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Sample records for active disassembly balance

  1. 2-opt heuristic for the disassembly line balancing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Seamus M.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2004-02-01

    Disassembly activities are an important part of product recovery operations. The disassembly line is the best choice for automated disassembly of returned products. However, finding the optimal balance for a disassembly line is computationally intensive with exhaustive search quickly becoming prohibitively large. In this paper, a greedy algorithm is presented for obtaining optimal or near-optimal solutions to the disassembly line-balancing problem. The greedy algorithm is a first-fit decreasing algorithm further enhanced to preserve precedence relationships. The algorithm seeks to minimize the number of workstations while addressing hazardous and high demand components. A two optimal algorithm is then developed to balance the part removal sequence and attempt to further reduce the total number of workstations. Examples are considered to illustrate the methodology. The conclusions drawn from the study include the consistent generation of optimal or near-optimal solutions, the ability to preserve precedence, the speed of the algorithms and their practicality due to the ease of implementation.

  2. Combinatorial optimization methods for disassembly line balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Seamus M.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2004-12-01

    Disassembly takes place in remanufacturing, recycling, and disposal with a line being the best choice for automation. The disassembly line balancing problem seeks a sequence which: minimizes workstations, ensures similar idle times, and is feasible. Finding the optimal balance is computationally intensive due to factorial growth. Combinatorial optimization methods hold promise for providing solutions to the disassembly line balancing problem, which is proven to belong to the class of NP-complete problems. Ant colony optimization, genetic algorithm, and H-K metaheuristics are presented and compared along with a greedy/hill-climbing heuristic hybrid. A numerical study is performed to illustrate the implementation and compare performance. Conclusions drawn include the consistent generation of optimal or near-optimal solutions, the ability to preserve precedence, the speed of the techniques, and their practicality due to ease of implementation.

  3. Disassembly line balancing with limited supply and subassembly availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altekin, Fatma Tevhide; Kandiller, Levent; Ozdemirel, Nur Evin

    2004-02-01

    Disassembly line balancing problem (DLBP) aims at finding a feasible assignment of disassembly tasks to workstations such that precedence relations among tasks are satisfied and some measure of effectiveness is optimized. We consider partial disassembly under limited supply of a single product as well as availability of its subassemblies. Hence, in satisfying the demand for revenue generating parts, both discarded products and available subassemblies can be utilized. We assume that part revenues and demand, task times and costs, inventory holding costs, and station opening costs are given. We propose two DLBP formulations. The first one maximizes the profit per disassembly cycle. The second formulation maximizes the profit over the whole planning horizon. Proposed formulations and computational results are presented.

  4. Impact of different disassembly line balancing algorithms on the performance of dynamic kanban system for disassembly line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilkaya, Elif A.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we compare the impact of different disassembly line balancing (DLB) algorithms on the performance of our recently introduced Dynamic Kanban System for Disassembly Line (DKSDL) to accommodate the vagaries of uncertainties associated with disassembly and remanufacturing processing. We consider a case study to illustrate the impact of various DLB algorithms on the DKSDL. The approach to the solution, scenario settings, results and the discussions of the results are included.

  5. Nek2 activation of Kif24 ensures cilium disassembly during the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sehyun; Lee, Kwanwoo; Choi, Jung-Hwan; Ringstad, Niels; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are known to promote ciliogenesis, but mechanisms that promote primary cilia disassembly before mitosis are largely unknown. Here we identify a mechanism that favours cilium disassembly and maintains the disassembled state. We show that co-localization of the S/G2 phase kinase, Nek2 and Kif24 triggers Kif24 phosphorylation, inhibiting cilia formation. We show that Kif24, a microtubule depolymerizing kinesin, is phosphorylated by Nek2, which stimulates its activity and prevents the outgrowth of cilia in proliferating cells, independent of Aurora A and HDAC6. Our data also suggest that cilium assembly and disassembly are in dynamic equilibrium, but Nek2 and Kif24 can shift the balance toward disassembly. Further, Nek2 and Kif24 are overexpressed in breast cancer cells, and ablation of these proteins restores ciliation in these cells, thereby reducing proliferation. Thus, Kif24 is a physiological substrate of Nek2, which regulates cilia disassembly through a concerted mechanism involving Kif24-mediated microtubule depolymerization. PMID:26290419

  6. Uninformed and probabilistic distributed agent combinatorial searches for the unary NP-complete disassembly line balancing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Seamus M.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2005-11-01

    Disassembly takes place in remanufacturing, recycling, and disposal, with a line being the best choice for automation. The disassembly line balancing problem seeks a sequence which: is feasible, minimizes workstations, and ensures similar idle times, as well as other end-of-life specific concerns. Finding the optimal balance is computationally intensive due to exponential growth. Combinatorial optimization methods hold promise for providing solutions to the disassembly line balancing problem, which is proven here to belong to the class of unary NP-complete problems. Probabilistic (ant colony optimization) and uninformed (H-K) search methods are presented and compared. Numerical results are obtained using a recent case study to illustrate the search implementations and compare their performance. Conclusions drawn include the consistent generation of near-optimal solutions, the ability to preserve precedence, the speed of the techniques, and their practicality due to ease of implementation.

  7. A heuristic solution for the disassembly line balancing problem incorporating sequence dependent costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, A. J. D.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2005-11-01

    This paper deals with disassembly sequencing problems subjected to sequence dependent disassembly costs. We present a heuristic and an iterative method based on partial branch and bound concept to solve such problems. Since heuristic methods intrinsically generate suboptimum solutions, we compared the heuristically obtained solutions with the exact solutions to see if they are reasonably good or not. This process, however, is limited to small or perhaps medium sized problems only as the required CPU time for exact methods tends to increase exponentially with the problem size. For the problems tested, we observed that the methods described in this paper generate surprisingly good results using almost negligible amount of CPU time.

  8. Balance Food and Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... eNewsletters Calendar Balance Food and Activity What is Energy Balance? Energy is another word for "calories." Your ... adults, fewer calories are needed at older ages. Energy Balance in Real Life Think of it as ...

  9. SWI/SNF has intrinsic nucleosome disassembly activity that is dependent on adjacent nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Sabri, Abdellah; Pondugula, Santhi; Kassabov, Stefan R; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Kladde, Michael P; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2010-05-28

    The ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF regulates transcription and has been implicated in promoter nucleosome eviction. Efficient nucleosome disassembly by SWI/SNF alone in biochemical assays, however, has not been directly observed. Employing a model system of dinucleosomes rather than mononucleosomes, we demonstrate that remodeling leads to ordered and efficient disassembly of one of the two nucleosomes. An H2A/H2B dimer is first rapidly displaced, and then, in a slower reaction, an entire histone octamer is lost. Nucleosome disassembly by SWI/SNF did not require additional factors such as chaperones or acceptors of histones. Observations in single molecules as well as bulk measurement suggest that a key intermediate in this process is one in which a nucleosome is moved toward the adjacent nucleosome. SWI/SNF recruited by the transcriptional activator Gal4-VP16 preferentially mobilizes the proximal nucleosome and destabilizes the adjacent nucleosome.

  10. Chlamydomonas shortens its flagella by activating axonemal disassembly, stimulating IFT particle trafficking, and blocking anterograde cargo loading.

    PubMed

    Pan, Junmin; Snell, William J

    2005-09-01

    Almost all eukaryotic cells form cilia/flagella, maintain them at their genetically specified lengths, and shorten them. Here, we define the cellular mechanisms that bring about shortening of flagella prior to meiotic cell division and in response to environmental cues in the biflagellated green alga Chlamydomonas. We show that the flagellar shortening pathway is distinct from the one that enforces transient shortening essential for length control. During flagellar shortening, disassembly of the axoneme is stimulated over the basal rate, and the rate of entry into flagella of intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles is increased. Moreover, the particles entering the disassembling flagella lack cargo. Thus, flagellar shortening depends on the interplay between dynamic properties of the axoneme and the IFT machinery; a cell triggered to shorten its flagellum activates disassembly of the axoneme and stimulates entry into the flagellum of IFT particles possessing empty cargo binding sites available to retrieve the disassembled components.

  11. D1 dopamine receptor stimulation impairs striatal proteasome activity in Parkinsonism through 26S proteasome disassembly.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Thiolat, Marie-Laure; Bido, Simone; Martinez, Audrey; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Baufreton, Jérôme; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Bloch, Bertrand; Bezard, Erwan; Martin-Negrier, Marie-Laure

    2015-06-01

    Among the mechanisms underlying the development of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease, complex alterations in dopamine signaling in D1 receptor (D1R)-expressing medium spiny striatal neurons have been unraveled such as, but not limited to, dysregulation of D1R expression, lateral diffusion, intraneuronal trafficking, subcellular localization and desensitization, leading to a pathological anchorage of D1R at the plasma membrane. Such anchorage is partly due to a decreased proteasomal activity that is specific of the L-dopa-exposed dopamine-depleted striatum, results from D1R activation and feeds-back the D1R exaggerated cell surface abundance. The precise mechanisms by which L-dopa affects striatal proteasome activity remained however unknown. We here show, in a series of in vitro ex vivo and in vivo models, that such rapid modulation of striatal proteasome activity intervenes through D1R-mediated disassembly of the 26S proteasome rather than change in transcription or translation of proteasome or proteasome subunits intraneuronal relocalization.

