of carbons were prepared with a wide range of nitrogen and oxygen contents and types of functional groups to investigate their effect on hydrogen adsorption. The porous structures of the carbons were characterized by nitrogen (77 K) and carbon dioxide (273 K) adsorption methods. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were studied at 77 K and pressure up to 100 kPa. All the isotherms were Type I in the IUPAC classification scheme. Hydrogen isobars indicated that the adsorption of hydrogen is very temperature dependent with little or no hydrogen adsorption above 195 K. The isosteric enthalpies of adsorption at zero surface coverage were obtained using a virial equation, while the values at various surface coverages were obtained from the van't Hoff isochore. The values were in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ mol(-1) for the carbons studied. The thermodynamics of the adsorption process are discussed in relation to temperature limitations for hydrogen storage applications. The maximum amounts of hydrogen adsorbed correlated with the micropore volume obtained from extrapolation of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for carbon dioxide adsorption. Functional groups have a small detrimental effect on hydrogen adsorption, and this is related to decreased adsorbate-adsorbent and increased adsorbate-adsorbate interactions.

  5. Study for ILC Damping Ring at KEKB

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, J.W.; Fukuma, H.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Koiso, H.; Masuzawa, M.; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Y.; Oide, Katsunobu; Suetsugu, Y.; Tobiyama, M.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    ILC damping ring consists of very low emittance electron and positron storage rings. It is necessary for ILC damping ring to study electron cloud effects in such low emittance positron ring. We propose a low emittance operation of KEKB to study the effects.

  6. Understanding the Damped SHM without ODEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2016-01-01

    Instead of solving ordinary differential equations (ODEs), the damped simple harmonic motion (SHM) is surveyed qualitatively from basic mechanics and quantitatively by the instrumentality of a graph of velocity against displacement. In this way, the condition b ? [square root]4mk for the occurrence of the non-oscillating critical damping and…

  7. Bending rate damping in elastic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Wang, Y.; Fabiano, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary results of an investigation of the bending rate damping model for elastic structures are presented. A model for which the internal damping term is physically plausible and which can accomodate cantilevered boundary conditions is discussed. The model formulation and mathematical foundations are given, and numerical results are discussed.

  8. Damping device for a stationary labyrinth seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Aini, Yehia M. (Inventor); Mitchell, William S. (Inventor); Roberts, Lawrence P. (Inventor); Montgomery, Stuart K. (Inventor); Davis, Gary A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A stationary labyrinth seal system includes a seal housing having an annular cavity, a plurality of damping devices, and a retaining ring. The damping devices are positioned within the annular cavity and are maintained within the annular cavity by the retaining ring.

  9. Magnetic dipole oscillations and radiation damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Daniel R.; Pollack, Gerald L.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the problem of radiation damping for a magnetic dipole oscillating in a magnetic field. An equation for the radiation reaction torque is derived, and the damping of the oscillations is described. Also discussed are runaway solutions for a rotating magnetic dipole moving under the influence of the reaction torque, with no external torque.

  10. Usage Of New Activation Function In Neuro-Symbolic Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Sathasivam, Saratha

    2010-12-23

    New activation function is examined for its ability to accelerate the performance of doing logic programming in Hopfield network. This method has a higher capacity and upgrades the neuro symbolic integration. Computer simulations are carried out to validate the effectiveness of the new activation function. Empirical results obtained support our theory.

  11. Landau damping in a turbulent setting

    SciTech Connect

    Plunk, G. G.

    2013-03-15

    To address the problem of Landau damping in kinetic turbulence, we consider the forcing of the linearized Vlasov equation by a stationary random source. It is found that the time-asymptotic density response is dominated by resonant particle interactions that are synchronized with the source. The energy consumption of this response is calculated, implying an effective damping rate, which is the main result of this paper. Evaluating several cases, it is found that the effective damping rate can differ from the Landau damping rate in magnitude and also, remarkably, in sign. A limit is demonstrated in which the density and current become phase-locked, which causes the effective damping to be negligible; this result offers a fresh perspective from which to reconsider recent observations of kinetic turbulence satisfying critical balance.

  12. Damping characteristics of damaged fiber composite components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, K.

    1986-01-01

    Defects in fiber composite components produce changes with respect to the vibrational characteristics of the material. These changes can be recognized in the form of a frequency shift or an alteration of the damping process. The present investigation is concerned with questions regarding the possibility of a utilization of the changes in suitable defect-detecting inspection procedures. A description is given of a method for measuring the damping characteristics of a specimen. This method provides a spectrum of the damping coefficients of the sample as a basis for a comprehensive evaluation of the damping behavior. The correlation between defects and change in the damping characteristics is demonstrated with the aid of results obtained in measurements involving specimens of carbon-fiber composites and a component consisting of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics.

  13. Magnetic damping of rotation. [in satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opik, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    Based on Wilson's (1977) article on the magnetic effects on space vehicles and other celestial bodies, the magnetic damping of rotation is considered. The inadequacy of the interstellar magnetic field in overcoming solar wind shielding and thus influencing the rotation of bodies is described. The ionospheric shielding of the interstellar field is discussed along with the permeability and magnetic damping by the solar or stellar wind. Star formation and angular momentum is discussed and attention is given to the magnetic damping of unshielded small bodies. Calculations of the rate for damping through random particle impact are made. Theories concerning the rotation of asteroids and the origin of meteorites are reviewed. The shielding process of ionospheric plasmas is outlined and the damping effect of the geomagnetic field on the rotation of artificial satellites is evaluated.

  14. VIBRATION DAMPING AND SHOCK MOUNT

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, D.J.; Forman, G.W.

    1963-12-10

    A shock absorbing mount in which vibrations are damped by an interference fit between relatively movable parts of the mount is described. A pair of generally cup-shaped parts or members have skirt portions disposed in an oppositely facing nesting relationship with the skirt of one member frictionally engaging the skirt of the other. The outermost skirt may be slotted to provide spring-like segments which embrace the inner skirt for effecting the interference fit. Belleville washers between the members provide yieldable support for a load carried by the mount. When a resonant frequency of vibration forces acting upon the moumt attains a certain level the kinetic energy of these forces is absorbed by sliding friction between the parts. (AEC)

  15. Large space structure damping design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, W. D.; Haviland, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Several FORTRAN subroutines and programs were developed which compute complex eigenvalues of a damped system using different approaches, and which rescale mode shapes to unit generalized mass and make rigid bodies orthogonal to each other. An analytical proof of a Minimum Constrained Frequency Criterion (MCFC) for a single damper is presented. A method to minimize the effect of control spill-over for large space structures is proposed. The characteristic equation of an undamped system with a generalized control law is derived using reanalysis theory. This equation can be implemented in computer programs for efficient eigenvalue analysis or control quasi synthesis. Methods to control vibrations in large space structure are reviewed and analyzed. The resulting prototype, using electromagnetic actuator, is described.

  16. Noise and vibration level reduction by covering metal structures with layers of damping materials. [considering viscoelastic insulation layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rugina, I.; Paven, H. T. O.

    1974-01-01

    One of the most important methods of reducing the noise and vibration level is the damping of the secondary sources, such as metal plates, often used in vehicle structures, by means of covering materials with high internal viscosity. Damping layers are chosen at an optimum thickness corresponding to the frequency and temperature range in which a certain structure works. The structure's response corresponding to various real situations is analyzed by means of a measuring chain including electroacoustical or electromechanical transducers. The experimental results provide the dependence of the loss factor and damping transmission coefficient as a function of the damping layer thickness or of the frequency for various viscoelastic covering materials.

  17. On Response of a Single-Degree-of-Freedom Oscillator with Constant Hysteretic Damping Under Arbitrary Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Goutam

    2016-10-01

    The simple constant hysteretic damping model is known to be non-causal although it is used often in diverse branches of engineering. In this paper the response of a single degree of freedom oscillator having linear hysteretic damping under arbitrary force excitation has been studied after deriving the impulse response function of the system. Some shortcomings of the results available in literature have been pointed out. It has been shown that the damping model can be practically used for calculating the response of a physical system when the damping is small and the force has small duration.

  18. Caspase activation inhibits proteasome function during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Ming; Butterworth, Michael; MacFarlane, Marion; Dubiel, Wolfgang; Ciechanover, Aaron; Cohen, Gerald M

    2004-04-09

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system regulates protein turnover by degrading polyubiquitinated proteins. To date, all studies on the relationship of apoptosis and the proteasome have emphasized the key role of the proteasome in the regulation of apoptosis, by virtue of its ability to degrade regulatory molecules involved in apoptosis. We now demonstrate how induction of apoptosis may regulate the activity of the proteasome. During apoptosis, caspase activation results in the cleavage of three specific subunits of the 19S regulatory complex of the proteasome: S6' (Rpt5) and S5a (Rpn10), whose role is to recognize polyubiquitinated substrates of the proteasome, and S1 (Rpn2), which with S5a and S2 (Rpn1) holds together the lid and base of the 19S regulatory complex. This caspase-mediated cleavage inhibits the proteasomal degradation of ubiquitin-dependent and -independent cellular substrates, including proapoptotic molecules such as Smac, so facilitating the execution of the apoptotic program by providing a feed-forward amplification loop.

  19. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gossage, A.A.; Crawley, J.C.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of (/sup 99m/Tc)pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity--TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p less than 0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination.

  20. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ruochan; Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNFα release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, and TNFα neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. - Highlights: • Nuclear DAMP complexes (nDCs) selectively induce cell death in macrophages, but not cancer cells. • TNFα-mediated oxidative stress is required for nDC-induced death. • RAGE-mediated Akt activation is required for nDC-induced TNFα release. • Blocking RAGE and TNFα inhibits nDC-induced macrophage cell death.

  1. Assessing physical function and physical activity in patients with CKD.

    PubMed

    Painter, Patricia; Marcus, Robin L

    2013-05-01

    Patients with CKD are characterized by low levels of physical functioning, which, along with low physical activity, predict poor outcomes in those treated with dialysis. The hallmark of clinical care in geriatric practice and geriatric research is the orientation to and assessment of physical function and functional limitations. Although there is increasing interest in physical function and physical activity in patients with CKD, the nephrology field has not focused on this aspect of care. This paper provides an in-depth review of the measurement of physical function and physical activity. It focuses on physiologic impairments and physical performance limitations (impaired mobility and functional limitations). The review is based on established frameworks of physical impairment and functional limitations that have guided research in physical function in the aging population. Definitions and measures for physiologic impairments, physical performance limitations, self-reported function, and physical activity are presented. On the basis of the information presented, recommendations for incorporating routine assessment of physical function and encouragement for physical activity in clinical care are provided.

  2. Active control of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of functionally graded laminated composite plates using piezoelectric fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Satyajit; Ray, M. C.

    2009-08-01

    This paper deals with the geometrically nonlinear dynamic analysis of functionally graded (FG) laminated composite plates integrated with a patch of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of the piezoelectric fiber reinforced composite (PFRC) material. Each layer of the substrate FG laminated composite plate is made of fiber-reinforced composite material in which the fibers are longitudinally aligned in the plane parallel to the top or bottom surface of the layer and the layer is assumed to be graded in the thickness direction by way of varying the fiber orientation angle across its thickness according to a power-law. The novelty of the present work is that, unlike the traditional laminated composite plates, the FG laminated composite plates are constructed in such a way that the continuous variation of material properties and stresses across the thickness of the plates is achieved. The constrained viscoelastic layer of the ACLD treatment is modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. Based on the first-order shear deformation (FSDT) theory, a finite element model has been developed to model the open-loop and closed-loop nonlinear dynamics of the overall FG laminated composite plates. Both symmetric and asymmetric FG laminated composite plates are considered as the substrate plates for presenting the numerical results. The analysis suggests the potential use of the ACLD treatment with its constraining layer made of the PFRC material for active control of geometrically nonlinear forced vibrations of FG laminated composite plates. The effect of piezoelectric fiber orientation in the active constraining PFRC layer on the damping characteristics of the overall FG plates is also investigated.

  3. Discontinuous Galerkin particle-in-cell simulation of longitudinal plasma wave damping and comparison to the Landau approximation and the exact solution of the dispersion relation

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, F. R.; Bell, T. F.; Spasojevic, M.; Inan, U. S.

    2011-06-15

    We present results showing the measured Landau damping rate using a high-order discontinuous Galerkin particle-in-cell (DG-PIC) [G. B. Jacobs and J. S. Hesthaven, J. Comput. Phys. 214, 96 (2006)] method. We show that typical damping rates measured in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations can differ significantly from the linearized Landau damping coefficient and propose a simple numerical method to solve the plasma dispersion function exactly for moderate to high damping rates. Simulation results show a high degree of agreement between the high-order PIC results and this calculated theoretical damping rate.

  4. Evaluation of Nanomaterial Approaches to Damping in Epoxy Resin and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Structures by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G.; Heimann, Paula J.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Johnston, J. Chris; Roberts, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Vibration mitigation in composite structures has been demonstrated through widely varying methods which include both active and passive damping. Recently, nanomaterials have been investigated as a viable approach to composite vibration damping due to the large surface available to generate energy dissipation through friction. This work evaluates the influence of dispersed nanoparticles on the damping ratio of an epoxy matrix. Limited benefit was observed through dispersion methods, however nanoparticle application as a coating resulting in up to a three-fold increase in damping.

  5. Higher order mode damping for a detuned structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, N.; Thompson, K.; Bane, K.; Ko, K.; Miller, R.; Ruth, R.; Gluckstern, R.

    1994-08-01

    We report in this paper the current status of our investigation of the possibility of suppressing the wake reappearance by providing relatively weak damping via the vacuum manifolds. The four vacuum manifolds running the length of the structure also function as multimode waveguides which serve to drain power from the HOM`s through the large coupling slots located in each cell, except, as discussed later, for a few at each end of the manifolds.

  6. Estimation on nonlinear damping in second order distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    An approximation and convergence theory for the identification of nonlinear damping in abstract wave equations is developed. It is assumed that the unknown dissipation mechanism to be identified can be described by a maximal monotone operator acting on the generalized velocity. The stiffness is assumed to be linear and symmetric. Functional analytic techniques are used to establish that solutions to a sequence of finite dimensional (Galerkin) approximating identification problems in some sense approximate a solution to the original infinite dimensional inverse problem.

  7. Gravitational radiation resistance, radiation damping and field fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, G.

    1981-03-01

    Application is made of two different generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorems and their derivations to the calculation of the gravitational quadrupole radiation resistance using the radiation-reaction force given by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler and the usual tidal force on one hand and the tidal force and the free gravitational radiation field on the other hand. The quantum-mechanical version (including thermal generalizations) of the well known classical quadrupole radiation damping formula is obtained as a function of the radiation resistance.

  8. Shunted Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Analysis Including Centrifugal Loading Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue problems which require damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. One method is the use of piezoelectric materials as passive or active dampers. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery rotor blades research, an effort has been made to investigate the effectiveness of a shunted piezoelectric for the turbomachinery rotor blades vibration control, specifically for a condition with centrifugal rotation. While ample research has been performed on the use of a piezoelectric material with electric circuits to attempt to control the structural vibration damping, very little study has been done regarding rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. Specifically, the objectives of this study are: (a) to create and analyze finite element models for harmonic forced response vibration analysis coupled with shunted piezoelectric circuits for engine blade operational conditions, (b) to validate the experimental test approaches with numerical results and vice versa, and (c) to establish a numerical modeling capability for vibration control using shunted piezoelectric circuits under rotation. Study has focused on a resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches on plate specimens. Tests and analyses were performed for both non-spinning and spinning conditions. The finite element (FE) shunted piezoelectric circuit damping simulations were performed using the ANSYS Multiphysics code for the resistive and inductive circuit piezoelectric simulations of both conditions. The FE results showed a good correlation with experimental test results. Tests and analyses of shunted piezoelectric damping control, demonstrating with plate specimens, show a great potential to reduce blade vibrations under centrifugal loading.

  9. Simulation Study of Electronic Damping of Microphonic Vibrations in Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler; Jean Delayen

    2005-05-01

    Electronic damping of microphonic vibrations in superconducting rf cavities involves an active modulation of the cavity field amplitude in order to induce ponderomotive forces that counteract the effect of ambient vibrations on the cavity frequency. In lightly beam loaded cavities, a reduction of the microphonics-induced frequency excursions leads directly to a reduction of the rf power required for phase and amplitude stabilization. Jefferson Lab is investigating such an electronic damping scheme that could be applied to the JLab 12 GeV upgrade, the RIA driver, and possibly to energy-recovering superconducting linacs. This paper discusses a model and presents simulation results for electronic damping of microphonic vibrations.

  10. Universal damping mechanism of quantum vibrations in deep sub-barrier fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate the damping of quantum octupole vibrations near the touching point when two colliding nuclei approach each other in the mass-asymmetric 16 O + 208 Pb system, for which the strong fusion hindrance was clearly observed. We, for the first time, apply the random-phase approximation method to the heavy-mass asymmetric dinuclear system to calculate the transition strength B (E 3 ) as a function of the center-of-mass distance. The obtained B (E 3 ) strengths are substantially damped near the touching point, because the single-particle wave functions of the two nuclei strongly mix with each other and a neck is formed. The energy-weighted sums of B (E 3 ) are also strongly correlated with the damping factor, which is phenomenologically introduced in the standard coupled-channel calculations to reproduce the fusion hindrance. This strongly indicates that the damping of the quantum vibrations universally occurs in the deep sub-barrier fusion reactions.

  11. Validation Of Equivalent Viscous Damping Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquer Araujo, Xavier; Fransen, S. H. J. A.; Germes, S.; Thiry, N.

    2012-07-01

    An important step in the design and verification process of spacecraft structures is the coupled dynamic analysis with the launch vehicle in the low-frequency domain. To obtain accurate predictions of the satellite’s dynamic environment it is essential that the damping of the system is correctly defined and taken into account within the resolution methodologies for the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). When working with finite element models, the materials’ damping is characterized by structural damping ratios. In addition, most of the load cases present in the CLA are transient excitations so the resolution of the equations of motion must be done in the time domain. Unfortunately, transient analyses cannot be carried out using structural damping models. Thus, a transformation from a structural to a viscous damping characterization is necessary. Nevertheless, this transformation is not trivial. There exist many methodologies aiming at computing an equivalent viscous damping matrix of the system so it can be used in transient analyses. This paper describes the results obtained in the validation of equivalent viscous damping methodologies used in the European Space Agency. This work permitted to identify the limitations of these methodologies and to come up with an enhanced methodology that predicts more reliable results.

  12. SLC positron damping ring optics design

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, J.P.; Rivkin, L.

    1984-12-01

    The basic SLAC Linear Collider operation scheme assumes the use of two damping rings, one for the e/sup -/, one for the e/sup +/, in order to reduce the colliding beam normalized emittances to 30..pi.. ..mu..radm hence raising the corresponding luminosity by a factor 170. The e/sup -/ damping ring which optics was designed by H. Wiedemann, has been extensively studied and modelled since it's completion at the end of 1982. The e/sup +/ damping ring to be built soon will be based on the same design except for some modifications resulting from the studies on the e/sup -/ damping ring which clearly pointed out two major optics weak points: the extracted normalized emittances are 30 to 60% bigger than the design values, which already left no margin for unavoidable blow-up between the damping rings and the SLC interaction point, and the chromaticity correction based on distributed sextupole components provided by shaping the ends of the bending magnet poles was insufficient. Moreover the QDI quadrupoles introduce a strong coupling between transverse planes due to an undesirable skew component. The present note describes the basic modifications of the ring lattice and main equipment positions in order to improve the first two points in the Positron Damping Ring. The QDI quadrupole design has already been modified and magnets of a new type will be implemented in both damping rings.

  13. On the experimental prediction of the stability threshold speed caused by rotating damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervisch, B.; Derammelaere, S.; Stockman, K.; De Baets, P.; Loccufier, M.

    2016-08-01

    An ever increasing demand for lighter rotating machinery and higher operating speeds results in a raised probability of instabilities. Rotating damping is one of the reasons, instability occurs. Rotating damping, or rotor internal damping, is the damping related to all rotating parts while non-rotating damping appearing in the non-rotating parts. The present study describes a rotating setup, designed to investigate rotating damping experimentally. An efficient experimental procedure is presented to predict the stability threshold of a rotating machine. The setup consists of a long thin shaft with a disk in the middle and clamped boundary conditions. The goal is to extract the system poles as a function of the rotating speed. The real parts of these poles are used to construct the decay rate plot, which is an indication for the stability. The efficiency of the experimental procedure relies on the model chosen for the rotating shaft. It is shown that the shaft behavior can be approximated by a single degree of freedom model that incorporates a speed dependent damping. As such low measurement effort and only one randomly chosen measurement location are needed to construct the decay rate plot. As an excitation, an automated impact hammer is used and the response is measured by eddy current probes. The proposed method yields a reliable prediction of the stability threshold speed which is validated through measurements.

  14. Characterization of hydrofoil damping due to fluid-structure interaction using piezocomposite actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, Charles; Coutu, André; Monette, Christine; Nennemann, Bernd; Marmont, Hugues

    2012-03-01

    Hydroelectric power generation is an important non-fossil fuel power source to help meet the world’s energy needs. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI), in the form of mass loading and damping, governs the dynamic response of water turbines, such as Francis turbines. Although the effects of fluid mass loading are well documented, fluid damping is also a critical quantity that may limit vibration amplitudes during service, and therefore help to avoid premature failure of the turbines. However, fluid damping has received less attention in the literature. This paper presents an experimental investigation of damping due to FSI. Three hydrofoils were designed and built to investigate damping due to FSI. Piezoelectric actuation using macrofiber composites (MFCs) provided excitation to the hydrofoil test structure, independent of the flow conditions, to overcome the noisy environment. Natural frequency and damping estimates were experimentally obtained from sine sweep frequency response functions measured with a laser vibrometer through a window in the test section. The results indicate that, although the natural frequencies were not substantially affected by the flow, the damping ratios were observed to increase in a linear manner with respect to flow velocity.

