Science.gov

Sample records for active deformation mechanism

  1. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science. PMID:27694937

  2. Mechanics of dielectric elastomer-activated deformable transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Zhou, Jinxiong; Sun, Wenjie; Wu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ling

    2014-09-01

    Laminating a thin layer of elastomeric grating on the surface of a prestretched dielectric elastomer (DE) membrane forms a basic design of electrically tunable transmission grating. We analyze the inhomogeneous deformation of a circular multiple-region configuration. Variation of the geometric and material parameters, as well as of the critical condition determined by loss of tension instability, is probed to aid the design of a DE-based deformable grating. The predicted changes in the grating period agree substantially with the experimental results reported by Aschwanden et al (Aschwanden et al 2007 IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 19 1090).

  3. Cyclic mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast proliferation and autocrine growth factor activity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J E; Mitchell, J J; Absher, P M; Baldor, L; Geller, H A; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Hamblin, M J; Vacek, P; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    Cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia and increased extracellular matrix deposition are features of tissue hypertrophy resulting from increased work load. It is known, for example, that mechanical forces play a critical role in lung development, cardiovascular remodeling following pressure overload, and skeletal muscle growth. The mechanisms involved in these processes, however, remain unclear. Here we examined the effect of mechanical deformation on fibroblast function in vitro. IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts grown on collagen-coated silastic membranes were subjected to cyclical mechanical deformation (10% increase in culture surface area; 1 Hz) for up to 5 days. Cell number was increased by 39% after 2 days of deformation (1.43 +/- .01 x 10(5) cells/membrane compared with control, 1.03 +/- 0.02 x 10(5) cells; mean +/- SEM; P < 0.02) increasing to 163% above control by 4 days (2.16 +/- 0.16 x 10(5) cells compared with 0.82 +/- 0.03 x 10(5) cells; P < 0.001). The medium from mechanically deformed cells was mitogenic for IMR-90 cells, with maximal activity in the medium from cells mechanically deformed for 2 days (stimulating cell replication by 35% compared with media control; P < 0.002). These data suggest that mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast replication and that this effect is mediated by the release of autocrine growth factors.

  4. Nanoscale deformation mechanisms in bone.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Himadri S; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Zickler, Gerald A; Raz-Ben Aroush, D; Funari, Sérgio S; Roschger, Paul; Wagner, H Daniel; Fratzl, Peter

    2005-10-01

    Deformation mechanisms in bone matrix at the nanoscale control its exceptional mechanical properties, but the detailed nature of these processes is as yet unknown. In situ tensile testing with synchrotron X-ray scattering allowed us to study directly and quantitatively the deformation mechanisms at the nanometer level. We find that bone deformation is not homogeneous but distributed between a tensile deformation of the fibrils and a shearing in the interfibrillar matrix between them.

  5. The role of mechanical heterogeneities in evaporite sequence during deformation initiated by basement fault activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Burliga, Stanisław

    2016-04-01

    Kłodawa Salt Structure (KSS) situated in the centre of the Polish Zechstein Basin started to rise above a basement fault in the Early Triassic. Geological studies of the KSS revealed significant differences in the deformation patterns between the PZ1-PZ2 (intensely deformed) and PZ3-PZ4 (less deformed) cycle evaporites. These two older and two younger cycle evaporite complexes are separated by the thick Main Anhydrite (A3) bed. We use numerical simulations to assess the impact of a thick anhydrite bed on intrasalt deformation. In our models, the overburden consists of clastic sediments. A normal fault located in the rigid basement beneath the salt is activated due to model extension. At the same time, the sedimentation process takes place. The evaporites consist of a salt bed intercalated with a thick anhydrite layer of varying position and geometry. To understand the role of anhydrite layer, we run comparative simulations, in which no anhydrite layer is present. In the study, we use our own numerical codes implemented in MATLAB combined with the MILAMIN and MUTILS numerical packages. Our investigations revealed a significant influence of the anhydrite on deformation style in the evaporate series. The supra-anhydrite domain is characterized by weaker deformation and lower rates of salt flow in comparison to the sub-anhydrite domain. The highest contrast in the rate of salt flow between the two domains is observed in the case of the anhydrite layer situated close to the bottom of the salt complex. The thick anhydrite layer additionally diminishes the deformation rate in the supra-anhydrite domain and can lead to detachment of the basement deformation from its overlay. Our numerical simulations showed that the presence of the A3 Main Anhydrite bed could be the dominant factor responsible for the decoupling of deformation in the KSS salt complex.

  6. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  7. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, P. M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, E.; Prakapenka, V.; Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Smith, J.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Wenk, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    The crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, yet little is known about its deformation mechanisms. Information about how stishovite deforms under stress is important for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. Particularly, stishovite is elastically anisotropic and thus development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation may contribute to seismic anomalies in the mantle. We converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. Diffraction patterns were collected in situ in radial geometry at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to examine development of CPO during deformation. We find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction and infer deformation mechanisms leading to the observed CPO with visco-plastic self consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity models. Our results show pyramidal and basal slip are most likely active at high pressure and ambient temperature, in agreement with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of rutile (TiO2) and paratellurite (TeO2), which are isostructural to stishovite. Conversely other TEM studies of stishovite done at higher temperature suggest dominant prismatic slip. This indicates that a variety of slip systems may be active in stishovite, depending on conditions. As a result, stishovite's contribution to the seismic signature in the mantle may vary as a function of pressure and temperature and thus depth.

  8. Deformation of noncommutative quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jian-Jian; Chowdhury, S. Hasibul Hassan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the Lie group GNC α , β , γ , of which the kinematical symmetry group GNC of noncommutative quantum mechanics (NCQM) is a special case due to fixed nonzero α, β, and γ, is three-parameter deformation quantized using the method suggested by Ballesteros and Musso [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 46, 195203 (2013)]. A certain family of QUE algebras, corresponding to GNC α , β , γ with two of the deformation parameters approaching zero, is found to be in agreement with the existing results of the literature on quantum Heisenberg group. Finally, we dualize the underlying QUE algebra to obtain an expression for the underlying star-product between smooth functions on GNC α , β , γ .

  9. A review about the mechanisms associated with active deformation, regional uplift and subsidence in southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folguera, Andrés; Gianni, Guido; Sagripanti, Lucía; Rojas Vera, Emilio; Novara, Iván; Colavitto, Bruno; Alvarez, Orlando; Orts, Darío; Tobal, Jonathan; Giménez, Mario; Introcaso, Antonio; Ruiz, Francisco; Martínez, Patricia; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-12-01

    A broad range of processes acted simultaneously during the Quaternary producing relief in the Andes and adjacent foreland, from the Chilean coast, where the Pacific Ocean floor is being subducted beneath South American, to the Brazilian and the Argentinean Atlantic platform area. This picture shows to be complex and responds to a variety of processes. The Geoid exemplifies this spectrum of uplift mechanisms, since it reflects an important change at 35°S along the Andes and the foreland that could be indicating the presence of dynamic forces modeling the topography with varying intensity through the subduction margin. On the other hand, mountains uplifted in the Atlantic margin, along a vast sector of the Brazilian Atlantic coast and inland regions seem to be created at the area where the passive margin has been hyper-extended and consequently mechanically debilitated and the forearc region shifts eastwardly at a similar rate than the westward advancing continent. Therefore the forearc at the Arica latitudes can be considered as relatively stationary and dynamically sustained by a perpendicular-to-the-margin asthenospheric flow that inhibits trench roll back, determining a highly active orogenic setting at the eastern Andes in the Subandean region. To the south, the Pampean flat subduction zone creates particular conditions for deformation and rapid propagation of the orogenic front producing a high-amplitude orogen. In the southern Central and Patagonian Andes, mountain (orogenic) building processes are attenuated, becoming dominant other mechanisms of exhumation such as the i) impact of mantle plumes originated in the 660 km mantle transition, ii) the ice-masse retreat from the Andes after the Pleistocene producing an isostatic rebound, iii) the dynamic topography associated with the opening of an asthenospheric window during the subduction of the Chile ridge and slab tearing processes, iv) the subduction of oceanic swells linked to transform zones and v) the

  10. Deformation Mechanisms during Hot Working of Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Bieler, T. R.; Miller, J. D.; Glavicic, M. G.

    2004-06-01

    Computer models of metal flow and texture evolution during hot working require accurate descriptions of deformation mechanisms and constitutive behavior. Such descriptions for titanium alloys can be very complex because of the variety of slip systems in the hexagonal (alpha) phase, let alone the complications associated with the deformation of two-phase (alpha/beta) microstructures in commercial alloys. Methods to elucidate the deformation behavior of unalloyed alpha titanium and two-phase Ti-6Al-4V will be described. First, the analysis of the hot deformation of heavily textured bar and plate materials will be described. In these instances, the anisotropy in flow stress and in sample deformation pattern have been used in conjunction with a crystal plasticity code to deduce the relative values of the critical resolved shear stresses for basal , prism , and pyramidal slip. Analysis of the flow curves has also provided insight into the micromechanism of flow softening in two-phase alloys with colony-alpha microstructures. To complement this work, an x-ray line broadening technique was developed to deduce the relative slip activity at large strains in unalloyed titanium and Ti-6Al-4V. These measurements also provided estimates of the dislocation density as a function of temperature and the competition between slip and twinning at cold-working temperatures.

  11. Plastic deformation mechanisms in nanocrystalline metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovid'ko, Ilya A.

    2013-11-01

    This article discusses the experiments, computer simulations, and theoretical models addressing the conventional and specific mechanisms of plastic deformation in nanocrystalline metallic materials. Particular attention is devoted to the competition between lattice dislocation slip and specific deformation mechanisms mediated by grain boundaries as well as its sensitivity to grain size and other parameters of nanocrystalline metallic structures.

  12. Nanoscale Deformation and Toughening Mechanisms of Nacre

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-31

    graduating undergraduates who achieved a 3.5 GPA to 4.0 (4.0 max scale ): Number of graduating undergraduates funded by a DoD funded Center of Excellence grant...design principle down to atomic scale with a purpose to fight against foreign attacks, which has opened up a new opportunity to unravel the...deformation mechanism of unique mechanical performance at the atomic scale . Technology Transfer 1 Nanoscale Deformation and Toughening Mechanisms of Nacre

  13. Determination of the deformation mechanism of Fe-Mn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Minho; Koo, Yang Mo; Kwon, Se Kyun

    2015-03-01

    The energy parameters of planar defects are decisive for understanding the deformation mechanisms of metals. The stacking fault energy has been regarded as a key parameter to determine the activation of the deformation mechanisms of the face-centered cubic metals and alloys. However, it is still under a long debate why the stacking fault energy can be treated to be such an exclusive parameter among the general planar fault energies. We have employed molecular dynamics method to examine the effects of Mn alloying on the deformation behavior of austenitic Fe-Mn systems. The energies of stable and unstable states are calculated by sliding the (111) plane and are analyzed in two different schemes, stacking fault energy and energy barriers, which leads to a contradiction between them. We show that a linear relationship can be identified among the energy barriers. This finding is used to identify the activated deformation mechanism. A new parameter is also suggested to characterize the material deformation.

  14. Deformation mechanisms of plasticized starch materials.

    PubMed

    Mikus, P-Y; Alix, S; Soulestin, J; Lacrampe, M F; Krawczak, P; Coqueret, X; Dole, P

    2014-12-19

    The aim of this paper is to understand the influence of plasticizer and plasticizer amount on the mechanical and deformation behaviors of plasticized starch. Glycerol, sorbitol and mannitol have been used as plasticizers. After extrusion of the various samples, dynamic mechanical analyses and video-controlled tensile tests have been performed. It was found that the nature of plasticizer, its amount as well as the aging of the material has an impact on the involved deformation mechanism. The variations of volume deformation could be explained by an antiplasticization effect (low plasticizer amount), a phase-separation phenomenon (excess of plasticizer) and/or by the retrogradation of starch.

  15. Dislocations: 75 years of Deformation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy

    2009-01-01

    The selection of papers presented in this section reflect on themes to be explored at the "Dislocations: 75 years of Deformation Mechanisms" Symposium to be held at the Annual 2009 TMS meeting. The symposium was sponsored by the Mechanical Behavior of Materials Committee to give tribute to the evolution of a concept that has formed the basis of our mechanistic understanding of how crystalline solids plastically deform and how they fail.

  16. Atomistic deformation mechanisms in twinned copper nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jianjun; Niu, Xinrui; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Gangfeng

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we perform molecular dynamic simulations to investigate the compression response and atomistic deformation mechanisms of twinned nanospheres. The relationship between load and compression depth is calculated for various twin spacing and loading directions. Then, the overall elastic properties and the underlying plastic deformation mechanisms are illuminated. Twin boundaries (TBs) act as obstacles to dislocation motion and lead to strengthening. As the loading direction varies, the plastic deformation transfers from dislocations intersecting with TBs, slipping parallel to TBs, and then to being restrained by TBs. The strengthening of TBs depends strongly on the twin spacing.

  17. Modeling the effects of particle deformation in chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaochun; Zhao, Yongwu; Wang, Yongguang

    2012-09-01

    In a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process, an active abrasive particle participating in the wear process will contact the pad and the wafer at the same time. The applied polishing load causes the deformation of the pad in the contact interface of the particle and the pad, and the deformation of the wafer in the contact interface of the particle and the wafer. Besides, this force causes the deformation of the abrasive particle. Based on the elastic-plastic micro-contact mechanics and abrasive wear theory, a novel model for material removal rate (MRR) with consideration of the abrasive particle deformation is presented in this paper. The deformation of the abrasive particle, affecting the indentation depth of the particle into the wafer, is quantitatively incorporated into the model. The results and analyses show that the present model is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    DOE PAGES

    Kaercher, Pamela M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, Eloisa; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; ...

    2014-11-07

    Although the crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, little is known about the development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation in stishovite. Insight into CPO and associated deformation mechanics of stishovite would provide important information for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. To study CPO development, we converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. We collected diffraction patterns in radial geometry to examine in situ development of crystallographic preferred orientation andmore » find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction. Viscoplastic self-consistent modeling suggests the most likely slip systems at high pressure and ambient temperature are pyramidal and basal slip.« less

  19. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Pamela M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, Eloisa; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    Although the crystal structure of the high-pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, little is known about the development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation in stishovite. Insight into CPO and associated deformation mechanics of stishovite would provide important information for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. To study CPO development, we converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. We collected diffraction patterns in radial geometry to examine in situ development of crystallographic preferred orientation and find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction. Viscoplastic self-consistent modeling suggests the most likely slip systems at high pressure and ambient temperature are pyramidal and basal slip.

  20. Highly deformable bones: unusual deformation mechanisms of seahorse armor.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael M; Novitskaya, Ekaterina; Castro-Ceseña, Ana Bertha; Meyers, Marc A; McKittrick, Joanna

    2013-06-01

    Multifunctional materials and devices found in nature serve as inspiration for advanced synthetic materials, structures and robotics. Here, we elucidate the architecture and unusual deformation mechanisms of seahorse tails that provide prehension as well as protection against predators. The seahorse tail is composed of subdermal bony plates arranged in articulating ring-like segments that overlap for controlled ventral bending and twisting. The bony plates are highly deformable materials designed to slide past one another and buckle when compressed. This complex plate and segment motion, along with the unique hardness distribution and structural hierarchy of each plate, provide seahorses with joint flexibility while shielding them against impact and crushing. Mimicking seahorse armor may lead to novel bio-inspired technologies, such as flexible armor, fracture-resistant structures or prehensile robotics.

  1. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kaercher, Pamela M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, Eloisa; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2014-11-07

    Although the crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, little is known about the development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation in stishovite. Insight into CPO and associated deformation mechanics of stishovite would provide important information for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. To study CPO development, we converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. We collected diffraction patterns in radial geometry to examine in situ development of crystallographic preferred orientation and find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction. Viscoplastic self-consistent modeling suggests the most likely slip systems at high pressure and ambient temperature are pyramidal and basal slip.

  2. Improving the mechanical properties of Zr-based bulk metallic glass by controlling the activation energy for β-relaxation through plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Nozomu; Todaka, Yoshikazu Umemoto, Minoru; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko

    2014-09-29

    The mechanism of plastic deformation in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is widely believed to be based on a shear transformation zone (STZ). This model assumes that a shear-induced atomic rearrangement occurs at local clusters that are a few to hundreds of atoms in size. It was recently postulated that the potential energy barrier for STZ activation, W{sub STZ}, calculated using the cooperative shear model, is equivalent to the activation energy for β-relaxation, E{sub β}. This result suggested that the fundamental process for STZ activation is the mechanically activated β-relaxation. Since the E{sub β} value and the glass transition temperature T{sub g} of BMGs have a linear relation, that is, because E{sub β} ≈ 26RT{sub g}, the composition of the BMG determines the ease with which the STZ can be activated. Enthalpy relaxation experiments revealed that the BMG Zr{sub 50}Cu{sub 40}Al{sub 10} when deformed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) has a lower E{sub β} of 101 kJ/mol. The HPT-processed samples accordingly exhibited tensile plastic elongation (0.34%) and marked decreases in their yield strength (330 MPa). These results suggest that mechanically induced structural defects (i.e., the free volume and the anti-free volume) effectively act to reduce W{sub STZ} and increase the number of STZs activated during tensile testing to accommodate the plastic strain without requiring a change in the composition of the BMG. Thus, this study shows quantitatively that mechanically induced structural defects can overcome the compositional limitations of E{sub β} (or W{sub STZ}) and result in improvements in the mechanical properties of the BMG.

  3. Creep deformation mechanism mapping in nickel base disk superalloys

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Timothy M.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Deutchman, Hallee; ...

    2016-05-10

    We investigated the creep deformation mechanisms at intermediate temperature in ME3, a modern Ni-based disk superalloy, using diffraction contrast imaging. Both conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM were utilised. Distinctly different deformation mechanisms become operative during creep at temperatures between 677-815 °C and at stresses ranging from 274 to 724 MPa. Both polycrystalline and single-crystal creep tests were conducted. The single-crystal tests provide new insight into grain orientation effects on creep response and deformation mechanisms. Creep at lower temperatures (≤760 °C) resulted in the thermally activated shearing modes such as microtwinning, stacking fault ribbons and isolated superlattice extrinsicmore » stacking faults. In contrast, these faulting modes occurred much less frequently during creep at 815 °C under lower applied stresses. Instead, the principal deformation mode was dislocation climb bypass. In addition to the difference in creep behaviour and creep deformation mechanisms as a function of stress and temperature, it was also observed that microstructural evolution occurs during creep at 760 °C and above, where the secondary coarsened and the tertiary precipitates dissolved. Based on this work, a creep deformation mechanism map is proposed, emphasising the influence of stress and temperature on the underlying creep mechanisms.« less

  4. Creep deformation mechanism mapping in nickel base disk superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Timothy M.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Deutchman, Hallee; Mills, Michael J.

    2016-05-10

    We investigated the creep deformation mechanisms at intermediate temperature in ME3, a modern Ni-based disk superalloy, using diffraction contrast imaging. Both conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM were utilised. Distinctly different deformation mechanisms become operative during creep at temperatures between 677-815 °C and at stresses ranging from 274 to 724 MPa. Both polycrystalline and single-crystal creep tests were conducted. The single-crystal tests provide new insight into grain orientation effects on creep response and deformation mechanisms. Creep at lower temperatures (≤760 °C) resulted in the thermally activated shearing modes such as microtwinning, stacking fault ribbons and isolated superlattice extrinsic stacking faults. In contrast, these faulting modes occurred much less frequently during creep at 815 °C under lower applied stresses. Instead, the principal deformation mode was dislocation climb bypass. In addition to the difference in creep behaviour and creep deformation mechanisms as a function of stress and temperature, it was also observed that microstructural evolution occurs during creep at 760 °C and above, where the secondary coarsened and the tertiary precipitates dissolved. Based on this work, a creep deformation mechanism map is proposed, emphasising the influence of stress and temperature on the underlying creep mechanisms.

  5. Imaging active faulting in a region of distributed deformation from the joint clustering of focal mechanisms and hypocentres: Application to the Azores-western Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, Susana; Lima, Vânia; Vales, Dina; Cesca, Simone; Carrilho, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The matching between linear trends of hypocentres and fault planes indicated by focal mechanisms (FMs) is frequently used to infer the location and geometry of active faults. This practice works well in regions of fast lithospheric deformation, where earthquake patterns are clear and major structures accommodate the bulk of deformation, but typically fails in regions of slow and distributed deformation. We present a new joint FM and hypocentre cluster algorithm that is able to detect systematically the consistency between hypocentre lineations and FMs, even in regions of distributed deformation. We apply the method to the Azores-western Mediterranean region, with particular emphasis on western Iberia. The analysis relies on a compilation of hypocentres and FMs taken from regional and global earthquake catalogues, academic theses and technical reports, complemented by new FMs for western Iberia. The joint clustering algorithm images both well-known and new seismo-tectonic features. The Azores triple junction is characterised by FMs with vertical pressure (P) axes, in good agreement with the divergent setting, and the Iberian domain is characterised by NW-SE oriented P axes, indicating a response of the lithosphere to the ongoing oblique convergence between Nubia and Eurasia. Several earthquakes remain unclustered in the western Mediterranean domain, which may indicate a response to local stresses. The major regions of consistent faulting that we identify are the mid-Atlantic ridge, the Terceira rift, the Trans-Alboran shear zone and the north coast of Algeria. In addition, other smaller earthquake clusters present a good match between epicentre lineations and FM fault planes. These clusters may signal single active faults or wide zones of distributed but consistent faulting. Mainland Portugal is dominated by strike-slip earthquakes with fault planes coincident with the predominant NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE oriented earthquake lineations. Clusters offshore SW Iberia are

  6. Deformation and recrystallization mechanisms in naturally deformed sillimanites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambregts, P. J.; van Roermund, H. L. M.

    1990-07-01

    Prismatic sillimanite (Al 2SiO 5), with a length between 0.3 and 2.5 mm, was obtained from a garnet migmatite. The sillimanite, naturally deformed at a temperature of 750 ° C and a confining pressure of 6 kbar, has been studied using optical and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Optical and universal stage measurements reveal undulatory extinction, "sharp" deformation-induced subgrain boundaries (subparallel to (001) and (010)) and minor recrystallization. Transmission electron microscopy shows free dislocations, dislocation loops, (110) planar defects and tiltwalls parallel to (001). Dislocations have Burgers vectors of [001] and [100]. All isolated dislocations are dissociated. The dominant slip system is (100) [001] with subordinate (001) [100]. The microstructure of sillimanite indicates that recrystallization has occurred by a rotation mechanism (around [010]), where single crystals become polycrystals by the progressive development of numerous internal high-angle boundaries. The latter have been interpreted as originating from low-angle (001) tilt- and (010) twistwalls. Rotation recrystallization was followed by grain boundary migration.

  7. Mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bumjoon; Yoon, Gwonchan; Lee, Sang Woo; Eom, Kilho

    2015-01-14

    Amyloid fibrils have recently received attention due to their remarkable mechanical properties, which are highly correlated with their biological functions. We have studied the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils as a function of their length scales by using atomistic simulations. It is shown that the length of amyloid fibrils plays a role in their deformation and fracture mechanisms in such a way that the competition between shear and bending deformations is highly dependent on the fibril length, and that as the fibril length increases, so does the bending strength of the fibril while its shear strength decreases. The dependence of rupture force for amyloid fibrils on their length is elucidated using the Bell model, which suggests that the rupture force of the fibril is determined from the hydrogen bond rupture mechanism that critically depends on the fibril length. We have measured the toughness of amyloid fibrils, which is shown to depend on the fibril length. In particular, the toughness of the fibril with its length of ∼3 nm is estimated to be ∼30 kcal mol(-1) nm(-3), comparable to that of a spider silk crystal with its length of ∼2 nm. Moreover, we have shown the important effect of the pulling rate on the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibril. It is found that as the pulling rate increases, so does the contribution of the shear effect to the elastic deformation of the amyloid fibril with its length of <10 nm. However, we found that the deformation mechanism of the amyloid fibril with its length of >15 nm is almost independent of the pulling rate. Our study sheds light on the role of the length scale of amyloid fibrils and the pulling rate in their mechanical behaviors and properties, which may provide insights into how the excellent mechanical properties of protein fibrils can be determined.

  8. Deformation Monitoring of AN Active Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of low frequency earthquakes, slow slip events and other deformation phenomena, new for geophysics, change our understanding of how the energy accumulated in the Earth's crust do release. The new geophysical data make one revise the underlying mechanism of geomechanical processes taking place in fault zones. Conditions for generating different slip modes are still unclear. The most vital question is whether a certain slip mode is intrinsic for a fault or may be controlled by external factors. This work presents the results of two and a half year deformation monitoring of a discontinuity in the zone of the Main Sayanskiy Fault. Main Sayanskiy Fault is right-lateral strike-slip fault. Observations were performed in the tunnel of Talaya seismic station (TLY), Irkutsk region, Russia. Measurements were carried out 70 m away from the entrance of the tunnel, the thickness of overlying rock was about 30 m. Inductive sensors of displacement were mounted at the both sides of a discontinuity, which recorded three components of relative fault side displacement with the accuracy of 0.2 mcm. Temperature variation inside the tunnel didn't exceed 0.5oC during the all period of observations. Important information about deformation properties of an active fault was obtained. A pronounced seasonality of deformation characteristics of discontinuity is observed in the investigated segment of rock. A great number of slow slip events with durations from several hours to several weeks were registered. Besides that alterations of fault deformation characteristics before the megathrust earthquake M9.0 Tohoku Oki 11 March 2011 and reaction to the event itself were detected. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant no. 14-17-00719).

  9. Deformation mechanisms of irradiated metallic nanofoams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepeda-Ruiz, L. A.; Martinez, E.; Caro, M.; Fu, E. G.; Caro, A.

    2013-07-01

    It was recently proposed that within a particular window in the parameter space of temperature, ion energy, dose rate, and filament diameter, nanoscale metallic foams could show radiation tolerance [Bringa et al., Nano Lett. 12, 3351 (2012)]. Outside this window, damage appears in the form of vacancy-related stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT), with no effects due to interstitials [Fu et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 191607 (2012)]. These SFT could be natural sources of dislocations within the ligaments composing the foam and determine their mechanical response. We employ molecular dynamics simulations of cylindrical ligaments containing an SFT to obtain an atomic-level picture of their deformation behavior under compression. We find that plastic deformation originates at the edges of the SFT, at lower stress than needed to create dislocations at the surface. Our results predict that nanoscale foams soften under irradiation, a prediction not yet tested experimentally.

  10. Deformation Mechanisms of Gum Metals Under Nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Rohini Priya

    Gum Metal is a set of multi-component beta-Ti alloys designed and developed by Toyota Central R&D Labs in 2003 to have a nearly zero shear modulus in the direction. After significant amounts of cold-work (>90%), these alloys were found to have yield strengths at a significant fraction of the predicted ideal strengths and exhibited very little work hardening. It has been speculated that this mechanical behavior may be realized through an ideal shear mechanism as opposed to conventional plastic deformation mechanisms, such as slip, and that such a mechanism may be realized through a defect structure termed "nanodisturbance". It is furthermore theorized that for near ideal strength to be attained, dislocations need to be pinned at sufficiently high stresses. It is the search for these defects and pinning points that motivates the present study. However, the mechanism of plastic deformation and the true origin of specific defect structures unique to gum metals is still controversial, mainly due to the complexity of the beta-Ti alloy system and the heavily distorted lattice exhibited in cold worked gum metals, rendering interpretation of images difficult. Accordingly, the first aim of this study is to clarify the starting as-received microstructures of gum metal alloys through conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and aberration-corrected high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy with high-angle annular dark field detector (HAADF-HRSTEM) imaging. To elucidate the effects of beta-stability and starting microstructure on the deformation behavior of gum metals and thus to provide adequate context for potentially novel deformation structures, we investigate three alloy conditions: gum metal that has undergone solution heat treatment (STGM), gum metal that has been heavily cold worked (CWGM), and a solution treated alloy of nominal gum metal composition, but leaner in beta-stabilizing content (ST Ref-1). In order to directly relate observed

  11. Universal mechanism of thermo-mechanical deformation in metallic glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Dmowski, W.; Tong, Y.; Iwashita, T.; ...

    2015-02-11

    Here we investigated the atomistic structure of metallic glasses subjected to thermo-mechanical creep deformation using high energy x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulation. The experiments were performed in-situ, at high temperatures as a time dependent deformation in the elastic regime, and ex-situ on samples quenched under stress. We show that all the anisotropic structure functions of the samples undergone thermo-mechanical creep can be scaled into a single curve, regardless of the magnitude of anelastic strain, stress level and the sign of the stress, demonstrating universal behavior and pointing to unique atomistic unit of anelastic deformation. The structural changes due tomore » creep are strongly localized within the second nearest neighbors, involving only a small group of atoms.« less

  12. Universal mechanism of thermo-mechanical deformation in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, W.; Tong, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Egami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Y.

    2015-02-11

    Here we investigated the atomistic structure of metallic glasses subjected to thermo-mechanical creep deformation using high energy x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulation. The experiments were performed in-situ, at high temperatures as a time dependent deformation in the elastic regime, and ex-situ on samples quenched under stress. We show that all the anisotropic structure functions of the samples undergone thermo-mechanical creep can be scaled into a single curve, regardless of the magnitude of anelastic strain, stress level and the sign of the stress, demonstrating universal behavior and pointing to unique atomistic unit of anelastic deformation. The structural changes due to creep are strongly localized within the second nearest neighbors, involving only a small group of atoms.

  13. Deformation mechanisms in a Laves phase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yaping; Allen, S.M.; Livingston, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    The stress-induced phase transformation between C36 and C15 structures in Fe{sub 2}Zr is studied by electron microscopy. Nucleus of transformation is believed to be pre-existing C15 layers in C36 particles. Microstructural evidence for three mechanisms of growth of a new phase were found: Fault accumulation and rearrangement, moving of a individual partial dislocations between two phases, and the migration of microscopic ledges composed of a series of Shockley partials between C36 and C15. Plastic deformation by slip on non-basal planes of C36 caused by indentation is studied.

  14. Exploring Deformation Mechanisms in Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Julia R.; Jang, Dongchan; Gu, X. Wendy

    2012-10-01

    Useful properties of structural materials generally depend on their bulk microstructure. For centuries, improvements in structural materials relied heavily on processing, which in turn determined the resulting microstructure and properties. Materials sciences are entering an era in which specific properties of a material are obtained not only from its processing but also by controlling of the architecture of its constituents, often with sub-micron dimensions. To utilize this newly achievable nanoscale engineering precision in structural applications, it is imperative to quantify the deformation processes at each relevant scale, with special attention focusing on the importance of internal and external heterogeneities, for example grain boundaries, bi-material interfaces, phase boundaries, etc., on mechanical loading. It has been shown for single crystals that yield (and fracture) strengths increase with power-law dependence on sample size reduction when the micron scale is reached, and therefore, can no longer be inferred from bulk response or from the literature. Although these studies provide a powerful foundation for fundamental deformation processes operating at small scales, they are far from representing real materials used in structural applications, whose microstructure is often complex, containing boundaries and interfaces. Both homogeneous (i.e. grain and twin boundaries) and heterogeneous (i.e. phase and precipitate-matrix boundaries) interfaces in size-limited features are crucial aspects of the structural reliability of most modern materials. They are also of particular importance to damage initiation. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art experimental and computational methods used to investigate mechanical behavior and microstructural evolution in small-scale metallic systems, deformation of which depends on intricate interactions of defects with internal interfaces and with free surfaces. Attention is focused on the

  15. Ruthenium Aluminides: Deformation Mechanisms and Substructure Development

    SciTech Connect

    Tresa M. Pollock

    2005-05-11

    Structural and functional materials that can operate in severe, high temperature environments are key to the operation of a wide range of energy generation systems. Because continued improvements in the energy efficiency of these systems is critical, the need for new materials with higher temperature capabilities is inevitable. Intermetallic compounds, with strong bonding and generally high melting points offer this possibility for a broad array of components such as coatings, electrode materials, actuators and/or structural elements. RuAl is a very unusual intermetallic compound among the large number of B2compounds that have been identified and investigated to date. This material has a very high melting temperature of 2050?C, low thermal expansion, high thermal conductivity and good corrosion resistance. Unlike most other high temperature B2 intermetallics, RuAl possesses good intrinsic deformability at low temperatures. In this program fundamental aspects of low and high temperature mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms in binary and higher order RuAl-based systems have been investigated. Alloying additions of interest included platinum, boron and niobium. Additionally, preliminary studies on high temperature oxidation behavior of these materials have been conducted.

  16. The Neighbor Switching Mechanism of Superplastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, David John

    At one time the notion that crystal plasticity resulted from the simultaneous motion of lattice planes over one another was entertained. This idea was displaced by the concept that relative atomic motions occur sequentially when dislocations move through the crystal. Similarly, McLean suggested that grains switch neighbors sequentially in a polycrystalline material undergoing superplastic flow. Morral and Ashby observed that the neighbor switching reactions in a froth occurred at irregular cells, and that these irregularities were associated with dislocations in the cellular array. They introduced cellular dislocation glide as a model for superplastic flow, and suggested that if the concentration of these defects required to make the froth flow increased with the flow stress, then the froth would have a non-Newtonian viscosity, like many superplastic materials. Cahn and Padawer pointed out that cellular dislocation climb was used as a model for grain growth by Hillert; this process results in the elimination of cells from the froth. Sato, Kuribayashi and Horiuchi used cellular dislocation climb to model both grain motion and the deformation-enhanced grain growth which can accompany superplastic flow. Here, the neighbor switching mechanism of superplastic deformation is developed as a topic in dislocation theory. The compatibility theory of dislocations is developed at an introductory level with exterior calculus. "Compatibility" of a cellular array corresponds to statements, a la Rivier, about the distribution of edges amongst the cells. The theory of dislocation motion, or crystal plasticity, is also developed with exterior calculus. Morral and Ashby's constitutive relationship for superplastic flow is analyzed and two models for deformation-enhanced grain growth are developed. The constitutive relationship and grain growth kinetics for superplastic flow are illustrated by modelling the behavior exhibited by single phase (Sn-1% Bi) and quasi -single phase (7475 Al

  17. Mechanisms of time-dependent deformation in porous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, Nicolas; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip G.

    2014-07-01

    We performed triaxial deformation experiments on a water-saturated porous limestone under constant strain rate and constant stress (creep) conditions. The tests were conducted at room temperature and at low effective pressures Peff=10 and Peff=20 MPa, in a regime where the rock is nominally brittle when tested at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1. Under these conditions and at constant stress, the phenomenon of brittle creep occurs. At Peff=10 MPa, brittle creep follows similar trends as those observed in other rock types (e.g., sandstones and granites): only small strains are accumulated before failure, and damage accumulation with increasing strain (as monitored by P wave speeds measurements during the tests) is not strongly dependent on the applied stresses. At Peff=20 MPa, brittle creep is also macroscopically observed, but when the creep strain rate is lower than ≈10-7 s-1, we observe that (1) much larger strains are accumulated, (2) less damage is accumulated with increasing strain, and (3) the deformation tends to be more compactant. These observations can be understood by considering that another deformation mechanism, different from crack growth, is active at low strain rates. We explore this possibility by constructing a deformation mechanism map that includes both subcritical crack growth and pressure solution creep processes; the increasing contribution of pressure solution creep at low strain rates is consistent with our observations.

  18. Deformation mechanisms in nanotwinned metal nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dongchan; Li, Xiaoyan; Gao, Huajian; Greer, Julia R

    2012-09-01

    Nanotwinned metals are attractive in many applications because they simultaneously demonstrate high strength and high ductility, characteristics that are usually thought to be mutually exclusive. However, most nanotwinned metals are produced in polycrystalline forms and therefore contain randomly oriented twin and grain boundaries making it difficult to determine the origins of their useful mechanical properties. Here, we report the fabrication of arrays of vertically aligned copper nanopillars that contain a very high density of periodic twin boundaries and no grain boundaries or other microstructural features. We use tension experiments, transmission electron microscopy and atomistic simulations to investigate the influence of diameter, twin-boundary spacing and twin-boundary orientation on the mechanical responses of individual nanopillars. We observe a brittle-to-ductile transition in samples with orthogonally oriented twin boundaries as the twin-boundary spacing decreases below a critical value (∼3-4 nm for copper). We also find that nanopillars with slanted twin boundaries deform via shear offsets and significant detwinning. The ability to decouple nanotwins from other microstructural features should lead to an improved understanding of the mechanical properties of nanotwinned metals.

  19. A mechanism for tectonic deformation on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.

    1986-01-01

    In the absence of identifiable physiographic features directly associated with plate tectonics, alternate mechanisms are sought for the intense tectonic deformation observed in radar images of Venus. One possible mechanism is direct coupling into an elastic lithosphere of the stresses associated with convective flow in the interior. Spectral Green's function solutions have been obtained for stresses in an elastic lithosphere overlying a Newtonian interior with an exponential depth dependence of viscosity, and a specified surface-density distribution driving the flow. At long wavelengths and for a rigid elastic/fluid boundary condition, horizontal normal stresses in the elastic lid are controlled by the vertical shear stress gradient and are directly proportional to the depth of the density disturbance in the underlying fluid. The depth and strength of density anomalies in the Venusian interior inferred by analyses of long wavelength gravity data suggest that stresses in excess of 100 MPa would be generated in a 10 km thick elastic lid unless a low viscosity channel occurring beneath the lid or a positive viscosity gradient uncouples the flow stresses. The great apparent depth of compensation of topographic features argues against this, however, thus supporting the importance of the coupling mechanism. If there is no elastic lid, stresses will also be very high near the surface, providing also that the viscosity gradient is negative.

  20. Deformation Behavior of Severely Deformed Al and Related Mechanisms Through Warm Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charkhesht, V.; Kazeminezhad, M.

    2017-03-01

    Flow stress and ductility behaviors of the annealed and severely deformed Al were investigated at warm deformation temperatures. Constrained groove pressing (CGP) method as a severe plastic deformation process was used. The tensile test was carried out at the temperature range of the 298-573 K and strain rate range of 0.001-0.1 s-1 to present the elevated temperature deformation behavior utilizing hyperbolic sine constitutive equation. The flow stress of the CGPed sample is increased with the number of CGP passes and decreased with temperature. Dynamic recovery and strain softening are found as main restoration mechanisms. Flow stress amounts are not remarkably affected by the strain rate. Values of the elongation are decreased with the number of CGP passes. Values of the calculated strain rate sensitivity are utilized to justify the elongation behavior. Shear bands created by CGP remarkably decrease the fracture elongation values. Temperature interval of 298-473 K cannot remarkably affect the flow stress and ductility. The interval of 473-573 K is chosen as critical temperature interval in which the values of flow stress and elongation are remarkably decreased and increased, respectively. Increasing the temperature up to 573 K causes recrystallization in shear bands. Scanning electron microscope was used to study fracture surface which can truly predict the elongation behavior. With increasing the temperature, the shear decohesion area is gradually replaced with fully dimpled structures. Finally, hot deformation activation energy for CGPed samples was calculated about 85 kJ/mol which is close to the grain boundary diffusion activation energy in pure Al.

  1. Deformation Behavior of Severely Deformed Al and Related Mechanisms Through Warm Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charkhesht, V.; Kazeminezhad, M.

    2017-01-01

    Flow stress and ductility behaviors of the annealed and severely deformed Al were investigated at warm deformation temperatures. Constrained groove pressing (CGP) method as a severe plastic deformation process was used. The tensile test was carried out at the temperature range of the 298-573 K and strain rate range of 0.001-0.1 s-1 to present the elevated temperature deformation behavior utilizing hyperbolic sine constitutive equation. The flow stress of the CGPed sample is increased with the number of CGP passes and decreased with temperature. Dynamic recovery and strain softening are found as main restoration mechanisms. Flow stress amounts are not remarkably affected by the strain rate. Values of the elongation are decreased with the number of CGP passes. Values of the calculated strain rate sensitivity are utilized to justify the elongation behavior. Shear bands created by CGP remarkably decrease the fracture elongation values. Temperature interval of 298-473 K cannot remarkably affect the flow stress and ductility. The interval of 473-573 K is chosen as critical temperature interval in which the values of flow stress and elongation are remarkably decreased and increased, respectively. Increasing the temperature up to 573 K causes recrystallization in shear bands. Scanning electron microscope was used to study fracture surface which can truly predict the elongation behavior. With increasing the temperature, the shear decohesion area is gradually replaced with fully dimpled structures. Finally, hot deformation activation energy for CGPed samples was calculated about 85 kJ/mol which is close to the grain boundary diffusion activation energy in pure Al.

  2. Monocytic Cells Become Less Compressible but More Deformable upon Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ravetto, Agnese; Wyss, Hans M.; Anderson, Patrick D.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Monocytes play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis. During the process of inflammation, circulating monocytes become activated in the blood stream. The consequent interactions of the activated monocytes with the blood flow and endothelial cells result in reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins, in particular of the microfilament structure, and concomitant changes in cell shape and mechanical behavior. Here we investigate the full elastic behavior of activated monocytes in relation to their cytoskeletal structure to obtain a better understanding of cell behavior during the progression of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Methods and Results The recently developed Capillary Micromechanics technique, based on exposing a cell to a pressure difference in a tapered glass microcapillary, was used to measure the deformation of activated and non-activated monocytic cells. Monitoring the elastic response of individual cells up to large deformations allowed us to obtain both the compressive and the shear modulus of a cell from a single experiment. Activation by inflammatory chemokines affected the cytoskeletal organization and increased the elastic compressive modulus of monocytes with 73–340%, while their resistance to shape deformation decreased, as indicated by a 25–88% drop in the cell’s shear modulus. This decrease in deformability is particularly pronounced at high strains, such as those that occur during diapedesis through the vascular wall. Conclusion Overall, monocytic cells become less compressible but more deformable upon activation. This change in mechanical response under different modes of deformation could be important in understanding the interplay between the mechanics and function of these cells. In addition, our data are of direct relevance for computational modeling and analysis of the distinct monocytic behavior in the circulation and the extravascular space. Lastly, an understanding of the changes of monocyte

  3. Constitutive Law and Flow Mechanism in Diamond Deformation

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Xiaohui; Raterron, Paul; Zhang, Jianzhong; ...

    2012-11-19

    Constitutive laws and crystal plasticity in diamond deformation have been the subjects of substantial interest since synthetic diamond was made in 1950's. To date, however, little is known quantitatively regarding its brittle-ductile properties and yield strength at high temperatures. In this paper, we report, for the first time, the strain-stress constitutive relations and experimental demonstration of deformation mechanisms under confined high pressure. The deformation at room temperature is essentially brittle, cataclastic, and mostly accommodated by fracturing on {111} plane with no plastic yielding at uniaxial strains up to 15%. At elevated temperatures of 1000°C and 1200°C diamond crystals exhibit significantmore » ductile flow with corresponding yield strength of 7.9 and 6.3 GPa, indicating that diamond starts to weaken when temperature is over 1000°C. Finally, at high temperature the plastic deformation and ductile flow is meditated by the <110>{111} dislocation glide and a very active {111} micro-twinning.« less

  4. Constitutive Law and Flow Mechanism in Diamond Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaohui; Raterron, Paul; Zhang, Jianzhong; Lin, Zhijun; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng

    2012-11-19

    Constitutive laws and crystal plasticity in diamond deformation have been the subjects of substantial interest since synthetic diamond was made in 1950's. To date, however, little is known quantitatively regarding its brittle-ductile properties and yield strength at high temperatures. In this paper, we report, for the first time, the strain-stress constitutive relations and experimental demonstration of deformation mechanisms under confined high pressure. The deformation at room temperature is essentially brittle, cataclastic, and mostly accommodated by fracturing on {111} plane with no plastic yielding at uniaxial strains up to 15%. At elevated temperatures of 1000°C and 1200°C diamond crystals exhibit significant ductile flow with corresponding yield strength of 7.9 and 6.3 GPa, indicating that diamond starts to weaken when temperature is over 1000°C. Finally, at high temperature the plastic deformation and ductile flow is meditated by the <110>{111} dislocation glide and a very active {111} micro-twinning.

  5. Deformation mechanisms of antigorite serpentinite at subduction zone conditions determined from experimentally and naturally deformed rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzende, Anne-Line; Escartin, Javier; Walte, Nicolas P.; Guillot, Stéphane; Hirth, Greg; Frost, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    We performed deformation-DIA experiments on antigorite serpentinite at pressures of 1-3.5 GPa and temperatures of between 400 and 650 °C, bracketing the stability of antigorite under subduction zone conditions. For each set of pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions, we conducted two runs at strain rates of 5 ×10-5 and 1 ×10-4 s-1. We complemented our study with a sample deformed in a Griggs-type apparatus at 1 GPa and 400 °C (Chernak and Hirth, 2010), and with natural samples from Cuba and the Alps deformed under blueschist/eclogitic conditions. Optical and transmission electron microscopies were used for microstructural characterization and determination of deformation mechanisms. Our observations on experimentally deformed antigorite prior to breakdown show that deformation is dominated by cataclastic flow with observable but minor contribution of plastic deformation (microkinking and (001) gliding mainly expressed by stacking disorder mainly). In contrast, in naturally deformed samples, plastic deformation structures are dominant (stacking disorder, kinking, pressure solution), with minor but also perceptible contribution of brittle deformation. When dehydration occurs in experiments, plasticity increases and is coupled to local embrittlement that we attribute to antigorite dehydration. In dehydrating samples collected in the Alps, embrittlement is also observed suggesting that dehydration may contribute to intermediate-depth seismicity. Our results thus show that semibrittle deformation operates within and above the stability field of antigorite. However, the plastic deformation recorded by naturally deformed samples was likely acquired at low strain rates. We also document that the corrugated structure of antigorite controls the strain accommodation mechanisms under subduction conditions, with preferred inter- and intra-grain cracking along (001) and gliding along both a and b. We also show that antigorite rheology in subduction zones is partly controlled

  6. Structural anisotropy in metallic glasses induced by mechanical deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, W.; Egami, T.

    2009-03-06

    We observed structural anisotropy in metallic glasses samples deformed by homogenous mechanical creep and by inhomogeneous compression using high energy X-ray diffraction. Pair distribution function analysis indicates bond anisotropy in the first atomic shell. This suggests that mechanical deformation involves rearrangements in a cluster of atoms by a bond reformation.

  7. Thermally activated deformation of irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhmert, J.; Müller, G.

    2002-03-01

    Temperature and strain rate change tensile tests were performed on two VVER 1000-type reactor pressure vessel welds with different contents of nickel in unirradiated and irradiated conditions in order to determine the activation parameters of the contribution of the thermally activated deformation. There are no differences of the activation parameters in the unirradiated and the irradiated conditions as well as for the two different materials. This shows that irradiation hardening preferentially results from a friction hardening mechanism by long-range obstacles.

  8. Significance of grain sliding mechanisms for ductile deformation of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, A.; Bourcier, M.; Gaye, A.; Héripré, E.; Bornert, M.; Raphanel, J.; Ludwig, W.

    2013-12-01

    Ductile shear zones at depth present polyphase and heterogeneous rocks and multi-scale strain localization patterns. Most strain concentrates in ultramylonitic layers, which exhibit microstructural signatures of several concomitant deformation mechanisms. The latter are either active in volume (dislocation creep), or in the vicinity and along interfaces (grain sliding and solution mass transfer). Because their chronology of appearance and interactions are unclear, inference of the overall rheology seems illusory. We have therefore characterized over a decade the rheology of synthetic lower crustal materials with different compositions and fluid contents, and for various microstructures. Non-Newtonian flow clearly related to dominant dislocation creep. Conversely, Newtonian behavior involved grain sliding mechanisms, but crystal plasticity could be identified as well. In order to clarify the respective roles of these mechanisms we underwent a multi-scale investigation of the ductile deformation of rock analog synthetic halite with controlled microstructures. The mechanical tests were combined with in-situ optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X ray computed tomography, allowing for digital image correlation (DIC) techniques and retrieval of full strain field. Crystal plasticity dominated, as evidenced by physical slip lines and DIC computed slip bands. Crystal orientation mapping allowed to identify strongly active easy glide {110} <110> systems. But, all other slip systems were observed as well, and especially near interfaces, where their activity is necessary to accommodate for the plastic strain incompatibilities between neighboring grains. We also evidenced grain boundary sliding (GBS), which clearly occurred as a secondary, but necessary, accommodation mechanism. The DIC technique allowed the quantification of the relative contribution of each mechanism. The amount of GBS clearly increased with decreasing grain size. Finite element (FE) modeling

  9. Inelastic deformation mechanisms in a transverse MMC lamina under compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newaz, Golam M.; Majumdar, Bhaskar S.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to study the inelastic deformation mechanisms in (90)(sub 8) Ti 15-3/SCS-6 lamina subjected to pure compression. Both mechanical behavior and microstructural evaluation were undertaken at room temperature, 538 and 650 C. Results indicate that mechanical response and deformation characteristics are significantly different in monotonic tension and compression. The inelastic deformation mechanisms in compression are controlled by radial fiber fracture, matrix plasticity and fiber-matrix debonding. The radial fiber fracture is a new damage mode observed for metal-matrix composites (MMC).

  10. Fatigue Behavior and Deformation Mechanisms in Inconel 718 Superalloy Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The nickel-base superalloy Inconel 718 (IN 718) is used as a structural material for a variety of components in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) and accounts for more than half of the total weight of this engine. IN 718 is the bill-of-material for the pressure vessels of nickel-hydrogen batteries for the space station. In the case of the space shuttle main engine, structural components are typically subjected to startup and shutdown load transients and occasional overloads in addition to high-frequency vibratory loads from routine operation. The nickel-hydrogen battery cells are prooftested before service and are subjected to fluctuating pressure loads during operation. In both of these applications, the structural material is subjected to a monotonic load initially, which is subsequently followed by fatigue. To assess the life of these structural components, it is necessary to determine the influence of a prior monotonic load on the subsequent fatigue life of the superalloy. An insight into the underlying deformation and damage mechanisms is also required to properly account for the interaction between the prior monotonic load and the subsequent fatigue loading. An experimental investigation was conducted to establish the effect of prior monotonic straining on the subsequent fatigue behavior of wrought, double-aged, IN 718 at room temperature. First, monotonic strain tests and fully-reversed, strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted on uniform-gage-section IN 718 specimens. Next, fully reversed fatigue tests were conducted under strain control on specimens that were monotonically strained in tension. Results from this investigation indicated that prior monotonic straining reduced the fatigue resistance of the superalloy particularly at the lowest strain range. Some of the tested specimens were sectioned and examined by transmission electron microscopy to reveal typical microstructures as well as the active deformation and damage mechanisms under each of

  11. Mechanisms of crustal deformation in the western US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The deformation processes in the western United States were studied, considering both deterministic models and random or statistical models. The role of the intracrustal delamination and mechanisms of crustal thinning were also examined. The application of fractal techniques to understand how the crust is deforming was studied in complex regions. Work continued on the development of a fractal based model for deformation in the western United States. Fractal studies were also extended to the study of topography and the geoid.

  12. Deformation and failure mechanisms in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newaz, G.; Majumdar, B. S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the key deformation mechanisms and their interaction leading to failure of both 0 degree and 90 degree Ti 15-3/SCS-6 laminae under monotonic loading. The experimental results suggest that inelastic deformation in the 0-degree lamina is dominated by plastic deformation and that in the 90-degree lamina is dominated by both fiber-matrix debonding and plasticity. The loading-unloading response, monitoring of Poisson's ratio and microscopy were utilized to identify the key deformation mechanisms. The sequence of deformation mechanisms leading to failure are identified for both the 0 and the 90-degree specimens. The threshold strains for plasticity or damage which are referred to as 'microdeformation' in the 0 deg and 90 deg laminae are approximately 0.004 and 0.002, respectively, at room temperature. These strain levels may be considered critical in initiation based structural design with these composites.

  13. The thermal and mechanical deformation study of up-stream pumping mechanical seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. L.; Xu, C.; Zuo, M. Z.; Wu, Q. B.

    2015-01-01

    Taking the viscosity-temperature relationship of the fluid film into consideration, a 3-D numerical model was established by ANSYS software which can simulate the heat transfer between the upstream pumping mechanical seal stationary and rotational rings and the fluid film between them as well as simulate the thermal deformation, structure deformation and the coupling deformation of them. According to the calculation result, thermal deformation causes the seal face expansion and the maximum thermal deformation appears at the inside of the seal ring. Pressure results in a mechanical deformation, the maximum deformation occurs at the top of the spiral groove and the overall trend is inward the mating face, opposite to the thermal deformation. The coupling deformation indicate that the thermal deformation can be partly counteracted by pressure deformation. Using this model, the relationship between deformation and shaft speed and the sealing liquid pressure was studied. It's found that the shaft speed will both enhance the thermal and structure deformation and the fluid pressure will enhance the structure deformation but has little to do with the thermal deformation. By changing the sealing material, it's found that material with low thermal expansion coefficient and low elastic modulus will suffer less thermal-pressure deformation.

  14. The mechanical deformation mechanisms in knitted fabric composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kelay, M.S.; Bader, D.L.; Reed, P.E.

    1994-12-31

    Knitted fabric composites have certain advantages over woven composites, particularly in their ability to conform to complicated contours. As a consequence, they demonstrate inferior mechanical characteristics compared to woven materials as a direct result of the presence of bent fibers. Such a knitted fabric composite made from, for example, glass fibers in a polyurethane matrix, can be used as an orthopaedic splinting bandage for immobilizing fractures of the upper and lower limbs. Relatively little research has been reported on knitted fabric composites was initiated. It was observed that knit patterns, type of fiber, size of fibers used, size of loops, coatings and lay-up procedure were all variables that could affect the structure/property relationship of knitted fabric composites. Tensile testing with optical measurement of strain was performed on knitted substrate and coated bandages in both course and wale directions. Results indicated that the knitted fabrics function as link mechanisms at the microscopic level, with knitted loops straightening and bending before the individual elements of the knitted yarn take up significant load and material deformation. Theoretical modeling of the glass knit structure, in both course and wale directions, agrees well with experimental testing.

  15. Viscoelastic deformation near active plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Model deformations near the active plate boundaries of Western North America using space-based geodetic measurements as constraints are discussed. The first six months of this project were spent gaining familarity with space-based measurements, accessing the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Computer, and building time independent deformation models. The initial goal was to see how well the simplest elastic models can reproduce very long base interferometry (VLBI) baseline data. From the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Service, a total of 18 VLBI baselines are available which have been surveyed on four or more occasions. These data were fed into weighted and unweighted inversions to obtain baseline closure rates. Four of the better quality lines are illustrated. The deformation model assumes that the observed baseline rates result from a combination of rigid plate tectonic motions plus a component resulting from elastic strain build up due to a failure of the plate boundary to slip at the full plate tectonic rate. The elastic deformation resulting from the locked plate boundary is meant to portray interseismic strain accumulation. During and shortly after a large interplate earthquake, these strains are largely released, and points near the fault which were previously retarded suddenly catch up to the positions predicted by rigid plate models. Researchers judge the quality of fit by the sum squares of weighted residuals, termed total variance. The observed baseline closures have a total variance of 99 (cm/y)squared. When the RM2 velocities are assumed to model the data, the total variance increases to 154 (cm/y)squared.

  16. Deformation twinning mechanisms in FCC and HCP metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Tome, Carlos N; Beyerlein, Irene J; Misra, Amit; Mara, N

    2011-01-31

    We report the recent work on twinning and detwinning in fcc and hcp metals based on the in situ and ex situ TEM observations and molecular dynamics simulations. Three aspects are discussed in this paper. (1) Detwinning in single-phase Cu with respect to growth twins, (2) deformation twinning in Ag-Cu composites, and (3) deformation twinning mechanisms in hcp metals. The main conclusion is that atomic structures of interfaces (twin boundaries, two-phases interface, and grain boundaries) play a crucial role in nucleating and propagating of deformation twins.

  17. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  18. An activated energy approach for accelerated testing of the deformation of UHMWPE in artificial joints.

    PubMed

    Galetz, Mathias Christian; Glatzel, Uwe

    2010-05-01

    The deformation behavior of ultrahigh molecular polyethylene (UHMWPE) is studied in the temperature range of 23-80 degrees C. Samples are examined in quasi-static compression, tensile and creep tests to determine the accelerated deformation of UHMWPE at elevated temperatures. The deformation mechanisms under compression load can be described by one strain rate and temperature dependent Eyring process. The activation energy and volume of that process do not change between 23 degrees C and 50 degrees C. This suggests that the deformation mechanism under compression remains stable within this temperature range. Tribological tests are conducted to transfer this activated energy approach to the deformation behavior under loading typical for artificial knee joints. While this approach does not cover the wear mechanisms close to the surface, testing at higher temperatures is shown to have a significant potential to reduce the testing time for lifetime predictions in terms of the macroscopic creep and deformation behavior of artificial joints.

  19. Orientation-related deformation mechanisms of naturally deformed amphibole in amphibolite mylonites from the Diancang Shan, SW Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuyun; Liu, Junlai; Leiss, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Sheared amphibolite rocks from Diancang Shan high-grade metamorphic complex along the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone, southwestern Yunnan, China, show typical mylonitic microstructures. The mylonites are characterized by porphyroclastic microstructures and the ultramylonites are highly lineated with alternating amphibole- and quartzofeldspathic domains. Microstructural analysis and P/T estimation suggest that the amphibole grains in the mylonitic rocks are deformed and dynamically recrystallized at amphibolite facies. In the mylonitic amphibolites, there are two types of amphibole porphyroclasts, i.e. type I "hard" and type II "soft" porphyroclasts. They have their [001] crystallographic orientations subnormal and sub-parallel to the stretching lineation of the rocks, respectively. The two types of porphyroclasts show distinct deformation microstructures and sub-microstructures formed by various deformation mechanisms, which contribute in different ways to the generation of the fine-grained matrix. Shape preferred orientation analysis, misorientation analysis of the two types of porphyroclasts and new fine grains around them further prove the generation of the fine grains in matrix from the type II porphyroclasts. The type I "hard" porphyroclasts are deformed mainly by mechanical rotation, work hardening and intragranular microfracturing. In contrast, the deformation of the type II "soft" porphyroclasts is mainly attributed to crystalline plasticity, i.e. twinning, dislocation creep and dynamic recrystallization. During the deformation of the type II porphyroclasts, the (100) [001] slip system plays a dominant role during deformation and grain size reduction of amphibole. Twinning along the active (100) slip system, in combination with dislocation creep (gliding and climbing) governs the nucleation of subgrains and formation of dynamically recrystallized fine grains, a process here named Twinning Nucleation Recrystallization.

  20. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams’ deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young’s moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams’ survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications. PMID:26821264

  1. Investigating Deformation and Failure Mechanisms in Nanoscale Multilayer Metallic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zbib, Hussein M.; Bahr, David F.

    2014-10-22

    Over the history of materials science there are many examples of materials discoveries that have made superlative materials; the strongest, lightest, or toughest material is almost always a goal when we invent new materials. However, often these have been a result of enormous trial and error approaches. A new methodology, one in which researchers design, from the atoms up, new ultra-strong materials for use in energy applications, is taking hold within the science and engineering community. This project focused on one particular new classification of materials; nanolaminate metallic composites. These materials, where two metallic materials are intimately bonded and layered over and over to form sheets or coatings, have been shown over the past decade to reach strengths over 10 times that of their constituents. However, they are not yet widely used in part because while extremely strong (they don’t permanently bend), they are also not particularly tough (they break relatively easily when notched). Our program took a coupled approach to investigating new materials systems within the laminate field. We used computational materials science to explore ways to institute new deformation mechanisms that occurred when a tri-layer, rather than the more common bi-layer system was created. Our predictions suggested that copper-nickel or copper-niobium composites (two very common bi-layer systems) with layer thicknesses on the order of 20 nm and then layered 100’s of times, would be less tough than a copper-nickel-niobium metallic composite of similar thicknesses. In particular, a particular mode of permanent deformation, cross-slip, could be activated only in the tri-layer system; the crystal structure of the other bi-layers would prohibit this particular mode of deformation. We then experimentally validated this predication using a wide range of tools. We utilized a DOE user facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnology (CINT), to fabricate, for the first time, these

  2. Inference of postseismic deformation mechanisms of the 1923 Kanto earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Nyst, M.; Nishimura, T.; Thatcher, W.

    2006-01-01

    Coseismic slip associated with the M7.9, 1923 Kanto earthquake is fairly well understood, involving slip of up to 8 m along the Philippine Sea-Honshu interplate boundary under Sagami Bay and its onland extension. Postseismic deformation after the 1923 earthquake, however, is relatively poorly understood. We revisit the available deformation data in order to constrain possible mechanisms of postseismic deformation and to examine the consequences for associated stress changes in the surrounding crust. Data from two leveling lines and one tide gage station over the first 7-8 years postseismic period are of much greater amplitude than the corresponding expected interseismic deformation during the same period, making these data suitable for isolating the signal from postseismic deformation. We consider both viscoelastic models of asthenosphere relaxation and afterslip models. A distributed coseismic slip model presented by Pollitz et al. (2005), combined with prescribed parameters of a viscoelastic Earth model, yields predicted postseismic deformation that agrees with observed deformation on mainland Honshu from Tokyo to the Izu peninsula. Elsewhere (southern Miura peninsula; Boso peninsula), the considered viscoelastic models fail to predict observed deformation, and a model of ???1 in shallow afterslip in the offshore region south of the Boso peninsula, with equivalent moment magnitude Mw = 7.0, adequately accounts for the observed deformation. Using the distributed coseismic slip model, layered viscoelastic structure, and a model of interseismic strain accumulation, we evaluate the post-1923 stress evolution, including both the coseismic and accumulated postseismic stress changes and those stresses contributed by interseismic loading. We find that if account is made for the varying tectonic regime in the region, the occurrence of both immediate (first month) post-1923 crustal aftershocks as well as recent regional crustal seismicity is consistent with the predicted

  3. Mechanical threshold of dynamically deformed copper and Nitronic 40

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, P.S.; Kocks, U.F.; Regazzoni, G.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the mechanical threshold, or threshold stress, are reported on quasi-statically and dynamically deformed copper and Nitronic 40. Results for copper show that the increase of the threshold stress with strain rate is similar to that of the flow stress. In Nitronic 40 the results show that the ratio of the flow stress to the threshold stress is approx.0.6. Both results indicate that the increased rate sensitivity found in these materials at high strain rates is not due to the predominance of a viscous drag deformation mechanism, as has been previously suggested.