  12. Intracellular Disassembly of Self-Quenched Nanoparticles Turns NIR Fluorescence on for Sensing Furin Activity in Cells and in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Zhang, Jia; Cao, Qinjingwen; An, Linna; Liang, Gaolin

    2015-06-16

    There has been no report on enzyme-controlled disassembly of self-quenched NIR fluorescent nanoparticles turning fluorescence on for specific detection/imaging of the enzyme's activity in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we reported the rational design of new NIR probe 1 whose fluorescence signal was self-quenched upon reduction-controlled condensation and subsequent assembly of its nanoparticles (i.e., 1-NPs). Then disassembly of 1-NPs by furin turned the fluorescence on. Employing this enzymatic strategy, we successfully applied 1-NPs for NIR detection of furin in vitro and NIR imaging furin activity in living cells. Moreover, we also applied 1-NPs for discriminative NIR imaging of MDA-MB-468 tumors in nude mice. This NIR probe 1 might be further developed for tumor-targeted imaging in routine preclinical studies or even in patients in the future.

  13. Active balance system and vibration balanced machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass.

  14. Modeling operational behavior of a disassembly line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilkaya, Elif A.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we present a dynamic kanban (pull) system specifically developed for disassembly lines. This type of kanban system is much more complex than the traditional kanban system used in assembly lines. For instance, unlike the assembly line where the external demand occurs only at the last station, the demands in the disassembly case also occur at any of the intermittent stations. The reason is that as a product moves on the disassembly line, various parts are disassembled at every station and accumulated at that station. Therefore, there are as many demand sources as there are number of parts. We consider a case example involving the end-of-life products. Based on the precedence relationships and other criteria such as hazardous properties of the parts, we balance the disassembly line. The results of the disassembly line-balancing problem (DLBP) are used as input to the proposed dynamic kanban system for disassembly line (DKSDL). We compare the performance of the DKSDL to the modified kanban system for disassembly line (MKSDL), which was previously introduced by the authors. We show, via simulation, that the DKSDL is far superior to MKSDL considered.

  15. The pedagogical value of Disassemble/Analyze/Assemble (DAA) activities: Assessing the potential for motivation and transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalrymple, Odesma Onika

    Undergraduate engineering institutions are currently seeking to improve recruiting practices and to retain engineering majors particularly by addressing what many studies document as a major challenge of poor instruction. There is an undisputed need for instructional practices that motivate students in addition to facilitating the transfer of learning beyond the classroom. Reverse engineering and product dissection, more broadly termed Disassemble/Analyze/Assemble (DAA) activities, have shown potential to address these concerns, based on the reviews of students and professors alike. DAA activities involve the systematic deconstruction of an artifact, the subsequent analysis and possible reconstruction of its components for the purpose of understanding the embodied fundamental concepts, design principles and developmental processes. These activities have been part of regular industry practice for some time; however, the systematic analysis of their benefits for learning and instruction is a relatively recent phenomenon. A number of studies have provided highly descriptive accounts of curricula and possible outcomes of DAA activities; but, relatively few have compared participants doing DAA activities to a control group doing more traditional activities. In this respect, two quasi-experiments were conducted as part of a first-year engineering laboratory, and it was hypothesized that students who engaged in the DAA activity would be more motivated and would demonstrate higher frequencies of transfer than the control. A DAA activity that required students to disassemble a single-use camera and analyze its components to discover how it works was compared to a step-by-step laboratory activity in the first experiment and a lecture method of instruction in the second experiment. In both experiments, over forty percent of the students that engaged in the DAA activity demonstrated the ability to transfer the knowledge gained about the functions of the camera's components and

  16. Nuclear removal during terminal lens fiber cell differentiation requires CDK1 activity: appropriating mitosis-related nuclear disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Chaffee, Blake R.; Shang, Fu; Chang, Min-Lee; Clement, Tracy M.; Eddy, Edward M.; Wagner, Brad D.; Nakahara, Masaki; Nagata, Shigekazu; Robinson, Michael L.; Taylor, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Lens epithelial cells and early lens fiber cells contain the typical complement of intracellular organelles. However, as lens fiber cells mature they must destroy their organelles, including nuclei, in a process that has remained enigmatic for over a century, but which is crucial for the formation of the organelle-free zone in the center of the lens that assures clarity and function to transmit light. Nuclear degradation in lens fiber cells requires the nuclease DNase IIβ (DLAD) but the mechanism by which DLAD gains access to nuclear DNA remains unknown. In eukaryotic cells, cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), in combination with either activator cyclins A or B, stimulates mitotic entry, in part, by phosphorylating the nuclear lamin proteins leading to the disassembly of the nuclear lamina and subsequent nuclear envelope breakdown. Although most post-mitotic cells lack CDK1 and cyclins, lens fiber cells maintain these proteins. Here, we show that loss of CDK1 from the lens inhibited the phosphorylation of nuclear lamins A and C, prevented the entry of DLAD into the nucleus, and resulted in abnormal retention of nuclei. In the presence of CDK1, a single focus of the phosphonuclear mitotic apparatus is observed, but it is not focused in CDK1-deficient lenses. CDK1 deficiency inhibited mitosis, but did not prevent DNA replication, resulting in an overall reduction of lens epithelial cells, with the remaining cells possessing an abnormally large nucleus. These observations suggest that CDK1-dependent phosphorylations required for the initiation of nuclear membrane disassembly during mitosis are adapted for removal of nuclei during fiber cell differentiation. PMID:25139855

  17. A kinetic assessment of the C. elegans amyloid disaggregation activity enables uncoupling of disassembly and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Bieschke, Jan; Cohen, Ehud; Murray, Amber; Dillin, Andrew; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2009-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a common feature of late onset neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. In Alzheimer's disease, misassembly of the Abeta peptide is genetically linked to proteotoxicity associated with disease etiology. A reduction in Abeta proteotoxicity is accomplished, in part, by the previously reported Abeta disaggregation and proteolysis activities-under partial control of heat shock factor 1, a transcription factor regulating proteostasis in the cytosol and negatively regulated by insulin growth factor signaling. Herein, we report an improved in vitro assay to quantify recombinant fibrillar Abeta disaggregation kinetics accomplished by the exogenous application of C.elegans extracts. With this assay we demonstrate that the Abeta disaggregation and proteolysis activities of C.elegans are separable. The disaggregation activity found in C.elegans preparations is more heat resistant than the proteolytic activity. Abeta disaggregation in the absence of proteolysis was found to be a reversible process. Future discovery of the molecular basis of the disaggregation and proteolysis activities offers the promise of delaying the age-onset proteotoxicity that leads to neurodegeneration in a spectrum of maladies.

  18. Spacer intercalated disassembly and photodynamic activity of zinc phthalocyanine inside nanochannels of mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xing; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Zhao, Yanli

    2013-12-26

    Hydrophobic photosensitizer zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPc) was loaded into adamantane (Ad) modified nanochannels of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs). The Ad units on the surface of MSNPs were complexed with amino-substituted β-cyclodextrin to enhance the solubility of the hybrid in aqueous solution. The amino groups on β-cyclodextrin also provide functional sites for further conjugation with targeting ligands toward targeted cancer therapy. Since the intercalation of the Ad spacer isolates loaded ZnPc and prevents its aggregation inside MSNPs, ZnPc exhibits its monomeric characteristics to effectively generate cytotoxic singlet oxygen ((1)O2) upon light irradiation (675 nm) in aqueous conditions, leading to efficient photodynamic activity for successful cancer treatment in vitro. Current research presents a convenient approach to maintain the monomeric state of hydrophobic photosensitizer ZnPc by rationally utilizing multifunctional MSNPs as the carriers. The novel hybrid with targeting capability achieves active photodynamic property of monomeric ZnPc in aqueous solution under light irradiation, which may find its way for practical photodynamic therapy in the future.

  19. Pit disassembly motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.; Pittman, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) is being designed for the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The facility will recover plutonium from excess nuclear weapon pits defined in START II and START III treaties. The plutonium will be stored and used to produce mixed oxide reactor fuel at another new DOE facility. Because of radiation dose issues, much of the pit disassembly work and material transfer will be automated. Automated material handling systems will interface with disassembly lathes, conversion reactors that produce oxide for storage, robotic container welding stations, vault retrieval systems, and nondestructive assay (NDA) instrumentation. The goal is to use common motion control hardware for material transfer and possibly common motion controllers for the unique PDCF systems. The latter is complicated by the different directions manufactures are considering for distributed control, such as Firewire, SERCOS, etc., and by the unique control requirements of machines such as lathes compared to controls for an integrated NDA system. The current design approach is to standardize where possible, use network cables to replace wire bundles where possible, but to first select hardware and motion controllers that meet specific machine or process requirements.

  20. S6K1-mediated disassembly of mitochondrial URI/PP1gamma complexes activates a negative feedback program that counters S6K1 survival signaling.

    PubMed

    Djouder, Nabil; Metzler, Stefan Christian; Schmidt, Alexander; Wirbelauer, Christiane; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hess, Daniel; Krek, Wilhelm

    2007-10-12

    S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) acts to integrate nutrient and growth factor signals to promote cell growth but also cell survival as a mitochondria-tethered protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates the proapoptotic molecule BAD. Here we report that the prefoldin chaperone URI represents a mitochondrial substrate of S6K1. In growth factor-deprived or rapamycin-treated cells, URI forms stable complexes with protein phosphatase (PP)1gamma at mitochondria, thereby inhibiting the activity of the bound enzyme. Growth factor stimulation induces disassembly of URI/PP1gamma complexes through S6K1-mediated phosphorylation of URI at serine 371. This activates a PP1gamma-dependent negative feedback program that decreases S6K1 activity and BAD phosphorylation, thereby altering the threshold for apoptosis. These findings establish URI and PP1gamma as integral components of an S6K1-regulated mitochondrial pathway dedicated, in part, to oppose sustained S6K1 survival signaling and to ensure that the mitochondrial threshold for apoptosis is set in accord with nutrient and growth factor availability.