  15. Strange attractors: DAMPs and autophagy link tumor cell death and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hou, W; Zhang, Q; Yan, Z; Chen, R; Zeh III, H J; Kang, R; Lotze, M T; Tang, D

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to ‘apoptotic' cell death is one of the major hallmarks of cancer, contributing to tumor development and therapeutic resistance. Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are molecules released or exposed by dead, dying, injured, or stressed non-apoptotic cells, with multiple roles in inflammation and immunity. Release of DAMPs not only contributes to tumor growth and progression but also mediates skewing of antitumor immunity during so-called immunogenic tumor cell death (ICD). Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated homeostatic degradation process in which cells digest their own effete organelles and macromolecules to meet bioenergetic needs and enable protein synthesis. For tumor cells, autophagy is a double-edged sword. Autophagy, in balance with apoptosis, can function as a tumor suppressor; autophagy deficiency, associated with alterations in apoptosis, initiates tumorigenesis in many settings. In contrast, autophagy-related stress tolerance generally promotes cell survival, which enables tumor growth and promotes therapeutic resistance. Most anticancer therapies promote DAMP release and enhance autophagy. Autophagy not only regulates DAMP release and degradation, but also is triggered and regulated by DAMPs. This interplay between autophagy and DAMPs, serving as ‘strange attractors' in the dynamic system that emerges in cancer, regulates the effectiveness of antitumor treatment. This interplay also shapes the immune response to dying cells upon ICD, culling the least fit tumor cells and promoting survival of others. Thus, DAMPs and autophagy are suitable emergent targets for cancer therapy, considering their more nuanced role in tumor progression. PMID:24336086

  16. Physical activity and cognitive function in bariatric surgery candidates.

    PubMed

    Galioto, Rachel; King, Wendy C; Bond, Dale S; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E; Gunstad, John

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in severe obesity. Lack of physical activity is a likely contributor to impairment in this population, as many obese persons are inactive and physical activity has been positively and independently associated with cognitive function in healthy and medically-ill samples. This study investigated whether physical activity, measured by self-report of aerobic physical activity in 85 bariatric surgery candidates, was associated with cognitive function. A subset of 31 participants also completed objective activity monitoring. Steps/d and high-cadence min/week, representative of ambulatory moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), were calculated. Approximately one quarter of participants self-reported at least 30 min/d of aerobic MVPA, at least 5 d/week. Median steps/d was 7949 (IQR = 4572) and median MVPA min/week was 105 (IQR = 123). Cognitive deficits were found in 32% of participants (29% memory, 10% executive function, 13% language, 10% attention). Controlling for demographic and medical factors, self-reported aerobic physical activity was weakly correlated with lower attention (r = -0.21, p = 0.04) and executive function (r = -0.27, p < 0.01) and both self-reported aerobic physical activity and objectively-determined MVPA min/week were negatively correlated with memory (r = -0.20, p = 0.04; r = -0.46; p = 0.02, respectively). No other correlations between physical activity measures and cognitive function were significant. Contrary to expectations, greater levels of physical activity were not associated with better cognitive functioning. Such findings encourage future studies to clarify the association among cognitive function and physical activity in obese persons.

  17. Multivariate neural network operators with sigmoidal activation functions.

    PubMed

    Costarelli, Danilo; Spigler, Renato

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we study pointwise and uniform convergence, as well as order of approximation, of a family of linear positive multivariate neural network (NN) operators with sigmoidal activation functions. The order of approximation is studied for functions belonging to suitable Lipschitz classes and using a moment-type approach. The special cases of NN operators, activated by logistic, hyperbolic tangent, and ramp sigmoidal functions are considered. Multivariate NNs approximation finds applications, typically, in neurocomputing processes. Our approach to NN operators allows us to extend previous convergence results and, in some cases, to improve the order of approximation. The case of multivariate quasi-interpolation operators constructed with sigmoidal functions is also considered.

  18. Electromagnetic induction and damping: Quantitative experiments using a PC interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Avinash; Mohapatra, Y. N.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2002-04-01

    A bar magnet, attached to an oscillating system, passes through a coil periodically, generating a series of electromotive force pulses. A novel method for the quantitative verification of Faraday's law is described which eliminates all errors associated with angular measurements, thereby revealing subtle features of the underlying mechanics. When electromagnetic damping is activated by short-circuiting the coil, a distinctly linear decay of the oscillation amplitude is observed. A quantitative analysis reveals an interesting interplay of the electromagnetic and mechanical time scales.

  19. Experimental verification of damping mechanisms in a composite beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudney, Harley H.; Inman, Daniel J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of estimating the distributed damping parameters based on the measured modal parameters (frequency and damping ratios) was derived. Three different mathematical models were used to model the damping mechanism of a quasi-isotropic pultruded cantilevered beam. These three models were (1) viscous (air) damping, (2) strain rate damping, and (3) both viscous and strain rate damping. The eigenvalues of the partial differential equation model were found to be uninfluenced by any of the three assumed damping models. Values were obtained for each of the damping models as well as the modulus of elasticity of the beam. It was found that the two-parameter damping model provided the best fit to measured modal data. However, the two-parameter damping model could only reproduce the measured damping ratios to within 85 percent.

  20. Investigation on the mechanism of damping behavior of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Gong, Xinglong; Deng, Huaxia; Qin, Lijun; Xuan, Shouhu

    2012-12-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are a group of smart materials which have many applications such as dynamic vibration absorbers, engine mounts, and so on. The damping behavior is important for applications of MREs. However, the mechanism of the damping of MREs has not been investigated thoroughly. In this study, MREs are modeled as special particle reinforced composites with magneto-induced properties and the mechanism of the damping behavior of MREs is investigated theoretically and experimentally. It has been found that there are three types of damping property in MREs: the intrinsic damping, the interface damping and the magneto-mechanical damping. The presented damping model is successfully validated by damping tests on a series of MRE samples. Furthermore, the relationships between the damping properties and formulas of MREs are discussed; this provides guidance for the manufacture of MREs with various damping properties.

  1. Loss of Landau Damping for Bunch Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-04-11

    Conditions for the existence, uniqueness and stability of self-consistent bunch steady states are considered. For the existence and uniqueness problems, simple algebraic criteria are derived for both the action and Hamiltonian domain distributions. For the stability problem, van Kampen theory is used. The onset of a discrete van Kampen mode means the emergence of a coherent mode without any Landau damping; thus, even a tiny couple-bunch or multi-turn wake is sufficient to drive the instability. The method presented here assumes an arbitrary impedance, RF shape, and beam distribution function. Available areas on the intensity-emittance plane are shown for resistive wall wake and single harmonic, bunch shortening and bunch lengthening RF configurations. Thresholds calculated for the Tevatron parameters and impedance model are in agreement with the observations. These thresholds are found to be extremely sensitive to the small-argument behaviour of the bunch distribution function. Accordingly, a method to increase the LLD threshold is suggested. This article summarizes and extends recent author's publications.

  2. Nonlinear Landau damping of Alfven waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.

    1971-01-01

    Demonstration that large-amplitude linearly or elliptically polarized Alfven waves propagating parallel to the average magnetic field can be dissipated by nonlinear Landau damping. The damping is due to the longitudinal electric field associated with the ion sound wave which is driven (in second order) by the Alfven wave. The damping rate can be large even in a cold plasma (beta much less than 1, but not zero), and the mechanism proposed may be the dominant one in many plasmas of astrophysical interest.

  3. Oscillation damped movement of suspended objects

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.F.; Petterson, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    Transportation of objects using overhead cranes or manipulators can induce pendulum motion of the object. Residual oscillation from transportation typically must be damped or allowed to decay before the next process can take place. By properly programming the acceleration of the transporting device (e.g., crane) an oscillation damped transport and swing free stop is obtainable. This paper reviews the theory associated with oscillation damped trajectories for simply suspended objects and describes a particular implementation using a CIMCORP XR 6100 gantry robot. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Eigensolutions of non-proportionally damped systems based on continuous damping sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázaro, Mario

    2016-02-01

    The viscous damping model has been widely used to represent dissipative forces in structures under mechanical vibrations. In multiple degree of freedom systems, such behavior is mathematically modeled by a damping matrix, which in general presents non-proportionality, that is, it does not become diagonal in the modal space of the undamped problem. Eigensolutions of non-proportional systems are usually estimated assuming that the modal damping matrix is diagonally dominant (neglecting the off-diagonal terms) or, in the general case, using the state-space approach. In this paper, a new closed-form expression for the complex eigenvalues of non-proportionally damped system is proposed. The approach is derived assuming small damping and involves not only the diagonal terms of the modal damping matrix, but also the off-diagonal terms, which appear under higher order. The validity of the proposed approach is illustrated through a numerical example.

  5. The Influence of Damping Changes on Vertical Dynamic Loads of Wheel - Experimental Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślaski, Grzegorz; Pikosz, Hubert

    2011-06-01

    In this paper the results of tests of vertical dynamic wheel loads due to changes in suspension damping level are presented. The changes in damping level were performed using semi-active shock absorbers with by-pass valve. The article presents suspension goals, the definition of dynamic loads of vehicle wheel, testing methods with the information on the used apparatus and sensors. In the end the results are presented, interpreted and compared with other researchers' results.

  6. Intrabeam Scattering in the NLC Main Damping Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2006-06-08

    We use Bane's approximation to the Bjorken-Mtingwa theory of intrabeam scattering to calculate the emittance growth as a function of bunch charge in the KEK ATF. We find that our results are consistent with the experimental data. We then calculate the emittance growth in the NLC Main Damping Rings using the same formulae; we allow for some uncertainty in the ATF data by using two different values for the Coulomb log factor in the formulae for the emittance growth rates. We find that despite the IBS emittance growth, it should still be possible to achieve the specified transverse and longitudinal emittances in the NLC Main Damping Rings at the specified bunch charge.

  7. Effect of surfaces on thermoelastic damping of nano-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, S.; Inamdar, M. M.; Pawaskar, D. N.

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the role of surfaces on thermoelastic damping of flexural vibrations in nanobeams. In the past, the role of surfaces on thermoelastic damping of a vibrating nanobeam has been discussed by considering only mechanical interaction between surfaces and the rest of bulk without accounting for thermal interaction between them. In this paper we account for heat flow due to conduction between the surface and bulk and a coupled thermo-mechanical heat equation for a thermoelastic surface has been derived. Quality factor of vibrating rectangular nanobeam has been computed using modified thermal boundary conditions for the bulk under adiabatic surface conditions. An expression for surface heat capacity used in modified boundary conditions has been derived using the modified Debye model. A simplified expression for quality factor of thin rectangular nanobeam has been obtained. We note that the quality factor and the frequency at which the maximum dissipation occurs is a function of both mechanical and thermal properties of surface. It has also been noticed that the relative change in thermoelastic dissipation due to surface effect is a function of operating frequency. The present analysis shows that effect of surfaces on quality factor and peak damping frequency increases with decrease in beam thickness. Coupled heat equation for a surface derived in the present work can be used for any general thermoelastic surface.

  8. Random vibrations of quadratic damping systems. [optimum damping analysis for automobile suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sireteanu, T.

    1974-01-01

    An oscillating system with quadratic damping subjected to white noise excitation is replaced by a nonlinear, statistically equivalent system for which the associated Fokker-Planck equation can be exactly solved. The mean square responses are calculated and the optimum damping coefficient is determined with respect to the minimum mean square acceleration criteria. An application of these results to the optimization of automobile suspension damping is given.

  9. Roll Damping Characterisation Program: User Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    sallying test. The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) have developed a software-based tool called the Roll Damping Characterisation...Murray Riding Maritime Division Murray obtained a Bachelor of Science (Honours) Degree from the

  10. Electron beam depolarization in a damping ring

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.

    1993-04-01

    Depolarization of a polarized electron beam injected into a damping ring is analyzed by extending calculations conventionally applied to proton synchrotrons. Synchrotron radiation in an electron ring gives rise to both polarizing and depolarizing effects. In a damping ring, the beam is stored for a time much less than the time for self polarization. Spin flip radiation may therefore be neglected. Synchrotron radiation without spin flips, however, must be considered as the resonance strength depends on the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude which changes as the electron beam is radiation damped. An expression for the beam polarization at extraction is derived which takes into account radiation damping. The results are applied to the electron ring at the Stanford Linear Collider and are compared with numerical matrix formalisms.

  11. Oscillation damping means for magnetically levitated systems

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2009-01-20

    The present invention presents a novel system and method of damping rolling, pitching, or yawing motions, or longitudinal oscillations superposed on their normal forward or backward velocity of a moving levitated system.

  12. Collisional damping of the geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhe

    2013-03-15

    The frequency and damping rate of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is revisited by using a gyrokinetic model with a number-conserving Krook collision operator. It is found that the damping rate of the GAM is non-monotonic as the collision rate increases. At low ion collision rate, the damping rate increases linearly with the collision rate; while as the ion collision rate is higher than v{sub ti}/R, where v{sub ti} and R are the ion thermal velocity and major radius, the damping rate decays with an increasing collision rate. At the same time, as the collision rate increases, the GAM frequency decreases from the (7/4+{tau})v{sub ti}/R to (1+{tau})v{sub ti}/R, where {tau} is the ratio of electron temperature to ion temperature.

  13. Mechanical loading, damping, and load-driven bone formation in mouse tibiae.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Todd; Wanis, Mina; Ayoub, Ramez; Zhao, Liming; Watts, Nelson B; Bhattacharya, Amit; Akkus, Ozan; Robling, Alexander; Yokota, Hiroki

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical loads play a pivotal role in the growth and maintenance of bone and joints. Although loading can activate anabolic genes and induce bone remodeling, damping is essential for preventing traumatic bone injury and fracture. In this study we investigated the damping capacity of bone, joint tissue, muscle, and skin using a mouse hindlimb model of enhanced loading in conjunction with finite element modeling to model bone curvature. Our hypothesis was that loads were primarily absorbed by the joints and muscle tissue, but that bone also contributed to damping through its compression and natural bending. To test this hypothesis, fresh mouse distal lower limb segments were cyclically loaded in axial compression in sequential bouts, with each subsequent bout having less surrounding tissue. A finite element model was generated to model effects of bone curvature in silico. Two damping-related parameters (phase shift angle and energy loss) were determined from the output of the loading experiments. Interestingly, the experimental results revealed that the knee joint contributed to the largest portion of the damping capacity of the limb, and bone itself accounted for approximately 38% of the total phase shift angle. Computational results showed that normal bone curvature enhanced the damping capacity of the bone by approximately 40%, and the damping effect grew at an accelerated pace as curvature was increased. Although structural curvature reduces critical loads for buckling in beam theory, evolution apparently favors maintaining curvature in the tibia. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia revealed that in response to axial loading, bone formation was significantly enhanced in the regions that were predicted to receive a curvature-induced bending moment. These results suggest that in addition to bone's compressive damping capacity, surrounding tissues, as well as naturally-occurring bone curvature, also contribute to mechanical damping, which may ultimately affect

  14. Spatial versus time hysteresis in damping mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Fabiano, R. H.; Wang, Y.; Inman, D. J.; Cudney, H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of continuing investigations on the task of estimating internal damping mechanisms in flexible structures. Specifically, two models for internal damping in Euler-Bernoulli beams are considered: spatial hysteresis and time hysteresis. A theoretically sound computational algorithm for estimation is described, and experimental results are discussed. It is concluded that both models perform well in the sense that they accurately predict response for the experiments conducted.

  15. Turbine blade with tuned damping structure

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X.; Messmann, Stephen J.

    2015-09-01

    A turbine blade is provided comprising: a root; an airfoil comprising an external wall extending radially from the root and having a radially outermost portion; and a damping structure. The external wall may comprise first and second side walls joined together to define an inner cavity of the airfoil. The damping structure may be positioned within the airfoil inner cavity and coupled to the airfoil so as to define a tuned mass damper.

  16. Analysis of nonlinear damping properties of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakova, Olga I.; Smolin, Igor Yu.; Bezmozgiy, Iosif M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes research results of nonlinear damping properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastics. The experimental and computational research is performed on flat composite specimens with the gradual structure complication (from 1 to 12 layers). Specimens are subjected to three types of testing which are modal, harmonic and transient analyses. Relationships between the amplitude response and damping ratio are obtained by means of the analysis of variance as the result of this research.

  17. Quantum damped oscillator I: Dissipation and resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz

    2006-04-15

    Quantization of a damped harmonic oscillator leads to so called Bateman's dual system. The corresponding Bateman's Hamiltonian, being a self-adjoint operator, displays the discrete family of complex eigenvalues. We show that they correspond to the poles of energy eigenvectors and the corresponding resolvent operator when continued to the complex energy plane. Therefore, the corresponding generalized eigenvectors may be interpreted as resonant states which are responsible for the irreversible quantum dynamics of a damped harmonic oscillator.

  18. Effects of Physical (In)activity on Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Heber, Stefan; Volf, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    As platelet activation is closely related to the liberation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, platelets play a central role in the development of CVD. Virtually all cardiovascular risk factors favor platelet hyperreactivity and, accordingly, also physical (in)activity affects platelet function. Within this paper, we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the impact of acute and habitual exercise on platelet function. Although there are apparent discrepancies regarding the reported effects of acute, strenuous exercise on platelet activation, a deeper analysis of the available literature reveals that the applied exercise intensity and the subjects' cardiorespiratory fitness represent critical determinants for the observed effects. Consideration of these factors leads to the summary that (i) acute, strenuous exercise can lead to platelet activation, (ii) regular physical activity and/or physical fitness diminish or prevent platelet activation in response to acute exercise, and (iii) habitual physical activity and/or physical fitness also favorably modulate platelet function at physical rest. Notably, these effects of exercise on platelet function show obvious similarities to the well-recognized relation between exercise and the risk for cardiovascular events where vigorous exercise transiently increases the risk for myocardial infarction and a physically active lifestyle dramatically reduces cardiovascular mortality. PMID:26557653

  19. Functional toxicology: a new approach to detect biologically active xenobiotics.

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, J A

    1993-01-01

    The pervasiveness of chemicals in the environment with estrogenic activity and other biological functions recommends the development of new approaches to monitor and study them. Chemicals can be screened for activity in vitro using a panel of human or animal cells that have been transfected with a specific receptor and reporter gene; for example, the estrogen receptor. By using a variety of different receptors, the screening of xenobiotics for biological functions can be broad. Chemicals could then be classified by their function in vitro which, in some cases, may be a useful guide for toxicological studies. Images Figure 1. PMID:8119246

  20. Validation of equivalent viscous damping methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquer Araujo, Xavier; Fransen, Sebastiaan H. J. A.; Germès, Sylvain; Thiry, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    An important step in the design and verification process of spacecraft structures is the coupled dynamic analysis with the launch vehicle in the low-frequency domain. To obtain accurate predictions of the satellite's dynamic environment, it is essential that the damping of the system is correctly defined and taken into account within the resolution methodologies for the coupled loads analysis (CLA). When working with finite element models, the materials' damping is characterized by structural damping ratios. In addition, most of the load cases present in the CLA are transient excitations, and so the resolution of the equations of motion must be done in the time domain. Unfortunately, in the CLA, transient analyses cannot be carried out using structural damping models. Thus, a transformation from a structural to a viscous damping characterization is necessary in this case. Nevertheless, this transformation is not trivial. There exist many methodologies for computing an equivalent viscous damping (EqVD) matrix of the system which can be used in transient analyses. This paper describes the results obtained from the validation of EqVD methodologies used in the European Space Agency. This work identifies the limitations of these methodologies and comes up with an enhanced methodology that predicts more reliable results.

  1. Experimental and theoretical investigation of passive damping concepts for member forced and free vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Zia; Mykins, David W.

    1987-01-01

    Potential passive damping concepts for use in space structures are identified. The effectiveness of copper brush, wool swab, and silly putty in chamber dampers is investigated through natural vibration tests on a tubular aluminum member. The member ends have zero translation and possess partial rotational restraints. The silly putty in chamber dampers provide the maximum passive damping efficiency. Forced vibration tests are then conducted with one, two, and three damper chambers containing silly putty. Owing to the limitation of the vibrator used, the performance of these dampers could not be evaluated experimentally until the forcing function was disengaged. Nevertheless, their performance is evaluated through a forced dynamic finite element analysis conducted as a part of this investigation. The theoretical results based on experimentally obtained damping ratios indicate that the passive dampers are considerably more effective under member natural vibration than during forced vibration. Also, the maximum damping under forced vibration occurs at or near resonance.

  2. Damped harmonic oscillator model for analyzing the dynamic characteristics of STM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, A. P.; Yao, X. X.; Wang, X.; Yang, D. X.; Zhang, X. M.

    2015-09-01

    Recognizing and distinguishing the dynamic characteristics of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) system is fatal for studying STM image. In this paper, a method for analyzing system’s characteristics by using a damped harmonic oscillator model is presented. The model is driven by random force and all of its properties are described by damping and periodic. For the general solution of such harmonic oscillator’s Langevin equation is deduced and the auto-correlation function (ACF) is obtained for fitting curve. It is shown that damping and periodic property of the two curves have a good agreement by comparing the fitting curve with the auto-correlation curve of time series dates which are acquired by STM. It could be concluded that the damped harmonic oscillator model and auto-correlation method are feasible for analyzing the dynamic characteristics of STM system.

  3. Tunable damping in the Heusler compound Co2 -xIrxMnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Albrecht; Wollmann, Lukas; Ebke, Daniel; Chadov, Stanislav; Kaiser, Christian; Diao, Zhitao; Zheng, Yuankai; Leng, Qunwen; Felser, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Here we report on the realization of tuning the intrinsic damping in the half-metallic Heusler compound Co2MnSi by substituting Co by Ir. The work includes theoretical calculations and experimental measurements on bulk and thin films samples. Control of damping is to remove unwanted magnetization motion and suppress signal echoes through uncontrolled precession of the magnetization for future implementation of this material into, e.g., current perpendicular plane-giant-magnetoresistance sensors. Density functional calculations revealed stable magnetization and increasing damping parameter with Iridium concentration, whereas the half metallicity could be retained. The calculations are consistent with experimental results from bulk and thin film samples of this report and elucidate the linear dependence of the Gilbert damping parameter on the substituent concentration. This report again demonstrates the inherent tunability of Heusler compounds, which constitutes a pivotal feature of this material class.

  4. Models of neural networks with fuzzy activation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, A. T.; Korikov, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    This paper investigates the application of a new form of neuron activation functions that are based on the fuzzy membership functions derived from the theory of fuzzy systems. On the basis of the results regarding neuron models with fuzzy activation functions, we created the models of fuzzy-neural networks. These fuzzy-neural network models differ from conventional networks that employ the fuzzy inference systems using the methods of neural networks. While conventional fuzzy-neural networks belong to the first type, fuzzy-neural networks proposed here are defined as the second-type models. The simulation results show that the proposed second-type model can successfully solve the problem of the property prediction for time – dependent signals. Neural networks with fuzzy impulse activation functions can be widely applied in many fields of science, technology and mechanical engineering to solve the problems of classification, prediction, approximation, etc.