  4. Modes of active deformation in Eastern Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Senz, J.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2012-04-01

    Eastern Hispaniola and the Puerto Rico Island are the emerged part of a doubly vergent thrust wedge formed by oblique arc-continent collision with subduction and underthrusting of the North America Plate in the Puerto Rico trench and underthrusting of the Caribbean crust in The Muertos trough (Dolan et al. 1998, Mann et al., 2002, ten Brink et al. 2010). In the relatively small area of Eastern Hispaniola several types of active crustal deformation have been recognized: 1) At the prowedge of the orogene, the rear of the accretionary prism is cut by the strike-slip Septentrional Fault, bounding a sliver plate (Mann et al, 2002). Recent detailed mapping and aeromagnetic surveys in the onshore part of the prism (Samaná Peninsula and Septentrional Cordillera, Sysmin Team) revealed that the internal structure of the sliver is made of parallel bands of sigmoidal, left-lateral, NW-SE thrust splays, bounded by steep strike-slip faults. We interpreted these structures as transpressional strike-slip duplex. It is worth to note the similarity between the strike and dip of the thrust splays and the 303, 62, 74 focal mechanism calculated by Russo and Villaseñor (1995) for the thrust event of the August 4, 1946 Hispaniola earthquake. 2) The uplifted core of the orogen extends between the accretionary prism and the beginning of the Muertos retrowedge. Half of this area is occupied by the Oriental Cordillera, a recent uplift of cretaceous island-arc rocks arching the Late Neogene reef. The rest of the territory is the Caribbean Coastal Plain modelled on the Late Neogene reef. The Oriental Cordillera is made of two en echelon left-stepping uplifts: the domal-shaped Haitises and the rhombohedral-shaped Seibo (García-Senz et al, 2007); the latter share structural similarities and scaling relations with the 90° neutral stepover model of McClay and Bonora (2001). Therefore we interpret it as a restraining stepover developed over a blind splay of the Septentrional Fault, and the main

  5. Mechanics of soft active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    Soft active materials, mostly elastomers and polymeric gels, are being developed to mimic a salient feature of life: movement in response to stimuli. For example, when an electric voltage is applied across a layer of a dielectric elastomer, the layer reduces in thickness and expands in area, giving a strain greater than 100%. As another example, in response to a small change of pH or temperature, a hydrogel may absorb a large amount of water and increase its volume over 100 times. The mechanics involved in these processes is important, interesting, and not well understood. This thesis studies large deformations and instabilities in dielectric elastomers and polymeric gels. The thesis first presents a nonlinear field theory for deformable dielectrics. The theory uses measurable quantities to define field variables. The definitions lead to decoupled field equations, and electromechanical coupling enters the theory through material laws. We use the theory to study electromechanical instability and coexistent states in dielectric elastomers. A computational method is also developed to analyze inhomogeneous deformations in complicated structures of dielectric elastomers. The second part of the thesis discusses large deformation and mass transportation in polymeric gels. A gel can undergo large deformation of two modes: local rearrangement and long-range migration. We assume that the local rearrangement is instantaneous, and model the long-range migration by assuming that the solvent molecules diffuse inside the gel. We further study inhomogeneous and anisotropic deformations and instabilities in gels constrained by rigid materials.

  6. Transformation from slip to plastic flow deformation mechanism during tensile deformation of zirconium nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kohei; Kizuka, Tokushi

    2017-02-01

    Various types of nanometer-sized structures have been applied to advanced functional and structural devices. Inherent structures, thermal stability, and properties of such nanostructures are emphasized when their size is decreased to several nanometers, especially, to several atoms. In this study, we observed the atomistic tensile deformation process of zirconium nanocontacts, which are typical nanostructures used in connection of nanometer-sized wires, transistors, and diodes, memory devices, and sensors, by in situ transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the contact was deformed via a plastic flow mechanism, which differs from the slip on lattice planes frequently observed in metals, and that the crystallinity became disordered. The various irregular relaxed structures formed during the deformation process affected the conductance.

  7. Transformation from slip to plastic flow deformation mechanism during tensile deformation of zirconium nanocontacts

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kohei; Kizuka, Tokushi

    2017-01-01

    Various types of nanometer-sized structures have been applied to advanced functional and structural devices. Inherent structures, thermal stability, and properties of such nanostructures are emphasized when their size is decreased to several nanometers, especially, to several atoms. In this study, we observed the atomistic tensile deformation process of zirconium nanocontacts, which are typical nanostructures used in connection of nanometer-sized wires, transistors, and diodes, memory devices, and sensors, by in situ transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the contact was deformed via a plastic flow mechanism, which differs from the slip on lattice planes frequently observed in metals, and that the crystallinity became disordered. The various irregular relaxed structures formed during the deformation process affected the conductance. PMID:28218244

  8. Molecular deformation mechanisms of the wood cell wall material.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kai; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-02-01

    Wood is a biological material with outstanding mechanical properties resulting from its hierarchical structure across different scales. Although earlier work has shown that the cellular structure of wood is a key factor that renders it excellent mechanical properties at light weight, the mechanical properties of the wood cell wall material itself still needs to be understood comprehensively. The wood cell wall material features a fiber reinforced composite structure, where cellulose fibrils act as stiff fibers, and hemicellulose and lignin molecules act as soft matrix. The angle between the fiber direction and the loading direction has been found to be the key factor controlling the mechanical properties. However, how the interactions between theses constitutive molecules contribute to the overall properties is still unclear, although the shearing between fibers has been proposed as a primary deformation mechanism. Here we report a molecular model of the wood cell wall material with atomistic resolution, used to assess the mechanical behavior under shear loading in order to understand the deformation mechanisms at the molecular level. The model includes an explicit description of cellulose crystals, hemicellulose, as well as lignin molecules arranged in a layered nanocomposite. The results obtained using this model show that the wood cell wall material under shear loading deforms in an elastic and then plastic manner. The plastic regime can be divided into two parts according to the different deformation mechanisms: yielding of the matrix and sliding of matrix along the cellulose surface. Our molecular dynamics study provides insights of the mechanical behavior of wood cell wall material at the molecular level, and paves a way for the multi-scale understanding of the mechanical properties of wood.

  9. Mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes in crossed junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yadong; Chen, Xiaoming; Ke, Changhong; Park, Cheol; Fay, Catharine C.; Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw

    2014-04-28

    We present a study of the mechanical deformations of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in crossed junctions. The structure and deformation of the crossed tubes in the junction are characterized by using atomic force microscopy. Our results show that the total tube heights are reduced by 20%–33% at the crossed junctions formed by double-walled BNNTs with outer diameters in the range of 2.21–4.67 nm. The measured tube height reduction is found to be in a nearly linear relationship with the summation of the outer diameters of the two tubes forming the junction. The contact force between the two tubes in the junction is estimated based on contact mechanics theories and found to be within the range of 4.2–7.6 nN. The Young's modulus of BNNTs and their binding strengths with the substrate are quantified, based on the deformation profile of the upper tube in the junction, and are found to be 1.07 ± 0.11 TPa and 0.18–0.29 nJ/m, respectively. Finally, we perform finite element simulations on the mechanical deformations of the crossed BNNT junctions. The numerical simulation results are consistent with both the experimental measurements and the analytical analysis. The results reported in this paper contribute to a better understanding of the structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and to the pursuit of their applications.

  10. Active deformable sheets: prototype implementation, modeling, and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Robert J.; Johnson, Norbert; Doumanidis, Charalabos C.

    2000-06-01

    Active deformable sheets are integrated smart planar sheet structures performing off-plane deformations under computer actuation and control, to take up a desired dynamic morphology specified in CAD software or obtained by 3-D scanning of a solid surface. The sheet prototypes are implemented in the laboratory by elastic neoprene foil layers with embedded asymmetric grids of SMA wires (Nitinol), which upon electrical contraction bend the sheet to the necessary local curvature distribution. An analytical model of such prototypes, consisting of an electrical, a thermal, a material and a mechanical module, as well as a more complex finite element thermomechanical simulation of the sheet structure have been developed and validated experimentally. Besides open-loop control of the sheet curvatures by modulation of the SMA wire actuation current, a closed-loop control system has been implemented, using feedback of the wire electrical resistance measurements in real time, correlating to the material transformation state. The active deformable sheets are intended for applications such as reconfigurable airfoils and aerospace structures, variable focal length optics and electromagnetic reflectors, flexible and rapid tooling and microrobotics.

  11. Deformation of supersymmetric and conformal quantum mechanics through affine transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiridonov, Vyacheslav

    1993-01-01

    Affine transformations (dilatations and translations) are used to define a deformation of one-dimensional N = 2 supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Resulting physical systems do not have conserved charges and degeneracies in the spectra. Instead, superpartner Hamiltonians are q-isospectral, i.e. the spectrum of one can be obtained from another (with possible exception of the lowest level) by q(sup 2)-factor scaling. This construction allows easily to rederive a special self-similar potential found by Shabat and to show that for the latter a q-deformed harmonic oscillator algebra of Biedenharn and Macfarlane serves as the spectrum generating algebra. A general class of potentials related to the quantum conformal algebra su(sub q)(1,1) is described. Further possibilities for q-deformation of known solvable potentials are outlined.

  12. Mechanical Properties and Deformation Mechanisms of Mg-Gd-Y-Zr Alloy at Cryogenic and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Zheng, Jing-Xu; Yang, Chao-Ming; Chen, Yi-Xin; Cao, San-Chen; Zhao, Zhi-Xian; Li, Xiao-Ling; Lu, Chen

    2017-02-01

    In this study, mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms of Mg-Gd-Y-Zr alloy at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 523 K have been investigated. The effects of temperature on the mechanical properties, deformation mechanism, and fracture mechanism are discussed. The results show that the strengths of alloy decrease gradually while the elongations increase progressively with increasing temperature. The maximum ultimate tensile strength of the alloy as high as 442 MPa is obtained at 77 K. As the temperature increases from 77 K to 523 K, the ultimate tensile strength of the alloy decreases from 442 MPa to 254 MPa and the elongations increase from 6.3% to 28.9% gradually. The study verifies that the deformation at 77 K is predominated by basal slip and {10bar{1}2} {10bar{1}2} < {10bar{1}1} rangle . < {10bar{1}1} rangle deformation twinning system. At 223 K, lots of twins emerge primarily at grain boundaries. At 373 K, all dislocations are proved to be < a> dislocations. At 523 K, although basal slip is still the dominant deformation mechanism, non-basal slip systems also become activate.

  13. Temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in pure amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Haberl, B.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.

    2014-03-21

    High temperature nanoindentation has been performed on pure ion-implanted amorphous silicon (unrelaxed a-Si) and structurally relaxed a-Si to investigate the temperature dependence of mechanical deformation, including pressure-induced phase transformations. Along with the indentation load-depth curves, ex situ measurements such as Raman micro-spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis on the residual indents reveal the mode of deformation under the indenter. While unrelaxed a-Si deforms entirely via plastic flow up to 200 °C, a clear transition in the mode of deformation is observed in relaxed a-Si with increasing temperature. Up to 100 °C, pressure-induced phase transformation and the observation of either crystalline (r8/bc8) end phases or pressure-induced a-Si occurs in relaxed a-Si. However, with further increase of temperature, plastic flow rather than phase transformation is the dominant mode of deformation. It is believed that the elevated temperature and pressure together induce bond softening and “defect” formation in structurally relaxed a-Si, leading to the inhibition of phase transformation due to pressure-releasing plastic flow under the indenter.

  14. Structural Anisotropy in Metallic Glasses Induced by Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, Wojtek; Egami, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    Metallic glasses have been studied vigorously since the first report on amorphous gold-silicon alloy back in 1960.[1] Initially soft magnetic properties were the most promising features for industrial applications. The recent development of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs)[2 5] initiated interests in engineering applications such as structural or biomedical materials because of attractive properties such as high strength,[6] high elasticity,[7,8] and good corrosion resistance,[9,10] among others. In addition, high temperature processing of BMGs allows for near-net-shape formability,[11 13] which could simplify and possibly reduce the cost of the final product. The glasses retain the disordered atomic structure of a liquid, and ideally are isotropic solids. Frequently because of processing conditions, such as directional heat flow, some structural anisotropy is produced during quenching, and has been observed by structural investigations. Usually, annealing at high temperatures results in an isotropic structure. Also, formation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy[14] had been observed in studies of creep deformed ferromagnetic metallic glasses. Samples with a near-zero magnetostriction coefficient had been studied to establish the origin of the magnetic anisotropy. It was concluded that anisotropy resulted from the atomic level anisotropy[15] and not the heterogeneous internal stress distribution. Indeed X-ray diffraction study of the creep deformed metallic glass showed bond anisotropy.[ 16,17] Such structural studies had been cumbersome and lengthy because they required measurement of many orientations with high statistics. Recently we have shown that use of an area detector and high energy X-rays at a synchrotron source can speed up data collection without compromising statistics.[18] In this contribution, we present data showing structural anisotropy in glassy samples after homogenous (creep) and inhomogeneous (compression) mechanical deformation. The observation of the

  15. Nanoparticle mechanics: deformation detection via nanopore resistive pulse sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvish, Armin; Goyal, Gaurav; Aneja, Rachna; Sundaram, Ramalingam V. K.; Lee, Kidan; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Ki-Bum; Vlahovska, Petia M.; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various liposomes inside nanopores. We observed a significant difference in resistive pulse characteristics between soft liposomes and rigid polystyrene nanoparticles especially at higher applied voltages. We used theoretical simulations to demonstrate that the difference can be explained by shape deformation of liposomes as they translocate through the nanopores. Comparing our results with the findings from electrodeformation experiments, we demonstrated that the rigidity of liposomes can be qualitatively compared using resistive pulse characteristics. This application of nanopores can provide new opportunities to study the mechanics at the nanoscale, to investigate properties of great value in fundamental biophysics and cellular mechanobiology, such as virus deformability and fusogenicity, and in applied sciences for designing novel drug/gene delivery systems.Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various

  16. Mechanical properties, deformation mechanism and origin of corrosion of electrodeposited nanocrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Indranil

    The mechanisms of deformation and fracture evolution in fully dense bulk Ni specimens as a function of its grain size, micro to nanocrystalline (nc) were determined from results of uniaxial tensile tests. Transmission electron micrographs of fractured gauge sections indicated that the deformation mechanism in specimens having an average grain size of 20 nm to be generally dictated by nanovoid formation at grain boundaries (GBs), collective motion of grains, grain rotation, and some twinning. With increase in the grain size the primary mechanism of fracture changed to twinning deformation and some dislocation activity, subsequently to a complete dislocation accommodated deformation in microcrystalline specimens. Bulk electrodeposited (ED) nc-Ni having an average grain size of 100 nm was selected as a model material to investigate salient mechanical properties/physical attributes because of its important attributes. First, it was observed to have better stability as compared to its finer grained counterparts; second, it had a grain size in the transition region between nanocrystalline and ultrafine grained (UFG) materials. The effect of strain rate on strength and ductility, corresponding strain rate sensitivity and activation volume were determined from uniaxial tensile tests and strain jump tests conducted selectively at 393 and 413 K. Results indicated that while there is an increase in strength with increasing strain rate at a constant temperature, ductility followed a negative correlation with increasing strain rate. It is clear that strengthening materials through grain refinement often results in reduced ductility necessitating means to augment their elongation to failure. An approach to simultaneously enhance both strength and ductility by engineering its grains through introduction of annealing twins and increasing the volume fraction of coherent low sigma boundaries was invented. Corrosion resistance has been demonstrated to be significantly superior in

  17. Instabilities, motion and deformation of active fluid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, Carl A.; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-12-01

    We consider two minimal models of active fluid droplets that exhibit complex dynamics including steady motion, deformation, rotation and oscillating motion. First we consider a droplet with a concentration of active contractile matter adsorbed to its boundary. We analytically predict activity driven instabilities in the concentration profile, and compare them to the dynamics we find from simulations. Secondly, we consider a droplet of active polar fluid of constant concentration. In this system we predict, motion and deformation of the droplets in certain activity ranges due to instabilities in the polarisation field. Both these systems show spontaneous transitions to motility and deformation which resemble dynamics of the cell cytoskeleton in animal cells.

  18. Understanding the microscopic deformation mechanism and macroscopic mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline Ni by the long-term stress relaxation test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xixun; Zhang, Congcong; Zeng, Tao; Cheng, Danhong; Lian, Jianshe

    2014-05-01

    The long-term stress relaxation tests with a relaxation time of about 7 h are performed on the bulk dense nanocrystalline Ni (with a mean grain size of 27 nm) pre-deformed at strain rate from 4.17 s-1- 4.17 × 10-6 s-1, where a phenomenon that the initial relaxation behavior of nc Ni depends on itself deformation history. That is, the nc Nis pre-deformed at higher strain rate (not less than 4.17 × 10-3 s-1) exhibit a three-staged relaxation process from the initial near linear rapidly stress delayed (LRSD) stage and the subsequent lumber nonlinear stress delayed (LNSD) one and the final near linear slowly stress delayed (LSSD) one while only the later two stages are observed for the nc Nis pre-deformed at low strain rate. The three-stage relaxation behavior is attributed to the transition from the initial dislocation-dominated plasticity to the mixture of dislocation motion and diffusion-based GB activity and finally to the entire diffusion-based GB activity including GB sliding or grain rotation in the rate-controlling deformation mechanism, which was illuminated by the attained three-staged strain rate sensitivity and activation volume and the exhaustion of mobile density of deformed nc Ni in the first two stages of relaxation. Such rate-controlling deformation mechanism well interpreted the macroscopic tensile mechanical behavior of nc Ni and simultaneously an optimizing strategy in improving the ductility of nc Ni is also mentioned.

  19. Mechanisms of Dynamic Deformation and Dynamic Failure in Aluminum Nitride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    study the deformation mechanisms under various load- ing conditions. 2. Experimental procedures The material investigated is a pressureless liquid phase...terminology The sintered AlN material system is illustrated in Fig. 2a. “Grain failure” is defined as the fracture of grains (transgranular fracture...representative of all sintered materials , as suggested by German [4]. Both grain boundary failure and grain–interphase failure are examples of so-called

  20. Discontinuous fluidization transition in dense suspensions of actively deforming particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjhung, Elsen; Berthier, Ludovic

    Collective dynamics of self-propelled particles at high density have been shown to display a glass-like transition with a critical slowing down of 2 to 4 orders of magnitude. In this talk, we propose a new mechanism of injecting energy or activity via volume fluctuations. We show that the behaviour of actively deforming particles is strikingly different from that of self-propelled particles. In particular, we find a discontinuous non-equilibrium phase transition from a flowing state to an arrested state. Our minimal model might also explain the collective dynamics in epithelial tissues. In particular, without needing self-propulsion or cell-cell adhesion, volume fluctuations of individual cells alone might be sufficient to give rise to an active fluidization and collective dynamics in densely packed tissues.

  1. Active Deformation of Etna Volcano Combing IFSAR and GPS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The surface deformation of an active volcano is an important indicator of its eruptive state and its hazard potential. Mount Etna volcano in Sicily is a very active volcano with well documented eruption episodes.

  2. A Mechanism-based Model for Deformation Twinning in Polycrystalline FCC Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Sun, Xin; Wang, Y. D.; Hu, Xiaohua; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2014-06-01

    Deformation twinning, a common and important plastic deformation mechanism, is the key contributor to the excellent combination of strength and ductility in twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel. In the open literature, a significant amount of research has been reported on the microstructural characteristics of deformation twinning and its influence on the overall deformation behavior of TWIP steel. In this study, we examine the feasibility of a mechanism-based crystal plasticity model in simulating the microstructural level deformation characteristics of TWIP steel. To this end, a model considering both double-slip and double-twin is developed to investigate the stress-strain behavior and local microstructural features related to the formation and growth of micro-twins in low stacking fault energy (SFE) TWIP steel. The twin systems are described as pseudo-slips that can be activated when their resolved shear stress reaches the corresponding critical value. A hardening law that accounts for the interaction among the slip and twin systems is also developed. Numerical simulations for dDifferent mesh sizes and single crystal patch tests under different loading modes are carried out to verify the modeling procedure. Our simulation results reveal that, despite its simple nature, the double-slip/double-twin model can capture the key deformation features of TWIP steel, including twin volume fraction evolution, continuous strain hardening, and the final fracture in the form of strain localization.

  3. Unraveling cyclic deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy using in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-12-23

    In the current study, the deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy were investigated under cyclic loading using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. The relationship between the macroscopic cyclic deformation behavior and the microscopic response at the grain level was established. The neutron diffraction results indicate that more and more grains are involved in the twinning and detwinning deformation process with the increase of fatigue cycles. The residual twins appear in the early fatigue life, which is responsible for the cyclic hardening behavior. The asymmetric shape of the hysteresis loop is attributed to the early exhaustionmore » of the detwinning process during compression, which leads to the activation of dislocation slips and rapid strain-hardening. The critical resolved shear stress for the activation of tensile twinning closely depends on the residual strain developed during cyclic loading. In the cycle before the sample fractured, the dislocation slips became active in tension, although the sample was not fully twinned. The increased dislocation density leads to the rise of the stress concentration at weak spots, which is believed to be the main reason for the fatigue failure. Furthermore, the deformation history greatly influences the deformation mechanisms of hexagonal-close-packed-structured magnesium alloy during cyclic loading.« less

  4. Unraveling cyclic deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy using in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-12-23

    In the current study, the deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy were investigated under cyclic loading using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. The relationship between the macroscopic cyclic deformation behavior and the microscopic response at the grain level was established. The neutron diffraction results indicate that more and more grains are involved in the twinning and detwinning deformation process with the increase of fatigue cycles. The residual twins appear in the early fatigue life, which is responsible for the cyclic hardening behavior. The asymmetric shape of the hysteresis loop is attributed to the early exhaustion of the detwinning process during compression, which leads to the activation of dislocation slips and rapid strain-hardening. The critical resolved shear stress for the activation of tensile twinning closely depends on the residual strain developed during cyclic loading. In the cycle before the sample fractured, the dislocation slips became active in tension, although the sample was not fully twinned. The increased dislocation density leads to the rise of the stress concentration at weak spots, which is believed to be the main reason for the fatigue failure. Furthermore, the deformation history greatly influences the deformation mechanisms of hexagonal-close-packed-structured magnesium alloy during cyclic loading.

  5. Bertram Hopkinson's pioneering work and the dislocation mechanics of high rate deformations and mechanically induced detonations.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ronald W

    2014-05-13

    Bertram Hopkinson was prescient in writing of the importance of better measuring, albeit better understanding, the nature of high rate deformation of materials in general and, in particular, of the importance of heat in initiating detonation of explosives. This report deals with these subjects in terms of post-Hopkinson crystal dislocation mechanics applied to high rate deformations, including impact tests, Hopkinson pressure bar results, Zerilli-Armstrong-type constitutive relations, shock-induced deformations, isentropic compression experiments, mechanical initiation of explosive crystals and shear banding in metals.

  6. Atomic force microscopic study of the structure of high-density polyethylene deformed in liquid medium by crazing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bagrov, D V; Yarysheva, A Y; Rukhlya, E G; Yarysheva, L M; Volynskii, A L; Bakeev, N F

    2014-02-01

    A procedure has been developed for the direct atomic force microscopic (AFM) examination of the native structure of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) deformed in an adsorption-active liquid medium (AALM) by the crazing mechanism. The AFM investigation has been carried out in the presence of a liquid medium under conditions preventing deformed films from shrinkage. Deformation of HDPE in AALM has been shown to proceed through the delocalized crazing mechanism and result in the development of a fibrillar-porous structure. The structural parameters of the crazed polymer have been determined. The obtained AFM images demonstrate a nanosized nonuniformity of the deformation and enable one to observe the structural rearrangements that take place in the deformed polymer after removal of the liquid medium and stress relaxation. A structural similarity has been revealed between HDPE deformed in the AALM and hard elastic polymers.

  7. Deformable liposomes and ethosomes: mechanism of enhanced skin delivery.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Mustafa M A; Abdallah, Ossama Y; Naggar, Viviane F; Khalafallah, Nawal M

    2006-09-28

    Despite intensive research, the mechanisms by which vesicular systems deliver drugs into intact skin are not yet fully understood. In the current study, possible mechanisms by which deformable liposomes and ethosomes improve skin delivery of ketotifen under non-occlusive conditions were investigated. In vitro permeation and skin deposition behavior of deformable liposomes and ethosomes, having ketotifen both inside and outside the vesicles (no separation of free ketotifen), having ketotifen only inside the vesicles (free ketotifen separated) and having ketotifen only outside the vesicles (ketotifen solution added to empty vesicles), was studied using rabbit pinna skin. Results suggested that both the penetration enhancing effect and the intact vesicle permeation into the stratum corneum might play a role in improving skin delivery of drugs by deformable liposomes, under non-occlusive conditions, and that the penetration enhancing effect was of greater importance in case of ketotifen. Regarding ethosomes, results indicated that ketotifen should be incorporated in ethosomal vesicles for optimum skin delivery. Ethosomes were not able to improve skin delivery of non-entrapped ketotifen.

  8. Temperature Dependent Cyclic Deformation Mechanisms in Haynes 188 Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Castelli, Michael G.; Allen, Gorden P.; Ellis, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188, has been investigated over a range of temperatures between 25 and 1000 C under isothermal and in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. Constant mechanical strain rates (epsilon-dot) of 10(exp -3)/s and 10(exp -4)/s were examined with a fully reversed strain range of 0.8%. Particular attention was given to the effects of dynamic strain aging (DSA) on the stress-strain response and low cycle fatigue life. A correlation between cyclic deformation behavior and microstructural substructure was made through detailed transmission electron microscopy. Although DSA was found to occur over a wide temperature range between approximately 300 and 750 C the microstructural characteristics and the deformation mechanisms responsible for DSA varied considerably and were dependent upon temperature. In general, the operation of DSA processes led to a maximum of the cyclic stress amplitude at 650 C and was accompanied by pronounced planar slip, relatively high dislocation density, and the generation of stacking faults. DSA was evidenced through a combination of phenomena, including serrated yielding, an inverse dependence of the maximum cyclic hardening with epsilon-dot, and an instantaneous inverse epsilon-dot sensitivity verified by specialized epsilon-dot -change tests. The TMF cyclic hardening behavior of the alloy appeared to be dictated by the substructural changes occuring at the maximum temperature in the TMF cycle.

  9. Deformation mechanism in swollen radiation-grafted polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungar, G.; Dlugosz, J.; Ranogajec, F.

    Stress-strain behaviour of anisotropic polyethylene (PE) film radiation-grafted with styrene was studied with the samples immersed in xylene. The glassy polystyrene (PS) phase (1) is softened by swelling. Whereas the tensile modulus of dry graft increases somewhat with increasing PS content, for the swollen graft it decreases sharply. However the yield stress and the elongation at break remain fairly large. For highly grafted films (PS/PE > 1) deformation is almost fully reversible and proceeds without necking up to draw ratios as high as 5:1. With the aid of additional X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results the deformation mechanism is interpreted in terms of the known morphology of the copolymer.

  10. Kh. A. Rakhmatulin's scientific legacy in the field of mechanics of deformable rigid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, R. V.; Dem'yanov, Yu. A.; Nikitin, L. V.; Smirnov, N. N.; Shemyakin, E. I.

    2010-02-01

    Kh. A. Rakhmatulin's scientific activity was aimed at solving the most important scientific and technical problems encountered by the country. Khalil Akhmetovich was a unique combination of a theorist and an experimenter, an engineer and an inventor, a talented teacher and a scientific research manager. He fruitfully worked in mechanics of deformable solids (the corresponding results are surveyed in the present paper) as well as in fluid mechanics (as described in detail in the journal [1] dedicated to his memory).

  11. Friction properties and deformation mechanisms of halite(-mica) gouges from low to high sliding velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijze, Loes; Niemeijer, André R.; Han, Raehee; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of friction as a function of slip rate is important in understanding earthquake nucleation and propagation. Many laboratory experiments investigating friction of fault rocks are either conducted in the low velocity regime (10-8-10-4 ms-1) or in the high velocity regime (0.01-1 m s-1). Here, we report on the evolution of friction and corresponding operating deformation mechanisms in analog gouges deformed from low to high slip rates, bridging the gap between these low and high velocity regimes. We used halite and halite-muscovite gouges to simulate processes, governing friction, active in upper crustal quartzitic fault rocks, at conditions accessible in the laboratory. The gouges were deformed over a 7 orders of magnitude range of slip rate (10-7-1 m s-1) using a low-to-high velocity rotary shear apparatus, using a normal stress of 5 MPa and room-dry humidity. Microstructural analysis was conducted to study the deformation mechanisms. Four frictional regimes as a function of slip rate could be recognized from the mechanical data, showing a transitional regime and stable sliding (10-7-10-6 m s-1), unstable sliding and weakening (10-6-10-3 m s-1), hardening (10-2-10-1 m s-1) and strong weakening (10-1-1 m s-1). Each of the four regimes can be associated with a distinct microstructure, reflecting a transition from mainly brittle deformation accompanied by pressure solution healing to temperature activated deformation mechanisms. Additionally, the frictional response of a sliding gouge to a sudden acceleration of slip rate to seismic velocities was investigated. These showed an initial strengthening, the amount of which depended on the friction level at which the step was made, followed by strong slip weakening.

  12. Plastic deformation mechanisms in SiC-whisker-reinforced alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano-Lopez, A.R. de; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A. )

    1993-06-01

    SiC-whisker-reinforced Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] samples (SiC[sub w]/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]), obtained from three different manufacturers, containing 0-30 vol% SiC have been crept under compression at 1,400 C in flowing argon. Compressive creep tests and microstructural observations have been used to characterize the plastic deformation mechanisms. The presence of whiskers decreased the creep rate by reducing grain-boundary sliding. Damage formation was increased, however, because the whiskers acted as stress concentration sites. For specimens with whisker loadings greater than 15%, the absolute creep rate was not strongly dependent on whisker concentration, and the formation of cavitation damage was negligible below a critical stress that depended on the fabrication procedure of the specimen. This creep regime was characterized by a stress exponent of approximately 1, in which deformation occurred primarily by diffusional flow. For the materials with less SiC, the deformation occurred primarily by grain boundary sliding.

  13. Identifying deformation mechanisms in the NEEM ice core using EBSD measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, Ernst-Jan; Weikusat, Ilka; Drury, Martyn R.; Pennock, Gill M.; de Winter, Matthijs D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Deformation of ice in continental sized ice sheets determines the flow behavior of ice towards the sea. Basal dislocation glide is assumed to be the dominant deformation mechanism in the creep deformation of natural ice, but non-basal glide is active as well. Knowledge of what types of deformation mechanisms are active in polar ice is critical in predicting the response of ice sheets in future warmer climates and its contribution to sea level rise, because the activity of deformation mechanisms depends critically on deformation conditions (such as temperature) as well as on the material properties (such as grain size). One of the methods to study the deformation mechanisms in natural materials is Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD). We obtained ca. 50 EBSD maps of five different depths from a Greenlandic ice core (NEEM). The step size varied between 8 and 25 micron depending on the size of the deformation features. The size of the maps varied from 2000 to 10000 grid point. Indexing rates were up to 95%, partially by saving and reanalyzing the EBSP patterns. With this method we can characterize subgrain boundaries and determine the lattice rotation configurations of each individual subgrain. Combining these observations with arrangement/geometry of subgrain boundaries the dislocation types can be determined, which form these boundaries. Three main types of subgrain boundaries have been recognized in Antarctic (EDML) ice core¹². Here, we present the first results obtained from EBSD measurements performed on the NEEM ice core samples from the last glacial period, focusing on the relevance of dislocation activity of the possible slip systems. Preliminary results show that all three subgrain types, recognized in the EDML core, occur in the NEEM samples. In addition to the classical boundaries made up of basal dislocations, subgrain boundaries made of non-basal dislocations are also common. ¹Weikusat, I.; de Winter, D. A. M.; Pennock, G. M.; Hayles, M

  14. A deformation quantization theory for noncommutative quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Costa Dias, Nuno; Prata, Joao Nuno; Gosson, Maurice de; Luef, Franz

    2010-07-15

    We show that the deformation quantization of noncommutative quantum mechanics previously considered by Dias and Prata ['Weyl-Wigner formulation of noncommutative quantum mechanics', J. Math. Phys. 49, 072101 (2008)] and Bastos, Dias, and Prata ['Wigner measures in non-commutative quantum mechanics', e-print arXiv:math-ph/0907.4438v1; Commun. Math. Phys. (to appear)] can be expressed as a Weyl calculus on a double phase space. We study the properties of the star-product thus defined and prove a spectral theorem for the star-genvalue equation using an extension of the methods recently initiated by de Gosson and Luef ['A new approach to the *-genvalue equation', Lett. Math. Phys. 85, 173-183 (2008)].

  15. Mechanical Deformation and Electronic Structure of Carbon Nanotorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wu, Shi-Yu; Jayanthi, Chakram

    2000-03-01

    The mechanical deformation and the electronic structure of carbon nanotorus of various radii are studied using an order(N) non-orthogonal tight-binding molecular dynamics[1] at finite temperature. The onset of the development of kinks in the torus is investigated as a function of radius. The defect structures associated with the kinks are analyzed in terms of local bonding configurations and the bond charge between pairs of atoms. [1] C.S. Jayanthi, S.Y. Wu, J. Cocks, N.S. Luo, Z.L. Xie, M.Menon, and G. Yang, Phys. Rev. B57, 3799 (1998).

  16. Early stiffening and softening of collagen: interplay of deformation mechanisms in biopolymer networks.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Wong, Long Hui; Rajagopalan, Raj

    2012-03-12

    Collagen networks, the main structural/mechanical elements in biological tissues, increasingly serve as biomimetic scaffolds for cell behavioral studies, assays, and tissue engineering, and yet their full spectrum of nonlinear behavior remains unclear. Here, with self-assembled type-I collagen as model, we use metrics beyond those in standard single-harmonic analysis of rheological measurements to reveal strain-softening and strain-stiffening of collagen networks both in instantaneous responses and at steady state. The results show how different deformation mechanisms, such as deformation-induced increase in the elastically active fibrils, nonlinear extension of individual fibrils, and slips in the physical cross-links in the network, can lead to the observed complex nonlinearity. We demonstrate how comprehensive rheological analyses can uncover the rich mechanical properties of biopolymer networks, including the above-mentioned softening as well as an early strain-stiffening, which are important for understanding physiological response of biological materials to mechanical loading.

  17. Miniature non-mechanical zoom camera using deformable MOEMS mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaylor, Brant M.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Greenfield, Nathan J.; Roos, Peter A.; Seger, Eric M.; Moghimi, Mohammad J.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2012-03-01

    We present a miniature non-mechanical zoom camera using deformable MOEMS mirrors. Bridger Photonics, Inc. (Bridger) in collaboration with Montana State University (MSU), has developed electrostatically actuated deformable MEMS mirrors for use in compact focus control and zoom imaging systems. Applications including microscopy, endomicroscopy, robotic surgery and cell-phone cameras. In comparison to conventional systems, our MEMS-based designs require no mechanically moving parts. Both circular and elliptical membranes are now being manufactured at the wafer level and possess excellent optical surface quality (membrane flatness < λ/4). The mirror diameters range from 1 - 4 mm. For membranes with a 25 μm air gap, the membrane stroke is 10 μm. In terms of the optical design, the mirrors are considered variable power optical elements. A device with 2 mm diameter and 10 μm stroke can vary its optical power over 40 diopters or 0.04mm∧(-1). Equivalently, this corresponds to a focal length ranging from infinity to 25 mm. We have designed and demonstrated a zoom system using two MOEMS elements and exclusively commercial off-the-shelf optical components to achieve an optical zoom of 1.9x with a 15° full field of view. The total optical track length of the system is 36 mm. The design is approximately 30 mm x 30 mm x 20 mm including the optomechanical housing and image sensor. With custom optics, we anticipate achieving form factors that are compatible with incorporation into cell phones.

  18. Deformation mechanisms of Cu nanowires with planar defects

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xia Yang, Haixia; Wan, Rui; Cui, Junzhi; Yu, Xingang

    2015-01-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the mechanical behavior of Cu nanowires (NWs) with planar defects such as grain boundaries (GBs), twin boundaries (TBs), stacking faults (SFs), etc. To investigate how the planar defects affect the deformation and fracture mechanisms of naowires, three types of nanowires are considered in this paper: (1) polycrystalline Cu nanowire; (2) single-crystalline Cu nanowire with twin boundaries; and (3) single-crystalline Cu nanowire with stacking faults. Because of the large fraction of atoms at grain boundaries, the energy of grain boundaries is higher than that of the grains. Thus, grain boundaries are proved to be the preferred sites for dislocations to nucleate. Moreover, necking and fracture prefer to occur at the grain boundary interface owing to the weakness of grain boundaries. For Cu nanowires in the presence of twin boundaries, it is found that twin boundaries can strength nanowires due to the restriction of the movement of dislocations. The pile up of dislocations on twin boundaries makes them rough, inducing high energy in twin boundaries. Hence, twin boundaries can emit dislocations, and necking initiates at twin boundaries. In the case of Cu nanowires with stacking faults, all pre-existing stacking faults in the nanowires are observed to disappear during deformation, giving rise to a fracture process resembling the samples without stacking fault.

  19. Tensile deformation mechanisms of ABS/PMMA/EMA blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. H.; Gao, J.; Lin, S. X.; Zhang, P.; Huang, J.; Xu, L. L.

    2014-08-01

    The tensile deformation mechanisms of acrylonitrile - butadiene - styrene (ABS) / polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) blends toughened by ethylene methacrylate (EMA) copolymer was investigated by analysing the fracture morphology. ABS/PMMA was blended with EMA copolymer by melt mixing technique using co-rotating twin extruder. Tensile tests show that the elongation at break of ABS/PMMA blends can be efficiently improved with the increase in EMA content. Fracture morphology of ABS/PMMA/EMA blends reveals that the material yield induced by hollowing-out of EMA particles and its propagation into yield zone is the main toughening mechanism. Moreover, the appearance that EMA particles in the central area are given priority to hollowing-out may be related to the skin-core structure of the injection moulded parts caused by the different cooling rate between surface and inside in the process of injection moulding.

  20. Effect of pre-strain on mechanical properties and deformation induced transformation of 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulfi, Fahri R.; Korda, Akhmad A.

    2016-08-01

    Effect of pre-strain on mechanical properties and deformation induced phase transformation of 304 stainless steel under tensile deformation has been studied. Pre-strain with the variation percentage of deformation was applied to the tensile test specimens. Tensile and hardness testing were carried out after pre-strain to study the mechanical properties change. Deformation induced phase transformation was investigated by using X-ray diffraction and optical microscope. XRD study indicates that metastable austenite transforms to martensite due to deformation. The martensite volume fraction increases with the increase in percentage of deformation. The increase in strength and hardness were associated with an increase in the volume fraction of martensite.

  1. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transformation temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antolovich, Stephen D.; Saxena, Ashok; Cullers, Cheryl

    1992-01-01

    One of the ongoing challenges of the aerospace industry is to develop more efficient turbine engines. Greater efficiency entails reduced specific strength and larger temperature gradients, the latter of which means higher operating temperatures and increased thermal conductivity. Continued development of nickel-based superalloys has provided steady increases in engine efficiency and the limits of superalloys have probably not been realized. However, other material systems are under intense investigation for possible use in high temperature engines. Ceramic, intermetallic, and various composite systems are being explored in an effort to exploit the much higher melting temperatures of these systems. NiAl is considered a potential alternative to conventional superalloys due to its excellent oxidation resistance, low density, and high melting temperature. The fact that NiAl is the most common coating for current superalloy turbine blades is a tribute to its oxidation resistance. Its density is one-third that of typical superalloys and in most temperature ranges its thermal conductivity is twice that of common superalloys. Despite these many advantages, NiAl requires more investigation before it is ready to be used in engines. Binary NiAl in general has poor high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. On-going research in alloy design continues to make improvements in the high-temperature strength of NiAl. The factors controlling low temperature ductility have been identified in the last few years. Small, but reproducible ductility can now be achieved at room temperature through careful control of chemical purity and processing. But the mechanisms controlling the transition from brittle to ductile behavior are not fully understood. Research in the area of fatigue deformation can aid the development of the NiAl system in two ways. Fatigue properties must be documented and optimized before NiAl can be applied to engineering systems. More importantly though

  2. STATISTICAL MECHANICS MODELING OF MESOSCALE DEFORMATION IN METALS

    SciTech Connect

    Anter El-Azab

    2013-04-08

    The research under this project focused on a theoretical and computational modeling of dislocation dynamics of mesoscale deformation of metal single crystals. Specifically, the work aimed to implement a continuum statistical theory of dislocations to understand strain hardening and cell structure formation under monotonic loading. These aspects of crystal deformation are manifestations of the evolution of the underlying dislocation system under mechanical loading. The project had three research tasks: 1) Investigating the statistical characteristics of dislocation systems in deformed crystals. 2) Formulating kinetic equations of dislocations and coupling these kinetics equations and crystal mechanics. 3) Computational solution of coupled crystal mechanics and dislocation kinetics. Comparison of dislocation dynamics predictions with experimental results in the area of statistical properties of dislocations and their field was also a part of the proposed effort. In the first research task, the dislocation dynamics simulation method was used to investigate the spatial, orientation, velocity, and temporal statistics of dynamical dislocation systems, and on the use of the results from this investigation to complete the kinetic description of dislocations. The second task focused on completing the formulation of a kinetic theory of dislocations that respects the discrete nature of crystallographic slip and the physics of dislocation motion and dislocation interaction in the crystal. Part of this effort also targeted the theoretical basis for establishing the connection between discrete and continuum representation of dislocations and the analysis of discrete dislocation simulation results within the continuum framework. This part of the research enables the enrichment of the kinetic description with information representing the discrete dislocation systems behavior. The third task focused on the development of physics-inspired numerical methods of solution of the coupled

  3. The relationships between deformation mechanisms and mechanical properties of additively manufactured porous biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Darabi, A Ch; Zargarian, A; Schmauder, S

    2016-09-16

    Modulating deformation mechanism through manipulating morphological parameters of scaffold internal pore architecture provides potential to tailor the overall mechanical properties under physiological loadings. Whereas cells sense local strains, cell differentiation is also impressed by the elastic deformations. In this paper, structure-property relations were developed for Ti6-Al-4V scaffolds designed based on triply periodic minimal surfaces. 10mm cubic scaffolds composed of 5×5×5 unit cells formed of F-RD (bending dominated) and I-WP (stretching dominated) architectures were additively manufactured at different volume fractions and subjected to compressive tests. The first stages of deformation for stretching dominated structure, was accompanied by bilateral layer-by-layer failure of unit cells owing to the buckling of micro-struts, while for bending dominated structure, namely F-RD, global shearing bands appeared since the shearing failure of struts in the internal architecture. Promoted mechanical properties were found for stretching dominated structure since the global orientation of struts were parallel to loading direction while inclination of struts diminished specific properties for bending dominated structure. Moreover, elastic-plastic deformation was computationally studied by applying Johnson-Cook damage model to the voxel-based models in FE analysis. Scaling analysis was performed for mechanical properties with respect to the relative density thereby failure mechanism was correlated to the constants of power law describing mechanical properties.

  4. Application of the perturbation method in mechanics of deformable solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaeva, N. V.

    2008-02-01

    Although the solutions of the classical problems of continuum mechanics have been studied sufficiently well, the smallest deviations, for example, of the body boundary or of the material characteristics from the traditional values prevent one from obtaining exact solutions of these problems. In this case, one has to use approximate methods, the most common of which is the perturbation method. The problems studied in [1-6] belong to classical problems in which the perturbation method is used to study the behavior of deformable bodies. A wide survey of studies analyzing the perturbations of the body boundary shape caused by variations in its stress-strain state is given in [5, 6]. In numerous studies, it was noted that the problem on the convergence of approximate solutions and hence the studies of the continuous dependence of the solution of the original problem on the characteristics of perturbations ("imperfections") play an important role. In the present paper, we analyze the forms of mathematical models of deformable bodies by studying whether the solution of the original problem continuously depends on the characteristics of the perturbed shape of the body boundary on which the boundary conditions are posed in terms of stresses and on the characteristics of the material properties. We use the results of this analysis to conclude that, when using the perturbation method, one should state the boundary conditions in terms of stresses on the boundary of the real body in stressed state.

  5. Deformation and Fracture Mechanisms of Bone and Nacre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rizhi; Gupta, Himadri S.

    2011-08-01

    Bone and nacre are the most-known biological hard tissues to materials researchers. Although highly mineralized, both bone and nacre are amazingly tough and exhibit remarkable inelasticity, properties that are still beyond the reach of many modern ceramic materials. Very interestingly, the two hard tissues seem to have adopted totally different structural strategies for achieving mechanical robustness. Starting from a true nanocomposite of the mineralized collagen fibril and following up to seven levels of hierarchical organization, bone is built on a structure with extreme complexity. In contrast, nacre possesses a structure of surprising simplicity. Polygonal mineral tablets of micrometer size are carefully cemented together into a macroscopic wonder. A comparative analysis of the structure-property relations in bone and nacre helps us to unveil the underlying mechanisms of this puzzling phenomenon. In this review, we critically compare the various levels of structures and their mechanical contributions between bone and nacre, with a focus on inelasticity and the toughening process. We demonstrate that, although nacre and bone differ from each other in many aspects, they have adopted very similar deformation and toughening mechanisms.

  6. An EBSD study of texture development and hybrid deformation mechanisms in fine grained calcite aggregates deformed in direct shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, X.; Trullenque, G.; Drury, M. R.; de Bresser, J.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding of texture development and its relation to grain size sensitive (GSS) deformation mechanism is of great importance since the rheological behavior of rocks varies substantially depending on which deformation mechanisms are controlling. Recent studies on naturally and experimentally deformed calcite and olivine aggregates have demonstrated that even fine grained materials that are expected to deform by grain size sensitive (GSS) mechanisms, develop a weak but distinct LPO (texture) at high strain. To investigate this behavior we conducted new deformation experiments on Solnhofen limestone in direct shear. This study is part of a wider investigation on large strain deformation in different deformation modes from G. Trullenque, in collaboration with D.L. Kohlstedt (Minneapolis, USA), R. Heilbronner and H. Stuenitz (Basel, Switzerland) and the Utrecht group. The samples have been deformed to high strain both in the conditions of the transition between the GSS and GSI creep regime and in the GSS creep regime. We used Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) to determine the texture strength of the samples, the distribution of misorientation axes and the grain size distributions. The results show an oblique shape preferred orientation at 35° to 40° to the shear plane and a moderate LPO. The c-axis preferred orientation shows a girdle with one main maximum at a high angle to the shear plane, displaced towards the shortening direction of the imposed shear. The a-axes present a weak girdle perpendicular to the c-axis. Grain growth occurred during high deformation. The misorientation angle distribution has a main peak at low angle. This is due to the progressive subgrain formation and rotation which occurred mainly in the larger grains. Subgrain rotation with misorientations up to 10° occured but most boundaries are low angle (< 5°). This shows the formation of new high angle boundaries and grain size reduction. The formation of subgrains and subgrain

  7. Atomistic simulations of deformation mechanisms in ultralight weight Mg-Li alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karewar, Shivraj

    Mg alloys have spurred a renewed academic and industrial interest because of their ultra-light-weight and high specific strength properties. Hexagonal close packed Mg has low deformability and a high plastic anisotropy between basal and non-basal slip systems at room temperature. Alloying with Li and other elements is believed to counter this deficiency by activating non-basal slip by reducing their nucleation stress. In this work I study how Li addition affects deformation mechanisms in Mg using atomistic simulations. In the first part, I create a reliable and transferable concentration dependent embedded atom method (CD-EAM) potential for my molecular dynamics study of deformation. This potential describes the Mg-Li phase diagram, which accurately describes the phase stability as a function of Li concentration and temperature. Also, it reproduces the heat of mixing, lattice parameters, and bulk moduli of the alloy as a function of Li concentration. Most importantly, our CD-EAM potential reproduces the variation of stacking fault energy for basal, prismatic, and pyramidal slip systems that in uences the deformation mechanisms as a function of Li concentration. This success of CD-EAM Mg-Li potential in reproducing different properties, as compared to literature data, shows its reliability and transferability. Next, I use this newly created potential to study the effect of Li addition on deformation mechanisms in Mg-Li nanocrystalline (NC) alloys. Mg-Li NC alloys show basal slip, pyramidal type-I slip, tension twinning, and two-compression twinning deformation modes. Li addition reduces the plastic anisotropy between basal and non-basal slip systems by modifying the energetics of Mg-Li alloys. This causes the solid solution softening. The inverse relationship between strength and ductility therefore suggests a concomitant increase in alloy ductility. A comparison of the NC results with single crystal deformation results helps to understand the qualitative and

  8. Competing indentation deformation mechanisms in glass using different strengthening methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Lezzi, Peter; Vargheese, K. Deenamma; Tandia, Adama; Harris, Jason; Mauro, John

    2016-11-01

    Chemical strengthening via ion exchange, thermal tempering, and lamination are proven techniques for strengthening of oxide glasses. For each of these techniques, the strengthening mechanism is conventionally ascribed to the linear superposition of the compressive stress profile on the glass surface. However, in this work we use molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the underlying indentation deformation mechanism beyond the simple linear superposition of compressive and indentation stresses. In particular, the plastic zone can be dramatically different from the commonly assumed hemispherical shape, which leads to a completely different stress field and resulting crack system. We show that the indentation-induced fracture is controlled by two competing mechanisms: the compressive stress itself and a potential reduction in free volume that can increase the driving force for crack formation. Chemical strengthening via ion exchange tends to escalate the competition between these two effects, while thermal tempering tends to reduce it. Lamination of glasses with differential thermal expansion falls in between. The crack system also depends on the indenter geometry and the loading stage, i.e., loading vs. after unloading. It is observed that combining thermal tempering or high free volume content with ion exchange or lamination can impart a relatively high compressive stress and reduce the driving force for crack formation. Therefore, such a combined approach might offer the best overall crack resistance for oxide glasses.

  9. Deformation mechanisms of antigorite and strain localization during dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, B.; Hirth, G.

    2012-12-01

    Antigorite, the high temperature and pressure serpentine polytype, is thought to exist along subduction zones between the mantle wedge and the subducting oceanic crust (e.g., Wada et al., 2008). Understanding how the rheology of antigorite changes with depth along the slab may be key to understanding seismicity along the upper plate boundary (e.g., Hacker et al., 2003). To explore this phenomenon we are conducting constant strain rate general shear experiments on antigorite-rich serpentinite at shear strain rates of 5*10^-7/s to 10^-5/s, confining pressures from 1-2 GPa and temperatures from 400-700°C. We are using microstructural observations to constrain deformation mechanisms and investigate conditions where strain localization occurs. In some experiments we employ either strain rate stepping or temperature ramping to examine the stress dependence of viscosity (i.e., determine stress exponent) and syntectonic reaction during heating. The results of our general shear experiments suggest the rheologic behavior of antigorite varies significantly with changes in temperature and pressure, similar to previous work in axial compression (e.g., Chernak and Hirth, 2010). At 400°C and 1GPa confining pressure antigorite deforms initially via steady-state ductile flow with strengths as high as 1.4 GPa at a strain rate of 10^-5/s. With increasing strain we observe weakening events that correlate with the development of shear fractures within the sample. At 2GPa pressure, the flow strength of antigorite increases to ~1.8 GPa at 10^-6/s and deformation is distributed at low strain. Strain rate stepping at these conditions suggests a very weak strain rate dependence on strength with a 5-10% change in stress for an order of magnitude strain rate step. At 700C and 1 GPa, above the thermal stability of antigorite, the steady-state strength is ~120 MPa at 10^-5/s. In these samples olivine becomes the dominant phase as antigorite progressively reacts to olivine and pyroxene. At the

  10. Deformation and Failure Mechanisms of Shape Memory Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Samantha Hayes

    2015-04-15

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental mechanics that drive the deformation and failure of shape memory alloys (SMAs). SMAs are difficult materials to characterize because of the complex phase transformations that give rise to their unique properties, including shape memory and superelasticity. These phase transformations occur across multiple length scales (one example being the martensite-austenite twinning that underlies macroscopic strain localization) and result in a large hysteresis. In order to optimize the use of this hysteretic behavior in energy storage and damping applications, we must first have a quantitative understanding of this transformation behavior. Prior results on shape memory alloys have been largely qualitative (i.e., mapping phase transformations through cracked oxide coatings or surface morphology). The PI developed and utilized new approaches to provide a quantitative, full-field characterization of phase transformation, conducting a comprehensive suite of experiments across multiple length scales and tying these results to theoretical and computational analysis. The research funded by this award utilized new combinations of scanning electron microscopy, diffraction, digital image correlation, and custom testing equipment and procedures to study phase transformation processes at a wide range of length scales, with a focus at small length scales with spatial resolution on the order of 1 nanometer. These experiments probe the basic connections between length scales during phase transformation. In addition to the insights gained on the fundamental mechanisms driving transformations in shape memory alloys, the unique experimental methodologies developed under this award are applicable to a wide range of solid-to-solid phase transformations and other strain localization mechanisms.

  11. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks.

  12. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-11-19

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks.

  13. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks. PMID:25408295

  14. Molecular modelling of structure and deformation mechanisms of auxetic behaviour in the α-quartz structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong Tao; Alderson, Andrew; Alderson, Kim Lesley

    2011-11-01

    Force field based simulation has been employed to predict the deformation mechanisms of auxetic nano-materials having tetrahedral framework. The structure of α-quartz was studied in detail for subjecting to uniaxial loading along the Z direction. The cooperative dilation and rotation of tetrahedra acting concurrently were demonstrated to be the main deformation mechanism of α-quartz, confirming previous analytical model. Slight tetrahedral distortion also existed for undeformed and deformed structure.

  15. Molecular modelling of structure and deformation mechanisms of auxetic behaviour in the α-quartz structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong Tao; Alderson, Andrew; Alderson, Kim Lesley

    2012-04-01

    Force field based simulation has been employed to predict the deformation mechanisms of auxetic nano-materials having tetrahedral framework. The structure of α-quartz was studied in detail for subjecting to uniaxial loading along the Z direction. The cooperative dilation and rotation of tetrahedra acting concurrently were demonstrated to be the main deformation mechanism of α-quartz, confirming previous analytical model. Slight tetrahedral distortion also existed for undeformed and deformed structure.

  16. New constraints on the active tectonic deformation of the Aegean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nyst, M.; Thatcher, W.

    2004-01-01

    Site velocities from six separate Global Positioning System (GPS) networks comprising 374 stations have been referred to a single common Eurasia-fixed reference frame to map the velocity distribution over the entire Aegean. We use the GPS velocity field to identify deforming regions, rigid elements, and potential microplate boundaries, and build upon previous work by others to initially specify rigid elements in central Greece, the South Aegean, Anatolia, and the Sea of Marmara. We apply an iterative approach, tentatively defining microplate boundaries, determining best fit rigid rotations, examining misfit patterns, and revising the boundaries to achieve a better match between model and data. Short-term seismic cycle effects are minor contaminants of the data that we remove when necessary to isolate the long-term kinematics. We find that present day Aegean deformation is due to the relative motions of four microplates and straining in several isolated zones internal to them. The RMS misfit of model to data is about 2-sigma, very good when compared to the typical match between coseismic fault models and GPS data. The simplicity of the microplate description of the deformation and its good fit to the GPS data are surprising and were not anticipated by previous work, which had suggested either many rigid elements or broad deforming zones that comprise much of the Aegean region. The isolated deforming zones are also unexpected and cannot be explained by the kinematics of the microplate motions. Strain rates within internally deforming zones are extensional and range from 30 to 50 nanostrain/year (nstrain/year, 10-9/year), 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than rates observed across the major microplate boundaries. Lower strain rates may exist elsewhere withi the microplates but are only resolved in Anatolia, where extension of 13 ?? 4 nstrain/ year is required by the data. Our results suggest that despite the detailed complexity of active continental deformation

  17. Effect of solvent annealing on the tensile deformation mechanism of a colloidal crystalline polymeric latex film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqi; Yi, Zhiyong; Wang, Qiao; Liu, Zhenyu; Perlich, Jan; Gehrke, Rainer; Men, Yongfeng

    2011-10-04

    The influence of solvent annealing on microscopic deformational behavior of a styrene/n-butyl acrylate copolymer latex film subjected to uniaxial tensile deformation was studied by small-angle X-ray scattering. It was demonstrated that the microscopic deformation mechanism of the latex films transformed from a nonaffine deformation behavior to an affine deformation behavior after solvent annealing. This was attributed to the interdiffusion of polymeric chains between adjacent swollen latex particles in the film. It turns out that solvent annealing is much more efficient than thermal annealing due to a much slow evaporation process after solvent annealing.

  18. Deformation mechanisms of carbon nanotube fibres under tensile loading by in situ Raman spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu; Kang, Yi-Lan; Qiu, Wei; Li, Ya-Li; Huang, Gan-Yun; Guo, Jian-Gang; Deng, Wei-Lin; Zhong, Xiao-Hua

    2011-06-03

    Deformation mechanisms of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibres under tensile loading are studied by means of in situ Raman spectroscopy to detect the CNT deformation and stress distributions in the fibres. The G' band in the Raman spectrum responds distinctly to the tensile stress in Raman shift, width and intensity. The G' band changes with the tensile deformation of the fibre at different stages, namely elastic deformation, strengthening and damage-fracture. It is deduced that the individual CNTs only deform elastically without obvious damage or bond breaking. The yield and fracture of fibres can be due to the slippage among the CNTs.

  19. a case of casing deformation and fault slip for the active fault drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, H.; Song, L.; Yuan, S.; Yang, W.

    2010-12-01

    Active fault is normally defined as a fault with displacement or seismic activity during the geologically recent period (in the last 10,000 years, USGS). Here, we refer the active fault to the fault that is under the post-seismic stress modification or recovery. Micro-seismic, fault slip would happen during the recovery of the active faults. It is possible that the drilling through this active fault, such as the Wenchuan Fault Scientific Drilling(WFSD), will be accompanied with some possible wellbore instability and casing deformation, which is noteworthy for the fault scientific drilling. This presentation gives a field case of the Wenchuan earthquake. The great Wenchuan earthquake happened on May 12, 2008. An oilfield is 400km apart from the epicenter and 260km from the main fault. Many wells were drilled or are under drilling. Some are drilled through the active fault and a few tectonic active phenomenons were observed. For instance, a drill pipe was cut off in the well which was just drilled through the fault. We concluded that this is due to the fault slip,if not, so thick wall pipe cannot be cut off. At the same time, a mass of well casings of the oilfield deformed during the great Wenchuan Earthquake. The analysis of the casing deformation characteristic, formation structure, seismicity, tectonic stress variation suggest that the casing deformation is closely related to the Wenchuan Earthquake. It is the tectonic stress variation that induces seismic activities, fault slip, salt/gypsum creep speedup, and deformation inconsistent between stratums. Additional earthquake dynamic loads were exerted on the casing and caused its deformation. Active fault scientific drilling has become an important tool to understand earthquake mechanism and physics. The casing deformation and wellbore instability is not only a consequence of the earthquake but also an indicator of stress modification and fault activity. It is noteworthy that tectonic stress variation and fault

  20. Hydro-mechanical regimes of deforming subduction interface: modeling versus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Gerya, T.; May, D.

    2015-12-01

    A lot of evidence indicates that fluid flows exist in the subduction interface, including seismic observation, magnetotelluric imaging, heat flow modeling, etc. Fluid percolation should strongly modify rock deformation affected by fluid-induced weakening within the subduction interface. Hence, we study the fluid-rock interaction along the subduction interface using a visco-plastic hydro-mechanical model, in which rock deformation and fluid percolation are self-consistently coupled. Based on a series of 2D numerical experiments, we found two typical hydro-mechanical regimes of deforming subduction interface: (1) coupled and (2) decoupled. In the case of the coupled regime, the tectonic movement of the subduction interface is divided into blocks; newly generated faults are distributed uniformly , say fault band; fluid activity concentrates inside the faults. In the case of the decoupled regime, the upper layer of the subduction interface stops moving while the lower layer continues moving along with the subduction slab; a primary fault is generated at the centre of the subduction interface, or namely decoupled interface. Available observations suggests that both coupled and decoupled regimes can be observed in the nature at different scales. Systematic parameter study suggests that it is mainly the magnitude of the yield strength of subducted rocks depending on their cohesion and friction coefficient, which control the transition between the coupled and decoupled subduction interface regimes.

  1. Deformation mechanism of nanoporous materials upon water freezing and melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erko, Maxim; Wallacher, Dirk; Paris, Oskar

    2012-10-01

    Temperature-induced non-monotonous reversible deformation of water-filled nanoporous silica materials is investigated experimentally using in-situ small-angle x-ray scattering. The influence of freezing and melting in the nanopores on this deformation is treated quantitatively by introducing a simple model based on the Gibbs-Thomson equation and a generalized Laplace-pressure. The physical origin of the melting/freezing induced pore lattice deformation is found to be exactly the same as for capillary condensation/evaporation, namely the curved phase boundary due to the preferred wetting of the pore walls by the liquid phase. As a practical implication, elastic properties of the nanoporous framework can be determined from the temperature-deformation curves.

  2. NMR study on mechanisms of ionic polymer-metal composites deformation with water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zicai; Chen, Hualing; Wang, Yongquan; Luo, Bin; Chang, Longfei; Li, Bo; Chen, Luping

    2011-10-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) exhibit a large dynamic bending deformation under exterior electric field. The states and proportions of water within the IPMCs have great effect on the IPMCs deformation properties. This letter investigates the influence of the proportion changes of different types of water on the deformation, which may disclose the working mechanisms of the IPMCs. We give a deformation trend of IPMCs with the reduction of water content firstly. Then by the method of nuclear magnetic resonance, various water types (water bonded to sulfonates, loosely bound water and free water) of IPMCs and their proportions are investigated in the drying process which corresponds to their different deformation states. It is obtained that the deformation properties of IPMCs depend strongly on their water content and the excess free water is responsible for the relaxation deformation.

  3. 400My of Deformation Along Tibet Active Strike Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, N. O.