  1. AGC-2 Disassembly Report

    SciTech Connect

    William Windes

    2014-05-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Graphite Research and Development (R&D) Program is currently measuring irradiated material properties for predicting the behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades available for use within the cores of new very high temperature reactor designs. The Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment, consisting of six irradiation capsules, will generate irradiated graphite performance data for NGNP reactor operating conditions. The AGC experiment is designed to determine the changes to specific material properties such as thermal diffusivity, thermal expansion, elastic modulus, mechanical strength, irradiation induced dimensional change rate, and irradiation creep for a wide variety of nuclear grade graphite types over a range of high temperature, and moderate doses. A series of six capsules containing graphite test specimens will be used to expose graphite test samples to a dose range from 1 to 7 dpa at three different temperatures (600, 900, and 1200°C) as described in the Graphite Technology Development Plan. Since irradiation induced creep within graphite components is considered critical to determining the operational life of the graphite core, some of the samples will also be exposed to an applied load to determine the creep rate for each graphite type under both temperature and neutron flux. All six AGC capsules in the experiment will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). AGC-1 and AGC-2 will be irradiated in the south flux trap and AGC-3–AGC-6 will be irradiated in the east flux trap. The change in flux traps is due to NGNP irradiation priorities requiring the AGC experiment to be moved to accommodate Fuel irradiation experiments. After irradiation, all six AGC capsules will be cooled in the ATR Canal, sized for shipment, and shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) where the capsule will be disassembled in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF). During disassembly, the metallic

  2. Static Detection of Disassembly Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Nithya; Debray, Saumya; Fligg, Alan K

    2009-10-13

    Static disassembly is a crucial first step in reverse engineering executable files, and there is a consider- able body of work in reverse-engineering of binaries, as well as areas such as semantics-based security anal- ysis, that assumes that the input executable has been correctly disassembled. However, disassembly errors, e.g., arising from binary obfuscations, can render this assumption invalid. This work describes a machine- learning-based approach, using decision trees, for stat- ically identifying possible errors in a static disassem- bly; such potential errors may then be examined more closely, e.g., using dynamic analyses. Experimental re- sults using a variety of input executables indicate that our approach performs well, correctly identifying most disassembly errors with relatively few false positives.

  3. Partial disassembly of peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Rat liver peroxisomes were subjected to a variety of procedures intended to partially disassemble or damage them; the effects were analyzed by recentrifugation into sucrose gradients, enzyme analyses, electron microscopy, and SDS PAGE. Freezing and thawing or mild sonication released some matrix proteins and produced apparently intact peroxisomal "ghosts" with crystalloid cores and some fuzzy fibrillar content. Vigorous sonication broke open the peroxisomes but the membranes remained associated with cores and fibrillar and amorphous matrix material. The density of both ghosts and more severely damaged peroxisomes was approximately 1.23. Pyrophosphate (pH 9) treatment solubilized the fibrillar content, yielding ghosts that were empty except for cores. Some matrix proteins such as catalase and thiolase readily leak from peroxisomes. Other proteins were identified that remain in mechanically damaged peroxisomes but are neither core nor membrane proteins because they can be released by pyrophosphate treatment. These constitute a class of poorly soluble matrix proteins that appear to correspond to the fibrillar material observed morphologically. All of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes are located in the matrix, but they vary greatly in how easily they leak out. Palmitoyl coenzyme A synthetase is in the membrane, based on its co-distribution with the 22-kilodalton integral membrane polypeptide. PMID:2989301

  4. Id-1 promotes TGF-{beta}1-induced cell motility through HSP27 activation and disassembly of adherens junction in prostate epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Di Kaijun; Wong, Y.C. Wang Xianghong

    2007-11-15

    Id-1 (inhibitor of differentiation or DNA binding-1) has been positively associated with cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and invasiveness during tumorigenesis. In addition, Id-1 has been shown to modulate cellular sensitivity to TGF-{beta}1 (transforming growth factor {beta}1). Here we demonstrate a novel role of Id-1 in promoting TGF-{beta}1-induced cell motility in a non-malignant prostate epithelial cell line, NPTX. We found that Id-1 promoted F-actin stress fiber formation in response to TGF-{beta}1, which was associated with increased cell-substrate adhesion and cell migration in NPTX cells. In addition, this positive effect of Id-1 on TGF-{beta}1-induced cell motility was mediated through activation of MEK-ERK signaling pathway and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (heat shock protein 27). Furthermore, Id-1 disrupted the adherens junction complex in TGF-{beta}1-treated cells through down-regulation of E-cadherin, redistribution of {beta}-catenin, along with up-regulation of N-cadherin. These lines of evidence reveal a novel tumorigenic role of Id-1 through reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and disassembly of cell-cell adhesion in response to TGF-{beta}1 in human prostate epithelial cells, and suggest that intracellular Id-1 levels might be a determining factor for switching TGF-{beta}1 from a growth inhibitor to a tumor promoter during prostate carcinogenesis.

  5. Anticancer peptide CIGB-300 binds to nucleophosmin/B23, impairs its CK2-mediated phosphorylation, and leads to apoptosis through its nucleolar disassembly activity.

    PubMed

    Perera, Yasser; Farina, Hernán G; Gil, Jeovanis; Rodriguez, Arielis; Benavent, Fernando; Castellanos, Lila; Gómez, Roberto E; Acevedo, Boris E; Alonso, Daniel F; Perea, Silvio E

    2009-05-01

    CIGB-300, formerly known as P15-tat, is a proapoptotic peptide with established antiproliferative activity in vitro and antitumoral activity in vivo. This hypothesis-driven peptide was initially selected for its ability to impair the in vitro CK2-mediated phosphorylation in one of its substrates through direct binding to the conserved acidic phosphoaceptor domain. However, the actual in vivo target(s) on human cancer cells among the hundreds of CK2 substrates as well as the subsequent events that lead to apoptosis on tumor cells remains to be determined. In this work, we identified the multifunctional oncoprotein nucleophosmin/B23 as a major target for CIGB-300. In vivo, the CIGB-300-B23 interaction was shown by pull-down experiments and confirmed by the early in situ colocalization of both molecules in the cell nucleolus. Moreover, CIGB-300 inhibits the CK2-mediated phosphorylation of B23 in a dose-dependent fashion both in vitro and in vivo as shown using the recombinant GST fusion protein and the metabolic labeling approach, respectively. Such phosphorylation impairment was correlated with the ability of CIGB-300 to induce nucleolar disassembly as documented by the use of established markers for nucleolar structure. Finally, we showed that such a sequence of events leads to the rapid and massive onset of apoptosis both at the molecular and cellular levels. Collectively, these findings provide important clues by which the CIGB-300 peptide exerts its proapoptotic effect on tumor cells and highlights the suitability of the B23/CK2 pathway for cancer-targeted therapy.

  6. Caspase-activated DNase is necessary and sufficient for oligonucleosomal DNA breakdown, but not for chromatin disassembly during caspase-dependent apoptosis of LN-18 glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Osuna, María; Garcia-Belinchón, Mercè; Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Gil-Guiñón, Estel; Casanelles, Elisenda; Yuste, Victor J

    2014-07-04

    Caspase-dependent apoptosis is a controlled type of cell death characterized by oligonucleosomal DNA breakdown and major nuclear morphological alterations. Other kinds of cell death do not share these highly distinctive traits because caspase-activated DNase (DFF40/CAD) remains inactive. Here, we report that human glioblastoma multiforme-derived LN-18 cells do not hydrolyze DNA into oligonucleosomal fragments after apoptotic insult. Furthermore, their chromatin remains packaged into a single mass, with no signs of nuclear fragmentation. However, ultrastructural analysis reveals that nuclear disassembly occurs, although compacted chromatin does not localize into apoptotic nuclear bodies. Caspases become properly activated, and ICAD, the inhibitor of DFF40/CAD, is correctly processed. Using cell-free in vitro assays, we show that chromatin from isolated nuclei of LN-18 cells is suitable for hydrolysis into oligonuclesomal fragments by staurosporine-pretreated SH-SY5Y cytoplasms. However, staurosporine-pretreated LN-18 cytoplasms do not induce DNA laddering in isolated nuclei from either LN-18 or SH-SY5Y cells because LN-18 cells express lower amounts of DFF40/CAD. DFF40/CAD overexpression makes LN-18 cells fully competent to degrade their DNA into oligonucleosome-sized fragments, and yet they remain unable to arrange their chromatin into nuclear clumps after apoptotic insult. Indeed, isolated nuclei from LN-18 cells were resistant to undergoing apoptotic nuclear morphology in vitro. The use of LN-18 cells has uncovered a previously unsuspected cellular model, whereby a caspase-dependent chromatin package is DFF40/CAD-independent, and DFF40/CAD-mediated double-strand DNA fragmentation does not warrant the distribution of the chromatin into apoptotic nuclear bodies. The studies highlight a not-yet reported DFF40/CAD-independent mechanism driving conformational nuclear changes during caspase-dependent cell death.