  5. Effects of physical activity on exercise tests and respiratory function

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y; Macera, C; Addy, C; Sy, F; Wieland, D; Blair, S

    2003-01-01

    Background: Exercise is an important component of pulmonary rehabilitation for patients with chronic lung disease. Objective: To explore the role of physical activity in maintaining cardiac and respiratory function in healthy people. Methods: Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured by a maximal treadmill test (MTT), and respiratory function was tested by spirometry. The cross sectional study included data from 24 536 healthy persons who were examined at the Cooper Clinic between 1971 and 1995; the longitudinal study included data from 5707 healthy persons who had an initial visit between 1971 and 1995 and a subsequent visit during the next five years. All participants were aged 25–55 years and completed a cardiorespiratory test and a medical questionnaire. Results: In the cross sectional study, after controlling for covariates, being active and not being a recent smoker were associated with better cardiorespiratory fitness and respiratory function in both men and women. In the follow up study, persons who remained or became active had better MTT than persons who remained or became sedentary. Men who remained active had higher forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) than the other groups. Smoking was related to lower cardiorespiratory fitness and respiratory function. Conclusions: Physical activity and non-smoking or smoking cessation is associated with maintenance of cardiorespiratory fitness. Change in physical activity habits is associated with change in cardiorespiratory fitness, but respiratory function contributed little to this association during a five year follow up. PMID:14665592

  6. Circulating Mitochondrial DAMPs Are Not Effective Inducers of Proteinuria and Kidney Injury in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hong; Liang, Yaojun; Wang, Xiao; Bao, Wenduona; Yun, Shifeng; Ye, Yuting; Zheng, Chunxia; Liu, Zhihong; Shi, Shaolin

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria in eukaryotic cells are derived from bacteria in evolution. Like bacteria, mitochondria contain DNA with unmethylated CpG motifs and formyl peptides, both of which have recently been shown to be damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and induce immune response and cell injury. Based on the facts that circulating mitochondrial DAMPs (mtDAMPs) are increased in the patients of trauma or burn injury who also have proteinuria, that mtDAMPs can activate immune cells which in turn secrete glomerular permeability factors, that renal intrinsic cells express a variety of DAMP receptors, and that mtDAMPs can directly increase endothelial cell permeability in vitro, we hypothesized that mtDAMPs may be novel circulating factors inducing proteinuria and kidney injury. We tested this hypothesis by directly injecting mtDAMPs into rodents and examining urinary protein and kidney histology. We prepared mtDAMP samples, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial debris (MTD), from rodent liver. In mice, injection of mtDNA for 20 μg/ml initial concentration in circulation (much higher than the clinical range), did not cause any renal manifestations. However, an increased dose leading to 45 μg/ml initial concentration in circulation resulted in a transient, slight increase in urinary albumin. In rats, MTD injection resulting in 450 μg/ml initial concentration of MTD protein in circulation, which was much higher than the clinical range, caused mild, transient proteinuria and lung lesions. Multiple injections of such large amount of either mtDNA or MTD into rodents on 3 consecutive days also failed in inducing proteinuria and kidney injury. In summary, clinical levels of circulating mtDAMPs do not induce proteinuria and clinically irrelevant high levels of mtDAMPs cause only a transient and slight increase in urinary protein in rodents, suggesting that circulating mtDAMPs may not be responsible for the proteinuria and kidney injury in patients with trauma

  7. Robust time-domain identification of mass stiffness, and damping matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roemer, Michael J.; Mook, D. Joseph

    1990-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the mass, stiffness, and damping characteristics of a structure is necessary for determining the control laws best suited for active control methodologies. There are several modal identification techniques available for determining the frequencies, damping ratios, and mode shapes of a structure. However, modal identification methods in both the frequency and time domains have difficulties for certain circumstances. Frequency domain techniques which utilize the steady-state response from various harmonic inputs often encounter difficulties when the frequencies are closely distributed, the structure exhibits a high degree of damping, or the steady-state condition is hard to establish. Time domain techniques have produced successful results, but lack robustness with respect to measurement noise. In this paper, two identification techniques and an estimation method are combined to form a time-domain technique to accurately identify the mass, stiffness, and damping matrices from noisy measurements.

  8. Tracing Plant Defense Responses in Roots upon MAMP/DAMP Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Kei; Saijo, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes how to apply microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) or damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) solutions to Arabidopsis roots to trace defense responses in the root. Plants sense the presence of microbes via the perception of MAMPs or DAMPs by surface-localized pattern recognition receptors. The mechanisms governing plant root immunity are poorly characterized compared with those underlying plant immunity in the leaf, despite the fact that plant roots constantly interact with countless microbes living in soils that carry potential MAMPs and could stimulate the production of plant-derived DAMPs during colonization. To understand how a plant root immune system detects and reacts to the potential sources of a stimulus, we describe a simple method to monitor activation of root immunity upon MAMP/DAMP treatment by measuring relative expression of defense-related genes by RT-qPCR.

  9. Damping and local control of mirror suspensions for laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, K. A.; Shapiro, B. N.

    2012-04-01

    The mirrors of laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors hang from multi-stage suspensions. These support the optics against gravity while isolating them from external vibration. Thermal noise must be kept small so mechanical loss must be minimized and the resulting structure has high-Q resonances rigid-body modes, typically in the frequency range between about 0.3 Hz and 20 Hz. Operation of the interferometer requires these resonances to be damped. Active damping provides the design flexibility required to achieve rapid settling with low noise. In practice there is a compromise between sensor performance, and hence cost and complexity, and sophistication of the control algorithm. We introduce a novel approach which combines the new technique of modal damping with methods developed from those applied in GEO 600. This approach is predicted to meet the goals for damping and for noise performance set by the Advanced LIGO project.

  10. Ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films functionalized with therapeutically active collagen networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Chen, M.; Bruno, P.; Lam, R.; Robinson, E.; Gruen, D.; Ho, D.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication of biologically amenable interfaces in medicine bridges translational technologies with their surrounding biological environment. Functionalized nanomaterials catalyze this coalescence through the creation of biomimetic and active substrates upon which a spectrum of therapeutic elements can be delivered to adherent cells to address biomolecular processes in cancer, inflammation, etc. Here, we demonstrate the robust functionalization of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) with type I collagen and dexamethasone (Dex), an anti-inflammatory drug, to fabricate a hybrid therapeutically active substrate for localized drug delivery. UNCD oxidation coupled with a pH-mediated collagen adsorption process generated a comprehensive interface between the two materials, and subsequent Dex integration, activity, and elution were confirmed through inflammatory gene expression assays. These studies confer a translational relevance to the biofunctionalized UNCD in its role as an active therapeutic network for potent regulation of cellular activity toward applications in nanomedicine.

  11. Damping effects in doped graphene: The relaxation-time approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupčić, I.

    2014-11-01

    The dynamical conductivity of interacting multiband electronic systems derived by Kupčić et al. [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 90, 145602 (2013), 10.1088/0953-8984/25/14/145602] is shown to be consistent with the general form of the Ward identity. Using the semiphenomenological form of this conductivity formula, we have demonstrated that the relaxation-time approximation can be used to describe the damping effects in weakly interacting multiband systems only if local charge conservation in the system and gauge invariance of the response theory are properly treated. Such a gauge-invariant response theory is illustrated on the common tight-binding model for conduction electrons in doped graphene. The model predicts two distinctly resolved maxima in the energy-loss-function spectra. The first one corresponds to the intraband plasmons (usually called the Dirac plasmons). On the other hand, the second maximum (π plasmon structure) is simply a consequence of the Van Hove singularity in the single-electron density of states. The dc resistivity and the real part of the dynamical conductivity are found to be well described by the relaxation-time approximation, but only in the parametric space in which the damping is dominated by the direct scattering processes. The ballistic transport and the damping of Dirac plasmons are thus the problems that require abandoning the relaxation-time approximation.

  12. Berberine improves kidney function in diabetic mice via AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Sun, Li-Na; Nie, Hui-Bin; Wang, Xue-Ling; Guan, Guang-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Effective therapies to prevent the development of this disease are required. Berberine (BBR) has several preventive effects on diabetes and its complications. However, the molecular mechanism of BBR on kidney function in diabetes is not well defined. Here, we reported that activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is required for BBR-induced improvement of kidney function in vivo. AMPK phosphorylation and activity, productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), kidney function including serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine clearance (Ccr), and urinary protein excretion, morphology of glomerulus were determined in vitro or in vivo. Exposure of cultured human glomerulus mesangial cells (HGMCs) to BBR time- or dose-dependently activates AMPK by increasing the thr172 phosphorylation and its activities. Inhibition of LKB1 by siRNA or mutant abolished BBR-induced AMPK activation. Incubation of cells with high glucose (HG, 30 mM) markedly induced the oxidative stress of HGMCs, which were abolished by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, AMPK gene overexpression or BBR. Importantly, the effects induced by BBR were bypassed by AMPK siRNA transfection in HG-treated HGMCs. In animal studies, streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia dramatically promoted glomerulosclerosis and impaired kidney function by increasing serum BUN, urinary protein excretion, and decreasing Ccr, as well as increased oxidative stress. Administration of BBR remarkably improved kidney function in wildtype mice but not in AMPKα2-deficient mice. We conclude that AMPK activation is required for BBR to improve kidney function in diabetic mice.

  13. On the modal damping ratios of shear-type structures equipped with Rayleigh damping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombetti, T.; Silvestri, S.

    2006-04-01

    The effects of added manufactured viscous dampers upon shear-type structures are analytically investigated here for the class of Rayleigh damping systems. The definitions of mass proportional damping (MPD) and stiffness proportional damping (SPD) systems are briefly recalled and their physical counterpart is derived. From basic physics, a detailed mathematical demonstration that the first modal damping ratio of a structure equipped with the MPD system is always larger than the first modal damping ratio of a structure equipped with the SPD system is provided here. All results are derived for the class of structures characterised by constant values of lateral stiffness and storey mass, under the equal "total size" constraint. The paper also provides closed form demonstrations of other properties of modal damping ratios which further indicate that the MPD and the SPD systems are respectively characterised by the largest and the smallest damping efficiency among Rayleigh damping systems subjected to base excitation. A numerical application with realistic data corresponding to an actual seven-storey building structure is presented to illustrate and verify the theoretical findings.

  14. Damping and fluidelastic instability in two-phase cross-flow heat exchanger tube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Joaquin E.

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate damping and fluidelastic instability in tube arrays subjected to two-phase cross-flow. The purpose of this research was to improve our understanding of these phenomena and how they are affected by void fraction and flow regime. The model tube bundle had 10 cantilevered tubes in a parallel-triangular configuration, with a pitch ratio of 1.49. The two-phase flow loop used in this research utilized Refrigerant 11 as the working fluid, which better models steam-water than air-water mixtures in terms of vapour-liquid mass ratio as well as permitting phase changes due to pressure fluctuations. The void fraction was measured using a gamma densitometer, introducing an improvement over the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) in terms of void fraction, density and velocity predictions. Three different damping measurement methodologies were implemented and compared in order to obtain a more reliable damping estimate. The methods were the traditionally used half-power bandwidth, the logarithmic decrement and an exponential fitting to the tube decay response. The decay trace was obtained by "plucking" the monitored tube from outside the test section using a novel technique, in which a pair of electromagnets changed their polarity at the natural frequency of the tube to produce resonance. The experiments showed that the half-power bandwidth produces higher damping values than the other two methods. The primary difference between the methods is caused by tube frequency shifting, triggered by fluctuations in the added mass and coupling between the tubes, which depend on void fraction and flow regime. The exponential fitting proved to be the more consistent and reliable approach to estimating damping. In order to examine the relationship between the damping ratio and mass flux, the former was plotted as a function of void fraction and pitch mass flux in an iso-contour plot. The results showed that damping is not independent of mass

  15. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Michael D.; Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  16. Effects of damping wigglers on beam dynamics in the NLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, Andrzej; Wu, Ying

    2001-06-16

    To achieve the required damping time in the main damping rings for the Next Linear Collider (NLC), a wiggler will be required in each ring with integrated squared field strength up to 110 T{sup 2}m. There are concerns that nonlinear components of the wiggler field will damage the dynamic aperture of the ring, leading to poor injection efficiency. Severe effects from an insertion device have been observed and corrected in SPEAR 2. In this paper, we describe a model that we have developed to study the effects of the damping wiggler, compare the predictions of the model with actual experience in the case of the SPEAR 2 wiggler, and consider the predicted effects of current damping wiggler design on the NLC main damping rings.

  17. Synchronization-based approach for detecting functional activation of brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Lei; Cai, Shi-Min; Zhang, Jie; Zhuo, Zhao; Fu, Zhong-Qian; Zhou, Pei-Ling

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate a synchronization-based, data-driven clustering approach for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, and specifically for detecting functional activation from fMRI data. We first define a new measure of similarity between all pairs of data points (i.e., time series of voxels) integrating both complete phase synchronization and amplitude correlation. These pairwise similarities are taken as the coupling between a set of Kuramoto oscillators, which in turn evolve according to a nearest-neighbor rule. As the network evolves, similar data points naturally synchronize with each other, and distinct clusters will emerge. The clustering behavior of the interaction network of the coupled oscillators, therefore, mirrors the clustering property of the original multiple time series. The clustered regions whose cross-correlation coefficients are much greater than other regions are considered as the functionally activated brain regions. The analysis of fMRI data in auditory and visual areas shows that the recognized brain functional activations are in complete correspondence with those from the general linear model of statistical parametric mapping, but with a significantly lower time complexity. We further compare our results with those from traditional K-means approach, and find that our new clustering approach can distinguish between different response patterns more accurately and efficiently than the K-means approach, and therefore more suitable in detecting functional activation from event-related experimental fMRI data.

  18. Dipeptides Increase Functional Activity of Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Malinin, V V; Durnova, A O; Polyakova, V O; Kvetnoi, I M

    2015-05-01

    We analyzed the effect of dipeptide Glu-Trp and isovaleroyl-Glu-Trp in concentrations of 0.2, 2 and 20 μg/ml and Actovegin preparation on functional activity of human skin fibroblasts. Dipeptides, especially Glu-Trp, produce a stimulating effect on human skin fibroblasts and their effect is equivalent to that of Actovegin. Dipeptides stimulate cell renewal processes by activating synthesis of Ki-67 and reducing expression of caspase-9 and enhance antioxidant function of the cells by stimulating the expression of Hsp-90 and inducible NO-synthase. These findings suggest that dipeptides are promising candidates for preparations stimulating reparative processes.

  19. Gilbert damping in magnetic layered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati, E.; Cinal, M.; Edwards, D. M.; Umerski, A.

    2014-07-01

    The Gilbert damping constant present in the phenomenological Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation describing the dynamics of magnetization is calculated for ferromagnetic metallic films as well as Co/nonmagnet (NM) bilayers. The calculations are done within a realistic nine-orbital tight-binding model including spin-orbit coupling. The convergence of the damping constant expressed as a sum over the Brillouin zone is remarkably improved by introducing finite temperature into the electronic occupation factors and subsequent summation over the Matsubara frequencies. We investigate how the Gilbert damping constant depends on the ferromagnetic film thickness as well as on the thickness of the nonmagnetic cap in Co/NM bilayers (NM=Cu, Pd, Ag, Pt, and Au). The obtained theoretical dependence of the damping constant on the electron-scattering rate, describing the average lifetime of electronic states, varies substantially with the ferromagnetic film thickness and it differs significantly from the dependence for bulk ferromagnetic metals. The presence of nonmagnetic caps is found to largely enhance the magnetic damping in Co/NM bilayers in accordance with experimental data. Unlike Cu, Ag, and Au a particularly strong enhancement is obtained for Pd and Pt caps. This is attributed to the combined effect of the large spin-orbit couplings of Pd and Pt and the simultaneous presence of d states at the Fermi level in these two metals. The calculated Gilbert damping constant also shows an oscillatory dependence on the thicknesses of both ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic parts of the investigated systems which is attributed to quantum-well states. Finally, the expression for contributions to the damping constant from individual atomic layers is derived. The obtained distribution of layer contributions in Co/Pt and Co/Pd bilayers proves that the enhanced damping which affects the dynamics of the magnetization in the Co film originates mainly from a region within the nonmagnetic part of the

  20. Informational Complexity and Functional Activity of RNA Structures

    PubMed Central

    Carothers, James M.; Oestreich, Stephanie C.; Davis, Jonathan H.

    2004-01-01

    Very little is known about the distribution of functional DNA, RNA, and protein molecules in sequence space. The question of how the number and complexity of distinct solutions to a particular biochemical problem varies with activity is an important aspect of this general problem. Here we present a comparison of the structures and activities of eleven distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers). By experimentally measuring the amount of information required to specify each optimal binding structure, we show that defining a structure capable of 10-fold tighter binding requires approximately 10 additional bits of information. This increase in information content is equivalent to specifying the identity of five additional nucleotide positions and corresponds to an ∼1000-fold decrease in abundance in a sample of random sequences. We observe a similar relationship between structural complexity and activity in a comparison of two catalytic RNAs (ribozyme ligases), raising the possibility of a general relationship between the complexity of RNA structures and their functional activity. Describing how information varies with activity in other heteropolymers, both biological and synthetic, may lead to an objective means of comparing their functional properties. This approach could be useful in predicting the functional utility of novel heteropolymers. PMID:15099096

  1. Self-efficacy: Implications for Physical Activity, Function, and Functional Limitations in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, Edward; Szabo, Amanda; Gothe, Neha; Olson, Erin A.

    2013-01-01

    Attenuating the physical decline and increases in disability associated with the aging process is an important public health priority. Evidence suggests that regular physical activity participation improves functional performance, such as walking, standing balance, flexibility, and getting up out of a chair, and also plays an important role in the disablement process by providing a protective effect against functional limitations. Whether these effects are direct or indirect has yet to be reliably established. In this review, the authors take the perspective that such relationships are indirect and operate through self-efficacy expectations. They first provide an introduction to social cognitive theory followed by an overview of self-efficacy's reciprocal relationship with physical activity. They then consider the literature that documents the effects of physical activity on functional performance and functional limitations in older adults and the extent to which self-efficacy might mediate these relationships. Furthermore, they also present evidence that suggests that self-efficacy plays a pivotal role in a model in which the protective effects conferred by physical activity on functional limitations operate through functional performance. The article concludes with a brief section making recommendations for the development of strategies within physical activity and rehabilitative programs for maximizing the major sources of efficacy information. PMID:24353482

  2. A numerical and experimental study on viscoelastic damping of a 3D structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijnen, M. W. L. M.; Pasteuning, F.; Fey, R. H. B.; Schothorst, G. van; Nijmeijer, H.

    2015-08-01

    Structural vibrations often cause problems in high precision instruments, which may be solved by introducing passive damping. In this paper, different ways of introducing passive damping via viscoelastic materials (VEM) are discussed. Discrete damping elements and constrained layer (CL) configurations are selected and used to efficiently damp an open aluminum box. For the constrained layer configurations, a distinction is made between full and partial coverage of the structure. The steady-state dynamics of the box are simulated using a finite element (FE) model, which includes frequency dependent VEM properties. This model is used to find a design that possesses high damping while taking into account design constraints. The simulation results are experimentally validated using both modal parameters and frequency response functions (FRFs). For the computation of model based FRFs, a new method based on Interpolated Modal Parameter Superposition (IMPS) is proposed. Model based results and experimental results show good resemblance, even without updating the model with deviations in the realized structure. The local dampers add most damping to a limited number of modes. Partially covering the box with CL dampers is found to be more effective than full coverage of the structure with the same mass addition.

  3. Radiation damping in microcoil NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, V. V.

    2006-04-01

    Radiation damping arises from the field induced in the receiver coil by large bulk magnetization and tends to selectively drive this magnetization back to equilibrium much faster than relaxation processes. The demand for increased sensitivity in mass-limited samples has led to the development of microcoil NMR probes that are capable of obtaining high quality NMR spectra with small sample volumes (nL-μL). Microcoil probes are optimized to increase sensitivity by increasing either the sample-to-coil ratio (filling factor) of the probe or quality factor of the detection coil. Though radiation damping effects have been studied in standard NMR probes, these effects have not been measured in the microcoil probes. Here a systematic evaluation of radiation damping effects in a microcoil NMR probe is presented and the results are compared with similar measurements in conventional large volume samples. These results show that radiation-damping effects in microcoil probe is much more pronounced than in 5 mm probes, and that it is critically important to optimize NMR experiments to minimize these effects. As microcoil probes provide better control of the bulk magnetization, with good RF and B0 inhomogeneity, in addition to negligible dipolar field effects due to nearly spherical sample volumes, these probes can be used exclusively to study the complex behavior of radiation damping.

  4. Radiation damping in microcoil NMR probes.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, V V

    2006-04-01

    Radiation damping arises from the field induced in the receiver coil by large bulk magnetization and tends to selectively drive this magnetization back to equilibrium much faster than relaxation processes. The demand for increased sensitivity in mass-limited samples has led to the development of microcoil NMR probes that are capable of obtaining high quality NMR spectra with small sample volumes (nL-microL). Microcoil probes are optimized to increase sensitivity by increasing either the sample-to-coil ratio (filling factor) of the probe or quality factor of the detection coil. Though radiation damping effects have been studied in standard NMR probes, these effects have not been measured in the microcoil probes. Here a systematic evaluation of radiation damping effects in a microcoil NMR probe is presented and the results are compared with similar measurements in conventional large volume samples. These results show that radiation-damping effects in microcoil probe is much more pronounced than in 5 mm probes, and that it is critically important to optimize NMR experiments to minimize these effects. As microcoil probes provide better control of the bulk magnetization, with good RF and B0 inhomogeneity, in addition to negligible dipolar field effects due to nearly spherical sample volumes, these probes can be used exclusively to study the complex behavior of radiation damping.

  5. Anti-damping effect of radiation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Li, H.; Shen, Y. F.; Yuan, X. Z.; Zi, J.

    2010-01-01

    The anti-damping effect of radiation reaction, which means the radiation reaction does non-negative work on a radiating charge, is investigated at length by using the Lorentz-Dirac equation (LDE) for the motion of a point charge respectively acted on by (a) a pure electric field, (b) a pure magnetic field and (c) the fields of an electromagnetic wave. We found that the curvature of the charge's trajectory plays an important role in the radiation reaction force, and the anti-damping effect cannot take place for the real macroscopic motions of a point charge. The condition for this anti-damping effect to take place is that the gradient of the external force field must exceed a certain value over the region of magnitude of the classical radius of massive charges (~10-15 m). Our results are potentially helpful to lessen the controversy on LDE and justify it as the correct classical equation describing the radiating charge's motion. If this anti-damping effect of LDE were a real existing physical process, it could serve as a mechanism within the context of classical electrodynamics for the stability of hydrogen atoms. Using the picture of an electron in quantum electrodynamics, namely the negative bare charge surrounded by the polarized positive charges of vacuum, we can obtain a reasonable explanation for the energy transferred to the electron during the occurrence of the anti-damping effect, on which the venerable work of Wheeler and Feynman has thrown some light.

  6. Damping by branching: a bioinspiration from trees.

    PubMed

    Theckes, B; Langre, E de; Boutillon, X

    2011-12-01

    Man-made slender structures are known to be sensitive to high levels of vibration due to their flexibility which often cause irreversible damage. In nature, trees repeatedly endure large amplitudes of motion, mostly caused by strong climatic events, yet with minor or no damage in most cases. A new damping mechanism inspired by the architecture of trees is identified here and characterized in the simplest tree-like structure, a Y-shaped branched structure. Through analytical and numerical analyses of a simple two-degree-of-freedom model, branching is shown to be the key ingredient in this protective mechanism that we call damping-by-branching. It originates in the geometrical nonlinearities so that it is specifically efficient to damp out large amplitudes of motion. A more realistic model, using flexible beam approximation, shows that the mechanism is robust. Finally, two bioinspired architectures are analyzed, showing significant levels of damping achieved via branching with typically 30% of the energy being dissipated in one oscillation. This concept of damping-by-branching is of simple practical use in the design of very slender and flexible structures subjected to extreme dynamical loadings.

  7. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation. [Toxoplasma gondii

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin.

  8. Passive damping concepts for slender columns in space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Z.; Ekhelikar, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of three different passive damping concepts is conducted for a slender member with partial rotational end restraints. Over a hundred full-scale natural vibration experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of mass-string, polyethylene tubing, and chain damping concepts. The damping properties obtained from the experiments were used in the approximate analyses based on the partial differential equation of motion for the problem. The comparison of the experimental and the theoretical deflection-time relations shows that the velocity-dependent damping model used in the theory is adequate. From the experimental results, the effect of end connection friction and induced axial forces on damping is identified. The definition of an efficiency index is proposed based on the damping ratio and the mass of a given passive damping device. Using this definition, the efficiencies of the three damping devices are compared. The polyethylene tubing concept resulted into a low damping efficiency.

  9. Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping Contributions of Variable-Speed Wind Generators in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI)

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yong; Gracia, Jose R,; King, Jr, Thomas J.; ...