    2003-12-01

    While it is widely accepted that strike slip faults in Tibet accommodate a significant part of the tertiary convergence between India and Asia, the true Cenozoic magnitude of the offset is still largely debated. Direct dating of Cenozoic piercing points is the most powerful tool to assess the total offset, but their use is not always possible. Therefore one gets to use older markers although this leads to significant results ONLY at the supreme condition that pre-Cenozoic movement of those markers be accurately known. The Kunlun and Altyn Tagh faults for example form a prominent example of Tibetan presently active fault, but they also constitute geological frontiers between blocks of different geological histories accreted at various times since early Paleozoic. One may thus question how much of the visible offset is indeed Cenozoic. Although deformation facies agree with recent kinematics, multi-geochronological approach indicates a series of events from 280-230 Ma to 120+/-10 Ma. The former may be linked either with suturing of the Qiantang and Kunlun blocks farther to the south, or collision further to the north or east in the Qilian Shan and Bei Shan ranges, while the latter range appears to be growing in importance with ongoing work but is still largely unexplained. Oblique subductions of collision to the north of the Qilian Shan are adequate candidates. Argon loss suggests that deformation was associated to a 250-300° C thermal pulse that lasted 5 to 20 Ma after the onset of movement (Arnaud et al., 2003). Unroofing on all faults occurred much later, around 25 Ma ago when sudden cooling suggests a component of normal faulting (Mock et al., 1999). Strong inheritage was also found along the Ghoza active fault, in central western Tibet. Of course the fact that some of the deformation is much older than the Cretaceous and shares compatible deformation criteria with the present-day deformation leads to false appreciation of the pure Cenozoic offset, potentially

  4. Mechanisms of Photo-Induced Deformations of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Nathan; Kuzyk, Mark; Neal, Jeremy; Luchette, Paul; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Over a century ago, Alexander Graham Bell invented the photophone, which he used to transmit mechanical information on a beam of light. We report on the use of an active Fabry-Perot interferometer to encode and detect mechanical information using the photomechanical effect of a liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) that is placed at a critical point between the reflectors. These are the first steps in the creation of ultra smart materials which require a large photomechanical response. Thus, understanding the underlying mechanisms is critical. Only limited studies of the mechanisms of the photomechanical effect, such as photo-isomerization, photo-reorientation and thermal effects have been studied in azo-dye-doped LCEs and in azo-dye-doped polymer fibers have been reported. The focus of our present work is to use the Fabry-Perot transducer geometry to study the underlying mechanisms and to determine the relevant material parameters that are used to develop theoretical models of the response. We use various intensity-modulated optical wave forms to determine the frequency response of the material, which are used to predict the material response.

  5. Local gate effect of mechanically deformed crossed carbon nanotube junction.

    PubMed

    Qing, Quan; Nezich, Daniel A; Kong, Jing; Wu, Zhongyun; Liu, Zhongfan

    2010-11-10

    In this work, we have demonstrated that the local deformation at the crossed carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions can introduce significant tunable local gate effect under ambient environment. Atomic force microscope (AFM) manipulation of the local deformation yielded a variation in transconductance that was retained after removing the AFM tip. Application of a large source-drain voltage and pressing the CNT junction above a threshold pressure can respectively erase and recover the transconductance modulation reversibly. The local gate effect is found to be independent of the length of the crossed CNT and attributed to the charges residing at the deformed junctions due to formation of localized states. The number of localized charges is estimated to be in the range of 10(2) to 10(3). These results may find potential applications in electromechanical sensors and could have important implications for designing nonvolatile devices based on crossed CNT junctions.

  6. Gauge Mechanics of Deformable Bodies: a Theory of Something.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapere, Alfred Dudley

    The treatment of the motion of deformable bodies requires a specification of axes for each shape. We present a natural kinematic formulation of this problem in terms of a gauge structure over the space of shapes that the body may assume. Our first and simplest application is to a freely -falling self-deforming body. We show how deformations of a body with angular momentum zero can result in a change in orientation, and we give a general expression for the gauge potential describing the net rotation due to an arbitrary change of shape. The problem of swimming at low Reynolds number may also be formulated in terms of a gauge potential. Effective methods for computing it, by solving a linear boundary value problem, are described. We employ conformal mapping techniques to calculate swimming motions for cylinders with a variety of cross-sections. We also determine the net translational motions due to arbitrary infinitesimal deformations of the sphere and the circular cylinder. The solution is compactly expressed in terms of the field strength tensor of the gauge potential. Having solved for all cyclic swimming motions of a nearly spherical body, it makes sense to ask which motions are the best. We define a notion of efficiency and use it to determine optimal swimming strokes. These strokes are composed of propagating waves, symmetric about the axis of propulsion. Qualitatively, they resemble the swimming strokes of ciliated micro-organisms, such as the Paramecium. The solution of Stokes' equations is not feasible analytically, except for the simplest shapes. Two approximation schemes may help in studying more general swimming strokes. We discuss and test a short-wavelength analytic approximation, valid when the scales associated with a deformation are small relative to the radius of curvature of the average shape. The complementary domain of large deformations is probably best dealt with on a computer. We sketch a general method for solving Stokes' equations numerically.

  7. Evolution of Deformation Studies on Active Hawaiian Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decker, Robert; Okamura, Arnold; Miklius, Asta; Poland, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Everything responds to pressure, even rocks. Deformation studies involve measuring and interpreting the changes in elevations and horizontal positions of the land surface or sea floor. These studies are variously referred to as geodetic changes or ground-surface deformations and are sometimes indexed under the general heading of geodesy. Deformation studies have been particularly useful on active volcanoes and in active tectonic areas. A great amount of time and energy has been spent on measuring geodetic changes on Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes in Hawai`i. These changes include the build-up of the surface by the piling up and ponding of lava flows, the changes in the surface caused by erosion, and the uplift, subsidence, and horizontal displacements of the surface caused by internal processes acting beneath the surface. It is these latter changes that are the principal concern of this review. A complete and objective review of deformation studies on active Hawaiian volcanoes would take many volumes. Instead, we attempt to follow the evolution of the most significant observations and interpretations in a roughly chronological way. It is correct to say that this is a subjective review. We have spent years measuring and recording deformation changes on these great volcanoes and more years trying to understand what makes these changes occur. We attempt to make this a balanced as well as a subjective review; the references are also selective rather than exhaustive. Geodetic changes caused by internal geologic processes vary in magnitude from the nearly infinitesimal - one micron or less, to the very large - hundreds of meters. Their apparent causes also are varied and include changes in material properties and composition, atmospheric pressure, tidal stress, thermal stress, subsurface-fluid pressure (including magma pressure, magma intrusion, or magma removal), gravity, and tectonic stress. Deformation is measured in units of strain or displacement. For example, tilt

  8. Temporal evolution of continental lithospheric strength in actively deforming regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; Pollitz, F.F.

    2008-01-01

    It has been agreed for nearly a century that a strong, load-bearing outer layer of earth is required to support mountain ranges, transmit stresses to deform active regions and store elastic strain to generate earthquakes. However the dept and extent of this strong layer remain controversial. Here we use a variety of observations to infer the distribution of lithospheric strength in the active western United States from seismic to steady-state time scales. We use evidence from post-seismic transient and earthquake cycle deformation reservoir loading glacio-isostatic adjustment, and lithosphere isostatic adjustment to large surface and subsurface loads. The nearly perfectly elastic behavior of Earth's crust and mantle at the time scale of seismic wave propagation evolves to that of a strong, elastic crust and weak, ductile upper mantle lithosphere at both earthquake cycle (EC, ???10?? to 103 yr) and glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA, ???103 to 104 yr) time scales. Topography and gravity field correlations indicate that lithosphere isostatic adjustment (LIA) on ???106-107 yr time scales occurs with most lithospheric stress supported by an upper crust overlying a much weaker ductile subtrate. These comparisons suggest that the upper mantle lithosphere is weaker than the crust at all time scales longer than seismic. In contrast, the lower crust has a chameleon-like behavior, strong at EC and GIA time scales and weak for LIA and steady-state deformation processes. The lower crust might even take on a third identity in regions of rapid crustal extension or continental collision, where anomalously high temperatures may lead to large-scale ductile flow in a lower crustal layer that is locally weaker than the upper mantle. Modeling of lithospheric processes in active regions thus cannot use a one-size-fits-all prescription of rheological layering (relation between applied stress and deformation as a function of depth) but must be tailored to the time scale and tectonic

  9. Continuum Mechanics Based Bi-linear Shear Deformable Shell Element Using Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-07

    the convergent solution in the case of the continuum mechanics based bi- linear shear deformable ANCF shell element. 5.3 Slit Annular Plate Subjected...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release. #24515 CONTINUUM MECHANICS BASED BI- LINEAR SHEAR DEFORMABLE SHELL ELEMENT...MAR 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED 07-01-2014 to 04-03-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CONTINUUM MECHANICS BASED BI- LINEAR

  10. Monitoring Hippocampus Electrical Activity In Vitro on an Elastically Deformable Microelectrode Array

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhe; Graudejus, Oliver; Tsay, Candice; Lacour, Stéphanie P.; Wagner, Sigurd

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interfacing electronics and recording electrophysiological activity in mechanically active biological tissues is challenging. This challenge extends to recording neural function of brain tissue in the setting of traumatic brain injury (TBI), which is caused by rapid (within hundreds of milliseconds) and large (greater than 5% strain) brain deformation. Interfacing electrodes must be biocompatible on multiple levels and should deform with the tissue to prevent additional mechanical damage. We describe an elastically stretchable microelectrode array (SMEA) that is capable of undergoing large, biaxial, 2-D stretch while remaining functional. The new SMEA consists of elastically stretchable thin metal films on a silicone membrane. It can stimulate and detect electrical activity from cultured brain tissue (hippocampal slices), before, during, and after large biaxial deformation. We have incorporated the SMEA into a well-characterized in vitro TBI research platform, which reproduces the biomechanics of TBI by stretching the SMEA and the adherent brain slice culture. Mechanical injury parameters, such as strain and strain rate, can be precisely controlled to generate specific levels of damage. The SMEA allowed for quantification of neuronal function both before and after injury, without breaking culture sterility or repositioning the electrodes for the injury event, thus enabling serial and long-term measurements. We report tests of the SMEA and an initial application to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on neuron function, which could be employed as a high-content, drug-screening platform for TBI. PMID:19594385

  11. Microscale Mechanical Deformation Behaviors and Mechanisms in Bulk Metallic Glasses Investigated with Micropillar Compression Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jianchao

    2011-12-01

    Over the past years of my PhD study, the focused-ion-beam (FIB) based microcompression experiment has been thoroughly investigated with respect to the small-scale deformation in metallic glasses. It was then utilized to explore the elastic and plastic deformation mechanisms in metallic glasses. To this end, micropillars with varying sample sizes and aspect ratios were fabricated by the FIB technique and subsequently compressed on a modified nanoindentation system. An improved formula for the measurement of the Young's modulus was derived by adding a geometrical prefactor to the Sneddon's solution. Through the formula, geometry-independent Young's moduli were extracted from microcompression experiments, which are consistent with nanoindentation results. Furthermore, cyclic microcompression was developed, which revealed reversible inelastic deformation in the apparent elastic regime through high-frequency cyclic loading. The reversible inelastic deformation manifests as hysteric loops in cyclic microcompression and can be captured by the Kelvin-type viscoelastic model. The experimental results indicate that the free-volume zones behave essentially like supercooled liquids with an effective viscosity on the order of 1 x 108 Pas. The microscopic yield strengths were first extracted with a formula derived based on the Mohr-Coulomb law to account for the geometrical effects from the tapered micropillar and the results showed a weak size effect on the yield strengths of a variety of metallic-glass alloys, which can be attributed to Weibull statistics. The nature of the yielding phenomenon was explored with the cyclic micro-compression approach. Through cyclic microcompression of a Zr-based metallic glass, it can be demonstrated that its yielding stress increases at higher applied stress rate but its yielding strain is kept at a constant of ~ 2%. The room-temperature post-yielding deformation behavior of metallic glasses is characterized by flow serrations, which were

  12. Models for rupture mechanics of plate boundaries and crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur, A.

    1983-02-01

    The role of pull aparts and pushups in transcurrent systems, the rotation of faults and blocks within transcurrent fault systems, the role of accretion tectonics in plate boundary deformation, and power law creep behavior and the yielding at plate boundaries were investigated.

  13. Models for rupture mechanics of plate boundaries and crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, A.

    1983-01-01

    The role of pull aparts and pushups in transcurrent systems, the rotation of faults and blocks within transcurrent fault systems, the role of accretion tectonics in plate boundary deformation, and power law creep behavior and the yielding at plate boundaries were investigated.

  14. [Inflammasome: activation mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Suárez, Raibel; Buelvas, Neudo

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation is a rapid biologic response of the immune system in vascular tissues, directed to eliminate stimuli capable of causing damage and begin the process of repair. The macromolecular complexes known as "inflammasomes" are formed by a receptor, either NOD (NLR) or ALR, the receptor absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2). In addition, the inflammasome is formed by the speck-like protein associated to apoptosis (ASC) and procaspase-1, that may be activated by variations in the ionic and intracellular and extracellular ATP concentrations; and the loss of stabilization of the fagolisosomme by internalization of insoluble crystals and redox mechanisms. As a result, there is activation of the molecular platform and the processing of inflammatory prointerleukins to their active forms. There are two modalities of activation of the inflammasome: canonical and non-canonical, both capable of generating effector responses. Recent data associate NLRP 3, IL-1β and IL-18 in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia, gout, malaria and hypertension. The inflammasome cascade is emerging as a new chemotherapeutic target in these diseases. In this review we shall discuss the mechanisms of activation and regulation of the inflammasome that stimulate, modulate and resolve inflammation.

  15. Automatic Segmentation of Mechanically Inhomogeneous Tissues Based on Deformation Gradient Jump

    PubMed Central

    Witzenburg, Colleen M.; Dhume, Rohit Y.; Lake, Spencer P.

    2016-01-01

    Variations in properties, active behavior, injury, scarring, and/or disease can all cause a tissue’s mechanical behavior to be heterogeneous. Advances in imaging technology allow for accurate full-field displacement tracking of both in vitro and in vivo deformation from an applied load. While detailed strain fields provide some insight into tissue behavior, material properties are usually determined by fitting stress-strain behavior with a constitutive equation. However, the determination of the mechanical behavior of heterogeneous soft tissue requires a spatially varying constitutive equation (i.e. one in which the material parameters vary with position). We present an approach that computationally dissects the sample domain into many homogeneous subdomains, wherein subdomain boundaries are formed by applying a betweenness based graphical analysis to the deformation gradient field to identify locations with large discontinuities. This novel partitioning technique successfully determined the shape, size and location of regions with locally similar material properties for: (1) a series of simulated soft tissue samples prescribed with both abrupt and gradual changes in anisotropy strength, prescribed fiber alignment, stiffness, and nonlinearity, (2) tissue analogs (PDMS and collagen gels) which were tested biaxially and speckle tracked (3) and soft tissues which exhibited a natural variation in properties (cadaveric supraspinatus tendon), a pathologic variation in properties (thoracic aorta containing transmural plaque), and active behavior (contracting cardiac sheet). The routine enables the dissection of samples computationally rather than physically, allowing for the study of small tissues specimens with unknown and irregular inhomogeneity. PMID:26168433

  16. Mechanically Active Electrospun Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Jaimee M.

    Electrospinning, a technique used to fabricate small diameter polymer fibers, has been employed to develop unique, active materials falling under two categories: (1) shape memory elastomeric composites (SMECs) and (2) water responsive fiber mats. (1) Previous work has characterized in detail the properties and behavior of traditional SMECs with isotropic fibers embedded in an elastomer matrix. The current work has two goals: (i) characterize laminated anisotropic SMECs and (ii) develop a fabrication process that is scalable for commercial SMEC manufacturing. The former ((i)) requires electrospinning aligned polymer fibers. The aligned fibers are similarly embedded in an elastomer matrix and stacked at various fiber orientations. The resulting laminated composite has a unique response to tensile deformation: after stretching and releasing, the composite curls. This curling response was characterized based on fiber orientation. The latter goal ((ii)) required use of a dual-electrospinning process to simultaneously electrospin two polymers. This fabrication approach incorporated only industrially relevant processing techniques, enabling the possibility of commercial application of a shape memory rubber. Furthermore, the approach had the added benefit of increased control over composition and material properties. (2) The strong elongational forces experienced by polymer chains during the electrospinning process induce molecular alignment along the length of electrospun fibers. Such orientation is maintained in the fibers as the polymer vitrifies. Consequently, residual stress is stored in electrospun fiber mats and can be recovered by heating through the polymer's glass transition temperature. Alternatively, the glass transition temperature can be depressed by introducing a plasticizing agent. Poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) is plasticized by water, and its glass transition temperature is lowered below room temperature. Therefore, the residual stress can be relaxed at room

  17. Focal Mechanisms for Local Earthquakes within a Rapidly Deforming Rhyolitic Magma System, Laguna del Maule, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. E.; Keranen, K. M.; Cardona, C.; Thurber, C. H.; Singer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Large shallow rhyolitic magma systems like the one underlying the Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field (LdM) atop the Southern Andes, Chile, that comprises the largest concentration of rhyolitic lava and tephra younger than 20 ka at earth's surface, are capable of producing modest to very large explosive eruptions. Moreover, LdM is currently exhibiting magma migration, reservoir growth, and crustal deformation at rates higher than any volcano that is not actively erupting. The long-term build-up of a large silicic magmatic system toward an eruption has yet to be monitored, therefore, precursory phenomena are poorly understood. In January of 2015, 12 broadband, 3-component seismometers were installed at LdM to detect local microearthquakes and tele-seismic events with the goals of determining the migration paths of fluids as well as the boundaries of the magma chamber beneath LdM. These stations complement the 6 permanent stations installed by the Southern Andes Volcano Observatory in 2011. Focal mechanisms were calculated using FOCMEC (Snoke et al., 1984) and P-wave first motions for local events occurring between January and March of 2015 using these 18 broadband stations. Results from six of the largest local events indicate a mixture of normal and reverse faulting at shallow (<10 km) depths surrounding the lake. This may be associated with the opening of fractures to accommodate rising magma in the subsurface and/or stresses induced by the rapid deformation. Two of these events occurred near the center of maximum deformation where seismic swarms have previously been identified. Focal mechanisms from smaller magnitude events will be calculated to better delineate subsurface structure. Source mechanisms will be refined using P-S amplitude ratios and full waveform inversion.

  18. Relationships between phase morphology and deformation mechanisms in polymer nanocomposite nanofibres prepared by an electrospinning process.

    PubMed

    Kim, G M; Lach, R; Michler, G H; Pötschke, P; Albrecht, K

    2006-02-28

    Relationships between phase morphology and mechanical deformation processes in various electrospun polymer nanocomposite nanofibres (PNCNFs) containing different types of one-, two- and three-dimensional nanofiller have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy using in situ tensile techniques. From the study of the phase structure of electrospun PNCNFs, two morphological standard types are classified for the analysis of deformation mechanisms: the binary system (polymer matrix and nanofillers), and the ternary system (polymer matrix, nanofillers and nanopores on the fibres surface). According to these categories, deformation processes have been characterized, and different schematic models for these processes are proposed. The finding of importance in the present work is a brittle-to-ductile transition in polymer nanocomposite fibres during in situ tensile deformation processes. This unique feature in the deformation behaviour of electrospun PNCNFs provides an optimal balance of stiffness, strength and toughness for use as reinforcing elements in a polymer based composite of a new kind.

  19. Dense seismic networks as a tool to characterize active faulting in regions of slow deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, Susana; Arroucau, Pierre; Carrilho, Fernando; Cesca, Simone; Dias, Nuno; Matos, Catarina; Vales, Dina

    2016-04-01

    The theory of plate tectonics states that the relative motion between lithospheric plates is accommodated at plate boundaries, where earthquakes occur on long faults. However, earthquakes with a wide range of magnitudes also occur both off plate boundaries, in intra-plate settings, and along discontinuous, diffuse plate boundaries. These settings are characterized by low rates of lithospheric deformation. A fundamental limitation in the study of slowly deforming regions is the lack of high-quality observations. In these regions, earthquake catalogs have traditionally displayed diffuse seismicity patterns. The location, geometry and activity rate of faults - all basic parameters for understanding fault dynamics - are usually poorly known. The dense seismic networks deployed in the last years around the world have opened new windows in observational seismology. Although high-magnitude earthquakes are rare in regions of slow deformation, low-magnitude earthquakes are well observable on the time-scale of these deployments. In this presentation, we will show how data from dense seismic deployments can be used to characterize faulting in regions of slow deformation. In particular, we will present the case study of western Iberia, a region undergoing low-rate deformation and which has generated some of the largest earthquakes in Europe, both intraplate (mainland) and interplate (offshore). The methods that we employ include automated earthquake detection methods to lower the completeness magnitude of catalogs, earthquake relocations, focal mechanisms patterns, waveform similarity and clustering analysis.

  20. Deformation mechanisms in negative Poisson's ratio materials - Structural aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakes, R.

    1991-01-01

    Poisson's ratio in materials is governed by the following aspects of the microstructure: the presence of rotational degrees of freedom, non-affine deformation kinematics, or anisotropic structure. Several structural models are examined. The non-affine kinematics are seen to be essential for the production of negative Poisson's ratios for isotropic materials containing central force linkages of positive stiffness. Non-central forces combined with pre-load can also give rise to a negative Poisson's ratio in isotropic materials. A chiral microstructure with non-central force interaction or non-affine deformation can also exhibit a negative Poisson's ratio. Toughness and damage resistance in these materials may be affected by the Poisson's ratio itself, as well as by generalized continuum aspects associated with the microstructure.

  1. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of 6061 aluminum alloy strips severely deformed by Dissimilar Channel Angular Pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Evren; Kibar, Alp Aykut; Guer, C. Hakan

    2011-04-15

    Dissimilar Channel Angular Pressing (DCAP) is a severe plastic deformation technique to improve the mechanical properties of flat products by producing ultrafine grains. In this study, the changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties of 6061 Al-alloy strips deformed by various numbers of DCAP passes were investigated. Some DCAPed samples were also held at 200 deg. C and 350 deg. C to investigate the effect of post-annealing. Mechanical properties were determined by hardness and tension tests; and microstructural changes were investigated by TEM analysis. Up to a critical level of plastic strain, remarkable improvements have been observed in the strength and hardness of the severely deformed strips; and the improvements have been explained by variations in grain size, dislocation structure, and formation of subgrains. - Research Highlights: {yields}Dissimilar Channel Angular Pressing (DCAP). {yields}Severe plastic deformation (SPD). {yields}Transmission Electron Microscopy of the 6061 Al alloy. {yields}Mechanical Properties of 6061 Al alloy.

  2. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  3. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels.

  4. Mechanical properties of a nitrogen-bearing austenitic steel during static and cycle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, E. V.; Terent'ev, V. F.; Prosvirnin, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    The mechanical properties of a nitrogen-bearing corrosion-resistant austenitic steel containing 0.311% nitrogen have been studied during static and cyclic deformation. It is found that the steel having an ultimate strength of 930 MPa exhibits a plasticity of 33%. The endurance limit under repeated tension at 106 loading cycles is 400 MPa. The propagation of a fatigue crack at low and high amplitudes of cyclic deformation follows a ductile fracture mechanism with the presence of fatigue grooves.

  5. Hot deformation mechanism and microstructure evolution of an ultra-high nitrogen austenitic steel containing Nb and V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong-hua; Zhou, Ze-an; Guo, Ming-wei; Qi, Jian-jun; Sun, Shu-hua; Fu, Wan-tang

    2015-10-01

    The flow curves of an ultra-high nitrogen austenitic steel containing niobium (Nb) and vanadium (V) were obtained by hot compression deformation at temperatures ranging from 1000°C to 1200°C and strain rates ranging from 0.001 s-1 to 10 s-1. The mechanical behavior during hot deformation was discussed on the basis of flow curves and hot processing maps. The microstructures were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The relationship between deformation conditions and grain size after dynamic recrystallization was obtained. The results show that the flow stress and peak strain both increase with decreasing temperature and increasing strain rate. The hot deformation activation energy is approximately 631 kJ/mol, and a hot deformation equation is proposed. (Nb,V)N precipitates with either round, square, or irregular shapes are observed at the grain boundaries and in the matrix after deformation. According to the discussion, the hot working should be processed in the temperature range of 1050°C to 1150°C and in the strain rate range of 0.01 to 1 s-1.

  6. Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations

    PubMed Central

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus. PMID:25522053

  7. Active printed materials for complex self-evolving deformations.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-18

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  8. Mechanical heterogeneities along carbonate-bearing faults constrained from field and rock deformation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Carpenter, Brett; Tesei, Telemaco; Viti, Cecilia; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mollo, Silvio; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2014-05-01

    Recent high-resolution GPS and seismological data have revealed that tectonic faults exhibit complex, multi-mode slip behavior. One way to improve our understanding of processes controlling the mode of slip is to study fault rock microstructures, collected from ancient faults exposed at Earth's surface or in deep boreholes and to characterize friction of the collected fault rocks. In several seismically active regions, like Italy, Greece, Iran, and China, a significant number of earthquakes nucleate and/or propagate through carbonates. For these reasons, we have been working to improve the characterization of carbonate bearing faults by integrating field and microstructural studies with mechanical data. Along some portions of carbonate fault zones: 1) the localization of deformation along sharp principal slipping zones (0.1-1 mm) made of fine-grained (0.1-10 μm) ultracataclasite and 2) the velocity weakening behavior of this material suggest a fast and seismic mechanism. Microstructural evidence indicates that seismic mechanisms are associated with thermally activated processes (i.e. dehydration and decarbonation). In other portions of these fault zones: 1) the distribution of deformation over thick (< 200 m) shear zones affected by pressure solution of carbonates and frictional sliding along foliated and clay-rich (illite-smectite) horizons, and 2) the velocity strengthening behavior of these foliated rocks indicate a slow and aseismic slip behavior. Sharp principal slipping zones that show high friction and significant re-strengthening during hold periods, indicate a fault patch capable of unstable slip with the ability to regain elastic strain energy. Conversely, phyllosilicate-rich shear zones showing low friction with no frictional healing suggest fault patches that can slip slowly and continuously with time. We are currently using a new biaxial apparatus with a pressure vessel to work on a large, 20x20 cm, experimental fault. In this fault we are reproducing

  9. Mechanics of the human red blood cell deformed by optical tweezers*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, M.; Lim, C. T.; Suresh, S.

    2003-11-01

    The mechanical deformation characteristics of living cells are known to influence strongly their chemical and biological functions and the onset, progression and consequences of a number of human diseases. The mechanics of the human red blood cell (erythrocyte) subjected to large deformation by optical tweezers forms the subject of this paper. Video photography of the cell deformed in a phosphate buffered saline solution at room temperature during the imposition of controlled stretching forces, in the tens to several hundreds picoNewton range, is used to assess experimentally the deformation characteristics. The mechanical responses of the cell during loading and upon release of the optical force are then analysed to extract the elastic properties of the cell membrane by recourse to several different constitutive formulations of the elastic and viscoelastic behavior within the framework of a fully three-dimensional finite element analysis. A parametric study of various geometric, loading and structural factors is also undertaken in order to develop quantitative models for the mechanics of deformation by means of optical tweezers. The outcome of the experimental and computational analyses is then compared with the information available on the mechanical response of the red blood cell from other independent experimental techniques. Potential applications of the optical tweezers method described in this paper to the study of mechanical deformation of living cells under different stress states and in response to the progression of some diseases are also highlighted.

  10. Deformation Mechanisms in Austenitic TRIP/TWIP Steel as a Function of Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stefan; Wolf, Steffen; Martin, Ulrich; Krüger, Lutz; Rafaja, David

    2016-01-01

    A high-alloy austenitic CrMnNi steel was deformed at temperatures between 213 K and 473 K (-60 °C and 200 °C) and the resulting microstructures were investigated. At low temperatures, the deformation was mainly accompanied by the direct martensitic transformation of γ-austenite to α'-martensite (fcc → bcc), whereas at ambient temperatures, the transformation via ɛ-martensite (fcc → hcp → bcc) was observed in deformation bands. Deformation twinning of the austenite became the dominant deformation mechanism at 373 K (100 °C), whereas the conventional dislocation glide represented the prevailing deformation mode at 473 K (200 °C). The change of the deformation mechanisms was attributed to the temperature dependence of both the driving force of the martensitic γ → α' transformation and the stacking fault energy of the austenite. The continuous transition between the ɛ-martensite formation and the twinning could be explained by different stacking fault arrangements on every second and on each successive {111} austenite lattice plane, respectively, when the stacking fault energy increased. A continuous transition between the transformation-induced plasticity effect and the twinning-induced plasticity effect was observed with increasing deformation temperature. Whereas the formation of α'-martensite was mainly responsible for increased work hardening, the stacking fault configurations forming ɛ-martensite and twins induced additional elongation during tensile testing.

  11. The mechanical microenvironment of high concentration agarose for applying deformation to primary chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zignego, Donald L; Jutila, Aaron A; Gelbke, Martin K; Gannon, Daniel M; June, Ronald K

    2014-06-27

    Cartilage and chondrocytes experience loading that causes alterations in chondrocyte biological activity. In vivo chondrocytes are surrounded by a pericellular matrix with a stiffness of ~25-200kPa. Understanding the mechanical loading environment of the chondrocyte is of substantial interest for understanding chondrocyte mechanotransduction. The first objective of this study was to analyze the spatial variability of applied mechanical deformations in physiologically stiff agarose on cellular and sub-cellular length scales. Fluorescent microspheres were embedded in physiologically stiff agarose hydrogels. Microsphere positions were measured via confocal microscopy and used to calculate displacement and strain fields as a function of spatial position. The second objective was to assess the feasibility of encapsulating primary human chondrocytes in physiologically stiff agarose. The third objective was to determine if primary human chondrocytes could deform in high-stiffness agarose gels. Primary human chondrocyte viability was assessed using live-dead imaging following 24 and 72h in tissue culture. Chondrocyte shape was measured before and after application of 10% compression. These data indicate that (1) displacement and strain precision are ~1% and 6.5% respectively, (2) high-stiffness agarose gels can maintain primary human chondrocyte viability of >95%, and (3) compression of chondrocytes in 4.5% agarose can induce shape changes indicative of cellular compression. Overall, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using high-concentration agarose for applying in vitro compression to chondrocytes as a model for understanding how chondrocytes respond to in vivo loading.

  12. Dislocation creep accommodated Grain Boundary Sliding: A high strain rate/low temperature deformation mechanism in calcite ultramylonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, Anna; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Grain boundary sliding (GBS) is an important grain size sensitive deformation mechanism that is often associated with extreme strain localization and superplasticity. Another mechanism has to operate simultaneously to GBS in order to prevent overlaps and voids between sliding grains. One of the most common accommodating mechanisms is diffusional creep but, recently, dislocation creep has been reported to operate simultaneous to GBS. Due to the formation of a flanking structure in nearly pure calcite marble on Syros (Cyclades, Greece) at lower greenschist facies conditions, an extremely fine grained ultramylonite developed. The microstructure of the layer is characterized by (1) calcite grains with an average grain size of 3.6 µm (developed by low temperature/high strain rate grain boundary migration recrystallization, BLG), (2) grain boundary triple junctions with nearly 120° angles and (3) small cavities preferentially located at triple junctions and at grain boundaries in extension. These features suggest that the dominant deformation mechanism was GBS. In order to get more information on the accommodation mechanism detailed microstructural and textural analyses have been performed on a FEI Quanta 3D FEG instrument equipped with an EDAX Digiview IV EBSD camera. The misorientation distribution curves for correlated and uncorrelated grains follow almost perfect the calculated theoretical curve for a random distribution, which is typical for polycrystalline material deformed by GBS. However, the crystallographic preferred orientation indicates that dislocation creep might have operated simultaneously. We also report Zener-Stroh cracks resulting from dislocation pile up, indicating that dislocation movement was active. We, therefore, conclude that the dominant deformation mechanism was dislocation creep accommodated grain boundary sliding. This is consistent with the observed grain size range that plots at the field boundary between grain size insensitive and grain

  13. Uncovering the deformation mechanisms of origami metamaterials by introducing generic degree-four vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongbin; Li, Suyi; Ji, Huimin; Wang, K. W.

    2016-10-01

    Origami-based design holds promise for developing new mechanical metamaterials whose overall kinematic and mechanical properties can be programmed using purely geometric criteria. In this article, we demonstrate that the deformation of a generic degree-four vertex (4-vertex) origami cell is a combination of contracting, shearing, bending, and facet-binding. The last three deformation mechanisms are missing in the current rigid-origami metamaterial investigations, which focus mainly on conventional Miura-ori patterns. We show that these mechanisms provide the 4-vertex origami sheets and blocks with new deformation patterns as well as extraordinary kinematical and mechanical properties, including self-locking, tridirectional negative Poisson's ratios, flipping of stiffness profiles, and emerging shearing stiffness. This study reveals that the 4-vertex cells offer a better platform and greater design space for developing origami-based mechanical metamaterials than the conventional Miura-ori cell.

  14. Uncovering the deformation mechanisms of origami metamaterials by introducing generic degree-four vertices.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hongbin; Li, Suyi; Ji, Huimin; Wang, K W

    2016-10-01

    Origami-based design holds promise for developing new mechanical metamaterials whose overall kinematic and mechanical properties can be programmed using purely geometric criteria. In this article, we demonstrate that the deformation of a generic degree-four vertex (4-vertex) origami cell is a combination of contracting, shearing, bending, and facet-binding. The last three deformation mechanisms are missing in the current rigid-origami metamaterial investigations, which focus mainly on conventional Miura-ori patterns. We show that these mechanisms provide the 4-vertex origami sheets and blocks with new deformation patterns as well as extraordinary kinematical and mechanical properties, including self-locking, tridirectional negative Poisson's ratios, flipping of stiffness profiles, and emerging shearing stiffness. This study reveals that the 4-vertex cells offer a better platform and greater design space for developing origami-based mechanical metamaterials than the conventional Miura-ori cell.

  15. Pathogenetic mechanisms of fetal akinesia deformation sequence and oligohydramnios sequence.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J I; Palacios, J

    1991-09-01

    This article briefly reviews the participation of fetal compression, muscular weakness, and fetal akinesia in the genesis of the anomalies found in fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) and oligohydramnios sequence (OS). Both sequences share phenotypic manifestations, such as arthrogryposis, short umbilical cord, and lung hypoplasia, in relation to decreased intrauterine fetal motility. Other characteristic manifestations found in OS, such as Potter face, and redundant skin, are produced by fetal compression. On the other hand, growth retardation, craniofacial anomalies, micrognathia, long bone hypoplasia, and polyhydramnios found in FADS could be related to intrauterine muscular weakness.

  16. Deformation Mechanisms is a-Phase Silicon Nitride Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Schneider; A. K. Mukherjee

    1998-08-12

    Changes of phase composition and morphology were investigated in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} both before and after compressive deformation testing. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens, with 5 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 5 wt% MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} additives, were rapidly consolidated to preserve the initial, metastable {alpha}-phase present in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} starting powders. Constant strain rate compression tests were used to evaluate the strain rate dependency of the flow stress. At 1723 K, a flow stress dependency value of n = 2 was observed.

  17. Application the particle method in problems of mechanics deformable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnoi, D. V.; Gabsalikova, N. F.; Miheev, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The work implemented method of deformation of ground-based particle method, which is a collection of mineral grains, which are linked to some system of forces on the contact areas between the mineral particles. Two-parameter potential Lennard-Jones and it is modified version were selected for describing the behavior of ground. Some model problems of straining layer of ground in the gravity field was decided. The calculations were performed on a heterogeneous computing cluster, on each of the seven components that were installed on three GPU AMD Radeon HD 7970.

  18. Deformation and failure mechanisms of 18650 battery cells under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Juner; Zhang, Xiaowei; Sahraei, Elham; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    An important deformation mode during ground impacts of battery packs made of cylindrical battery cells is axial compression. This type of loading subjects the cell to a complex deformation pattern and failure mechanism. The design of endcaps plays an important role in such deformations. To explore the sequence of deformation and the underlying failure mechanisms, a combined experimental/numerical study was carried out. Tests were conducted on 18650 cells, and the deformation of each component was carefully investigated and documented. There are four different stages in the force-displacement curve, corresponding with deformation of various components in the endcap assembly. A short circuit happens at a displacement of 4 mm. To clarify these observations, a detailed Finite Element model was set up, covering the geometry and the mechanical property of almost all the components of the cell. Using the simulation results, the sequence of the axial compression was revealed, which was subsequently validated by Micro CT scans as well as analytical solutions. Based on the precise analysis of the mechanical behavior, the cause of the short circuit during axial loading was clarified. Two failure mechanisms in the separator at the top section of the cell explain the possible causes of short circuit.

  19. The influence of large deformations on mechanical properties of sinusoidal ligament structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Tomasz; Jopek, Hubert; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof W.

    2016-05-01

    Studies of mechanical properties of materials, both theoretical and experimental, usually deal with linear characteristics assuming a small range of deformations. In particular, not much research has been published devoted to large deformations of auxetic structures - i.e. structures exhibiting negative Poisson’s ratio. This paper is focused on mechanical properties of selected structures that are subject to large deformations. Four examples of structure built of sinusoidal ligaments are studied and for each geometry the impact of deformation size and geometrical parameters on the effective mechanical properties of these structures are investigated. It is shown that some of them are auxetic when compressed and non-auxetic when stretched. Geometrical parameters describing sinusoidal shape of ligaments strongly affect effective mechanical properties of the structure. In some cases of deformation, the increase of the value of amplitude of the sinusoidal shape decreases the effective Poisson’s ratio by 0.7. Therefore the influence of geometry, as well as the arrangement of ligaments allows for smart control of mechanical properties of the sinusoidal ligament structure being considered. Given the large deformation of the structure, both a linear elastic material model, and a hyperelastic Neo-Hookean material model are used.

  20. Microstructure, strengthening mechanisms and hot deformation behavior of an oxide-dispersion strengthened UFG Al6063 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Asgharzadeh, H.; Kim, H.S.; Simchi, A.

    2013-01-15

    An ultrafine-grained Al6063/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0.8 vol.%, 25 nm) nanocomposite was prepared via powder metallurgy route through reactive mechanical alloying and hot powder extrusion. Scanning electron microcopy, transmission electron microscopy, and back scattered electron diffraction analysis showed that the grain structure of the nanocomposite is trimodal and composed of nano-size grains (< 0.1 {mu}m), ultrafine grains (0.1-1 {mu}m), and micron-size grains (> 1 {mu}m) with random orientations. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of the nanocomposite based on the strengthening-mechanism models revealed that the yield strength of the ultrafine-grained nanocomposite is mainly controlled by the high-angle grain boundaries rather than nanometric alumina particles. Hot deformation behavior of the material at different temperatures and strain rates was studied by compression test and compared to coarse-grained Al6063 alloy. The activation energy of the hot deformation process for the nanocomposite was determined to be 291 kJ mol{sup -1}, which is about 64% higher than that of the coarse-grained alloy. Detailed microstructural analysis revealed that dynamic recrystallization is responsible for the observed deformation softening in the ultrafine-grained nanocomposite. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strengthening mechanisms of Al6063/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite were evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hot deformation behavior of the nanocomposite was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hot deformation activation energy was determined using consecutive models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The restoration mechanisms and microstructural changes are presented.

  1. New sedimentary structures in seismites from SW Tanzania: Evaluating gas- vs. water-escape mechanisms of soft-sediment deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert-Wolf, Hannah L.; Roberts, Eric M.; Simpson, Edward L.

    2016-10-01

    Seismite horizons are abundant in Cretaceous sandstones of the Rukwa Rift Basin, southwestern Tanzania. Diverse morphologies of soft-sediment deformation are preserved, including two new, unusual sedimentary structures, herein referred to as 1) balloon-shaped inflation structures and 2) surface fractures with linked sandstone splays. This original description of new sedimentary structures contributes to the growing catalogue of seismically induced deformation features. Their unusual morphologies bring to the forefront an important, though seldom touched upon, question of how to differentiate between gas- and water-escape in soft-sediment deformation features. The recognition of the spectrum of soft-sediment deformation structures contained in strata and their deformational mechanisms is important because it permits the differentiation between triggering mechanisms, particularly seismic activity, and can constrain such events spatially and temporally. We interpret the surface fractures and linked sandstone splays to reflect a high gas effusion rate, formed by the release of high-pressure gas followed by a limited expulsion of water. The balloon-shaped inflation structures reflect lower gas effusion rates due to expulsion of lower pressure gas that did not breach the Cretaceous surface seal. When these gas pulses did breach the paleosurface, they formed gas-discharge pits. These seismogenic structures are consistent with deposition of Cretaceous strata in the Rukwa Rift during periods of active carbonatite volcanism, seismicity, and possibly hot spring activity. This documentation serves as an important data point for the re-examination of the classification scheme of soft-sediment deformation structures as primarily water-escape structures to accommodate for the genesis of some secondary sedimentary features by gas-escape.

  2. Mechanisms of membrane deformation by lipid-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Toshiki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2009-09-01

    Among an increasing number of lipid-binding domains, a group that not only binds to membrane lipids but also changes the shape of the membrane has been found. These domains are characterized by their strong ability to transform globular liposomes as well as flat plasma membranes into elongated membrane tubules both in vitro and in vivo. Biochemical studies on the structures of these proteins have revealed the importance of the amphipathic helix, which potentially intercalates into the lipid bilayer to induce and/or sense membrane curvature. Among such membrane-deforming domains, BAR and F-BAR/EFC domains form crescent-shaped dimers, suggesting a preference for a curved membrane, which is important for curvature sensing. Bioinformatics in combination with structural analyses has been identifying an increasing number of novel families of lipid-binding domains. This review attempts to summarize the evidence obtained by recent studies in order to gain general insights into the roles of membrane-deforming domains in a variety of biological events.

  3. The Mechanisms of Deformation and Damage of Mudstones: A Micro-scale Study Combining ESEM and DIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. L.; Bornert, M.; Héripré, E.; Chanchole, S.; Pouya, A.; Halphen, B.

    2015-09-01

    Combining environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and digital image correlation techniques, the mechanical behaviour of mudstones is studied at the scale of their composite microstructure (that is, grains of carbonate and quartz embedded in a clay matrix). A specially designed apparatus is developed to allow in-situ uniaxial compression tests on samples with controlled humidity states in the ESEM chamber. As the mechanical behavior of mudstones is sensitive to water content, two tests on samples with contrasting water contents (3.8 and 7.4 %) are performed to identify the unified mechanisms of deformation and damage. We illustrate heterogeneous local strain fields that well correlate with the microstructure of mudstones. Three types of deformation bands involving different mechanisms have been classified: orthogonal (compaction of macro-pores and closure of pre-existing cracks), parallel (micro-cracking) and inclined (shear deformation) to the uniaxial compression direction. These deformation modes are activated at different stress levels, and they strongly interact: for instance, a high-strained shear band may result in tensile micro-cracks at its tip. We also illustrate damage phenomena, particularly at the inclusion-matrix interface, which is found to be a hazardous position for nucleation of micro-cracks.

  4. Thermal-mechanical deformation modelling of soft tissues for thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Jazar, Reza; Subic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues is of great importance for thermal ablation. This paper presents a method by integrating the heating process with thermal-induced mechanical deformations of soft tissues for simulation and analysis of the thermal ablation process. This method combines bio-heat transfer theories, constitutive elastic material law under thermal loads as well as non-rigid motion dynamics to predict and analyze thermal-mechanical deformations of soft tissues. The 3D governing equations of thermal-mechanical soft tissue deformation are discretized by using the finite difference scheme and are subsequently solved by numerical algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues, and can be used for the thermal ablation therapy to effectively control the delivered heat energy for cancer treatment.

  5. Representing Matrix Cracks Through Decomposition of the Deformation Gradient Tensor in Continuum Damage Mechanics Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented to represent the large-deformation kinematics of intraply matrix cracks and delaminations in continuum damage mechanics (CDM) constitutive material models. The method involves the additive decomposition of the deformation gradient tensor into 'crack' and 'bulk material' components. The response of the intact bulk material is represented by a reduced deformation gradient tensor, and the opening of an embedded cohesive interface is represented by a normalized cohesive displacement-jump vector. The rotation of the embedded interface is tracked as the material deforms and as the crack opens. The distribution of the total local deformation between the bulk material and the cohesive interface components is determined by minimizing the difference between the cohesive stress and the bulk material stress projected onto the cohesive interface. The improvements to the accuracy of CDM models that incorporate the presented method over existing approaches are demonstrated for a single element subjected to simple shear deformation and for a finite element model of a unidirectional open-hole tension specimen. The material model is implemented as a VUMAT user subroutine for the Abaqus/Explicit finite element software. The presented deformation gradient decomposition method reduces the artificial load transfer across matrix cracks subjected to large shearing deformations, and avoids the spurious secondary failure modes that often occur in analyses based on conventional progressive damage models.

  6. Research on the deformation of a confined aquifer based on Cosserat continuum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. S.; Zhang, N.; Yuan, Y.; Shen, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    Recent monitoring of land subsidence and soil deformation indicates a new phenomenon where excessive and continuous deformation occurs in the sandy aquifers in Shanghai and the Su-Xi-Chang region of China. It is hard to explain factors contributing to this phenomenon with traditional Cauchy continuum mechanics in which low normal stress in the ground could not cause such large deformation. Steep hydraulic gradient would be formed in the aquifer if groundwater is pumped from densely distributed wells, and shear stresses would develop then. Accumulated shear stress could then lead to deformation of the aquifer or even land subsidence. Accumulated shear stress due to the drawdown of groundwater level is one of the main factors that contribute to deformation within an aquifer. Traditional Cauchy continuum mechanics cannot consider this shear stress because of the hypothesis of equal shear stress in the aquifer unit. Cosserat continuum mechanics can be applied to analyse the mechanism of aquifer deformation controlled by accumulated shear stress by considering the scale effect and the asymmetric distribution of shear stress in the aquifer unit.

  7. Deformation mechanisms of a 20Mn TWIP steel investigated by in situ neutron diffraction and TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Wang, Y. D.; Liu, Xiaopeng; Sun, Xin; Peng, R. Lin; Zhang, S. Y.; Zuo, Liang; Liaw, Peter K.

    2013-07-25

    The deformation mechanisms and associated microstructure changes during tensile loading of an annealed twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel with the chemical composition of Fe–20Mn–3Si–3Al–0.045C (wt.%) were systematically investigated using in situ time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction in combination with postmortem transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The initial microstructure of the investigated alloy consists of equiaxed austenitic grains with the initial α´-phase of ~7% in volume. In addition to dislocation slip, twinning and two kinds of martensitic transformations from the austenite to α´- and epsilon martensites were observed as the main deformation modes during the tensile deformation. In situ neutron diffraction provides a powerful tool to establish the deformation mode map for elucidating the role of different deformation modes in different strain regions. The critical stress is 520 MPa for the martensitic transformation from the austenite to α´-martensite, whereas a higher stress (>600 MPa) is required for actuating the deformation twin and/or the martensitic transformation from -martensite. Both epsilon- and α´-martensites act as the hard phases whereas mechanical twinning contributes to both strength and ductility of the studied steel. TEM observations confirmed that the twinning process was facilitated by the parent grains orientated with <111> or <110> parallel to the loading direction. The nucleation and growth of twins are attributed to the pole and self-generation formation mechanisms, as well as the stair-rod cross-slip mechanism.

  8. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of High-Mn TRIP Steel Based on Warm Deformation of Martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhikai; Li, Longfei; Yang, Wangyue; Sun, Zuqing

    2015-04-01

    High-Mn TRIP steel with about 5 wt pct Mn was prepared by a thermo-mechanical treatment based on warm deformation of martensite and subsequent short-time annealing in the intercritical region. The microstructural evolution and the mechanical properties of the used steel during such treatment were investigated. The results indicate that during warm deformation of martensite in the intercritical region, the decomposition of martensite was accelerated by warm deformation and the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization of ferrite led to the formation of equiaxed ferrite grains. Meanwhile, the reverse transformation of austenite was accelerated by warm deformation to some extent. During subsequent annealing in the intercritical region, static recrystallization of ferrite led to the increase in the fraction of equiaxed ferrite grains, and the formation of the reversed austenite was accelerated by the addition of the deformation-stored energy, while the stability of the reversed austenite was improved by the accelerated diffusions of C atoms and Mn atoms. As a whole, the mechanical properties of the used steel by the thermo-mechanical treatment based on warm deformation of martensite and subsequent short-time annealing in the intercritical region were comparable to the steels with similar compositions subjected to intercritical annealing for hours after cold rolling of martensite.

  9. Earthquake mechanism and seafloor deformation for tsunami generation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.; Oglesby, David D.; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Tsunamis are generated in the ocean by rapidly displacing the entire water column over a significant area. The potential energy resulting from this disturbance is balanced with the kinetic energy of the waves during propagation. Only a handful of submarine geologic phenomena can generate tsunamis: large-magnitude earthquakes, large landslides, and volcanic processes. Asteroid and subaerial landslide impacts can generate tsunami waves from above the water. Earthquakes are by far the most common generator of tsunamis. Generally, earthquakes greater than magnitude (M) 6.5–7 can generate tsunamis if they occur beneath an ocean and if they result in predominantly vertical displacement. One of the greatest uncertainties in both deterministic and probabilistic hazard assessments of tsunamis is computing seafloor deformation for earthquakes of a given magnitude.

  10. Correcting Thermal Deformations in an Active Composite Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel C.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilkie, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Large, high-precision composite reflectors for future space missions are costly to manufacture, and heavy. An active composite reflector capable of adjusting shape in situ to maintain required tolerances can be lighter and cheaper to manufacture. An active composite reflector testbed was developed that uses an array of piezoelectric composite actuators embedded in the back face sheet of a 0.8-m reflector panel. Each individually addressable actuator can be commanded from 500 to +1,500 V, and the flatness of the panel can be controlled to tolerances of 100 nm. Measuring the surface flatness at this resolution required the use of a speckle holography interferometer system in the Precision Environmental Test Enclosure (PETE) at JPL. The existing testbed combines the PETE for test environment stability, the speckle holography system for measuring out-of-plane deformations, the active panel including an array of individually addressable actuators, a FLIR thermal camera to measure thermal profiles across the reflector, and a heat source. Use of an array of flat piezoelectric actuators to correct thermal deformations is a promising new application for these actuators, as is the use of this actuator technology for surface flatness and wavefront control. An isogrid of these actuators is moving one step closer to a fully active face sheet, with the significant advantage of ease in manufacturing. No extensive rib structure or other actuation backing structure is required, as these actuators can be applied directly to an easy-to-manufacture flat surface. Any mission with a surface flatness requirement for a panel or reflector structure could adopt this actuator array concept to create lighter structures and enable improved performance on orbit. The thermal environment on orbit tends to include variations in temperature during shadowing or changes in angle. Because of this, a purely passive system is not an effective way to maintain flatness at the scale of microns over several

  11. Detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in diffusion bonding of steel hollow structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Li, H.; Li, M. Q.

    2016-05-01

    This study focused on the detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in similar diffusion bonding as well as on the fabrication of high quality martensitic stainless steel hollow structural components. A special surface with regular patterns was processed to be joined so as to observe the extent of surface asperity deformation under different bonding pressures. Results showed that an undamaged hollow structural component has been obtained with full interfacial contact and the same shear strength to that of base material. Fracture surface characteristic combined with surface roughness profiles distinctly revealed the enhanced surface asperity deformation as the applied pressure increases. The influence of surface asperity deformation mechanism on joint formation was analyzed: (a) surface asperity deformation not only directly expanded the interfacial contact areas, but also released deformation heat and caused defects, indirectly accelerating atomic diffusion, then benefits to void shrinkage; (b) surface asperity deformation readily introduced stored energy difference between two opposite sides of interface grain boundary, resulting in strain induced interface grain boundary migration. In addition, the influence of void on interface grain boundary migration was analyzed in detail.

  12. Deformation mechanisms adjacent to a thrust fault, Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.C.; McConnell, D.A.; Friberg, V.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the character of grain-scale deformation adjacent to a Laramide thrust fault in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. This site represents a window through the hanging wall of a thrust sheet which juxtaposes Precambrian rocks over Pennsylvanian rocks. It provides a rare opportunity to examine deformation mechanisms in the footwall of a basement-involved thrust. Brittle deformation is evident at both outcrop and grain-scale. Filled fractures and slickensides composed of quartz and epidote are present throughout the area, and increase in abundance adjacent to the fault zone, as does the frequency of mesoscopic faulting. Variations in deformation mechanisms can be seen between the Precambrian rocks of the thrust sheet and the Pennsylvanian metasedimentary rocks, and between the metamorphosed arkoses and metapelites within the Pennsylvanian section. Cataclastic textures are present in deformed Precambrian rocks, and the degree of cataclasis is greatest immediately adjacent to the fault zone. Deformation in the Pennsylvanian rocks is largely dependent upon the abundance of fine-grained matrix within each sample. The degree of brittle deformation is negatively correlated to the percentage of matrix. Coarser-grained sections show microscopic faults which offset quartz and feldspar grains. Offsets decrease on the faults as they pass from coarse grains into the matrix.

  13. Effect of native oxide mechanical deformation on InP nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, C. M.; Prioli, R.; Ponce, F. A.

    2008-12-01

    Native oxide has been found to have a noticeable effect on the mechanical deformation of InP during nanoindentation. The indentations were performed using spherical diamond tips and the residual impressions were studied by atomic force microscopy. It has been observed that in the early stages of mechanical deformation, plastic flow occurs in the oxide layer while the indium phosphide is still in the elastic regime. The deformed native oxide layer results in a pile-up formation that causes an increase in the contact area between the tip and the surface during the nanoindentation process. This increase in the projected contact area is shown to contribute to the apparent high pressure sustained by the crystal before the onset of plastic deformation. It is also shown that the stress necessary to generate the first dislocations from the crystal surface is ˜3 GPa higher than the stress needed for slip to occur when dislocations are already present in the crystalline structure.

  14. Uncommon deformation mechanisms during fatigue-crack propagation in nanocrystalline alloys.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sheng; Lee, Soo Yeol; Li, Li; Lei, Changhui; Almer, Jon; Wang, Xun-Li; Ungar, Tamas; Wang, Yinmin; Liaw, Peter K

    2013-03-29

    The irreversible damage at cracks during the fatigue of crystalline solids is well known. Here we report on in situ high-energy x-ray evidence of reversible fatigue behavior in a nanocrystalline NiFe alloy both in the plastic zone and around the crack tip. In the plastic zone, the deformation is fully recoverable as the crack propagates, and the plastic deformation invokes reversible interactions of dislocation and twinning in the nanograins. But around the crack tip lies a regime with reversible grain lattice reorientation promoted by a change of local stress state. These observations suggest unprecedented fatigue deformation mechanisms in nanostructured systems that are not addressed theoretically.

  15. Large Deformation Mechanisms, Plasticity, and Failure of an Individual Collagen Fibril With Different Mineral Content.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils are composed of tropocollagen molecules and mineral crystals derived from hydroxyapatite to form a composite material that combines optimal properties of both constituents and exhibits incredible strength and toughness. Their complex hierarchical structure allows collagen fibrils to sustain large deformation without breaking. In this study, we report a mesoscale model of a single mineralized collagen fibril using a bottom-up approach. By conserving the three-dimensional structure and the entanglement of the molecules, we were able to construct finite-size fibril models that allowed us to explore the deformation mechanisms which govern their mechanical behavior under large deformation. We investigated the tensile behavior of a single collagen fibril with various intrafibrillar mineral content and found that a mineralized collagen fibril can present up to five different deformation mechanisms to dissipate energy. These mechanisms include molecular uncoiling, molecular stretching, mineral/collagen sliding, molecular slippage, and crystal dissociation. By multiplying its sources of energy dissipation and deformation mechanisms, a collagen fibril can reach impressive strength and toughness. Adding mineral into the collagen fibril can increase its strength up to 10 times and its toughness up to 35 times. Combining crosslinks with mineral makes the fibril stiffer but more brittle. We also found that a mineralized fibril reaches its maximum toughness to density and strength to density ratios for a mineral density of around 30%. This result, in good agreement with experimental observations, attests that bone tissue is optimized mechanically to remain lightweight but maintain strength and toughness.

  16. Kinetic Monte Carlo study of activated states and correlated shear-transformation-zone activity during the deformation of an amorphous metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homer, Eric R.; Rodney, David; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2010-02-01

    Shear transformation zone (STZ) dynamics simulations, which are based on the kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm, are used to model the mechanical response of amorphous metals and provide insight into the collective aspects of the microscopic events underlying deformation. The present analysis details the activated states of STZs in such a model, as well as the statistics of their activation and how these are affected by imposed conditions of stress and temperature. The analysis sheds light on the spatial and temporal correlations between the individual STZ activations that lead to different macroscopic modes of deformation. Three basic STZ correlation behaviors are observed: uncorrelated activity, nearest-neighbor correlation, and self-reactivating STZs. These three behaviors correspond well with the macroscopic deformation modes of homogeneous flow, inhomogeneous deformation, and elastic behavior, respectively. The effect of pre-existing stresses in the simulation cell is also studied and found to have a homogenizing effect on STZ correlations, suppressing the tendency for localization.

  17. Dislocation-accommodated grain boundary sliding as the major deformation mechanism of olivine in the Earth's upper mantle.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Tomohiro; Kawazoe, Takaaki; Higo, Yuji; Funakoshi, Ken-Ichi; Suzuki, Akio; Kikegawa, Takumi; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the deformation mechanisms of olivine is important for addressing the dynamic processes in Earth's upper mantle. It has been thought that dislocation creep is the dominant mechanism because of extrapolated laboratory data on the plasticity of olivine at pressures below 0.5 GPa. However, we found that dislocation-accommodated grain boundary sliding (DisGBS), rather than dislocation creep, dominates the deformation of olivine under middle and deep upper mantle conditions. We used a deformation-DIA apparatus combined with synchrotron in situ x-ray observations to study the plasticity of olivine aggregates at pressures up to 6.7 GPa (that is, ~200-km depth) and at temperatures between 1273 and 1473 K, which is equivalent to the conditions in the middle region of the upper mantle. The creep strength of olivine deforming by DisGBS is apparently less sensitive to pressure because of the competing pressure-hardening effect of the activation volume and pressure-softening effect of water fugacity. The estimated viscosity of olivine controlled by DisGBS is independent of depth and ranges from 10(19.6) to 10(20.7) Pa·s throughout the asthenospheric upper mantle with a representative water content (50 to 1000 parts per million H/Si), which is consistent with geophysical viscosity profiles. Because DisGBS is a grain size-sensitive creep mechanism, the evolution of the grain size of olivine is an important process controlling the dynamics of the upper mantle.

  18. The surface geometry of inherited joint and fracture trace patterns resulting from active and passive deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podwysocki, M. H.; Gold, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    Hypothetical models are considered for detecting subsurface structure from the fracture or joint pattern, which may be influenced by the structure and propagated to the surface. Various patterns of an initially orthogonal fracture grid are modeled according to active and passive deformation mechanisms. In the active periclinal structure with a vertical axis, fracture frequency increased both over the dome and basin, and remained constant with decreasing depth to the structure. For passive periclinal features such as a reef or sand body, fracture frequency is determined by the arc of curvature and showed a reduction over the reefmound and increased over the basin.

  19. Cell Deformation by Single-beam Acoustic Trapping: A Promising Tool for Measurements of Cell Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Jihun; Park, Jin Man; Lee, Changyang; Jung, Hayong; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact single-beam acoustic trapping method for the quantification of the mechanical properties of a single suspended cell with label-free. Experimentally results show that the single-beam acoustic trapping force results in morphological deformation of a trapped cell. While a cancer cell was trapped in an acoustic beam focus, the morphological changes of the immobilized cell were monitored using bright-field imaging. The cell deformability was then compared with that of a trapped polystyrene microbead as a function of the applied acoustic pressure for a better understanding of the relationship between the pressure and degree of cell deformation. Cell deformation was found to become more pronounced as higher pressure levels were applied. Furthermore, to determine if this acoustic trapping method can be exploited in quantifying the cell mechanics in a suspension and in a non-contact manner, the deformability levels of breast cancer cells with different degrees of invasiveness due to acoustic trapping were compared. It was found that highly-invasive breast cancer cells exhibited greater deformability than weakly-invasive breast cancer cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the single-beam acoustic trapping technique is a promising tool for non-contact quantitative assessments of the mechanical properties of single cells in suspensions with label-free. PMID:27273365

  20. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites: Plasticity and damage mechanisms, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The inelastic deformation mechanisms for the SiC (SCS-6)/Ti-15-3 system were studied at 538 C (1000 F) using a combination of mechanical measurements and detailed microstructural examinations. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall MMC response, and to compare the room temperature and elevated temperature deformation behaviors. Four different laminates were studied: (0)8, (90)8,(+ or -45)2s, and (0/90)2s, with the primary emphasis on the unidirectional (0)8, and (90)8 systems. The elevated temperature responses were similar to those at room temperature, involving a two-stage elastic-plastic type of response for the (0)8 system, and a characteristic three-stage deformation response for the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s systems. The primary effects of elevated temperatures included: (1) reduction in the 'yield' and failure strengths; (2) plasticity through diffused slip rather than concentrated planar slip (which occurred at room temperature); and (3) time-dependent deformation. The inelastic deformation mechanism for the (0)8 MMC was dominated by plasticity at both temperatures. For the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s MMCs, a combination of damage and plasticity contributed to the deformation at both temperatures.

  1. μCT based assessment of mechanical deformation of designed PTMC scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Narra, Nathaniel; Blanquer, Sébastien B.G.; Haimi, Suvi P.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Hyttinen, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Advances in rapid-prototyping and 3D printing technologies have enhanced the possibilities in preparing designed architectures for tissue engineering applications. A major advantage in custom designing is the ability to create structures with desired mechanical properties. While the behaviour of a designed scaffold can be simulated using bulk material properties, it is important to verify the behaviour of a printed scaffold at the microstructure level. OBJECTIVE: In this study we present an effective method in validating the mechanical behaviour of designed scaffolds using a μCT with an in-situ mechanical deformation device. METHODS: The scaffolds were prepared from biodegradable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) by stereolithography and images obtained using a high-resolution μCT with 12.25μm isometric voxels. The data was processed (filtering, segmentation) and analysed (surface generation, registration) to extract relevant deformation features. RESULTS: The computed local deformation fields, calculated at sub-pore resolutions, displayed expected linear behaviour within the scaffold along the compressions axis. On planes perpendicular to this axis, the deformations varied by 150– 200μm. CONCLUSIONS: μCT based imaging with in-situ deformation provides a vital tool in validating the design parameters of printed scaffolds. Deformation fields obtained from micro-tomographic image volumes can serve to corroborate the simulated ideal design with the realized product. PMID:25818150

  2. Micro-to-nano-scale deformation mechanisms of a bimodal ultrafine eutectic composite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoung Wan; Kim, Jeong Tae; Hong, Sung Hwan; Park, Hae Jin; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Nae Sung; Seo, Yongho; Suh, Jin Yoo; Eckert, Jürgen; Kim, Do Hyang; Park, Jin Man; Kim, Ki Buem

    2014-09-30

    The outstading mechanical properties of bimodal ultrafine eutectic composites (BUECs) containing length scale hierarchy in eutectic structure were demonstrated by using AFM observation of surface topography with quantitative height measurements and were interpreted in light of the details of the deformation mechanisms by three different interface modes. It is possible to develop a novel strain accommodated eutectic structure for triggering three different interface-controlled deformation modes; (I) rotational boundary mode, (II) accumulated interface mode and (III) individual interface mode. A strain accommodated microstructure characterized by the surface topology gives a hint to design a novel ultrafine eutectic alloys with excellent mechanical properties.