  7. First insights into disassembled "evapotranspiration"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chormański, Jarosław; Kleniewska, Małgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatyłowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present an initial data analysis obtained from a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them fromthe total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its component transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project

  8. Balance Comparisons between Female Dancers and Active Nondancers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambegaonkar, Jatin P.; Caswell, Shane V.; Winchester, Jason B.; Shimokochi, Yohei; Cortes, Nelson; Caswell, Amanda M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Female dancers have lower anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury rates compared with physically active women. Enhanced balance can decrease musculoskeletal injury risk. Dancers are proposed to have superior balance compared with physically active nondancers, and this may reduce their risk for ACL injury. However, whether female dancers…

  9. Montmorillonite-induced Bacteriophage φ6 Disassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusiak, A.; Gottlieb, P.; Katz, A.; Alimova, A.; Steiner, J. C.; Block, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is estimated that there are 1031 virus particles on Earth making viruses an order of magnitude more prevalent in number than prokaryotes with the vast majority of viruses being bacteriophages. Clays are a major component of soils and aquatic sediments and can react with RNA, proteins and bacterial biofilms. The clays in soils serve as an important moderator between phage and their host bacteria, helping to preserve the evolutionary balance. Studies on the effects of clays on viral infectivity have given somewhat contradictory results; possibly a consequence of clay-virus interactions being dependent on the unique structure of particular viruses. In this work, the interaction between montmorillonite and the bacteriophage φ6 is investigated. φ6 is a member of the cystovirus family that infects Pseudomonas syringe, a common plant pathogen. As a member of the cystovirus family with an enveloped structure, φ6 serves as a model for reoviruses, a human pathogen. Experiments were conducted with φ6 suspended in dilute, purified homoionic commercial-grade montmorillonite over a range of virus:clay ratios. At a 1:100000 virus:clay ratio, the clay reduced viral infectivity by 99%. The minimum clay to virus ratio which results in a measurable reduction of P. syringae infection is 1:1. Electron microscopy demonstrates that mixed suspensions of smectite and virus co-aggregate to form flocs encompassing virions within the smectite. Both free viral particles as well as those imbedded in the flocs are seen in the micrographs to be missing the envelope- leaving only the nucleocapsid (NC) intact; indicating that smectite inactivates the virus by envelope disassembly. These results have strong implications in the evolution of both the φ6 virus and its P. syringae host cells. TEM of aggregate showing several disassembled NCs.

  10. BALANCE

    DOEpatents

    Carmichael, H.

    1953-01-01

    A torsional-type analytical balance designed to arrive at its equilibrium point more quickly than previous balances is described. In order to prevent external heat sources creating air currents inside the balance casing that would reiard the attainment of equilibrium conditions, a relatively thick casing shaped as an inverted U is placed over the load support arms and the balance beam. This casing is of a metal of good thernnal conductivity characteristics, such as copper or aluminum, in order that heat applied to one portion of the balance is quickly conducted to all other sensitive areas, thus effectively preventing the fornnation of air currents caused by unequal heating of the balance.

  11. CALUTRON ASSEMBLING AND DISASSEMBLING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, R.E.; Thornton, J.

    1959-01-27

    This patent relates to the assembling and disassembling of a calutron and, more specifically describes a calutron having the ion separating mechanism carried by a fuce plate removably secured to the tank. When it is desired to withdraw the ion separating mechanism from the tank, a motor is energized and a carriage attached through a bracket to the fuce plate is driven along a track. The face plate moves out from the tank in substantially a linear direction, preventing injury to the ion separating mechanism.

  12. The activity of the histone chaperone yeast Asf1 in the assembly and disassembly of histone H3/H4–DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Douglas C.; Scorgie, Jean K.; Churchill, Mair E. A.

    2011-01-01

    The deposition of the histones H3/H4 onto DNA to give the tetrasome intermediate and the displacement of H3/H4 from DNA are thought to be the first and the last steps in nucleosome assembly and disassembly, respectively. Anti-silencing function 1 (Asf1) is a chaperone of the H3/H4 dimer that functions in both of these processes. However, little is known about the thermodynamics of chaperone–histone interactions or the direct role of Asf1 in the formation or disassembly of histone–DNA complexes. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Asf1 shields H3/H4 from unfavorable DNA interactions and aids the formation of favorable histone–DNA interactions through the formation of disomes. However, Asf1 was unable to disengage histones from DNA for tetrasomes formed with H3/H4 and strong nucleosome positioning DNA sequences or tetrasomes weakened by mutant (H3K56Q/H4) histones or non-positioning DNA sequences. Furthermore, Asf1 did not associate with preformed tetrasomes. These results are consistent with the measured affinity of Asf1 for H3/H4 dimers of 2.5 nM, which is weaker than the association of H3/H4 for DNA. These studies support a mechanism by which Asf1 aids H3/H4 deposition onto DNA but suggest that additional factors or post-translational modifications are required for Asf1 to remove H3/H4 from tetrasome intermediates in chromatin. PMID:21447559

  13. Balancing Openness and Interpretation in Active Listening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topornycky, Joseph; Golparian, Shaya

    2016-01-01

    Active listening is an important communication skill in a variety of disciplines and professions, including the profession of Educational Development. In our roles as educational developers, we engage in a variety of processes, all of which rely heavily on the practice of active listening. Emerging strategies of active listening praxis have…

  14. 19 CFR 181.132 - Disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disassembly. 181.132 Section 181.132 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT Rules of Origin § 181.132 Disassembly. (a) Treated...

  15. 19 CFR 181.132 - Disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disassembly. 181.132 Section 181.132 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT Rules of Origin § 181.132 Disassembly. (a) Treated...

  16. 19 CFR 181.132 - Disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disassembly. 181.132 Section 181.132 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT Rules of Origin § 181.132 Disassembly. (a) Treated...

  17. 19 CFR 181.132 - Disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disassembly. 181.132 Section 181.132 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT Rules of Origin § 181.132 Disassembly. (a) Treated...

  18. PREVIOUS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND BODY BALANCE IN ELDERLY PEOPLE

    PubMed Central

    Nowotny-Czupryna, O.; Czupryna, K.; Nowotny, J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to evaluate the efficiency of body balance regulation in the elderly and verify whether physical activity in adolescence could influence later physical efficiency. Research was carried out on 62 persons aged between 65 and 96 years of age. Fifty people declared that they undertook physical activity in adolescence, while 12 reported no activity. Stabilographic examinations were performed during trials with open and closed eyes on a horizontally situated platform tilted forward and backward. The centre-of-pressure (COP) path length, sway range area and centre-of-pressure velocity (COP velocity) were assessed. The safety margin when a person leans forward and backward was evaluated as well. On a horizontally situated platform, exclusion of visual control in most of the examined participants resulted in a significant increase in values of examined parameters. Tilting the platform caused in both groups an increase in values of all the parameters. These changes were more visible when a trial with eyes closed was performed and the group of active people obtained better results. These people were also able to use the support area more effectively when changing the position of the body. It was found that body balance disorder affects more often elderly people who were less active in adolescence and that with age visual balance control dominates the proprioceptive one. This means that physical activity directed towards, among other things, forming and improving the body balance regulation system is needed at an early age. PMID:24795500

  19. Balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    At many occasions we are asked to achieve a “balance” in our lives: when it comes, for example, to work and food. Balancing is crucial in game design as well as many have pointed out. In games with a meaningful purpose, however, balancing is remarkably different. It involves the balancing of three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play. From the experience of designing Levee Patroller, I observed that different types of tensions can come into existence that require balancing. It is possible to conceive of within-worlds dilemmas, between-worlds dilemmas, and trilemmas. The first, the within-world dilemmas, only take place within one of the worlds. We can think, for example, of a user interface problem which just relates to the world of Play. The second, the between-worlds dilemmas, have to do with a tension in which two worlds are predominantly involved. Choosing between a cartoon or a realistic style concerns, for instance, a tension between Reality and Play. Finally, the trilemmas are those in which all three worlds play an important role. For each of the types of tensions, I will give in this level a concrete example from the development of Levee Patroller. Although these examples come from just one game, I think the examples can be exemplary for other game development projects as they may represent stereotypical tensions. Therefore, to achieve harmony in any of these forthcoming games, it is worthwhile to study the struggles we had to deal with.

  20. Disassembling iron availability to phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Yeala; Lis, Hagar

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis, and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO(2) drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature, and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability - the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton - and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron, and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic autotrophs. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as a spectrum rather than an absolute "all or nothing." We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe-compounds, and environments, and for gaging the contribution of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species.

  1. Disassembling Iron Availability to Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Yeala; Lis, Hagar

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis, and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature, and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability – the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton – and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron, and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic autotrophs. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as a spectrum rather than an absolute “all or nothing.” We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe-compounds, and environments, and for gaging the contribution of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species. PMID:22529839

  2. 401(k) plan asset allocation, account balances, and loan activity.

    PubMed

    VanDerhei, J; Galer, R; Quick, C; Rea, J

    1999-01-01

    The Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) and the Investment Company Institute (ICI) have been collaborating for the past two years to collect data on participants in 401(k) plans. This effort, known as the EBRI/ICI Participant-Directed Retirement Plan Data Collection Project, has obtained data for 401(k) plan participants from certain of EBRI and ICI sponsors and members serving as plan recordkeepers and administrators. The report includes 1996 information on 6.6 million active participants in 27,762 plans holding nearly $246 billion in assets. The data include demographic information, annual contributions, plan balances, asset allocation, and loans, and are currently the most comprehensive source of information on individual plan participants. In 1996, the first year for which data are ready for analysis, the EBRI/ICI database appears to be broadly representative of the universe of 401(k) plans. Key findings include: for all participants, 44.0 percent of the total plan balance is invested in equity funds, 19.1 percent in employer stock, 15.1 percent in guaranteed investment contracts (GICs), 7.8 percent in balanced funds, 6.8 percent in bond funds, 5.4 percent in money funds, 0.8 percent in other stable value funds, and 1.0 percent in other or unidentified investments. This allocation implies that over two-thirds of plan balances are invested directly or indirectly in equity securities. Asset allocation varies with age. For instance, on average, individuals in their twenties invested 76.8 percent of assets in equities and only 22.1 percent in fixed-income investments. By comparison, individuals in their sixties invested 53.2 percent of their assets in equities and 45.9 percent of assets in fixed-income investments. Investment options offered by 401(k) plans appear to influence asset allocation. For example, the addition of company stock substantially reduces the allocation to equity funds and the addition of GICs lowers allocations to bond and money funds

  3. Interactome disassembly during apoptosis occurs independent of caspase cleavage.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nichollas E; Rogers, Lindsay D; Prudova, Anna; Brown, Nat F; Fortelny, Nikolaus; Overall, Christopher M; Foster, Leonard J

    2017-01-12

    Protein-protein interaction networks (interactomes) define the functionality of all biological systems. In apoptosis, proteolysis by caspases is thought to initiate disassembly of protein complexes and cell death. Here we used a quantitative proteomics approach, protein correlation profiling (PCP), to explore changes in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial interactomes in response to apoptosis initiation as a function of caspase activity. We measured the response to initiation of Fas-mediated apoptosis in 17,991 interactions among 2,779 proteins, comprising the largest dynamic interactome to date. The majority of interactions were unaffected early in apoptosis, but multiple complexes containing known caspase targets were disassembled. Nonetheless, proteome-wide analysis of proteolytic processing by terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates (TAILS) revealed little correlation between proteolytic and interactome changes. Our findings show that, in apoptosis, significant interactome alterations occur before and independently of caspase activity. Thus, apoptosis initiation includes a tight program of interactome rearrangement, leading to disassembly of relatively few, select complexes. These early interactome alterations occur independently of cleavage of these protein by caspases.