    2014-05-16

    The U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI) is one of the largest electric power grids in the world and is expected to have difficulties in dealing with frequency regulation and oscillation damping issues caused by the increasing wind power. On the other side, variable-speed wind generators can actively engage in frequency regulation or oscillation damping with supplementary control loops. This paper creates a 5% wind power penetration simulation scenario based on the 16 000-bus EI system dynamic model and developed the user-defined wind electrical control model in PSS (R) E that incorporates additional frequency regulation and oscillation damping control loops. We evaluatedmore » the potential contributions of variable-speed wind generations to the EI system frequency regulation and oscillation damping, and simulation results demonstrate that current and future penetrations of wind power are promising in the EI system frequency regulation and oscillation damping.« less

  10. Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping Contributions of Variable-Speed Wind Generators in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Gracia, Jose R,; King, Jr, Thomas J.; Liu, Yilu

    2014-05-16

    The U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI) is one of the largest electric power grids in the world and is expected to have difficulties in dealing with frequency regulation and oscillation damping issues caused by the increasing wind power. On the other side, variable-speed wind generators can actively engage in frequency regulation or oscillation damping with supplementary control loops. This paper creates a 5% wind power penetration simulation scenario based on the 16 000-bus EI system dynamic model and developed the user-defined wind electrical control model in PSS (R) E that incorporates additional frequency regulation and oscillation damping control loops. We evaluated the potential contributions of variable-speed wind generations to the EI system frequency regulation and oscillation damping, and simulation results demonstrate that current and future penetrations of wind power are promising in the EI system frequency regulation and oscillation damping.

  11. Thin-layer magnetostrictive composite films for turbomachinery fan blade damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, Wade J.; Lee, Donggun; Carman, Gregory P.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.

    2003-08-01

    Recently, there have been significant advances in using magnetostrictive particles in a polymer matrix; finding uses in many applications, both as an active transducer and a passive dumper. Termed magnetostrictive particulate composites (MPC), the material provides capabilities identical or superior to the monolithic material. Fortis Technologies has been pursuing improvements in the applications and fabrication of this innovative material. Specifically, this MPC technology provides a passive, broadband, large temperature range, high stiffness, damping material to be used where current technologies fall short. A novel manufacturing technique based on magnetic fields has been developed to distribute magnetostrictive particulates in a polymer resin and apply it in thin-layer on surfaces for vibration damping in environments typical of turbomachinery fan blades. These magnetostrictive particulates provide damping through domain wall switching, a non-conservative action which provides a high loss factor, and, in turn, significant vibration mitigation. The magnetostrictive damping composites can be easily fabricated into thin films, provide stiffness and strength while also incorporating damping capabilities which exceed in performance and temperature range viscoelastic materials, the current state of the art for applied blade damping. Analytical studies, a finite element analysis and experimental study of the new material in a typical turbomachinery blade loading condition has been conducted and has demonstrated the benefits of this technology.

  12. Damping measurements from an operating wind turbine: Preliminary results and procedures

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H.; Carne, T.G.

    1992-01-01

    The Natural Excitation Technique (NEXT) extracts modal parameters from structures undergoing some natural excitation in which no measure of the excitation force is available. Preliminary damping results are presented for the first blade flatwise modes of the Sandia/DOE 34-m Test Bed (a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine) as a function of both wind speed and tip speed ratio. The current data set is to sparse to show a trend between damping and wind speed, however a trend of higher damping for higher tip speed ratio is apparent. An estimate of the uncertainty of the data is provided. Several improvements to NEXT have been added and are discussed in this paper. These improvements include: the use of a single software environment, the addition of the complex mode indicator function, the partial removal of harmonics, time and frequency domain cross-correlation function calculation, windowing, variable ensemble size capability, filtering and data decimation, and visual convergence checking.

  13. Damping measurements from an operating wind turbine: Preliminary results and procedures

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H.; Carne, T.G.

    1992-12-31

    The Natural Excitation Technique (NEXT) extracts modal parameters from structures undergoing some natural excitation in which no measure of the excitation force is available. Preliminary damping results are presented for the first blade flatwise modes of the Sandia/DOE 34-m Test Bed (a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine) as a function of both wind speed and tip speed ratio. The current data set is to sparse to show a trend between damping and wind speed, however a trend of higher damping for higher tip speed ratio is apparent. An estimate of the uncertainty of the data is provided. Several improvements to NEXT have been added and are discussed in this paper. These improvements include: the use of a single software environment, the addition of the complex mode indicator function, the partial removal of harmonics, time and frequency domain cross-correlation function calculation, windowing, variable ensemble size capability, filtering and data decimation, and visual convergence checking.

  14. Geometric reasoning about damped and forced harmonic motion in the complex plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Hunter G.

    2015-09-01

    Complex-valued functions are commonly used to solve differential equations for one-dimensional motion of a harmonic oscillator with linear damping, a sinusoidal driving force, or both. However, the usual approach treats complex functions as an algebraic shortcut, neglecting geometrical representations of those functions and discarding imaginary parts. This article emphasizes the benefit of using diagrams in the complex plane for such systems, in order to build intuition about harmonic motion and promote spatial reasoning and the use of varied representations. Examples include the analysis of exact time sequences of various kinematic events in damped harmonic motion, sense-making about the phase difference between a driving force and the resulting motion, and understanding the discrepancy between the resonant frequency and the natural undamped frequency for forced, damped harmonic motion. The approach is suitable for supporting instruction in undergraduate upper-division classical mechanics.

  15. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.; Jensen, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  16. Measurement of damping of graphite epoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The design of an experiment to measure the damping of a cylindrical graphite-epoxy specimen with a three point support and a knife edge support is described as well as equipment used in tests conducted to determine the influence of the support at the two ends of the specimen and to simulate an idealized free-free boundary condition at the two edges. A curve fitting technique is being used to process the frequency response data obtained. Experiments conducted on the thin plate specimen also reveal the influence of the end support condition on the damping ratio of the specimen. The damping ratio values measured for both specimens appear to be strongly influenced by the shape of the specimen and appear to depend on length and fiber orientation as well as the presence of discontinuities such as sharp bends, corners, and notches.

  17. Turbine blade damping device with controlled loading

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John J

    2013-09-24

    A damping structure for a turbomachine rotor. The damping structure including an elongated snubber element including a first snubber end rigidly attached to a first blade and extending toward an adjacent second blade, and an opposite second snubber end positioned adjacent to a cooperating surface associated with the second blade. The snubber element has a centerline extending radially inwardly in a direction from the first blade toward the second blade along at least a portion of the snubber element between the first and second snubber ends. Rotational movement of the rotor effects relative movement between the second snubber end and the cooperating surface to position the second snubber end in frictional engagement with the cooperating surface with a predetermined damping force determined by a centrifugal force on the snubber element.

  18. Radiation damping in focusing-dominated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Chen, Pisin; Ruth, R.D.

    1995-06-01

    A quasi-classical method is developed to calculate the radiation damping of a relativistic particle in a straight, continuous focusing system. In one limiting case where the pitch angle of the particle {theta}{sub p} is much larger than the radiation opening angle 1/{gamma}, the radiation power spectrum is similar to synchrotron radiation and the relative damping rate of the transverse action is proportional to the relative energy loss rate. In the other limiting case where {theta}{sub p} {much_lt} 1/{gamma}, the radiation is dipole in nature and the relative damping rate of the transverse action is energy-independent and is much faster than the relative energy rate. Quantum excitation to the transverse action is absent in this focusing channel. These results can be extended to bent systems provided that the focusing field dominates over the bending field.

  19. Resolving photons from cosmic ray in DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zunlei; Chang, Jin; Li, Xiang; Dong, TieKuang; Zang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer(DAMPE), which took to the skies on 17 December, is designed for high energy cosmic ray ion detection. The proportion of photons in the cosmic ray is very small, so it's difficult to distinguish between photons and 'background', but necessary for any DAMPE gamma-ray science goals.The paper present a algorithm to identify photons from 'background' mainly by the tracker/converter, which promote pair conversion and measure the directions of incident particles, and an anticoincidence detector,featuring an array of plastic scintillator to detect the charged particles.The method has been studied by simulating using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code and adjusted by the BeamTest at CERN in December,2014.In addition,DAMPE photon detection capabilities can be checked using the flight data.

  20. Turbine blade damping device with controlled loading

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John J.

    2015-09-29

    A damping structure for a turbomachine rotor. The damping structure including an elongated snubber element including a first snubber end rigidly attached to a first blade and extending toward an adjacent second blade, and an opposite second snubber end positioned adjacent to a cooperating surface associated with the second blade. The snubber element has a centerline extending radially inwardly in a direction from the first blade toward the second blade along at least a portion of the snubber element between the first and second snubber ends. Rotational movement of the rotor effects relative movement between the second snubber end and the cooperating surface to position the second snubber end in frictional engagement with the cooperating surface with a predetermined damping force determined by a centrifugal force on the snubber element.

  1. Viscous damping of perforated planar micromechanical structures

    PubMed Central

    Homentcovschi, D.; Miles, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    The paper gives an analytical approximation to the viscous damping coefficient due to the motion of a gas between a pair of closely spaced fluctuating plates in which one of the plates contains a regular system of circular holes. These types of structures are important parts of many microelectromechanical devices realized in MEMS technology as microphones, microaccelerometers, resonators, etc. The pressure satisfies a Reynolds’ type equation with coefficients accounting for all the important effects: compressibility of the gas, inertia and possibly slip of the gas on the plates. An analytical expression for the optimum number of circular holes which assure a minimum value of the total damping coefficient is given. This value realizes an equilibrium between the squeeze-film damping and the viscous resistance of the holes. The paper also provides analytical design formulas to be used in the case of regular circular perforated plates. PMID:19365579

  2. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  3. Biomimetic Gradient Polymers with Enhanced Damping Capacities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Huan; Guo, Jing; Cheng, Beichen; Cao, Yuan; Lu, Shengjun; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Designing gradient structures, mimicking biological materials, such as pummelo peels and tendon, is a promising strategy for developing advanced materials with superior energy damping capacities. Here a facile and effective approach for fabricating polymers with composition gradients at millimeter length scale is presented. The gradient thiol-ene polymers (TEPs) are created by the use of density difference of ternary thiol-ene-ene precursors and the subsequent photo-crosslinking via thiol-ene reaction. The compositional gradients are analyzed via differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), compressive modulus testing, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation, and swelling measurements. In contrast to homogeneous TEPs networks, the resultant gradient polymer shows a broader effective damping temperature range combining with good mechanical properties. The present result provides an effective route toward high damping materials by the fabrication of gradient structures.

  4. Fluid damping of cylindrical liquid storage tanks.

    PubMed

    Habenberger, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed in order to calculate the damping effects of viscous fluids in liquid storage tanks subjected to earthquakes. The potential equation of an ideal fluid can satisfy only the boundary conditions normal to the surface of the liquid. To satisfy also the tangential interaction conditions between liquid and tank wall and tank bottom, the potential flow is superimposed by a one-dimensional shear flow. The shear flow in this boundary layer yields to a decrease of the mechanical energy of the shell-liquid-system. A damping factor is derived from the mean value of the energy dissipation in time. Depending on shell geometry and fluid viscosity, modal damping ratios are calculated for the convective component.

  5. Functional Embedding Predicts the Variability of Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mišić, Bratislav; Vakorin, Vasily A.; Paus, Tomáš; McIntosh, Anthony R.

    2011-01-01

    Neural activity is irregular and unpredictable, yet little is known about why this is the case and how this property relates to the functional architecture of the brain. Here we show that the variability of a region’s activity systematically varies according to its topological role in functional networks. We recorded the resting-state electroencephalogram (EEG) and constructed undirected graphs of functional networks. We measured the centrality of each node in terms of the number of connections it makes (degree), the ease with which the node can be reached from other nodes in the network (efficiency) and the tendency of the node to occupy a position on the shortest paths between other pairs of nodes in the network (betweenness). As a proxy for variability, we estimated the information content of neural activity using multiscale entropy analysis. We found that the rate at which information was generated was largely predicted by centrality. Namely, nodes with greater degree, betweenness, and efficiency were more likely to have high information content, while peripheral nodes had relatively low information content. These results suggest that the variability of regional activity reflects functional embedding. PMID:22164135

  6. The restless brain: how intrinsic activity organizes brain function.

    PubMed

    Raichle, Marcus E

    2015-05-19

    Traditionally studies of brain function have focused on task-evoked responses. By their very nature such experiments tacitly encourage a reflexive view of brain function. While such an approach has been remarkably productive at all levels of neuroscience, it ignores the alternative possibility that brain functions are mainly intrinsic and ongoing, involving information processing for interpreting, responding to and predicting environmental demands. I suggest that the latter view best captures the essence of brain function, a position that accords well with the allocation of the brain's energy resources, its limited access to sensory information and a dynamic, intrinsic functional organization. The nature of this intrinsic activity, which exhibits a surprising level of organization with dimensions of both space and time, is revealed in the ongoing activity of the brain and its metabolism. As we look to the future, understanding the nature of this intrinsic activity will require integrating knowledge from cognitive and systems neuroscience with cellular and molecular neuroscience where ion channels, receptors, components of signal transduction and metabolic pathways are all in a constant state of flux. The reward for doing so will be a much better understanding of human behaviour in health and disease.

  7. The restless brain: how intrinsic activity organizes brain function

    PubMed Central

    Raichle, Marcus E.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally studies of brain function have focused on task-evoked responses. By their very nature such experiments tacitly encourage a reflexive view of brain function. While such an approach has been remarkably productive at all levels of neuroscience, it ignores the alternative possibility that brain functions are mainly intrinsic and ongoing, involving information processing for interpreting, responding to and predicting environmental demands. I suggest that the latter view best captures the essence of brain function, a position that accords well with the allocation of the brain's energy resources, its limited access to sensory information and a dynamic, intrinsic functional organization. The nature of this intrinsic activity, which exhibits a surprising level of organization with dimensions of both space and time, is revealed in the ongoing activity of the brain and its metabolism. As we look to the future, understanding the nature of this intrinsic activity will require integrating knowledge from cognitive and systems neuroscience with cellular and molecular neuroscience where ion channels, receptors, components of signal transduction and metabolic pathways are all in a constant state of flux. The reward for doing so will be a much better understanding of human behaviour in health and disease. PMID:25823869

  8. Heated Proteins are Still Active in a Functionalized Nanoporous Support

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Qi, Wen N.; Li, Xiaolin; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2013-07-08

    We report that even under the heated condition, the conformation and activity of a protein can be hoarded in a functionalized nanoporous support via non-covalent interaction, although the hoarded protein was not exhibiting the full protein activity, the protein released subsequently still maintained its native conformation and activity. Glucose oxidase (GOX) was spontaneously and largely entrapped in aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous silica (NH2-FMS) at 20 oC via a dominant electrostatic interaction. Although FMS-GOX displayed 45% activity of the free enzyme in solution, the GOX released from FMS exhibited its 100% activity prior to the entrapment. Surprisingly, the released GOX from FMS still maintained 89% of its initial activity prior to the entrapment after FMS-GOX was incubated at 60 oC for 1 h prior to release, while the free GOX in solution lost nearly all activity under the same incubation. Intrinsic fluorescence emission of GOX and native electrophoresis demonstrated that the heating resulted in significant conformational changes and oligomeric structures of the free GOX, but FMS efficiently maintained the thermal stability of GOX therein and resisted the thermal denaturation and oligomeric aggregation.

  9. Radiation Damping in a Focusing Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, Ronald D.

    1996-05-01

    In electron storage rings synchrotron radiation leads to the damping of the three degrees of freedom of the particle trajectory towards a stable closed orbit transversely and a fixed stable phase longitudinally. At the same time, the emission of discrete quanta leads to diffusion in all three degrees of freedom. These two competing effects result in an equilibrium beam emittance that depends upon the parameters of the storage ring. In the case above, the radiation in the bending fields dominates, and the radiation due to the focusing fields is either neglected or taken into account perturbatively. In this talk we study the opposite case, a continuous focusing channel in which the radiation and its reaction are dominated by the strong focusing field. If there is a bending field, it is much weaker than the focusing field. In such focusing systems, we find that the radiation is synchrotron-like for larger betatron oscillation amplitudes and undulator-like for smaller amplitudes. However, quantum excitation is absent for any oscillation amplitude, and the damping exhibits asymmetry in favor of the transverse degree of freedom as the amplitude becomes smaller. In the undulator regime, the damping turns into exponential in the transverse direction, much faster than the total energy damping in this system. In principle, the particle could damp to the transverse ground state of the harmonic oscillator, reaching a minimum normalized emittance, γ ɛ_min = hbar/2mc, limited only by the uncertainty principle. In the case of a bent focusing system, we find that the lack of quantum excitation and asymmetric damping still hold provided that the bending field is sufficiently weak.

  10. Multi-neuronal activity and functional connectivity in cell assemblies.

    PubMed

    Roudi, Yasser; Dunn, Benjamin; Hertz, John

    2015-06-01

    Our ability to collect large amounts of data from many cells has been paralleled by the development of powerful statistical models for extracting information from this data. Here we discuss how the activity of cell assemblies can be analyzed using these models, focusing on the generalized linear models and the maximum entropy models and describing a number of recent studies that employ these tools for analyzing multi-neuronal activity. We show results from simulations comparing inferred functional connectivity, pairwise correlations and the real synaptic connections in simulated networks demonstrating the power of statistical models in inferring functional connectivity. Further development of network reconstruction techniques based on statistical models should lead to more powerful methods of understanding functional anatomy of cell assemblies.

  11. Human brain activity with functional NIR optical imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming

    2001-08-01

    In this paper we reviewed the applications of functional near infrared optical imager in human brain activity. Optical imaging results of brain activity, including memory for new association, emotional thinking, mental arithmetic, pattern recognition ' where's Waldo?, occipital cortex in visual stimulation, and motor cortex in finger tapping, are demonstrated. It is shown that the NIR optical method opens up new fields of study of the human population, in adults under conditions of simulated or real stress that may have important effects upon functional performance. It makes practical and affordable for large populations the complex technology of measuring brain function. It is portable and low cost. In cognitive tasks subjects could report orally. The temporal resolution could be millisecond or less in theory. NIR method will have good prospects in exploring human brain secret.

  12. Method Developed for Noninterference Measurement of Blade Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, Anatole P.

    2004-01-01

    Although noninterference optical instrumentation has been previously used to monitor and measure rotor blade vibrations, it has not been used at the NASA Glenn Research Center for the determination of damping. This article describes such a measurement in Glenn's Spin Rig facility. The optical system was chosen because installation of the slip rig for this particular configuration was not feasible, ruling out strain gauge instrumentation. The shaft in this facility was suspended with two radial magnetic bearings, and the excitation was supplied to the bearings by a signal generator. For the first mode, the direction of excitation force was always perpendicular to the blade as described by Morrison. The preceding graph shows blade displacements, as measured by an optical probe during a frequency sweep designed to locate the first mode resonance. The resonance determines the frequency at which the shaft is excited. Because the sampling rate was fixed to only once per revolution with these transducers, and the first mode frequency was much larger than the rotational frequency, the data in this figure were undersampled with an apparent frequency that was only 1 Hz at the beginning of the sweep, about 14 Hz at the maximum amplitude, and about 20 Hz at the end of the sweep. The true excitation frequency varied during the sweep from 320 to 340 Hz, and the resonance occurred at 334 Hz. Damping is determined by applying a frequency burst to the shaft. Upon cessation of the burst, the blade undergoes free decay. The apparent damping is then obtained by a least squares fit of the theoretical cosine decay function through the experimental points. The following graph illustrates this procedure. Because of frequency aliasing, the apparent measured damping must be divided by the ratio of the true resonant frequency to the apparent measured frequency to obtain the true damping. Note that the contribution of the shaft vibration to the blade vibration could be neglected because it

  13. Functional modules, structural topology, and optimal activity in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Hernández, Magdalena; Mora, Yolanda; Encarnación, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Modular organization in biological networks has been suggested as a natural mechanism by which a cell coordinates its metabolic strategies for evolving and responding to environmental perturbations. To understand how this occurs, there is a need for developing computational schemes that contribute to integration of genomic-scale information and assist investigators in formulating biological hypotheses in a quantitative and systematic fashion. In this work, we combined metabolome data and constraint-based modeling to elucidate the relationships among structural modules, functional organization, and the optimal metabolic phenotype of Rhizobium etli, a bacterium that fixes nitrogen in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris. To experimentally characterize the metabolic phenotype of this microorganism, we obtained the metabolic profile of 220 metabolites at two physiological stages: under free-living conditions, and during nitrogen fixation with P. vulgaris. By integrating these data into a constraint-based model, we built a refined computational platform with the capability to survey the metabolic activity underlying nitrogen fixation in R. etli. Topological analysis of the metabolic reconstruction led us to identify modular structures with functional activities. Consistent with modular activity in metabolism, we found that most of the metabolites experimentally detected in each module simultaneously increased their relative abundances during nitrogen fixation. In this work, we explore the relationships among topology, biological function, and optimal activity in the metabolism of R. etli through an integrative analysis based on modeling and metabolome data. Our findings suggest that the metabolic activity during nitrogen fixation is supported by interacting structural modules that correlate with three functional classifications: nucleic acids, peptides, and lipids. More fundamentally, we supply evidence that such modular organization during functional nitrogen fixation is

  14. Histamine H3 activation depresses cardiac function in experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Eschun, G; Bose, D; Jacobs, H; Yang, J J; Light, R B; Mink, S N

    1998-11-01

    In the heart, histamine (H3) receptors may function as inhibitory presynaptic receptors that decrease adrenergic norepinephrine release in conditions of enhanced sympathetic neural activity. We hypothesized that H3-receptor blockade might improve cardiovascular function in sepsis. In a canine model of Escherichia coli sepsis, we found that H3-receptor blockade increased cardiac output (3.6 to 5.3 l/min, P < 0.05), systemic blood pressure (mean 76 to 96 mmHg, P < 0.05), and left ventricular contractility compared with pretreatment values. Plasma histamine concentrations increased modestly in the H3-blocker-sepsis group compared with values obtained in a nonsepsis-time-control group. In an in vitro preparation, histamine H3 activation could be identified under conditions of septic plasma. We conclude that activation of H3 receptors may contribute to cardiovascular collapse in sepsis.

  15. Lag-stabilized force feedback damping

    SciTech Connect

    Petterson, B.J.; Robinett, R.D.; Werner, J.C.

    1991-05-01

    A lag-stabilized, force feedback controller for damping initial and residual oscillations of a planar, cantilevered flexible arm has been analytically developed and experimentally implemented on a commercial robot. The controller feeds back force sensor measurements that are delayed in time and proportional to the displacement (angular orientation) of the arm in order to damp the oscillation. As a result of the lag (contrary to popular belief), the controlled robot system is stable and provides tunable performance on a Cincinnati Milacron T3-786 robot. 3 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Particle systems and nonlinear Landau damping

    SciTech Connect

    Villani, Cédric

    2014-03-15

    Some works dealing with the long-time behavior of interacting particle systems are reviewed and put into perspective, with focus on the classical Kolmogorov–Arnold–Moser theory and recent results of Landau damping in the nonlinear perturbative regime, obtained in collaboration with Clément Mouhot. Analogies are discussed, as well as new qualitative insights in the theory. Finally, the connection with a more recent work on the inviscid Landau damping near the Couette shear flow, by Bedrossian and Masmoudi, is briefly discussed.

  17. Optimal piezoelectric switching technique for vibration damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Marcus; Oleskiewicz, Robert

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes piezoelectric switching techniques for vibration damping. The dynamical behaviour of a piezoceramics connected to a switching LR shunt and the dissipated energy are obtained using a fundamental piezoelectric model. All calculations are performed in a normalized way and highlight the influence of the electromechanical coupling coefficient of the piezoceramics and the shunt parameters. For the first time, a precise result for the dynamics of a shunted piezoceramics is derived. The analytic results are used to determine the optimal switching sequence and external branch parameters in order to maximize the damping performance. The results are validated by measurements of a clamped beam.