  3. Mechanical Response of DNA–Nanoparticle Crystals to Controlled Deformation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of DNA-conjugated nanoparticles represents a promising avenue toward the design of engineered hierarchical materials. By using DNA to encode nanoscale interactions, macroscale crystals can be formed with mechanical properties that can, at least in principle, be tuned. Here we present in silico evidence that the mechanical response of these assemblies can indeed be controlled, and that subtle modifications of the linking DNA sequences can change the Young’s modulus from 97 kPa to 2.1 MPa. We rely on a detailed molecular model to quantify the energetics of DNA–nanoparticle assembly and demonstrate that the mechanical response is governed by entropic, rather than enthalpic, contributions and that the response of the entire network can be estimated from the elastic properties of an individual nanoparticle. The results here provide a first step toward the mechanical characterization of DNA–nanoparticle assemblies, and suggest the possibility of mechanical metamaterials constructed using DNA. PMID:27725959

  4. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Jacob R.; Thomason, Kelsey E.; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B.; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped “glaven”) for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object’s shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions–e.g., the participants’ performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  5. Inelastic Deformation of Metal Matrix Composites. Part 1; Plasticity and Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a Ti 15-3/SCS6 (SiC fiber) metal matrix composite (MMC) were investigated using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall inelastic response, and to confirm the mechanisms by rigorous microstructural evaluations. The results of room temperature experiments performed on 0 degree and 90 degree systems primarily are reported in this report. Results of experiments performed on other laminate systems and at high temperatures will be provided in a forthcoming report. Inelastic deformation of the 0 degree MMC (fibers parallel to load direction) was dominated by the plasticity of the matrix. In contrast, inelastic deformations of the 90 degree composite (fibers perpendicular to loading direction) occurred by both damage and plasticity. The predictions of a continuum elastic plastic model were compared with experimental data. The model was adequate for predicting the 0 degree response; however, it was inadequate for predicting the 90 degree response largely because it neglected damage. The importance of validating constitutive models using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis is pointed out. The deformation mechanisms, and the likely sequence of events associated with the inelastic deformation of MMCs, are indicated in this paper.

  6. Materials and noncoplanar mesh designs for integrated circuits with linear elastic responses to extreme mechanical deformations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Song, Jizhou; Choi, Won Mook; Kim, Hoon-Sik; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Liu, Zhuangjian; Huang, Yonggang Y.; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Zhang, Yong-wei; Rogers, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic systems that offer elastic mechanical responses to high-strain deformations are of growing interest because of their ability to enable new biomedical devices and other applications whose requirements are impossible to satisfy with conventional wafer-based technologies or even with those that offer simple bendability. This article introduces materials and mechanical design strategies for classes of electronic circuits that offer extremely high stretchability, enabling them to accommodate even demanding configurations such as corkscrew twists with tight pitch (e.g., 90° in ≈1 cm) and linear stretching to “rubber-band” levels of strain (e.g., up to ≈140%). The use of single crystalline silicon nanomaterials for the semiconductor provides performance in stretchable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits approaching that of conventional devices with comparable feature sizes formed on silicon wafers. Comprehensive theoretical studies of the mechanics reveal the way in which the structural designs enable these extreme mechanical properties without fracturing the intrinsically brittle active materials or even inducing significant changes in their electrical properties. The results, as demonstrated through electrical measurements of arrays of transistors, CMOS inverters, ring oscillators, and differential amplifiers, suggest a valuable route to high-performance stretchable electronics. PMID:19015528

  7. Investigation of deformation mechanisms of staggered nanocomposites using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiazhagan, S.; Anup, S.

    2016-08-01

    Biological materials with nanostructure of regularly or stair-wise staggered arrangements of hard platelets reinforced in a soft protein matrix have superior mechanical properties. Applications of these nanostructures to ceramic matrix composites could enhance their toughness. Using molecular dynamics simulations, mechanical behaviour of the bio-inspired nanocomposites is studied. Regularly staggered model shows better flow behaviour compared to stair-wise staggered model due to the symmetrical crack propagation along the interface. Though higher stiffness and strength are obtained for stair-wise staggered models, rapid crack propagation reduces the toughness. Arresting this crack propagation could lead to superior mechanical properties in stair-wise staggered models.

  8. Microstructural evolution of carbon nanotube fibers: deformation and strength mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Lu, Weibang; Ayala, Orlando M; Wang, Lian-Ping; Karlsson, Anette M; Yang, Qingsheng; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2013-03-07

    A comprehensive investigation of the mechanical behavior and microstructural evolution of carbon nanotube (CNT) continuous fibers under twisting and tension is conducted using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. The tensile strength of CNT fibers with random CNT stacking is found to be higher than that of fibers with regular CNT stacking. The factor dominating the mechanical response of CNT fibers is identified as individual CNT stretching. A simplified twisted CNT fiber model is studied to illustrate the structural evolution mechanisms of CNT fibers under tension. Moreover, it is demonstrated that CNT fibers can be reinforced by enhancing intertube interactions. This study would be helpful not only in the general understanding of the nano- and micro-scale factors affecting CNT fibers' mechanical behavior, but also in the optimal design of CNT fibers' architecture and performance.

  9. Deformation mechanism study of a hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb alloy by transmission electron microscopy. II. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of deformation mechanism change of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy upon heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Fei; Daymond, Mark R. Yao, Zhongwen; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2015-03-14

    The effect of heavy-ion irradiation on deformation mechanisms of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy was investigated by using the in situ transmission electron microscopy deformation technique. The gliding behavior of prismatic 〈a〉 dislocations has been dynamically observed before and after irradiation at room temperature and 300 °C. Irradiation induced loops were shown to strongly pin the gliding dislocations. Unpinning occurred while loops were incorporated into or eliminated by 〈a〉 dislocations. In the irradiated sample, loop depleted areas with a boundary parallel to the basal plane trace were found by post-mortem observation after room temperature deformation, supporting the possibility of basal channel formation in bulk neutron irradiated samples. Strong activity of pyramidal slip was also observed at both temperatures, which might be another important mechanism to induce plastic instability in irradiated zirconium alloys. Finally, (011{sup ¯}1)〈01{sup ¯}12〉 twinning was identified in the irradiated sample deformed at 300 °C.

  10. Investigation of deformation micro-mechanisms in nickel consolidated from a bimodal powder by spark plasma sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Tingaud, D.; Jenei, P.; Krawczynska, A.; Mompiou, F.; Gubicza, J.; Dirras, G.

    2015-01-15

    Bulk polycrystalline nickel compact was processed by spark plasma sintering from heterogeneous powder consisting of a mixture of nanometer and micrometer sized particles. The consolidated samples inherited the bimodal structure of the starting powder and was composed of ~ 55 vol.% coarse-grained (with the grain size larger than 1 μm) and ~ 45 vol.% ultrafine-grained (with an average grain size of ~ 550 nm) components. The deformation mechanisms were established by EBSD, X-ray line profile analysis and in-situ TEM observations. In the ultrafine-grained volume, the deformation occurred mainly through the activation of dislocation sources emitting full or partial dislocation either from grain interior or grain boundaries. Besides dislocation activity, rolling and sliding of nanograins were also observed during deformation by in-situ transmission electron microscopy, which have a considerable contribution to the observed high strain rate sensitivity of the bimodal microstructure. The cracks formed during deformation easily propagated in the nanograin regions due to the weaker particle bonding caused by the relatively high fraction of native oxide layer on the surface of the initial nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Bulk bimodal polycrystalline Ni was processed by SPS from a heterogeneous powder. • High SRS of the flow stress was observed which enhanced ductility and strength. • In-situ TEM revealed dislocation sources inside and at the boundaries of UFGs. • Twinning, partial dislocation and NG rolling were observed at crack tip vicinity. • The high SRS pertained to both dislocation activity in CG and NG rolling.

  11. Understanding creep in sandstone reservoirs - theoretical deformation mechanism maps for pressure solution in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface exploitation of the Earth's natural resources removes the natural system from its chemical and physical equilibrium. As such, groundwater extraction and hydrocarbon production from subsurface reservoirs frequently causes surface subsidence and induces (micro)seismicity. These effects are not only a problem in onshore (e.g. Groningen, the Netherlands) and offshore hydrocarbon fields (e.g. Ekofisk, Norway), but also in urban areas with extensive groundwater pumping (e.g. Venice, Italy). It is known that fluid extraction inevitably leads to (poro)elastic compaction of reservoirs, hence subsidence and occasional fault reactivation, and causes significant technical, economic and ecological impact. However, such effects often exceed what is expected from purely elastic reservoir behaviour and may continue long after exploitation has ceased. This is most likely due to time-dependent compaction, or 'creep deformation', of such reservoirs, driven by the reduction in pore fluid pressure compared with the rock overburden. Given the societal and ecological impact of surface subsidence, as well as the current interest in developing geothermal energy and unconventional gas resources in densely populated areas, there is much need for obtaining better quantitative understanding of creep in sediments to improve the predictability of the impact of geo-energy and groundwater production. The key problem in developing a reliable, quantitative description of the creep behaviour of sediments, such as sands and sandstones, is that the operative deformation mechanisms are poorly known and poorly quantified. While grain-scale brittle fracturing plus intergranular sliding play an important role in the early stages of compaction, these time-independent, brittle-frictional processes give way to compaction creep on longer time-scales. Thermally-activated mass transfer processes, like pressure solution, can cause creep via dissolution of material at stressed grain contacts, grain

  12. Effect of different heating methods on deformation of metal plate under upsetting mechanism in laser forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yongjun; Liu, Yancong; Yi, Peng; Hu, Jun

    2012-03-01

    In a laser forming process, different forming mechanisms have different deformation behaviors. The aim of laser forming is to acquire plane strain under an upsetting mechanism, while a plate undergoes a small bending deformation. In some industrial applications, the bending strain should not occur. To achieve high-precision forming, the deformation behaviors of a metal plate when an upsetting mechanism plays a dominant role are studied in the paper. Several heating methods are proposed to reduce the plane strain difference along the thickness direction and little bending deformation resulting from a small temperature difference between the top and bottom surfaces of the plate. The results show that negligible bending deformation and a uniform plastic plane strain field can be obtained by simultaneously heating the top and bottom surfaces with the same process parameters. A conventional scanning method needs a larger spot diameter and slower scanning speed under the upsetting mechanism, but a smaller spot diameter and quicker scanning speed may be selected using the simultaneous heating method, which can greatly widen the potential scope of process parameters.

  13. Energy Level Effects on Deformation Mechanism in Micro-scale Laser Peen Forming

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,Y.; Fan, Y.; Vukelic, S.; Yao, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Laser micro-scale peen forming attracts more and more attention recently as one of laser processing technology because it not only imparts desirable residual stress into target to improve the fatigue life of the material but also precisely deforms the target. In the present study, energy level effects on deformation mechanism in laser micro-scale peen forming was investigated by both numerical and experimental methods. Deformation curvatures and residual stress distributions of both sides, characterized by x-ray microdiffraction, were compared with the results obtained from FEM simulation. Forming mechanism of convex and concave phenomena was explained in terms of the resulting pressure, compressive stress distribution, and plastic strain. Difference of residual stress distribution patterns was also studied from the point of view of forming mechanism.

  14. The effect of mechanical deformation to the magnetic properties of stainless steel 304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarok, N.; Notonegoro, H. A.; Zaini Thosin, K. A.; Manaf, A.

    2016-11-01

    A study of a non-magnetic 304 austenitic stainless steel alloy through mechanical deformation has been done. These specimens are pipe usually used to deliver gas which contains corrosive oil fields. The metallographic observation of a 20% deformation shows the increase in the value of the magnetization, as compensation for the formation of martensite phase as a result of a mechanical treatment. Martensitic phase formed due to a shift in the structure of the z-axis due to the effects of pressure and shear from the cold rolled. The existence of martensite phase and magnetic properties conducted through x-ray diffraction and permagraf investigation. An identified x-ray diffraction pattern shows the presence of a new peak between 10°-30° angle indicate the mechanical deformation in crystallite structure. Furthermore, at in 20% distortion, the value of magnetization is increased above 0.2 T in small coercivity value and caused decreased the ability of corrosion resistant.

  15. Elucidating the Molecular Deformation Mechanism of Entangled Polymers in Fast Flow by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yangyang; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis; Cheng, Shiwang; Hong, Kunlun; Chen, Wei-Ren; Liu, Jianning; Lin, Panpan; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Understanding the viscoelastic properties of polymers is of fundamental and practical importance because of the vast and ever expanding demand of polymeric materials in daily life. Our current theoretical framework for describing the nonlinear flow behavior of entangled polymers is built upon the tube model pioneered by de Gennes, Doi, and Edwards. In this work, we critically examine the central hypothesis of the tube model for nonlinear rheology using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). While the tube model envisions a unique non-affine elastic deformation mechanism for entangled polymers, our SANS measurements show that the evolution of chain conformation of a well-entangled polystyrene melt closely follows the affine deformation mechanism in uniaxial extension, even when the Rouse Weissenberg number is much smaller than unity. This result provides a key clue for understanding the molecular deformation mechanism of entangled polymers in fast flow. Several implications from our analysis will be discussed in this talk.

  16. High resolution transmission electron microscope observation of zero-strain deformation twinning mechanisms in Ag.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wang, J; Gong, S K; Mao, S X

    2011-04-29

    We have observed a new deformation-twinning mechanism using the high resolution transmission electron microscope in polycrystalline Ag films, zero-strain twinning via nucleation, and the migration of a Σ3{112} incoherent twin boundary (ITB). This twinning mechanism produces a near zero macroscopic strain because the net Burgers vectors either equal zero or are equivalent to a Shockley partial dislocation. This observation provides new insight into the understanding of deformation twinning and confirms a previous hypothesis: detwinning could be accomplished via the nucleation and migration of Σ3{112} ITBs. The zero-strain twinning mechanism may be unique to low staking fault energy metals with implications for their deformation behavior.

  17. Deformation quantization: Quantum mechanics lives and works in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachos, Cosmas K.

    2014-09-01

    Wigner's 1932 quasi-probability Distribution Function in phase-space, his first paper in English, is a special (Weyl) representation of the density matrix. It has been useful in describing quantum flows in semiclassical limits; quantum optics; nuclear and physics; decoherence (eg, quantum computing); quantum chaos; "Welcher Weg" puzzles; molecular Talbot-Lau interferometry; atomic measurements. It is further of great importance in signal processing (time-frequency analysis). Nevertheless, a remarkable aspect of its internal logic, pioneered by H. Groenewold and J. Moyal, has only blossomed in the last quarter-century: It furnishes a third, alternate, formulation of Quantum Mechanics, independent of the conventional Hilbert Space (the gold medal), or Path Integral (the silver medal) formulations, and perhaps more intuitive, since it shares language with classical mechanics: one need not choose sides between coordinate or momentum space variables, since it is formulated simultaneously in terms of position and momentum. This bronze medal formulation is logically complete and self-standing, and accommodates the uncertainty principle in an unexpected manner, so that it offers unique insights into the classical limit of quantum theory. The observables in this formulation are cnumber functions in phase space instead of operators, with the same interpretation as their classical counterparts, only now composed together in novel algebraic ways using star products. One might then envision an imaginary world in which this formulation of quantum mechanics had preceded the conventional Hilbert-space formulation, and its own techniques and methods had arisen independently, perhaps out of generalizations of classical mechanics and statistical mechanics. A sampling of such intriguing techniques and methods has already been published in C. K. Zachos, Int Jou Mod Phys A17 297-316 (2002), and T. L. Curtright, D. B. Fairlie, and C. K. Zachos, A Concise Treatise on Quantum Mechanics in

  18. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, Cheryl L.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1993-01-01

    The intermetallic compound NiAl is one of many advanced materials which is being scrutinized for possible use in high temperature, structural applications. Stoichiometric NiAl has a high melting temperature, excellent oxidation resistance, and good thermal conductivity. Past research has concentrated on improving monotonic properties. The encouraging results obtained on binary and micro-alloyed NiAl over the past ten years have led to the broadening of NiAl experimental programs. The purpose of this research project was to determine the low cycle fatigue properties and dislocation mechanisms of stoichiometric NiAl at temperatures near the monotonic brittle-to-ductile transition. The fatigue properties were found to change only slightly in the temperature range of 600 to 700 K; a temperature range over which monotonic ductility and fracture strength increase markedly. The shape of the cyclic hardening curves coincided with the changes observed in the dislocation structures. The evolution of dislocation structures did not appear to change with temperature.

  19. Molecular mechanisms in deformation of cross-linked hydrogel nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Mathesan, Santhosh; Rath, Amrita; Ghosh, Pijush

    2016-02-01

    The self-folding behavior in response to external stimuli observed in hydrogels is potentially used in biomedical applications. However, the use of hydrogels is limited because of its reduced mechanical properties. These properties are enhanced when the hydrogels are cross-linked and reinforced with nanoparticles. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is applied to perform uniaxial tension and pull out tests to understand the mechanism contributing towards the enhanced mechanical properties. Also, nanomechanical characterization is performed using quasi static nanoindentation experiments to determine the Young's modulus of hydrogels in the presence of nanoparticles. The stress-strain responses for chitosan (CS), chitosan reinforced with hydroxyapatite (HAP) and cross-linked chitosan are obtained from uniaxial tension test. It is observed that the Young's modulus and maximum stress increase as the HAP content increases and also with cross-linking process. Load displacement plot from pullout test is compared for uncross-linked and cross-linked chitosan chains on hydroxyapatite surface. MD simulation reveals that the variation in the dihedral conformation of chitosan chains and the evolution of internal structural variables are associated with mechanical properties. Additional results reveal that the formation of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions is responsible for the above variations in different systems.

  20. Computational implementation of the multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model for salt

    SciTech Connect

    Koteras, J.R.; Munson, D.E.

    1996-05-01

    The Multi-Mechanism Deformation (M-D) model for creep in rock salt has been used in three-dimensional computations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a potential waste, repository. These computational studies are relied upon to make key predictions about long-term behavior of the repository. Recently, the M-D model was extended to include creep-induced damage. The extended model, the Multi-Mechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, is considerably more complicated than the M-D model and required a different technology from that of the M-D model for a computational implementation.

  1. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-40 mass % Nb alloy after megaplastic deformation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkeev, Yurii P.; Eroshenko, Anna Yu.; Glukhov, Ivan A.; Sun, Zeming; Zhu, Qifang; Danilov, Vladimir I.; Tolmachev, Alexei I.

    2015-10-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti alloy contained 40 mass % Nb at megaplastic deformation effect is described. It was proved that the deformation effect including the multiple abc-pressing and multi-pass rolling and further pre-recrystallizing annealing enhances the formation of ultra-fine grained structures with mean element size of 0.3 μm or less, involving stable (β + α)-phase composition and metastable nanosized ω-phase in the alloy. This, in its turn, significantly improves the mechanical properties and simultaneously preserves low elastic modulus level.

  2. Influence of thermally activated processes on the deformation behavior during low temperature ECAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, S.; Scholze, M.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2016-03-01

    High strength aluminum alloys are generally hard to deform. Therefore, the application of conventional severe plastic deformation methods to generate ultrafine-grained microstructures and to further increase strength is considerably limited. In this study, we consider low temperature deformation in a custom-built, cooled equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) tool (internal angle 90°) as an alternative approach to severely plastically deform a 7075 aluminum alloy. To document the maximum improvement of mechanical properties, these alloys are initially deformed from a solid solution heat-treated condition. We characterize the mechanical behavior and the microstructure of the coarse grained initial material at different low temperatures, and we analyze how a tendency for the PLC effect and the strain-hardening rate affect the formability during subsequent severe plastic deformation at low temperatures. We then discuss how the deformation temperature and velocity influence the occurrence of PLC effects and the homogeneity of the deformed ECAP billets. Besides the mechanical properties and these microstructural changes, we discuss technologically relevant processing parameters (such as pressing forces) and practical limitations, as well as changes in fracture behavior of the low temperature deformed materials as a function of deformation temperature.

  3. Projection Moire Interferometry for Rotorcraft Applications: Deformation Measurements of Active Twist Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Soto, Hector L.; South, Bruce W.

    2002-01-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used during wind tunnel tests to obtain azimuthally dependent blade bending and twist measurements for a 4-bladed Active Twist Rotor (ATR) system in simulated forward flight. The ATR concept offers a means to reduce rotor vibratory loads and noise by using piezoelectric active fiber composite actuators embedded in the blade structure to twist each blade as they rotate throughout the rotor azimuth. The twist imparted on the blades for blade control causes significant changes in blade loading, resulting in complex blade deformation consisting of coupled bending and twist. Measurement of this blade deformation is critical in understanding the overall behavior of the ATR system and the physical mechanisms causing the reduction in rotor loads and noise. PMI is a non-contacting, video-based optical measurement technique capable of obtaining spatially continuous structural deformation measurements over the entire object surface within the PMI system field-of-view. When applied to rotorcraft testing, PMI can be used to measure the azimuth-dependent blade bending and twist along the full span of the rotor blade. This paper presents the PMI technique as applied to rotorcraft testing, and provides results obtained during the ATR tests demonstrating the PMI system performance. PMI measurements acquired at select blade actuation conditions generating minimum and maximum rotor loads are provided to explore the interrelationship between rotor loads, blade bending, and twist.

  4. Modelling heat and mass transfer in bread baking with mechanical deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, V.; Salagnac, P.; Glouannec, P.; Ploteau, J.-P.; Jury, V.; Boillereaux, L.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the thermo-hydric behaviour of bread during baking is studied. A numerical model has been developed with Comsol Multiphysics© software. The model takes into account the heat and mass transfers in the bread and the phenomenon of swelling. This model predicts the evolution of temperature, moisture, gas pressure and deformation in French "baguette" during baking. Local deformation is included in equations using solid phase conservation and, global deformation is calculated using a viscous mechanic model. Boundary conditions are specified with the sole temperature model and vapour pressure estimation of the oven during baking. The model results are compared with experimental data for a classic baking. Then, the model is analysed according to physical properties of bread and solicitations for a better understanding of the interactions between different mechanisms within the porous matrix.

  5. Mechanical properties of mammalian cells in suspension measured by electro-deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacQueen, Luke A.; Buschmann, Michael D.; Wertheimer, Michael R.

    2010-06-01

    We describe a planar, micro-fabricated device for generating fringing non-uniform electric fields. We used it to measure the mechanical properties of individual mammalian cells in suspension by deforming them in time-varying, non-uniform electric fields. Electrical stresses generated by the planar microelectrodes were used to trap and stretch cells, while cell deformation was observed using optical microscopy. Two distinct cell types were compared after fitting strain data with a three-parameter 'standard linear solid' model of visco-elasticity, and with a two-parameter power-law method. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were approximately twice as stiff as U937 human promonocytes, and CHO cells displayed an elastic behaviour with recovery of initial shape, while U937 strain data bore witness to plastic deformation. Our results demonstrate that electrical stresses generated by micro-fabricated electrodes permit mechanical characterization of distinct mammalian cell types.

  6. Thermo-mechanical Deformation in Magneto-micropolar Elastic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Rupender

    2009-04-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a two-dimensional problem in electromagnetic micropolar elasticity for a half-space whose surface is subjected to distributed (concentrated or continuous) thermo-mechanical sources in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. As an application of the approach, the sources are taken as uniformly or linearly distributed. Laplace and Fourier transform techniques are used to solve the problem. The integral transforms have been inverted by using a numerical technique to obtain the components of normal strain, normal stress, tangential couple stress, and temperature distribution in the physical domain. Magnetic effects on the components of normal strain, normal stress, tangential couple stress, and temperature distribution have been depicted graphically for two different theories of generalized thermoelasticity, Lord and Shulman (L-S) theory and Green and Lindsay (G-L) theory. A particular case of interest is also deduced from the present investigation.

  7. Mechanical properties and processes of deformation in shallow sedimentary rocks from subduction zones: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadenne, Leslie; Raimbourg, Hugues; Champallier, Rémi; Yamamoto, Yuzuru

    2014-12-01

    better constrain the mechanical behavior of sediments accreted to accretionary prism, we conducted triaxial mechanical tests on natural samples from the Miura-Boso paleo-accretionary prism (Japan) in drained conditions with confining pressures up to 200 MPa as well as postexperiments P-wave velocity (Vp) measurements. During experiments, deformation is principally noncoaxial and accommodated by two successive modes of deformation, both associated with strain-hardening and velocity-strengthening behavior: (1) compaction-assisted shearing, distributed in a several mm-wide shear zone and (2) faulting, localized within a few tens of μm-wide, dilatant fault zone. Deformation is also associated with (1) a decrease in Young's modulus all over the tests, (2) anomalously low Vp in the deformed samples compared to their porosity and (3) an increase in sensitivity of Vp to effective pressure. We interpret this evolution of the poroelastic properties of the material as reflecting the progressive breakage of intergrain cement and the formation of microcracks along with macroscopic deformation. When applied to natural conditions, these results suggest that the deformation style (localized versus distributed) of shallow (z < a few km) sediments is mainly controlled by the variations in stress/strain rate during the seismic cycle and is therefore independent of the porosity of sediments. Finally, we show that the effect of strain, through cement breakage and microcracks formation, may lower Vp for effective pressure up to 40 MPa. As a consequence, the low Vp anomalies observed in Nankai accretionary prisms by seismic imaging between 2 and 4 km depth could reflect sediment deformation rather than porosity anomalies.

  8. Deformation mechanisms in a coal mine roadway in extremely swelling soft rock.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghai; Shi, Weiping; Yang, Renshu

    2016-01-01

    The problem of roadway support in swelling soft rock was one of the challenging problems during mining. For most geological conditions, combinations of two or more supporting approaches could meet the requirements of most roadways; however, in extremely swelling soft rock, combined approaches even could not control large deformations. The purpose of this work was to probe the roadway deformation mechanisms in extremely swelling soft rock. Based on the main return air-way in a coal mine, deformation monitoring and geomechanical analysis were conducted, as well as plastic zone mechanical model was analysed. Results indicated that this soft rock was potentially very swelling. When the ground stress acted alone, the support strength needed in situ was not too large and combined supporting approaches could meet this requirement; however, when this potential released, the roadway would undergo permanent deformation. When the loose zone reached 3 m within surrounding rock, remote stress p ∞ and supporting stress P presented a linear relationship. Namely, the greater the swelling stress, the more difficult it would be in roadway supporting. So in this extremely swelling soft rock, a better way to control roadway deformation was to control the releasing of surrounding rock's swelling potential.

  9. Formation mechanism of fivefold deformation twins in a face-centered cubic alloy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Huang, Siling; Chen, Leilei; Zhu, Zhanwei; Guo, Dongming

    2017-01-01

    The formation mechanism considers fivefold deformation twins originating from the grain boundaries in a nanocrystalline material, resulting in that fivefold deformation twins derived from a single crystal have not been reported by molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, fivefold deformation twins are observed in a single crystal of face-centered cubic (fcc) alloy. A new formation mechanism is proposed for fivefold deformation twins in a single crystal. A partial dislocation is emitted from the incoherent twin boundaries (ITBs) with high energy, generating a stacking fault along {111} plane, and resulting in the nucleating and growing of a twin by the successive emission of partials. A node is fixed at the intersecting center of the four different slip {111} planes. With increasing stress under the indentation, ITBs come into being close to the node, leading to the emission of a partial from the node. This generates a stacking fault along a {111} plane, nucleating and growing a twin by the continuous emission of the partials. This process repeats until the formation of fivefold deformation twins. PMID:28349995

  10. Formation mechanism of fivefold deformation twins in a face-centered cubic alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Huang, Siling; Chen, Leilei; Zhu, Zhanwei; Guo, Dongming

    2017-03-28

    The formation mechanism considers fivefold deformation twins originating from the grain boundaries in a nanocrystalline material, resulting in that fivefold deformation twins derived from a single crystal have not been reported by molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, fivefold deformation twins are observed in a single crystal of face-centered cubic (fcc) alloy. A new formation mechanism is proposed for fivefold deformation twins in a single crystal. A partial dislocation is emitted from the incoherent twin boundaries (ITBs) with high energy, generating a stacking fault along {111} plane, and resulting in the nucleating and growing of a twin by the successive emission of partials. A node is fixed at the intersecting center of the four different slip {111} planes. With increasing stress under the indentation, ITBs come into being close to the node, leading to the emission of a partial from the node. This generates a stacking fault along a {111} plane, nucleating and growing a twin by the continuous emission of the partials. This process repeats until the formation of fivefold deformation twins.

  11. Large Deformation Mechanisms, Plasticity, and Failure of an Individual Collagen Fibril With Different Mineral Content

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mineralized collagen fibrils are composed of tropocollagen molecules and mineral crystals derived from hydroxyapatite to form a composite material that combines optimal properties of both constituents and exhibits incredible strength and toughness. Their complex hierarchical structure allows collagen fibrils to sustain large deformation without breaking. In this study, we report a mesoscale model of a single mineralized collagen fibril using a bottom‐up approach. By conserving the three‐dimensional structure and the entanglement of the molecules, we were able to construct finite‐size fibril models that allowed us to explore the deformation mechanisms which govern their mechanical behavior under large deformation. We investigated the tensile behavior of a single collagen fibril with various intrafibrillar mineral content and found that a mineralized collagen fibril can present up to five different deformation mechanisms to dissipate energy. These mechanisms include molecular uncoiling, molecular stretching, mineral/collagen sliding, molecular slippage, and crystal dissociation. By multiplying its sources of energy dissipation and deformation mechanisms, a collagen fibril can reach impressive strength and toughness. Adding mineral into the collagen fibril can increase its strength up to 10 times and its toughness up to 35 times. Combining crosslinks with mineral makes the fibril stiffer but more brittle. We also found that a mineralized fibril reaches its maximum toughness to density and strength to density ratios for a mineral density of around 30%. This result, in good agreement with experimental observations, attests that bone tissue is optimized mechanically to remain lightweight but maintain strength and toughness. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR). PMID:26866939

  12. Processing Map and Mechanism of Hot Deformation of a Corrosion-Resistant Nickel-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Liu, F.; Zuo, Q.; Cheng, J. J.; Chen, C. F.

    2017-01-01

    Hot deformation behavior of a corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy was studied in temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and strain rate range of 0.001-10 s-1 by employing hot compression tests. An approach of processing map was used to reveal the hot workability and microstructural evolution during the hot deformation. The results show that different stable domains in the processing map associated with the microstructure evolution can be ascribed to different dynamic recrystallization (DRX) mechanisms. The discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) grains evolved by the necklace mechanism are finer than those evolved by the ordinary mechanism, respectively, arising from the strong nucleation process and the growth process. If subjected to low temperature and high strain rate, the flow instability domain occurs, due to the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) based on the evolution of deformation micro-bands within the deformed grains. Based on the processing map, a DRX mechanism map is established, which can provide an idea for designing desired microstructure.

  13. Deformation Microstructures and Creep Mechanisms in Advanced ZR-Based Cladding Under Biazal Loading

    SciTech Connect

    K. Linga Murty

    2008-08-11

    Investigate creep behavior of Zr-based cladding tubes with attention to basic creep mechanisms and transitions in them at low stresses and/or temperatures and study the dislocation microstructures of deformed samples for correlation with the underlying micromechanism of creep

  14. Acoustic Emission Determination of Deformation Mechanisms Leading to Failure of Naval Alloys. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    Emission Laser Beam Interferometer HY80 , 100, 130 Steels Mechanical Deformation Nondestructive Evaluation 2. ABSTRACT (Conetnue an rovere eli if necoo y...publication, J. Applied Phys.). 43. A. Peterlin, B.B. Djordjvic, J.C. Murphy, R.E. Green, "Acoustic Emission During Craze Forma- tion in Polymers

  15. Mechanics of brittle deformation and slope failure at the North Menan Butte tuff cone, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Menan Volcanic Complex consists of phreatomagmatic tuff cones that were emplaced as part of the regional volcanic activity in the Snake River Plain during the late Pleistocene. These tuff cones, the ';Menan Buttes', resulted from the eruption of basaltic magma through water-saturated alluvium and older basalts along the Snake River. The tuffs are composed primarily of basaltic glass with occasional plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts. The tuff is hydrothermally altered to a massive palagonitic tuff at depth but is otherwise poorly welded. Mass movements along the flanks of the cones were contemporaneous with tuff deposition. These slope failures are manifest as cm- to meter-scale pure folds, faults and fault-related folds, as well as larger slumps that are tens to a few hundred meters wide. Previous investigations classified the structural discontinuities at North Menan Butte based on orientation and sense of displacement, and all were recognized as opening-mode or shear fractures (Russell and Brisbin, 1990). This earlier work also used a generalized model of static (i.e., aseismic) gravity-driven shear failure within cohesionless soils to infer a possible origin for these fractures through slope failure. Recent work at North Menan Butte has provided novel insight into the styles of brittle deformation present, the effect of this deformation on the circulation of subsurface fluids within the tuff cone, as well as the mechanisms of the observed slope failures. Field observations reveal that the brittle deformation, previously classified as fractures, is manifest as deformation bands within the non-altered, poorly welded portions of the tuff. Both dilational and compactional bands, with shear, are observed. Slumps are bounded by normal faults, which are found to have developed within clusters of deformation bands. Deformation bands along the down-slope ends of these failure surfaces are predominantly compactional in nature. These bands have a ~3800 millidarcy

  16. Atomistic Mechanism of Plastic Deformation During Nano-indentation of Titanium Aluminide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rino, Jose; Dasilva, Claudio

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms governing defect nucleation in solids are of great interest in all material science branches. Atomistic computer simulations such as Molecular Dynamics (MD), has been providing more understanding of subsurface deformations, bringing out details of atomic structures and dynamics of defects within the material. In the present work we show the first simulation measurements within an atomistic resolution of the mechanical properties of titanium aluminide intermetallic compound (TiAl), which is a promising candidate for high temperature applications with remarkable properties, such as: attractive combination of low density, high melting temperature, high elastic modulus, and strength retention at elevated temperatures, besides its good creep properties. Through calculations of local pressure, local shear stress and spatial rearrangements of atoms beneath the indenter, it was possible to quantify the indentation damage on the structure. We have founded that prismatic dislocations mediate the emission and interaction of dislocations and the activated slip planes are associated with the Thompson tetrahedron. Furthermore, using the load-penetration depth response, we were able to estimate the elastic modulus and the hardness of the TiAl alloy. All our findings are in well agreement with experimental results.

  17. Multiscale Simulation Framework for Coupled Fluid Flow and Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Thomas; Efendiev, Yalchin; Tchelepi, Hamdi; Durlofsky, Louis

    2016-05-24

    Our work in this project is aimed at making fundamental advances in multiscale methods for flow and transport in highly heterogeneous porous media. The main thrust of this research is to develop a systematic multiscale analysis and efficient coarse-scale models that can capture global effects and extend existing multiscale approaches to problems with additional physics and uncertainties. A key emphasis is on problems without an apparent scale separation. Multiscale solution methods are currently under active investigation for the simulation of subsurface flow in heterogeneous formations. These procedures capture the effects of fine-scale permeability variations through the calculation of specialized coarse-scale basis functions. Most of the multiscale techniques presented to date employ localization approximations in the calculation of these basis functions. For some highly correlated (e.g., channelized) formations, however, global effects are important and these may need to be incorporated into the multiscale basis functions. Other challenging issues facing multiscale simulations are the extension of existing multiscale techniques to problems with additional physics, such as compressibility, capillary effects, etc. In our project, we explore the improvement of multiscale methods through the incorporation of additional (single-phase flow) information and the development of a general multiscale framework for flows in the presence of uncertainties, compressible flow and heterogeneous transport, and geomechanics. We have considered (1) adaptive local-global multiscale methods, (2) multiscale methods for the transport equation, (3) operator-based multiscale methods and solvers, (4) multiscale methods in the presence of uncertainties and applications, (5) multiscale finite element methods for high contrast porous media and their generalizations, and (6) multiscale methods for geomechanics.

  18. Hardening mechanisms in a dynamic strain aging alloy, Hastelloy X, during isothermal and thermomechanical cyclic deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V.; Castelli, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    The relative contributions of the hardening mechanisms in Hastelloy X during cyclic deformation were investigated by conducting isothermal cyclic deformation tests within a total strain range of +/-0.3 pct and at several temperatures and strain rates, and thermomechanical tests within several different temperature limits. The results of the TEM examinations and special constant structure tests showed that the precipitation on dislocations of Cr23C6 contributed to hardening, but only after sufficient time above 500 C. Solute drag alone produced very considerable cyclic hardening. Heat dislocation densities, peaking around 10 exp 11 per sq cm, were found to develop at temperatures producing the greatest cyclic hardening.

  19. Phase diagram of tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) + water + octanol system with application of mechanical deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Aykut Evren; Masalci, Özgür; Kazanci, Nadide

    2014-11-01

    Morphological properties of tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) + water + octanol system in different concentrations have been studied. In the process, isotropic phase (L1) and nematic calamitic (NC), nematic discotic (ND), hexagonal E and lamellar D anizotropic mesophases have been determined by polarizing microscopy method and partial ternary phase diagram of the system set up. Textural properties of the anisotropic mesophases of the system have been discussed and their birefringence values measured. Mechanical deformation has been applied to the mesophases. The textural properties and the birefringence values have been observed to be changed by the deformation, after and before which changes have been compared.

  20. Mechanism of grain growth during severe plastic deformation of a nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongqi; Wang, Y B; Ho, J C; Liao, X Z; Zhu, Y T; Ringer, S P

    2009-01-01

    Deformation induced grain growth has been widely reported in nanocrystalline materials. However, the grain growth mechanism remains an open question. This study applies high-pressure torsion to severely deform bulk nanocrystalline Ni-20 wt % Fe disks and uses transmission electron microscopy to characterize the grain growth process. Our results provide solid evidence suggesting that high pressure torsion induced grain growth is achieved primarily via grain rotation for grains much smaller than 100 nm. Dislocations are mainly seen at small-angle subgrain boundaries during the grain growth process but are seen everywhere in grains after the grains have grown large.

  1. Deformation Mechanisms and High Strain Rate Properties of Magnesium (Mg) and Mg Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Deformation Mechanisms and High Strain Rate Properties of Magnesium (Mg) and Mg Alloys by Bin Li, Logan Shannahan, Evan Ma, Kaliatt T. Ramesh...Properties of Magnesium (Mg) and Mg Alloys Bin Li, Logan Shannahan, Evan Ma, and Kaliatt T. Ramesh Johns Hopkins University Suveen Mathaudhu...Mechanisms and High Strain Rate Properties of Magnesium (Mg) and Mg Alloys 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911NF-06-2-0006 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  2. An in situ transmission electron microscope deformation study of the slip transfer mechanisms in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.C.; Robertson, I.M.; Birnbaum, H.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-09-01

    The slip transfer mechanisms across grain boundaries in 310 stainless steel, high-purity aluminum, and a Ni-S alloy have been studied by using the in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) deformation technique. Several interactions between mobile lattice dislocations and grain boundaries have been observed, including the transfer and generation of dislocations at grain boundaries and the nucleation and propagation of a grain boundary crack. Quantitative condition have been established to correctly predict the slip transfer mechanism.

  3. Effects of mechanical deformation on energy conversion efficiency of piezoelectric nanogenerators.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jinho; Cho, Seunghyeon; Kim, Wook; Kwon, Jang-Yeon; Kim, Hojoong; Kim, Seunghyun; Chang, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Chang-Wan; Choi, Dukhyun

    2015-07-10

    Piezoelectric nanogenerators (PNGs) are capable of converting energy from various mechanical sources into electric energy and have many attractive features such as continuous operation, replenishment and low cost. However, many researchers still have studied novel material synthesis and interfacial controls to improve the power production from PNGs. In this study, we report the energy conversion efficiency (ECE) of PNGs dependent on mechanical deformations such as bending and twisting. Since the output power of PNGs is caused by the mechanical strain of the piezoelectric material, the power production and their ECE is critically dependent on the types of external mechanical deformations. Thus, we examine the output power from PNGs according to bending and twisting. In order to clearly understand the ECE of PNGs in the presence of those external mechanical deformations, we determine the ECE of PNGs by the ratio of output electrical energy and input mechanical energy, where we suggest that the input energy is based only on the strain energy of the piezoelectric layer. We calculate the strain energy of the piezoelectric layer using numerical simulation of bending and twisting of the PNG. Finally, we demonstrate that the ECE of the PNG caused by twisting is much higher than that caused by bending due to the multiple effects of normal and lateral piezoelectric coefficients. Our results thus provide a design direction for PNG systems as high-performance power generators.

  4. Scaling laws and deformation mechanisms of nanoporous copper under adiabatic uniaxial strain compression

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Fuping Wu, Xiaolei

    2014-12-15

    A series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the scaling laws and the related atomistic deformation mechanisms of Cu monocrystal samples containing randomly placed nanovoids under adiabatic uniaxial strain compression. At onset of yielding, plastic deformation is accommodated by dislocations emitted from void surfaces as shear loops. The collapse of voids are observed by continuous emissions of dislocations from void surfaces and their interactions with further plastic deformation. The simulation results also suggest that the effect modulus, the yield stress and the energy aborption density of samples under uniaxial strain are linearly proportional to the relative density ρ. Moreover, the yield stress, the average flow stress and the energy aborption density of samples with the same relative density show a strong dependence on the void diameter d, expressed by exponential relations with decay coefficients much higher than -1/2. The corresponding atomistic mechanisms for scaling laws of the relative density and the void diameter were also presented. The present results should provide insights for understanding deformation mechanisms of nanoporous metals under extreme conditions.

  5. A deformation mechanism of hard metal surrounded by soft metal during roll forming

    PubMed Central

    YU, Hailiang; TIEU, A. Kiet; LU, Cheng; LIU, Xiong; GODBOLE, Ajit; LI, Huijun; KONG, Charlie; QIN, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    It is interesting to imagine what would happen when a mixture of soft-boiled eggs and stones is deformed together. A foil made of pure Ti is stronger than that made of Cu. When a composite Cu/Ti foil deforms, the harder Ti will penetrate into the softer Cu in the convex shapes according to previously reported results. In this paper, we describe the fabrication of multilayer Cu/Ti foils by the roll bonding technique and report our observations. The experimental results lead us to propose a new deformation mechanism for a hard metal surrounded by a soft metal during rolling of a laminated foil, particularly when the thickness of hard metal foil (Ti, 25 μm) is much less than that of the soft metal foil (Cu, 300 μm). Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) imaging results show that the hard metal penetrates into the soft metal in the form of concave protrusions. Finite element simulations of the rolling process of a Cu/Ti/Cu composite foil are described. Finally, we focus on an analysis of the deformation mechanism of Ti foils and its effects on grain refinement, and propose a grain refinement mechanism from the inside to the outside of the laminates during rolling. PMID:24853192

  6. A deformation mechanism of hard metal surrounded by soft metal during roll forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hailiang; Tieu, A. Kiet; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Xiong; Godbole, Ajit; Li, Huijun; Kong, Charlie; Qin, Qinghua

    2014-05-01

    It is interesting to imagine what would happen when a mixture of soft-boiled eggs and stones is deformed together. A foil made of pure Ti is stronger than that made of Cu. When a composite Cu/Ti foil deforms, the harder Ti will penetrate into the softer Cu in the convex shapes according to previously reported results. In this paper, we describe the fabrication of multilayer Cu/Ti foils by the roll bonding technique and report our observations. The experimental results lead us to propose a new deformation mechanism for a hard metal surrounded by a soft metal during rolling of a laminated foil, particularly when the thickness of hard metal foil (Ti, 25 μm) is much less than that of the soft metal foil (Cu, 300 μm). Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) imaging results show that the hard metal penetrates into the soft metal in the form of concave protrusions. Finite element simulations of the rolling process of a Cu/Ti/Cu composite foil are described. Finally, we focus on an analysis of the deformation mechanism of Ti foils and its effects on grain refinement, and propose a grain refinement mechanism from the inside to the outside of the laminates during rolling.

  7. Inelastic deformation mechanisms in SCS-6/Ti 15-3 MMC lamina under compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newaz, Golam M.; Majumdar, Bhaskar S.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to study the inelastic deformation mechanisms in (0)(sub 8) and (90)(sub 8) Ti 15-3/SCS-6 lamina subjected to pure compression. Monotonic tests were conducted at room temperature (RT), 538 C and 650 C. Results indicate that mechanical response and deformation characteristics were different in monotonic tension and compression loading whereas some of those differences could be attributed to residual stress effects. There were other differences because of changes in damage and failure modes. The inelastic deformation in the (0)(sub 8) lamina under compression was controlled primarily by matrix plasticity, although some evidence of fiber-matrix debonding was observed. Failure of the specimen in compression was due to fiber buckling in a macroscopic shear zone (the failure plane). The inelastic deformation mechanisms under compression in (90)(sub 8) lamina were controlled by radial fiber fracture, matrix plasticity, and fiber-matrix debonding. The radial fiber fracture was a new damage mode observed for MMC's. Constitutive response was predicted for both the (0)(sub 8) and (90)(sub 8) laminae, using AGLPLY, METCAN, and Battelle's Unit Cell FEA model. Results from the analyses were encouraging.

  8. Deformation and failure mechanisms of graphite/epoxy composites under static loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms of deformation and failure of graphite epoxy composites under static loading were clarified. The influence of moisture and temperature upon these mechanisms were also investigated. Because the longitudinal tensile properties are the most critical to the performance of the composite, these properties were investigated in detail. Both ultimate and elastic mechanical properties were investigated, but the study of mechanisms emphasized those leading to failure of the composite. The graphite epoxy composite selected for study was the system being used in several NASA sponsored flight test programs.

  9. Evolving Stress State and Deformation Mechanism in the Himalayan Foreland Fold-and-Thrust Belt, Northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, I.; Dasti, N.

    2010-12-01

    Crustal deformation along with shortening due to northward under-thrusting of the Indian plate beneath the Eurasian plate continues to create active tectonic features on the northern fringes of the Indian craton since major collision began in the Eocene. Here the study provides insights on the evolving stress state and deformation mechanism of the Salt Range and Potwar area of Northern Pakistan. This part of Himalayan foreland fold-and-thrust-belt has severe history of deformation during 5.1 Ma and 2 Ma. This foreland area lies between Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) in the north, Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) in the south and Jhelum fault of sinistral nature in the east & Kalabagh fault of dextral nature in the west. An integrated data from seismic reflection profiles and drilling logs reveal that the subsurface deformation encompasses pop-ups, imbricates, duplexes with in-sequence and out-of-sequence thrusting. It also depicts that intensity of deformation increases from the northern margin of Soan geosyncline towards north due to lacking of evaporites while in the south it decreases due to gradual increase in salt thickness. Surface geologic mapping glimpses a series of thrust sheets and anticlines trending ENE-SWS in the eastern and central part of the study area; whereas in the western part, the trend is almost E-W. This variation in the trend of structures is the result of counter clock rotational behaviour (~10°deviation from north to the west) of north-western part of the Indian lithospheric plate. Current outcrop-scale natural fracture data collected from selected anticlinal structures of the study area is presented to manifest the stress evolution and deformation styles under the established tectonic framework. Collected data is analysed for the evaluation of tectonic stress direction and deformation mechanism. The genetic arrangement and types of fractures observed in the study area indicate that the whole area is under compression. The data also testify

  10. Impact of mechanical deformation on guest diffusion in zeolitic imidazolate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bin; Wang, Lian Li; Hui, Jia Chen; Du, Lifei; Du, Huiling; Zhu, Ming

    2016-03-14

    The effect of the mechanical deformation of metal-organic frameworks on guest diffusion was investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations. Two basic deformation modes, uniaxial tensile and shear deformation, were considered. The computed shear modulus of the zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) model system was much lower than the Young's modulus, which is in agreement with the experimental results. The diffusion rate in ZIF-8 was calculated for two types of guest molecules: the nonpolar H2 and the quadrupolar CO2. Under tensile strain, the diffusion of both H2 and CO2 was found to be enhanced, whereas the diffusion rates did not change significantly under shear loading. The evolution of the internal structure of ZIF-8 was studied to determine its effect on guest diffusion. The organic-inorganic connection was identified as the source of the framework's flexibility, and therefore we focused on the N-Zn bond and the N-Zn-N angle. Under stretching deformation, the N-Zn bond is elongated and the N-Zn-N angle remains constant. Thus, the length of the C2-C2 long bond, determining the size of the 6-membered ring (6MR) gate, increases and the gate is opened, allowing for faster guest diffusion. Under shear deformation, the N-Zn bond length changes very little and the N-Zn-N angle is distorted. This results in the occurrence of three peaks in the C2-C2 bond length distribution. Although the 6MR gate is distorted, the variation of its average size is small, resulting in a very small effect on the guest diffusivity. In addition, we found that the fluctuation of the ZIF-8 cell can enhance the impact of the mechanical deformation of the host on guest diffusion.

  11. Plastic deformation mechanisms in polyimide resins and their semi-interpenetrating networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Bor Z.

    1990-01-01

    High-performance thermoset resins and composites are critical to the future growth of space, aircraft, and defense industries in the USA. However, the processing-structure-property relationships in these materials remain poorly understood. In the present ASEE/NASA Summer Research Program, the plastic deformation modes and toughening mechanisms in single-phase and multiphase thermoset resins were investigated. Both thermoplastic and thermoset polyimide resins and their interpenetrating networks (IPNs and semi-IPNs) were included. The fundamental tendency to undergo strain localization (crazing and shear banding) as opposed to a more diffuse (or homogeneous) deformation in these polymers were evaluated. Other possible toughening mechanisms in multiphase thermoset resins were also examined. The topological features of network chain configuration/conformation and the multiplicity of phase morphology in INPs and semi-IPNs provide unprecedented opportunities for studying the toughening mechanisms in multiphase thermoset polymers and their fiber composites.

  12. Deformation mechanisms of human amnion: Quantitative studies based on second harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Arabella; Ehret, Alexander E; Perrini, Michela; Maake, Caroline; Ochsenbein-Kölble, Nicole; Ehrbar, Martin; Oyen, Michelle L; Mazza, Edoardo

    2015-06-25

    Multiphoton microscopy has proven to be a versatile tool to analyze the three-dimensional microstructure of the fetal membrane and the mechanisms of deformation on the length scale of cells and the collagen network. In the present contribution, dedicated microscopic tools for in situ mechanical characterization of tissue under applied mechanical loads and the related methods for data interpretation are presented with emphasis on new stepwise monotonic uniaxial experiments. The resulting microscopic parameters are consistent with previous ones quantified for cyclic and relaxation tests, underlining the reliability of these techniques. The thickness reduction and the substantial alignment of collagen fiber bundles in the compact and fibroblast layer starting at very small loads are highlighted, which challenges the definition of a reference configuration in terms of a force threshold. The findings presented in this paper intend to inform the development of models towards a better understanding of fetal membrane deformation and failure, and thus of related problems in obstetrics and other clinical conditions.

  13. Influence of cross-link structure, density and mechanical properties in the mesoscale deformation mechanisms of collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is a ubiquitous protein with remarkable mechanical properties. It is highly elastic, shows large fracture strength and enables substantial energy dissipation during deformation. Most of the connective tissue in humans consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of tropocollagen molecules, which are connected by intermolecular cross-links. In this study, we report a three-dimensional coarse-grained model of collagen and analyze the influence of enzymatic cross-links on the mechanics of collagen fibrils. Two representatives immature and mature cross-links are implemented in the mesoscale model using a bottom-up approach. By varying the number, type and mechanical properties of cross-links in the fibrils and performing tensile test on the models, we systematically investigate the deformation mechanisms of cross-linked collagen fibrils. We find that cross-linked fibrils exhibit a three phase behavior, which agrees closer with experimental results than what was obtained using previous models. The fibril mechanical response is characterized by: (i) an initial elastic deformation corresponding to the collagen molecule uncoiling, (ii) a linear regime dominated by molecule sliding and (iii) the second stiffer elastic regime related to the stretching of the backbone of the tropocollagen molecules until the fibril ruptures. Our results suggest that both cross-link density and type dictate the stiffness of large deformation regime by increasing the number of interconnected molecules while cross-links mechanical properties determine the failure strain and strength of the fibril. These findings reveal that cross-links play an essential role in creating an interconnected fibrillar material of tunable toughness and strength. PMID:25153614

  14. Influence of cross-link structure, density and mechanical properties in the mesoscale deformation mechanisms of collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-12-01

    Collagen is a ubiquitous protein with remarkable mechanical properties. It is highly elastic, shows large fracture strength and enables substantial energy dissipation during deformation. Most of the connective tissue in humans consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of tropocollagen molecules, which are connected by intermolecular cross-links. In this study, we report a three-dimensional coarse-grained model of collagen and analyze the influence of enzymatic cross-links on the mechanics of collagen fibrils. Two representatives immature and mature cross-links are implemented in the mesoscale model using a bottom-up approach. By varying the number, type and mechanical properties of cross-links in the fibrils and performing tensile test on the models, we systematically investigate the deformation mechanisms of cross-linked collagen fibrils. We find that cross-linked fibrils exhibit a three phase behavior, which agrees closer with experimental results than what was obtained using previous models. The fibril mechanical response is characterized by: (i) an initial elastic deformation corresponding to the collagen molecule uncoiling, (ii) a linear regime dominated by molecule sliding and (iii) the second stiffer elastic regime related to the stretching of the backbone of the tropocollagen molecules until the fibril ruptures. Our results suggest that both cross-link density and type dictate the stiffness of large deformation regime by increasing the number of interconnected molecules while cross-links mechanical properties determine the failure strain and strength of the fibril. These findings reveal that cross-links play an essential role in creating an interconnected fibrillar material of tunable toughness and strength.

  15. A mechanical model for deformable and mesh pattern wheel of lunar roving vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhongchao; Wang, Yongfu; Chen, Gang (Sheng); Gao, Haibo

    2015-12-01

    As an indispensable tool for astronauts on lunar surface, the lunar roving vehicle (LRV) is of great significance for manned lunar exploration. An LRV moves on loose and soft lunar soil, so the mechanical property of its wheels directly affects the mobility performance. The wheels used for LRV have deformable and mesh pattern, therefore, the existing mechanical theory of vehicle wheel cannot be used directly for analyzing the property of LRV wheels. In this paper, a new mechanical model for LRV wheel is proposed. At first, a mechanical model for a rigid normal wheel is presented, which involves in multiple conventional parameters such as vertical load, tangential traction force, lateral force, and slip ratio. Secondly, six equivalent coefficients are introduced to amend the rigid normal wheel model to fit for the wheels with deformable and mesh-pattern in LRV application. Thirdly, the values of the six equivalent coefficients are identified by using experimental data obtained in an LRV's single wheel testing. Finally, the identified mechanical model for LRV's wheel with deformable and mesh pattern are further verified and validated by using additional experimental results.

  16. Dislocation-accommodated grain boundary sliding as the major deformation mechanism of olivine in the Earth’s upper mantle

    PubMed Central

    Ohuchi, Tomohiro; Kawazoe, Takaaki; Higo, Yuji; Funakoshi, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Akio; Kikegawa, Takumi; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the deformation mechanisms of olivine is important for addressing the dynamic processes in Earth’s upper mantle. It has been thought that dislocation creep is the dominant mechanism because of extrapolated laboratory data on the plasticity of olivine at pressures below 0.5 GPa. However, we found that dislocation-accommodated grain boundary sliding (DisGBS), rather than dislocation creep, dominates the deformation of olivine under middle and deep upper mantle conditions. We used a deformation-DIA apparatus combined with synchrotron in situ x-ray observations to study the plasticity of olivine aggregates at pressures up to 6.7 GPa (that is, ~200-km depth) and at temperatures between 1273 and 1473 K, which is equivalent to the conditions in the middle region of the upper mantle. The creep strength of olivine deforming by DisGBS is apparently less sensitive to pressure because of the competing pressure-hardening effect of the activation volume and pressure-softening effect of water fugacity. The estimated viscosity of olivine controlled by DisGBS is independent of depth and ranges from 1019.6 to 1020.7 Pa·s throughout the asthenospheric upper mantle with a representative water content (50 to 1000 parts per million H/Si), which is consistent with geophysical viscosity profiles. Because DisGBS is a grain size–sensitive creep mechanism, the evolution of the grain size of olivine is an important process controlling the dynamics of the upper mantle. PMID:26601281

  17. Comparison of deformation mechanics for two different carbonates: oolitic limestone and laminites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zihms, Stephanie; Lewis, Helen; Couples, Gary; Hall, Stephen; Somerville, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate rocks form under a range of conditions which leads to a diverse rock group. Even though carbonates are overall mineralogically simple, the solid-space distribution ranges from simple compositions such as oolitic limestones to highly complex networks of pores and solids as seen in coquinas. Their fundamental mechanical behaviour has been identified to be like clastic rocks (Vajdova 2004, Brantut, Heap et al. 2014). However it is very likely that this observation is not true for more complex carbonates. Triaxial tests were performed on cylindrical samples of two different carbonates; a) oolitic limestone (Bicqueley quarry, France) and b) laminite (Ariripe basin, Brazil). The samples were deformed under confining pressures of 8, 12 and 20MPa, and 20, 30 and 40MPa, respectively. All tests were stopped as soon as peak load was observed to preserve as many deformation characteristics as possible. Photographs of the samples were taken before and after deformation to allow surface analysis of deformation features. Additionally, samples were analysed post-deformation with X-ray tomography (XRT) (using the Zeiss XRadia XRM 520 at the 4D Imaging Lab at Lund University). The 3D tomography images represent the post-deformation samples' density distribution, allowing detailed, non-destructive, 3D analysis of the deformation features that developed in the triaxial testing, including the complex geometries and interactions of fractures, deformation bands and sedimentary layering. They also provide an insight into the complexity of deformation features produced due to the carbonate response. Initial results show that the oolitic limestone forms single shear bands almost the length of the sample, exhibiting similar characteristics to sandstones deformed under similar conditions. These features are observed for all three applied loads. The laminate sample deformed at the lowest confining pressure exhibits compactive features. However, the laminite samples deformed at the

  18. Effects of Fault Segmentation, Mechanical Interaction, and Structural Complexity on Earthquake-Generated Deformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, David Elias

    2014-01-01

    Earth's topographic surface forms an interface across which the geodynamic and geomorphic engines interact. This interaction is best observed along crustal margins where topography is created by active faulting and sculpted by geomorphic processes. Crustal deformation manifests as earthquakes at centennial to millennial timescales. Given that…

  19. Soft Tissue Deformations Contribute to the Mechanics of Walking in Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiao-Yu; Zelik, Karl E.; Board, Wayne J.; Browning, Raymond C.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity not only adds to the mass that must be carried during walking, but also changes body composition. Although extra mass causes roughly proportional increases in musculoskeletal loading, less well understood is the effect of relatively soft and mechanically compliant adipose tissue. Purpose To estimate the work performed by soft tissue deformations during walking. The soft tissue would be expected to experience damped oscillations, particularly from high force transients following heel strike, and could potentially change the mechanical work demands for walking. Method We analyzed treadmill walking data at 1.25 m/s for 11 obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) and 9 non-obese (BMI < 30 kg/m2) adults. The soft tissue work was quantified with a method that compares the work performed by lower extremity joints as derived using assumptions of rigid body segments, with that estimated without rigid body assumptions. Results Relative to body mass, obese and non-obese individuals perform similar amounts of mechanical work. But negative work performed by soft tissues was significantly greater in obese individuals (p= 0.0102), equivalent to about 0.36 J/kg vs. 0.27 J/kg in non-obese individuals. The negative (dissipative) work by soft tissues occurred mainly after heel strike, and for obese individuals was comparable in magnitude to the total negative work from all of the joints combined (0.34 J/kg vs. 0.33 J/kg for obese and non-obese adults, respectively). Although the joints performed a relatively similar amount of work overall, obese individuals performed less negative work actively at the knee. Conclusion The greater proportion of soft tissues in obese individuals results in substantial changes in the amount, location, and timing of work, and may also impact metabolic energy expenditure during walking. PMID:25380475

  20. Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Tran, T. T.; Smillie, L. A.; Subianto, D.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.; Haberl, B.

    2015-05-28

    This study uses high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with in situ electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25–200 °C) of the phase transformation behavior of diamond cubic (dc) silicon at the nanoscale. Along with in situ indentation and electrical data, ex situ characterizations, such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, have been used to reveal the indentation-induced deformation mechanisms. We find that phase transformation and defect propagation within the crystal lattice are not mutually exclusive deformation processes at elevated temperature. Both can occur at temperatures up to 150 °C but to different extents, depending on the temperature and loading conditions. For nanoindentation, we observe that phase transformation is dominant below 100 °C but that deformation by twinning along (111) planes dominates at 150 °C and 200 °C. This work, therefore, provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale and helps to clarify previous inconsistencies in the literature.

  1. Understanding deformation mechanisms during powder compaction using principal component analysis of compression data.

    PubMed

    Roopwani, Rahul; Buckner, Ira S

    2011-10-14

    Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to pharmaceutical powder compaction. A solid fraction parameter (SF(c/d)) and a mechanical work parameter (W(c/d)) representing irreversible compression behavior were determined as functions of applied load. Multivariate analysis of the compression data was carried out using PCA. The first principal component (PC1) showed loadings for the solid fraction and work values that agreed with changes in the relative significance of plastic deformation to consolidation at different pressures. The PC1 scores showed the same rank order as the relative plasticity ranking derived from the literature for common pharmaceutical materials. The utility of PC1 in understanding deformation was extended to binary mixtures using a subset of the original materials. Combinations of brittle and plastic materials were characterized using the PCA method. The relationships between PC1 scores and the weight fractions of the mixtures were typically linear showing ideal mixing in their deformation behaviors. The mixture consisting of two plastic materials was the only combination to show a consistent positive deviation from ideality. The application of PCA to solid fraction and mechanical work data appears to be an effective means of predicting deformation behavior during compaction of simple powder mixtures.