  4. Choreography of importin-α/CAS complex assembly and disassembly at nuclear pores.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changxia; Fu, Guo; Ciziene, Danguole; Stewart, Murray; Musser, Siegfried M

    2013-04-23

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) mediate the exchange of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm. Soluble nuclear transport receptors bind signal-dependent cargos to form transport complexes that diffuse through the NPC and are then disassembled. Although transport receptors enable the NPC's permeability barrier to be overcome, directionality is established by complex assembly and disassembly. Here, we delineate the choreography of importin-α/CAS complex assembly and disassembly in permeabilized cells, using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer and particle tracking. Monitoring interaction sequences in intact NPCs ensures spatiotemporal preservation of structures and interactions critical for activity in vivo. We show that key interactions between components are reversible, multiple outcomes are often possible, and the assembly and disassembly of complexes are precisely controlled to occur at the appropriate place and time. Importin-α mutants that impair interactions during nuclear import were used together with cytoplasmic Ran GTPase-activating factors to demonstrate that importin-α/CAS complexes form in the nuclear basket region, at the termination of protein import, and disassembly of importin-α/CAS complexes after export occurs in the cytoplasmic filament region of the NPC. Mathematical models derived from our data emphasize the intimate connection between transport and the coordinated assembly and disassembly of importin-α/CAS complexes for generating productive transport cycles.

  5. Generation of control sequences for a pilot-disassembly system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, Guenther; Kim, Hyung-Ju; Keil, Thomas

    2002-02-01

    Closing the product and material cycles has emerged as a paradigm for industry in the 21st century. Disassembly plays a key role in a life cycle economy since it enables the recovery of resources. A partly automated disassembly system should adapt to a large variety of products and different degrees of devaluation. Also the amounts of products to be disassembled can vary strongly. To cope with these demands an approach to generate on-line disassembly control sequences will be presented. In order to react on these demands the technological feasibility is considered within a procedure for the generation of disassembly control sequences. Procedures are designed to find available and technologically feasible disassembly processes. The control system is formed by modularised and parameterised control units in the cell level within the entire control architecture. In the first development stage product and process analyses at the sample product washing machine were executed. Furthermore a generalized disassembly process was defined. Afterwards these processes were structured in primary and secondary functions. In the second stage the disassembly control at the technological level was investigated. Factors were the availability of the disassembly tools and the technological feasibility of the disassembly processes within the disassembly system. Technical alternative disassembly processes are determined as a result of availability of the tools and technological feasibility of processes. The fourth phase was the concept for the generation of the disassembly control sequences. The approach will be proved in a prototypical disassembly system.

  6. Activities-Specific Balance Confidence in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nilsagård, Ylva; Carling, Anna; Forsberg, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the validity of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC) in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Design. A multicentre, cross-sectional study. Setting. Six rural and urban Swedish sites, including specialized units at hospitals and primary care centers. Participants. A sample of 84 PwMS with subjective gait and balance impairment but still able to walk 100 m (comparable with EDSS 1–6). Outcome Measures. Timed Up and Go, Timed Up and Gocog, 25-foot Timed Walk Test, Four Square Step Test, Dynamic Gait Index, Chair Stand Test, 12-item MS Walking Scale, self-reported falls, and use of assistive walking device were used for validation. Results. The concurrent convergent validity was moderate to good (0.50 to −0.75) with the highest correlation found for the 12-item MS Walking Scale. The ABC discriminated between multiple fallers and nonfallers but not between men and women. Ecological validity is suggested since ABC discriminated between users of assistive walking device and nonusers. The internal consistency was high at α = 0.95, and interitem correlations were between 0.30 and 0.83. Conclusion. This study supports the validity of the ABC for persons with mild-to-moderate MS. The participants lacked balance confidence in many everyday activities, likely restricting their participation in society. PMID:22919491

  7. Activities-specific balance confidence in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nilsagård, Ylva; Carling, Anna; Forsberg, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the validity of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC) in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Design. A multicentre, cross-sectional study. Setting. Six rural and urban Swedish sites, including specialized units at hospitals and primary care centers. Participants. A sample of 84 PwMS with subjective gait and balance impairment but still able to walk 100 m (comparable with EDSS 1-6). Outcome Measures. Timed Up and Go, Timed Up and Go(cog), 25-foot Timed Walk Test, Four Square Step Test, Dynamic Gait Index, Chair Stand Test, 12-item MS Walking Scale, self-reported falls, and use of assistive walking device were used for validation. Results. The concurrent convergent validity was moderate to good (0.50 to -0.75) with the highest correlation found for the 12-item MS Walking Scale. The ABC discriminated between multiple fallers and nonfallers but not between men and women. Ecological validity is suggested since ABC discriminated between users of assistive walking device and nonusers. The internal consistency was high at α = 0.95, and interitem correlations were between 0.30 and 0.83. Conclusion. This study supports the validity of the ABC for persons with mild-to-moderate MS. The participants lacked balance confidence in many everyday activities, likely restricting their participation in society.

  8. Active vibration and balance system for closed cycle thermodynamic machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass. A method is also provided.

  9. Electronic waste disassembly with industrial waste heat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengjun; Wang, Jianbo; Chen, Haiyian; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Zhang, Mingxin; Zang, Hongbin; Hu, Jiukun

    2013-01-01

    Waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) are resource-rich but hazardous, demanding innovative strategies for post-consumer collection, recycling, and mining for economically precious constituents. A novel technology for disassembling electronic components from WPCBs is proposed, using hot air to melt solders and to separate the components and base boards. An automatic heated-air disassembling equipment was designed to operate at a heating source temperature at a maximum of 260 °C and an inlet pressure of 0.5 MPa. A total of 13 individual WPCBs were subjected to disassembling tests at different preheat temperatures in increments of 20 °C between 80 and 160 °C, heating source temperatures ranging from 220 to 300 °C in increments of 20 °C, and incubation periods of 1, 2, 4, 6, or 8 min. For each experimental treatment, the disassembly efficiency was calculated as the ratio of electronic components released from the board to the total number of its original components. The optimal preheat temperature, heating source temperature, and incubation period to disassemble intact components were 120 °C, 260 °C, and 2 min, respectively. The disassembly rate of small surface mount components (side length ≤ 3 mm) was 40-50% lower than that of other surface mount components and pin through hole components. On the basis of these results, a reproducible and sustainable industrial ecological protocol using steam produced by industrial exhaust heat coupled to electronic-waste recycling is proposed, providing an efficient, promising, and green method for both electronic component recovery and industrial exhaust heat reutilization.

  10. Relationship between balance and physical activity measured by an activity monitor in elderly COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Iwakura, Masahiro; Okura, Kazuki; Shibata, Kazuyuki; Kawagoshi, Atsuyoshi; Sugawara, Keiyu; Takahashi, Hitomi; Shioya, Takanobu

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the relationship between balance impairments and physical activity in COPD. There has been no study investigating the relationship between balance and objectively measured physical activity. Here we investigated the association between balance and physical activity measured by an activity monitor in elderly COPD patients. Materials and methods Twenty-two outpatients with COPD (mean age, 72±7 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 53%±21% predicted) and 13 age-matched healthy control subjects (mean age, 72±6 years) participated in the study. We assessed all 35 subjects’ balance (one-leg standing test [OLST] times, Short Physical Performance Battery total scores, standing balance test scores, 4 m gait speed, and five-times sit-to-stand test [5STST]) and physical activity (daily steps and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day [MV-PA]). Possible confounders were assessed in the COPD group. The between-group differences in balance test scores and physical activity were analyzed. A correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis were conducted in the COPD group. Results The COPD patients exhibited significant reductions in OLST times (P=0.033), Short Physical Performance Battery scores (P=0.013), 4 m gait speed (P<0.001), five-times sit-to-stand times (P=0.002), daily steps (P=0.003), and MV-PA (P=0.022) compared to the controls; the exception was the standing balance test scores. The correlation and multivariate regression analyses revealed significant independent associations between OLST times and daily steps (P<0.001) and between OLST times and MV-PA (P=0.014) in the COPD group after adjusting for possible confounding factors. Conclusion Impairments in balance and reductions in physical activity were observed in the COPD group. Deficits in balance are independently associated with physical inactivity. PMID:27445470