  18. Wind turbine blade with viscoelastic damping

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Ryan A.; Mullings, Justin L.

    2017-01-10

    A wind turbine blade (60) damped by viscoelastic material (54, 54A-F) sandwiched between stiffer load-bearing sublayers (52A, 52B, 56A, 56B) in portions of the blade effective to damp oscillations (38) of the blade. The viscoelastic material may be located in one or more of: a forward portion (54A) of the shell, an aft portion (54D) of the shell, pressure and suction side end caps (54B) of an internal spar, internal webbing walls (54C, 54E), and a trailing edge core (54F).

  19. Damping Goes the Distance in Golf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In the late 1980s, Dr. Benjamin Dolgin of NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a concept for a high-damping graphite/viscoelastic material for the Strategic Defense Initiative (popularly referred to as "Star Wars"), as part of a space-based laser anti-missile program called "Asterix." Dolgin drummed up this concept with the intention of stabilizing weapons launch platforms in space, where there is no solid ground to firmly support these structures. Without the inclusion of high-damping material, the orbital platforms were said to vibrate for 20 minutes after force was applied - a rate deemed "unacceptable" by leaders of the Strategic Defense Initiative.

  20. Mechanical Design of the DAMPE BGO Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yiming; Wu, Jian; Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Yunlong; Chen, Dengyi; Chang, Jin

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer, DAMPE, is a new designed satellite developed for the CASs new Innovation 2020 program. As the main component of DAMPE, the new designed BGO calorimeter consists of 308 BGO Crystals coupled with photomultiplier tube.The reliability and safety of the BGO Calorimeter structure play a very important role in the operation of whole detector. During the rocket launch, the calorimeter structure should be stable against vibration and environmental factors to ensure detector works in good conditions. In this article, we make the BGO calorimeter structure design, and then prove that it will work in the environments of rocket launch and flight.

  1. Ramiprilate inhibits functional matrix metalloproteinase activity in Crohn's disease fistulas.

    PubMed

    Efsen, Eva; Saermark, Torben; Hansen, Alastair; Bruun, Eywin; Brynskov, Jørn

    2011-09-01

    Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -3 and -9 has been demonstrated in Crohn's disease fistulas, but it is unknown whether these enzymes are biologically active and represent a therapeutic target. Therefore, we investigated the proteolytic activity of MMPs in fistula tissue and examined the effect of inhibitors, including clinically available drugs that beside their main action also suppress MMPs. Fistula specimens were obtained by surgical excision from 22 patients with Crohn's disease and from 10 patients with fistulas resulting from other causes. Colonic endoscopic biopsies from six controls were also included. Total functional MMP activity was measured by a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based, fluorogenic MMP-substrate cleavage assay, and the specific activity of MMP-2, -3 and -9 by the MMP Biotrak Activity Assay. The MMP inhibitors comprised ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA), the synthetic broad-spectrum inhibitor, GM6001, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, ramiprilate, and the tetracycline, doxycycline. In Crohn's disease fistulas, about 50% of the total protease activity was attributable to MMP activity. The average total MMP activity was significantly higher (about 3.5-times) in Crohn's fistulas (471 FU/μg protein, range 49-2661) compared with non-Crohn's fistulas [134 FU/μg protein, range 0-495, (p < 0.05)] and normal colon [153 FU/μg protein, range 77-243, (p < 0.01)]. MMP-3 activity was increased in Crohn's fistulas (1.4 ng/ml, range 0-9.83) compared with non-Crohn's fistulas, [0.32 ng/ml, range 0-2.66, (p < 0.02)]. The same applied to MMP-9 activity [0.64 ng/ml, range 0-5.66 and 0.17 ng/ml, range 0-1.1, respectively (p < 0.04)]. Ramiprilate significantly decreased the average total MMP activity level by 42% and suppressed the specific MMP-3 activity by 72%, which is comparable to the effect of GM6001 (87%). Moreover, MMP-9 activity was completely blunted by ramiprilate. Doxycycline had no

  2. Landau damping of surface plasmons in metal nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbazyan, Tigran V.

    2016-12-01

    We develop a quantum-mechanical theory for Landau damping of surface plasmons in metal nanostructures of arbitrary shape. We show that the electron surface scattering, which facilitates plasmon decay in small nanostructures, can be incorporated into the metal dielectric function on par with phonon and impurity scattering. The derived surface scattering rate is determined by the local field polarization relative to the metal-dielectric interface and is highly sensitive to the system geometry. We illustrate our model by providing analytical results for surface scattering rate in some common shape nanostructures. Our results can be used for calculations of hot carrier generation rates in photovoltaics and photochemistry applications.

  3. Motivational activation: a unifying hypothesis of orexin/hypocretin function

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Stephen V; Moorman, David E; Smith, Rachel J; James, Morgan H; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Orexins (hypocretins) are two peptides (orexin A and B) produced from the pre-pro-orexin precursor and expressed in a limited region of dorsolateral hypothalamus. Orexins were originally thought to specifically mediate feeding and promote wakefulness, but it is now clear that they participate in a wide range of behavioral and physiological processes under select circumstances. Orexins primarily mediate behavior under situations of high motivational relevance, such as during physiological need states, exposure to threats or reward opportunities. We hypothesize that many behavioral functions of orexins (including regulation of sleep/wake cycling) reflect a fundamentally integrated function for orexins in translating motivational activation into organized suites of psychological and physiological processes supporting adaptive behaviors. We also discuss how numerous forms of neural heterogeneity modulate this function, allowing orexin neurons to organize diverse, adaptive responses in a variety of motivationally relevant situations. Thus, the involvement of orexins in diverse behaviors may reflect a common underlying function for this peptide system. PMID:25254979

  4. Serotonin and Dopamine: Unifying Affective, Activational, and Decision Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cools, Roshan; Nakamura, Kae; Daw, Nathaniel D

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin, like dopamine (DA), has long been implicated in adaptive behavior, including decision making and reinforcement learning. However, although the two neuromodulators are tightly related and have a similar degree of functional importance, compared with DA, we have a much less specific understanding about the mechanisms by which serotonin affects behavior. Here, we draw on recent work on computational models of dopaminergic function to suggest a framework by which many of the seemingly diverse functions associated with both DA and serotonin—comprising both affective and activational ones, as well as a number of other functions not overtly related to either—can be seen as consequences of a single root mechanism. PMID:20736991

  5. Motivational activation: a unifying hypothesis of orexin/hypocretin function.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Stephen V; Moorman, David E; Smith, Rachel J; James, Morgan H; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2014-10-01

    Orexins (hypocretins) are two peptides (orexin A and B) produced from the pre-pro-orexin precursor and expressed in a limited region of dorsolateral hypothalamus. Orexins were originally thought to specifically mediate feeding and promote wakefulness, but it is now clear that they participate in a wide range of behavioral and physiological processes under select circumstances. Orexins primarily mediate behavior under situations of high motivational relevance, such as during physiological need states, exposure to threats or reward opportunities. We hypothesize that many behavioral functions of orexins (including regulation of sleep/wake cycling) reflect a fundamentally integrated function for orexins in translating motivational activation into organized suites of psychological and physiological processes supporting adaptive behaviors. We also discuss how numerous forms of neural heterogeneity modulate this function, allowing orexin neurons to organize diverse, adaptive responses in a variety of motivationally relevant situations. Thus, the involvement of orexins in diverse behaviors may reflect a common underlying function for this peptide system.

  6. Physical activity and memory functions: an interventional study.

    PubMed

    Ruscheweyh, R; Willemer, C; Krüger, K; Duning, T; Warnecke, T; Sommer, J; Völker, K; Ho, H V; Mooren, F; Knecht, S; Flöel, A

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested beneficial effects of physical activity on cognition. Here, we asked in an interventional approach if physical activity performed at different intensity levels would differentially affect episodic memory function. Additionally, we tried to identify mechanisms mediating these changes. Sixty-two healthy elderly individuals were assessed for level of physical activity, aerobic fitness, episodic memory score, neurotrophin and catecholamine levels, and received a magnetic resonance image of the brain at baseline and after a six months intervention of medium or low-intensity physical activity or control. Increase in total physical activity was positively associated with increase in memory score over the entire cohort, without significant differences between intensity groups. It was also positively associated with increases in local gray matter volume in prefrontal and cingulate cortex, and BDNF levels (trend). In conclusion, we showed that physical activity conveys the beneficial effects on memory function independently of its intensity, possibly mediated by local gray matter volume and neurotrophic factors. Our findings may carry significant implications for prevention of cognitive decline in the elderly.

  7. Antioxidant Activities of Functional Beverage Concentrates Containing Herbal Medicine Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Joo; Kim, Mi-Ok; Kim, Jung Hoan; Jeong, Sehyun; Kim, Min Hee; Yang, Su-Jin; Lee, Jongsung; Lee, Hae-Jeung

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the antioxidant activity of functional beverage concentrates containing herbal medicine extracts (FBCH) using various antioxidant assays, such as 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging activity, and reducing power assay. The total polyphenolic content of FBCH (81.45 mg/100 g) was higher than Ssanghwa tea (SHT, 37.56 mg/100 g). The antioxidant activities of FBCH showed 52.92% DPPH and 55.18% ABTS radical scavenging activities at 100 mg/mL, respectively. FBCH showed significantly higher antioxidant activities compared to the SHT (DPPH, 23.43%; ABTS, 22.21%; reducing power optical density; 0.23, P<0.05). In addition, intracellular reactive oxygen species generation significantly decreased in a concentration-dependent manner following FBCH treatment. These results suggest that the addition of herbal medicine extract contributes to the improved functionality of beverage concentrates.

  8. Self-assembly of active colloidal molecules with dynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    Catalytically active colloids maintain non-equilibrium conditions in which they produce and deplete chemicals at their surface. While individual colloids that are symmetrically coated do not exhibit dynamical activity, the concentration fields resulting from their chemical activity decay as 1/r and produce gradients that attract or repel other colloids depending on their surface chemistry and ambient variables. This results in a non-equilibrium analogue of ionic systems, but with the remarkable novel feature of action-reaction symmetry breaking. In dilute conditions these active colloids join up to form molecules via generalized ionic bonds. Colloids are found to join up to form self-assembled molecules that could be inert or have spontaneous activity in the form of net translational velocity and spin depending on their symmetry properties and their constituents. As the interactions do not satisfy detailed-balance, it is possible to achieve structures with time dependent functionality. We study a molecule that adopts spontaneous oscillations and another that exhibits a run-and-tumble dynamics similar to bacteria. Our study shows that catalytically active colloids could be used for designing self-assembled structures that posses dynamical functionalities.

  9. An efficient delivery of DAMPs on the cell surface by the unconventional secretion pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haiyan; Wang, Lan; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Dongmei; Min, Zhihui; Xie, Jianhui; Yu, Min; Gu, Jianxin

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} Hsp60 transported to cell surface through the classical secretory pathway was modified with N-glycosylation. {yields} HSAPB-N18 could efficiently deliver Hsp60 to the cell surface via the unconventional secretory pathway. {yields} Cell surface Hsp60 delivered by HASPB-N18 has a proper conformation. {yields} HASPB-N18 is an efficient delivery signal for other DAMP molecules such as Hsp70 and HMGB1. -- Abstract: Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are signals released from dying cells evoking the immune system response in several inflammatory disorders. In normal situations, many of DAMPs are nuclear or cytosolic proteins with defined intracellular function, but they could be found on the cell surface following tissue injury. The biological function of the translocated DAMPs is still not well known and an efficient delivery of these molecules on the cell surface is required to clarify their biological effects. In this study, we demonstrated that an unclassical secretory signal peptide, N-terminal 18 amino acids of HASPB (HASPB-N18), could efficiently deliver Hsp60, Hsp70, and HMGB1 on the cell surface. Furthermore, the delivery of these molecules on the cell surface by HASPB-N18 is not limited to a special cell line because several cell lines could use this delivery signal to deliver these molecules on the cell surface. Moreover, we demonstrated that Hsp60 on the cell surface delivered by HASPB-N18 could be recognized by a soluble form of LOX-1, which implies that DAMPs on the cell surface delivered by HASPB-N18 have a proper conformation during transport. Therefore, delivery of DAMPs by HASPB-N18 is a reliable model to further understand the biological significance of DAMPs on the cell surface.

  10. Chemical Signaling and Functional Activation in Colloidosome-Based Protocells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Li, Mei; Dong, Faqin; Wang, Shengjie; Tian, Liangfei; Mann, Stephen

    2016-04-13

    An aqueous-based microcompartmentalized model involving the integration of partially hydrophobic Fe(III)-rich montmorillonite (FeM) clay particles as structural and catalytic building blocks for colloidosome membrane assembly, self-directed membrane remodeling, and signal-induced protocell communication is described. The clay colloidosomes exhibit size- and charge-selective permeability, and show dual catalytic functions involving spatially confined enzyme-mediated dephosphorylation and peroxidase-like membrane activity. The latter is used for the colloidosome-mediated synthesis and assembly of a temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM)/clay-integrated hybrid membrane. In situ PNIPAM elaboration of the membrane is coupled to a glucose oxidase (GOx)-mediated signaling pathway to establish a primitive model of chemical communication and functional activation within a synthetic "protocell community" comprising a mixed population of GOx-containing silica colloidosomes and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-containing FeM-clay colloidosomes. Triggering the enzyme reaction in the silica colloidosomes gives a hydrogen peroxide signal that induces polymer wall formation in a coexistent population of the FeM-clay colloidosomes, which in turn generates self-regulated membrane-gated ALP-activity within the clay microcompartments. The emergence of new functionalities in inorganic colloidosomes via chemical communication between different protocell populations provides a first step toward the realization of interacting communities of synthetic functional microcompartments.

  11. Function and biotechnology of extremophilic enzymes in low water activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes from extremophilic microorganisms usually catalyze chemical reactions in non-standard conditions. Such conditions promote aggregation, precipitation, and denaturation, reducing the activity of most non-extremophilic enzymes, frequently due to the absence of sufficient hydration. Some extremophilic enzymes maintain a tight hydration shell and remain active in solution even when liquid water is limiting, e.g. in the presence of high ionic concentrations, or at cold temperature when water is close to the freezing point. Extremophilic enzymes are able to compete for hydration via alterations especially to their surface through greater surface charges and increased molecular motion. These properties have enabled some extremophilic enzymes to function in the presence of non-aqueous organic solvents, with potential for design of useful catalysts. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of extremophilic enzymes functioning in high salinity and cold temperatures, focusing on their strategy for function at low water activity. We discuss how the understanding of extremophilic enzyme function is leading to the design of a new generation of enzyme catalysts and their applications to biotechnology. PMID:22480329

  12. XIAP reverses various functional activities of FRNK in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Sunyoung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Chi, Sung-Gil; Park, Heonyong

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FRNK domain is recruited into focal adhesion (FA), controlling endothelial cell adhesion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XIAP binds the FRNK domain of FAK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XIAP inhibits recruitment of FRNK into Fas and FRNK-promoted cell adhesion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XIAP plays a key role in vascular functions of FRNK or FRNK domain-mediated vascular functions of FAK. -- Abstract: In endothelial cells, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, and shear-stimulated activation of MAPK. We recently found that FAK is recruited into focal adhesion (FA) sites through interactions with XIAP (X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) and activated by Src kinase in response to shear stress. In this study, we examined which domain(s) of FAK is(are) important for various vascular functions such as FA recruiting, XIAP-binding and shear stress-stimulated ERK activation. Through a series of experiments, we determined that the FRNK domain is recruited into FA sites and promotes endothelial cell adhesion. Interestingly, XIAP knockdown was shown to reduce FA recruitment of FRNK and the cell adhesive effect of FRNK. In addition, we found that XIAP interacts with FRNK, suggesting cross-talk between XIAP and FRNK. We also demonstrated that FRNK inhibits endothelial cell migration and shear-stimulated ERK activation. These inhibitory effects of FRNK were reversed by XIAP knockdown. Taken together, we can conclude that XIAP plays a key role in vascular functions of FRNK or FRNK domain-mediated vascular functions of FAK.

  13. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis.

  14. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activation in heart failure restores mitochondrial function and improves ventricular function and remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Katia M.S.; Campos, Juliane C.; Bechara, Luiz R.G.; Queliconi, Bruno; Lima, Vanessa M.; Disatnik, Marie-Helene; Magno, Paulo; Chen, Che-Hong; Brum, Patricia C.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Ferreira, Julio C.B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We previously demonstrated that pharmacological activation of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) protects the heart against acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Here, we determined the benefits of chronic activation of ALDH2 on the progression of heart failure (HF) using a post-myocardial infarction model. Methods and results We showed that a 6-week treatment of myocardial infarction-induced HF rats with a selective ALDH2 activator (Alda-1), starting 4 weeks after myocardial infarction at a time when ventricular remodelling and cardiac dysfunction were present, improved cardiomyocyte shortening, cardiac function, left ventricular compliance and diastolic function under basal conditions, and after isoproterenol stimulation. Importantly, sustained Alda-1 treatment showed no toxicity and promoted a cardiac anti-remodelling effect by suppressing myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis. Moreover, accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE)-protein adducts and protein carbonyls seen in HF was not observed in Alda-1-treated rats, suggesting that increasing the activity of ALDH2 contributes to the reduction of aldehydic load in failing hearts. ALDH2 activation was associated with improved mitochondrial function, including elevated mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and reduced H2O2 release. Importantly, selective ALDH2 activation decreased mitochondrial Ca2+-induced permeability transition and cytochrome c release in failing hearts. Further supporting a mitochondrial mechanism for ALDH2, Alda-1 treatment preserved mitochondrial function upon in vitro aldehydic load. Conclusions Selective activation of mitochondrial ALDH2 is sufficient to improve the HF outcome by reducing the toxic effects of aldehydic overload on mitochondrial bioenergetics and reactive oxygen species generation, suggesting that ALDH2 activators, such as Alda-1, have a potential therapeutic value for treating HF patients. PMID:24817685

  15. β-Glucans: Relationships between Modification, Conformation and Functional Activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Sheng, Xiaojing; Shi, Aimin; Hu, Hui; Yang, Ying; Liu, Li; Fei, Ling; Liu, Hongzhi

    2017-02-09

    β-glucan is a type of polysaccharide which widely exists in bacteria, fungi, algae, and plants, and has been well known for its biological activities such as enhancing immunity, antitumor, antibacterial, antiviral, and wound healing activities. The conformation of β-glucan plays a crucial role on its biological activities. Therefore, β-glucans obtained from different sources, while sharing the same basic structures, often show different bioactivities. The basic structure and inter-molecular forces of polysaccharides can be changed by modification, which leads to the conformational transformation in solution that can directly affect bioactivity. In this review, we will first determine different ways to modify β-glucan molecules including physical methods, chemical methods, and biological methods, and then reveal the relationship of the flexible helix form of the molecule chain and the helix conformation to their bioactivities. Last, we summarize the scientific challenges to modifying β-glucan's conformation and functional activity, and discuss its potential future development.

  16. Active Acetylcholinesterase Immobilization on a Functionalized Silicon Surface.

    PubMed

    Khaldi, K; Sam, S; Gouget-Laemmel, A C; Henry de Villeneuve, C; Moraillon, A; Ozanam, F; Yang, J; Kermad, A; Ghellai, N; Gabouze, N

    2015-08-04

    In this work, we studied the attachment of active acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme on a silicon substrate as a potential biomarker for the detection of organophosphorous (OP) pesticides. A multistep functionalization strategy was developed on a crystalline silicon surface: a carboxylic acid-terminated monolayer was grafted onto a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface by photochemical hydrosilylation, and then AChE was covalently attached through amide bonds using an activation EDC/NHS process. Each step of the modification was quantitatively characterized by ex-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated-total-reflection geometry (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The kinetics of enzyme immobilization was investigated using in situ real-time infrared spectroscopy. The enzymatic activity of immobilized acetylcholinesterase enzymes was determined with a colorimetric test. The surface concentration of active AChE was estimated to be Γ = 1.72 × 10(10) cm(-2).

  17. Arrangement for damping the resonance in a laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.; Yariv, A.; Margalit, S. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An arrangement for damping the resonance in a laser diode is described. This arrangement includes an additional layer which together with the conventional laser diode form a structure (35) of a bipolar transistor. Therein, the additional layer serves as the collector, the cladding layer next to it as the base, and the active region and the other cladding layer as the emitter. A capacitor is connected across the base and the collector. It is chosen so that at any frequency above a certain selected frequency which is far below the resonance frequency the capacitor impedance is very low, effectively shorting the base to the collector.

  18. Muscle metabolic function and free-living physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Sirikul, Bovorn; Newcomer, Bradley R

    2006-11-01

    We have previously shown that muscle metabolic function measured during exercise is related to exercise performance and subsequent 1-yr weight gain. Because it is well established that physical activity is important in weight maintenance, we examined muscle function relationships with free-living energy expenditure and physical activity. Subjects were 71 premenopausal black and white women. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during 90-s isometric plantar flexion contractions (45% maximum). Free-living energy expenditure (TEE) was measured using doubly labeled water, activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was calculated as 0.9 x TEE - sleeping energy expenditure from room calorimetry, and free-living physical activity (ARTE) was calculated by dividing AEE by energy cost of standard physical activities. At the end of exercise, anaerobic glycolytic rate (ANGLY) and muscle concentration of phosphomonoesters (PME) were negatively related to TEE, AEE, and ARTE (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that both PME (partial r = -0.29, <0.02) and ANGLY (partial r = -0.24, P < 0.04) were independently related to ARTE. PME, primarily glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate, was significantly related to ratings of perceived exertion (r = 0.21, P < or = 0.05) during a maximal treadmill test. PME was not related to ARTE after inclusion of RPE in the multiple regression model, suggesting that PME may be obtaining its relationship with ARTE through an increased perception of effort during physical activity. In conclusion, physically inactive individuals tend to be more dependent on anaerobic glycolysis during exercise while relying on a glycolytic pathway that may not be functioning optimally.

  19. Review: Production and functionality of active peptides from milk.

    PubMed

    Muro Urista, C; Álvarez Fernández, R; Riera Rodriguez, F; Arana Cuenca, A; Téllez Jurado, A

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, research on the production of active peptides obtained from milk and their potential functionality has grown, to a great extent. Bioactive peptides have been defined as specific protein fragments that have a positive impact on body functions or conditions, and they may ultimately have an influence on health. Individual proteins of casein or milk-derived products such as cheese and yogurt have been used as a protein source to study the isolation and activity of peptides with several applications. Currently, the milk whey waste obtained in the production of cheese also represents a protein source from which active peptides could be isolated with potential industrial applications. The active properties of milk peptides and the results found with regard to their physiological effects have led to the classification of peptides as belonging to the group of ingredients of protein nature, appropriate for use in functional foods or pharmaceutical formulations. In this study, the main peptides obtained from milk protein and the past research studies about its production and biological activities will be explained. Second, an analysis will be made on the methods to determinate the biological activities, the separation of bioactive peptides and its structure identification. All of these form the base required to obtain synthetic peptides. Finally, we explain the experimental animal and human trials done in the past years. Nevertheless, more research is required on the design and implementation of equipment for the industrial production and separation of peptides. In addition, different authors suggest that more emphasis should therefore be given to preclinical studies, proving that results are consistent and that effects are demonstrated repeatedly by several research human groups.