  2. Deformation mechanisms to ameliorate the mechanical properties of novel TRIP/TWIP Co-Cr-Mo-(Cu) ultrafine eutectic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J. T.; Hong, S. H.; Park, H. J.; Kim, Y. S.; Suh, J. Y.; Lee, J. K.; Park, J. M.; Maity, T.; Eckert, J.; Kim, K. B.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the microstructural evolution and the modulation of the mechanical properties have been investigated for a Co-Cr-Mo (CCM) ternary eutectic alloy by addition of a small amount of copper (0.5 and 1 at.%). The microstructural observations reveal a distinct dissimilarity in the eutectic structure such as a broken lamellar structure and a well-aligned lamellar structure and an increasing volume fraction of Co lamellae as increasing amount of copper addition. This microstructural evolution leads to improved plasticity from 1% to 10% without the typical tradeoff between the overall strength and compressive plasticity. Moreover, investigation of the fractured samples indicates that the CCMCu alloy exhibits higher plastic deformability and combinatorial mechanisms for improved plastic behavior. The improved plasticity of CCMCu alloys originates from several deformation mechanisms; i) slip, ii) deformation twinning, iii) strain-induced transformation and iv) shear banding. These results reveal that the mechanical properties of eutectic alloys in the Co-Cr-Mo system can be ameliorated by micro-alloying such as Cu addition. PMID:28067248

  3. Deformation mechanisms to ameliorate the mechanical properties of novel TRIP/TWIP Co-Cr-Mo-(Cu) ultrafine eutectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. T.; Hong, S. H.; Park, H. J.; Kim, Y. S.; Suh, J. Y.; Lee, J. K.; Park, J. M.; Maity, T.; Eckert, J.; Kim, K. B.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the microstructural evolution and the modulation of the mechanical properties have been investigated for a Co-Cr-Mo (CCM) ternary eutectic alloy by addition of a small amount of copper (0.5 and 1 at.%). The microstructural observations reveal a distinct dissimilarity in the eutectic structure such as a broken lamellar structure and a well-aligned lamellar structure and an increasing volume fraction of Co lamellae as increasing amount of copper addition. This microstructural evolution leads to improved plasticity from 1% to 10% without the typical tradeoff between the overall strength and compressive plasticity. Moreover, investigation of the fractured samples indicates that the CCMCu alloy exhibits higher plastic deformability and combinatorial mechanisms for improved plastic behavior. The improved plasticity of CCMCu alloys originates from several deformation mechanisms; i) slip, ii) deformation twinning, iii) strain-induced transformation and iv) shear banding. These results reveal that the mechanical properties of eutectic alloys in the Co-Cr-Mo system can be ameliorated by micro-alloying such as Cu addition.

  4. Deformation mechanisms to ameliorate the mechanical properties of novel TRIP/TWIP Co-Cr-Mo-(Cu) ultrafine eutectic alloys.

    PubMed

    Kim, J T; Hong, S H; Park, H J; Kim, Y S; Suh, J Y; Lee, J K; Park, J M; Maity, T; Eckert, J; Kim, K B

    2017-01-09

    In the present study, the microstructural evolution and the modulation of the mechanical properties have been investigated for a Co-Cr-Mo (CCM) ternary eutectic alloy by addition of a small amount of copper (0.5 and 1 at.%). The microstructural observations reveal a distinct dissimilarity in the eutectic structure such as a broken lamellar structure and a well-aligned lamellar structure and an increasing volume fraction of Co lamellae as increasing amount of copper addition. This microstructural evolution leads to improved plasticity from 1% to 10% without the typical tradeoff between the overall strength and compressive plasticity. Moreover, investigation of the fractured samples indicates that the CCMCu alloy exhibits higher plastic deformability and combinatorial mechanisms for improved plastic behavior. The improved plasticity of CCMCu alloys originates from several deformation mechanisms; i) slip, ii) deformation twinning, iii) strain-induced transformation and iv) shear banding. These results reveal that the mechanical properties of eutectic alloys in the Co-Cr-Mo system can be ameliorated by micro-alloying such as Cu addition.

  5. Plastic deformation mechanisms of ultrafine-grained copper in the temperature range of 4.2-300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, N. V.; Grigorova, T. V.; Mendiuk, O. V.; Davydenko, O. A.; Polishchuk, S. S.; Geidarov, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    Main microstructural features of ultrafine-grained (UFG) polycrystalline oxygen-free copper (Cu-OF) obtained by direct and equal-channel angular hydrostatic extrusion were studied by EBSD and XRD methods. The effect of microstructure on the temperature dependences of the yield stress and strain rate sensitivity of the deforming stress was investigated using tensile and stress relaxation tests in the insufficiently studied temperature range of 4.2-300 K. Using thermal activation analysis it was established that in the range 77-200 K the rate of plastic deformation is controlled by the thermally activated mechanism of crossing the forest dislocations and its empirical parameters were obtained. The experimental anomalies below 77 K unaccountable by the forest crossing mechanism were explained by the inertial properties of dislocations revealed under conditions of high effective stress and low dynamic friction. The inversion of the temperature dependences of the activation volume observed above 200 K was attributed to the thermally activated detachment of dislocations from local pinning centers within the grain boundaries.

  6. Study of the deformation mechanisms in a Fe-14% Cr ODS alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praud, M.; Mompiou, F.; Malaplate, J.; Caillard, D.; Garnier, J.; Steckmeyer, A.; Fournier, B.

    2012-09-01

    In this present work, the plasticity of a rod bar of a 14% Cr ferritic ODS steel is examined through a multiscale approach based on both macroscopic and microscopic results. This bar was elaborated at CEA by powder metallurgy and consolidated by hot extrusion. The microstructure of the material has been characterized. First, the tensile behavior of this material is studied in a wide range of temperatures. Thereafter, through in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) straining experiments, dislocation/dislocation and dislocation/precipitates interactions are observed. The collapse of the tensile properties noticed from 400 °C can be explained by a change in the deformation mechanism. At lower temperatures, the hardening seems to be due to the precipitates, dislocations are pinned on oxides. At higher temperatures, the hardening role of the precipitates is still observed, but the dislocations seem to move in a more steady way, thermal activation of dislocations sources is observed and leads to formation of cavities at the grain boundaries.

  7. Deformation of clinopyroxenite: evidence for a transition in flow mechanisms and semibrittle behavior.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.; Kronenberg, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    A systematic suite of constant strain rate experiments was performed on a vacuum-dried, high-purity, fine-grained clinopyroxenite using NaCl and NaF as confining media in a Griggs-type piston-cylinder apparatus. The experiments were carried out over a range of temperatures from 400o to 1100oC, strain rates from 10-3 to 10-7 s-1, and confining pressures from 170 to 1990 MPa. At T = 600oC and 8e = 1.1 X 10-5 s-1, 3 modes of deformation occur with increasing confining pressure. In experiments at P = 1500 MPa, 2 regimes of flow are clearly defined. The flow data within each regime can be satisfactorily fitted to thermally activated power laws. We believe that the parameters reflect flow dominated by the kinetics of dislocation glide associated with mechanical twinning and (100) slip in the low temperature regime and creep by multiple slip accompanied by increased rates of diffusion and recovery in the high temperature regime. -after Authors

  8. Structural and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline titanium processed by severe plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A.A.; Pyshmintsev, I.Y.; Demakov, S.L.; Illarionov, A.G.; Lowe, T.C.; Sergeyeva, A.V.; Valiev, R.Z.

    1997-10-01

    Recent investigations have demonstrated that materials with ultrafine grain (UFG) structure (nano- and submicron crystalline) can be processed by severe plastic deformation. One advantage of this method is that it can be applied to both pure metals and alloys. Moreover, it produces samples that have no residual porosity so that meaningful measurements of the physical and mechanical properties are possible. Investigations of ultrafine grain copper and aluminum alloys have revealed a number of specific features of their mechanical behavior, namely extremely high hardness and strength, the absence of strain hardening, and deviation form the Hall-Petch relationship. In this work the authors investigate the mechanical properties and thermal stability of UFG titanium.

  9. Characterization of dislocation structures and deformation mechanisms in as-grown and deformed directionally solidified NiAl–Mo composites

    DOE PAGES

    Kwon, J.; Bowers, M. L.; Brandes, M. C.; ...

    2015-02-26

    In this paper, directionally solidified (DS) NiAl–Mo eutectic composites were strained to plastic strain values ranging from 0% to 12% to investigate the origin of the previously observed stochastic versus deterministic mechanical behaviors of Mo-alloy micropillars in terms of the development of dislocation structures at different pre-strain levels. The DS composites consist of long, [1 0 0] single-crystal Mo-alloy fibers with approximately square cross-sections embedded in a [1 0 0] single-crystal NiAl matrix. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and computational stress state analysis were conducted for the current study. STEM of the as-grown samples (without pre-straining) reveal no dislocations inmore » the investigated Mo-alloy fibers. In the NiAl matrix, on the other hand, a(1 0 0)-type dislocations exist in two orthogonal orientations: along the [1 0 0] Mo fiber axis, and wrapped around the fiber axis. They presumably form to accommodate the different thermal contractions of the two phases during cool down after eutectic solidification. At intermediate pre-strain levels (4–8%), a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are present in the Mo-alloy fibers and the pre-existing dislocations in the NiAl matrix seem to be swept toward the interphase boundary. Some of the dislocations in the Mo-alloy fibers appear to be transformed from a(1 0 0)-type dislocations present in the NiAl matrix. Subsequently, the transformed dislocations in the fibers propagate through the NiAl matrix as a(1 1 1) dislocations and aid in initiating additional slip bands in adjacent fibers. Thereafter, co-deformation presumably occurs by (1 1 1) slip in both phases. With a further increase in the pre-strain level (>10%), multiple a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are observed in many locations in the Mo-alloy fibers. Interactions between these systems upon subsequent deformation could lead to stable junctions and persistent dislocation sources. Finally, the transition from stochastic to

  10. Characterization of dislocation structures and deformation mechanisms in as-grown and deformed directionally solidified NiAl–Mo composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J.; Bowers, M. L.; Brandes, M. C.; McCreary, V.; Robertson, Ian M.; Phani, P. Sudaharshan; Bei, H.; Gao, Y. F.; Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-02-26

    In this paper, directionally solidified (DS) NiAl–Mo eutectic composites were strained to plastic strain values ranging from 0% to 12% to investigate the origin of the previously observed stochastic versus deterministic mechanical behaviors of Mo-alloy micropillars in terms of the development of dislocation structures at different pre-strain levels. The DS composites consist of long, [1 0 0] single-crystal Mo-alloy fibers with approximately square cross-sections embedded in a [1 0 0] single-crystal NiAl matrix. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and computational stress state analysis were conducted for the current study. STEM of the as-grown samples (without pre-straining) reveal no dislocations in the investigated Mo-alloy fibers. In the NiAl matrix, on the other hand, a(1 0 0)-type dislocations exist in two orthogonal orientations: along the [1 0 0] Mo fiber axis, and wrapped around the fiber axis. They presumably form to accommodate the different thermal contractions of the two phases during cool down after eutectic solidification. At intermediate pre-strain levels (4–8%), a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are present in the Mo-alloy fibers and the pre-existing dislocations in the NiAl matrix seem to be swept toward the interphase boundary. Some of the dislocations in the Mo-alloy fibers appear to be transformed from a(1 0 0)-type dislocations present in the NiAl matrix. Subsequently, the transformed dislocations in the fibers propagate through the NiAl matrix as a(1 1 1) dislocations and aid in initiating additional slip bands in adjacent fibers. Thereafter, co-deformation presumably occurs by (1 1 1) slip in both phases. With a further increase in the pre-strain level (>10%), multiple a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are observed in many locations in the Mo-alloy fibers. Interactions between these systems upon subsequent deformation could lead to stable junctions and persistent dislocation sources. Finally, the transition from stochastic to

  11. Modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers: a catalog of deformation models and modeling approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; ,; Peter, F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    This manual provides the physical and mathematical concepts for selected models used to interpret deformation measurements near active faults and volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), leveling surveys, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal, and horizontal penny-shaped geometries in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Vertical dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the analytical expressions were verified against numerical models developed by use of COMSOL Multyphics, a Finite Element Analysis software (http://www.comsol.com). In this way, typographical errors present were identified and corrected. Matlab scripts are also provided to facilitate the application of these models.

  12. Effects of Fault Segmentation, Mechanical Interaction, and Structural Complexity on Earthquake-Generated Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, David Elias

    Earth's topographic surface forms an interface across which the geodynamic and geomorphic engines interact. This interaction is best observed along crustal margins where topography is created by active faulting and sculpted by geomorphic processes. Crustal deformation manifests as earthquakes at centennial to millennial timescales. Given that nearly half of Earth's human population lives along active fault zones, a quantitative understanding of the mechanics of earthquakes and faulting is necessary to build accurate earthquake forecasts. My research relies on the quantitative documentation of the geomorphic expression of large earthquakes and the physical processes that control their spatiotemporal distributions. The first part of my research uses high-resolution topographic lidar data to quantitatively document the geomorphic expression of historic and prehistoric large earthquakes. Lidar data allow for enhanced visualization and reconstruction of structures and stratigraphy exposed by paleoseismic trenches. Lidar surveys of fault scarps formed by the 1992 Landers earthquake document the centimeter-scale erosional landforms developed by repeated winter storm-driven erosion. The second part of my research employs a quasi-static numerical earthquake simulator to explore the effects of fault roughness, friction, and structural complexities on earthquake-generated deformation. My experiments show that fault roughness plays a critical role in determining fault-to-fault rupture jumping probabilities. These results corroborate the accepted 3-5 km rupture jumping distance for smooth faults. However, my simulations show that the rupture jumping threshold distance is highly variable for rough faults due to heterogeneous elastic strain energies. Furthermore, fault roughness controls spatiotemporal variations in slip rates such that rough faults exhibit lower slip rates relative to their smooth counterparts. The central implication of these results lies in guiding the

  13. Active auditory mechanics in mosquitoes.

    PubMed Central

    Göpfert, M. C.; Robert, D.

    2001-01-01

    In humans and other vertebrates, hearing is improved by active contractile properties of hair cells. Comparable active auditory mechanics is now demonstrated in insects. In mosquitoes, Johnston's organ transduces sound-induced vibrations of the antennal flagellum. A non-muscular 'motor' activity enhances the sensitivity and tuning of the flagellar mechanical response in physiologically intact animals. This motor is capable of driving the flagellum autonomously, amplifying sound-induced vibrations at specific frequencies and intensities. Motor-related electrical activity of Johnston's organ strongly suggests that mosquito hearing is improved by mechanoreceptor motility. PMID:11270428

  14. Topological mechanics: from metamaterials to active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical metamaterials are artificial structures with unusual properties, such as negative Poisson ratio, bistability or tunable acoustic response, which originate in the geometry of their unit cell. At the heart of such unusual behavior is often a mechanism: a motion that does not significantly stretch or compress the links between constituent elements. When activated by motors or external fields, these soft motions become the building blocks of robots and smart materials. In this talk, we discuss topological mechanisms that possess two key properties: (i) their existence cannot be traced to a local imbalance between degrees of freedom and constraints (ii) they are robust against a wide range of structural deformations or changes in material parameters. The continuum elasticity of these mechanical structures is captured by non-linear field theories with a topological boundary term similar to topological insulators and quantum Hall systems. We present several applications of these concepts to the design and experimental realization of 2D and 3D topological structures based on linkages, origami, buckling meta-materials and lastly active media that break time-reversal symmetry.

  15. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  16. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-09-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  17. Structural evolution of fault zones in sandstone by multiple deformation mechanisms: Moab fault, southeast Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davatzes, N.C.; Eichhubl, P.; Aydin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Faults in sandstone are frequently composed of two classes of structures: (1) deformation bands and (2) joints and sheared joints. Whereas the former structures are associated with cataclastic deformation, the latter ones represent brittle fracturing, fragmentation, and brecciation. We investigated the distribution of these structures, their formation, and the underlying mechanical controls for their occurrence along the Moab normal fault in southeastern Utah through the use of structural mapping and numerical elastic boundary element modeling. We found that deformation bands occur everywhere along the fault, but with increased density in contractional relays. Joints and sheared joints only occur at intersections and extensional relays. In all locations , joints consistently overprint deformation bands. Localization of joints and sheared joints in extensional relays suggests that their distribution is controlled by local variations in stress state that are due to mechanical interaction between the fault segments. This interpretation is consistent with elastic boundary element models that predict a local reduction in mean stress and least compressive principal stress at intersections and extensional relays. The transition from deformation band to joint formation along these sections of the fault system likely resulted from the combined effects of changes in remote tectonic loading, burial depth, fluid pressure, and rock properties. In the case of the Moab fault, we conclude that the structural heterogeneity in the fault zone is systematically related to the geometric evolution of the fault, the local state of stress associated with fault slip , and the remote loading history. Because the type and distribution of structures affect fault permeability and strength, our results predict systematic variations in these parameters with fault evolution. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  18. Modeling coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical processes including plastic deformation in geological porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, S.; Karra, S.; Pawar, R. J.; Zyvoloski, G.

    2012-12-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the recent years in developing computational tools for analyzing coupled thermal, hydrological and mechanical (THM) processes that occur in geological porous media. This is mainly due to their importance in applications including carbon sequestration, enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas production from unconventional sources, degradation of Arctic permafrost, and nuclear waste isolation. Large changes in pressures, temperatures and saturation can result due to injection/withdrawal of fluids or emplaced heat sources. These can potentially lead to large changes in the fluid flow and mechanical behavior of the formation, including shear and tensile failure on pre-existing or induced fractures and the associated permeability changes. Due to this, plastic deformation and large changes in material properties such as permeability and porosity can be expected to play an important role in these processes. We describe a general purpose computational code FEHM that has been developed for the purpose of modeling coupled THM processes during multi-phase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code uses a continuum mechanics approach, based on control volume - finite element method. It is designed to address spatial scales on the order of tens of centimeters to tens of kilometers. While large deformations are important in many situations, we have adapted the small strain formulation as useful insight can be obtained in many problems of practical interest with this approach while remaining computationally manageable. Nonlinearities in the equations and the material properties are handled using a full Jacobian Newton-Raphson technique. Stress-strain relationships are assumed to follow linear elastic/plastic behavior. The code incorporates several plasticity models such as von Mises, Drucker-Prager, and also a large suite of models for coupling flow and mechanical deformation via permeability and stresses/deformations

  19. In Situ Mechanical Testing Techniques for Real-Time Materials Deformation Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Chris; Boesl, Benjamin; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    In situ mechanical property testing has the ability to enhance quantitative characterization of materials by revealing the occurring deformation behavior in real time. This article will summarize select recent testing performed inside a scanning electron microscope on various materials including metals, ceramics, composites, coatings, and 3-Dimensional graphene foam. Tensile and indentation testing methods are outlined with case studies and preliminary data. The benefits of performing a novel double-torsion testing technique in situ are also proposed.

  20. Microfabrics and deformation mechanisms in a jadeite-blueschist from the Franciscan melange, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, S.; Krohe, A.; Stoeckhert, B.; Trepmann, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Franciscan melange is a chaotic mixture of metasedimentary, metabasic and hydrated mantle material forming a typical block in matrix structure with extreme strain gradients on length scales between centimeter and kilometer. Mineral assemblages indicate high-pressure low-temperature metamorphism, with assemblages comprising jadeite + quartz, glaucophane, and aragonite. In combination, the structural relations and metamorphic conditions suggest that the Franciscan melange records processes in the deep level of an accretionary complex or in a subduction channel reaching to great depth. Exhumed materials provide insight into typical deformation mechanisms, stress states, and stress history at depth, which cannot be gained by other approaches. Here we analyze the microfabrics of a highly deformed and compositionally heterogenous jadeite-blueschist. Brittle failure is evident on various length scales. Several generations of fractures are widened and sealed to become veins. The shape of the veins, poor fitting of the walls, and the overall low aspect ratio indicate host rock deformation during sealing. The vein minerals indicate sealing at high-pressure metamorphic conditions, with aragonite being predominant in the latest generation. Individual jadeite porphyroblasts are fragmented. The fractures are sealed by quartz and new jadeite epitactically grown on the broken host. Microstructures suggest that the distributed deformation concomitant with vein formation is predominantly by dissolution precipitation creep. Jadeite porphyroblasts show strain caps and strain shadows, indicating progressive deformation after their crystallization. Unequivocal evidence for dislocation creep is restricted to quartz in some of the veins, where the fine-grained microstructure indicates strain induced grain boundary migration and subgrain rotation. In contrast, in other veins quartz shows a foam structure controlled by interfacial free energy. The microfabrics of the jadeite

  1. Investigation of the Deformation Activation Volume of an Ultrafinegrained Ti50Ni50 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunderov, D. V.; Churakova, A. A.; Lukianov, A. V.; Prokofiev, E. A.; Prokoshkin, S. D.; Kreizberg, A. Yu.; Raab, G. I.; Sabirov, I. N.

    2015-10-01

    The mechanical properties, strain rate sensitivity (m) and deformation activation volume (ΔV) are investigated at the experimental temperatures from 20 to 400°C in a Ti50Ni50 alloy in a coarse-grained (CG) state with the austenite grain size D = 200 μm and in an ultrafine-grained (UFG) state with D = 700 μm following an ECAP treatment. It is observed that this treatment improves the yield strength of the alloy compared to its CG-state. The strain rate sensitivity, m, is found to be by a factor of 1.5-2 higher than that of CG-specimens; it increases with the temperature in both states of the material. As the temperature of the material in tension increases up to Т = 150-250°C, parameter ΔV increases to its maximum and with a further growth of the experimental temperature to 400°C, parameter ΔV decreases. The deformation activation volume of the alloy in the UFG-state is by a factor of 2-4 larger than that in the CG-state for the same experimental temperatures.

  2. On The Creep Behavior and Deformation Mechanisms Found in an Advanced Polycrystalline Nickel-Base Superalloy at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutchman, Hallee Zox

    Polycrystalline Ni-base superalloys are used as turbine disks in the hot section in jet engines, placing them in a high temperature and stress environment. As operating temperatures increase in search of better fuel efficiency, it becomes important to understand how these higher temperatures are affecting mechanical behavior and active deformation mechanisms in the substructure. Not only are operating temperatures increasing, but there is a drive to design next generation alloys in shorter time periods using predictive modeling capabilities. This dissertation focuses on mechanical behavior and active deformation mechanisms found in two different advanced polycrystalline alloy systems, information which will then be used to build advanced predictive models to design the next generation of alloys. The first part of this dissertation discusses the creep behavior and identifying active deformation mechanisms in an advanced polycrystalline Ni-based superalloy (ME3) that is currently in operation, but at higher temperatures and stresses than are experienced in current engines. Monotonic creep tests were run at 700°C and between 655-793MPa at 34MPa increments, on two microstructures (called M1 and M2) produced by different heat treatments. All tests were crept to 0.5% plastic strain. Transient temperature and transient stress tests were used determine activation energy and stress exponents of the M1 microstructure. Constant strain rate tests (at 10-4s-1) were performed on both microstructures as well. Following creep testing, both M1 and M2 microstructures were fully characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for basic microstructure information, and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) to determine active deformation mechanism. It was found that in the M1 microstructure, reorder mediated activity (such as discontinuous faulting and microtwinning) is dominant at low stresses (655-724 MPa). Dislocations in the gamma matrix, and overall planar

  3. Size effects of primary/secondary twins on the atomistic deformation mechanisms in hierarchically nanotwinned metals

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Xiaolei

    2013-05-28

    A series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the tensile properties of nanotwinned (NT) copper with hierarchically twinned structures (HTS). For the same grain size d and the same spacing of primary twins {lambda}{sub 1}, the average flow stress first increases as the spacing of secondary twins {lambda}{sub 2} decreases, reaching a maximum at a critical {lambda}{sub 2}, and then decreases as {lambda}{sub 2} becomes even smaller. The smaller the spacing for {lambda}{sub 1}, the smaller the critical spacing for {lambda}{sub 2}. There exists a transition in dominating deformation mechanisms, occurring at a critical spacing of {lambda}{sub 2} for which strength is maximized. Above the critical spacing of {lambda}{sub 2}, the deformation mechanisms are dominated by the two Hall-Petch type strengthening mechanisms: (a) partial dislocations emitted from grain boundaries (GBs) travel across other GBs and twin boundaries (TBs); (b) partial dislocations emitted from TBs travel across other TBs. Below the critical spacing of {lambda}{sub 2}, the deformation mechanism is dominated by the two softening mechanisms: (a) Partial dislocations emitted from boundaries of the primary twins travel parallel to the TBs of the secondary twins, leading to detwinning of the secondary twins; (b) Boundaries of the primary twins shift entirely, leading to thickening in one part of primary twins and thinning in the other part of primary twins. The present results should provide insights to design the microstructures for reinforcing the mechanical properties in the NT metals with HTS.

  4. Atomistic tensile deformation mechanisms of Fe with gradient nano-grained structure

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenbin E-mail: xlwu@imech.ac.cn; Yuan, Fuping Wu, Xiaolei E-mail: xlwu@imech.ac.cn

    2015-08-15

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate the tensile properties and the related atomistic deformation mechanisms of the gradient nano-grained (GNG) structure of bcc Fe (gradient grains with d from 25 nm to 105 nm), and comparisons were made with the uniform nano-grained (NG) structure of bcc Fe (grains with d = 25 nm). The grain size gradient in the nano-scale converts the applied uniaxial stress to multi-axial stresses and promotes the dislocation behaviors in the GNG structure, which results in extra hardening and flow strength. Thus, the GNG structure shows slightly higher flow stress at the early plastic deformation stage when compared to the uniform NG structure (even with smaller grain size). In the GNG structure, the dominant deformation mechanisms are closely related to the grain sizes. For grains with d = 25 nm, the deformation mechanisms are dominated by GB migration, grain rotation and grain coalescence although a few dislocations are observed. For grains with d = 54 nm, dislocation nucleation, propagation and formation of dislocation wall near GBs are observed. Moreover, formation of dislocation wall and dislocation pile-up near GBs are observed for grains with d = 105 nm, which is the first observation by MD simulations to our best knowledge. The strain compatibility among different layers with various grain sizes in the GNG structure should promote the dislocation behaviors and the flow stress of the whole structure, and the present results should provide insights to design the microstructures for developing strong-and-ductile metals.

  5. Atomistic tensile deformation mechanisms of Fe with gradient nano-grained structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenbin; Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Xiaolei

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate the tensile properties and the related atomistic deformation mechanisms of the gradient nano-grained (GNG) structure of bcc Fe (gradient grains with d from 25 nm to 105 nm), and comparisons were made with the uniform nano-grained (NG) structure of bcc Fe (grains with d = 25 nm). The grain size gradient in the nano-scale converts the applied uniaxial stress to multi-axial stresses and promotes the dislocation behaviors in the GNG structure, which results in extra hardening and flow strength. Thus, the GNG structure shows slightly higher flow stress at the early plastic deformation stage when compared to the uniform NG structure (even with smaller grain size). In the GNG structure, the dominant deformation mechanisms are closely related to the grain sizes. For grains with d = 25 nm, the deformation mechanisms are dominated by GB migration, grain rotation and grain coalescence although a few dislocations are observed. For grains with d = 54 nm, dislocation nucleation, propagation and formation of dislocation wall near GBs are observed. Moreover, formation of dislocation wall and dislocation pile-up near GBs are observed for grains with d = 105 nm, which is the first observation by MD simulations to our best knowledge. The strain compatibility among different layers with various grain sizes in the GNG structure should promote the dislocation behaviors and the flow stress of the whole structure, and the present results should provide insights to design the microstructures for developing strong-and-ductile metals.

  6. Influences of periodic mechanical deformation on spiral breakup in excitable media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Xu, Jiang-Rong; Yuan, Xiao-Ping; Ying, He-Ping

    2009-01-22

    Influences of periodic mechanical deformation (PMD) on spiral breakup that results from Doppler instability in excitable media are investigated. We present a new effect: a high degree of homogeneous PMD is favored to prevent the low-excitability-induced breakup of spiral waves. The frequency and amplitude of PMD are also significant for achieving this purpose. The underlying mechanism of successful control is also discussed, which is believed to be related to the increase of the minimum temporal period of the meandering spiral when the suitable PMD is applied.

  7. Time scales and mechanisms of relaxation in the energy landscape of polymer glass under deformation: direct atomistic modeling.

    PubMed

    Lyulin, Alexey V; Michels, M A J

    2007-08-24

    Molecular-dynamics simulation is used to explore the influence of thermal and mechanical history of typical glassy polymers on their deformation. Polymer stress-strain and energy-strain developments have been followed for different deformation velocities, also in closed extension-recompression loops. The latter simulate for the first time the experimentally observed mechanical rejuvenation and overaging of polymers, and energy partitioning reveals essential differences between mechanical and thermal rejuvenation. All results can be qualitatively interpreted by considering the ratios of the relevant time scales: for cooling down, for deformation, and for segmental relaxation.

  8. Material heterogeneity in cancellous bone promotes deformation recovery after mechanical failure

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ashley M.; Matheny, Jonathan B.; Keaveny, Tony M.; Taylor, David; Rimnac, Clare M.; Hernandez, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Many natural structures use a foam core and solid outer shell to achieve high strength and stiffness with relatively small amounts of mass. Biological foams, however, must also resist crack growth. The process of crack propagation within the struts of a foam is not well understood and is complicated by the foam microstructure. We demonstrate that in cancellous bone, the foam-like component of whole bones, damage propagation during cyclic loading is dictated not by local tissue stresses but by heterogeneity of material properties associated with increased ductility of strut surfaces. The increase in surface ductility is unexpected because it is the opposite pattern generated by surface treatments to increase fatigue life in man-made materials, which often result in reduced surface ductility. We show that the more ductile surfaces of cancellous bone are a result of reduced accumulation of advanced glycation end products compared with the strut interior. Damage is therefore likely to accumulate in strut centers making cancellous bone more tolerant of stress concentrations at strut surfaces. Hence, the structure is able to recover more deformation after failure and return to a closer approximation of its original shape. Increased recovery of deformation is a passive mechanism seen in biology for setting a broken bone that allows for a better approximation of initial shape during healing processes and is likely the most important mechanical function. Our findings suggest a previously unidentified biomimetic design strategy in which tissue level material heterogeneity in foams can be used to improve deformation recovery after failure. PMID:26929343

  9. Material heterogeneity in cancellous bone promotes deformation recovery after mechanical failure.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ashley M; Matheny, Jonathan B; Keaveny, Tony M; Taylor, David; Rimnac, Clare M; Hernandez, Christopher J

    2016-03-15

    Many natural structures use a foam core and solid outer shell to achieve high strength and stiffness with relatively small amounts of mass. Biological foams, however, must also resist crack growth. The process of crack propagation within the struts of a foam is not well understood and is complicated by the foam microstructure. We demonstrate that in cancellous bone, the foam-like component of whole bones, damage propagation during cyclic loading is dictated not by local tissue stresses but by heterogeneity of material properties associated with increased ductility of strut surfaces. The increase in surface ductility is unexpected because it is the opposite pattern generated by surface treatments to increase fatigue life in man-made materials, which often result in reduced surface ductility. We show that the more ductile surfaces of cancellous bone are a result of reduced accumulation of advanced glycation end products compared with the strut interior. Damage is therefore likely to accumulate in strut centers making cancellous bone more tolerant of stress concentrations at strut surfaces. Hence, the structure is able to recover more deformation after failure and return to a closer approximation of its original shape. Increased recovery of deformation is a passive mechanism seen in biology for setting a broken bone that allows for a better approximation of initial shape during healing processes and is likely the most important mechanical function. Our findings suggest a previously unidentified biomimetic design strategy in which tissue level material heterogeneity in foams can be used to improve deformation recovery after failure.

  10. Quantifying and observing viscoplasticity at the nanoscale: highly localized deformation mechanisms in ultrathin nanocrystalline gold films.

    PubMed

    Hosseinian, Ehsan; Legros, Marc; Pierron, Olivier N

    2016-04-28

    This study unveils the stress relaxation transient deformation mechanisms in 100 nm-thick, nanocrystalline Au films thanks to a robust quantitative in situ TEM MEMS nanomechanical testing approach to quantify stress relaxation and to perform in situ observations of time-dependent deformation in ultrathin nanocrystalline films. The relaxation is characterized by a decrease in plastic strain rate of more than one order of magnitude over the first ∼30 minutes (from 10(-4) to less than 10(-5) s(-1)). For longer relaxation experiments, the plastic strain rate decreases down to 10(-7) s(-1) after several hours. The power-law exponent n, relating plastic strain rate and stress, continuously decreases from initial large values (n from 6 to 14 at t = 0) down to low values (n ∼ 1-2) after several hours. In situ TEM observations reveal that the relaxation behavior is initially accommodated by highly localized, sustained, intergranular and transgranular dislocation motion. Over time, the dislocation sources become less operative or exhausted, leading to a transition to grain-boundary-diffusion based mechanisms. The results also highlight a promising technique for nanoscale characterization of time-dependent deformation.

  11. Topographically induced self-deformation of the nuclei of cells: dependence on cell type and proposed mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia M; Fromigué, Olivia; Marie, Pierre J; Hasirci, Vasif; Reiter, Günter; Anselme, Karine

    2010-03-01

    Osteosarcoma-derived cell lines (SaOs-2, MG63) have recently been shown to deform their nucleus considerably in response to surface topography. Such a deformation had not been described previously. Here we present results on additional cell lines, including cancerous (OHS4, U2OS), immortalized (F/STRO-1(+)A and FHSO6) and healthy cells (HOP). The cancerous cells were found to deform extensively, the immortalized cells showed small deformations, whereas the healthy cells showed deformation only at short incubation times. These results suggest a strong link between the malignant transformation of cells and the state of the cytoskeletal network. We propose mechanisms to explain the deformation in which the cytoskeleton either pushes down on the nucleus during spreading or pulls it down upon adhesion to the pillars.

  12. Deformation mechanisms of olivine single crystals compressed at 300 MPa and 800-1100°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Patrick; Demouchy, Sylvie; Mussi, Alexandre; Tommasi, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Rheology of mantle rocks at lithospheric temperatures remains poorly constrained, since most experimental studies on creep mechanisms of olivine single crystals ((MgFe)2SiO4, Pbnm) and polycrystalline olivine aggregates were performed at high-temperatures (T >> 1200oC). In this study, we have performed deformation experiments on oriented single crystals of San Carlos olivine and polycrystalline olivine aggregate at temperatures relevant of the uppermost mantle (ranging from 800o to 1090oC) in tri-axial compression. The experiments were carried out at a confining pressure of 300 MPa in a high-resolution gas-medium mechanical testing apparatus at various constant strain rates (from 7 × 10-6 s-1 to 1 × 10-4 s-1). Mechanical tests yield differential stresses ranging from 88 to 1076 MPa. All samples were deformed at constant displacement rate and for finite strains ranging from 4 to 23 %, to provide insight into possible effects of hardening, softening or stick-and-slip. The single crystals were compressed along several crystallographic directions to test the possibility of activating different slip systems (e.g. [100](001), [001](100), [001](010) and [100](010)). We will present the characterization of the dislocation microstructures performed in the TEM.

  13. Mechanism of Martensitic to Equiaxed Microstructure Evolution during Hot Deformation of a Near-Alpha Ti Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Seyed Amir Arsalan; Mirdamadi, Shamsoddin; Abbasi, Seyed Mahdi; Kim, Daehwan; Lee, Chong Soo

    2017-03-01

    In this study, mechanisms of microstructural evolution during hot deformation of Ti-1100 were investigated by EBSD analysis. Misorientation angle distribution of initial microstructure showed that diffusionless martensitic phase transformation in Ti-1100 obeys Burgers orientation relationship, and most of the high-angle-grain boundaries consist of angles of 60 and 63 deg. Calculated activation energy of hot deformation ( 338 kJ/mol) and EBSD grain boundary maps revealed that continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) is the dominant mechanism during hot compression at 1073 K (800 °C) and strain rate of 0.005 s-1. At a temperature range of 1073 K to 1173 K (800 °C to 900 °C), not only the array of variants lying perpendicular to compression axis but also CDRX contributes to flow softening. Increasing the rolling temperature from 1123 K to 1273 K (850 °C to 1000 °C) brought about changes in spheroidization mechanism from CDRX to conventional boundary splitting and termination migration correlated with the higher volume fraction of beta phase at higher temperatures.

  14. Measurements of mechanical deformation using a full field optical interferometry and a fast camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez López, Carlos; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Gutiérrez Zamarripa, Rodolfo; Caloca Mendez, Cristian

    2006-02-01

    Full field optical interferometry known as ESPI (Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry), has been applied to dynamical deformations on solid and semisolid objects. Although microscopic (1 to 30 micrometers), these deformations offer enough information to know even an early crack detection of the material. In industrial and biomedical environments however there is a lot of noise bigger than the signal we try to recovery, therefore is necessary to compensate mechanical or digitally or both. In this paper we will discuss the basic operating principle of the interferometer and analyze its performance. The technique use a continue wave laser for illuminating the tested object. The transient event is recorded by an ultra fast digital image camera. Data processing is completed with a help of a spatio-temporal algorithm. Some results are presented.

  15. Deformation Mechanism of Zr702 Processed by Equal Channel Angular Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, W. Q.; Yu, S. H.; Chun, Y. B.; Shin, D. H.; Hwang, S. K.

    2007-11-01

    Commercial purity zirconium (Zr702) was deformed by equal channel angular (ECA) pressing up to eight passes, and the resulting microstructure and texture were studied by electron backscattered diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction. The most prominent feature of the substructure was the dislocation cell blocks (CBs), indicating that the dislocation slip rather than twinning was the main mechanism of deformation. With two passes of ECA pressing, pancake-shape grains of 0.25 μm in thickness were obtained. The grain refinement achieved by the ECA pressing was attributed to the evolution of low-angle geometrically necessary boundaries (GNBs) into high-angle grain boundaries (HAGBs) during accumulation of strain by repeated pressing. The texture characteristics were such that a shear texture was predominant in the single-pass specimen, whereas a high-strain rolling texture became apparent in the specimens repeatedly pressed.

  16. Intraplate deformation, stress in the lithosphere and the driving mechanism for plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    1988-01-01

    During this period work was carried out on three fronts relevant to the understanding of intraplate deformation, stress in the lithosphere, and the driving mechanisms for plate motions: (1) observational constraints, using GPS geodesy on the deformation in the region of the boundry between the Pacific and North American plates in central and southern California; (2) numerical modeling of the effects of temperature dependent lithospheric viscosity on the stress and strain history of extensional regimes; and (3) improvement of estimates of mantle viscosity variation, the long-wave-length density variations in the mantle, and the topography of the core-mantel boundary from modeling of geoid anomalies, nutation, and changes in length of day. These projects are described in more detail, followed by a discussion of meetings attended and a list of abstracts and papers submitted and/or published.

  17. On the energy conservation during the active deformation in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhong, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we examined the energy conservation for the current schemes of applying active deformation in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Specifically, two methods are examined. One is scaling the dimension of the simulation box and the atom positions via an affine transformation, suitable for the periodic system. The other is moving the rigid walls that interact with the atoms in the system, suitable for the non-periodic system. Based on the calculation of the external work and the internal energy change, we present that the atom velocities also need to be updated in the first deformation method; otherwise the energy conservation cannot be satisfied. The classic updating scheme is examined, in which any atom crossing the periodic boundary experiences a velocity delta that is equal to the velocity difference between the opposite boundaries. In addition, a new scheme which scales the velocities of all the atoms according to the strain increment is proposed, which is more efficient and realistic than the classic scheme. It is also demonstrated that the Virial stress instead of its interaction part is the correct stress definition that corresponds to Cauchy stress in the continuum mechanics.

  18. Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Seismic Cycle and Quaternary Deformation of the Asal Rift, Djibouti, Africa: Implication for the Rheology of the Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattin, R.; de Chabalier, J.; King, G.; Vigny, C.; Avouac, J.; Ruegg, J.

    2001-12-01

    Because it is subaerial, the Asal rift in the Afar depression of Djibouti provides an exceptional opportunity to study the mechanics of active rifting. Horizontal extension and vertical displacements have been deduced from the deformation of ~ 100,000 yr old volcano that had formed across the rift zone. Over the three last decades seismic, geodetic and field observations have been performed in this region. Over this period major seismovolcanic crisis occurred in 1978. This unique set of data provides information on long term, co-seismic, post-seismic and inter-seismic deformation that might be used to infer the mechanical properties of the rift zone. In that respect the data are compared with the results of a thermo-mechanical modeling. We compute the thermal structure and deformation separately. The temperature field, computed from a finite difference scheme of heat conduction in a moving medium, is adjusted to fit data of 6 thermal wells. Deformation is computed from a two-dimensional finite element model (ADELI) that was modified for the purpose of this study. We conducted several sets of experiments, varying rheological parameters and boundary conditions, in which a section of lithosphere is submitted to 17-20 mm/yr horizontal spreading. Our modeling reconciles all data on seismic cycle and quaternary deformation. The following questions will be tackle: what is the range of viscosity associated with ductile flow in lithosphere? What is the effect of plasticity? What is the contribution of tectonics and volcanism to rifting processes?

  19. Deformation of partially pumped active mirrors for high average-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Albach, Daniel; LeTouzé, Geoffroy; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-25

    We discuss the deformation of a partially pumped active mirror amplifier as a free standing disk, as implemented in several laser systems. We rely on the Lucia laser project to experimentally evaluate the analytical and numerical deformation models.

  20. Active Deformation in the Overriding Plate Associated with Temporal Changes of the Philippine Sea Plate Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, T.; Sato, H.; Van Horne, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present detailed geologic evidence linking changes over time in Philippine Sea plate (PHS) motion and intracontinental deformation in central and southwest (SW) Japan during the Pliocene and after. In the early Pliocene, subduction of the PHS plate under SW Japan restarted in a northerly direction after period of deceleration or cessation. Later, motion changed to a more westerly direction. Corresponding geological changes found in the overriding plate include unconformities in the forearc basins, changes in slip sense on faults, depocenter migration, re-organization of drainage systems and volcanism. Quaternary intraplate deformation is prominent north of the Median Tectonic Line (MTL) inactive segment, above a shallow flat slab. In contrast, less Quaternary tectonic activity is found north of the MTL active segment which lies over a steadily-slipping portion of the subducting slab that behaves as a less-deformed rigid block. Depocenters and active thrusting have migrated north/northwestward over the past 5 My above the shallow flat slab segment of the PHS. We reconstructed the Plio-Pleistocene migration history using Neogene stratigraphy and shallow seismic reflection profiles. We see shallow PHS slab contact with the lower continental crust in our deep seismic reflection profiles, which may explain its enhanced downward drag of the overriding plate and synchronous strong compression in the crust. We find evidence of more westerly PHS plate subduction since the middle Pleistocene in (1) unconformities in the Kumano forearc basin deposits in SW Japan, (2) drastic stream captures in Shikoku, and (3) concordant changes in fault slip sense from thrust to dextral slip along the MTL. Oblique subduction could have induced stronger horizontal stress in the overriding plate above the shallow flat slab which could account for the increasing geologic slip rate observed on active structures. During four repetitions of megathrust earthquake sequences since the 17th century

  1. Size-dependent transition of deformation mechanism, and nonlinear elasticity in Ni{sub 3}Al nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yun-Jiang; Ogata, Shigenobu; Gao, Guo-Jie J.

    2013-01-28

    A size-dependent transition of deformation mechanism is revealed in Ni{sub 3}Al nanowire under atomistic uniaxial tension. Deformation twinning is replaced by phase transformation when the diameter of Ni{sub 3}Al nanowire reduces to a critical value near 4 nm. Enhanced size-dependent nonlinear elasticity is observed in the nanowires, in comparison to their bulk counterpart which is benchmarked by combined density functional and atomistic study. This study provide fundamental understanding on the size-dependent deformation mechanisms of nanostructured alloys.

  2. A Micro Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based Cryogenic Deformable Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; Kataza, H.; Bierden, P.

    2009-03-01

    We present our first results on the development and evaluation of a cryogenic deformable mirror (DM) based on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. A MEMS silicon-based DM chip with 32 channels, in which each channel is 300 μm × 300 μm in size, was mounted on a silicon substrate in order to minimize distortion and prevent it from being permanently damaged by thermal stresses introduced by cooling. The silicon substrate was oxidized to obtain electric insulation and had a metal fan-out pattern on the surface. For cryogenic tests, we constructed a measurement system consisting of a Fizeau interferometer, a cryostat cooled by liquid N2, zooming optics, electric drivers. The surface of the mirror at 95 K deformed in response to the application of a voltage, and no significant difference was found between the deformation at 95 K and that at room temperature. The power dissipation by the cryogenic DM was also measured, and we suggest that this is small enough for it to be used in a space cryogenic telescope. The properties of the DM remained unchanged after five cycles of vacuum pumping, cooling, warming, and venting. We conclude that fabricating cryogenic DMs employing MEMS technology is a promising approach. Therefore, we intend to develop a more sophisticated device for actual use, and to look for potential applications including the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology & Astrophysics (SPICA), and other missions.

  3. Non-geometric fluxes, quasi-Hopf twist deformations, and nonassociative quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Mylonas, Dionysios Szabo, Richard J.; Schupp, Peter

    2014-12-15

    We analyse the symmetries underlying nonassociative deformations of geometry in non-geometric R-flux compactifications which arise via T-duality from closed strings with constant geometric fluxes. Starting from the non-abelian Lie algebra of translations and Bopp shifts in phase space, together with a suitable cochain twist, we construct the quasi-Hopf algebra of symmetries that deforms the algebra of functions and the exterior differential calculus in the phase space description of nonassociative R-space. In this setting, nonassociativity is characterised by the associator 3-cocycle which controls non-coassociativity of the quasi-Hopf algebra. We use abelian 2-cocycle twists to construct maps between the dynamical nonassociative star product and a family of associative star products parametrized by constant momentum surfaces in phase space. We define a suitable integration on these nonassociative spaces and find that the usual cyclicity of associative noncommutative deformations is replaced by weaker notions of 2-cyclicity and 3-cyclicity. Using this star product quantization on phase space together with 3-cyclicity, we formulate a consistent version of nonassociative quantum mechanics, in which we calculate the expectation values of area and volume operators, and find coarse-graining of the string background due to the R-flux.

  4. Mechanics of leukocyte deformation and adhesion to endothelium in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Cao, J; Struble, E J; Lipowsky, H H

    1999-01-01

    The mechanics of leukocyte [white blood cell (WBC)] deformation and adhesion to endothelial cells (EC) in shear flow has been investigated. Experimental data on transient WBC-EC adhesion were obtained from in vivo measurements. Microscopic images of WBC-EC contact during incipient WBC rolling revealed that for a given wall shear stress, the contact area increases with time as new bonds are formed at the leading edge, and then decreases with time as the trailing edge of the WBC membrane peels away from the EC. A two-dimensional model (2D) was developed consisting of an elastic ring adhered to a surface under fluid stresses. This ring represents an actin-rich WBC cortical layer and contains an incompressible fluid as the cell interior. All molecular bonds are modeled as elastic springs distributed in the WBC-EC contact region. Variations of the proportionality between wall shear stress (tau(w)) in the vicinity of the WBC and the resulting drag force (F(s)), i.e., F(s)/tau(w), reveal its decrease with WBC deformation and increasing vessel channel height (2D). The computations also find that the peeling zone between adherent WBC and EC may account for less than 5% of the total contact interface. Computational studies describe the WBC-EC adhesion and the extent of WBC deformation during the adhesive process.

  5. Whisking mechanics and active sensing.

    PubMed

    Bush, Nicholas E; Solla, Sara A; Hartmann, Mitra Jz

    2016-10-01

    We describe recent advances in quantifying the three-dimensional (3D) geometry and mechanics of whisking. Careful delineation of relevant 3D reference frames reveals important geometric and mechanical distinctions between the localization problem ('where' is an object) and the feature extraction problem ('what' is an object). Head-centered and resting-whisker reference frames lend themselves to quantifying temporal and kinematic cues used for object localization. The whisking-centered reference frame lends itself to quantifying the contact mechanics likely associated with feature extraction. We offer the 'windowed sampling' hypothesis for active sensing: that rats can estimate an object's spatial features by integrating mechanical information across whiskers during brief (25-60ms) windows of 'haptic enclosure' with the whiskers, a motion that resembles a hand grasp.

  6. Mechanisms of submicron inclusion re-equilibration during host mineral deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Thomas; Habler, Gerlinde; Abart, Rainer; Rhede, Dieter; Wirth, Richard

    2014-05-01

    data, and no subgrain boundaries. Secondly, garnet lattice rotation of up to 10° around rational garnet crystal axes is observed in connection with some already coarsened inclusions. Strain concentrations are widespread in some trails, but rare in others. A TEM foil transecting a garnet domain with concentrated lattice rotation in association with inclusions reveals well developed polygonal subgrain walls with few free dislocations. Where dislocation density is greatest, almost no <100nm inclusions are observed, whereas these are more abundant in unstrained garnet domains despite the foil being located entirely within the optically visible bleaching zone. Chlorite inclusions and formation of etch pits at dislocations at the garnet-chlorite interface demonstrate the presence of fluid along subgrain boundaries during this second bleaching process. In summary, brittle deformation in these garnets led to enhanced transport and inclusion re-equilibration by coarsening, forming inclusion trails. The precise mechanism allowing enhanced transport is still to be determined and may have involved fluid supply with or without pipe diffusion along introduced dislocations. Later ductile deformation via dislocations, concentrated at already coarsened inclusions and enhanced by fluid availability, further affected the nanoinclusion population. The inclusion trail microstructure records complex small-scale interaction between deformation and reaction, shedding light on the mechanisms by which re-equilibration and strain localisation can influence each other in deforming host-inclusion systems. Bestmann et al. (2008) Journal of Structural Geology 30: 777-790

  7. Microstructures, deformation mechanisms and strain patterns in a vertical profile, inner appalachian fold-thrust belt, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Schuman

    1993-02-01

    A core from the American Anniston No. 1 well, drilled in the Pell City thrust sheet, Calhoun County, Alabama, provides an excellent scientific opportunity to study in a vertical profile the deformation mechanisms and strain patterns associated with large-scale structures. The core contains stratigraphic units from Cambrian to Mississippian in age and two major thrust faults. A detailed structural analysis revealed two deformation episodes, a pre-orogenic deformation and Alleghanian orogenic deformation. In the pre-orogenic deformation, synsedimentary folds and growth faults are the characteristic early structures, and normal faults formed in lithifield rocks later. During Alleghanian deformation, earlier fractures are overprinted by later S1 penetrative structures. In limestone, shale and siltstone within thrust sheets, S1 is solution cleavage. Dolomites in the thrust sheets were deformed by fracturing, and no penetrative cleavages formed. In major fault zones, S1 mylonitic foliation formed in limestone, shale and siltstone. Fault-related dolomites were deformed cataclastically and no S surfaces formed. Strain magnitude increases towards major thrust faults in both the hanging walls and footwalls. For the typical fault configuration in the core with limestone-dolomite in the hanging wall and shale-siltstone in the footwall, strain is mainly caused by pressure solution and cataclasis in the hanging wall and by plastic deformation in the footwall.

  8. The influence of bi-metal interfaces on deformation mechanisms in bulk nanolaminar composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mara, Nathan Allan; Ledonne, Jon; Wynn, Thomas A; Rollett, Anthony D; Beyerlein, I. J.; Misra, Amit

    2011-01-04

    In this presentation, we report on the plastic deformation mechanisms in Ag-Cu and Cu-Nb nanocomposites rolled to large reductions. Starting with an Ag-Cu alloy with eutectic lamellar bilayer thickness of 200 nm, we roll the as-cast rods from 9.5 mm diameter to sheets of final thickness varying from 2.4 mm to 500 {micro}m, corresponding to 75% to 95% nominal reduction in thickness. Cu(111) X-ray pole figures of the rolled nanocomposites indicate a measured texture similar to that of Ag but different from that expected during rolling of pure bulk Cu involving dislocation slip alone. Visco-Plastic Self Consistent (VPSC) polycrystal modeling indicate that both silver and copper deformed by slip and twinning and the twin fraction reached over 30%, depending on rolling reduction. Because pure Cu is not expected to twin under these processing conditions, we hypothesize that twinning in Cu is induced by twinning in Ag, aided by the presence of high Ag-Cu interfacial content. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are then carried out on perfect and defective Ag-Cu interfaces and the results support this hypothesis. In the Cu-Nb system, it has been found that at individual layer thicknesses of 40 nm and above, physical vapor deposited foils can be rolled to large strains. However, when the layer thickness decreases to {approx}5nm, shear instability during rolling limits ductility. In this work, we show the effects of cladding 5nm CuINb multilayers with 40 nm CuINb multilayers to limit the onset of geometric instability, thereby facilitating the deformation of 5nm Cu/Nb multi layers to large rolling strains. Results will be discussed in terms of the effects of the interface on deformation processes at diminishing length scales.

  9. Deformation mechanisms and strain storage during forging of powder-metallurgy nickel-base turbine disk alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Wen J.

    Nickel-based superalloys account for 50% of the total weight of high temperature gas turbine engines. Increasing the lifespan and temperature capabilities of superalloy turbine blades and disks can significantly increase the efficiency and cost of the engines. The properties of superalloy disk materials, including strength and fatigue resistance, are sensitive to the grain structure at the end of a series of thermomechanical processing. To date, there have been few fundamental studies on deformation mechanisms and microstructural evolution under conditions relevant to forging of superalloy disk materials. In this study, high temperature compression testing combined with high resolution Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis has been used to analyze microstructural-scale straining processes that occur during high temperature deformation of a powder-consolidated nickel-based superalloy, Rene 88DT. Orientation imaging has been employed to study grain-level straining and strain storage at temperatures, strains, and strain rates of interest. Two distinct deformation mechanisms were observed using these techniques. At strain rates below 0.001/s, superplastic deformation dominates at temperature between 1241K (968°C) and 1323K (1050°C). At strain rates above 0.001/s, a combination of superplastic and power-law creep deformation mechanisms is evident. At the highest strain rates, power-law creep deformation dominates. Using experimental evidence along with previous studies, constitutive models of deformation mechanisms and microstructure evolution during high temperature compression are proposed. The proposed models predict the boundaries of deformation mechanisms along with the material response to imposed deformation conditions such as superplasticity-enhanced grain growth and dynamic recrystallization.

  10. Postseismic deformation after Maule earthquake and the mechanical properties of the asthenosphere and subduction interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Emilie; Fleitout, Luce; Vigny, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    The interseismic and postseismic deformations preceding and following the large subduction earthquake of Maule (Chile, Mw8.8, 2010) have been closely monitored with GPS from 70 km up to 2000 km away from the trench. Post-seismic deformations exhibit a behavior generally similar to that already observed after the Aceh and Tohoku-Oki earthquakes: vertical uplift is observed on the oceanward side of the volcanic arc. A moderate large scale subsidence is associated with sizeable horizontal deformation in the far-field (500-2000km from the trench). In addition, near-field data (70-200km from the trench) feature a rather complex deformation pattern. A 3D FE code (Zebulon Zset) is used to relate these deformations to the mechanical properties of the mantle and of the subduction interface. The mesh features a spherical shell-portion from the core-mantle boundary to the Earth's surface, extending over more than 60 degrees in latitude and longitude. The overridding and subducting plates are elastic, and the asthenosphere is viscoelastic. We test the presence and shape of two low viscosity areas in the mantle : a low viscosity wedge (LVW) above the subducting plate extending beneath the volcanic arc, and a narrow low viscosity channel (LVCh) along the lower part of the subduction interface, and potentially deeper. All the viscoelastic regions feature a Burgers rheology and we invert for their mechanical properties and geometrical characteristics. Our best fitting models present, (i) an asthenosphere extending down to 270km, with a 'long-term' viscosity of the order of 3.1018Pa.s; (ii) a LVCh along the plate interface extending from depths of 50 to 150 km with viscosities slightly below 1018 Pa.s; (iii) a LVW restricted to the base of the lithosphere below the volcanic arc, with viscosities of a few 1018 Pa.s. Increased horizontal velocities are due to relaxation in both the asthenosphere and the LVCh. A deep channel is necessary to produce enough uplift in the middle

  11. Multiple deformation mechanisms operating at seismogenic depths: Tectonic pseudotachylyte and associated deformation from the central Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prante, M. R.; Evans, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Description and identification of fault-related deformation products that are diagnostic of seismic slip have implications for the energy budget of earthquakes, fault strength, and fault-rock assemblages. We describe tectonic pseduotachylyte, cataclastic rocks, crystal-plastic deformation, and hydrothermal alteration form faults exhumed from seismogenic depths in the Volcanic Lakes area, in northern Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park, CA, USA. Fault rock protoliths include Mesozoic granite and granodiorite plutonic and limited metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. These plutonic and metamorphic rocks are cross-cut by the E-W striking, steeply dipping, left-lateral strike-slip Granite Pass (GPF) and Glacier Lakes faults (GLF). Cross-cutting relationships and microstructural data suggest that the GPF is the oldest fault in the area and preserves evidence for coeval brittle and plastic crystal deformation, and hydrothermal fluid-flow. Tectonic pseudotachylyte from the area has been dated using the 40Ar/39Ar method at 76.6 ± 0.3 Ma; when placed into a thermochronologic framework for the plutonic host rock it can be inferred that the pseudotachylyte formed at depths between 2.4-6.0 km with ambient temperatures between 110-160°C. Exceptionally well preserved tectonic pseudotachylyte from the GLF and GPF contain evidence for a frictional melt origin including: 1) plagioclase spherulites and microlites, 2) injection vein morphology, 3) amygdules, 4) viscous flow banding and folds, and 5) embayed and corroded clasts. Pseudotachylyte from the GPF and GLF is associated with brittle and plastic deformation in the damage zone of the faults. Evidence for plastic deformation includes undulose extinction, deformation lamellae, subgrain development, and grain boundary bulging in quartz; and limited undulose extinction in feldspar. Additionally, abundant hydrothermal alteration and mineralization has been documented in the GPF and GLF fault zones, including, chlorite

  12. Large deformation mechanical testing of biological membranes using speckle interferometry in transmission. I: Experimental apparatus.

    PubMed

    Charette, P G; Hunter, I W; Hunter, P J

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes an apparatus designed to study large mechanical deformations in biological membranes. The task of mechanically characterizing biological membranes is challenging because of the anisotropic and nonlinear nature of their material properties. The apparatus described here is well suited to the task because it uses speckle interferometry to measure in-plane displacements in a distributed fashion and has multiple degrees of freedom in the applied stress mechanism. In this way few a priori assumptions or restrictions are imposed on the applied stress and strain fields. The interferometer operates in transmission mode to increase the light efficiency of the system since the sample biological membranes are translucent and reflect little light. The experimental results confirm that the strain fields in the biological membranes that are generated in the experiments are highly nonuniform and cannot be properly estimated from a small number of point measurements.

  13. Smaller is Plastic: Polymorphic Structures and Mechanism of Deformation in Nanoscale hcp Metals.

    PubMed

    Bhogra, Meha; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, Umesh V

    2015-06-10

    Using first-principles calculations, we establish the existence of highly stable polymorphs of hcp metals (Ti, Mg, Be, La and Y) with nanoscale structural periodicity. They arise from heterogeneous deformation of the hcp structure occurring in response to large shear stresses localized at the basal planes separated by a few nanometers. Through Landau theoretical analysis, we show that their stability derives from nonlinear coupling between strains at different length scales. Such multiscale hyperelasticity and long-period structures constitute a new mechanism of size-dependent plasticity and its enhancement in nanoscale hcp metals.

  14. Intraplate deformation, stress in the lithosphere and the driving mechanism for plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden L.

    1993-01-01

    The initial research proposed was to use the predictions of geodynamical models of mantle flow, combined with geodetic observations of intraplate strain and stress, to better constrain mantle convection and the driving mechanism for plate motions and deformation. It is only now that geodetic observations of intraplate strain are becoming sufficiently well resolved to make them useful for substantial geodynamical inference to be made. A model of flow in the mantle that explains almost 90 percent of the variance in the observed longwavelength nonhydrostatic geoid was developed.

  15. Preliminary atlas of active shallow tectonic deformation in the Puget Lowland, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, Elizabeth A.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Weaver, Craig S.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    This atlas presents an up-to-date map compilation of the geological and geophysical observations that underpin interpretations of active, surface-deforming faults in the Puget Lowland, Washington. Shallow lowland faults are mapped where observations of deformation from paleoseismic, seismic-reflection, and potential-field investigations converge. Together, results from these studies strengthen the identification and characterization of regional faults and show that as many as a dozen shallow faults have been active during the Holocene. The suite of maps presented in our atlas identifies sites that have evidence of deformation attributed to these shallow faults. For example, the paleoseismic-investigations map shows where coseismic surface rupture and deformation produced geomorphic scarps and deformed shorelines. Other maps compile results of seismic-reflection and potential-field studies that demonstrate evidence of deformation along suspected fault structures in the subsurface. Summary maps show the fault traces derived from, and draped over, the datasets presented in the preceding maps. Overall, the atlas provides map users with a visual overview of the observations and interpretations that support the existence of active, shallow faults beneath the densely populated Puget Lowland.

  16. PMCA activity and membrane tubulin affect deformability of erythrocytes from normal and hypertensive human subjects.

    PubMed

    Monesterolo, Noelia E; Nigra, Ayelen D; Campetelli, Alexis N; Santander, Verónica S; Rivelli, Juan F; Arce, Carlos A; Casale, Cesar H

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated formation of a complex between acetylated tubulin and brain plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), and the effect of the lipid environment on structure of this complex and on PMCA activity. Deformability of erythrocytes from hypertensive human subjects was reduced by an increase in membrane tubulin content. In the present study, we examined the regulation of PMCA activity by tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, and the effect of exogenously added diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) on erythrocyte deformability. Some of the key findings were that: (i) PMCA was associated with tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, (ii) PMCA enzyme activity was directly correlated with erythrocyte deformability, and (iii) when tubulin was present in the erythrocyte membrane, treatment with DAG or PA led to increased deformability and associated PMCA activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that PMCA activity is involved in deformability of both normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes. This rheological property of erythrocytes is affected by acetylated tubulin and its lipid environment because both regulate PMCA activity.