  11. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs

  12. Microtubules regulate disassembly of epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I; McCall, Ingrid C; Babbin, Brian; Samarin, Stanislav N; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Background Epithelial tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) form the apical junctional complex (AJC) which regulates cell-cell adhesion, paracellular permeability and cell polarity. The AJC is anchored on cytoskeletal structures including actin microfilaments and microtubules. Such cytoskeletal interactions are thought to be important for the assembly and remodeling of apical junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of microtubules in disassembly of the AJC in intestinal epithelial cells using a model of extracellular calcium depletion. Results Calcium depletion resulted in disruption and internalization of epithelial TJs and AJs along with reorganization of perijunctional F-actin into contractile rings. Microtubules reorganized into dense plaques positioned inside such F-actin rings. Depolymerization of microtubules with nocodazole prevented junctional disassembly and F-actin ring formation. Stabilization of microtubules with either docetaxel or pacitaxel blocked contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated internalization of junctional proteins into a subapical cytosolic compartment. Likewise, pharmacological inhibition of microtubule motors, kinesins, prevented contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated disassembly of apical junctions. Kinesin-1 was enriched at the AJC in cultured epithelial cells and it also accumulated at epithelial cell-cell contacts in normal human colonic mucosa. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated association of kinesin-1 with the E-cadherin-catenin complex. Conclusion Our data suggest that microtubules play a role in disassembly of the AJC during calcium depletion by regulating formation of contractile F-actin rings and internalization of AJ/TJ proteins. PMID:16509970

  13. Multi-kanban mechanism for appliance disassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomsawat, Gun; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2005-11-01

    The use of household appliances continues to rise every year. A significant number of End-Of-Life (EOL) appliances are generated because of the introduction of newer models that are more attractive, efficient and affordable. Others are, of course, generated when they become non-functional. Many regulations encourage recycling of EOL appliances to reduce the amount of waste sent to landfills. In addition, EOL appliances offer the appliance manufacturing and remanufacturing industries a source of less expensive raw materials and components. For this reason product recovery has become a subject of interest during the past decade. In this paper, we study the disassembly line for appliance disassembly. We discuss and incorporate some of the complications that are inherent in disassembly line including product arrival, demand arrival, inventory fluctuation and production control mechanisms. We show how to overcome such complications by implementing a multi-kanban system in the appliance disassembly line setting. The multi-kanban system (MKS) relies on dynamic routing of kanbans according to the state of the system. We investigate the multi-kanban mechanism using simulation and explore the effect of product mix on performance of the traditional push system (TPS) and MKS in terms of controlling the system's inventory while attempting to achieve a decent customer service level.

  14. Supramolecular disassembly of facially amphiphilic dendrimer assemblies in response to physical, chemical, and biological stimuli.

    PubMed

    Raghupathi, Krishna R; Guo, Jing; Munkhbat, Oyuntuya; Rangadurai, Poornima; Thayumanavan, S

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Supramolecular assemblies formed from spontaneous self-assembly of amphiphilic macromolecules are explored as biomimetic architectures and for applications in areas such as sensing, drug delivery, and diagnostics. Macromolecular assemblies are usually preferred, compared with their simpler small molecule counterparts, due to their low critical aggregate concentrations (CAC) and high thermodynamic stability. This Account focuses on the structural and functional aspects of assemblies formed from dendrimers, specifically facially amphiphilic dendrons that form micelle or inverse micelle type supramolecular assemblies depending on the nature of the solvent medium. The micelle type assemblies formed from facially amphiphilic dendrons sequester hydrophobic guest molecules in their interiors. The stability of these assemblies is dependent on the relative compatibility of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic functionalities with water, often referred to as hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB). Disruption of the HLB, using an external stimulus, could lead to disassembly of the aggregates, which can then be utilized to cause an actuation event, such as guest molecule release. Studying these possibilities has led to (i) a robust and general strategy for stimulus-induced disassembly and molecular release and (ii) the introduction of a new approach to protein-responsive supramolecular disassembly. The latter strategy provides a particularly novel avenue for impacting biomedical applications. Most of the stimuli-sensitive supramolecular assemblies have been designed to be responsive to factors such pH, temperature, and redox conditions. The reason for this interest stems from the fact that certain disease microenvironments have aberrations in these factors. However, these variations are the secondary imbalances in biology. Imbalances in protein activity are the primary reasons for most, if not all, human pathology. There have been no robust strategies in stimulus

  15. Broken Detailed Balance of Filament Dynamics in Active Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladrow, J.; Fakhri, N.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Schmidt, C. F.; Broedersz, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Myosin motor proteins drive vigorous steady-state fluctuations in the actin cytoskeleton of cells. Endogenous embedded semiflexible filaments such as microtubules, or added filaments such as single-walled carbon nanotubes are used as novel tools to noninvasively track equilibrium and nonequilibrium fluctuations in such biopolymer networks. Here, we analytically calculate shape fluctuations of semiflexible probe filaments in a viscoelastic environment, driven out of equilibrium by motor activity. Transverse bending fluctuations of the probe filaments can be decomposed into dynamic normal modes. We find that these modes no longer evolve independently under nonequilibrium driving. This effective mode coupling results in nonzero circulatory currents in a conformational phase space, reflecting a violation of detailed balance. We present predictions for the characteristic frequencies associated with these currents and investigate how the temporal signatures of motor activity determine mode correlations, which we find to be consistent with recent experiments on microtubules embedded in cytoskeletal networks.

  16. Role of CCT chaperonin in the disassembly of mitotic checkpoint complexes.

    PubMed

    Kaisari, Sharon; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Teichner, Adar; Hershko, Avram

    2017-01-31

    The mitotic checkpoint system prevents premature separation of sister chromatids in mitosis and thus ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation. When this checkpoint is active, a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), composed of the checkpoint proteins Mad2, BubR1, Bub3, and Cdc20, is assembled. MCC inhibits the ubiquitin ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), whose action is necessary for anaphase initiation. When the checkpoint signal is turned off, MCC is disassembled, a process required for exit from checkpoint-arrested state. Different moieties of MCC are disassembled by different ATP-requiring processes. Previous work showed that Mad2 is released from MCC by the joint action of the TRIP13 AAA-ATPase and the Mad2-binding protein p31(comet) Now we have isolated from extracts of HeLa cells an ATP-dependent factor that releases Cdc20 from MCC and identified it as chaperonin containing TCP1 or TCP1-Ring complex (CCT/TRiC chaperonin), a complex known to function in protein folding. Bacterially expressed CCT5 chaperonin subunits, which form biologically active homooligomers [Sergeeva, et al. (2013) J Biol Chem 288(24):17734-17744], also promote the disassembly of MCC. CCT chaperonin further binds and disassembles subcomplexes of MCC that lack Mad2. Thus, the combined action of CCT chaperonin with that of TRIP13 ATPase promotes the complete disassembly of MCC, necessary for the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint.

  17. LLNL Torso Phantom Assembly and Disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, D P

    2005-10-05

    This document from the LLNL In Vivo measurement Facility archives provides important historical as well as current methods for the proper handling of the LLNL Torso Phantom. This document was written circa 1980 and is intended for use by in vivo measurement facilities that perform calibrations using the LLNL Torso Phantom. Proper care and use of the LLNL Torso Phantom will greatly extend the useful lifetime of the phantom. The assembly, and disassembly of the Realistic Phantom are simple tasks and are, for the most part, self evident. However, there are some considerations that will make these tasks easier and assure long life of the parts. The assembly process is presented in Figures 1 through 9 while disassembly suggestions are illustrated in Figures 10 and 11.

  18. Balanced Ero1 activation and inactivation establishes ER redox homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunghwan; Sideris, Dionisia P.; Sevier, Carolyn S.

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) provides an environment optimized for oxidative protein folding through the action of Ero1p, which generates disulfide bonds, and Pdi1p, which receives disulfide bonds from Ero1p and transfers them to substrate proteins. Feedback regulation of Ero1p through reduction and oxidation of regulatory bonds within Ero1p is essential for maintaining the proper redox balance in the ER. In this paper, we show that Pdi1p is the key regulator of Ero1p activity. Reduced Pdi1p resulted in the activation of Ero1p by direct reduction of Ero1p regulatory bonds. Conversely, upon depletion of thiol substrates and accumulation of oxidized Pdi1p, Ero1p was inactivated by both autonomous oxidation and Pdi1p-mediated oxidation of Ero1p regulatory bonds. Pdi1p responded to the availability of free thiols and the relative levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione in the ER to control Ero1p activity and ensure that cells generate the minimum number of disulfide bonds needed for efficient oxidative protein folding. PMID:22412017

  19. Single-molecule studies of actin assembly and disassembly factors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin A; Gelles, Jeff; Goode, Bruce L

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is very dynamic and highly regulated by multiple associated proteins in vivo. Understanding how this system of proteins functions in the processes of actin network assembly and disassembly requires methods to dissect the mechanisms of activity of individual factors and of multiple factors acting in concert. The advent of single-filament and single-molecule fluorescence imaging methods has provided a powerful new approach to discovering actin-regulatory activities and obtaining direct, quantitative insights into the pathways of molecular interactions that regulate actin network architecture and dynamics. Here we describe techniques for acquisition and analysis of single-molecule data, applied to the novel challenges of studying the filament assembly and disassembly activities of actin-associated proteins in vitro. We discuss the advantages of single-molecule analysis in directly visualizing the order of molecular events, measuring the kinetic rates of filament binding and dissociation, and studying the coordination among multiple factors. The methods described here complement traditional biochemical approaches in elucidating actin-regulatory mechanisms in reconstituted filamentous networks.