  20. Platelet function, activation and apoptosis during and after apheresis.

    PubMed

    Bakry, Rania; Sayed, Douaa; Galal, Hanan; Shaker, Sanaa

    2010-10-01

    Platelets are known to undergo shape change, activation, release reaction and apoptosis/necrosis during processing and storage. Apheresis may have a deleterious impact on platelet achievability and functional integrity. Platelet concentrates from 50 male volunteers obtained by COBE spectra were screened for platelet activation (CD62 and CD154) and apoptosis (phosphatidylserine detected by Annexin V). Donor samples before separation, during apheresis and at the third day of storage were used as baseline donor samples. Platelet aggregation to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen was performed. There was a statistically significant increase in the expression of activation markers in two different samples (during separation samples and third day samples). Although the increase in Annexin V expression was not so observable, it showed a significant increase also. There was marked decline in the platelet aggregation. The correlations between the values of CD62, CD154 and Annexin V were detected in baseline samples and increased during separation and at the third day of platelets storage. Correlation between values of platelet aggregation to collagen and Annexin V was relevant only in the baseline samples. No other correlations were encountered between platelet aggregation and markers of activation and apoptosis during apheresis and storage. Initial platelet activation induced by apheresis may have an impact on phosphatidylserine expression with no impact on aggregation function of platelets during storage.

  1. Self-assembly of active colloidal molecules with dynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    2015-05-01

    Catalytically active colloids maintain nonequilibrium conditions in which they produce and deplete chemicals and hence effectively act as sources and sinks of molecules. While individual colloids that are symmetrically coated do not exhibit any form of dynamical activity, the concentration fields resulting from their chemical activity decay as 1 /r and produce gradients that attract or repel other colloids depending on their surface chemistry and ambient variables. This results in a nonequilibrium analog of ionic systems, but with the remarkable novel feature of action-reaction symmetry breaking. We study solutions of such chemically active colloids in dilute conditions when they join up to form molecules via generalized ionic bonds and discuss how we can achieve structures with time-dependent functionality. In particular, we study a molecule that adopts a spontaneous oscillatory pattern of conformations and another that exhibits a run-and-tumble dynamics similar to bacteria. Our study shows that catalytically active colloids could be used for designing self-assembled structures that possess dynamical functionalities that are determined by their prescribed three-dimensional structures, a strategy that follows the design principle of proteins.

  2. Nonlinear Landau damping and Alfven wave dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Miller, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Nonlinear Landau damping has been often suggested to be the cause of the dissipation of Alfven waves in the solar wind as well as the mechanism for ion heating and selective preacceleration in solar flares. We discuss the viability of these processes in light of our theoretical and numerical results. We present one-dimensional hybrid plasma simulations of the nonlinear Landau damping of parallel Alfven waves. In this scenario, two Alfven waves nonresonantly combine to create second-order magnetic field pressure gradients, which then drive density fluctuations, which in turn drive a second-order longitudinal electric field. Under certain conditions, this electric field strongly interacts with the ambient ions via the Landau resonance which leads to a rapid dissipation of the Alfven wave energy. While there is a net flux of energy from the waves to the ions, one of the Alfven waves will grow if both have the same polarization. We compare damping and growth rates from plasma simulations with those predicted by Lee and Volk (1973), and also discuss the evolution of the ambient ion distribution. We then consider this nonlinear interaction in the presence of a spectrum of Alfven waves, and discuss the spectrum's influence on the growth or damping of a single wave. We also discuss the implications for wave dissipation and ion heating in the solar wind.

  3. The Stochastic Nonlinear Damped Wave Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Barbu, V. Da Prato, G.

    2002-12-19

    We prove the existence of an invariant measure for the transition semigroup associated with a nonlinear damped stochastic wave equation in R{sup n} of the Klein-Gordon type. The uniqueness of the invariant measure and the structure of the corresponding Kolmogorov operator are also studied.

  4. Radiation damping in pulsed Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Chris; Marklund, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    We consider the effects of radiation damping on the electron dynamics in a Gaussian-beam model of a laser field. For high intensities, i.e., with dimensionless intensity a0≫1, it is found that the dynamics divides into three regimes. For low-energy electrons (low initial γ factor, γ0) the radiation damping effects are negligible. At higher energies, but still at 2γ0damping alters the final displacement and the net energy change of the electron. For 2γ0>a0 one is in a regime of radiation-reaction-induced electron capture. This capture is found to be stable with respect to the spatial properties of the electron beam and results in a significant energy loss of the electrons. In this regime the plane-wave model of the laser field provides a good description of the dynamics, whereas for lower energies the Gaussian-beam and plane-wave models differ significantly. Finally the dynamics is considered for the case of an x-ray free-electron laser field. It is found that the significantly lower intensities of such fields inhibit the damping effects.

  5. Scattering Theory of Mesoscopic Gilbert Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brataas, Arne

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic damping determines the performance of magnetic devices including high-frequency oscillators, hard drives, magnetic random access memories, magnetic logic devices, and magnetic field sensors. The drive to improve these devices, to reduce the response time of sensors and the physical dimensions has led to a greater focus on studying the friction force a changing magnetization experiences. We study the magnetization dynamics of single domain ferromagnets and domain walls in contact with a thermal bath by scattering theory. We recover the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation and express the Gilbert damping tensor in terms of the scattering matrix [1,2]. Dissipation of magnetic energy equals energy current pumped out of the system by the time-dependent magnetization, with separable spin-relaxation induced bulk and spin-pumping generated interface contributions [3]. The scattering theory of Gilbert damping is suitable for first-principles calculations that include disorder and spin-orbit coupling on an equal footing [4]. In linear response, our scattering theory for the Gilbert damping tensor is equivalent with the Kubo formalism. [4pt] [1] A. Brataas, Y. Tserkovnyak, and G. E. W. Bauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 037207 (2008). [0pt] [2] K. M. D. Hals, A. K. Nguyen, and A. Brataas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 256601 (2009). [0pt] [3] Y. Tserkovnyak, A. Brataas, G. E. W. Bauer, and B. I. Halperin, Rev. Mod. Phys. 77, 1375 (2005). [0pt] [4] A. A. Starikov, P. J. Kelly, A. Brataas, Y. Tserkovnyak, and G. E. W. Bauer, unpublished.

  6. The DAMPE experiment: first data from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Mitri, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    The DAMPE satellite has been successfully launched in orbit on December 2015. The science goals of the mission include the study of high energy cosmic ray electrons, photons, protons and nuclei in a wide energy range: 109 - 1014 eV. A report on the mission status will be presented, together with on-orbit detector performance and first data coming from space.

  7. The DAMPE silicon-tungsten tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzarello, P.; Ambrosi, G.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Bernardini, P.; Bertucci, B.; Bolognini, A.; Cadoux, F.; Caprai, M.; De Mitri, I.; Domenjoz, M.; Dong, Y.; Duranti, M.; Fan, R.; Fusco, P.; Gallo, V.; Gargano, F.; Gong, K.; Guo, D.; Husi, C.; Ionica, M.; La Marra, D.; Loparco, F.; Marsella, G.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mesa, J.; Nardinocchi, A.; Nicola, L.; Pelleriti, G.; Peng, W.; Pohl, M.; Postolache, V.; Qiao, R.; Surdo, A.; Tykhonov, A.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, H.; Weber, M.; Wu, D.; Wu, X.; Zhang, F.

    2016-09-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a spaceborne astroparticle physics experiment, launched on 17 December 2015. DAMPE will identify possible dark matter signatures by detecting electrons and photons in the 5 GeV-10 TeV energy range. It will also measure the flux of nuclei up to 100 TeV, for the study of the high energy cosmic ray origin and propagation mechanisms. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is composed of six tracking planes of 2 orthogonal layers of single-sided micro-strip detectors, for a total detector surface of ca. 7 m2. The STK has been extensively tested for space qualification. Also, numerous beam tests at CERN have been done to study particle detection at silicon module level, and at full detector level. After description of the DAMPE payload and its scientific mission, we will describe the STK characteristics and assembly. We will then focus on some results of single ladder performance tests done with particle beams at CERN.

  8. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C K; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ).

  9. Apparatus and method of preloading vibration-damping bellows

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1988-01-01

    An improved vibration damping bellows mount or interconnection is disclosed. In one aspect, the bellows is compressively prestressed along its length to offset vacuum-generated tensile loads and thereby improve vibration damping characteristics.

  10. Experimental determination of material damping using vibration analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chowdhury, Mostafiz R.; Chowdhury, Farida

    1990-01-01

    Structural damping is an important dynamic characteristic of engineering materials that helps to damp vibrations by reducing their amplitudes. In this investigation, an experimental method is illustrated to determine the damping characteristics of engineering materials using a dual channel Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analyzer. A portable Compaq III computer which houses the analyzer, is used to collect the dynamic responses of three metal rods. Time-domain information is analyzed to obtain the logarithmic decrement of their damping. The damping coefficients are then compared to determine the variation of damping from material to material. The variations of damping from one point to another of the same material, due to a fixed point excitation, and the variable damping at a fixed point due to excitation at different points, are also demonstrated.

  11. SUMOylation of ROR{alpha} potentiates transcriptional activation function

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ji Min; Jeong, Jiyeong; Park, Joo Hyeon; Yang, Young; Lim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Jung Hwa; Baek, Sung Hee; Kim, Keun Il

    2009-01-16

    SUMOylation regulates a variety of cellular processes, including control of transcriptional activities of nuclear receptors. Here, we present SUMOylation of orphan nuclear receptor, ROR{alpha} by both SUMO-1 and SUMO-2. SUMOylation of ROR{alpha} occurred on the 240th lysine residue at the hinge region of human protein. PIAS family members, PIASx{alpha}, PIAS3, and PIASy, increased SUMOylation of ROR{alpha}, whereas SENP2 specifically removed SUMO from ROR{alpha}. SUMOylation-defective mutant form of ROR{alpha} exhibited decreased transcriptional activity on ROR{alpha}-responsive promoters indicating that SUMOylation may positively regulate transcriptional function of ROR{alpha}.

  12. Plasma oscillations and Landau damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crownfield, F. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The Fourier-Hermite expansion is used to follow the time development of a non-analytic initial perturbation of the linearized Vlasov-Poisson system. The calculations differ from some previous applications of the Fourier-Hermite expansion in that they relax certain symmetry conditions on the distribution functions and in that many coefficients are required to describe the initial conditions. The results confirm Weitzner's prediction of the asymptotic t to the -3rd time dependence for this problem, and exhibit the way in which this behavior develops. An appendix outlines the way in which the initial conditions are expanded in Hermite functions.

  13. Analysis of damped tissue vibrations in time-frequency space: a wavelet-based approach.

    PubMed

    Enders, Hendrik; von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Nigg, Benno M

    2012-11-15

    There is evidence that vibrations of soft tissue compartments are not appropriately described by a single sinusoidal oscillation for certain types of locomotion such as running or sprinting. This paper discusses a new method to quantify damping of superimposed oscillations using a wavelet-based time-frequency approach. This wavelet-based method was applied to experimental data in order to analyze the decay of the overall power of vibration signals over time. Eight healthy subjects performed sprinting trials on a 30 m runway on a hard surface and a soft surface. Soft tissue vibrations were quantified from the tissue overlaying the muscle belly of the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The new methodology determines damping coefficients with an average error of 2.2% based on a wavelet scaling factor of 0.7. This was sufficient to detect differences in soft tissue compartment damping between the hard and soft surface. On average, the hard surface elicited a 7.02 s(-1) lower damping coefficient than the soft surface (p<0.05). A power spectral analysis of the muscular vibrations occurring during sprinting confirmed that vibrations during dynamic movements cannot be represented by a single sinusoidal function. Compared to the traditional sinusoidal approach, this newly developed method can quantify vibration damping for systems with multiple vibration modes that interfere with one another. This new time-frequency analysis may be more appropriate when an acceleration trace does not follow a sinusoidal function, as is the case with multiple forms of human locomotion.

  14. Polyhexamethylene biguanide functionalized cationic silver nanoparticles for enhanced antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), a broad spectrum disinfectant against many pathogens, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles. The particles formed were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and TEM to measure their morphology and surface chemistry. PHMB-functionalized silver nanoparticles were then evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against a gram-negative bacterial strain, Escherichia coli. These silver nanoparticles were found to have about 100 times higher bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities, compared to the previous reports, due to the combined antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles and PHMB. In addition to other applications, PHMB-functionalized silver nanoparticles would be extremely useful in textile industry due to the strong interaction of PHMB with cellulose fabrics. PMID:22625664

  15. Polyhexamethylene biguanide functionalized cationic silver nanoparticles for enhanced antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Sumaira; Akhtar, Nasrin; Ghauri, Muhammad Afzal; Rajoka, Muhammad Ibrahim; Khalid, Zafar M.; Hussain, Irshad

    2012-05-01

    Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), a broad spectrum disinfectant against many pathogens, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles. The particles formed were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and TEM to measure their morphology and surface chemistry. PHMB-functionalized silver nanoparticles were then evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against a gram-negative bacterial strain, Escherichia coli. These silver nanoparticles were found to have about 100 times higher bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities, compared to the previous reports, due to the combined antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles and PHMB. In addition to other applications, PHMB-functionalized silver nanoparticles would be extremely useful in textile industry due to the strong interaction of PHMB with cellulose fabrics.

  16. Spillover-mediated feedforward-inhibition functionally segregates interneuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Coddington, Luke T.; Rudolph, Stephanie; Lune, Patrick Vande; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda; Wadiche, Jacques I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter spillover represents a form of neural transmission not restricted to morphologically defined synaptic connections. Communication between climbing fibers (CFs) and molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) in the cerebellum is mediated exclusively by glutamate spillover. Here, we show how CF stimulation functionally segregates MLIs based on their location relative to glutamate release. Excitation of MLIs that reside within the domain of spillover diffusion coordinates inhibition of MLIs outside the diffusion limit. CF excitation of MLIs is dependent on extrasynaptic NMDA receptors that enhance the spatial and temporal spread of CF signaling. Activity mediated by functionally segregated MLIs converges onto neighboring Purkinje cells (PCs) to generate a long-lasting biphasic change in inhibition. These data demonstrate how glutamate release from single CFs modulates excitability of neighboring PCs, thus expanding the influence of CFs on cerebellar cortical activity in a manner not predicted by anatomical connectivity. PMID:23707614

  17. FUNCTION FOLLOWS FORM: ACTIVATION OF SHAPE & FUNCTION FEATURES DURING OBJECT IDENTIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Eiling; Huffstetler, Stacy; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Most theories of semantic memory characterize knowledge of a given object as comprising a set of semantic features. But how does conceptual activation of these features proceed during object identification? We present the results of a pair of experiments that demonstrate that object recognition is a dynamically unfolding process in which function follows form. We used eye movements to explore whether activating one object’s concept leads to the activation of others that share perceptual (shape) or abstract (function) features. Participants viewed four-picture displays and clicked on the picture corresponding to a heard word. In critical trials, the conceptual representation of one of the objects in the display was similar in shape or function (i.e., its purpose) to the heard word. Importantly, this similarity was not apparent in the visual depictions (e.g., for the target “frisbee,” the shape-related object was a triangular slice of pizza – a shape that a frisbee cannot take); preferential fixations on the related object were therefore attributable to overlap of the conceptual representations on the relevant features. We observed relatedness effects for both shape and function, but shape effects occurred earlier than function effects. We discuss the implications of these findings for current accounts of the representation of semantic memory. PMID:21417543

  18. [Functional activity of bone marrow-derived peptides (myelopeptides)].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlova, A A; Petrov, R V

    2009-12-01

    The review describes structure and functions of bone marrow-derived peptides (myelopeptides). The final biological effects of these endogenous bioregulators (antitumor, antiviral, anti-infectious, antileukemia etc.) are due to their immunocorrecting and differentiating activity. Myelopeptides are the integral parts of the immune homeostasis maintenance system. Nowadays, medical preparations with no side effects and natural mechanisms of action are being developed on the basis of synthesized myelopeptides.

  19. Comparative studies of brain activation with MEG and functional MRI

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Aine, C.J.; Sanders, J.A.; Lewine, J.D.; Caprihan, A.

    1993-12-31

    The past two years have witnessed the emergence of MRI as a functional imaging methodology. Initial demonstrations involved the injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent and required ultrafast echo planar imaging capability to adequately resolve the passage of the injected bolus. By measuring the local reduction in image intensity due to magnetic susceptibility, it was possible to calculate blood volume, which changes as a function of neural activation. Later developments have exploited endogenous contrast mechanisms to monitor changes in blood volume or in venous blood oxygen content. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that it is possible to make such measurements in a clinical imager, suggesting that the large installed base of such machines might be utilized for functional imaging. Although it is likely that functional MRI (fMRI) will subsume some of the clinical and basic neuroscience applications now touted for MEG, it is also clear that these techniques offer different largely complementary, capabilities. At the very least, it is useful to compare and cross-validate the activation maps produced by these techniques. Such studies will be valuable as a check on results of neuromagnetic distributed current reconstructions and will allow better characterization of the relationship between neurophysiological activation and associated hemodynamic changes. A more exciting prospect is the development of analyses that combine information from the two modalities to produce a better description of underlying neural activity than is possible with either technique in isolation. In this paper we describe some results from initial comparative studies and outline several techniques that can be used to treat MEG and fMRI data within a unified computational framework.

  20. Experimental study on using electromagnetic devices on bridge stay cables for simultaneous energy harvesting and vibration damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wenai; Zhu, Songye; Zhu, Hongping

    2016-06-01

    Flexible bridge stay cables are often vulnerable to problematic vibrations under dynamic excitations. However, from an energy perspective, such excessive vibrations denote a green and sustainable energy source to some electronic devices (such as semi-active dampers or wireless sensors) installed on the same cables. This paper presents an experimental study on a novel dual-function system called electromagnetic damper cum energy harvester (EMDEH). The proposed EMDEH, consisting of an electromagnetic device connected to an energy-harvesting circuit (EHC), simultaneously harvests cable vibration energy and provides sufficient damping to the cables. A fixed-duty-cycle buck-boost converter is employed as the EHC, which emulates a resistive load and provides approximately optimal damping and optimal energy harvesting efficiency when operating in discontinuous conduction mode. A 5.85 m long scaled stay cable installed with a prototype EMDEH is tested in the laboratory under a series of harmonic and random excitations. The EMDEH can achieve a control performance comparable to passive viscous dampers. An average electrical power of 31.6 and 21.51 mW is harvested under harmonic and random vibrations, respectively, corresponding to the efficiency of 16.9% and 13.8%, respectively. Moreover, this experimental study proves that optimal damping and energy harvesting can be achieved simultaneously, which answers a pending question regarding such a dual-objective optimization problem. Self-powered semi-active control systems or wireless sensor networks may be developed for bridge stay cables in the future based on the proposed concept in this study.

  1. Gene Expression Profiles of HIV/AIDS Patients with Qi-Yin Deficiency and Dampness-Heat Retention

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sa; Chen, Yulong; Xu, Qianlei; Chen, Jianshe; Wang, Changhai; Wang, Zhao; Ma, Suna; Wu, Xingwei; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) applied in the clinic as a complementary and alternative therapy has helped improve immunity and reduce side effects and symptomatic treatment in patients with HIV/AIDS. However, the mechanisms of TCM syndromes are not clear. Transcriptomics enables the study of such TCM syndromes. Design: This study compared the messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of healthy persons and patients with HIV/AIDS who had two common TCM syndromes, qi-yin deficiency and dampness-heat retention, to find the difference in HIV/AIDS with TCM syndromes. Results: Comparison with healthy persons identified 113 mRNAs—41 enhanced and 72 decreased—in the qi-yin deficiency group. Additionally, 76 mRNAs were found in the dampness-heat retention group: 14 increased and 62 decreased. Functional genetic analysis of the mRNAs indicated that two TCM syndromes were correlated with cell apoptosis, immunoinflammatory responses, and lymphocyte activation. Differentially expressed mRNAs in the qi-yin deficiency group were obviously associated with cellular activity, communication, protein localization, cellular ion homeostasis, and regulation of cell motion, whereas mRNAs in the dampness-heat retention group were associated with sequence-specific DNA binding, cellular response to stress, and hemopoietic or lymphoid organ development. Conclusions: These results suggest that the formation of different TCM syndromes in patients with HIV/AIDS were founded on biological transcriptomics, which reveal mechanisms of the formation of these syndromes in HIV/AIDS. Differentially expressed mRNAs in two TCM syndrome groups tended to normalize after TCM intervention, which indicates that TCM might remit symptoms by changing genetic expression. PMID:27759429

  2. A Research Agenda on Assessing and Remediating Home Dampness and Mold to Reduce Dampness-Related Health Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    This report briefly summarizes, based on recent review articles and selected more recent research reports, current scientific knowledge on two topics: assessing unhealthy levels of indoor D/M in homes and remediating home dampness-related problems to protect health. Based on a comparison of current scientific knowledge to that required to support effective, evidence-based, health-protective policies on home D/M, gaps in knowledge are highlighted, prior questions and research questions specified, and necessary research activities and approaches recommended.

  3. A Research Agenda on Assessing and Remediating Home Dampness and Mold to Reduce Dampness-Related Health Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, Mark J.

    2015-05-28

    This report briefly summarizes, based on recent review articles and selected more recent research reports, current scientific knowledge on two topics: assessing unhealthy levels of indoor D/M in homes and remediating home dampness-related problems to protect health. Based on a comparison of current scientific knowledge to that required to support effective, evidence-based, health-protective policies on home D/M, gaps in knowledge are highlighted, prior questions and research questions specified, and necessary research activities and approaches recommended.

  4. Intermediate scattering function of an anisotropic active Brownian particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzthaler, Christina; Leitmann, Sebastian; Franosch, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Various challenges are faced when animalcules such as bacteria, protozoa, algae, or sperms move autonomously in aqueous media at low Reynolds number. These active agents are subject to strong stochastic fluctuations, that compete with the directed motion. So far most studies consider the lowest order moments of the displacements only, while more general spatio-temporal information on the stochastic motion is provided in scattering experiments. Here we derive analytically exact expressions for the directly measurable intermediate scattering function for a mesoscopic model of a single, anisotropic active Brownian particle in three dimensions. The mean-square displacement and the non-Gaussian parameter of the stochastic process are obtained as derivatives of the intermediate scattering function. These display different temporal regimes dominated by effective diffusion and directed motion due to the interplay of translational and rotational diffusion which is rationalized within the theory. The most prominent feature of the intermediate scattering function is an oscillatory behavior at intermediate wavenumbers reflecting the persistent swimming motion, whereas at small length scales bare translational and at large length scales an enhanced effective diffusion emerges. We anticipate that our characterization of the motion of active agents will serve as a reference for more realistic models and experimental observations.

  5. Interactions between occlusion and human brain function activities.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, C; Morokuma, M; Yoneyama, Y; Matsuda, R; Lee, J S

    2013-02-01

    There are few review articles in the area of human research that focus on the interactions between occlusion and brain function. This systematic review discusses the effect of occlusion on the health of the entire body with a focus on brain function. Available relevant articles in English from 1999 to 2011 were assessed in an online database and as hard copies in libraries. The selected 19 articles were classified into the following five categories: chewing and tongue movements, clenching and grinding, occlusal splints and occlusal interference, prosthetic rehabilitation, and pain and stimulation. The relationships between the brain activity observed in the motor and sensory cortices and movements of the oral and maxillofacial area, such as those produced by gum chewing, tapping and clenching, were investigated. It was found that the sensorimotor cortex was also affected by the placement of the occlusal interference devices, splints and implant prostheses. Brain activity may change depending on the strength of the movements in the oral and maxillofacial area. Therefore, mastication and other movements stimulate the activity in the cerebral cortex and may be helpful in preventing degradation of a brain function. However, these findings must be verified by evidence gathered from more subjects.