  17. Deformation of Diopside Single Crystal at Mantle Pressure, 1, Mechanical Data

    SciTech Connect

    Amiguet, E.; Raterron, P; Cordier, P; Couvy, H; Chen, J

    2009-01-01

    Steady-state deformation experiments were carried out in a deformation-DIA (D-DIA) high-pressure apparatus on oriented diopside single crystals, at pressure (P) ranging from 3.8 to 8.8 GPa, temperature (T) from 1100 to 1400 C, and differential stress ({sigma}) between 0.2 and 1.7 GPa. Three compression directions were chosen in order to test the activity of diopside dislocation slip systems, i.e., 1/2<1 1 0>{l_brace}1 {bar 1} 0{r_brace} systems activated together, both [1 0 0](0 1 0) and [0 1 0](1 0 0) systems together, or [0 0 1] dislocation slip activated in (1 0 0), (0 1 0) and {l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace} planes. Constant applied stress and specimen strain rates ({var_epsilon}) were monitored in situ using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction and radiography, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of the run products revealed that dislocation creep was responsible for sample deformation. Comparison of the present high-P data with those obtained at room-P by Raterron and Jaoul (1991) - on similar crystals deformed at comparable T-{sigma} conditions - allows quantifying the effect of P on 1/2<1 1 0>{l_brace} 1 {bar 1} 0{r_brace} activity. This translates into the activation volume V* = 17 {+-} 6 cm{sup 3}/mol in the corresponding creep power law. Our data also show that both 1/2<1 1 0> dislocation slips and [0 0 1] have comparable slip activities at mantle P and T, while [1 0 0](0 1 0) and [0 1 0](1 0 0) slip systems remain marginal. These results show that P has a significant effect on high-T dislocation creep in diopside, the higher the pressure the harder the crystal, and that this effect is stronger on 1/2<1 1 0> slip than on [0 0 1] slip.

  18. Coupled chemical alteration and mechanical deformation in fractures: Insights from laboratory-scale imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, R. L.; Elkhoury, J. E.; Ameli, P.

    2012-12-01

    Perturbations from mechanical and chemical equilibrium can lead to significant alterations in fracture permeability and corresponding changes in fracture mechanical properties. Under conditions favoring mineral dissolution, alterations caused by chemical disequilibrium depend on the dimensionless Damkohler number (Da=kL/Vb, where k is an effective reaction rate, L is the length scale of the fracture, V is a mean flow velocity and b is the mean fracture aperture). At small values of Da, dissolution is relatively uniform throughout the fracture, whereas at high values of Da, instabilities in the reaction front lead to the formation of dissolution channels, and increased permeability at all values of Da. However, the addition of mechanical stresses can lead to contrasting behavior (i.e., either permeability increase or permeability decrease) due to the alteration of contact regions between the fracture surfaces. Quantifying the rates and relative impacts of different mechanisms in such experiments is necessary, particularly if we wish to use results to support predictions of field-scale behavior under different conditions. However, laboratory-scale experiments aimed at understanding coupled chemical and mechanical disequilibrium typically rely upon core-scale observations that provide insufficient details about the evolution of contacting asperities and the resulting stress induced deformation. We present results from a set of experiments in fractured cores through which we flowed reactive fluids. The cores were reservoir- and cap-rock (limestone and anhydrite, respectively) from the Weyburn CO2 sequestration project in Saskatchewan. In addition to differential pore pressures and effluent chemistry we measured the surface topography (+/- 1 μm) of each sample before and after each experiment at high spatial resolution (20 x 20 μm). We fabricated a jig for accurately aligning the halves of the core on the profilometer stage and developed and tested numerical routines

  19. New mechanism of lenalidomide activity.

    PubMed

    Keevan, Jacob; Figg, William D

    2014-08-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent (IMiD) that has activity in hematologic cancer (e.g., multiple myeloma). The immunomodulatory and apoptotic properties are readily apparent in therapy. However, the exact mechanism of action has been difficult to quantify until recently when it was shown that another IMiD, thalidomide, binds to an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex constituent, CRBN. The article by Kronke et al. demonstrates that, by binding to CRBN and altering its selectivity, lenalidomide potentiates the ubiquitination and proteolysis of 2 specific proteins, IKZF1 and IKZF3. An article in the same issue, by Lu et al., supports these observations. IKZF1 and IKZF3 are transcription factors that are necessary for multiple myeloma, and repression of these transcription factors is a likely mechanism for lenalidomide activity in this disease.

  20. Phase transformation as the single-mode mechanical deformation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sherman; Haberl, Bianca; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.

    2015-06-25

    The mixture of the metastable body-centered cubic (bc8) and rhombohedral (r8) phases of silicon that is formed via nanoindentation of diamond cubic (dc) silicon exhibits properties that are of scientifc and technological interest. This letter demonstrates that large regions of this mixed phase can be formed in crystalline Si via nanoindentation without signifcant damage to the surrounding crystal. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to show that volumes 6 μm wide and up to 650 nm deep can be generated in this way using a spherical tip of ~21.5 μm diameter. The phase transformed region is characterised using both Raman microspectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that uniform loading using large spherical indenters can favor phase transformation as the sole deformation mechanism as long as the maximum load is below a critical level. We suggest that the sluggish nature of the transformation from the dc-Si phase to the metallic (b-Sn) phase normally results in competing deformation mechanisms such as slip and cracking but these can be suppressed by controlled loading conditions.

  1. Deformation mechanisms during nanoindentation of sodium borosilicate glasses of nuclear interest

    SciTech Connect

    Kilymis, D. A.; Delaye, J.-M.

    2014-07-07

    In this paper we analyze results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of Vickers nanoindentation, performed for sodium borosilicate glasses of interest in the nuclear industry. Three glasses have been studied in their pristine form, as well as a disordered one that is analogous to the real irradiated glass. We focused in the behavior of the glass during the nanoindentation in order to reveal the mechanisms of deformation and how they are affected by microstructural characteristics. Results have shown a strong dependence on the SiO{sub 2} content of the glass, which promotes densification due to the open structure of SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra and also due to the strength of Si-O bonds. Densification for the glasses is primarily expressed by the relative decrease of the Si-O-Si and Si-O-B angles, indicating rotation of the structural units and decrease of free volume. The increase of alkali content on the other hand results to higher plasticity of the matrix and increased shear flow. The most important effect on the deformation mechanism of the disordered glasses is that of the highly depolymerized network that will also induce shear flow and, in combination with the increased free volume, will result in the decreased hardness of these glasses, as has been previously observed.

  2. Fault Mechanics and Post-seismic Deformation at Bam, SE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimpenny, Sam; Copley, Alex; Ingleby, Tom

    2017-02-01

    The extent to which aseismic deformation relaxes co-seismic stress changes on a fault zone is fundamental to assessing the future seismic hazard following any earthquake, and in understanding the mechanical behaviour of faults. Here we use models of stress-driven afterslip and visco-elastic relaxation, in conjunction with post-seismic InSAR measurements, to show that there has been minimal release of co-seismic stress changes through post-seismic deformation following the 2003 Mw 6.6 Bam earthquake. Our analysis indicates the faults at Bam remain predominantly locked, suggesting that the co- plus inter-seismically accumulated elastic strain stored down-dip of the 2003 rupture patch may be released in a future Mw 6 earthquake. Our observations and models also provide an opportunity to probe the growth of topography at Bam. We find that, for our modelled afterslip distribution to be consistent with forming the sharp step in the local topography over repeated earthquake cycles, and also to be consistent with the geodetic observations, requires either (1) far-field tectonic loading equivalent to a 2-10 MPa deviatoric stress acting across the fault system, which suggests it supports stresses 60-100 times less than classical views of static fault strength, or (2) that the fault surface has some form of mechanical anisotropy, potentially related to corrugations on the fault plane, that controls the sense of slip.

  3. Mechanical dyssynchrony and deformation imaging in patients with functional mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Isabella; Marini, Claudia; Stella, Stefano; Ancona, Francesco; Spartera, Marco; Margonato, Alberto; Agricola, Eustachio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is a frequent finding of ischemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), associated with unfavourable prognosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms are involved in FMR, such as annular dilatation and dysfunction, left ventricle (LV) remodeling, dysfunction and dyssynchrony, papillary muscles displacement and dyssynchrony. The best therapeutic choice for FMR is still debated. When optimal medical treatment has already been set, a further option for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and/or surgical correction should be considered. CRT is able to contrast most of the pathophysiologic determinants of FMR by minimizing LV dyssynchrony through different mechanisms: Increasing closing forces, reducing tethering forces, reshaping annular geometry and function, correcting diastolic MR. Deformation imaging in terms of two-dimensional speckle tracking has been validated for LV dyssynchrony assessment. Radial speckle tracking and three-dimensional strain analysis appear to be the best methods to quantify intraventricular delay and to predict CRT-responders. Speckle-tracking echocardiography in patients with mitral valve regurgitation has been usually proposed for the assessment of LV and left atrial function. However it has also revealed a fundamental role of intraventricular dyssynchrony in determining FMR especially in DCM, rather than in ischemic cardiomyopathy in which MR severity seems to be more related to mitral valve deformation indexes. Furthermore speckle tracking allows the assessment of papillary muscle dyssynchrony. Therefore this technique can help to identify optimal candidates to CRT that will probably demonstrate a reduction in FMR degree and thus will experience a better outcome. PMID:26981211

  4. Phase transformation as the single-mode mechanical deformation of silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Sherman; Haberl, Bianca; Williams, James S.; ...

    2015-06-25

    The mixture of the metastable body-centered cubic (bc8) and rhombohedral (r8) phases of silicon that is formed via nanoindentation of diamond cubic (dc) silicon exhibits properties that are of scientifc and technological interest. This letter demonstrates that large regions of this mixed phase can be formed in crystalline Si via nanoindentation without signifcant damage to the surrounding crystal. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to show that volumes 6 μm wide and up to 650 nm deep can be generated in this way using a spherical tip of ~21.5 μm diameter. The phase transformed region is characterised using both Ramanmore » microspectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that uniform loading using large spherical indenters can favor phase transformation as the sole deformation mechanism as long as the maximum load is below a critical level. We suggest that the sluggish nature of the transformation from the dc-Si phase to the metallic (b-Sn) phase normally results in competing deformation mechanisms such as slip and cracking but these can be suppressed by controlled loading conditions.« less

  5. Mechanical properties of sand tiger shark (Carcharias taurus) vertebrae in relation to spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Huber, Daniel R; Neveu, Danielle E; Stinson, Charlotte M; Anderson, Paul A; Berzins, Ilze K

    2013-11-15

    Approximately 35% of sand tiger sharks (Carcharias taurus) in public aquaria exhibit spinal deformities ranging from compressed vertebrae and loss of intervertebral space to dislocated spines with vertebral degeneration and massive spondylosis caused by excessive mineralization both within vertebrae and outside the notochordal sheath. To identify the mechanical basis of these deformities, vertebral centra from affected (N=12) and non-affected (N=9) C. taurus were subjected to axial compression tests on an MTS 858 Bionix material testing system, after which mineral content was determined. Vertebral centra from affected sharks had significantly lower mineral content and material behavior in nearly all variables characterizing elasticity, plasticity and failure. These mechanical deficiencies are correlated with size at capture, capture method, vitamin C and zinc deficiency, aquarium size and swimming behavior in public aquaria. Non-affected C. taurus had greater stiffness and toughness even though these properties are generally incompatible in mineralized structures, suggesting that the biphasic (mineralized, unmineralized phases) nature of chondrichthyan vertebrae yields material behavior not otherwise observed in vertebrate skeletons. However, vertebral centra from non-affected sharks had lower mineral content (33%), stiffness (167 MPa), yield strain (14%) and ultimate strength (16 MPa) than other species of sharks and bony vertebrates, indicating that biomechanical precautions must be taken in the husbandry of this species.

  6. Deformation mechanisms during nanoindentation of sodium borosilicate glasses of nuclear interest.

    PubMed

    Kilymis, D A; Delaye, J-M

    2014-07-07

    In this paper we analyze results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of Vickers nanoindentation, performed for sodium borosilicate glasses of interest in the nuclear industry. Three glasses have been studied in their pristine form, as well as a disordered one that is analogous to the real irradiated glass. We focused in the behavior of the glass during the nanoindentation in order to reveal the mechanisms of deformation and how they are affected by microstructural characteristics. Results have shown a strong dependence on the SiO2 content of the glass, which promotes densification due to the open structure of SiO4 tetrahedra and also due to the strength of Si-O bonds. Densification for the glasses is primarily expressed by the relative decrease of the Si-O-Si and Si-O-B angles, indicating rotation of the structural units and decrease of free volume. The increase of alkali content on the other hand results to higher plasticity of the matrix and increased shear flow. The most important effect on the deformation mechanism of the disordered glasses is that of the highly depolymerized network that will also induce shear flow and, in combination with the increased free volume, will result in the decreased hardness of these glasses, as has been previously observed.

  7. Mechanical dyssynchrony and deformation imaging in patients with functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Isabella; Marini, Claudia; Stella, Stefano; Ancona, Francesco; Spartera, Marco; Margonato, Alberto; Agricola, Eustachio

    2016-02-26

    Chronic functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is a frequent finding of ischemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), associated with unfavourable prognosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms are involved in FMR, such as annular dilatation and dysfunction, left ventricle (LV) remodeling, dysfunction and dyssynchrony, papillary muscles displacement and dyssynchrony. The best therapeutic choice for FMR is still debated. When optimal medical treatment has already been set, a further option for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and/or surgical correction should be considered. CRT is able to contrast most of the pathophysiologic determinants of FMR by minimizing LV dyssynchrony through different mechanisms: Increasing closing forces, reducing tethering forces, reshaping annular geometry and function, correcting diastolic MR. Deformation imaging in terms of two-dimensional speckle tracking has been validated for LV dyssynchrony assessment. Radial speckle tracking and three-dimensional strain analysis appear to be the best methods to quantify intraventricular delay and to predict CRT-responders. Speckle-tracking echocardiography in patients with mitral valve regurgitation has been usually proposed for the assessment of LV and left atrial function. However it has also revealed a fundamental role of intraventricular dyssynchrony in determining FMR especially in DCM, rather than in ischemic cardiomyopathy in which MR severity seems to be more related to mitral valve deformation indexes. Furthermore speckle tracking allows the assessment of papillary muscle dyssynchrony. Therefore this technique can help to identify optimal candidates to CRT that will probably demonstrate a reduction in FMR degree and thus will experience a better outcome.

  8. Mechanisms of traumatic rupture of the aorta and associated peri-isthmic motion and deformation.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Warren N; Shah, Chirag S; Mason, Matthew J; Kopacz, James M; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Van Ee, Chris A; Bishop, Jennifer L; Banglmaier, Richard F; Bey, Michael J; Morgan, Richard M; Digges, Kennerly H

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the mechanisms of traumatic rupture of the aorta (TRA). Eight unembalmed human cadavers were tested using various dynamic blunt loading modes. Impacts were conducted using a 32-kg impactor with a 152-mm face, and high-speed seatbelt pretensioners. High-speed biplane x-ray was used to visualize aortic motion within the mediastinum, and to measure deformation of the aorta. An axillary thoracotomy approach was used to access the peri-isthmic region to place radiopaque markers on the aorta. The cadavers were inverted for testing. Clinically relevant TRA was observed in seven of the tests. Peak average longitudinal Lagrange strain was 0.644, with the average peak for all tests being 0.208 +/- 0.216. Peak intraluminal pressure of 165 kPa was recorded. Longitudinal stretch of the aorta was found to be a principal component of injury causation. Stretch of the aorta was generated by thoracic deformation, which is required for injury to occur. The presence of atherosclerosis was demonstrated to promote injury. The isthmus of the aorta moved dorsocranially during frontal impact and submarining loading modes. The aortic isthmus moved medially and anteriorly during impact to the left side. The results of this study provide a better understanding of the mechanisms associated with TRA, and can be used for the validation of finite element models developed for the examination and prediction of TRA.

  9. Influence of bone volume fraction and architecture on computed large-deformation failure mechanisms in human trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Bevill, Grant; Eswaran, Senthil K; Gupta, Atul; Papadopoulos, Panayiotis; Keaveny, Tony M

    2006-12-01

    Large-deformation bending and buckling have long been proposed as failure mechanisms by which the strength of trabecular bone can be affected disproportionately to changes in bone density, and thus may represent an important aspect of bone quality. We sought here to quantify the contribution of large-deformation failure mechanisms on strength, to determine the dependence of these effects on bone volume fraction and architecture, and to confirm that the inclusion of large-deformation effects in high-resolution finite element models improves predictions of strength versus experiment. Micro-CT-based finite element models having uniform hard tissue material properties were created from 54 cores of human trabecular bone taken from four anatomic sites (age = 70+/-11; 24 male, 27 female donors), which were subsequently biomechanically tested to failure. Strength predictions were made from the models first including, then excluding, large-deformation failure mechanisms, both for compressive and tensile load cases. As expected, strength predictions versus experimental data for the large-deformation finite element models were significantly improved (p < 0.001) relative to the small deformation models in both tension and compression. Below a volume fraction of about 0.20, large-deformation failure mechanisms decreased trabecular strength from 5-80% for compressive loading, while effects were negligible above this volume fraction. Step-wise nonlinear multiple regression revealed that structure model index (SMI) and volume fraction (BV/TV) were significant predictors of these reductions in strength (R2 = 0.83, p < 0.03). Even so, some low-density specimens having nearly identical volume fraction and SMI exhibited up to fivefold differences in strength reduction. We conclude that within very low-density bone, the potentially important biomechanical effect of large-deformation failure mechanisms on trabecular bone strength is highly heterogeneous and is not well explained by

  10. Detection and Analysis of Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation and Relations with the Active Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, M.; Saroli, M.; Lancia, M.; Albano, M.; Lo Sardo, L.; Stramondo, S.

    2015-12-01

    Modern geomorphological investigations focused on the definition of major factors conditioning the landscape evolution. The interaction of some of these factors as the litho-structural setting, the local relief, the tectonic activity, the climatic conditions and the seismicity plays a key-role in determining large scale slope instability phenomena which display the general morphological features of deep seated gravitational deformations (DSGD). The present work aims to detect the large scale gravitational deformation and relations with the active tectonics affecting the Abruzzo Region and to provide a description of the morphologic features of the deformations by means of aerial photograph interpretation, geological/geomorphological field surveys and DInSAR data. The investigated areas are morphologically characterized by significant elevation changes due to the presence of high mountain peaks, separated from surrounding depressed areas by steep escarpments, frequently represented by active faults. Consequently, relief energy favours the development of gravity-driven deformations. These deformations seem to be superimposed on and influenced by the inherited structural and tectonic pattern, related to the sin- and post-thrusting evolution. The morphological evidences of these phenomena, are represented by landslides, sackungen or rock-flows, lateral spreads and block slides. DInSAR analysis measured deformation of the large scale gravitative phenomena previously identified through aerial-photo analysis. DSGD may evolve in rapid, catastrophic mass movements and this paroxistic evolution of the deformations may be triggered by high magnitude seismic events. These assumptions point out the great importance of mapping in detail large scale slope instability phenomena in relation to the active faults, in a perspective of land-use planning such as the Abruzzo Region characterized by a high magnitude historical seismicity.

  11. High temperature deformation and fracture mechanisms in a dendritic Ni[sub 3]Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.K.; Earthman, J.C. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    The mechanisms that control high temperature deformation and rupture were studied in a Ni[sub 3]Al alloy that was thermo-mechanically treated to produce a non-porous dendritic grain structure. Comparisons of data corresponding to the dendritic grain morphology with that for the equiaxed grain structures indicate that the dendritic morphology results in significantly lower creep rates as well as substantially greater times to rupture. Comparison of the data with numerical calculations suggests that this difference in creep strength is due to an inherent resistance to grain boundary sliding by the dendritic grain structure. A constrained cavity growth model was adapted based on microstructural observations to account for cavitation within the dendritic microstructure. The success of the model indicates that rupture time is primarily determined by constrained cavity growth on isolated dendrite boundary segments.

  12. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-01-01

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675–1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m0.5. Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications. PMID:26503706

  13. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-10-27

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675-1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m(0.5). Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications.

  14. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-10-01

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675-1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m0.5. Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications.

  15. Strong equivalence principle in polymer quantum mechanics and deformed Heisenberg algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajuri, Nirmalya

    2016-10-01

    The strong equivalence principle (SEP) states that the description of a physical system in a gravitational field is indistinguishable from the description of the same system at rest in an accelerating frame. While this statement holds true in both general relativity and ordinary quantum mechanics, one expects it to fail when quantum gravity corrections are taken into account. In this paper we investigate the possible failure of the SEP in two quantum gravity inspired modifications of quantum mechanics—polymer quantum mechanics and deformed Heisenberg algebra. We find that the SEP fails to hold in both these theories. We estimate the deviation from SEP and find in both cases that it is too small to be measured in present day experiments.

  16. Mechanical properties and constitutive relations for tantalum and tantalum alloys under high-rate deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III; Bingert, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    Tantalum and its alloys have received increased interest as a model bcc metal and for defense-related applications. The stress-strain behavior of several tantalums, possessing varied compositions and manufacturing histories, and tantalum alloyed with tungsten, was investigated as a function of temperature from {minus}196 C to 1,000 C, and strain rate from 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} to 8,000 s{sup {minus}1}. The yield stress for all the Ta-materials was found to be sensitive to the test temperature, the impurity and solute contents; however, the strain hardening remained very similar for various ``pure`` tantalums but increased with alloying. Powder-metallurgy (P/M) tantalum with various levels of oxygen content produced via different processing paths was also investigated. Similar mechanical properties compared to conventionally processed tantalums were achieved in the P/M Ta. This data suggests that the frequently observed inhomogeneities in the mechanical behavior of tantalum inherited from conventional processes can be overcome. Constitutive relations based upon the Johnson-Cook, the Zerilli-Armstrong, and the Mechanical Threshold Stress models were evaluated for all the Ta-based materials. Parameters were also fit for these models to a tantalum-bar material. Flow stresses of a Ta bar stock subjected to a large-strain deformation of {var_epsilon} = 1.85 via multiple upset forging were obtained. The capabilities and limitations of each model for large-strain applications are examined. The deformation mechanisms controlling high-rate plasticity in tantalum are revisited.

  17. Reversible cyclic deformation mechanism of gold nanowires by twinning-detwinning transition evidenced from in situ TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Subin; Im, Jiseong; Yoo, Youngdong; Bitzek, Erik; Kiener, Daniel; Richter, Gunther; Kim, Bongsoo; Oh, Sang Ho

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical response of metal nanowires has recently attracted a lot of interest due to their ultra-high strengths and unique deformation behaviours. Atomistic simulations have predicted that face-centered cubic metal nanowires deform in different modes depending on the orientation between wire axis and loading direction. Here we report, by combination of in situ transmission electron microscopy and molecular dynamic simulation, the conditions under which particular deformation mechanisms take place during the uniaxial loading of [110]-oriented Au nanowires. Furthermore, by performing cyclic uniaxial loading, we show reversible plastic deformation by twinning and consecutive detwinning in tension and compression, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulations rationalize the observed behaviours in terms of the orientation-dependent resolved shear stress on the leading and trailing partial dislocations, their potential nucleation sites and energy barriers. This reversible twinning-detwinning process accommodates large strains that can be beneficially utilized in applications requiring high ductility in addition to ultra-high strength.

  18. Geophysical analysis of rock glacier internal structure and implications for deformation mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florentine, C. E.; Skidmore, M. L.; Speece, M. A.; Link, C. A.; Locke, W. W.; Carr, C. G.; Shaw, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    invoked to explain either a direct connection between individual transverse ridges to sub-surface structures or a specific structural regime. Our passive roof duplex faulting interpretation of GPR data at the LPRG is consistent with findings from previous studies on the internal composition and structure of rock glaciers and thus provides a testable model for improved understanding of rock glacier deformation mechanics.

  19. Dynamic deformation measurement and analysis of active stressed lap using optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qican; Su, Xianyu; Liu, Yuankun; Xiang, Liqun

    2007-12-01

    The active stressed lap is the heart of polishing process. A novel non-contact optical method of dynamic deformation measurement and analysis of an active stressed lap is put forward. This method, based on structured illumination, is able to record full-field information of the bending and rotating stressed lap dynamically and continuously, while its profile is changed under computer control, and restore the whole process of lap deformation varied with time at different position and rotating angle. It has been verified by experiments that this proposed method will be helpful to the opticians to ensure the stressed lap as expected.

  20. Deformation mechanisms in granodiorite at effective pressures to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Bauer, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Deformation mechanisms in room-dry and water-saturated specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, shortened at 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective pressures (Pe) to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting (less than or equal to 1050/sup 0/C) are documented with a view toward providing criteria to recognize and characterize the deformation for geological and engienering applications. Above 800/sup 0/C strength decreases dramatically at effective pressures greater than or equal to 50 MPa and water-weakening reduces strength an additional 30 to 40% at Pe = 100 MPa. Strains at failure are only 0.1 to 2.2% with macroscopic ductility (within this range) increasing as the effective pressures are increased and in wet versus dry tests. Shattering (multiple faulting) gives way to faulting along a single zone to failure without macroscopic faulting as ductility increases. Microscopically, cataclasis (extension microfracturing and thermal cracking with rigid-body motions) predominates at all conditions. Dislocation gliding contributes little to the strain. Precursive extension microfractures coalesce to produce the throughgoing faults with gouge zones exhibiting possible Riedel shears. Incipient melting, particularly in wet tests, produces a distinctive texture along feldspar grain boundaries that suggests a grain-boundary-softening effect contributes to the weakening. In addition, it is demonstrated that the presence of water does not lead to more microfractures, but to a reduction in the stresses required to initiate and propagate them.

  1. Insights from the Lattice-Strain Evolution on Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic-Glass-Matrix Composites

    DOE PAGES

    Jia, Haoling; Zheng, Lili; Li, Weidong; ...

    2015-02-18

    In this paper, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and micromechanics-based finite element simulations have been conducted to examine the lattice-strain evolution in metallic-glass-matrix composites (MGMCs) with dendritic crystalline phases dispersed in the metallic-glass matrix. Significant plastic deformation can be observed prior to failure from the macroscopic stress–strain curves in these MGMCs. The entire lattice-strain evolution curves can be divided into elastic–elastic (denoting deformation behavior of matrix and inclusion, respectively), elastic–plastic, and plastic–plastic stages. Characteristics of these three stages are governed by the constitutive laws of the two phases (modeled by free-volume theory and crystal plasticity) and geometric informationmore » (crystalline phase morphology and distribution). The load-partitioning mechanisms have been revealed among various crystalline orientations and between the two phases, as determined by slip strain fields in crystalline phase and by strain localizations in matrix. Finally, implications on ductility enhancement of MGMCs are also discussed.« less

  2. Insights from the Lattice-Strain Evolution on Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic-Glass-Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Haoling; Zheng, Lili; Li, Weidong; Li, Nan; Qiao, Junwei; Wang, Gongyao; Ren, Yang; Liaw, Peter K.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-02-18

    In this paper, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and micromechanics-based finite element simulations have been conducted to examine the lattice-strain evolution in metallic-glass-matrix composites (MGMCs) with dendritic crystalline phases dispersed in the metallic-glass matrix. Significant plastic deformation can be observed prior to failure from the macroscopic stress–strain curves in these MGMCs. The entire lattice-strain evolution curves can be divided into elastic–elastic (denoting deformation behavior of matrix and inclusion, respectively), elastic–plastic, and plastic–plastic stages. Characteristics of these three stages are governed by the constitutive laws of the two phases (modeled by free-volume theory and crystal plasticity) and geometric information (crystalline phase morphology and distribution). The load-partitioning mechanisms have been revealed among various crystalline orientations and between the two phases, as determined by slip strain fields in crystalline phase and by strain localizations in matrix. Finally, implications on ductility enhancement of MGMCs are also discussed.

  3. On the Bonding Mechanism in Cold Spray of Deformable hex-BN-Ni Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshastehriz, M.; Smid, I.; Segall, A. E.; Eden, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    Bond strength and the lubrication potential of coatings made of 7 µm Hexagonal Boron Nitride particles encapsulated with nickel (hBN-Ni), and deposited onto aluminum 6061 substrates via cold spray were examined; for all tests, N2 was used as the carrier gas at a temperature of 480 °C and pressure of 2.4 MPa. Results showed significant improvement in both wear resistance and reduced surface friction. Coated samples also demonstrated unexpected high bond strength, which was much greater than pure nickel cold sprayed onto aluminum. However, while the results were truly promising, the primary reason for the observed high bond strength could not be explained using existing cold spray theories which were primarily developed for pure metal particles. Based on the present findings compared to cold-sprayed layers of composite nickel-nickel (nickel particles encapsulated with nickel), a mechanism for bonding of hBN-Ni particles to aluminum based on the level of plastic deformation and hardenability is proposed. Indeed, the high bond strength between the coating and substrate is related to the relatively high initial ductility of the nickel encapsulation, compliance of the hBN, as well as the ensuing significant plastic deformation of the composite particles during cold spray deposition.

  4. Deformation and failure of single- and multi-phase silicate liquids: seismic precursors and mechanical work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Wassermann, Joachim; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2013-04-01

    Along with many others, volcanic unrest is regarded as a catastrophic material failure phenomenon and is often preceded by diverse precursory signals. Although a volcanic system intrinsically behave in a non-linear and stochastic way, these precursors display systematic evolutionary trends to upcoming eruptions. Seismic signals in particular are in general dramatically increasing prior to an eruption and have been extensively reported to show accelerating rates through time, as well as in the laboratory before failure of rock samples. At the lab-scale, acoustic emissions (AE) are high frequency transient stress waves used to track fracture initiation and propagation inside a rock sample. Synthesized glass samples featuring a range of porosities (0 - 30%) and natural rock samples from volcán de Colima, Mexico, have been failed under high temperature uniaxial compression experiments at constant stresses and strain rates. Using the monitored AEs and the generated mechanical work during deformation, we investigated the evolutionary trends of energy patterns associated to different degrees of heterogeneity. We observed that the failure of dense, poorly porous glasses is achieved by exceeding elevated strength and thus requires a significant accumulation of strain, meaning only pervasive small-scale cracking is occurring. More porous glasses as well as volcanic samples need much lower applied stress and deformation to fail, as fractures are nucleating, propagating and coalescing into localized large-scale cracks, taking the advantage of the existence of numerous defects (voids for glasses, voids and crystals for volcanic rocks). These observations demonstrate that the mechanical work generated through cracking is efficiently distributed inside denser and more homogeneous samples, as underlined by the overall lower AE energy released during experiments. In contrast, the quicker and larger AE energy released during the loading of heterogeneous samples shows that the

  5. Mechanical and statistical aspects of brittle faulting: From coseismic rupture to cumulative deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Scott Jay

    This dissertation is focused on answering fundamental problems in extensional tectonics at Valles Marineris and Tempe Terra, two regions of Mars that have characteristics similar to continental rifts on Earth. Three-dimensional displacement-length scaling relations for terrestrial earthquakes are also investigated because they provide the underlying physical basis for the analyses of extensional tectonics on Mars. Motivated by conflicting interpretations of the origin of blunt terminations of troughs at Valles Marineris, I investigate the reactivation of pre-existing cross faults in response to stress changes associated with slippage along a major, basin bounding normal fault (i.e., border fault). Observations from the Valles Marineris are consistent with model predictions, and are suggestive of a new sequence of deformation that accounts for the formation of blunt-trough terminations during the major phase of extension: coeval and locally bi-directional extension, that results from local stress field changes associated with border fault growth in a dominantly unidirectional remote strain field. These results indicate that irregular closed troughs at Valles Marineris are better interpreted as grabens rather than collapse depressions. Rates of deformation at Tempe Terra are estimated through an analysis of fault population statistics, which incorporates fault segment linkage and utilizes displacement-length relationships from exposed normal faults in this region. Deformation remained localized within the Tempe Rift throughout much of Martian history, with moment rates, strain rates, and rifting velocities comparable to stable plate interiors of Earth. This indicates that either the timing of deformation on Mars is poorly constrained or, less likely, rates are significantly slower than on Earth. Strike-slip earthquake source parameters, including slip distribution characteristics, are compared with predictions of a three-dimensional fracture mechanics model of

  6. Microstructure and mechanical properties of halite/coarse muscovite synthetic aggregates deformed in torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, F. O.; Burlini, L.; Burg, J.-P.

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the behavior of a synthetic two-phase aggregate composed of 80% halite + 20% coarse muscovite under torsion deformation, at 100, 200 and 300 °C, a confining pressure of 250 MPa, and a constant strain rate of 3E-4 s -1. At all temperatures, the two-phase aggregate deformed homogeneously at the sample scale. The strength of the aggregate and muscovite deformation depended on temperature, strain rate and initial orientation of muscovite greatest dimension relative to the shear plane. With muscovite initially parallel to the shear plane, halite flowed plastically and long muscovite grains were not strong enough to behave as a rigid inclusion rotating in a ductile matrix. Instead, high aspect ratio grains deformed by folding, which was visibly accomplished by slip along mica {001} cleavage and by great flattening of halite in the core of the folds. When initially normal to the shear plane, high aspect ratio muscovite grains passively rotated towards the shear plane. In both cases, small and low aspect ratio muscovite grains behaved mostly as mica-fish, with mica grains tilted opposite to shear sense. Similarly to natural mylonites, σ-porphyroclast systems and rolling structures were also common in the microstructure. A strong foliation made of halite ribbons and aligned muscovite flakes rapidly developed but did not make the composite aggregate weaker when compared with single-phase halite. Comparison with synthetic aggregates of single-phase halite shows that the two-phase aggregate was much stronger than single-phase halite in all cases. Comparison with a synthetic aggregate with calcite porphyroclasts shows that the strength of the aggregate with muscovite at 100 °C was lower below a strain of ca. 2.6 and higher beyond this value, and that the aggregate with calcite was stronger at 200 °C. Strain rate stepping tests (1E-5 s -1-2E-3 s -1) indicate that the two-phase aggregate behaved as power-law viscous, with stress exponents of ca. 12 and 10 at

  7. Microearthquake activity, lithospheric structure, and deformation modes at an amagmatic ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera

    2016-07-01

    While nascent oceanic lithosphere at slow to fast spreading mid-ocean ridges (MOR) is relatively well studied, much less is known about the lithospheric structure and properties at ultraslow MORs. Here we present microearthquake data from a 1 year ocean bottom seismometer deployment at the amagmatic, oblique supersegment of the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. A refraction seismic experiment was performed to constrain upper lithosphere P-velocities and results were used to construct a 1D velocity model for earthquake location. Earthquake foci were located individually and subsequently relocated relative to each other to sharpen the image of seismically active structures. Frequent earthquake activity extends to 31 km beneath the seafloor, indicating an exceptionally thick brittle lithosphere and an undulating brittle-ductile transition that implies significant variations in the along-axis thermal structure of the lithosphere. We observe a strong relation between petrology, microseismicity distribution, and topography along the ridge axis: Peridotite-dominated areas associate with deepest hypocenters, vast volumes of lithosphere that deforms aseismically as a consequence of alteration, and the deepest axial rift valley. Areas of basalt exposure correspond to shallower hypocenters, shallower and more rugged axial seafloor. Focal mechanisms deviate from pure extension and are spatially variable. Earthquakes form an undulating band of background seismicity and do not delineate discrete detachment faults as common on slow spreading ridges. Instead, the seismicity band sharply terminates to the south, immediately beneath the rift boundary. Considering the deep alteration, large steep boundary faults might be present but are entirely aseismic.

  8. Influence of interfacial interactions on deformation mechanism and interface viscosity in α-chitin-calcite interfaces.

    PubMed

    Qu, Tao; Verma, Devendra; Alucozai, Milad; Tomar, Vikas

    2015-10-01

    The interfaces between organic and inorganic phases in natural materials have a significant effect on their mechanical properties. This work presents a quantification of the interface stress as a function of interface chemical changes (water, organic molecules) in chitin-calcite (CHI-CAL) interfaces using classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations. NEMD is used to investigate interface stress as a function of applied strain based on the virial stress formulation. SMD is used to understand interface separation mechanism and to calculate interfacial shear stress based on a viscoplastic interfacial sliding model. Analyses indicate that interfacial shear stress combined with shear viscosity can result in variations to the mechanical properties of the examined interfacial material systems. It is further verified with Kelvin-Voigt and Maxwell viscoelastic analytical models representing viscous interfaces and outer matrix. Further analyses show that overall mechanical deformation depends on maximization of interface shear strength in such materials. This work establishes lower and upper bounds of interface strength in the interfaces examined.

  9. Some contributions to the high strain rate deformation of solids and the thermally activated deformation of wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, W. George

    2009-08-01

    The behaviour of metals as a function of rate of loading, strain rate, and temperature is discussed in terms of previous work by the author. Strain rates range from 10-3 s-1, obtained in a standard tensile testing machine, to 102 s-1 obtained in a hydraulic piston driven machine and up to 104 s-1, very high strain rates with a Kolsky split Hopkinson bar using shear type loading. At rates less 103 s-1 the strength is a function of strain rate and temperature, is thermally activated and governed by the stress-assisted thermal activation of dislocations across short-range barriers in the crystal. At very high strain rates however the behaviour is controlled by interaction of dislocations with either phonons or electrons, giving a strength proportional to strain rate. The compressive strength of small clear samples of wood, Pinus radiata and Kahikatea, determined over the strain rate range 10-3 s-1 to 103 s-1 as a function of strain rate, temperature and moisture content shows the behaviour to again be thermally activated with the strength a function of stain rate, temperature and moisture content. A rate theory of deformation is developed where the yield behaviour of wood is assumed to result from the stress-assisted thermally activated motion of elementary fibrils over short-range barriers. The moisture is assumed to affect the bond energy between elementary fibrils and the barrier energy is taken to be a linear decreasing function of increasing moisture content and the moisture to act like a plasticiser in separating the elementary fibrils. The theory more than adequately explains the observed behaviour.

  10. Deformation mechanisms, defects, heat treatment, and thermal conductivity in large grain niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, Thomas R. Kang, Di Baars, Derek C.; Chandrasekaran, Saravan; Mapar, Aboozar Wright, Neil T.; Ciovati, Gianluigi Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Pourboghrat, Farhang; Murphy, James E.; Compton, Chris C.

    2015-12-04

    The physical and mechanical metallurgy underlying fabrication of large grain cavities for superconducting radio frequency accelerators is summarized, based on research of 1) grain orientations in ingots, 2) a metallurgical assessment of processing a large grain single cell cavity and a tube, 3) assessment of slip behavior of single crystal tensile samples extracted from a high purity ingot slice before and after annealing at 800 °C / 2 h, 4) development of crystal plasticity models based upon the single crystal experiments, and 5) assessment of how thermal conductivity is affected by strain, heat treatment, and exposure to hydrogen. Because of the large grains, the plastic anisotropy of deformation is exaggerated, and heterogeneous strains and localized defects are present to a much greater degree than expected in polycrystalline material, making it highly desirable to computationally anticipate potential forming problems before manufacturing cavities.

  11. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model to Predict Kink-Band Propagation Using Deformation Gradient Tensor Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    A new model is proposed that represents the kinematics of kink-band formation and propagation within the framework of a mesoscale continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model. The model uses the recently proposed deformation gradient decomposition approach to represent a kink band as a displacement jump via a cohesive interface that is embedded in an elastic bulk material. The model is capable of representing the combination of matrix failure in the frame of a misaligned fiber and instability due to shear nonlinearity. In contrast to conventional linear or bilinear strain softening laws used in most mesoscale CDM models for longitudinal compression, the constitutive response of the proposed model includes features predicted by detailed micromechanical models. These features include: 1) the rotational kinematics of the kink band, 2) an instability when the peak load is reached, and 3) a nonzero plateau stress under large strains.

  12. Directionally tunable and mechanically deformable ferroelectric crystals from rotating polar globular ionic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Jun; Shimojo, Takafumi; Oyamaguchi, Hideaki; Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Satomi, Koichiro; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Kawamata, Jun; Inabe, Tamotsu

    2016-10-01

    Ferroelectrics are used in a wide range of applications, including memory elements, capacitors and sensors. Recently, molecular ferroelectric crystals have attracted interest as viable alternatives to conventional ceramic ferroelectrics because of their solution processability and lack of toxicity. Here we show that a class of molecular compounds—known as plastic crystals—can exhibit ferroelectricity if the constituents are judiciously chosen from polar ionic molecules. The intrinsic features of plastic crystals, for example, the rotational motion of molecules and phase transitions with lattice-symmetry changes, provide the crystals with unique ferroelectric properties relative to those of conventional molecular crystals. This allows a flexible alteration of the polarization axis direction in a grown crystal by applying an electric field. Owing to the tunable nature of the crystal orientation, together with mechanical deformability, this type of molecular crystal represents an attractive functional material that could find use in a diverse range of applications.

  13. Deformation mechanisms, defects, heat treatment, and thermal conductivity in large grain niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, Thomas R.; Kang, Di; Baars, Derek C.; Chandrasekaran, Saravan; Mapar, Aboozar; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Wright, Neil T.; Pourboghrat, Farhang; Murphy, James E.; Compton, Chris C.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-12-01

    The physical and mechanical metallurgy underlying fabrication of large grain cavities for superconducting radio frequency accelerators is summarized, based on research of 1) grain orientations in ingots, 2) a metallurgical assessment of processing a large grain single cell cavity and a tube, 3) assessment of slip behavior of single crystal tensile samples extracted from a high purity ingot slice before and after annealing at 800 °C / 2 h, 4) development of crystal plasticity models based upon the single crystal experiments, and 5) assessment of how thermal conductivity is affected by strain, heat treatment, and exposure to hydrogen. Because of the large grains, the plastic anisotropy of deformation is exaggerated, and heterogeneous strains and localized defects are present to a much greater degree than expected in polycrystalline material, making it highly desirable to computationally anticipate potential forming problems before manufacturing cavities.

  14. Wrinkle ridge-upland scarp transitions: Implications for the mechanical properties of the deformed materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watters, Thomas R.; Tuttle, Michael J.; Simpson, Debra

    1991-01-01

    Wrinkle ridge-upland scarp transitions are structures that occur at the contact between smooth plains material and highlands or uplands materials on the Moon and Mars. In the smooth plains material the structures have a morphology typical of wrinkle ridges, interpreted to be the result of a combination of folding and thrust faulting. Where the structures extend into the uplands, a distinct change in the morphology occurs. The generally asymmetric cross sectional geometry characteristics of wrinkle ridges becomes that of a one-sided, often lobate scarp. The scarp is indistinguishable from other highland/upland scarps, interpreted to be the result of reverse or thrust faulting. Although these structures are rare, they provide important insight into the mechanical properties of deformed materials. These insights are discussed.

  15. Metastable alloy materials produced by solid state reaction of compacted, mechanically deformed mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Atzmon, M.; Johnson, W.L.; Verhoeven, J.D.

    1987-02-03

    Bulk metastable, amorphous or fine crystalline alloy materials are produced by reacting cold-worked, mechanically deformed filamentary precursors such as metal powder mixtures or intercalated metal foils. Cold-working consolidates the metals, increases the interfacial area, lowers the free energy for reaction, and reduces at least one characteristic dimension of the metals. For example, the grains of powder or the sheets of foil are clad in a container to form a disc. The disc is cold-rolled between the nip of rollers to form a flattened disc. The grains are further elongated by further rolling to form a very thin sheet of a lamellar filamentary structure containing filaments having a thickness of less than 0.01 microns. Thus, diffusion distance and time for reaction are substantially reduced when the flattened foil is thermally treated in oven to form a composite sheet containing metastable material dispersed in unreacted polycrystalline material. 4 figs.

  16. Extreme variability of deformation mechanisms at tiny scale in natural peridotite: the effect of phase distribution and mineral reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, M. A.; Reddy, S.; Vonlanthen, P.

    2015-12-01

    concentration of [010] axes perpendicular to foliation plane with other axes forming girdles within the foliation plane suggesting axial [010] deformation. During mantle exhumation the mineral distribution and proportion, the fluid percolation and the mineralogical reaction lead to the activation of variable deformation mechanisms at mm or cm scale.

  17. How stress and temperature conditions affect rock-fluid chemistry and mechanical deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nermoen, Anders; Korsnes, Reidar; Aursjø, Olav; Madland, Merete; Kjørslevik, Trygve Alexander; Østensen, Geir

    2016-02-01

    We report the results from a series of chalk flow-through-compaction experiments performed at three effective stresses (0.5 MPa, 3.5 MPa and 12.3 MPa) and two temperatures (92° and and 130°). The results show that both stress and temperature are important to both chemical alteration and mechanical deformation. The experiments were conducted on cores drilled from the same block of outcrop chalks from the Obourg quarry within the Saint Vast formation (Mons, Belgium). The pore pressure was kept at 0.7 MPa for all experiments with a continuous flow of 0.219 M MgCl2 brine at a constant flow rate; 1 original pore volume (PV) per day. The experiments have been performed in tri-axial cells with independent control of the external stress (hydraulic pressure in the confining oil), pore pressure, temperature, and the injected flow rate. Each experiment consists of two phases; a loading phase where stress-strain dependencies are investigated (approx. 2 days), and a creep phase that lasts for more than 150-160 days. During creep, the axial deformation was logged, and the effluent samples were collected for ion chromatography analyses. Any difference between the injected and produced water chemistry gives insight into the rock-fluid interactions that occur during flow through of the core. The observed effluent concentration shows a reduction in Mg2+, while the Ca2+ concentration is increased. This, together with SEM-EDS analysis, indicates that magnesium-bearing mineral phases are precipitated leading to dissolution of calcite, an observation . This is in-line with other flow-through experiments reported earlier. The observed dissolution and precipitation are sensitive to the effective stress and test temperature. Typically. H, higher stress and temperature lead to increased concentration differences of Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentration changes.. The observed strain can be partitioned additively into a mechanical and chemical driven component.

  18. Activity of platelet hemostasis in children with spinal deformities.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, I N; Lapshina, E V; Zavalishina, S Yu

    2010-10-01

    An increase of adhesion and aggregation functions of platelets in vivo and in vitro was detected in 5-6-year-old children with scoliosis. These disorders were caused by hyperproduction of von Willebrand's factor in the vascular wall and intensification of thromboxane production in blood platelets. Activation of thromboxane formation is the main cause of platelet hyperactivity in children with scoliosis. Correction of platelet hemostasis may include pathogenetically substantiated complex of therapeutic exercises, swimming, and massage.

  19. Room temperature deformation mechanisms of alumina particles observed from in situ micro-compression and atomistic simulations.

    DOE PAGES

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay D.; ...

    2015-09-22

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containingmore » numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. As a result, the identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.« less

  20. Room temperature deformation mechanisms of alumina particles observed from in situ micro-compression and atomistic simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2015-09-22

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containing numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. As a result, the identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.

  1. The mechanisms of driving lithospheric deformation in India-Asia collision zone: a perspective from 3-D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianfeng; Kaus, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of intraplate deformation remains incompletely understood by plate tectonics theory. The India-Asia collision zone is the largest present-day example of continental collision, which makes it an ideal location to study the processes of continental deformation. Existing models of lithospheric deformation are typically quasi two-dimensional and often assume that the lithosphere is a thin viscous sheet, which deforms homogeneously as a result of the collision, or flows above a partially molten lower crust, which explains the exhumation of Himalayan units and lateral spreading of Tibetan plateau. An opposing view is that most deformation localize in shear zones separating less deformed blocks, requiring the lithosphere to have an elasto-plastic rather than a viscous rheology. In order to distinguish which model best fits the observations we develop a 3-D visco-elasto-plastic model, which can model both distributed and highly localized deformation. In our preliminary result, most of the large-scale strike-slips faults including Altyn-Tagh fault, Xianshuihe fault, Red-River fault, Sagaing fault and Jiali fault can be simulated. The topography is consistent with observations that flat plateau in central Tibet and steep, abrupt margins adjacent to Sichuan basin, and gradual topography in southeast Tibet. These models suggest that the localized large-scale strike-slip faults accommodate the continental deformation. These results show the importance of a weak lower crust and topographic effects, as well as the effect of rheology and temperature structure of the lithosphere on the deformation patterns.

  2. Time-dependent deformation behavior of polyvinylidene fluoride binder: Implications on the mechanics of composite electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santimetaneedol, Arnuparp; Tripuraneni, Rajasekhar; Chester, Shawn A.; Nadimpalli, Siva P. V.

    2016-11-01

    The majority of existing battery models that simulate composite electrode behavior assume the binder as a linear elastic material due to lack of a thorough understanding of time-dependent mechanical behavior of binders. Here, thin films of polyvinylidene fluoride binder, prepared according to commercial battery manufacturing method, are subjected to standard monotonic, load-unload, and relaxation tests to characterize the time-dependent mechanical behavior. The strain in the binder samples is measured with the digital image correlation technique to eliminate experimental errors. The experimental data showed that for (charging/discharging) time scales of practical importance, polyvinylidene fluoride behaves more like an elastic-viscoplastic material as opposed to a visco-elastic material; based on this observation, a simple elastic-viscoplastic model, calibrated against the data is adopted to represent the deformation behavior of binder in a Si-based composite electrode; the lithiation/delithiation process of this composite was simulated at different C rates and the stress/strain behavior was monitored. It is observed that the linear elastic assumption of the binder leads to inaccurate results and the time-dependent constitutive behavior of the binder not only leads to accurate prediction of the mechanics but is an essential step towards developing advanced multi-physics models for simulating the degradation behavior of batteries.

  3. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    PubMed Central

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71–4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain. PMID:26898475

  4. Mechanical characterization of the P56 mouse brain under large-deformation dynamic indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacManus, David B.; Pierrat, Baptiste; Murphy, Jeremiah G.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2016-02-01

    The brain is a complex organ made up of many different functional and structural regions consisting of different types of cells such as neurons and glia, as well as complex anatomical geometries. It is hypothesized that the different regions of the brain exhibit significantly different mechanical properties, which may be attributed to the diversity of cells and anisotropy of neuronal fibers within individual brain regions. The regional dynamic mechanical properties of P56 mouse brain tissue in vitro and in situ at velocities of 0.71–4.28 mm/s, up to a deformation of 70 μm are presented and discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. The experimental data obtained from micro-indentation measurements were fit to three hyperelastic material models using the inverse Finite Element method. The cerebral cortex elicited a stiffer response than the cerebellum, thalamus, and medulla oblongata regions for all velocities. The thalamus was found to be the least sensitive to changes in velocity, and the medulla oblongata was most compliant. The results show that different regions of the mouse brain possess significantly different mechanical properties, and a significant difference also exists between the in vitro and in situ brain.

  5. Rate-dependent Mechanical Deformation Behavior of POSS-filled and Plasticized Poly(vinyl chloride).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soong, Sharon; Cohen, Robert; Boyce, Mary

    2006-03-01

    In different temperatures or strain-rate regimes, the rate sensitivities of polymers change as various primary and secondary molecular mobility mechanisms are accessed. Incorporating nanoparticles into the polymer matrix can potentially alter the molecular level structure and offers an opportunity to tailor the rate-dependent mechanical deformation behavior of the polymer. In this study, methacryl-POSS (C56H88O28Si8) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) were incorporated into poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) through melt blending. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis revealed that the incorporation of POSS in PVC plasticizes PVC and reduces both the alpha and beta transition temperatures. As for the PVC/DOP blends, while the alpha-transition temperatures were reduced, beta-motions vanishes with high DOP contents. The rate dependent yield behavior is characterized in compression testing. Zwick Mechine is used for low to moderate strain rate (0.0001 to 0.1/s) and Split Hopkinson Bar is used for high strain rate (500 to 2000/s). It was found that PVC with POSS shows a delay in yield strength rate-sensitivity transition. For PVC with higher DOP contents which show restricted beta-motions, the rate-sensitivity transition in yield stress faded away. Constitutive model used was able to predict the rate-sensitivity transitions in the compression yield behavior of PVC compounds.

  6. Elasticity of MoS2 Sheets by Mechanical Deformation Observed by in Situ Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    MoS2 has been the focus of extensive research due to its potential applications. More recently, the mechanical properties of MoS2 layers have raised interest due to applications in flexible electronics. In this article, we show in situ transmission electron microcsopy (TEM) observation of the mechanical response of a few layers of MoS2 to an external load. We used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip mounted on a TEM stage to induce deformation on nanosheets of MoS2 containing few layers. The results confirm the outstanding mechanical properties on the MoS2. The layers can be bent close to 180°. However, when the tip is retrieved the initial structure is recovered. Evidence indicates that there is a significant bond reconstruction during the bending with an outstanding capability to recover the initial bond structure. The results show that flexibility of three layers of MoS2 remains the same as a single layer while increasing the bending modulus by 3 orders of magnitude. Our findings are consistent with theoretical calculations and confirm the great potential of MoS2 for applications. PMID:25598860

  7. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of high strength magneisum alloys fabricated by deformation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansoor, Bilal

    The goal of this research was to develop high strength Mg by thermo-mechanical processing. Several novel techniques were developed to impart large plastic strains on Mg alloys and Mg based composites. The main emphasis of this work was on investigating the effect of different processing schemes on grain-refinement and texture modification of processed material. The room-temperature and elevated-temperature mechanical behavior of processed-Mg was studied in detail. Biaxial corrugated pressing, also known as alternate biaxial reverse corrugation processing was applied to twin-roll cast AZ31 Mg and warm-extruded ZK60 Mg. Friction stir processing to partial depths was applied to thixomolded AM60 Mg and warm-extruded ZK60 Mg. A new process called "bending reverse-bending", was developed and applied to hot rolled AZ31-H24 Mg. A Mg/Al laminated composite was developed by hot pressing and rolling. In processed condition, Mg alloys exhibit enhancement in room-temperature strength and ductility, as well as elevated temperature formability. It was concluded that improvement in mechanical properties of processed-Mg is strongly influenced by grain size and precipitates; while ductility largely depends on resulting deformation textures.

  8. Deformation Mechanics of Quartz at a Single Asperity under Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakku, S.; Beeler, N. M.; Hickman, S.; Evans, B.

    2009-12-01

    Pressure Solution is a naturally occurring deformation process in fluid-bearing rocks, with implications for sediment consolidation rates and deformation in the mid to upper crust. The process involves dissolution at asperities under load; diffusion along grain-to-grain contacts; and precipitation in the pore space. The kinetics of the process and the identity of the rate-limiting step in quartzose rocks are still a subject of debate and depend critically upon the structure of the intergranular boundary during deformation. To investigate the mechanisms and kinetics of pressure solution and the effects of changes in boundary morphology, we continuously monitored deformation and the evolution of boundary morphology at a Y-cut convex quartz lens that was pressed against a flat surface of Y-cut quartz under hydrothermal conditions in a see-through optical pressure vessel. Several different boundary morphologies were used, including polished flats, etched and roughened flats, and an island-channel structure fabricated by plasma etching. The island-channel structure had square pillars of quartz, either 4 or 8 μm on a side, surrounded by an interconnected grid of open channels of comparable width. This geometry introduces stress concentrations within the overall intergranular contact region and dramatically reduces the diffusional path length within the solid-to-solid contact region from that present with polished, flat surfaces. The samples are loaded using quartz weights in an externally heated pressure vessel and relative motion between the quartz flat and lens is monitored using optical interferometry. Contact spot radius ranged from 25 μm to 60 μm and the mean effective normal stress at the contact ranged from 800 MPa to 150 MPa. The experiments were run, on an average, for 400 hours at 425°C and 150 MPa fluid pressure. The pore fluid was de-ionized water, which became saturated with quartz during the initial heat-up period. Deformation at the interface between

  9. A deformable lung tumor tracking method in fluoroscopic video using active shape models: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianyi; Hamilton, Russell J; Schowengerdt, Robert A; Jiang, Steve B

    2007-09-07

    A dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) can be used to track a moving target during radiotherapy. One of the major benefits for DMLC tumor tracking is that, in addition to the compensation for tumor translational motion, DMLC can also change the aperture shape to conform to a deforming tumor projection in the beam's eye view. This paper presents a method that can track a deforming lung tumor in fluoroscopic video using active shape models (ASM) (Cootes et al 1995 Comput. Vis. Image Underst. 61 38-59). The method was evaluated by comparing tracking results against tumor projection contours manually edited by an expert observer. The evaluation shows the feasibility of using this method for precise tracking of lung tumors with deformation, which is important for DMLC-based real-time tumor tracking.

  10. Active range of motion outcomes after reconstruction of burned wrist and hand deformities.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed M; Mahboub, Tarek A; Ibrahim Fouad, Amr; Azari, Kodi; Khalil, Haitham H; McCarthy, James E

    2016-06-01

    This works aim is to evaluate the efficacy of skin grafts and flaps in reconstruction of post-burn hand and wrist deformities. A prospective study of 57 burn contractures of the wrist and dorsum of the hand was performed. Flaps were used only if there was a non-vascularized structure after contracture release, otherwise a skin graft was used. Active range of motion (ROM) was used to assess hand function. The extension deformity cohort uniformly underwent skin graft following contracture release with a mean improvement of 71 degrees (p<0.0001). The flexion deformity cohort was treated with either skin grafts (8 patients) or flaps (9 patients) with a mean improvement of 44 degrees (p<0.0001). Skin grafts suffice for dorsal hand contractures to restore functional wrist ROM. For flexion contractures, flaps were more likely for contractures >6 months. Early release of burn contracture is advisable to avoid deep structure contracture.

  11. Study on fatigue damage characteristics of deformable mirrors under thermal-mechanical coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lixia; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Nianchun

    2016-11-01

    In a wavefront correction process, both the mechanical effect and the irradiation of a high-power continuous-wave laser distort the deformable mirror (DM) surface, which inevitably speeds up the fatigue damage of the DM. By utilizing the stress analysis model for the fatigue damage of the DM, the fatigue damage effects are analyzed quantitatively on the consideration of thermal-mechanical coupling effects, and the fatigue life prediction model has further been proposed based on the S-N curve and Miner cumulative damage theory. On this basis, thermal-mechanical conditions have been analyzed, and the influence of laser parameters on the fatigue life of the DM has also been discussed in detail. The results indicate that the increasing of maximum temperature rise of the DM leads to the increasing of stress, and further brings about the decreasing of the fatigue life. Meanwhile, the position at the rear surface of the DM subjected to the maximum stress always presents the minimum fatigue life. Furthermore, the laser irradiation makes the DM more easily damaged when the DM is correcting a distorted wavefront, and the fatigue life decreases with the increasing of irradiation time and power density for a given peak and valley (PV) value of the corrected wavefront. Additionally, the fatigue life also decreases with the increasing of power density and the decreasing of spot radius for a certain total irradiation. On the other hand, for the given laser parameters, the influence of the mechanical effect on fatigue life is gradually apparent with increasing PV value of the corrected wavefront, and when the PV value is more than 2λ, the mechanical effect instead of the thermal effect becomes the key factor for fatigue damage of the DM.

  12. Mechanical and structural aspects of high-strain-rate deformation of NiTi alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragov, A. M.; Danilov, A. N.; Konstantinov, A. Yu.; Lomunov, A. K.; Motorin, A. S.; Razov, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of the binary polycrystalline NiTi alloy with a quasi-equilibrium structure has been considered in the course of the high-strain-rate extension in a temperature range of 20-300°C. The quasi-equilibrium structure, which is necessary to ensure the long-term stability of special properties of the alloy, was achieved using aging, after which both the forward and reverse martensitic transformations exhibited a multistage character and the phase composition at room temperature was characterized by the presence of R and B19' martensites. To separate the contributions that come from the equilibrium structure and from the high rate of tension to the mechanical behavior of the alloy, a comparative analysis of the diagrams of high-strain-rate and quasi-static tension has been performed. It has been shown that the action of several mechanisms of reversible deformation is determined by the specific features of the equilibrium structure, and the level of stresses at which these mechanisms are developed is controlled by the rate of tension. The results of the X-ray diffraction study of the phase composition of the alloy samples after high-strain-rate tension, which make it possible to conclude that the mechanical behavior of martensite and austenite upon the dynamic tension of the alloy is determined by the development of stress-induced R → B19', B2 → R, and B2 → B19' transformations and by the processes of the detwinning and reorientation of crystals of B19' martensite, are given.

  13. Earthquake relocations, crustal rheology, and active deformation in the central-eastern Alps (N Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, Alfio; Scafidi, Davide; Ranalli, Giorgio; Martin, Silvana; Della Vedova, Bruno; Spallarossa, Daniele

    2015-10-01

    A revised seismic catalogue (1994-2007) for the central-eastern Alps (N Italy) is presented. 396 earthquake relocations, for local magnitudes in the 1.2-5.3 range, are performed using a 3D crustal velocity structure and probabilistic locations. The location procedure is validated by computing a set of 41 quarry shot solutions and all the results, both about shots and seismic events, are compared with those obtained using the routine location procedure. Results are shown for five contiguous seismotectonic domains, as supported by geological and geophysical evidence (e.g., fault systems, crustal tomography, focal mechanisms types). Earthquake hypocentres are mostly located in the upper crust (0-15 km of depth), in good agreement with thermo-rheological models about the brittle-ductile transitions (8-9 km of depth) and total crustal strengths (1.0-2.0 TN m- 1). Epicentres are clustered and/or aligned along present-day active geological structures. The proposed seismotectonic model shows dominant compression along the Giudicarie and Belluno-Bassano-Montello thrusts, with strain partitioning along the dominant right-lateral strike-slip faults of the Schio-Vicenza domain. The present-day deformation of the Southern Alps and the internal Alpine chain is compatible with Adria indentation and the related crustal stress distribution.

  14. Deformation of the Calabrian Arc subduction complex and its relation to STEP activity at depth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonia, Alina; Wortel, Rinus; Nijholt, Nicolai; Govers, Rob; Torelli, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Propagating tear faults at the edge of subducted slabs ("Subduction transform edge propagator", STEP) are an intrinsic part of lithospheric plate dynamics. The surface expression of a STEP is generally not known yet, and is expected to vary significantly from one region to the other. We choose the Sicily -Calabria-Ionian Sea region, of which the lithosphere-upper mantle structure has the characteristics of a STEP zone, as a study area. The area has a very prominent accretionary wedge, the formation and subsequent deformation of which presumably were affected by the STEP activity at depth. In this contribution, we use seismic data on the near surface structure and deformation in combination with numerical model results to investigate the relation between deep STEP activity and near surface expression. Prominent features in the surface tectonics are the Malta escarpment (with predominantly normal faulting), the newly identified Ionian Fault and Alfeo-Etna fault system, and a distinct longitudinal division of the wedge into a western and an eastern lobe (Polonia et al., Tectonics, 2011). The two lobes are characterized by different structural style, deformation rates and basal detachment depths. Numerical model results indicate that the regional lithospheric structure, such as the orientation of the eastern passive (albeit subsequently activated) margin of Sicily relative to the Calabrian subduction zone, has a profound effect on possible fault activity along the Malta escarpment. Fault activity along the above primary fault structures may have varied in time, implying the possibility of intermittent activity. Interpreting seismicity in the context of a possible STEP, and the accompanying deformation zone at or near the surface, is not (yet) straightforward. Although direct evidence for recognizing all aspects of STEP activity is - as usual - lacking, a comparison with two well-known STEP regions, the northern part of the Tonga subduction zone and southern part of the

  15. P-T conditions of deformation: A key to understand the mechanical behavior of a thrust fault (Monte perdido thrust fault, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, B.; Buatier, M.; Leclère, H.; Fabbri, O.; Labaume, P.