  20. Coordinated Action of Nap1 and RSC in Disassembly of Tandem Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rashmi; D'Arcy, Sheena; Hada, Arjan; Luger, Karolin

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF and RSC family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers disassembles nucleosomes by moving nucleosomes into the vicinity of adjoining nucleosomes. We found that the histone chaperone Nap1 efficiently promotes disassembly of adjacent nucleosomes with which RSC collides and not the disassembly of nucleosomes mobilized by RSC. Nap1 is specific to RSC, as it does not target SWI/SNF, its paralog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Extensive mutational analysis of Nap1 has revealed that Nap1 affinity for histones H2A-H2B and H3-H4 and its ability to displace histones from DNA are required for Nap1 to enhance RSC-mediated disassembly. Other histone chaperones, such as Vps75, that also bind histones are not able to enhance RSC-mediated disassembly. Our study suggests a mechanism by which Nap1 is recruited to actively transcribed regions and assists in the passage of the transcription complex through chromatin, and it provides a novel mechanism for the coordinated action of RSC and Nap1. PMID:27273866

  1. Microcalorimetric study of adsorption and disassembling of virus-like particles on anion exchange chromatography media.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengran; Zhang, Songping; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Yanli; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-04-03

    Chromatographic purification of virus-like particles (VLPs) is important to the development of modern vaccines. However, disassembly of the VLPs on the solid-liquid interface during chromatography process could be a serious problem. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) measurements, together with chromatography experiments, were performed on the adsorption and disassembling of multi-subunits hepatitis B virus surface antigen virus-like particles (HB-VLPs). Two gigaporous ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) media, DEAE-AP-280 nm and DEAE-POROS, were used. The application of gigaporous media with high ligand density led to significantly increased irreversible disassembling of HB-VLPs and consequently low antigen activity recovery during IEC process. To elucidate the thermodynamic mechanism of the effect of ligand density on the adsorption and conformational change of VLPs, a thermodynamic model was proposed. With this model, one can obtain the intrinsic molar enthalpy changes related to the binding of VLPs and the accompanying conformational change on the liquid-solid interface during its adsorption. This model assumes that, when intact HB-VLPs interact with the IEC media, the total adsorbed proteins contain two states, the intact formation and the disassembled formation; accordingly, the apparent adsorption enthalpy, ΔappH, which can be directly measured from ITC experiments, presents the sum of three terms: (1) the intrinsic molar enthalpy change associated to the binding of intact HB-VLPs (ΔbindHintact), (2) the intrinsic molar enthalpy change associated to the binding of HB-VLPs disassembled formation (ΔbindHdis), and (3) the enthalpy change accompanying the disassembling of HB-VLPs (ΔconfHdis). The intrinsic binding of intact HB-VLPs and the disassembled HB-VLPs to both kinds of gigaporous media (each of which has three different ligand densities), were all observed to be entropically driven as indicated by positive values of

  2. Balancing Online Teaching Activities: Strategies for Optimizing Efficiency and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffo, Deana M.; Brinthaupt, Thomas M.; Gardner, Justin G.; Fisher, Lawanna S.

    2015-01-01

    Increased demands in professional expectations have required online faculty to learn how to balance multiple roles in an open-ended, changing, and relatively unstructured job. In this paper, we argue that being strategic about one's balance of the various facets of online teaching will improve one's teaching efficiency and effectiveness. We…

  3. The perennial organelle: assembly and disassembly of the primary cilium

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, E. Scott; Nachury, Maxence V.

    2010-01-01

    Primary cilia contain signaling receptors of diverse classes, and ciliary dysfunction results in a variety of developmental defects. Thus, primary cilia are thought to have an important role in sensing and transducing cellular signals. Although there is clear evidence demonstrating that these organelles are assembled and disassembled dynamically as cells progress through the cell cycle, the mechanisms by which the cell cycle controls the assembly and disassembly of the primary cilium remain poorly understood. In this Commentary, we review the basic cellular mechanisms that underlie the early stages of cilium assembly and discuss how the cell cycle communicates with the ciliation program. A commonly held view is that ciliation occurs exclusively in cells that have exited the cell cycle and entered quiescence or differentiation. However, this concept is at odds with the finding that, during development, many actively proliferating cells require cilia-mediated signaling pathways to instruct their developmental fate. Here, we reassess the quiescence-centric view of ciliation by reviewing historic and current literature. We discuss ample evidence that cilia are in fact present on many proliferating cells, and that a transient peak of ciliation before the G1-S transition might be tightly coupled to entry into the DNA replication phase. Finally, we touch on the relationship between the ciliation and cell-division cycles and the tissue distribution of primary cilia in order to highlight potential roles for the primary cilium in restraining cells from the hyperproliferative state that contributes to cancer. PMID:20144999

  4. Peroxiredoxin 1 is involved in disassembly of flagella and cilia.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fanghua; Liu, Hongtao; Li, Jie; Xue, Lexun; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2014-02-14

    Cilia/flagella are evolutionarily conserved cellular organelles. In this study, we demonstrated that Dunaliella salina Peroxiredoxin 1 (DsPrdx1) localized to the flagella and basal bodies, and was involved in flagellar disassembly. The link between DsPrdx1 and flagella of Dunaliella salina (D. salina) encouraged us to explore the function of its human homologue, Homo sapiens Peroxiredoxin 1 (HsPrdx1) in development and physiology. Our results showed that HsPrdx1 was overexpressed, and cilia were lost in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells compared with the non-cancerous esophageal epithelial cells Het-1A. Furthermore, when HsPrdx1 was knocked down by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentivirus in ESCC cells, the phenotype of cilia lost can be reversed, and the expression levels of tumor suppressor genes LKB1 and p-AMPK were increased, and the activity of the oncogene Aurora A was inhibited compared with those in cells transfected with scrambe-shRNA lentivirus. These findings firstly showed that Prdx1 is involved in disassembly of flagella and cilia, and suggested that the abnormal expression of the cilia-related gene including Prdx1 may affect both ciliogenesis and cancernogenesis.

  5. 30 CFR 816.57 - Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 816.57 Section 816.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.57 Hydrologic balance: Activities...

  6. 30 CFR 816.57 - Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 816.57 Section 816.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.57 Hydrologic balance: Activities...

  7. Regulation of glomerulotubular balance: flow-activated proximal tubule function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Weinstein, Alan M

    2017-03-07

    The purpose of this review is to summarize our knowledge and understanding of the physiological importance and the mechanisms underlying flow-activated proximal tubule transport. Since the earliest micropuncture studies of mammalian proximal tubule, it has been recognized that tubular flow is an important regulator of sodium, potassium, and acid-base transport in the kidney. Increased fluid flow stimulates Na(+) and HCO3(-) absorption in the proximal tubule via stimulation of Na/H-exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) and H(+)-ATPase. In the proximal tubule, brush border microvilli are the major flow sensors, which experience changes in hydrodynamic drag and bending moment as luminal flow velocity changes and which transmit the force of altered flow to cytoskeletal structures within the cell. The signal to NHE3 depends upon the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton; the signal to the H(+)-ATPase depends upon microtubules. We have demonstrated that alterations in fluid drag impact tubule function by modulating ion transporter availability within the brush border membrane of the proximal tubule. Beyond that, there is evidence that transporter activity within the peritubular membrane is also modulated by luminal flow. Secondary messengers that regulate the flow-mediated tubule function have also been delineated. Dopamine blunts the responsiveness of proximal tubule transporters to changes in luminal flow velocity, while a DA1 antagonist increases flow sensitivity of solute reabsorption. IP3 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling is critical to transduction of microvillus drag. In this review, we summarize our findings of the regulatory mechanism of flow-mediated Na(+) and HCO3(-) transport in the proximal tubule and review available information about flow sensing and regulatory mechanism of glomerulotubular balance.

  8. Disassembly of mitotic checkpoint complexes by the joint action of the AAA-ATPase TRIP13 and p31comet

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Wang, Kexi; Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Kaisari, Sharon; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao; Hershko, Avram

    2014-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system delays anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. When the checkpoint is active, a Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC) assembles and inhibits the ubiquitin ligase Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C). MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins Mad2, BubR1, and Bub3 associated with the APC/C activator Cdc20. When the checkpoint signal is turned off, MCC is disassembled and the checkpoint is inactivated. The mechanisms of the disassembly of MCC are not sufficiently understood. We have previously observed that ATP hydrolysis is required for the action of the Mad2-binding protein p31comet to disassemble MCC. We now show that HeLa cell extracts contain a factor that promotes ATP- and p31comet-dependent disassembly of a Cdc20–Mad2 subcomplex and identify it as Thyroid Receptor Interacting Protein 13 (TRIP13), an AAA-ATPase known to interact with p31comet. The joint action of TRIP13 and p31comet also promotes the release of Mad2 from MCC, participates in the complete disassembly of MCC and abrogates checkpoint inhibition of APC/C. We propose that TRIP13 plays centrally important roles in the sequence of events leading to MCC disassembly and checkpoint inactivation. PMID:25092294

  9. Multikanban model for disassembly line with demand fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomsawat, Gun; Gupta, Surendra M.; Al-Turki, Yousef A. Y.

    2004-02-01

    In recent years, the continuous growth in consumer waste and dwindling natural resources has seriously threatened the environment. Realizing this, several countries have passed regulations that force manufacturers not only to manufacture environmentally conscious products, but also to take back their used products from consumers so that the components and materials recovered from the products may be reused and/or recycled. Disassembly plays an important role in product recovery. A disassembly line is perhaps the most suitable setting for disassembly of products in large quantities. Because a disassembly line has a tendency to generate excessive inventory, employing a kanban system can reduce the inventory level and let the system run more efficiently. A disassembly line is quite different from an assembly line. For example, not only can the demand arrive at the last station, it can also arrive at any of the other stations in the system. The demand for a component on the disassembly line could fluctuate widely. In fact, there are many other complicating matters that need to be considered to implement the concept of kanbans in such an environment. In this paper, we discuss the complications that are unique to a disassembly line. We discuss the complications in utilizing the conventional production control mechanisms in a disassembly line setting. We then show how to overcome them by implementing kanbans in a disassembly line setting with demand fluctuation and introduce the concept of multi-kanban mechanism. We demonstrate its effectiveness using a simulation model. An example is presented to illustrate the concept.