  6. Spectroscopic Evidence of Alfvén Wave Damping in the Off-limb Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. R.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the off-limb active-region and quiet-Sun corona using spectroscopic data. The active region is clearly visible in several spectral lines formed in the temperature range of 1.1–2.8 MK. We derive the electron number density using the line ratio method, and the nonthermal velocity in the off-limb region up to the distance of 140 Mm. We compare density scale heights derived from several spectral line pairs with expected scale heights per the hydrostatic equilibrium model. Using several isolated and unblended spectral line profiles, we estimate nonthermal velocities in the active region and quiet Sun. Nonthermal velocities obtained from warm lines in the active region first show an increase and then later either a decrease or remain almost constant with height in the far off-limb region, whereas nonthermal velocities obtained from hot lines show consistent decrease. However, in the quiet-Sun region, nonthermal velocities obtained from various spectral lines show either a gradual decrease or remain almost constant with height. Using these obtained parameters, we further calculate Alfvén wave energy flux in both active and quiet-Sun regions. We find a significant decrease in wave energy fluxes with height, and hence provide evidence of Alfvén wave damping. Furthermore, we derive damping lengths of Alfvén waves in the both regions and find them to be in the range of 25–170 Mm. Different damping lengths obtained at different temperatures may be explained as either possible temperature-dependent damping or by measurements obtained in different coronal structures formed at different temperatures along the line of sight. Temperature-dependent damping may suggest some role of thermal conduction in the damping of Alfvén waves in the lower corona.

  7. PIC Activation through Functional Interplay between Mediator and TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sohail; Molina, Henrik; Xue, Zhu

    2017-01-06

    The multiprotein Mediator coactivator complex functions in large part by controlling the formation and function of the promoter-bound preinitiation complex (PIC), which consists of RNA polymerase II and general transcription factors. However, precisely how Mediator impacts the PIC, especially post-recruitment, has remained unclear. Here, we have studied Mediator effects on basal transcription in an in vitro transcription system reconstituted from purified components. Our results reveal a close functional interplay between Mediator and TFIIH in the early stages of PIC development. We find that under conditions when TFIIH is not normally required for transcription, Mediator actually represses transcription. TFIIH, whose recruitment to the PIC is known to be facilitated by the Mediator, then acts to relieve Mediator-induced repression to generate an active form of the PIC. Gel mobility shift analyses of PICs and characterization of TFIIH preparations carrying mutant XPB translocase subunit further indicate that this relief of repression is achieved through expending energy via ATP hydrolysis, suggesting that it is coupled to TFIIH's established promoter melting activity. Our interpretation of these results is that Mediator functions as an assembly factor that facilitates PIC maturation through its various stages. Whereas the overall effect of the Mediator is to stimulate basal transcription, its initial engagement with the PIC generates a transcriptionally inert PIC intermediate, which necessitates energy expenditure to complete the process.

  8. Damped and zero-damped quasinormal modes of charged, nearly extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Aaron; Mark, Zachary

    2016-02-01

    Despite recent progress, the complete understanding of the perturbations of charged, rotating black holes as described by the Kerr-Newman metric remains an open and fundamental problem in relativity. In this study, we explore the existence of families of quasinormal modes of Kerr-Newman black holes whose decay rates limit to zero at extremality, called zero-damped modes in past studies. We review the nearly extremal and WKB approximation methods for spin-weighted scalar fields (governed by the Dudley-Finley equation) and give an accounting of the regimes where scalar zero-damped and damped modes exist. Using Leaver's continued fraction method, we verify that these approximations give accurate predictions for the frequencies in their regimes of validity. In the nonrotating limit, we argue that gravito-electromagnetic perturbations of nearly extremal Reissner-Nordström black holes have zero-damped modes in addition to the well-known spectrum of damped modes. We provide an analytic formula for the frequencies of these modes, verify their existence using a numerical search, and demonstrate the accuracy of our formula. These results, along with recent numerical studies, point to the existence of a simple universal equation for the frequencies of zero-damped gravito-electromagnetic modes of Kerr-Newman black holes, whose precise form remains an open question.

  9. Calculation of continuum damping of Alfvén eigenmodes in tokamak and stellarator equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G. W.; Hole, M. J.; Könies, A.

    2015-09-15

    In an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma, shear Alfvén eigenmodes may experience dissipationless damping due to resonant interaction with the shear Alfvén continuum. This continuum damping can make a significant contribution to the overall growth/decay rate of shear Alfvén eigenmodes, with consequent implications for fast ion transport. One method for calculating continuum damping is to solve the MHD eigenvalue problem over a suitable contour in the complex plane, thereby satisfying the causality condition. Such an approach can be implemented in three-dimensional ideal MHD codes which use the Galerkin method. Analytic functions can be fitted to numerical data for equilibrium quantities in order to determine the value of these quantities along the complex contour. This approach requires less resolution than the established technique of calculating damping as resistivity vanishes and is thus more computationally efficient. The complex contour method has been applied to the three-dimensional finite element ideal MHD Code for Kinetic Alfvén waves. In this paper, we discuss the application of the complex contour technique to calculate the continuum damping of global modes in tokamak as well as torsatron, W7-X and H-1NF stellarator cases. To the authors' knowledge, these stellarator calculations represent the first calculation of continuum damping for eigenmodes in fully three-dimensional equilibria. The continuum damping of global modes in W7-X and H-1NF stellarator configurations investigated is found to depend sensitively on coupling to numerous poloidal and toroidal harmonics.

  10. [Histidine triad protein superfamily--biological function and enzymatic activity].

    PubMed

    Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Fryc, Izabela

    2012-01-01

    The HIT superfamily consists of proteins that share the histidine triad motif, His-X-His-X-His-X-X (where X is a hydrophobic amino acid), which constitutes enzymatic catalytic center. These enzymes act as nucleotidylyl hydrolase or transferase, and the mutation of the second histidine in the triad abolishes their activity. HIT proteins were found ubiquitous in all organisms and they were classified into 5 branches, which are represented by human proteins: HINT1, FHIT, Aprataxin, GALT and DCPS. Because HINT1 orthologs, which belong to the evolutionally oldest family branch, were found from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, it is clear that HIT motif was conserved during the evolution what means that the enzymatic activity is necessary for functions of these proteins. However, in few cases, e.g. HINT1 and FHIT, the connection between the biological function and the enzymatic activity is still obscure. In this review, the relations between biology and activity for 7 HIT proteins, which were found in human, are highlighted.

  11. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  12. Everyday activity patterns and sensory functioning in old age.

    PubMed

    Marsiske, M; Klumb, P; Baltes, M M

    1997-09-01

    In the present study the authors investigated the relationship between visual and auditory acuity and everyday activity functioning. Participants were 516 older adults (70-103 years; equal numbers of men and women) who were members of the age-stratified Berlin Aging Study. Two categories of everyday activity functioning, perceived competence with basic activities of daily living (BaCo; basic competence) and amount of participation in discretionary social and leisure tasks (ExCo; expanded competence), were examined. The results revealed that sensory acuity, particularly vision, was a significant predictor of both BaCo and ExCo (rs ranging from .32 to .47). Indeed, hearing and vision could explain most of the age-related variance in everyday activities. At the same time, in the context of a broader model, evidence for the differential prediction of BaCo and ExCo was found, although there was also evidence for strong general age-related predictive variance that was common to both measures. Discussion focuses on the role of sensory acuity constructs as mediators of age-related variance in psychological and behavioral outcomes and the potential causal implications of this mediation.

  13. The impact of chromospheric activity on observed initial mass functions

    SciTech Connect

    Stassun, Keivan G.; Scholz, Aleks; Dupuy, Trent J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2014-12-01

    Using recently established empirical calibrations for the impact of chromospheric activity on the radii, effective temperatures, and estimated masses of active low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, we reassess the shape of the initial mass function (IMF) across the stellar/substellar boundary in the Upper Sco star-forming region (age ∼ 5-10 Myr). We adjust the observed effective temperatures to warmer values using the observed strength of the chromospheric Hα emission, and redetermine the estimated masses of objects using pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks in the H-R diagram. The effect of the activity-adjusted temperatures is to shift the objects to higher masses by 3%-100%. While the slope of the resulting IMF at substellar masses is not strongly changed, the peak of the IMF does shift from ≈0.06 to ≈0.11 M {sub ☉}. Moreover, for objects with masses ≲ 0.2 M {sub ☉}, the ratio of brown dwarfs to stars changes from ∼80% to ∼33%. These results suggest that activity corrections are essential for studies of the substellar mass function, if the masses are estimated from spectral types or from effective temperatures.

  14. Immunomodulation by Blastomyces dermatitidis: functional activity of murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, L S; Cozad, G C

    1983-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays the dominant role in the immune response of mice to Blastomyces dermatitidis infections. Since macrophages play an important role in cell-mediated immunity, the interactions between sensitized murine peritoneal macrophages and the yeast phase of B. dermatitidis were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the sensitized macrophages readily phagocytized B. dermatitidis yeast cells. In addition, there appeared to be activation of metabolic pathways within the sensitized macrophages, as indicated by increased chemiluminescence activity during phagocytosis. Sensitized macrophages were significantly better at controlling intracellular proliferation of the yeast cells when compared to nonsensitized cells. This was determined by disruption of macrophages and plating for viable yeasts. Scanning electron microscope observations offered further substantiation. Experiments with Candida albicans indicated that B. dermatitidis non-specifically activated macrophages. At 2 h postphagocytosis, 30% fewer C. albicans in B. dermatitidis-activated macrophages were able to form germ tubes. These studies demonstrated the multiple potential of activated macrophages with regard to their functional activity. Images PMID:6840859

  15. Quantitative evaluation of activation state in functional brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenghui; Ni, Pengyu; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Xiaohu; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-10-01

    Neuronal activity can evoke the hemodynamic change that gives rise to the observed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal. These increases are also regulated by the resting blood volume fraction (V (0)) associated with regional vasculature. The activation locus detected by means of the change in the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity thereby may deviate from the actual active site due to varied vascular density in the cortex. Furthermore, conventional detection techniques evaluate the statistical significance of the hemodynamic observations. In this sense, the significance level relies not only upon the intensity of the BOLD signal change, but also upon the spatially inhomogeneous fMRI noise distribution that complicates the expression of the results. In this paper, we propose a quantitative strategy for the calibration of activation states to address these challenging problems. The quantitative assessment is based on the estimated neuronal efficacy parameter [Formula: see text] of the hemodynamic model in a voxel-by-voxel way. It is partly immune to the inhomogeneous fMRI noise by virtue of the strength of the optimization strategy. Moreover, it is easy to incorporate regional vascular information into the activation detection procedure. By combining MR angiography images, this approach can remove large vessel contamination in fMRI signals, and provide more accurate functional localization than classical statistical techniques for clinical applications. It is also helpful to investigate the nonlinear nature of the coupling between synaptic activity and the evoked BOLD response. The proposed method might be considered as a potentially useful complement to existing statistical approaches.

  16. Effect of chemical exchange on radiation damping in aqueous solutions of the osmolyte glycine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Juan Carlos; Jennings, Patricia A; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2002-06-05

    Radiation damping is of central relevance in NMR spectroscopy especially with the advent of ultrahigh-field magnets and of supersensitive probes. Furthermore, the recent realization that the combined effect of the distant dipole field and of radiation damping causes the resurrection of undesired crushed water magnetization emphasizes the need for a thorough understanding of all the factors affecting radiation damping. While the effects of pulsed-field gradients and of active feedback have been extensively investigated, the consequences on radiation damping of chemical exchange between water and co-solutes is not as well understood. Here it is demonstrated that the rate of water radiation damping is significantly affected by free glycine (Gly), a representative of an important class of biocompatible osmolytes often used at molar concentrations as protein stabilizers. The pH and temperature dependencies of this effect were investigated and rationalized in terms of radiation damping attenuation caused by incoherent dephasing occurring in the intermediate exchange regime. For instance, at pH 6.0 and at a temperature of 313 K the Gly NH3+/water exchange has the same dramatic effect on radiation damping as a series of repeated weak PFGs, increasing the water inversion-recovery zero-crossing delay from approximately 30 ms to approximately 2.3 s. In addition, under these conditions, the Gly NH3+/water exchange suppresses the resurrection of unwanted crushed water magnetization. When used in combination with PFGs and water flip-back schemes, glycine is therefore expected to tame chaotic dynamics and improve the reproducibility of the NMR experiments affected by it.

  17. [Biodiversity and Function Analyses of BIOLAK Activated Sludge Metagenome].

    PubMed

    Tian, Mei; Liu, Han-hu; Shen, Xin; Zhao, Fang-qing; Chen, Shuai; Yao, Yong-jia

    2015-05-01

    The BIOLAK is a multi-stage activated sludge process, which has been successfully promoted worldwide. However, the biological community and function of the BIOLAK activated sludge ( the core component in the process) have not been reported so far. In this study, taking Lianyungang Dapu Industrial Zone WWTP as an example, a large-scale metagenomic data (428 588 high-quality DNA sequences) of the BIOLAK activated sludge were obtained by means of a new generation of high-throughput sequencing technology. Amazing biodiversity was revealed in the BIOLAK activated sludge, which included 47 phyla, 872 genera and 1351 species. There were 33 phyla identified in the Bacteria domain (289 933 sequences). Proteohacteria was the most abundant phylum (62.54%), followed by Bacteroidetes (11.29%), Nitrospirae ( 5. 65%) and Planctomycetes (4.79%), suggesting that these groups played a key role in the BIOLAK wastewater treatment system. Among the 748 bacterial genera, Nitrospira (5.60%) was the most prevalent genus, which was a key group in the nitrogen cycle. Followed by Gemmatimonas (2.45%), which was an important genus in the biological phosphorus removal process. In Archaea domain (1019 sequences), three phyla and 39 genera were detected. In Eukaryota domain (1055 sequences), 60 genera and 10 phyla were identified, among which Ciliophora was the largest phylum (257 sequences). Meanwhile, 448 viral sequences were detected in the BIOLAK sludge metagenome, which were dominated by bacteriophages. The proportions of nitrogen, aromatic compounds and phosphorus metabolism in the BIOLAK sludge were 2.50%, 2.28% and 1.56%, respectively, which were higher than those in the sludge of United States and Australia. Among four processes of nitrogen metabolism, denitrification-related genes were most abundant (80.81%), followed by ammonification (12.78%), nitrification,(4.38%) and nitrogen fixation (2.04%). In conclusion, the BIOLAK activated sludge had amazing biodiversity, meanwhile

  18. Estimation of damped oscillation associated spectra from ultrafast transient absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Jumper, Chanelle C; Snellenburg, Joris J; Scholes, Gregory D; van Grondelle, Rienk; Malý, Pavel

    2016-11-07

    When exciting a complex molecular system with a short optical pulse, all chromophores present in the system can be excited. The resulting superposition of electronically and vibrationally excited states evolves in time, which is monitored with transient absorption spectroscopy. We present a methodology to resolve simultaneously the contributions of the different electronically and vibrationally excited states from the complete data. The evolution of the excited states is described with a superposition of damped oscillations. The amplitude of a damped oscillation cos(ωnt)exp(-γnt) as a function of the detection wavelength constitutes a damped oscillation associated spectrum DOASn(λ) with an accompanying phase characteristic φn(λ). In a case study, the cryptophyte photosynthetic antenna complex PC612 which contains eight bilin chromophores was excited by a broadband optical pulse. Difference absorption spectra from 525 to 715 nm were measured until 1 ns. The population dynamics is described by four lifetimes, with interchromophore equilibration in 0.8 and 7.5 ps. We have resolved 24 DOAS with frequencies between 130 and 1649 cm(-1) and with damping rates between 0.9 and 12 ps(-1). In addition, 11 more DOAS with faster damping rates were necessary to describe the "coherent artefact." The DOAS contains both ground and excited state features. Their interpretation is aided by DOAS analysis of simulated transient absorption signals resulting from stimulated emission and ground state bleach.

  19. Estimation of damped oscillation associated spectra from ultrafast transient absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Snellenburg, Joris J.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Malý, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    When exciting a complex molecular system with a short optical pulse, all chromophores present in the system can be excited. The resulting superposition of electronically and vibrationally excited states evolves in time, which is monitored with transient absorption spectroscopy. We present a methodology to resolve simultaneously the contributions of the different electronically and vibrationally excited states from the complete data. The evolution of the excited states is described with a superposition of damped oscillations. The amplitude of a damped oscillation cos(ωnt)exp(-γnt) as a function of the detection wavelength constitutes a damped oscillation associated spectrum DOASn(λ) with an accompanying phase characteristic φn(λ). In a case study, the cryptophyte photosynthetic antenna complex PC612 which contains eight bilin chromophores was excited by a broadband optical pulse. Difference absorption spectra from 525 to 715 nm were measured until 1 ns. The population dynamics is described by four lifetimes, with interchromophore equilibration in 0.8 and 7.5 ps. We have resolved 24 DOAS with frequencies between 130 and 1649 cm-1 and with damping rates between 0.9 and 12 ps-1. In addition, 11 more DOAS with faster damping rates were necessary to describe the "coherent artefact." The DOAS contains both ground and excited state features. Their interpretation is aided by DOAS analysis of simulated transient absorption signals resulting from stimulated emission and ground state bleach.

  20. Acoustic radiation damping of flat rectangular plates subjected to subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen Heitman

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic radiation damping for various isotropic and laminated composite plates and semi-infinite strips subjected to a uniform, subsonic and steady flow has been predicted. The predictions are based on the linear vibration of a flat plate. The fluid loading is characterized as the perturbation pressure derived from the linearized Bernoulli and continuity equations. Parameters varied in the analysis include Mach number, mode number and plate size, aspect ratio and mass. The predictions are compared with existing theoretical results and experimental data. The analytical results show that the fluid loading can significantly affect realistic plate responses. Generally, graphite/epoxy and carbon/carbon plates have higher acoustic radiation damping values than similar aluminum plates, except near plate divergence conditions resulting from aeroelastic instability. Universal curves are presented where the acoustic radiation damping normalized by the mass ratio is a linear function of the reduced frequency. A separate curve is required for each Mach number and plate aspect ratio. In addition, acoustic radiation damping values can be greater than or equal to the structural component of the modal critical damping ratio (assumed as 0.01) for the higher subsonic Mach numbers. New experimental data were acquired for comparison with the analytical results.

  1. Fast damping in mismatched high intensity beam transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variale, V.

    2001-08-01

    A very fast damping of beam envelope oscillation amplitudes was recently observed in simulations of high intensity beam transport, through periodic FODO cells, in mismatched conditions [V. Variale, Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. 112A, 1571-1582 (1999) and T. Clauser et al., in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999), p. 1779]. A Landau damping mechanism was proposed at the origin of observed effect. In this paper, to further investigate the source of this fast damping, extensive simulations have been carried out. The results presented here support the interpretation of the mechanism at the origin of the fast damping as a Landau damping effect.

  2. Determining material damping type by comparing modal frequency estimators.

    PubMed

    Anthony, D K; Simón, F; Juan, Jesús

    2009-09-01

    The accuracy of modal frequency and damping estimators for non-lightly damped single degree of freedom systems depend on the response parameter used as well as the damping mechanism. Therefore, in order to make accurate modal parameter measurements, the damping mechanism at play must be known to be either viscous or hysteretic a priori. Here, comparisons between the evaluated frequency values are used to glean this information. The damping mechanism of an experimental system (consisting of resilient layer and mass plate) is then determined using two simple modal parameter estimators and applying statistical methods.

  3. Effects of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert damping on domain growth.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kazue

    2016-12-01

    Domain patterns are simulated by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with an easy-axis anisotropy. If the Gilbert damping is removed from the LLG equation, it merely describes the precession of magnetization with a ferromagnetic interaction. However, even without the damping, domains that look similar to those of scalar fields are formed, and they grow with time. It is demonstrated that the damping has no significant effects on domain growth laws and large-scale domain structure. In contrast, small-scale domain structure is affected by the damping. The difference in small-scale structure arises from energy dissipation due to the damping.

  4. Effects of damping on mode shapes, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Displacement, velocity, and acceleration admittances were calculated for a realistic NASTRAN structural model of space shuttle for three conditions: liftoff, maximum dynamic pressure and end of solid rocket booster burn. The realistic model of the orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket motors included the representation of structural joint transmissibilities by finite stiffness and damping elements. Methods developed to incorporate structural joints and their damping characteristics into a finite element model of the space shuttle, to determine the point damping parameters required to produce realistic damping in the primary modes, and to calculate the effect of distributed damping on structural resonances through the calculation of admittances.

  5. Influence of gold nanoparticles on platelets functional activity in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, George G.; Ivanov, Alexey N.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Terentyuk, George S.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolay G.

    2008-02-01

    Now in the leading biomedical centers of the world approved new technology of laser photothermal destruction of cancer cells using plasmon gold nanoparticles. Investigations of influence of gold nanoparticles on white rat platelets aggregative activity in vitro have been made. Platelet aggregation was investigated in platelet rich plasma (PRP) with help of laser analyzer 230 LA <>, Russia). Aggregation inductor was ADP solution in terminal concentration 2.5 micromole (<>, Russia). Gold nanoshells soluted in salt solution were used for experiments. Samples of PRP were incubated with 50 or 100 μl gold nanoshells solution in 5 minute, after that we made definition ADP induced platelet aggregation. We found out increase platelet function activity after incubation with nanoparticles solution which shown in maximum ADP-induced aggregation degree increase. Increase platelet function activity during intravenous nanoshells injection can be cause of thrombosis on patients. That's why before clinical application of cancer cell destruction based on laser photothermal used with plasmon gold nanoparticles careful investigations of thrombosis process and detail analyze of physiological blood parameters are very necessary.

  6. Evolution of l-photon excited thermo vacuum state in a single-mode damping channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rui; Fan, Hong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate how a kind of non-Gaussian states (l-photon excited thermo vacuum state Cla†l|0(β)>) evolves in a single-mode damping channel. We find that it evolves into a Laguerre-polynomial-weighted real-fictitious squeezed thermo vacuum state, which exhibits strong decoherence and its original nonclassicality fades. In particular, when l = 0, in this damping process the thermo squeezing effect decreases while the fictitious-mode vacuum becomes chaotic. In overcoming the difficulty of calculation, we employ the summation method within ordered product of operators, a new generating function formula about two-variable Hermite polynomials is derived.

  7. Modified thiol-ene networks: Tuning the glass transition temperature and energy damping capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning; Rafailovich, Miriam; Gersappe, Dilip

    2013-03-01

    Utilizing thiol-ene `click' reactions, it is possible to produce thermoset networks that are highly homogeneous and thus exhibit enhanced energy damping capabilities. This talk will present recent results in the characterization and impact testing of modified thiol-ene networks with tunable physical properties. In particular, we synthesize ternary networks containing (1) bulky side-chain substituents, (2) isocyanate functionality, or (3) dual thiol components to improve control over the glass transition temperature and strain at break. In addition, we present results in the high-impact compression testing to demonstrate the energy damping capabilities of these materials.