    2011-12-01

    mechanisms are occuring. During the first step of deformation, the Monte Perdido Thrust Fault activation is facilitated by incremental shear surface reactivation following a fluid pressure cycle. Pressure solution processes triggered a calcite departure from host sediments to veins increasing the relative insoluble clay minerals content. Furthermore, during the second stage of deformation chlorite precipitates along shear surfaces. As a result, the host rock frictional coefficient decreased from 0.65 to 0.25. Consequently, the increase of phyllosilicates acts as a fault weakening mechanism, facilitating stable creeping deformation.

  16. Statistical model for the mechanical behavior of the tissue engineering non-woven fibrous matrices under large deformation.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Mohd Suhail; Pal, Anupam

    2014-09-01

    The fibrous matrices are widely used as scaffolds for the regeneration of load-bearing tissues due to their structural and mechanical similarities with the fibrous components of the extracellular matrix. These scaffolds not only provide the appropriate microenvironment for the residing cells but also act as medium for the transmission of the mechanical stimuli, essential for the tissue regeneration, from macroscopic scale of the scaffolds to the microscopic scale of cells. The requirement of the mechanical loading for the tissue regeneration requires the fibrous scaffolds to be able to sustain the complex three-dimensional mechanical loading conditions. In order to gain insight into the mechanical behavior of the fibrous matrices under large amount of elongation as well as shear, a statistical model has been formulated to study the macroscopic mechanical behavior of the electrospun fibrous matrix and the transmission of the mechanical stimuli from scaffolds to the cells via the constituting fibers. The study establishes the load-deformation relationships for the fibrous matrices for different structural parameters. It also quantifies the changes in the fiber arrangement and tension generated in the fibers with the deformation of the matrix. The model reveals that the tension generated in the fibers on matrix deformation is not homogeneous and hence the cells located in different regions of the fibrous scaffold might experience different mechanical stimuli. The mechanical response of fibrous matrices was also found to be dependent on the aspect ratio of the matrix. Therefore, the model establishes a structure-mechanics interdependence of the fibrous matrices under large deformation, which can be utilized in identifying the appropriate structure and external mechanical loading conditions for the regeneration of load-bearing tissues.

  17. High temperature deformation mechanisms of L12-containing Co-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Michael Shaw

    Ni-based superalloys have been used as the structural material of choice for high temperature applications in gas turbine engines since the 1940s, but their operating temperature is becoming limited by their melting temperature (Tm =1300degrees C). Despite decades of research, no viable alternatives to Ni-based superalloys have been discovered and developed. However, in 2006, a ternary gamma' phase was discovered in the Co-Al-W system that enabled a new class of Co-based superalloys to be developed. These new Co-based superalloys possess a gamma-gamma' microstructure that is nearly identical to Ni-based superalloys, which enables these superalloys to achieve extraordinary high temperature mechanical properties. Furthermore, Co-based alloys possess the added benefit of exhibiting a melting temperature of at least 100degrees C higher than commercial Ni-based superalloys. Superalloys used as the structural materials in high pressure turbine blades must withstand large thermomechanical stresses imparted from the rotating disk and hot, corrosive gases present. These stresses induce time-dependent plastic deformation, which is commonly known as creep, and new superalloys must possess adequate creep resistance over a broad range of temperature in order to be used as the structural materials for high pressure turbine blades. For these reasons, this research focuses on quantifying high temperature creep properties of new gamma'-containing Co-based superalloys and identifying the high temperature creep deformation mechanisms. The high temperature creep properties of new Co- and CoNi-based alloys were found to be comparable to Ni-based superalloys with respect to minimum creep rates and creep-rupture lives at 900degrees C up to the solvus temperature of the gamma' phase. Co-based alloys exhibited a propensity for extended superlattice stacking fault formation in the gamma' precipitates resulting from dislocation shearing events. When Ni was added to the Co-based compositions

  18. Molecular and nanostructural mechanisms of deformation, strength and toughness of spider silk fibrils.

    PubMed

    Nova, Andrea; Keten, Sinan; Pugno, Nicola M; Redaelli, Alberto; Buehler, Markus J

    2010-07-14

    Spider dragline silk is one of the strongest, most extensible and toughest biological materials known, exceeding the properties of many engineered materials including steel. Silk features a hierarchical architecture where highly organized, densely H-bonded beta-sheet nanocrystals are arranged within a semiamorphous protein matrix consisting of 3(1)-helices and beta-turn protein structures. By using a bottom-up molecular-based approach, here we develop the first spider silk mesoscale model, bridging the scales from Angstroms to tens to potentially hundreds of nanometers. We demonstrate that the specific nanoscale combination of a crystalline phase and a semiamorphous matrix is crucial to achieve the unique properties of silks. Our results reveal that the superior mechanical properties of spider silk can be explained solely by structural effects, where the geometric confinement of beta-sheet nanocrystals, combined with highly extensible semiamorphous domains, is the key to reach great strength and great toughness, despite the dominance of mechanically inferior chemical interactions such as H-bonding. Our model directly shows that semiamorphous regions govern the silk behavior at small deformation, unraveling first when silk is being stretched and leading to the large extensibility of the material. Conversely, beta-sheet nanocrystals play a significant role in defining the mechanical behavior of silk at large-deformation. In particular, the ultimate tensile strength of silk is controlled by the strength of beta-sheet nanocrystals, which is directly related to their size, where small beta-sheet nanocrystals are crucial to reach outstanding levels of strength and toughness. Our results and mechanistic insight directly explain recent experimental results, where it was shown that a significant change in the strength and toughness of silk can be achieved solely by tuning the size of beta-sheet nanocrystals. Our findings help to unveil the material design strategy that

  19. Chemopreventive activity of sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) from yacon against TPA-induced Raji cells deformation.

    PubMed

    Siriwan, D; Miyawaki, C; Miyamoto, T; Naruse, T; Okazaki, K; Tamura, H

    2011-05-15

    Yacon is a medicinal plant used as a traditional medicine by the natives in South America. In Japan, it becomes popular as a health food. Sesquiterpene Lactones (SLs) from yacon leaves were investigated and the active SLs such as enhydrin, uvedalin and sonchifolin, bearing alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone and epoxides as the active functional groups, were identified by 1H-6000 MHz-NMR. Chemopreventive and cytotoxic activities were determined using different primary screening methods. In this study, all tested SLs strongly inhibited TPA-induced deformed of Raji cells. The IC50 values of yacon SLs from anti-deforming assay were 0.04-0.4 microM. Interestingly, yacon SLs showed more potential of chemo preventive activity than both curcumin and parthenolide. However, the cytotoxicity on Raji cells was observed at high concentration of yacon SLs. The degree of anti-deformation was ranked in order: enhydrin >uvedalin >sonchifolin >parthenolide >curcumin. As according to structure-activity relationship, the high activities of enhydrin, uvedalin and sonchifolin may be due to the 2-methyl-2-butenoate and its epoxide moiety.

  20. Microstructures, deformation mechanisms and seismic properties of a Palaeoproterozoic shear zone: The Mertz shear zone, East-Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarque, Gaëlle; Bascou, Jérôme; Maurice, Claire; Cottin, Jean-Yves; Riel, Nicolas; Ménot, René-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    The Mertz shear zone (MSZ) is a lithospheric scale structure that recorded mid-crustal deformation during the 1.7 Ga orogeny. We performed a microstructural and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) study of samples from both mylonites and tectonic boudins that constitute relics of the Terre Adélie Craton (TAC). The deformation is highly accommodated in the MSZ by anastomosed shear bands, which become more scattered elsewhere in the TAC. Most of the MSZ amphibolite-facies mylonites display similar CPO, thermal conditions, intensity of deformation and dominant shear strain. Preserved granulite-facies boudins show both coaxial and non-coaxial strains related to the previous 2.45 Ga event. This former deformation is more penetrative and less localized and shows a deformation gradient, later affected by a major phase of recrystallization during retrogression at 2.42 Ga. Both MSZ samples and granulite-facies tectonic boudins present microstructures that reflect a variety of deformation mechanisms associated with the rock creep that induce contrasted CPO of minerals (quartz, feldspar, biotite, amphibole and orthopyroxene). In particular, we highlight the development of an "uncommon" CPO in orthopyroxene from weakly deformed samples characterized by (010)-planes oriented parallel to the foliation plane, [001]-axes parallel to the stretching lineation and clustering of [100]-axes near the Y structural direction. Lastly, we computed the seismic properties of the amphibolite and granulite facies rocks in the MSZ area in order to evaluate the contribution of the deformed intermediate and lower continental crust to the seismic anisotropy recorded above the MSZ. Our results reveal that (i) the low content of amphibole and biotite in the rock formations of the TAC, and (ii) the interactions between the CPO of the different mineralogical phases, generate a seismically isotropic crust. Thus, the seismic anisotropy recorded by the seismic stations of the TAC, including the

  1. The deformation and acoustic emission of aluminum-magnesium alloy under non-isothermal thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, S. V.; Plotnikov, V. A.; Lysikov, M. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The following study investigates the deformation behavior and acoustic emission in aluminum-magnesium alloy under conditions of non-isothermal thermo-mechanical loading. The accumulation of deformation in the alloy, in conditions of change from room temperature to 500°C, occurs in two temperature intervals (I, II), characterized by different rates of deformation. The rate of deformation accumulation is correlated with acoustic emission. With load increasing in cycles from 40 to 200 MPa, the value of the boundary temperature (Tb) between intervals I and II changes non-monotonically. In cycles with load up to 90 MPa, the Tb value increases, while an increase up to 200 MPa makes Tb shift toward lower temperatures. This suggests that the shift of boundaries in the region of low temperatures and the appearance of high-amplitude pulses of acoustic emission characterize the decrease of the magnitude of thermal fluctuations with increasing mechanical load, leading to the rupture of interatomic bonds in an elementary deformation act.

  2. The deformation and acoustic emission of aluminum-magnesium alloy under non-isothermal thermo-mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, S. V.; Plotnikov, V. A. Lysikov, M. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-27

    The following study investigates the deformation behavior and acoustic emission in aluminum-magnesium alloy under conditions of non-isothermal thermo-mechanical loading. The accumulation of deformation in the alloy, in conditions of change from room temperature to 500°C, occurs in two temperature intervals (I, II), characterized by different rates of deformation. The rate of deformation accumulation is correlated with acoustic emission. With load increasing in cycles from 40 to 200 MPa, the value of the boundary temperature (T{sub b}) between intervals I and II changes non-monotonically. In cycles with load up to 90 MPa, the T{sub b} value increases, while an increase up to 200 MPa makes T{sub b} shift toward lower temperatures. This suggests that the shift of boundaries in the region of low temperatures and the appearance of high-amplitude pulses of acoustic emission characterize the decrease of the magnitude of thermal fluctuations with increasing mechanical load, leading to the rupture of interatomic bonds in an elementary deformation act.

  3. Biomaterials-Based Strategies for the Engineering of Mechanically Active Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhixiang; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-01-01

    Load-bearing, mechanically active tissues are routinely subjected to non-linear mechanical deformations. Consequently, these tissues exhibit complex mechanical properties and unique tissue organizations. Successful engineering of mechanically active tissues relies on the integration of the mechanical sensing mechanism found in the native tissues into polymeric scaffolds. Intelligent biomaterials that closely mimic the structural organizations and multi-scale responsiveness of the natural extracellular matrices (ECM), when strategically combined with multipotent cells and dynamic culture devices that generate physiologically relevant physical forces, will lead to the creation of artificial tissues that are mechanically robust and biologically functional. PMID:25250199

  4. Deformation mechanisms in advanced structural ceramics due to indentation and scratch processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipankar

    Plasma pressure compaction technique was used to develop boron carbide (B4C) and zirconium diboride-silicon carbide (ZrB2-SiC) composite. B4C ceramics are extensively used as body armor in military and civilian applications, and ZrB2-SiC composite has been recognized as a potential candidate for high-temperature aerospace applications. In this dissertation, processing parameters, quasistatic and high-strain rate mechanical response, and fundamental deformation mechanisms of these materials have been investigated. In the case of B4C, the rate sensitivity of indentation hardness was determined using a dynamic indentation hardness tester that can deliver loads in 100 micros. By comparing dynamic hardness with the static hardness, it was found that B4C exhibits a lower hardness at high-strain rate, contrary to known behavior in many structural ceramics. However, these results are consistent with the ballistic testing of B4C armors as reported in recent literature. This behavior was further investigated using a series of spectroscopic techniques such as visible and UV micro-Raman, photoluminescence and infrared. These studies not only confirmed that structural transformation occurred during indentation experiments similar to that in ballistic testing of B4C but also suggested a greater degree of structural changes under dynamic loading compared to static loading. Due to the potential application as external heat shields in supersonic vehicles, scratch studies were conducted on the ZrB2-SiC composite. These studies revealed metal-like slip-line patterns which are indeed an unusual in brittle solids at room-temperature. Utilizing classical stress field solutions under combined normal and tangential loads, a rationale was developed for understanding the formation of scratch-induced deformation features. Also, an analytical framework was developed, combining the concept of 'blister field' and the 'secular equation' relating Raman peaks to strain, to measure scratch

  5. Analysis of the thermo-mechanical deformations in a hot forging tool by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L-Cancelos, R.; Varas, F.; Martín, E.; Viéitez, I.

    2016-03-01

    Although programs have been developed for the design of tools for hot forging, its design is still largely based on the experience of the tool maker. This obliges to build some test matrices and correct their errors to minimize distortions in the forged piece. This phase prior to mass production consumes time and material resources, which makes the final product more expensive. The forging tools are usually constituted by various parts made of different grades of steel, which in turn have different mechanical properties and therefore suffer different degrees of strain. Furthermore, the tools used in the hot forging are exposed to a thermal field that also induces strain or stress based on the degree of confinement of the piece. Therefore, the mechanical behaviour of the assembly is determined by the contact between the different pieces. The numerical simulation allows to analyse different configurations and anticipate possible defects before tool making, thus, reducing the costs of this preliminary phase. In order to improve the dimensional quality of the manufactured parts, the work presented here focuses on the application of a numerical model to a hot forging manufacturing process in order to predict the areas of the forging die subjected to large deformations. The thermo-mechanical model developed and implemented with free software (Code-Aster) includes the strains of thermal origin, strains during forge impact and contact effects. The numerical results are validated with experimental measurements in a tooling set that produces forged crankshafts for the automotive industry. The numerical results show good agreement with the experimental tests. Thereby, a very useful tool for the design of tooling sets for hot forging is achieved.

  6. Characterization and modeling of mechanical behavior of single crystal titanium deformed by split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, B. M.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Trujillo, C. P.; Martinez, D. T.; Addessio, F. L.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Lookman, T.; Cerreta, E. K.

    2016-03-28

    Single crystal titanium samples were dynamically loaded using split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) and the resulting microstructures were examined. Characterization of the twins and dislocations present in the microstructure was conducted to understand the pathway for observed mechanical behavior. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to measure textures and quantify twinning. Microstructures were profusely twinned after loading, and twin variants and corresponding textures were different as a function of initial orientation. Focused ion beam (FIB) foils were created to analyze dislocation content using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Large amounts of dislocations were present, indicating that plasticity was achieved through slip and twinning together. Viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) modeling was used to confirm the complex order of operations during deformation. The activation of different mechanisms was highly dependent upon crystal orientation. For [0001] and View the MathML source[101¯1]-oriented crystals, compressive twinning was observed, followed by secondary tensile twinning. Furthermore, dislocations though prevalent in the microstructure, contributed to final texture far less than twinning.

  7. Characterization and modeling of mechanical behavior of single crystal titanium deformed by split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    DOE PAGES

    Morrow, B. M.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Trujillo, C. P.; ...

    2016-03-28

    Single crystal titanium samples were dynamically loaded using split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) and the resulting microstructures were examined. Characterization of the twins and dislocations present in the microstructure was conducted to understand the pathway for observed mechanical behavior. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to measure textures and quantify twinning. Microstructures were profusely twinned after loading, and twin variants and corresponding textures were different as a function of initial orientation. Focused ion beam (FIB) foils were created to analyze dislocation content using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Large amounts of dislocations were present, indicating that plasticity was achieved through slip andmore » twinning together. Viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) modeling was used to confirm the complex order of operations during deformation. The activation of different mechanisms was highly dependent upon crystal orientation. For [0001] and View the MathML source[101¯1]-oriented crystals, compressive twinning was observed, followed by secondary tensile twinning. Furthermore, dislocations though prevalent in the microstructure, contributed to final texture far less than twinning.« less

  8. Crustal deformation and volcanic earthquakes associated with the recent volcanic activity of Iwojima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, H.; Fujita, E.; Tanada, T.

    2013-12-01

    Iwojima is an active volcanic island located within a 10 km wide submarine caldera about 1250 km to the south of Tokyo, Japan. The seismometer and GPS network of National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) in Iwojima has observed a repeating island wide uplift more than 1 m associated with large number of volcanic earthquakes every several years. During 2006-2012, we observed more than 20000 volcanic earthquakes and an uplift of about 3 m, and precursory volcanic earthquakes and rapid crustal deformation just before the small submarine eruption near the northern coast of Iwojima in April 2012. In a restless volcano such as Iwojima, it is important issue to distinguish whether rapid crustal deformation and intense earthquake activity lead to an eruption or not. According to a long period geodetic observation by Ukawa et al. (2006), the crustal deformation of Iwojima can be classify into 2 phases. The first is an island wide large uplift centering on Motoyama area (the eastern part of the island, the center of the caldera), and the second is contraction and subsidence at local area centering on Motoyama and uplift around that area. They are interpreted by superposition of crustal deformations by a shallow contraction source and a deep seated inflation source beneath Motoyama. The earthquake activity of Iwojima highly correlates with the island wide large uplift, suggesting the earthquakes are almost controlled by a magma accumulation into a deep seated magma chamber. In contrast to the activity, the precursory activity of the eruption in 2012 is deviated from the correlation. The rapid crustal deformation just before and after the eruption in 2012 can be interpreted by rapid inflation and deflation of a shallow sill source about 1km deep, respectively, suggesting that it was caused by a shallow hydrothermal activity. The result shows that we can probably distinguish an abnormal activity related with a volcanic eruption when we observe

  9. Effects of deformation on microstructure and mechanical properties of a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sari, U. Kirindi, T.

    2008-07-15

    In Cu-11.92 wt.%Al-3.78 wt.%Ni shape memory alloy, the influence of deformation and thermal treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties under the compression test were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Experiments show that the mechanical properties of the alloy can be enhanced by convenient heat treatments. The alloy exhibits good mechanical properties with high ultimate compression strength and ductility after annealing at high temperature. However, it exhibits brittle fracture and dramatic strain hardening, with linear stress-strain behavior after annealing at low temperature. The changes in the mechanical properties have been linked to the evolution of the degree of order, occurrence of precipitation, and variation of the grain size. From microstructural observations, it is seen that the {beta}{sub 1}' (18R) and {gamma}{sub 1}' (2H) martensite phases coexist at different fractions in the undeformed and deformed states. Deformation induces the changes between the {beta}{sub 1}' and {gamma}{sub 1}' martensites and deformation-induced martensites form at preferred orientations as mechanical twins. The {beta}{sub 1}' martensite variants are twin-related with respect to the (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub 18R} mirror plane and a new orientation relationship for these twin variants is derived as (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub A}-parallel (1-bar 2-bar 8){sub C}: [4-bar 61] {sub A}-parallel [4-bar 61]{sub C}. Additionally, an increase in the amount of deformation causes martensite reorientation, de-twinning, and dislocation generation; also, the martensite plates are seen to have rearranged in the same orientation to be parallel with each other.

  10. Active deformation near the Nicoya Peninsula, northwestern Costa Rica, between 1996 and 2010: Interseismic megathrust coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lujia; Newman, Andrew V.; Protti, Marino; GonzáLez, VíCtor; Jiang, Yan; Dixon, Timothy H.

    2012-06-01

    We use campaign and continuous GPS measurements at 49 sites between 1996 and 2010 to describe the long-term active deformation in and near the Nicoya Peninsula, northwestern Costa Rica. The observed deformation reveals partial partitioning of the Cocos-Caribbean oblique convergence into trench-parallel forearc sliver motion and less oblique thrusting on the subduction interface. The northern Costa Rican forearc translates northwestward as a whole ridge block at 11 ± 1 mm/yr relative to the stable Caribbean. The transition from the forearc to the stable Caribbean occurs in a narrow deforming zone of ˜16 km wide. Subduction thrust earthquakes take 2/3 of the trench-parallel component of the plate convergence; however, surface deformation caused by interseismic megathrust coupling is primarily trench-normal. Two fully coupled patches, one located offshore Nicoya centered at ˜15 km depth and the other located inland centered at ˜24 km depth, are identified in Nicoya with the potential to generate an Mw 7.8 1950-type earthquake. Another fully coupled patch SE of Nicoya coincides with the rupture region of the 1990 Nicoya Gulf earthquake. Interface microearthquakes, non-volcanic tremor, low-frequency earthquakes, and transient slow-slip events generally occur in the intermediately to weakly coupled regions.

  11. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  12. Mechanical properties that influence antimicrobial peptide activity in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Marín-Medina, Nathaly; Ramírez, Diego Alejandro; Trier, Steve; Leidy, Chad

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small amphiphilic proteins found in animals and plants as essential components of the innate immune system and whose function is to control bacterial infectious activity. In order to accomplish their function, antimicrobial peptides use different mechanisms of action which have been deeply studied in view of their potential exploitation to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. One of the main mechanisms of action of these peptides is the disruption of the bacterial membrane through pore formation, which, in some cases, takes place via a monomer to oligomer cooperative transition. Previous studies have shown that lipid composition, and the presence of exogenous components, such as cholesterol in model membranes or carotenoids in bacteria, can affect the potency of distinct antimicrobial peptides. At the same time, considering the membrane as a two-dimensional material, it has been shown that membrane composition defines its mechanical properties which might be relevant in many membrane-related processes. Nevertheless, the correlation between the mechanical properties of the membrane and antimicrobial peptide potency has not been considered according to the importance it deserves. The relevance of these mechanical properties in membrane deformation due to peptide insertion is reviewed here for different types of pores in order to elucidate if indeed membrane composition affects antimicrobial peptide activity by modulation of the mechanical properties of the membrane. This would also provide a better understanding of the mechanisms used by bacteria to overcome antimicrobial peptide activity.

  13. Effect of the compaction platform on the densification parameters of tableting excipients with different deformation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rojas, John; Hernandez, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Several compaction models have been attempted to explain the compression and compaction phenomena of excipients. However, the resulting parameters could be influenced by the compaction platform such as dwell time, compact mass, geometry and type of material. The goal of this study is to assess the effect of these variables on the densification parameters obtained from key models such as Heckel, non-linear Heckel, Kawakita, Carstensen, and Leuenberger. The relationship among the parameters derived was determined by employing a Principal Component Analysis. Results indicated that factors such as compact geometry, consolidation time and compact mass had a negligible impact on parameters such as tensile strength, yield pressure and compressibility. On the contrary, the excipient type had the largest influence on these parameters. Further, the Leuenberger (γ) and Carstensen (f) parameters were highly correlated and related to the excipient deformation mechanism. Sorbitol and PVP-k30 were the most highly compactable excipients and were characterized for having a low yield pressure (P(y)), compressibility (a), and critical porosity (ε(c)). The magnitude of these parameters was highly dependent on the consolidation behavior of each material.

  14. Evaluation of the Mechanical Properties of AA 6063 Processed by Severe Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarlou, Davoud Mashhadi; Zalnezhad, Erfan; Hamouda, Abdelmagid Salem; Faraji, Ghader; Mardi, Noor Azizi Bin; Hassan Mohamed, Mohsen Abdelnaeim

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties, including surface hardness, tensile strength, fatigue, and fretting fatigue behavior of AA 6063 processed by equal channel angular pressing as the most efficient severe shear plastic deformation (SPD) technique, were investigated. Following the SPD process, samples were subjected to heat treatment (HT), hard anodizing (HA), and a combination of HT and HA. Rotating-bending fretting fatigue tests were performed to explore the samples' response to the fretting condition. From the experimental fatigue and fretting fatigue tests, it was apparent that the SPD treatment had a positive effect on enhancing the fatigue and fretting fatigue lives of the samples at low and high-cyclic loads compared with the HT technique by 78 and 67 pct, and 131 and 154 pct respectively. The results also indicate that the SPD + HT technique significantly increased the fatigue and fretting fatigue lives of the samples at high and low cycles by 15.56 and 8.33 pct, and 14.4 and 5.1 pct respectively, compared with the SPD method. HA of AA6063 increased the fatigue and fretting fatigue lives of SPD + HT-processed samples at low cycle by 15.5 and 18.4 pct respectively; however, at high cycle, HA had reverse effects, whereby the fatigue and fretting fatigue lives of SPD + HT-processed samples decreased by 16.7 and 30 pct, respectively.

  15. Metastable alloy materials produced by solid state reaction of compacted, mechanically deformed mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Atzmon, Michael; Johnson, William L.; Verhoeven, John D.

    1987-01-01

    Bulk metastable, amorphous or fine crystalline alloy materials are produced by reacting cold-worked, mechanically deformed filamentary precursors such as metal powder mixtures or intercalated metal foils. Cold-working consolidates the metals, increases the interfacial area, lowers the free energy for reaction, and reduces at least one characteristic dimension of the metals. For example, the grains (13) of powder or the sheets of foil are clad in a container (14) to form a disc (10). The disc (10) is cold-rolled between the nip (16) of rollers (18,20) to form a flattened disc (22). The grains (13) are further elongated by further rolling to form a very thin sheet (26) of a lamellar filamentary structure (FIG. 4) containing filaments having a thickness of less than 0.01 microns. Thus, diffusion distance and time for reaction are substantially reduced when the flattened foil (28) is thermally treated in oven (32) to form a composite sheet (33) containing metastable material (34) dispersed in unreacted polycrystalline material (36).

  16. Microstructural mechanisms of cyclic deformation, fatigue crack initiation and early crack growth.

    PubMed

    Mughrabi, Haël

    2015-03-28

    In this survey, the origin of fatigue crack initiation and damage evolution in different metallic materials is discussed with emphasis on the responsible microstructural mechanisms. After a historical introduction, the stages of cyclic deformation which precede the onset of fatigue damage are reviewed. Different types of cyclic slip irreversibilities in the bulk that eventually lead to the initiation of fatigue cracks are discussed. Examples of trans- and intercrystalline fatigue damage evolution in the low cycle, high cycle and ultrahigh cycle fatigue regimes in mono- and polycrystalline face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic metals and alloys and in different engineering materials are presented, and some microstructural models of fatigue crack initiation and early crack growth are discussed. The basic difficulties in defining the transition from the initiation to the growth of fatigue cracks are emphasized. In ultrahigh cycle fatigue at very low loading amplitudes, the initiation of fatigue cracks generally occupies a major fraction of fatigue life and is hence life controlling.

  17. Cyclic Deformation of Advanced High-Strength Steels: Mechanical Behavior and Microstructural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilditch, Timothy B.; Timokhina, Ilana B.; Robertson, Leigh T.; Pereloma, Elena V.; Hodgson, Peter D.

    2009-02-01

    The fatigue properties of multiphase steels are an important consideration in the automotive industry. The different microstructural phases present in these steels can influence the strain life and cyclic stabilized strength of the material due to the way in which these phases accommodate the applied cyclic strain. Fully reversed strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests have been used to determine the mechanical fatigue performance of a dual-phase (DP) 590 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) 780 steel, with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) used to examine the deformed microstructures. It is shown that the higher strain life and cyclic stabilized strength of the TRIP steel can be attributed to an increased yield strength. Despite the presence of significant levels of retained austenite in the TRIP steel, both steels exhibited similar cyclic softening behavior at a range of strain amplitudes due to comparable ferrite volume fractions and yielding characteristics. Both steels formed low-energy dislocation structures in the ferrite during cyclic straining.

  18. High Temperature Deformation Mechanism in Hierarchical and Single Precipitate Strengthened Ferritic Alloys by In Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Clausen, Bjørn; Zhang, Shu Yan; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2017-01-01

    The ferritic Fe-Cr-Ni-Al-Ti alloys strengthened by hierarchical-Ni2TiAl/NiAl or single-Ni2TiAl precipitates have been developed and received great attentions due to their superior creep resistance, as compared to conventional ferritic steels. Although the significant improvement of the creep resistance is achieved in the hierarchical-precipitate-strengthened ferritic alloy, the in-depth understanding of its high-temperature deformation mechanisms is essential to further optimize the microstructure and mechanical properties, and advance the development of the creep resistant materials. In the present study, in-situ neutron diffraction has been used to investigate the evolution of elastic strain of constitutive phases and their interactions, such as load-transfer/load-relaxation behavior between the precipitate and matrix, during tensile deformation and stress relaxation at 973 K, which provide the key features in understanding the governing deformation mechanisms. Crystal-plasticity finite-element simulations were employed to qualitatively compare the experimental evolution of the elastic strain during tensile deformation at 973 K. It was found that the coherent elastic strain field in the matrix, created by the lattice misfit between the matrix and precipitate phases for the hierarchical-precipitate-strengthened ferritic alloy, is effective in reducing the diffusional relaxation along the interface between the precipitate and matrix phases, which leads to the strong load-transfer capability from the matrix to precipitate. PMID:28387230

  19. Dolomite microstructures between 390° and 700 °C: Indications for deformation mechanisms and grain size evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Alfons; Ebert, Andreas; Ramseyer, Karl; Gnos, Edwin; Decrouez, Danielle

    2016-08-01

    Dolomitic marble on the island of Naxos was deformed at variable temperatures ranging from 390 °C to >700 °C. Microstructural investigations indicate two end-member of deformation mechanisms: (1) Diffusion creep processes associated with small grain sizes and weak or no CPO (crystallographic preferred orientation), whereas (2) dislocation creep processes are related with larger grain sizes and strong CPO. The change between these mechanisms depends on grain size and temperature. Therefore, sample with dislocation and diffusion creep microstructures and CPO occur at intermediate temperatures in relative pure dolomite samples. The measured dolomite grain size ranges from 3 to 940 μm. Grain sizes at Tmax >450 °C show an Arrhenius type evolution reflecting the stabilized grain size in deformed and relative pure dolomite. The stabilized grain size is five times smaller than that of calcite at the same temperature and shows the same Arrhenius-type evolution. In addition, the effect of second phase particle influences the grain size evolution, comparable with calcite. Calcite/dolomite mixtures are also characterized by the same difference in grain size, but recrystallization mechanism including chemical recrystallization induced by deformation may contribute to apparent non-temperature equilibrated Mg-content in calcite.

  20. About mechanisms of tetonic activity of the satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2003-04-01

    ABOUT MECHANISMS OF TECTONIC ACTIVITY OF THE SATELLITES Yu.V. Barkin Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow, Russia, barkin@sai.msu.ru Due to attraction of the central planet and others external bodies satellite is subjected by tidal and non-tidal deformations. Elastic energy is changed in dependence from mutual position and motion of celestial bodies and as result the tensional state of satellite and its tectonic (endogenous) activity also is changed. Satellites of the planets have the definite shell’s structure and due to own rotation these shells are characterized by different oblatenesses. Gravitational interaction of the satellite and its mother planet generates big additional mechanical forces (and moments) between the neighboring non-spherical shells of the satellite (mantle, core and crust). These forces and moments are cyclic functions of time, which are changed in the different time-scales. They generate corresponding cyclic perturbations of the tensional state of the shells, their deformations, small relative transnational displacements and slow rotation of the shells and others. In geological period of time it leads to a fundamental tectonic reconstruction of the body. Definite contribution to discussed phenomena are caused by classical tidal mechanism. of planet-satellite interaction. But in this report we discuss in first the new mechanisms of endogenous activity of celestial bodies. They are connected with differential gravitational attraction of non-spherical satellite shells by the external celestial bodies which leads: 1) to small relative rotation (nutations) of the shells; 2) to small relative translational motions of the shells (displacements of their center of mass); 3) to relative displacements and rotations of the shells due to eccentricity of their center of mass positions; 4) to viscous elastic deformations of the shells and oth. (Barkin, 2001). For higher evaluations of the power of satellite endogenous activities were obtained

  1. Mechanics, microstructure and AMS evolution of a synthetic porphyritic calcite aggregate deformed in torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, F. O.; Machek, M.; Roxerová, Z.; Burg, J.-P.; Almqvist, B. S. G.

    2015-08-01

    In order to investigate the mechanical, microstructural and AMS evolution of porphyritic mylonites, we made a synthetic aggregate composed of 70% fine calcite (< 50 μm) and 30% coarse calcite (200-700 μm), and deformed cylindrical specimens in torsion at 300 MPa, 727 °C, a constant strain rate of 3.0E- 4 s- 1, to shear strains γ ≈ 1 and 5. After peak stress, dynamic recrystallization of porphyroclasts resulted in grain size reduction and weakening till a mechanical steady state was reached. Microstructural, AMS and EBSD analyses show the consistent evolution of pre-torsion (cold-pressed) planar fabric from perpendicular to sample cylinder axis at γ ≈ 0, to oblique at γ ≈ 1, and finally to low angle to the shear plane at γ ≈ 5, as expected for approximate simple shear. At γ ≈ 1, stretched calcite grains > 3 mm in length defined a conspicuous foliation, and showed aligned twins. At γ ≈ 5, calcite porphyroclasts were highly stretched (aspect ratio around 20), and had rotated towards the shear plane. Between γ = 1 and 5, a composite fabric formed, one at low and the other at high angle to the shear plane, from which shear sense can be deduced. The AMS patterns were sensitive to increasing shearing, and tracked strain reasonably well, despite the reduced size and low susceptibility of specimens. From the CPO and the microstructure, we infer that a balance compatible with an optimal dissipation of the applied stress was achieved between grain growth and grain reduction processes.

  2. Mechanotransduction Mechanisms for Intraventricular Diastolic Vortex Forces and Myocardial Deformations: Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are fundamental in cardiac adaptations, remodeling, reverse remodeling, and disease. This 2-article series proposes that variable forces associated with diastolic RV/LV rotatory intraventricular flows can exert physiologically and clinically important, albeit still unappreciated, epigenetic actions influencing functional and morphological cardiac adaptations and/or maladaptations. Taken in-toto, the 2-part survey formulates a new paradigm in which intraventricular diastolic filling vortex-associated forces play a fundamental epigenetic role, and examines how heart cells react to these forces. The objective is to provide a perspective on vortical epigenetic effects, to introduce emerging ideas and suggest directions of multidisciplinary translational research. The main goal is to make pertinent biophysics and cytomechanical dynamic systems concepts accessible to interested translational and clinical cardiologists. I recognize that the diversity of the epigenetic problems can give rise to a diversity of approaches and multifaceted specialized research undertakings. Specificity may dominate the picture. However, I take a contrasting approach. Are there concepts that are central enough that they should be developed in some detail? Broadness competes with specificity. Would however this viewpoint allow for a more encompassing view that may otherwise be lost by generation of fragmented results? Part 1 serves as a general introduction, focusing on background concepts, on intracardiac vortex imaging methods, and on diastolic filling vortex-associated forces acting epigenetically on RV/LV endocardium and myocardium. Part 2 will describe pertinent available pluridisciplinary knowledge/research relating to mechanotransduction mechanisms for intraventricular diastolic vortex forces and myocardial deformations and to their epigenetic actions on myocardial and ventricular function and adaptations. PMID:25624114

  3. Magma emplacement mechanisms and syn-magmatic deformation - a new approach to the Knaben area in Vest Agder, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stormoen, Martin Austin; Slagstad, Trond; Henderson, Iain

    2014-05-01

    The Knaben area, known for its molybdenite mining, defines a N-S striking (~30 degrees dip towards the east) belt, consisting of porphyry granite with a varying density of amphibolite and varieties of deformed granite, lying within the Sirdal Magmatic Belt, is important for understanding the emplacement- and deformation mechanisms of the batholith. Detailed geological mapping combined with geochronology, geochemistry, and structural geology will be the focus areas. Last autumn's fieldwork indicated that several of the formerly mapped enclaves of amphibolite and deformed granite are more coherent then previously indicated, and some have been followed for a few kilometres. Several varieties of granite make up the area, mainly a dominating red porphyry granite, and a grey molybdenite-bearing finer grained granite. Structural investigations revealed consistent "top to the west" compressional kinematics on mappable shear zone networks often displaying west-directed duplex geometries. The Knaben area could possibly comprise a boundary between two individual plutons in the Sirdal Magmatic Belt, or a zone with remaining host rock. Geochronology of the eastern and western plutons will be done. Currently, largely different paleomagnetic vectors of the eastern and western porphyry granites indicate that they are separate plutons. Exploring how the emplacement- and deformation mechanisms have acted and are related, will be one of the main objectives. If the deformed granite is host rock, or syn- to post-magmatic deformed porphyry granite has been one of the major questions. A better understanding of the formation of the Knaben area, also regarding the emplacement of molybdenite, will prove useful for understanding the regional batholith, and possibly the possibility for molybdenite to occur elsewhere. The Sirdal Magmatic Belt, and also Knaben, seem to be of great value for studying magmatic processes.

  4. A High-Performance Deformable Mirror with Integrated Driver ASIC for Space Based Active Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Chris

    Direct imaging of exoplanets is key to fully understanding these systems through spectroscopy and astrometry. The primary impediment to direct imaging of exoplanets is the extremely high brightness ratio between the planet and its parent star. Direct imaging requires a technique for contrast suppression, which include coronagraphs, and nulling interferometers. Deformable mirrors (DMs) are essential to both of these techniques. With space missions in mind, Microscale is developing a novel DM with direct integration of DM and its electronic control functions in a single small envelope. The Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) is key to the shrinking of the electronic control functions to a size compatible with direct integration with the DM. Through a NASA SBIR project, Microscale, with JPL oversight, has successfully demonstrated a unique deformable mirror (DM) driver ASIC prototype based on an ultra-low power switch architecture. Microscale calls this the Switch-Mode ASIC, or SM-ASIC, and has characterized it for a key set of performance parameters, and has tested its operation with a variety of actuator loads, such as piezo stack and unimorph, and over a wide temperature range. These tests show the SM-ASIC's capability of supporting active optics in correcting aberrations of a telescope in space. Microscale has also developed DMs to go with the SM-ASIC driver. The latest DM version produced uses small piezo stack elements in an 8x8 array, bonded to a novel silicon facesheet structure fabricated monolithically into a polished mirror on one side and mechanical linkage posts that connect to the piezoelectric stack actuators on the other. In this Supporting Technology proposal we propose to further develop the ASIC-DM and have assembled a very capable team to do so. It will be led by JPL, which has considerable expertise with DMs used in Adaptive Optics systems, with high-contrast imaging systems for exoplanet missions, and with designing DM driver

  5. The Mechanics and Energetics of Soil Bioturbation by Plant Roots and Earthworms - Plastic Deformation Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Siul; Or, Dani; Schymanski, Stanislaus

    2014-05-01

    Soil structure plays a critical factor in the agricultural, hydrological and ecological functions of soils. These services are adversely impacted by soil compaction, a damage that could last for many years until functional structure is restored. An important class of soil structural restoration processes are related to biomechanical activity associated with burrowing of earthworms and root proliferation in impacted soil volumes. We study details of the mechanical processes and energetics associated with quantifying the rates and mechanical energy required for soil structural restoration. We first consider plastic cavity expansion to describe earthworm and plant root radial expansion under various conditions. We then use cone penetration models as analogues to wedging induced by root tip growth and worm locomotion. The associated mechanical stresses and strains determine the mechanical energy associated with bioturbation for different hydration conditions and root/earthworm geometries. Results illustrate a reduction in strain energy with increasing water content and trade-offs between pressure and energy investment for various root and earthworm geometries. The study provides the basic building blocks for estimating rates of soil structural alteration, the associated energetic requirements (soil carbon, plant assimilates) needed to sustain structure regeneration by earthworms and roots, and highlights potential mechanical cut-offs for such activities.

  6. The effect of mechanical deformation on magnetic properties and MRI artifacts of type 304 and type 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Bendel, L P; Shellock, F G; Steckel, M

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of composition and deformation of biomedical stainless steels on mechanical properties, magnetic properties, and MRI artifacts. Type 304 and Type 316L samples were prepared using standard wire-drawing techniques. Mechanical properties were determined using standard test methods. The amount of ferromagnetic phase present was estimated using a Severn Gage and x-ray diffraction. Magnetic field attraction and artifacts were determined using previously described techniques. The strength of both steels increased significantly with increasing deformation. None of the type 316L wires transformed to the magnetic phase. The amount of magnetic phase in the type 304 wires increased with increasing deformation. There was no magnetic field attraction, and artifacts were minimal for all of type 316L wires and the undeformed type 304 wire. Deflection and artifacts were significant for the deformed type 304 stainless steel. These results provide guidance regarding the use of type 304 and type 316L stainless steels for bioimplants. In this regard, type 316L stainless steel seems to be a more acceptable material with respect to MR compatibility.

  7. Confocal microscopy-based three-dimensional cell-specific modeling for large deformation analyses in cellular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Noa; Gefen, Amit

    2010-06-18

    This study introduces a new confocal microscopy-based three-dimensional cell-specific finite element (FE) modeling methodology for simulating cellular mechanics experiments involving large cell deformations. Three-dimensional FE models of undifferentiated skeletal muscle cells were developed by scanning C2C12 myoblasts using a confocal microscope, and then building FE model geometries from the z-stack images. Strain magnitudes and distributions in two cells were studied when the cells were subjected to compression and stretching, which are used in pressure ulcer and deep tissue injury research to induce large cell deformations. Localized plasma membrane and nuclear surface area (NSA) stretches were observed for both the cell compression and stretching simulation configurations. It was found that in order to induce large tensile strains (>5%) in the plasma membrane and NSA, one needs to apply more than approximately 15% of global cell deformation in cell compression tests, or more than approximately 3% of tensile strains in the elastic plate substrate in cell stretching experiments. Utilization of our modeling can substantially enrich experimental cellular mechanics studies in classic cell loading designs that typically involve large cell deformations, such as static and cyclic stretching, cell compression, micropipette aspiration, shear flow and hydrostatic pressure, by providing magnitudes and distributions of the localized cellular strains specific to each setup and cell type, which could then be associated with the applied stimuli.

  8. Effect of forging strain rate and deformation temperature on the mechanical properties of warm-worked 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, N. T.; Van Tyne, C. J.; Mataya, M. C.

    2010-01-25

    Stainless steel 304L forgings were produced with four different types of production forging equipment – hydraulic press, mechanical press, screw press, and high-energy rate forging (HERF). Each machine imparted a different nominal strain rate during the deformation. The final forgings were done at the warm working (low hot working) temperatures of 816 °C, 843°C, and 871°C. The objectives of the study were to characterize and understand the effect of industrial strain rates (i.e. processing equipment), and deformation temperature on the mechanical properties for the final component. Some of the components were produced with an anneal prior to the final forging while others were deformed without the anneal. The results indicate that lower strain rates produced lower strength and higher ductility components, but the lower strain rate processes were more sensitive to deformation temperature variation and resulted in more within-part property variation. The highest strain rate process, HERF, resulted in slightly lower yield strength due to internal heating. Lower processing temperatures increased strength, decreased ductility but decreased within-part property variation. The anneal prior to the final forging produced a decrease in strength, a small increase in ductility, and a small decrease of within-part property variation.

  9. The influence of metallic shell deformation on the contact mechanics of a ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Changdong; Wang, Ling; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty of ceramic-on-ceramic bearing combinations is increasingly used clinically. The majority of these implants are used with cementless fixation that a metal-backing shell is press-fitted into the pelvic bone. This usually results in the deformation of the metallic shell, which may also influence the ceramic liner deformation and consequently the contact mechanics between the liner and the femoral head under loading. The explicit dynamic finite element method was applied to model the implantation of a cementless ceramic-on-ceramic with a titanium shell and subsequently to investigate the effect of the metallic shell deformation on the contact mechanics. A total of three impacts were found to be necessary to seat the titanium alloy shell into the pelvic bone cavity with a 1 mm diameter interference and a 1.3 kg impactor at 4500 mm s(-1) velocity. The maximum deformation of the metallic shell was found to be 160 µm in the antero-superior and postero-inferior direction and 97 µm in the antero-inferior and postero-superior direction after the press-fit. The corresponding values were slightly reduced to 67 and 45 µm after the ceramic liner was inserted and then modified to 74 and 43 µm under loading, respectively. The maximum deformation and the maximum principal stress of the ceramic liner were 31 µm and 144 MPa (tensile stress), respectively, after it was inserted into the shell and further increased to 52 µm and 245 MPa under loading. This research highlights the importance of the press-fit of the metallic shell on the contact mechanics of the ceramic liner for ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasties and potential clinical performances.

  10. Structural ensembles of the north belt of Venus deformations and possible mechanisms of their formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markov, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    The author discusses structural formations in the northern deformation belt of Venus, studied according to the data of the radar pictures obtained with the Venera 15 and 16 probes. He shows that it consists of regions of compression with submeridional orientation, regions of displacement, extending in the sublatitudinal direction and individual slightly deformed blocks. He puts forward the hypothesis that the formation of these structures is related with horizontal movements in the mantle in the sublatitudinal direction.

  11. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  12. Soft sediment deformation structures in the Lixian lacustrine sediments, eastern Tibetan Plateau and implications for postglacial seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hanchao; Zhong, Ning; Li, Yanhao; Xu, Hongyan; Yang, Huili; Peng, Xiaoping

    2016-10-01

    The eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau is characterized by frequent earthquakes, which are closely associated with tectonic activity. To assess tectonic activity during the Late Pleistocene, we studied a well-exposed, 23-m-thick lacustrine sequence on the eastern margin of the plateau and found a variety of soft-sediment deformation (SSD) structures. Distributed in 24 stratigraphic levels, they comprise clastic dykes, ball-and-pillow structures, flame structures, clastic gravels, micro-faults, and slump folds. Most of the SSD structures indicate deformation mechanisms related to liquefaction and/or fluidization processes, most probably triggered by paleoseismic events. Given at least 4 historical earthquakes of M > 7 in the study area, most SSD structures in the Lixian lacustrine sequence indicate seismic events with M > 6 while simple flame structures point to some lower-magnitude earthquakes. OSL dating indicates that the sequence accumulated between 15.8 and 6.0 ka, giving a mean recurrence interval of 480 years for the 24 events, and demonstrating that lacustrine sediments in eastern Tibet have the potential to record a continuous seismic history on the centennial scale.

  13. Prior thermo-mechanical processing to modify structure and properties of severely deformed low carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrnik, J.; Lapovok, R.; Raab, G. I.

    2014-08-01

    The article focuses on the severe plastic deformation (SPD) of low carbon steel AISI 1010 performed at increased temperature. The grain refinement of ferrite structure is monitored and described with respect to different initial steel structure modified by thermal and thermomechanical (TM) treatment (TM) prior severe plastic deformation. The refinement of coarse initial ferrite structure with grain size in range of 30 - 50 gm resulted from solutioning was conducted then in two steps. Preliminary structure refinement has been achieved due to multistep open die forging process and quite uniform ferrite structure with grain size of the order of gm was obtained. The further grain refinement steel structure was then accomplished during warm Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP phi = 120°) at 300°C, introducing different strain in range of ɛef = 2.6 -4. The change of microstructure in dependence of the effective strain was evaluated by SEM and TEM study of thin foils. The high straining of steel resulted in extensive deformation of ferrite grains and formation of mixture of submicron grains structure in banded deformed structure with dense dislocation network and subgrains. The dynamic polygonization process, due to increased ECAP temperature, modified the submicrocrystalline structure formation. There was only indistinctive difference observed in structure refinement when considering different initial structure of steel. The tensile behaviour was characterized by strength increase followed by softening. None work hardening phenomenon appeared at tensile deformation of deformed bars.

  14. On the deformation mechanisms and electrical behavior of highly stretchable metallic interconnects on elastomer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafat, Yeasir; Dutta, Indranath; Panat, Rahul

    2016-09-01

    Flexible metallic interconnects are highly important in the emerging field of deformable/wearable electronics. In our previous work [Arafat et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 081906 (2015)], interconnect films of Indium metal, periodically bonded to an elastomer substrate using a thin discontinuous/cracked adhesion interlayer of Cr, were shown to sustain a linear strain of 80%-100% without failure during repeated cycling. In this paper, we investigate the mechanisms that allow such films to be stretched to a large strain without rupture along with strategies to prevent a deterioration in their electrical performance under high linear strain. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Digital Image Correlation are used to map the strain field of the Cr adhesion interlayer and the In interconnect film when the elastomer substrate is stretched. It is shown that the Cr interlayer morphology, consisting of islands separated by bi-axial cracks, accommodates the strain primarily by widening of the cracks between the islands along the tensile direction. This behavior is shown to cause the strain in the In interconnect film to be discontinuous and concentrated in bands perpendicular to the loading direction. This localization of strain at numerous periodically spaced locations preempts strain-localization at one location and makes the In film highly stretchable by delaying rupture. Finally, the elastic-plastic mismatch-driven wrinkling of the In interconnect upon release from first loading cycle is utilized to delay the onset of plasticity and allow the interconnect to be stretched repeatedly up to 25% linear strain in subsequent cycles without a deterioration of its electrical performance.

  15. Arterial Mechanical Motion Estimation Based on a Semi-Rigid Body Deformation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Pablo; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Ros, Rafael; Ros, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Arterial motion estimation in ultrasound (US) sequences is a hard task due to noise and discontinuities in the signal derived from US artifacts. Characterizing the mechanical properties of the artery is a promising novel imaging technique to diagnose various cardiovascular pathologies and a new way of obtaining relevant clinical information, such as determining the absence of dicrotic peak, estimating the Augmentation Index (AIx), the arterial pressure or the arterial stiffness. One of the advantages of using US imaging is the non-invasive nature of the technique unlike Intra Vascular Ultra Sound (IVUS) or angiography invasive techniques, plus the relative low cost of the US units. In this paper, we propose a semi rigid deformable method based on Soft Bodies dynamics realized by a hybrid motion approach based on cross-correlation and optical flow methods to quantify the elasticity of the artery. We evaluate and compare different techniques (for instance optical flow methods) on which our approach is based. The goal of this comparative study is to identify the best model to be used and the impact of the accuracy of these different stages in the proposed method. To this end, an exhaustive assessment has been conducted in order to decide which model is the most appropriate for registering the variation of the arterial diameter over time. Our experiments involved a total of 1620 evaluations within nine simulated sequences of 84 frames each and the estimation of four error metrics. We conclude that our proposed approach obtains approximately 2.5 times higher accuracy than conventional state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:24871987

  16. Analysis of Coupled Multiphase Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer and Mechanical Deformation at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect

    J. Rutqvist; C.F. Tsang; Y. Tsang

    2005-05-17

    A numerical simulation of coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transfer, and mechanical deformation was carried out to study coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test (DST) and for validation of a coupled THM numerical simulator. The ability of the numerical simulator to model relevant coupled THM processes at the DST was evaluated by comparison of numerical results to in situ measurements of temperature, water saturation, displacement, and fracture permeability. Of particular relevance for coupled THM processes are thermally induced rock-mass stress and deformations, with associated changes in fracture aperture and fractured rock permeability. Thermally induced rock-mass deformation and accompanying changes in fracture permeability were reasonably well predicted using a continuum elastic model, although some individual measurements of displacement and permeability indicate inelastic mechanical responses. It is concluded that fracture closure/opening caused by a change in thermally induced normal stress across fractures is an important mechanism for changes in intrinsic fracture permeability at the DST, whereas fracture shear dilation appears to be less significant. Observed and predicted maximum permeability changes at the DST are within one order of magnitude. These data are important for bounding model predictions of potential changes in rock-mass permeability at a future repository in Yucca Mountain.

  17. Removal of daytime thermal deformations in the GBT active surface via out-of-focus holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Mello, M.; Nikolic, B.; Mason, B.; Schwab, F.; Ghigo, F.; Dicker, S.

    2009-01-01

    The 100-m diameter Green Bank Telescope (GBT) was built with an active surface of 2209 actuators in order to achieve and maintain an accurate paraboloidal shape. While much of the large-scale gravitational deformation of the surface can be described by a finite element model, a significant uncompensated gravitational deformation exists. In recent years, the elevation-dependence of this residual deformation has been successfully measured during benign nighttime conditions using the out-of-focus (OOF) holography technique (Nikolic et al, 2007, A&A 465, 685). Parametrized by a set of Zernike polynomials, the OOF model correction was implemented into the active surface and has been applied during all high-frequency observations since Fall 2006, yielding a consistent gain curve that is flat with elevation. However, large-scale thermal deformation of the surface has remained a problem for daytime high-frequency observations. OOF holography maps taken throughout a clear winter day indicate that surface deformations become significant whenever the Sun is above 10 degrees elevation, but that they change slowly while tracking a single source. In this paper, we describe a further improvement to the GBT active surface that allows an observer to measure and compensate for the thermal surface deformation using the OOF technique. In order to support high-frequency observers, "AutoOOF" is a new GBT Astrid procedure that acquires a quick set of in-focus and out-of-focus on-the-fly continuum maps on a quasar using the currently active receiver. Upon completion of the maps, the data analysis software is launched automatically which produces and displays the surface map along with a set of Zernike coefficients. These coefficients are then sent to the active surface manager which combines them with the existing gravitational Zernike terms and FEM in order to compute the total active surface correction. The end-to-end functionality has been tested on the sky at Q-Band and Ka-band during

  18. Removal of daytime thermal deformations in the GBT active surface via out-of-focus holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Mello, M.; Nikolic, B.; Mason, B. S.; Schwab, F. R.; Ghigo, F. D.; Dicker, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    The 100-m diameter Green Bank Telescope (GBT) was built with an active surface of 2209 actuators in order to achieve and maintain an accurate paraboloidal shape. While much of the large-scale gravitational deformation of the surface can be described by a finite element model, a significant uncompensated gravitational deformation exists. In recent years, the elevation-dependence of this residual deformation has been successfully measured during benign nighttime conditions using the out-of-focus (OOF) holography technique (Nikolic et al, 2007, A&A 465, 685). Parametrized by a set of Zernike polynomials, the OOF model correction was implemented into the active surface and has been applied during all high frequency observations since Fall 2006, yielding a consistent gain curve that is constant with elevation. However, large-scale thermal deformation of the surface has remained a problem for daytime high-frequency observations. OOF holography maps taken throughout a clear winter day indicate that surface deformations become significant whenever the Sun is above 10 degrees elevation, but that they change slowly while tracking a single source. In this paper, we describe a further improvement to the GBT active surface that allows an observer to measure and compensate for the thermal surface deformation using the OOF technique. In order to support high-frequency observers, "AutoOOF" is a new GBT Astrid procedure that acquires a quick set of in-focus and out-of-focus on-the-fly continuum maps on a quasar using the currently active receiver. Upon completion of the maps, the data analysis software is launched automatically which produces and displays the surface map along with a set of Zernike coefficients. These coefficients are then sent to the active surface manager which combines them with the existing gravitational Zernike terms and FEM in order to compute the total active surface correction. The end-to-end functionality has been tested on the sky at Q-Band and Ka

  19. Simulation and experimental investigation of active lightweight compliant mechanisms with integrated piezoceramic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modler, Niels; Winkler, Anja; Filippatos, Angelos; Lovasz, Erwin-Christian; Mărgineanu, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Compliant mechanisms with integrated actuators can enable new function-integrative structures through the elastic deformation of elements without the use of classical links and joints. For such designs, the mechanical behaviour of the mechanism has to be well known, because external loads, the utilised materials and the geometry of the structural parts influence the deformation performance significantly. In order to speed up the development process of such mechanisms, a tool for the dynamic analysis of compliant movements is necessary before any further FEM simulation and manufacturing. Therefore, the paper presents a simulating procedure for active compliant mechanisms obtained through the integration of piezoceramic actuators into fibre-reinforced composite structures using a double layer model. A new mechanism was designed, simulated, constructed and tested. The comparison between simulation and experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the presented procedure in regard to the design phase of new active compliant structures.

  20. Deformation mechanisms for high-temperature creep of high yttria content stabilized zirconia single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Garcia, D.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; Eveno, P.; Castaing, J.

    1996-03-01

    Creep of 21 mol.% yttria-stabilized zirconia single crystals has been studied between 1,400 and 1,800 C. The creep parameters have been determined indicating a change of the controlling mechanism around 1,500 C. At higher temperatures recovery creep is found to be the rate controlling mechanism, with a stress exponent {approx_equal} 3 and an activation energy {approx_equal} 6 eV. Transition to glide controlled creep occurs below 1,500 C, associated with larger stress exponents ({approx_equal} 5) and activation energies ({approx_equal} 8.5 eV). TEM observations of the dislocation microstructure confirm this transition. The influence of the high yttria content, which is at the origin of the high creep resistance of these crystals, is discussed for each range of temperatures.

  1. The three-dimensional pattern of crustal deformation associated with active normal fault systems observed using continuous GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. A.; Hreinsdottir, S.

    2009-12-01

    Geological examples of shallow dipping normal faults with large displacements are exposed at numerous locations throughout the world and it is widely recognized that extensional deformation at brittle crustal levels is most efficiently accomplished by slip across such structures. It has previously been shown that lower dip angles reduce the regional stresses required to drive large horizontal displacements. Nevertheless, the traditional theory of fault mechanics—based on Anderson’s classification of stress regimes, the Coulomb failure criterion, and Byerlee’s friction law—precludes such faults from slipping at low angle. Observational support for this traditional theory includes the absence of large unequivocally low-angle normal fault earthquakes in the global catalog; all well-determined normal fault earthquakes appear to have occurred on moderate to steeply dipping planes. However, precise measurements of 3D crustal motions based on continuous GPS in central Italy and Utah reveal deformation patterns across active normal fault systems that are inconsistent with active slip across steeply dipping planes. Instead, the combination of observed horizontal and vertical surface motions are consistent with slip across low angle surfaces independently imaged in the subsurface by seismic reflection and other geophysical data. For the Alto Tiberina fault in central Italy, active aseismic creep occurs at shallow crustal levels, most likely within the brittle-frictional regime at which Andersonian-Byerlee fault mechanics should be applicable. The actively creeping portion of the fault inferred using GPS geodesy correlates well with the observed pattern of micro-seismicity, which concentrates along the inferred subsurface fault plane. GPS measurements across the greater Wasatch fault zone in the vicinity of Salt Lake City, Utah, reveal crustal motions consistent with aseismic displacement across a shallow dipping fault or sub-horizontal shear zone at mid

  2. Effect of bimodal harmonic structure design on the deformation behaviour and mechanical properties of Co-Cr-Mo alloy.

    PubMed

    Vajpai, Sanjay Kumar; Sawangrat, Choncharoen; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Ciuca, Octav Paul; Ameyama, Kei

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, Co-Cr-Mo alloy compacts with a unique bimodal microstructural design, harmonic structure design, were successfully prepared via a powder metallurgy route consisting of controlled mechanical milling of pre-alloyed powders followed by spark plasma sintering. The harmonic structured Co-Cr-Mo alloy with bimodal grain size distribution exhibited relatively higher strength together with higher ductility as compared to the coarse-grained specimens. The harmonic Co-Cr-Mo alloy exhibited a very complex deformation behavior wherein it was found that the higher strength and the high retained ductility are derived from fine-grained shell and coarse-grained core regions, respectively. Finally, it was observed that the peculiar spatial/topological arrangement of stronger fine-grained and ductile coarse-grained regions in the harmonic structure promotes uniformity of strain distribution, leading to improved mechanical properties by suppressing the localized plastic deformation during straining.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Anthracycline Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, Giovanni Luca; Zunino, Franco

    On the basis of evidence that anthracyclines are DNA intercalating agents and DNA is the primary target, a large number of analogs and related intercalators have been developed. However, doxorubicin and closely related anthracyclines still remain among the most effective antitumor agents. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to explain their efficacy. They include inhibition of DNA-dependent functions, free radical formation, and membrane interactions. The primary mechanism of action is now ascribed to drug interference with the function of DNA topoisomerase II. The stabilization of the topoisomerase-mediated cleavable complex results in a specific type of DNA damage (i.e., double-strand protein-associated DNA breaks). The drug-stabilized cleavable complex is a potentially reversible molecular event and its persistence, as a consequence of strong DNA binding, may be recognized as an apoptotic stimulus. Indirect evidence supports the notion that the bioreductive processes of the quinone moiety generating the semiquinone radical with concomitant production of reactive oxygen species may contribute to the drug effects. The cellular defense mechanisms and response to genotoxic/cytotoxic stress appear to be critical determinants of the tumor sensitivity to anthracyclines.

  4. Collaborative Research and Development (CR&D). Delivery Order 0002: Deformation Mechanisms During Hot Working of Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Titanium Ayman Salem Universal Technology Corporation S.L. Semiatin Metals Branch Metals, Ceramics & NDE Division OCTOBER 2005 Final...2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) October 2005 Final 02 May 2003 – 30 October 2005 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AND...DEVELOPMENT (CR&D) Delivery Order 0002: Deformation Mechanisms During Hot Working of Titanium 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER F33615-03-D-5801-0002 5b

  5. The Features of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Metastable Austenitic Steel Subjected to Low-Temperature and Subsequent Warm Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litovchenko, I. Yu.; Akkuzin, S. A.; Polekhina, N. A.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Naiden, E. P.

    2016-10-01

    The features of microstructure and phase composition of metastable austenitic steel subjected to thermomechanical treatment, including low-temperature processing accompanied by warm rolling deformation, are investigated. Direct (γ → α΄) and reverse strain-induced martensitic transformations are shown to take place, followed by the formation of submicrocrystalline states and 3-4-fold increase in the yield point values. The mechanisms of formation of submicrocrystalline states and the reasons for increased strength are discussed.