  8. Natural antibodies as a sensor of electronegative damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs).

    PubMed

    Uchida, Koji

    2014-07-01

    Natural antibodies (Abs), predominantly IgMs, play an important function in the host response to the recognition of endogenous danger signals called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Many of the natural IgM Abs also show several different antigenic cross-reactivities toward covalently modified proteins, such as oxidized low-density lipoproteins and advanced glycation end products. Of interest, a recent study has shown that these DAMPs have several physicochemical characteristics that differ from native proteins, such as an increased negative charge due to modification of the lysine residues. This finding may provide a mechanistic insight into the multispecificity of the natural Abs.

  9. Hamiltonian of mean force and a damped harmonic oscillator in an anisotropic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Marjan; Kheirandish, Fardin

    2017-01-01

    The quantum dynamics of a damped harmonic oscillator is investigated in the presence of an anisotropic heat bath. The medium is modeled by a continuum of three dimensional harmonic oscillators and anisotropic coupling is treated by introducing tensor coupling functions. Starting from a classical Lagrangian, the total system is quantized in the framework of the canonical quantization. Following the Fano technique, the Hamiltonian of the system is diagonalized in terms of creation and annihilation operators that are linear combinations of the basic dynamical variables. Using the diagonalized Hamiltonian, the mean force internal energy, free energy and entropy of the damped oscillator are calculated.

  10. Blowup phenomena for the \\varvec{N}-dimensional compressible Euler equations with damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Ka Luen

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we extend the finite propagation speed property for the compressible Euler equations with damping from the three-dimensional case to the general N-dimensional case. Subsequently, blowup results of the N-dimensional compressible Euler equations with damping are obtained. More precisely, we show that if the initial data int limits _0^∞f(r)V(0,r) {d}r are sufficiently large, then blowup phenomena occurs and the finite blowup time can be estimated, where f is a general test function with mild conditions and V represents the speed of the fluid in radial symmetry.

  11. Exponential stabilization of magnetoelastic waves in a Mindlin-Timoshenko plate by localized internal damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen, Marié

    2015-08-01

    This article is a continuation of our earlier work in Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen (Z Angew Math Phys 63:1047-1065, 2012) on the polynomial stabilization of a linear model for the magnetoelastic interactions in a two-dimensional electrically conducting Mindlin-Timoshenko plate. We introduce nonlinear damping that is effective only in a small portion of the interior of the plate. It turns out that the model is uniformly exponentially stable when the function , that represents the locally distributed damping, behaves linearly near the origin. However, the use of Mindlin-Timoshenko plate theory in the model enforces a restriction on the region occupied by the plate.

  12. Landau damping of magnetospherically reflected whistlers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Unducted VLF signals produced by lightning activity can form a population of magnetospherically reflected (MR) whistlers in the inner magnetosphere. It has been suggested recently that in the absence of significant attenuation such waves could merge into a broadband continuum with sufficient intensity to account for plasmaspheric hiss. To test this conjecture we have evaluated the path-integrated attenuation of MR whistlers along representative ray paths using the HOTRAY code. Using a realistic plasma distribution modeled on in-situ data, we find that the majority of MR waves experience significant damping after a few transits across the equator. This is primarily due to Landau resonance with suprathermal (0.1-1 keV) electrons. The attenuation is most pronounced for waves that propagate through the outer plasmasphere; this can readily account for the infrequent occurrence of multiple-hop MR waves for L greater than or equal to 3.5. Selected waves that originate at intermediate latitudes (15 deg is less than or equal to lambda is less than or equal to 35 deg) and whose ray paths are confined to the inner plasma- sphere may experience up to 10 magnetospheric reflections before substantial attentuation occurs. These waves should form the population of observed MR waves. Wave attenuation becomes more pronounced at higher frequencies; this can account for the absence of multiple-hop waves above 5 kHz. Weakly attenuated MR waves tend to migrate outward to the L shell, where their frequency is comparable to the equatorial lower hybrid frequency. The enhanced concentration of waves due to a merging of ray paths would produce a spectral feature that rises in frequency at lower L. This is quite distinct from the reported properties of plasmaspheric hiss, which maintains a constant frequency band throughout the entire plasmasphere. Furthermore, in the absence of mode conversion, waves below 500 Hz, which often form an important if not dominant part of the spectral properties

  13. Magnetic-stress-assisted damping of magnetization precession in multilayered metallic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastrukov, Sergey; Yong Khoo, Jun; Lukianchuk, Boris; Molodtsova, Irina

    2013-09-01

    Micromagnetic dynamics of spin relaxation in multilayered metallic films of stacked microelectronic devices is modeled by a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a newly introduced form of damping torque owing its origin to coupling between precessing magnetization-vector and stress-tensor of combined intrinsic and extrinsic magnetic anisotropy. Based on the magnetization energy loss equation, the exponential relaxation time as a function of precession frequency and angle of applied rf-field is obtained, depending upon two parameters of intrinsic and extrinsic damping torques acting on precessing magnetization. It is shown that theoretically obtained from the Gabor uncertainty relation the FMR linewidth, originating from the above magnetic-stress-assisted damping of magnetization precession, provides proper account for the empirical non-linear linewidth-vs-frequency curves deduced from recent in-plane FMR measurements on multilayered ultrathin films of ferromagnetic metals.

  14. Operation and performance of the PEP-II prototype longitudinal damping system at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Teytelman, D.; Claus, R.; Fox, J.

    1995-05-01

    A modular programmable longitudinal feedback system has been developed as a component of the PEP-II R+D program. This system is based on a family of VME and VXI packaged signal processing functions which implement a general purpose digital feedback controller for accelerators with bunch spacings of 2 ns. A complete PEP-II prototype system has been configured and installed for use at the LBL Advanced Light Source. The system configuration used for tests at the ALS is described and results are presented showing the action of the feedback system. Open and closed loop results showing the detection and calculation of feedback signals from bunch motion are presented and the system is shown to damp coupled-bunch instabilities in the ALS. Use of the system for accelerator diagnostics is illustrated via measurement of grow-damp transients which quantify growth rates without feedback, damping rates with feedback, and identify unstable modes.

  15. Multi-objective shape and material optimization of composite structures including damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    A multi-objective optimal design methodology is developed for light-weight, low cost composite structures of improved dynamic performance. The design objectives include minimization of resonance amplitudes (or maximization of modal damping), weight, and material cost. The design vector includes micromechanics, laminate, and structural shape parameters. Performance constraints are imposed on static displacements, dynamic amplitudes, and natural frequencies. The effects of damping on the dynamics of composite structures are incorporated. Preliminary applications on a cantilever composite beam illustrated that only the proposed multi-objective optimization, as opposed to single objective functions, simultaneously improved all objectives. The significance of composite damping in the design of advanced composite structures was also demonstrated, indicating the design methods based on undamped dynamics may fail to improve the dynamic performance near resonances.

  16. Spatial Landau damping in plasmas with three-dimensional {kappa} distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, J.J.

    2005-05-15

    The increase in linear Landau damping in {kappa}-distributed plasmas compared to thermal equilibrium plasmas is studied by solving a boundary value problem for the spatially damped plasma waves generated by a planar grid electrode with an applied time harmonic potential. Solutions are computed for the plasma potential versus the distance from the electrode for different values of the parameter {kappa} (kappa). The velocity parameter v{sub 0} of the distribution function is chosen so that, as the parameter {kappa} varies, the kinetic temperature of the plasma remains constant. The exact solutions of this problem are also compared to approximate solutions derived from the theory of normal modes, that is, from the roots of the dispersion relation. This model problem demonstrates the significant increase in Landau damping by electrons which occurs for small values of the parameter {kappa}.

  17. Optimal uniform-damping ratio controller for sequential design of multivariable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, Leang G.; Liu, Zhen; Sunkel, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal uniform-damping ratio controller is developed for the sequential design of a multivariable control system so that the designed closed-loop poles of the respective multivariable system and reduced-order observer are exactly placed on the negative real axis and/or the boundaries of desired sectors with constant-damping ratios. The functions in the quadratic performance index to be minimized are chosen as a combination of the weighted outputs, reduced states and inputs. Also, the optimal uniform-damping ratio controller is a combination of optimal output-feedback and optimal reduced-order state-feedback controllers. A numerical example is given to demonstrate the design procedure.

  18. The Frequency and Damping of Soil-Structure Systems with Embedded Foundation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghannad, M. Ali; Rahmani, Mohammad T.; Jahankhah, Hossein

    2008-07-08

    The effect of foundation embedment on fundamental period and damping of buildings has been the title of several researches in three past decades. A review of the literature reveals some discrepancies between proposed formulations for dynamic characteristics of soil-embedded foundation-structure systems that raise the necessity of more investigation on this issue. Here, first a set of approximate polynomial equations for soil impedances, based on numerical data calculated from well known cone models, are presented. Then a simplified approach is suggested to calculate period and damping of the whole system considering soil medium as a viscoelastic half space. The procedure includes both material and radiation damping while frequency dependency of soil impedance functions is not ignored. Results show that soil-structure interaction can highly affect dynamic properties of system. Finally the results are compared with one of the commonly referred researches.

  19. Multi-objective shape and material optimization of composite structures including damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    A multi-objective optimal design methodology is developed for light-weight, low-cost composite structures of improved dynamic performance. The design objectives include minimization of resonance amplitudes (or maximization of modal damping), weight, and material cost. The design vector includes micromechanics, laminate, and structural shape parameters. Performance constraints are imposed on static displacements, dynamic amplitudes, and natural frequencies. The effects of damping on the dynamics of composite structures are incorporated. Preliminary applications on a cantilever composite beam illustrated that only the proposed multi-objective optimization, as opposed to single objective functions, simultaneously improved all objectives. The significance of composite damping in the design of advanced composite structures was also demonstrated, indicating that design methods based on undamped dynamics may fail to improve the dynamic performance near resonances.

  20. Exploring Electro-active Functionality of Transparent Oxide Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Hideo

    2013-09-01

    Ceramics, one of the earliest materials used by humans, have been used since the Stone Age and are also one of the core materials supporting modern society. In this article, I will review the features of transparent oxides, the main components of ceramics, and the progress of research on their electro-active functionalities from the viewpoint of material design. Specifically, the emergence of the functionality of the cement component 12CaO.7Al2O3, the application of transparent oxide semiconductors to thin-film transistors for flat panel displays, and the design of wide-gap p-type semiconductors are introduced along with the progress in their research. In addition, oxide semiconductors are comprehensively discussed on the basis of the band lineup.

  1. Long wavelength plasmon damping in the two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Böhm, Helga M.; Schinner, Andreas

    1993-07-01

    The damping of the long wavelength plasmon in a homogeneos electron layer is determined by two-electron-hole excitations. Analytical and numerical results for the corresponding imaginary part of the dielectric function and the plasmon half width are presented for various densities and different manners of screening.

  2. Note on the Time-Dependent Damped and Forced Harmonic Oscillator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, P. G. L.

    1978-01-01

    A Hamiltonian for the time-dependent damped and forced harmonic oscillator is derived. A simple time-dependent linear canonical transformation transforms the Hamiltonian to one whose solution is readily obtained. The wave function for the corresponding quantum mechanical problem is given. (Author/GA)

  3. Stability of a Timoshenko system with local Kelvin-Voigt damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xinhong; Zhang, Qiong

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we study a Timoshenko system with local Kelvin-Voigt damping, which models the dynamics of a beam. We prove that the energy of the system decays exponentially or polynomially and the decay rate depends on properties of material coefficient function. The method is based on the frequency analysis and inequalities of Poincaré's and Hardy's type.

  4. Validation of the Standard Ship Motion Program, SMP: Improved Roll Damping Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    procedures of Kato; the function F2 (V) is the speed dependence of this skin friction2 7 damping In accordance with Tamlya and Komura . BHull is the...34 Journal of the Society of Naval Architects of J.Tpan, Vol. 102 (1958). 7. Tamiya, S. and T. Komura , "Topics on Ship Rolling Characteristics with

  5. Relativity Damps OPEP in Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Manoj K.

    1998-09-01

    Using a relativistic Dirac--Brueckner analysis the OPEP contribution to the ground state energy of nuclear matter is studied. In the study the pion is derivative-coupled. We find that the role of the tensor force in the saturation mechanism is substantially reduced compared to its dominant role in a usual nonrelativistic treatment. We show that the damping of derivative-coupled OPEP is actually due to the decrease of M*/M with increasing density. We point out that if derivative-coupled OPEP is the preferred form of nuclear effective Lagrangian nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter is in trouble. Lacking the notion of M* it cannot replicate the damping. We suggest an examination of the feasibility of using pseudoscalar coupled πN interaction before reaching a final conclusion about nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter.

  6. Nonlinear Landau damping in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiwamoto, Y.; Benson, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    A model is presented to explain the non-resonant waves which give rise to the diffuse resonance observed near 3/2 f sub H by the Alouette and ISIS topside sounders, where f sub H is the ambient electron cyclotron frequency. In a strictly linear analysis, these instability driven waves will decay due to Landau damping on a time scale much shorter than the observed time duration of the diffuse resonance. Calculations of the nonlinear wave particle coupling coefficients, however, indicate that the diffuse resonance wave can be maintained by the nonlinear Landau damping of the sounder stimulated 2f sub H wave. The time duration of the diffuse resonance is determined by the transit time of the instability generated and nonlinearly maintained diffuse resonance wave from the remote short lived hot region back to the antenna. The model is consistent with the Alouette/ISIS observations, and clearly demonstrates the existence of nonlinear wave-particle interactions in the ionosphere.

  7. Harmonic cavities for the NLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    de Santis, S.; Wolski, A.

    2003-05-29

    To achieve high luminosity, a linear collider needs damping rings to produce beams with very small transverse emittances. In the NLC, design constraints place the Main Damping Rings in a parameter regime where intrabeam scattering (IBS) is likely to be a limitation on the emittance, and hence on the final luminosity. It is possible to mitigate the effects of IBS by lengthening the bunch: this may be achieved by redesigning the lattice with higher momentum compaction, or by use of higher harmonic cavities. Here, we consider the latter approach. We estimate the required bunch lengthening that might be needed, outline some appropriate parameters for the harmonic cavities, and discuss some of the effects that might be introduced or exacerbated by the cavities, such as synchronous phase variation along the bunch train.

  8. Movers and shakers: granular damping in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Bannerman, M N; Kollmer, J E; Sack, A; Heckel, M; Mueller, P; Pöschel, T

    2011-07-01

    The response of an oscillating granular damper to an initial perturbation is studied using experiments performed in microgravity and granular dynamics simulations. High-speed video and image processing techniques are used to extract experimental data. An inelastic hard sphere model is developed to perform simulations and the results are in excellent agreement with the experiments. In line with previous work, a linear decay of the amplitude is observed. Although this behavior is typical for a friction-damped oscillator, through simulation it is shown that this effect is still present even when friction forces are absent. A simple expression is developed which predicts the optimal damping conditions for a given amplitude and is independent of the oscillation frequency and particle inelasticities.

  9. Relativity damps OPEP in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, M.K.

    1998-06-01

    Using a relativistic Dirac-Brueckner analysis the OPEP contribution to the ground state energy of nuclear matter is studied. In the study the pion is derivative-coupled. The author finds that the role of the tensor force in the saturation mechanism is substantially reduced compared to its dominant role in a usual nonrelativistic treatment. He shows that the damping of derivative-coupled OPEP is actually due to the decrease of M{sup *}/M with increasing density. He points out that if derivative-coupled OPEP is the preferred form of nuclear effective lagrangian nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter is in trouble. Lacking the notion of M{sup *} it cannot replicate the damping. He suggests an examination of the feasibility of using pseudoscalar coupled {pi}N interaction before reaching a final conclusion about nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear matter.

  10. Enthalpy damping for the steady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    For inviscid steady flow problems where the enthalpy is constant at steady state, it was previously proposed to use the difference between the local enthalpy and the steady state enthalpy as a driving term to accelerate convergence of iterative schemes. This idea is analyzed, both on the level of the partial differential equation and on the level of a particular finite difference scheme. It is shown that for the two-dimensional unsteady Euler equations, a hyperbolic system with eigenvalues on the imaginary axis, there is no enthalpy damping strategy which moves all the eigenvalues into the open left half plane. For the numerical scheme, however, the analysis shows and examples verify that enthalpy damping is potentially effective in accelerating convergence to steady state.

  11. Enthalpy damping for the steady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    For inviscid steady flow problems where the enthalpy is constant at steady state, it was previously proposed to use the difference between the local enthalpy and the steady state enthalpy as a driving term to accelerate convergence of iterative schemes. This idea is analyzed, both on the level of the partial differential equation and on the level of a particular finite difference scheme. It is shown that for the two-dimensional unsteady Euler equations, a hyperbolic system with eigenvalues on the imaginary axis, there is no enthalpy damping strategy which moves all the eigenvalues into the open left half plane. For the numerical scheme, however, the analysis shows and examples verify that enthalpy damping is potentially effective in accelerating convergence to steady state.

  12. On the damping capacity of cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, S. A.

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of experimental data on the amplitude-dependent internal friction (ADIF) in terms of various theoretical models has revealed a staged character and the main mechanisms of the processes of energy dissipation in graphite with increasing amplitude of vibrations upon cyclic loading. It is shown that the level of the damping capacity of lamellar cast iron depends on the relationship between the elastic and strength characteristics of graphite and the matrix phase. In cast irons with a rigid matrix structure (pearlite, martensite), the energy dissipation is determined by the volume fraction and morphology of the initial graphite phase. In cast irons with a softer metallic phase (ferrite), the contact interaction of graphite inclusions with the matrix and the properties of the matrix introduce additional sources of high damping.

  13. Pressurized fluid damping of nanoelectromechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Svitelskiy, Oleksiy; Sauer, Vince; Liu, Ning; Cheng, Kar-Mun; Finley, Eric; Freeman, Mark R; Hiebert, Wayne K

    2009-12-11

    Interactions of nanoscale structures with fluids are of current interest both in the elucidation of fluid dynamics at these small scales, and in determining the ultimate performance of nanoelectromechanical systems outside of vacuum. We present a comprehensive study of nanomechanical damping in three gases (He, N2, CO2), and liquid CO2. Resonant dynamics in multiple devices of varying size and frequency is measured over 10 decades of pressure (1 mPa-20 MPa) using time-domain stroboscopic optical interferometry. The wide pressure range allows full exploration of the regions of validity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow damping models. Observing free molecular flow behavior extending above 1 atm, we find a fluid relaxation time model to be valid throughout, but not beyond, the non-Newtonian regime, and a Newtonian flow vibrating spheres model to be valid in the viscous limit.

  14. Development of Transverse Modes Damped DLA Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.

    2009-01-22

    As the dimensions of accelerating structures become smaller and beam intensities higher, the transverse wakefields driven by the beam become quite large with even a slight misalignment of the beam from the geometric axis. These deflection modes can cause inter-bunch beam breakup and intra-bunch head-tail instabilities along the beam path, and thus BBU control becomes a critical issue. All new metal based accelerating structures, like the accelerating structures developed at SLAC or power extractors at CLIC, have designs in which the transverse modes are heavily damped. Similarly, minimizing the transverse wakefield modes (here the HEMmn hybrid modes in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures) is also very critical for developing dielectric based high energy accelerators. In this paper, we present the design of a 7.8 GHz transverse mode damped DLA structure currently under construction, along with plans for the experimental program.

  15. Plasmon damping in graphene out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Basov, Dimitri; Fogler, Michael

    Motivated by recent experiments with graphene under high photoexcitation, we study theoretically plasmons of graphene in the two-temperature regime, i.e., the regime where electrons are much hotter than the lattice. We calculate the plasmon damping due to scattering of electrons by acoustic phonons, which is the dominant intrinsic contribution in clean graphene. As the system relaxes to equilibrium, the plasmon frequency adiabatically changes with time. We show that this causes a partial compensation of the plasmon damping. A similar mechanism may apply to another collective mode (the energy wave) predicted to exist in graphene in the low-frequency hydrodynamic regime. Implications for infrared and THz pump-probe experiments are discussed.

  16. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  17. Two methods for damping torsional vibrations in DFIG-based wind generators using power converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zuyi; Lu, Yupu; Xie, Da; Yu, Songtao; Wu, Wangping

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes novel damping control algorithms by using static synchronous compensator (STATCOM) and energy storage system (ESS) to damp torsional vibrations in doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind turbine systems. It first analyses the operating characteristics of STATCOM and ESS for regulating power variations to increase grid voltage stability. Then, new control strategies for STATCOM and ESS are introduced to damp the vibrations. It is followed by illustration of their effectiveness to damp the drive train torsional vibrations of wind turbines, which can be caused by grid disturbances, such as voltage sags and frequency fluctuations. Results suggest that STATCOM is a promising technology to mitigate the torsional vibrations caused by grid voltage sags. By contrast, the ESS connected to the point of common coupling (PCC) of wind turbine systems shows even obvious advantages because of its capability of absorbing/releasing both active and reactive power. It can thus be concluded that STATCOM is useful for stabilizing power system voltage fluctuations, and ESS is more effective both in regulating PCC voltage fluctuations and damping torsional vibrations caused by grid voltage frequency fluctuations.

  18. Sigma-1 receptors modulate functional activity of rat splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Whitlock, B B; Pultz, J A; Wolfe, S A

    1995-06-01

    Neuroleptics, opiates, and cocaine are commonly prescribed for or abused by humans. Although primarily used for their actions at other receptors in brain, these compounds also act at sigma receptors. We have previously identified sigma-1 receptors on human peripheral blood leukocytes and rat spleen, and in the present study we demonstrate a correlation between the pharmacology of these receptors and the ability of drugs to suppress concanavalin A-induced splenocyte proliferation. These results support the hypothesis that sigma-1 receptors regulate functional activities of immune cells, and suggest that sigma agonists may cause changes in immune competence in vivo.

  19. Synthesis and psychotropic activity of functionally substituted diaziridines and bisdiaziridines

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyanovskii, R.G.; Shustov, G.V.; Nabiev, O.G.; Denisenko, S.N.; Sukhanova, S.A.; Lavretskaya, E.F.

    1987-04-01

    The authors examine the psychotropic activity of diaziridines which differ considerable in their structures and the C- and N-substituents. Diaziridines are monoamine oxidase inhibitors in the brain and, thus, are potential antidepressants. The acute toxicities and some pharmacological effects of diaziridines are shown. Mice were used in the experiments. The bisdiaziridines obtained differ in their /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectra. The effect is presented of functionally substituted diaziridines on the effects of reserpine, 5-hydroxytryptophan, tryptamine, corazole, and apomorphine hypothermia.

  20. Polymeric active coatings with functionality in vascular applications.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, María Rosa; Rodríguez, Gema; Fernández, Mar; Gallardo, Alberto; San Román, Julio

    2002-12-01

    Copolymers containing functional groups with activity as antiaggregating agents for platelets, based on random chains of metacryloyloxyethyl [2-(acetyloxy)-4-(trifluoromethyl)]benzoate, TH, and 2-acrylamido-2-metylpropanesulfonic acid, AMPS, with AMPS molar fractions ranging from 0.1 to 0.4, have been prepared. The spectroscopical characterization and the in vitro swelling behavior have been studied, as well as the surface free energy, showing the copolymers an appropriate surface properties from a haemocompatible point of view. Preliminary in vitro tests using human blood have shown a promising antiaggregating behavior.