  6. The mechanics of ground deformation precursory to dome-building extrusions at Mount St. Helens 1981-1982.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W.; Archuleta, R.J.; Swanson, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Detailed monitoring at Mount St. Helens since 1980 has enabled prediction of the intermittent eruptive activity (mostly dome growth) with unprecedented success. During 1981 and 1982, accelerating deformation of the crater floor around the vent (including radial cracks, thrust faults, and ground tilt) was the earliest indicator of impending activity. The magnitude of the shear stress required to match observed dipslacements (1-7 MPa) is inversely proportional to the conduit diameter (estimated to be 25-100 m). The most probable source of this shear stress is the flow of viscous magma up to the conduit and into the lava dome. A model is proposed in which the accelerating deformation, beginning as much as 4 weeks before extrusions, is caused by the increasing velocity of ascending magma in the conduit. This model is examined by using deformation data of the dome before four extrusions in 1981 and 1982 to estimate the volumetric flow rate through the conduit. This flow rate and an estimate of the effective viscosity of the magma enable calculation of an ascent velocity and an applied shear stress that, again, depend on the conduit diameter. The results of these calculations are consistent with the finite element experiments and show that the proposed model is feasible. Precursory deformation like that measured at Mount St. Helens should be observable at similar volcanoes elsewhere because it is caused by the fundamental process of magma ascent.-from Authors

  7. Simultaneous measurements of photoemission and morphology of various Al alloys during mechanical deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, M.; Li, W.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2006-11-15

    We report simultaneous measurements of strain and photoelectron emission from high purity Al (1350), Al-Mg (5052), Al-Mn (3003), Al-Cu (2024), and Al-Mg-Si (6061) alloys under uniaxial tension due to pulsed excimer laser radiation (248 nm). The emission of low-energy photoelectrons is sensitive to deformation-induced changes in surface morphology, including the formation of slip lines and slip bands. Alloy composition and surface treatment significantly influence the photoemission during deformation. Surface oxide enhances the signal-to-noise level during photoemission measurement. In the early stage of deformation (strain {<=}0.04), photoemission intensity increases gradually in a nonlinear fashion. While subsequent photoemission increases almost linearly with strain until failure in samples with thin oxide layer ({approx}31 A ring ), there are two linear segments of photoemission for the samples with oxide of 45 A ring . The onset of strain localization corresponds to the intersection point of two linear segments, usually at a strain of 0.08-0.20. A constitutive model incorporating microstructure evolution and work hardening during tensile deformation is proposed to qualitatively interpret the growth of the photoemission as a function of strain. Photoemissions from various alloys are interpreted in the light of surface treatment, work function, composition, and microstructural development during deformation.

  8. Active deformation of the northern front of the Eastern Great Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niviere, Bertrand; Gagala, Lukasz; Callot, Jean-Paul; Regard, Vincent; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2016-04-01

    The Arabia-Eurasia collision involved a mosaic of island arcs and microcontinents. Their accretion to the complex paleogeographic margin of Neotethys was marked by numerous collisional events. The Greater Caucasus constitute the northernmost tectonic element of this tectonic collage, developed as a back arc extensional zone now inverted, which relationships to the onset of Arabia-Eurasia continental collision and/or to the reorganization of the Arabia-Eurasia plate boundary at ˜5 Ma remain controversial. Structurally, the Greater Caucasus are a former continental back arc rift, now the locus of ongoing continental shortening. Modern geodetic observations suggest that in the west, the strain north of the Armenian Plateau is accommodated almost exclusively along the margins of the Greater Caucasus. This differs from regions further east where strain accommodation is distributed across both the Lesser and Greater Caucasus, and within the Greater Caucasus range, with a unique southward vergence. We question here the amount and mechanisms by which the Eastern Greater Caucasus accommodate part of the Arabia-Eurasia convergence. Morphostructural analysis of the folded late Pleistocene marine terrace along the northern slope of the Eastern Greater Caucasus evidences an on going tectonic activity in the area where GPS measurements record no motion. Most of the recent foreland deformation is accommodated by south-vergent folds and thrust, i. e. opposite to the vergence of the Caucasus frontal northern thrust. A progressive unconformity in the folded beds shows that it was already active during the late Pliocene. Cosmogenic dating of the terrace and kinematic restoration of the remnant terrace, linked to the subsurface geology allows for the estimation of a shortening rate ranging from a few mm/yr to 1 cm/yr over the last 5 Myr along the greater Caucasus northern front. Thus more than one third of the shortening between the Kura block / Lesser Caucasus domain and the Stable

  9. Assessment of Tungsten Content on Tertiary Creep Deformation Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar

    2015-10-01

    Tertiary creep deformation behavior of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels having different tungsten contents has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) over a stress range of 180 to 260 MPa on three heats of the RAFM steel (9Cr-W-0.06Ta-0.22V) with tungsten content of 1, 1.4, and 2.0 wt pct. With creep exposure, the steels exhibited minimum in creep rate followed by progressive increase in creep rate until fracture. The minimum creep rate decreased, rupture life increased, and the onset of tertiary stage of creep deformation delayed with the increase in tungsten content. The tertiary creep behavior has been assessed based on the relationship, , considering minimum creep rate () instead of steady-state creep rate. The increase in tungsten content was found to decrease the rate of acceleration of tertiary parameter ` p.' The relationships between (1) tertiary parameter `p' with minimum creep rate and time spent in tertiary creep deformation and (2) the final creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the same first-order reaction rate theory prevailed in the minimum creep rate as well as throughout the tertiary creep deformation behavior of the steel. A master tertiary creep curve of the steels has been developed. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed enhanced coarsening resistance of carbides in the steel on creep exposure with increase in tungsten content. The decrease in tertiary parameter ` p' with tungsten content with the consequent decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in rupture life has been attributed to the enhanced microstructural stability of the steel.

  10. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic superalloy revealed by in situ neutron diffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Wu, Wei; Teng, Zhenke; Liaw, Peter K

    2014-10-22

    In this study, the ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)Al B2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticity theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.

  11. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic superalloy revealed by in situ neutron diffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; ...

    2014-10-22

    In this study, the ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)Al B2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticitymore » theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.« less

  12. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic super alloy revealed by in situ neutron dffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Teng, Zhenke; Wu, Wei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    The ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)AlB2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticity theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.

  13. High temperature deformation mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels at cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugino, Yoshito; Ukai, Shigeharu; Oono, Naoko; Hayashi, Shigenari; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    The ODS ferritic steels realize potentially higher operating temperature due to structural stability by the dispersed nano-size oxide particles. The deformation process and mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels were investigated at 1073 K and 1173 K for the cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions. Tensile and creep tests were conducted at the stress in parallel (LD) and perpendicular (TD) directions to the grain boundaries. Strain rate varied from 10-1 to 10-9 s-1. For the LD specimens, deformation in the cold rolled and recrystallized conditions is reinforced by finely dispersed oxide particles. The dominant deformation process for the recrystallized TD specimen is controlled through the grain boundary sliding and stress accommodation via diffusional creep at temperature of 1173 K and lower strain rate less than 10-4 s-1. The grain boundary sliding couldn't be rate-controlling process at 1073 K for the as-cold rolled TD specimen, where a dynamic recovery of the dislocation produced by cold-rolling is related to the deformation process.

  14. Deformation structures associated with the Trachyte Mesa intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah: Implications for sill and laccolith emplacement mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Penelope I. R.; McCaffrey, Ken J. W.; Wilson, Robert W.; Jarvis, Ian; Holdsworth, Robert E.

    2016-06-01

    Deformation structures in the wall rocks of igneous intrusions emplaced at shallow crustal depths preserve an important record of how space was created for magma in the host rocks. Trachyte Mesa, a small Oligocene age intrusion in the Henry Mountains, Utah, is composed of a series of stacked tabular, sheet-like intrusions emplaced at 3-3.5 km depth into sandstone-dominated sedimentary sequences of late Palaeozoic-Mesozoic age. New structural analysis of the spatial distribution, geometry, kinematics and relative timings of deformation structures in the host rocks of the intrusion has enabled the recognition of distinct pre-, syn-, and late-stage-emplacement deformation phases. Our observations suggest a two-stage growth mechanism for individual sheets where radial growth of a thin sheet was followed by vertical inflation. Dip-slip faults formed during vertical inflation; they are restricted to the tips of individual sheets due to strain localisation, with magma preferentially exploiting these faults, initiating sill (sheet) climbing. The order in which sheets are stacked impacts on the intrusion geometry and associated deformation of wall rocks. Our results offer new insights into the incremental intrusion geometries of shallow-level magmatic bodies and the potential impact of their emplacement on surrounding host rocks.

  15. Resistance of mature Arabidopsis plants to mechanical deformation in relation to g-force during development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Arabidopsis plants were grown in centrifuge tubes under well standardized culture conditions. Each plant was subjected to centrifugation (roots out) for 10 min at one of a series of centripetal forces between 7 and 390g. No deformation was observed in plants centrifuged at less than 35g. An 'average' degree of deformation was attained at about 60g. All plants exposed to more than 95g were maximally deformed but none was broken nor otherwise damaged irreversibly even at 390g. In every case new shoot growth continued normally after the centrifugation. A plant population grown on horizontal clinostats (0.5 rpm) under culture conditions exactly the same as for the upright plants responded to centrifugation stress in a way that was not substantially different from the response pattern of the plants cultured upright at 1g.

  16. Dissecting Oceanic Detachment Faults: Fault Zone Geometry, Deformation Mechanisms, and Nature of Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnemains, D.; Escartin, J.; Verlaguet, A.; Andreani, M.; Mevel, C.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the extreme strain localization at long-lived oceanic detachment faults rooting deeply below the axis, we present results of geological investigations at the 13°19'N detachment along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, conducted during the ODEMAR cruise (Nov-Dec13, NO Pourquoi Pas?) with ROV Victor6000 (IFREMER). During this cruise we investigated and sampled the corrugated fault to understand its geometry, nature of deformation, and links to fluid flow. We identified and explored 7 fault outcrops on the flanks of microbathymetric striations subparallel to extension. These outcrops expose extensive fault planes, with the most prominent ones extending 40-90m laterally, and up to 10 m vertically. These fault surfaces systematically show subhorizontal striations subparallel to extension, and define slabs of fault-rock that are flat and also striated at sample scale. Visual observations show a complex detachment fault zone, with anastomosing fault planes at outcrop scale (1-10 m), with a highly heterogeneous distribution of deformation. We observe heterogeneity in fault-rock nature at outcrop scale. In situ samples from striated faults are primarily basalt breccias with prior green-schist facies alteration, and a few ultramafic fault-rocks that show a complex deformation history, with early schistose textures, brittlely reworked as clasts within the fault. The basalt breccias show variable silicification and associated sulfides, recording important fluid-rock interactions during exhumation. To understand the link between fluid and deformation during exhumation, we will present microstructural observation of deformation textures, composition, and distribution and origin of quartz and sulfides, as well as constraints on the temperature of silicifying fluids from fluid inclusions in quartz. These results allow us to characterize in detail the detachment fault zone geometry, and investigate the timing of silicification relative to deformation.

  17. Low resistivity and permeability in actively deforming shear zones on the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, Carolyn A.; Lockner, David A.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific drillhole near Parkfield, California crosses the San Andreas Fault at a depth of 2.7 km. Downhole measurements and analysis of core retrieved from Phase 3 drilling reveal two narrow, actively deforming zones of smectite-clay gouge within a roughly 200 m-wide fault damage zone of sandstones, siltstones and mudstones. Here we report electrical resistivity and permeability measurements on core samples from all of these structural units at effective confining pressures up to 120 MPa. Electrical resistivity (~10 ohm-m) and permeability (10-21 to 10-22 m2) in the actively deforming zones were one to two orders of magnitude lower than the surrounding damage zone material, consistent with broader-scale observations from the downhole resistivity and seismic velocity logs. The higher porosity of the clay gouge, 2 to 8 times greater than that in the damage zone rocks, along with surface conduction were the principal factors contributing to the observed low resistivities. The high percentage of fine-grained clay in the deforming zones also greatly reduced permeability to values low enough to create a barrier to fluid flow across the fault. Together, resistivity and permeability data can be used to assess the hydrogeologic characteristics of the fault, key to understanding fault structure and strength. The low resistivities and strength measurements of the SAFOD core are consistent with observations of low resistivity clays that are often found in the principal slip zones of other active faults making resistivity logs a valuable tool for identifying these zones.

  18. Active deformation in the northern Sierra de Valle Fértil, Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gustavo; Alvarado, Patricia; Fosdick, Julie C.; Perucca, Laura; Saez, Mauro; Venerdini, Agostina

    2015-12-01

    The Western Sierras Pampeanas region in the San Juan Province is characterized by thick-skinned deformation with approximately N-S trending ranges of average heights of 2500 m and a high frequency occurrence of seismic activity. Its location to the east of the mainly thin-skinned tectonics of the Argentine Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt suggests that at 30°S, deformation is concentrated in a narrow zone involving these two morphostructural units. In this paper, we present new apatite (U-Th)/He results (AHe) across the northern part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil (around 30°S) and analyze them in a framework of thermochronologic available datasets. We found Pliocene AHe results for Carboniferous and Triassic strata in the northern Sierra de Valle Fértil consistent with the hypothesis of recent cooling and inferred erosional denudation concentrated along the northern end of this mountain range. Our analysis shows that this northern region may have evolved under different conditions than the central part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil. Previous studies have observed AHe ages consistent with Permian through Cretaceous cooling, indicating the middle part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil remained near surface before the Pampean slab subduction flattening process. Those studies also obtained ˜5 My cooling ages in the southern part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil, which are similar to our results in the northern end of the range. Taken together, these results suggest a pattern of young deformation in the northern and southern low elevation ends of the Sierra de Valle Fértil consistent with regions of high seismic activity, and Quaternary active faulting along the western-bounding thrust fault of the Sierra de Valle Fértil.

  19. Severe plastic deformation using friction stir processing, and the characterization of microstructure and mechanical behavior using neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Wanchuck

    Friction-stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process, which utilizes a cylindrical rotating tool consisting of a concentric threaded tool pin and tool shoulder. The strong metallurgical bonding during the FSW is accomplished through: (1) the severe plastic deformation caused by the rotation of the tool pin that plunges into the material and travels along the joining line; and (2) the frictional heat generated mainly from the pressing tool shoulder. Recently, a number of variations of the FSW have been applied to modify the microstructure, for example, grain refinements and homogenization of precipitate particles, namely friction-stir processing (FSP). Applications of the FSP/FSW are widespread for the transportation industries. The microstructure and mechanical behavior of light-weight materials subjected to the FSW/FSP are being studied extensively. However, separating the effect of the frictional heat and severe plastic deformation on the residual stress and texture has been a standing problem for the fundamental understanding of FSW/FSP. The fundamental issues are: (i) the heat- and plastic-deformation-induced internal stresses that may be detrimental to the integrity and performance of components; (ii) the frictional heating that causes a microstructural softening due to the dissolution or growth of the precipitates in precipitation-hardenable Al alloys during the process; and (iii) the crystallographic texture can be significantly altered from the original texture, which could affect the physical and mechanical properties. The understanding of the influences of the de-convoluted sources (e.g. frictional heat, severe plastic deformation, or their combination) on the residual stress, microstructural softening, and texture variations during FSW can be used for a physicsvi based optimization of the processing parameters and new tool designs. Furthermore, the analyses and characterization of the natural aging behavior and the aging kinetics can be

  20. Active deformations of the Jura arc inferred by GPS and seismotectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Mickael; Sue, Christian; Walpersdorf, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The Jura Mountain is the most recent expression of the alpine orogeny. At the northern end of the western Alps, its recent deformation is still a matter of debates. GPS data available in the Jura bear witness of disagreement between studies, as interpretations vary from uplifted belt to arc-parallel extension (Walpersdorf, et al., 2006) and very slow horizontal movements. Moreover, the traditionally accepted model of an active collisional activity of the Jura, in the dynamic continuity of the Alps, rises up the matter of its geodynamic origin. Indeed, the European Alps are in a post-collisional regime characterized by isostatic-related extension and uplift driven by interaction between buoyancy forces and erosional dynamics (e.g. Sue et al. 2007; Champagnac, et al., 2007; Vernant, et al., 2013.). We present a reappraisal of published focal mechanisms combined with a new GPS solution over the entire arc and surrounding areas. Although the Jura presents a low seismic activity, 53 focal mechanisms over the Jura have been inverted in order to infer the current stress field. Anyhow, we tested several combinations of f.m. inversions, by structural zones, in order to test the regional stress stability. It appears that the current stress field is very stable all over the arc, and following our different sub-datasets. Indeed, the stress field shows a stable near horizontal NW-SE-oriented s1, associated to a NE-SW-oriented s3. Therefore, the structural arc of the Jura seems to have very low or no impact in terms of current stress. Complementarily, we present preliminary velocity and strain fields from a GPS network composed of 25 permanent stations implemented between 1998 and 2014 all around the Jura arc. Indeed, we also integrated the recent GPS-JURA station (OSU THETA Besançon), but they are still too young to accurately constrain the strain of the belt. Preliminary results exhibit very slow velocities across the arc in term of baselines evolution, with infra

  1. Microfabrics and 3D grain shape of Gorleben rock salt: Constraints on deformation mechanisms and paleodifferential stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemeyer, Nicolas; Zulauf, Gernold; Mertineit, Michael; Linckens, Jolien; Pusch, Maximilian; Hammer, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The Permian Knäuel- and Streifensalz formations (z2HS1 and z2HS2) are main constituents of the Gorleben salt dome (Northern Germany) and show different amounts and distributions of anhydrite. The reconstruction of 3D halite grain shape ellipsoids reveals small grain size (3.4 ± 0.6 mm) and heterogeneous grain shapes in both formations, the latter attributed to the polyphase deformation of the rock salt during diapirism. The halite microfabrics of both formations indicate that strain-induced grain boundary migration was active during deformation. Crystal plastic deformation of halite is further documented by lattice bending, subgrain formation and minor subgrain rotation. Evidence for pressure solution of halite has not been found, but cannot be excluded because of the small grain size, the lack of LPO and the low differential stress (1.1-1.3 MPa) as deduced from subgrain-size piezometry. Anhydrite has been deformed in the brittle-ductile regime by solution precipitation creep, minor dislocation creep and brittle boudinage. No continuous anhydrite layers are preserved, and halite has acted as a sealing matrix embedding the disrupted anhydrite fragments prohibiting any potential migration pathways for fluids. Thus, anhydrite should not have a negative effect on the barrier properties of the Gorleben rock salts investigated in this study.

  2. A Study of Localized Plastic Deformation as Related to Fatigue Mechanisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    J. M. Baik) ... ............. 5 III.1 Introduction .... ... .. ....................... 6 111.2 Cyclic Deformation Behavior and Strain-Life...Strain and Plastic Strain Control LCF Behavior . 27 111.2.3.3 Fatigue Life Characteristic ..... .............. 36 111.2.3.4 Fracture Surface Morphology...59 111.3.3 Results ....... ......................... ... 61 111.3.3.1 Crack Closure Behavior ..... ..... .......... .. 61

  3. Deformation mechanism of basic rock during long-term compression: Area of HLW repository design, Chelyabinsk District, Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, V.A.; Zviagintsev, L.I.; Poluektov, V.V.

    1996-08-01

    A combination of ultrasound, mechanical and petrographic results for long-term experimental compression of greenschist facies porphyritic andesite tuffs indicate a deformation mechanism that depends upon the mineral composition, textural-structural features of the rocks and the orientation of compression relative to the rock textures. Three dry samples of rock were investigated. Coaxial compression of a massive sample for 816 hours and a foliated sample for 1,176 hours (pressure orthogonal to foliation) is characterized by solidification when the rocks are temporarily metastable. Compressive strength of the first sample is 850 kg/cm{sup 2} and of the second one, 800 kg/cm{sup 2}. Experimentally, the rock behavior changes from a plastic to a brittle regime of deformation. In contrast, compression of the foliated sample parallel to foliation causes disintegration along the foliation within 480 hours without solidification. The rock is liable to brittle deformation and its compressive strength is 500 kg/cm{sup 2}. These results may have implications for characterization of near-field processes in connection with numerous subhorizontal zones of schistosity within the strata that are targeted for underground disposal of high-level wastes (HLW) in the Mayak radiochemical complex area.

  4. Characterising Seismicity at Alutu, an Actively Deforming Volcano in the Main Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilks, M.; Nowacki, A.; Kendall, J. M.; Wookey, J. M.; Biggs, J.; Bastow, I. D.; Ayele, A.; Bedada, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) provides a unique example of the tectonic and volcanic processes occuring during the transition from continental rifting to oceanic spreading. Situated 100 km south of Addis Ababa along the eastern rift margin, Alutu is a silicic stratovolcano that geodetic measurements (InSAR and GPS) have shown is actively deforming. Though the volcano has received relatively little scientific attention it is also a site of economic significance as a geothermal power plant resides within the caldera. As part of ARGOS (Alutu Research Geophysical ObservationS), a multi-disciplinary project aiming to investigate the magmatic and hydrothermal processes occuring at Alutu, a seismic network of 12 broadband seismometers was deployed in January 2012. Other components of ARGOS include InSAR, GPS, geologic mapping and magnetotellurics. From the seismic dataset, P- and S-wave arrivals across the array were manually picked and used to locate events using a non-linear earthquake location algorithm (NonLinLoc) and a predefined 1D velocity model. Perturbations were later applied to this velocity model to investigate the sensitivity of the locations and evaluate the true uncertainties of the solutions. Over 1000 events were successfully located during 2012, where picks were possible at 4 or more stations. Seismicity clusters at both shallow depths (z<2 km) beneath the caldera and at deeper depths of 5-15 km. There is a significant increase in seismicity during the rainy months, suggesting the shallow events may be related to the hydrothermal system. We interpret the deeper events as being magmatic in origin. Events are also located along the eastern border faults that bound the outer edges of the MER and highlights that seismicity arises concurrently via tectonic processes. An adapted version of Richter's original local magnitude scale (ML) to account for attenuation within the MER (Keir et al., 2006) was then used to compute magnitudes for the best located events

  5. 10Be surface exposure dating reveals strong active deformation in the central Andean backarc interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Morabito, Ezequiel; Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; Willett, Sean; Yamin, Marcela; Haghipour, Negar; Wuethrich, Lorenz; Christl, Marcus; María Cortes, José; Ramos, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the deformation associated with active thrust wedges is essential to evaluate seismic hazard. How is active faulting distributed throughout the wedge, and how much deformation is taken up by individual structures? We address these questions for our study region, the central Andean backarc of Argentina. We combined a structural and geomorphological approach with surface exposure dating (10Be) of alluvial fans and strath terraces in two key localities at ~32° S: the Cerro Salinas, located in the active orogenic front of the Precordillera, and the Barreal block in the interior of the Andean mountain range. We analysed 22 surface samples and 6 depth profiles. At the thrust front, the oldest terrace (T1) yields an age of 100-130 ka, the intermediate terrace (T2) between 40-95 ka, and the youngest terrace (T3) an age of ~20 ka. In the Andean interior, T1´ dates to 117-146 ka, T2´ to ~70 ka, and T3´ to ~20 ka, all calculations assuming negligible erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. Vertical slip rates of fault offsets are 0.3-0.5 mm/yr and of 0.6-1.2 mm/yr at the thrust front and in the Andean interior, respectively. Our results highlight: i) fault activity related to the growth of the Andean orogenic wedge is not only limited to a narrow thrust front zone. Internal structures have been active during the last 150 ka, ii) deformation rates in the Andean interior are comparable or even higher that those estimated and reported along the emerging thrust front, iii) distribution of active faulting seems to account for unsteady state conditions, and iv) seismic hazards may be more relevant in the internal parts of the Andean orogen than assumed so far. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 104: 424-439. Stone, J.O., 2000: Air pressure and cosmogenic isotope production. Journal of Geophysical

  6. Active salt deformation and rapid, transient incision along the Colorado River near Moab, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochems, Andrew P.; Pederson, Joel L.

    2015-04-01

    In certain settings, erosion is driven by and balanced with tectonic uplift, but the evolution of many landscapes is dominated by other factors such as geologic substrate, drainage history, and transient incision. The Colorado Plateau is an example where these controls are debated and where salt deformation is hypothesized to be locally active and driven by differential unloading, although this is unconfirmed and unquantified in most places. We use luminescence-dated Colorado River terraces upstream of Moab, Utah, to quantify rates of salt-driven subsidence and uplift at the local scale. Active deformation in the study area is also supported by patterns of concavity along tributary drainages crossing salt structures. Subsidence in Professor Valley at a time-averaged rate of ~500 m/Myr (meters/million years) is superimposed upon rapid bedrock incision rates that increase from ~600 to ~900 m/Myr upstream through the study area. Such high rates are unexpected given the absence of sources of regional tectonic uplift here. Instead, the incision rate pattern across the greater area is consistent with a transient signal, perhaps still from ancient drainage integration through Grand Canyon far downstream, and then amplified by unloading at both the broad regional scale and at the local canyon scale.

  7. Phase transformation and its effect on mechanical characteristics in warm-deformed Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taekyung; Nakai, Masaaki; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Park, Chan Hee; Lee, Chong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr (TNTZ) alloy has been extensively studied as it is promising for use in biomedical applications. Despite its potential, the effects of warm plastic deformation on the alloy have not yet been revealed. This study investigated the differences in phase constitution of two warm-deformed TNTZ alloys and revealed relevant mechanisms with particular attention to martensitic transformation. The influence of phase constituents on mechanical characteristics was discussed as well. The TNTZ alloy deformed at 823 K possessed α, β, and ω phases as well as α″ martensite, and demonstrated a low Young's modulus and double-yielding phenomenon. In contrast, the alloy deformed at 723 K had no martensite but more ω phase, leading to increased strength, hardness, and Young's modulus. The absence of α″ martensite in the alloy deformed at 723 K was interpreted in light of β-stability of the parent phase and reduced M s temperature.

  8. Extensional Elastica in large deformation as $Gamma $ Γ -limit of a discrete 1D mechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Jean-Jacques; Della Corte, Alessandro; Giorgio, Ivan; Battista, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The present paper deals with the rigorous homogenization of a discrete system consisting of extensible rods linked by rotational springs. Specifically, a Γ -convergence result is proven for a sequence of discrete measure functionals En, describing the energy of the discrete system, toward the continuous energy functional for the extensible Euler beam model ( Elastica) in large deformation regime. A relative compactness result for the sequence En is also proven. Moreover, numerical results are shown on the deformed shape and on the total energy of the system when the number of elements of the discrete system increases. The numerical convergence of the energy to a definite value is shown in two cases. The results provide rigorous justification of a very commonly used algorithm for the discretization of the extensible Euler beam, namely Hencky-type beam model.

  9. Fracture of ECAP-deformed iron and the role of extrinsic toughening mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hohenwarter, A; Pippan, R

    2013-05-01

    The fracture behaviour of pure iron deformed by equal-channel angular pressing via route A was examined. The fracture toughness was determined for different specimen orientations and measured in terms of the critical plane strain fracture toughness, KIC , the critical J integral, JIC , and the crack opening displacement for crack initiation, CODi . The results demonstrate that the crack plane orientation has a pronounced effect on the fracture toughness. Different crack plane orientations lead to either crack deflection or delamination, resulting in increased fracture resistance in comparison to one remarkably weak specimen orientation. The relation between the microstructure typical for the applied deformation route and the enormous differences in the fracture toughness depending on the crack plane orientation will be analyzed in this paper.

  10. Fracture of ECAP-deformed iron and the role of extrinsic toughening mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hohenwarter, A.; Pippan, R.

    2013-01-01

    The fracture behaviour of pure iron deformed by equal-channel angular pressing via route A was examined. The fracture toughness was determined for different specimen orientations and measured in terms of the critical plane strain fracture toughness, KIC, the critical J integral, JIC, and the crack opening displacement for crack initiation, CODi. The results demonstrate that the crack plane orientation has a pronounced effect on the fracture toughness. Different crack plane orientations lead to either crack deflection or delamination, resulting in increased fracture resistance in comparison to one remarkably weak specimen orientation. The relation between the microstructure typical for the applied deformation route and the enormous differences in the fracture toughness depending on the crack plane orientation will be analyzed in this paper. PMID:23645995

  11. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  12. Elevated-temperature Deformation Mechanisms in Ta2C: An Experimental Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggesstions for reducing this burden, to...dislocations suggests that lattice friction limits screw mobil- ity, which, in turn, inhibits plastic deformation at low temperatures. Since TaC has...an adjacent plane; the pair is termed a zonal dislocation. All of the above scenarios result in large frictional forces for dislocation glide. As TaC1

  13. Dynamic mechanical deformation of a SiC[sub p]/Al-Li (8090) composite

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, R.U.; Zurek, A.K.

    1993-01-01

    The deformation behavior in compression of a silicon carbide particle-reinforced aluminum-lithium (8090) matrix composite, at strain rates in the range of 10[sup [minus]3] to 6500 s[sup [minus]1], was investigated, and compared with that of unreinforced alloy samples. Dynamics strengthening in these composites was found to change depending on the direction of testing. These differences were attributed to differences in the orientation of the reinforcing particles. 4 refs, 5 figs.

  14. Dynamic mechanical deformation of a SiC{sub p}/Al-Li (8090) composite

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, R.U.; Zurek, A.K.

    1993-06-01

    The deformation behavior in compression of a silicon carbide particle-reinforced aluminum-lithium (8090) matrix composite, at strain rates in the range of 10{sup {minus}3} to 6500 s{sup {minus}1}, was investigated, and compared with that of unreinforced alloy samples. Dynamics strengthening in these composites was found to change depending on the direction of testing. These differences were attributed to differences in the orientation of the reinforcing particles. 4 refs, 5 figs.

  15. Heterogeneous deformation and mechanical strength of materials - Approach to the theoretical strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, H.; Fujita, N.

    2002-01-01

    Grain size in polycrystalline materials was changed from larger than phi 10 mum to smaller than phi 10 nm, and the effects of both grain size and strain rate on the strength has been investigated from a view point of heterogeneous deformation. Grains of phi10 nm or less in size were obtained by crystallization of amorphous alloys. The experimental results are summarized as follows: (a) Heterogeneous deformation is effectively suppressed when grain size decreases smaller than about phi0.1 mum. As a result, the strength remarkably increases in this grain size range, and takes the maximum value when grains of phi10 nm in size are homogeneously formed, (b) When grain size becomes smaller than phi10 nm, those ultrafine grains are embedded into the amorphous matrix, and the strength decreases with increasing volume fraction of amorphous phase. (c) Heterogeneous deformation is also effectively suppressed by increasing strain rate in general as well as decreasing grain size. The maximum strength obtained experimentally is compared with the theoretical strengths estimated under various conditions.

  16. Trends in cardiac dynamics : towards coupled models of intracavity fluid dynamics and deformable wall mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelle, G.; Ohayon, J.; Oddou, C.

    1994-06-01

    We report here preliminary results in the development of a computational model in cardiac mechanics which takes into account the coupled effects of ventricular mechanics and intracardiac hemodynamics. In this first work, complex geometrical, architectural and rheological properties of the organ have been strongly simplified in order to propose a “quasi-analytical” model. We assume axisymmetrical geometry of the ventricle and myocardium material to be made of a sheath of a composite, collagenic, fibrous and active muscle medium inside which the blood dynamics is dominated by unsteady inertial effects. Moreover, we have made grossly simplifying assumptions concerning rather stringent and unusual functioning conditions about the mechanical behavior of the input and output valvular and vascular impedances as well as the biochemical action of the fiber. By imposing the time variation of the input and output flow rate and activation function, it is possible, assuming uniformity of the pressure stresses applied to the internal wall surface at every instant of the cardiac cycle, to calculate the overall distribution of fluid pressure and velocity inside the cavity as well as the distributions of stresses and strains inside the wall. It was shown that under the action of a given biochemical activation function, both kinematics of the wall and induced motion of the fluid are such that the boundary conditions concerning normal pressure stresses conservation was constantly satisfied. Moreover, the results concerning the dynamics of the blood flow, as viewed through the human clinical investigations using velocimetric technology based upon color doppler ultrasound, are in accordance with those obtained from such a model, at least during the ejection phase. In particular, contrarily to the filling phase processes, the ejection dynamics is such that the time evolution of the blood velocity measured along the cavity axis does not display any phase shift characterizing an

  17. Electric Eel-Skin-Inspired Mechanically Durable and Super-Stretchable Nanogenerator for Deformable Power Source and Fully Autonomous Conformable Electronic-Skin Applications.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying-Chih; Deng, Jianan; Niu, Simiao; Peng, Wenbo; Wu, Changsheng; Liu, Ruiyuan; Wen, Zhen; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-12-01

    Electric eel-skin-inspired mechanically durable and super-stretchable nanogenerator is demonstrated for the first time by using triboelectric effect. This newly designed nanogenerator can produce electricity by touch or tapping despite under various extreme mechanical deformations or even after experiencing damage. This device can be used not only as deformable and wearable power source but also as fully autonomous and self-sufficient adaptive electronic skin system.

  18. Quartz deformation mechanisms during Barrovian metamorphism: Implications from crystallographic orientation of different generations of quartz in pelites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi-Chakdel, A.; Boyle, A. P.; Prior, D. J.

    2006-12-01

    The behaviour of quartz during metamorphism is studied based on two case studies from the Barrovian terrains of Sulitjelma in arctic Scandinavia and Loch Tay in the Central Highlands Dalradian of Scotland. Both terrains preserve evidence for metamorphism in pelites involving nucleation and growth of garnet at different times in the deformation history. Data are presented on the size, shape and crystallographic orientation of quartz preserved as inclusions in garnet and as grains in the surrounding matrix. While quartz-grains remain small and dispersed between mica grains, deformation appears to be dominated by grain-boundary sliding accommodated by dissolution-precipitation. At amphibolite facies, textural coarsening occurs by dissolution of small quartz grains and growth of larger quartz grains, coupled with segregation of quartz from mica. As a result, quartz deforms by dislocation creep, developing crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) consistent with both coaxial and non-coaxial strain. Quartz CPOs with <0001> axes lying parallel to foliation and stretching direction are commonly developed, and best explained by mechanical rotation of inequant (detrital?) quartz grains. There is no evidence for selective entrapment of quartz inclusions in garnet on the basis of quartz crystallographic orientation.

  19. Temperature-dependent phase-specific deformation mechanisms in a directionally solidified NiAl-Cr(Mo) lamellar composite

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dunji; An, Ke; Chen, Xu; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-09

    Phase-specific thermal expansion and mechanical deformation behaviors of a directionally solidified NiAl–Cr(Mo) lamellar in situ composite were investigated by using real-time in situ neutron diffraction during compression at elevated temperatures up to 800 °C. Tensile and compressive thermal residual stresses were found to exist in the NiAl phase and Crss (solid solution) phase, respectively. Then, based on the evolution of lattice spacings and phase stresses, the phase-specific deformation behavior was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Moreover, estimates of phase stresses were derived by Hooke's law on the basis of a simple method for the determination of stress-free lattice spacing in in situ composites. During compressive loading, the NiAl phase yields earlier than the Crss phase. The Crss phase carries much higher stress than the NiAl phase, and displays consistent strain hardening at all temperatures. The NiAl phase exhibits strain hardening at relatively low temperatures and softening at high temperatures. During unloading, the NiAl phase yields in tension whereas the Crss phase unloads elastically. Additionally, post-test microstructural observations show phase-through cracks at room temperature, micro cracks along phase interfaces at 600 °C and intact lamellae kinks at 800 °C, which is due to the increasing deformability of both phases as temperature rises.

  20. Temperature-dependent phase-specific deformation mechanisms in a directionally solidified NiAl-Cr(Mo) lamellar composite

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Dunji; An, Ke; Chen, Xu; ...

    2015-10-09

    Phase-specific thermal expansion and mechanical deformation behaviors of a directionally solidified NiAl–Cr(Mo) lamellar in situ composite were investigated by using real-time in situ neutron diffraction during compression at elevated temperatures up to 800 °C. Tensile and compressive thermal residual stresses were found to exist in the NiAl phase and Crss (solid solution) phase, respectively. Then, based on the evolution of lattice spacings and phase stresses, the phase-specific deformation behavior was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Moreover, estimates of phase stresses were derived by Hooke's law on the basis of a simple method for the determination of stress-free lattice spacing in inmore » situ composites. During compressive loading, the NiAl phase yields earlier than the Crss phase. The Crss phase carries much higher stress than the NiAl phase, and displays consistent strain hardening at all temperatures. The NiAl phase exhibits strain hardening at relatively low temperatures and softening at high temperatures. During unloading, the NiAl phase yields in tension whereas the Crss phase unloads elastically. Additionally, post-test microstructural observations show phase-through cracks at room temperature, micro cracks along phase interfaces at 600 °C and intact lamellae kinks at 800 °C, which is due to the increasing deformability of both phases as temperature rises.« less

  1. Analysis of high temperature deformation mechanism in ODS EUROFER97 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramar, A.; Spätig, P.; Schäublin, R.

    2008-12-01

    Oxide dispersion in tempered martensitic EUROFER97 steel is an efficient approach to improve its strength. The oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) EUROFER97 steel shows a good strength up to 600 °C, but degrades rapidly beyond that temperature. To understand the origin in the microstructure of this drop in strength in situ heating experiment in TEM was performed from room temperature to 1000 °C. Upon heating neither microstructure changes nor dislocation movement are observed up to 600 °C. Movement of dislocations are observed above 680 °C. Phase transformation to austenite starts at 840 °C. Yttria particles remain stable up to 1000 °C. Changes in mechanical properties thus do not relate to changes in yttria dispersion. It is attempted to relate these observations to the thermal activation parameters measured by the technique of conventional strain rate experiment, which allow to identify at a mesoscopic scale the microstructural mechanisms responsible for the degradation of ODS steel at high temperatures.

  2. Development of TRIP-Aided Lean Duplex Stainless Steel by Twin-Roll Strip Casting and Its Deformation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Weina; Liu, Xin; Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Guodong

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, twin-roll strip casting was carried out to fabricate thin strip of a Mn-N alloyed lean duplex stainless steel with the composition of Fe-19Cr-6Mn-0.4N, in which internal pore defects had been effectively avoided as compared to conventional cast ingots. The solidification structure observed by optical microscope indicated that fine Widmannstatten structure and coarse-equiaxed crystals had been formed in the surface and center, respectively, with no columnar crystal structures through the surface to center of the cast strip. By applying hot rolling and cold rolling, thin sheets with the thickness of 0.5 mm were fabricated from the cast strips, and no edge cracks were formed during the rolling processes. With an annealing treatment at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 5 minutes after cold rolling, the volume fractions of ferrite and austenite were measured to be approximately equal, and the distribution of alloying elements in the strip was further homogenized. The cold-rolled and annealed sheet exhibited an excellent combination of strength and ductility, with the ultimate tensile strength and elongation having been measured to be 1000 MPa and 65 pct, respectively. The microstructural evolution during deformation was investigated by XRD, EBSD, and TEM, indicating that ferrite and austenite had different deformation mechanisms. The deformation of ferrite phase was dominated by dislocation slipping, and the deformation of austenite phase was mainly controlled by martensitic transformation in the sequence of γ→ ɛ-martensite→ α'-martensite, leading to the improvement of strength and plasticity by the so-called transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect. By contrast, lean duplex stainless steels of Fe-21Cr-6Mn-0.5N and Fe-23Cr-7Mn-0.6N fabricated by twin-roll strip casting did not show TRIP effects and exhibited lower strength and elongation as compared to Fe-19Cr-6Mn-0.4N.

  3. Mechanisms of plastic deformation in highly cross-linked UHMWPE for total hip components--the molecular physics viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Shishido, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Kengo; Masaoka, Toshinori; Kubo, Kosuke; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Plastic deformation is an unavoidable event in biomedical polymeric implants for load-bearing application during long-term in-vivo service life, which involves a mass transfer process, irreversible chain motion, and molecular reorganization. Deformation-induced microstructural alterations greatly affect mechanical properties and durability of implant devices. The present research focused on evaluating, from a molecular physics viewpoint, the impact of externally applied strain (or stress) in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) prostheses, subjected to radiation cross-linking and subsequent remelting for application in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Two different types of commercial acetabular liners, which belong to the first-generation highly cross-linked UHMWPE (HXLPE), were investigated by means of confocal/polarized Raman microprobe spectroscopy. The amount of crystalline region and the spatial distribution of molecular chain orientation were quantitatively analyzed according to a combined theory including Raman selection rules for the polyethylene orthorhombic structure and the orientation distribution function (ODF) statistical approach. The structurally important finding was that pronounced recrystallization and molecular reorientation increasingly appeared in the near-surface regions of HXLPE liners with increasing the amount of plastic (compressive) deformation stored in the microstructure. Such molecular rearrangements, occurred in response to external strains, locally increase surface cross-shear (CS) stresses, which in turn trigger microscopic wear processes in HXLPE acetabular liners. Thus, on the basis of the results obtained at the molecular scale, we emphasize here the importance of minimizing the development of irrecoverable deformation strain in order to retain the pristine and intrinsically high wear performance of HXLPE components.

  4. Approximation solution of Schrodinger equation for Q-deformed Rosen-Morse using supersymmetry quantum mechanics (SUSY QM)

    SciTech Connect

    Alemgadmi, Khaled I. K. Suparmi; Cari; Deta, U. A.

    2015-09-30

    The approximate analytical solution of Schrodinger equation for Q-Deformed Rosen-Morse potential was investigated using Supersymmetry Quantum Mechanics (SUSY QM) method. The approximate bound state energy is given in the closed form and the corresponding approximate wave function for arbitrary l-state given for ground state wave function. The first excited state obtained using upper operator and ground state wave function. The special case is given for the ground state in various number of q. The existence of Rosen-Morse potential reduce energy spectra of system. The larger value of q, the smaller energy spectra of system.

  5. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Shadden, Shawn C; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here, we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport.

  6. Ear Deformations Give Bats a Physical Mechanism for Fast Adaptation of Ultrasonic Beam Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li; Balakrishnan, Sreenath; He, Weikai; Yan, Zhen; Müller, Rolf

    2011-11-01

    A large number of mammals, including humans, have intricate outer ear shapes that diffract incoming sound in a direction- and frequency-specific manner. Through this physical process, the outer ear shapes encode sound-source information into the sensory signals from each ear. Our results show that horseshoe bats could dynamically control these diffraction processes through fast nonrigid ear deformations. The bats’ ear shapes can alter between extreme configurations in about 100 ms and thereby change their acoustic properties in ways that would suit different acoustic sensing tasks.

  7. Tharsis Province of Mars - Geologic sequence, geometry, and a deformation mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, D. U.; Golombek, M. P.; Mcgill, G. E.

    1979-01-01

    Tharsis development apparently involved two stages: (1) an initial rapid topographic rise accompanied by the development of a vast radial fault system and (2) an extremely long-lived volcanic stage apparently continuing to the geological present. A deformation model is proposed in which a first-order mantle convection cell caused early subcrustal erosion and foundering of the low third of the planet. Underplating and deep intrusion by the eroded materials beneath Tharsis caused isostatic doming. Minor radial gravity motions of surficial layers off the dome produced the radial fault system. The hot underplate eventually affected the surface to cause the very long-lived volcanic second stage.

  8. The role of microstructure on deformation and damage mechanisms in a Nickel-based superalloy at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Kimberly E.

    introduced by considering the mobility limit in the tangential direction leading to strain incompatibility and failure. This limit is diminished by environmental effects which are introduced as a dynamic embrittlement process that hinders grain boundary mobility due to oxygen diffusion. The concepts described herein indicate that implementation of the cohesive zone model requires the knowledge of the grain boundary external and internal deformation fields. The external field is generated by developing and coupling two continuum constitutive models including (i) a microstructure-explicit coarse scale crystal plasticity model with strength provided by tertiary and secondary gamma' precipitates. This scale is appropriate for the representation of the continuum region at the immediate crack tip, and (ii) a macroscopic internal state variable model for the purpose of modeling the response of the far field region located several grains away from the crack path. The hardening contributions of the gamma' precipitates consider dislocation/precipitate interactions in terms of gamma' particles shearing and/or Orowan by-passing mechanisms. The material parameters for these models are obtained from results of low cycle fatigue tests which were performed at three temperatures; 650, 704 and 760°C. Furthermore, a series of microstructure controlled experiments were carried out in order to develop and validate the microstructure dependency feature of the continuum constitutive models. The second requirement in the implementation of the cohesive zone model is a grain boundary deformation model which has been developed, as described above, on the basis of viscous flow rules of the boundary material. This model is supported by dwell crack growth experiments carried out at the three temperatures mentioned above, in both air and vacuum environments. Results of these tests have identified the frequency range in which the grain boundary cohesive zone model is applicable and also provided data to

  9. Theoretical Analysis on Mechanical Deformation of Membrane-Based Photomask Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marumoto, Kenji; Aya, Sunao; Yabe, Hedeki; Okada, Tatsunori; Sumitani, Hiroaki

    2012-04-01

    Membrane-based photomask is used in proximity X-ray lithography including that in LIGA (Lithographie, Galvanoformung und Abformung) process, and near-field photolithography. In this article, out-of-plane deformation (OPD) and in-plane displacement (IPD) of membrane-based photomask blanks are theoretically analyzed to obtain the mask blanks with flat front surface and low stress absorber film. First, we derived the equations of OPD and IPD for the processing steps of membrane-based photomask such as film deposition, back-etching and bonding, using a theory of symmetrical bending of circular plates with a coaxial circular hole and that of deformation of cylinder under hydrostatic pressure. The validity of the equations was proved by comparing the calculation results with experimental ones. Using these equations, we investigated the relation between the geometry of the mask blanks and the distortions generally, and gave the criterion to attain the flat front surface. Moreover, the absorber stress-bias required to obtain zero-stress on finished mask blanks was also calculated and it has been found that only little stress-bias was required for adequate hole size of support plate.

  10. Insights from analogue modelling into the deformation mechanism of the Vaiont landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Ventisette, Chiara; Gigli, Giovanni; Bonini, Marco; Corti, Giacomo; Montanari, Domenico; Santoro, Simone; Sani, Federico; Fanti, Riccardo; Casagli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The Vaiont landslide (Southern Alps, Italy) represents one of the most catastrophic landslides in the world recorded in the modern history. The landslide, occurred on 9th October 1963, involved about 3 × 108 m3 of rock that collapsed in an artificial lake: more than 1900 people died as a consequence of the tsunami produced by the sudden fall of the mass in the water. Despite the importance of this event, many aspects of the Vaiont rockslide still remain unexplained, particularly its fast emplacement. In order to obtain a better understanding of the Vaiont disaster, this paper focuses on the results of analogue models designed to get insights into the internal and surficial deformation patterns that characterized the sliding rock mass. Plan view reconstructions of surface model displacement reveal that the rock mass is subdivided into compartments with different relative movements and differential rotations, believed to have played a significant role in causing the fast collapse. The deformation of the analogue models, compared with geological cross sections and in-situ data, suggests that sliding of the rock mass was accomplished by the development of some new (or the reactivation of pre-existing) fractures into the rock mass.

  11. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W. John; Denny, F. Brett; Follmer, Leon R.; Masters, John M.

    1999-05-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  12. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: Deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  13. Improvement in the mechanical properties of Al/SiC nanocomposites fabricated by severe plastic deformation and friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorrami, M. Sarkari; Kazeminezhad, M.; Miyashita, Y.; Kokabi, A. H.

    2017-03-01

    Severely deformed aluminum sheets were processed by friction stir processing (FSP) with SiC nanoparticles under different conditions to improve the mechanical properties of both the stir zone and the heat affected zone (HAZ). In the case of using a simple probe and the same rotational direction (RD) of the FSP tool between passes, at least three FSP passes were required to obtain the appropriate distribution of nanoparticles. However, after three FSP passes, fracture occurred outward from the stir zone during transverse tensile tests; thus, the strength of the specimen was significantly lower than that of the severely deformed base material because of the softening phenomenon in the HAZ. To improve the mechanical properties of the HAZ, we investigated the possibility of achieving an appropriate distribution of nanoparticles using fewer FSP passes. The results indicated that using the threaded probe and changing the RD of the FSP tool between the passes effectively shattered the clusters of nanoparticles and led to an acceptable distribution of SiC nanoparticles after two FSP passes. In these cases, fracture occurred at the HAZ with higher strength compared to the specimen processed using three FSP passes with the same RD between the passes and with the simple probe. The fracture behaviors of the processed specimens are discussed in detail.

  14. Digital moiré interferometric analysis on the effect of nanoparticle conditioning on the mechanical deformation in dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang Chi; Kishen, Anil

    2016-02-01

    Dentin is a biological composite that forms the major bulk of tooth structure. Understanding the biomechanical response of dentin structure to forces is essential to restore the loss of mechanical integrity associated with dentin loss during disease or treatment procedures. Moiré interferometry is an optical interferometry based method, which allows wholefield, real-time analysis of dental structures with high-sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the deformation gradients in dentin during function and subsequent to surface conditioning with bioactive biopolymeric nanoparticle. Slab shaped dentin specimens were prepared and a customized loading jig was used to compressively load the specimens from 10 N to 50 N. Specific regions of interest was chosen on the dentin specimens for strain analysis. The digital moiré interferometry experiments showed a distinct deformation pattern in dentin in the direction perpendicular to the dentinal tubules, which increased with increase in dentin loss. The dentin conditioned with nanoparticles did not display marked increase in strain gradients with loads. The current photomechanical experiment highlighted the impact of nanoparticle treatment to improve the mechanical integrity of dentin.

  15. The sequence of moderate-size earthquakes at the junction of the Ligurian basin and the Corsica margin (western Mediterranean): The initiation of an active deformation zone revealed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larroque, Christophe; Delouis, Bertrand; Sage, Françoise; Régnier, Marc; Béthoux, Nicole; Courboulex, Françoise; Deschamps, Anne

    2016-04-01

    A new seismically active zone is found in the southern part of the Ligurian basin, 80-km west of Corsica (western Mediterranean). The activity began in February 2011 with a foreshock (ML 4) and a mainshock (ML 5.3) 5 days later, followed by numerous aftershocks. We first analyze the fore- and mainshock in detail. We compare the results obtained using classical methods (linear location in a 1D medium and focal mechanisms from P and S polarities) and new approaches (non-linear location in a 3D medium and waveform modeling for determining the seismic moment and the focal mechanism). Both methods provided similar results for location, depth (in the range of 6-13 km) and focal mechanisms, which reveal reverse faulting with nodal planes oriented N-S and NE-SW. We then locate 27 of the aftershocks in the 3D model and find a 10-km-long NE-SW alignment with a depth between 7 and 16 km. In 2012 and 2013, three other moderate-size events (ML 3.8, 4 and 4.5) occurred and confirm that this zone is still active. The epicentral area is located in the oceanic domain of the Ligurian Basin. From analysis of the bathymetry and high-resolution multi-channel seismic profiles, no morphologic anomaly at surface and no inherited fault in the shallow ~ 4 km depth were imaged, which suggest that no significant deformation occurred in the area since 5 Ma. Thus, the structure(s) activated during the 2011-2013 sequence remain unknown. In light of these results, we point out a notable difference on both sides of the Ligurian Basin: the northern margin, close to the alpine chain, suffered strong earthquakes and large cumulated deformation since 5 Ma, while the southern margin, close to the Corsica-Sardinia continental block, is poorly deformed since 5 Ma.

  16. [Activation and inhibitory mechanisms of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue

    2014-07-01

    Exposure of platelets to subendothelial matrices initiates physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Under high shear stress, von Willebrand factor bridges newly exposed collagen to glycoprotein (GP) Ib on platelets. This initial tethering facilitates association between the collagen receptor GPVI and collagen, which generates tyrosine kinase-dependent activation signals, followed by release of secondary mediators and integrin activation. Activated integrin can bind to their ligands including fibrinogen. The released secondary mediators, ADP and thromboxane A2, activate integrin of flowing platelets, which enables formation of platelet thrombi by binding of activated flowing platelets and adhered platelets to collagen via binding between activated aIIbbeta3 integrin and fibrinogen. Platelets also have inhibitory mechanisms, which help to prevent unwanted platelet activation in vivo.

  17. Spontaneous mechanical activity in depolarized frog ventricle

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Spontaneous mechanical activity can be produced in depolarized frog ventricle by bathing the tissue in a solution with low Na, Iow Ca, and high K+. The contractions can be inhibited by depleting the tissue of Ca first, but they are relatively insensitive to changes in either extracellular [Ca++] or [Ca++]/[Na+]2. They are terminated very rapidly by raising [Na+] to 40 mM. Local anesthetics enhance the spontaneous activity in proportion to the concentration of their free base form. These contractions occur relatively rhythmically for several hours. Since the preparation is multicellular, this suggests a mechanism for intercellular communication without change in membrane potential. PMID:822122

  18. Large-scale deformational systems in the South Polar Layered Deposits (Promethei Lingula, Mars): "Soft-sediment" and Deep-Seated Gravitational Slope Deformations Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guallini, Luca; Brozzetti, Francesco; Marinangeli, Lucia

    2012-08-01

    The present study is the first attempt at a detailed structural and kinematic analysis of large-scale deformational systems observed in the South Polar Layered Deposits (SPLDs) in the Promethei Lingula (PL) margins (Mars). By systematically collecting attitude data referable to previously unknown deformational structures and defining the cross-cut relationships of the structures, we reconstructed a deformational history consisting of two superimposed, well-defined stages. The first stage is dominated by large-scale strike-slip and transtensional faults arranged into conjugate systems and delimiting shear zones that show a wide range of subsidiary structures, including normal and reverse faults, drag folds, boudins, S-C tectonites and sub-horizontal interstratal shear planes marked by sygmoidal boudins. Other typical structures referable to this event are ductile folds (locally true convolute folds) and lobes (ball-and-pillow structures) affecting certain marker beds of the succession. We suggest that the structural assemblage might be the expression of a shallow soft-sediment tectonics that possibly occurred during warm periods of the South Pole climate. The second stage seems to affect the weaker and in certain cases pre-deformed stratigraphic levels of the SPLD succession. This stage is mainly characterized by extensional deformations caused by gravity. The consequence of the deformations is the nucleation of Deep-Seated Gravitational Slope Deformations (DSGSDs) marked by typical morphostructures, such as scarps, trenches and bulging basal contractant zones. These phenomena were never observed within an ice cap. According to terrestrial modeling, these slow collapses were caused by (1) the presence of detachment levels (i.e., subhorizontal bedding planes) along which the ice-sheet margins can slide and (2) the development of listric faults within the glacial mass, which merge with sub-horizontal shear planes in the subsurface. The presence of complex

  19. Isolated, slowly evolving, and dynamical trapping horizons: Geometry and mechanics from surface deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Ivan; Fairhurst, Stephen

    2007-04-15

    We study the geometry and dynamics of both isolated and dynamical trapping horizons by considering the allowed variations of their foliating two-surfaces. This provides a common framework that may be used to consider both their possible evolutions and their deformations as well as derive the well-known flux laws. Using this framework, we unify much of what is already known about these objects as well as derive some new results. In particular we characterize and study the 'almost isolated' trapping horizons known as slowly evolving horizons. It is for these horizons that a dynamical first law holds and this is analogous and closely related to the Hawking-Hartle formula for event horizons.

  20. DEFORMATION CHARACTERISTICS OF CRUSHED-STONE LAYER UNDER CYCLIC IMPACT LOADING FROM MICRO-MECHANICAL VIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akiko; Matsushima, Takashi

    'Hanging sleepers', which have gaps between sleepers and ballast layer are often found in the neighborhood of rail joints or rugged surface rails. This suggests that differential settlement of the ballast layer is due to impact loading generated by the contact between running wheel and rugged surface rail. Then cyclic loading tests were performed on crushed-stone layer with two loading patterns, the one is a cyclic impact loading and the other one is cyclic 'standard' loading controlled at 1/10 loading velocity of the impact loading. It was shown that the crashed-stone layer deforms with volumetric expansion during every off-loading processes under the cyclic impact loading. This phenomena prevents crushed stone layer from forming stable grain columns, then the residual settlement under the cyclic impact loading is larger than that under the cyclic 'standard' loading. A simple mass-spring model simulates that two masses move in the opposite direction with increased frequency of harmonic excitation.

  1. Dynamic restoration mechanism of a Fe{sub 3}Al based alloy during elevated temperature deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Shan, A.; Lin, D.

    1995-08-01

    By TEM and metallographic examination, the authors found that dynamic recovery and following continuous recrystallization, which connects with the elevated temperature ductility, takes place in a Fe{sub 3}Al based alloy during elevated temperature deformation. Dynamic restoration consists of the following process: (1) by climbing or cross-slipping, glide dislocations change into dislocation arrays, (2) the dislocation array attracts lattice dislocations, (3) with increasing dislocation density, a non-equilibrium sub boundary forms, which is easy to migrate, slide or rotate under external force, and (4) when the misorientation angle of the sub boundary increases to a critical value, the sub boundary changes into a grain boundary with continuous misfit. By relaxation, the boundary then changes into a grain boundary consisting of periodical structure units.

  2. Demonstration of the "conditioning effect" in soil organic matter in support of a pore deformation mechanism for sorption hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuefeng; Pignatello, Joseph J

    2002-11-01

    Hysteresis, or isotherm nonsingularity, is a confounding issue in sorption research that undermines the commonplace assumption of reversibility in environmental fate and effects models for organic compounds in soil media. Until now, a molecular-level mechanism for true hysteresis when the sorbate is retrievable, structurally intact, has not been forthcoming. We show here that two organic soils exhibit the "conditioning effect", which refers to the enhancement in sorption of a compound following brief exposure of the sorbent to high concentrations of the same or a similar compound. The conditioning effect has been used in support of a pore deformation mechanism for hysteresis in glassy polymers. By this mechanism, the sorbate causes irreversible changes in the structure of internal nanopores (holes) in the organic matrix upon its sorption. Trichloromethane was the test solute for dichloromethane-conditioned Pahokee soil (44.6% organic carbon), and chlorobenzene and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene were the test solutes for benzene-conditioned Mount Pleasant silt loam (4.5% organic carbon). In each case, the isotherm of the test solute in the conditioned soil was shifted upward of, and was less linear than, the corresponding isotherm in the nonconditioned control. Application of the polymer-based Dual-Mode (partitioning-hole filling) Model shows an expansion of the hole domain as a result of conditioning. The memory of the conditioning effect persists for longer than 96 days at 21 degrees C but is lost upon heating the sample at 100 degrees C. A three-step (sorption-desorption-resorption) experiment demonstrated hysteresis followed by enhanced resorption, implying a mechanistic relationship between hysteresis and the conditioning effect. The results indicate that irreversible pore deformation is a mechanism for hysteresis in natural organic matter materials and suggest that slow matrix relaxation may contribute to the often-observed long-term resistance of some contaminants to

  3. Calculation of the Slip System Activity in Deformed Zinc Single Crystals Using Digital 3-D Image Correlation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Florando, J; Rhee, M; Arsenlis, A; LeBlanc, M; Lassila, D

    2006-02-21

    A 3-D image correlation system, which measures the full-field displacements in 3 dimensions, has been used to experimentally determine the full deformation gradient matrix for two zinc single crystals. Based on the image correlation data, the slip system activity for the two crystals has been calculated. The results of the calculation show that for one crystal, only the primary slip system is active, which is consistent with traditional theory. The other crystal however, shows appreciable deformation on slip systems other than the primary. An analysis has been conducted which confirms the experimental observation that these other slip system deform in such a manner that the net result is slip which is approximately one third the magnitude and directly orthogonal to the primary system.

  4. Structure and mechanical properties of aging Al-Li-Cu-Zr-Sc-Ag alloy after severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaigorodova, L. I.; Rasposienko, D. Yu.; Pushin, V. G.; Pilyugin, V. P.; Smirnov, S. V.

    2015-04-01

    The structural and phase transformations have been studied in aging commercial aluminum-lithium alloy Al-1.2 Li-3.2 Cu-0.09 Zr-0.11 Sc-0.4 Ag-0.3 Mg in the as-delivered state and after severe plastic deformation by torsion for 1, 5 and 10 revolutions under a high pressure of 4 GPa. Deformation-induced nanofragmentation and dynamic recrystallization have been found to occur in the alloy. The degree of recrystallization increases with deformation. Nanofragmentation and recrystallization processes are accompanied by the deformation-induced decomposition of solid solution and changes in both the nucleation mechanism of precipitation and the phase composition of the alloy. The influence of a nanostructured nanophase state of the alloy on its mechanical properties (microhardness, plasticity, elastic modulus, and stiffness) is discussed.

  5. Comments on “Deformation of clinopyroxenite: Evidence for a transition in flow mechanisms and semibrittle behavior” By S.H. Kirby and A.K. Kronenberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, J. N.

    1986-04-01

    Attempts to improve the accuracy of experimentation in the Griggs-type piston-cylinder deformation apparatus are most welcome and the recent study by Kirby and Kronenberg [1984] on the deformation of clinopyroxenite has the potential for useful quantitative manipulation of rheological data. However, there are many apparent inconsistencies and data-handling inaccuracies in this work that require clarification before further use can be made of the data. The following comments relate specifically to (1) the presentation and/or selection of data, (2) rheological relationships, (3) semibrittle behavior, reproducibility and instability, and (4) single versus multiple mechanisms of deformation.

  6. Deformation effect simulation and optimization for double front axle steering mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jungang; Zhang, Siqin; Yang, Qinglong

    2013-03-01

    This paper research on tire wear problem of heavy vehicles with Double Front Axle Steering Mechanism from the flexible effect of Steering Mechanism, and proposes a structural optimization method which use both traditional static structural theory and dynamic structure theory - Equivalent Static Load (ESL) method to optimize key parts. The good simulated and test results show this method has high engineering practice and reference value for tire wear problem of Double Front Axle Steering Mechanism design.

  7. Disclinations and grain boundary migration: evidence for a new deformation mechanism in olivine-rich rocks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, P.; Demouchy, S. A.; Beausir, B.; Taupin, V.; Fressengeas, C.

    2013-12-01

    The rheology of olivine-rich rocks remains poorly understood. In particular, the ability of orthorhombic olivine to bear large strains represents an apparent violation of the von Mises criterion due to a lack of slip systems. In this study we show that a more general description of the deformation process including the motion of rotational defects referred to as disclinations can solve the olivine deformation paradox. Disclinations were proposed together with dislocations by Volterra (1907) to account for elastic distorsions (distorzione) in solids. They have recently been experimentally evidenced from orientation maps in several polycrystalline metallic alloys (Beausir & Fressengeas, 2013). Using high-resolution EBSD orientation maps we show that disclinations decorate grain boundaries in olivine samples deformed experimentally and in nature. We present a disclination-based model of a high-angle tilt boundary in olivine, which demonstrates that an applied shear induces grain boundary migration through disclination motion. This new approach allows further understanding of grain boundary-mediated plasticity in polycrystalline aggregates. By providing the miss