  10. Disassembly sequencing problem: a case study of a cell phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Surendra M.; Erbis, Evren; McGovern, Seamus M.

    2004-12-01

    Selection of an optimal disassembly sequence is essential for the efficient processing of a product at the end of its life. Disassembly sequences are listings of disassembly actions (such as the separation of an assembly into two or more subassemblies, or removing one or more connections between components). Disassembly takes place in remanufacturing, recycling, and disposal with a disassembly line being the best choice for automation. In this paper, the disassembly sequencing problem is solved for a cell phone case on a disassembly line, seeking a sequence which is feasible, minimizes the number of workstations (and hence idle times), provides for early removal of high demand/value parts, provides the removal of parts that lead to the access of greatest number of still-installed parts, and early removal of hazardous parts as well as for the grouping of parts for removal having identical part removal directions. Since finding the optimal sequence is computationally intensive due to factorial growth, a heuristic method is used taking into account various disassembly-specific matters. Using the experimentally determined precedence relationships and task times of a real-world cell phone, a MATLAB program is designed and a sequencing solution is generated. Finally, Design for Disassembly (DFD) improvements are recommended with respect to environmentally conscious manufacturing.

  11. A Heuristic for Disassembly Planning in Remanufacturing System

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to improve the efficiency of disassembly planning in remanufacturing environment. Even though disassembly processes are considered as the reverse of the corresponding assembly processes, under some technological and management constraints the feasible and efficient disassembly planning can be achieved by only well-designed algorithms. In this paper, we propose a heuristic for disassembly planning with the existence of disassembled part/subassembly demands. A mathematical model is formulated for solving this problem to determine the sequence and quantity of disassembly operations to minimize the disassembly costs under sequence-dependent setup and capacity constraints. The disassembly costs consist of the setup cost, part inventory holding cost, disassembly processing cost, and purchasing cost that resulted from unsatisfied demand. A simple but efficient heuristic algorithm is proposed to improve the quality of solution and computational efficiency. The main idea of heuristic is to divide the planning horizon into the smaller planning windows and improve the computational efficiency without much loss of solution quality. Performances of the heuristic are investigated through the computational experiments. PMID:24895679

  12. Postulated accident scenarios in weapons disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.S.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief summary of three postulated accident scenarios for weapons disassembly is provided in the paper. The first deals with a tetrahedral configuration of four generic pits; the second, an infinite planar array of generic pits with varying interstitial water density; and the third, a spherical shell with internal mass suspension in water varying the size and mass of the shell. Calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon transport code MCNP4A. Preliminary calculations pointed to a need for higher resolution of small pit separation regimes and snapshots of hydrodynamic processes of water/plutonium mixtures.

  13. Effect of balanced low pressure drying of curcuma longa leaf on skin immune activation activities.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wooseok; Lim, Hye Won; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2014-01-01

    The effect of balanced low pressure drying pretreatment associated with ultrasonication extraction (BU) on the enhancement of skin immune modulatory activities of Curcuma longa leaf was studied by comparing with conventional hot air drying (HE), freeze drying (FE) and balanced low pressure drying (BE) pretreatment processes. In considering skin immune activation activities such as the inhibition of hyaluronidase activity, the BU extract showed ca. 10% higher than those of HE, and even higher than that of the FE extract. Nitric oxide production from macrophage of the BU extract in adding 1.0 mg/mL was increased up to 16.5 μM. When measuring inhibition of IL-6 and TNF-a production from the human T lymphocytes (T cell), the BU extract also showed 53% and 78% of inhibition effect, respectively. It is found that the BU extract could effectively suppress the expression levels of skin inflammation related genes such as Cox-2 and iNOS, down to 80% and 85% compared to the control, respectively. Balanced low pressure drying process was especially active on dehydration of the leaves with minimizing the destruction and making easier elution of the bioactive substances, which resulted in higher extraction yield and better biological activities.

  14. Dynamic Balancing Of Turbomachinery Shafts And Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.

    1993-01-01

    Method for dynamic balancing of turbomachinery shafts and rotors developed with view toward reducing time spent in balancing process. Improved method based on existing dynamic-balancing techniques and equipment, incorporating use of balancing arbor, which is mandrel duplicating mounting geometry and dynamic-balance properties of shaft balanced. Once shaft balanced, not necessary to disassemble machinery and/or shaft completely and rebalance shaft when replacing rotor on shaft. Instead, one balances replacement rotor on balancing arbor, then installs balanced rotor on shaft.

  15. Shaping tissues by balancing active forces and geometric constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foolen, Jasper; Yamashita, Tadahiro; Kollmannsberger, Philip

    2016-02-01

    The self-organization of cells into complex tissues during growth and regeneration is a combination of physical-mechanical events and biochemical signal processing. Cells actively generate forces at all stages in this process, and according to the laws of mechanics, these forces result in stress fields defined by the geometric boundary conditions of the cell and tissue. The unique ability of cells to translate such force patterns into biochemical information and vice versa sets biological tissues apart from any other material. In this topical review, we summarize the current knowledge and open questions of how forces and geometry act together on scales from the single cell to tissues and organisms, and how their interaction determines biological shape and structure. Starting with a planar surface as the simplest type of geometric constraint, we review literature on how forces during cell spreading and adhesion together with geometric constraints impact cell shape, stress patterns, and the resulting biological response. We then move on to include cell-cell interactions and the role of forces in monolayers and in collective cell migration, and introduce curvature at the transition from flat cell sheets to three-dimensional (3D) tissues. Fibrous 3D environments, as cells experience them in the body, introduce new mechanical boundary conditions and change cell behaviour compared to flat surfaces. Starting from early work on force transmission and collagen remodelling, we discuss recent discoveries on the interaction with geometric constraints and the resulting structure formation and network organization in 3D. Recent literature on two physiological scenarios—embryonic development and bone—is reviewed to demonstrate the role of the force-geometry balance in living organisms. Furthermore, the role of mechanics in pathological scenarios such as cancer is discussed. We conclude by highlighting common physical principles guiding cell mechanics, tissue patterning and

  16. Asymmetric disassembly and robustness in declining networks

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Serguei; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Uzzi, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms that enable declining networks to avert structural collapse and performance degradation are not well understood. This knowledge gap reflects a shortage of data on declining networks and an emphasis on models of network growth. Analyzing >700,000 transactions between firms in the New York garment industry over 19 years, we tracked this network's decline and measured how its topology and global performance evolved. We find that favoring asymmetric (disassortative) links is key to preserving the topology and functionality of the declining network. Based on our findings, we tested a model of network decline that combines an asymmetric disassembly process for contraction with a preferential attachment process for regrowth. Our simulation results indicate that the model can explain robustness under decline even if the total population of nodes contracts by more than an order of magnitude, in line with our observations for the empirical network. These findings suggest that disassembly mechanisms are not simply assembly mechanisms in reverse and that our model is relevant to understanding the process of decline and collapse in a broad range of biological, technological, and financial networks. PMID:18936489

  17. Detailed Per-residue Energetic Analysis Explains the Driving Force for Microtubule Disassembly.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Ahmed T; Klobukowski, Mariusz; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2015-06-01

    Microtubules are long filamentous hollow cylinders whose surfaces form lattice structures of αβ-tubulin heterodimers. They perform multiple physiological roles in eukaryotic cells and are targets for therapeutic interventions. In our study, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for arbitrarily long microtubules that have either GDP or GTP molecules in the E-site of β-tubulin. A detailed energy balance of the MM/GBSA inter-dimer interaction energy per residue contributing to the overall lateral and longitudinal structural stability was performed. The obtained results identified the key residues and tubulin domains according to their energetic contributions. They also identified the molecular forces that drive microtubule disassembly. At the tip of the plus end of the microtubule, the uneven distribution of longitudinal interaction energies within a protofilament generates a torque that bends tubulin outwardly with respect to the cylinder's axis causing disassembly. In the presence of GTP, this torque is opposed by lateral interactions that prevent outward curling, thus stabilizing the whole microtubule. Once GTP hydrolysis reaches the tip of the microtubule (lateral cap), lateral interactions become much weaker, allowing tubulin dimers to bend outwards, causing disassembly. The role of magnesium in the process of outward curling has also been demonstrated. This study also showed that the microtubule seam is the most energetically labile inter-dimer interface and could serve as a trigger point for disassembly. Based on a detailed balance of the energetic contributions per amino acid residue in the microtubule, numerous other analyses could be performed to give additional insights into the properties of microtubule dynamic instability.

  18. Detailed Per-residue Energetic Analysis Explains the Driving Force for Microtubule Disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Ahmed T.; Klobukowski, Mariusz; Tuszynski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules are long filamentous hollow cylinders whose surfaces form lattice structures of αβ-tubulin heterodimers. They perform multiple physiological roles in eukaryotic cells and are targets for therapeutic interventions. In our study, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for arbitrarily long microtubules that have either GDP or GTP molecules in the E-site of β-tubulin. A detailed energy balance of the MM/GBSA inter-dimer interaction energy per residue contributing to the overall lateral and longitudinal structural stability was performed. The obtained results identified the key residues and tubulin domains according to their energetic contributions. They also identified the molecular forces that drive microtubule disassembly. At the tip of the plus end of the microtubule, the uneven distribution of longitudinal interaction energies within a protofilament generates a torque that bends tubulin outwardly with respect to the cylinder's axis causing disassembly. In the presence of GTP, this torque is opposed by lateral interactions that prevent outward curling, thus stabilizing the whole microtubule. Once GTP hydrolysis reaches the tip of the microtubule (lateral cap), lateral interactions become much weaker, allowing tubulin dimers to bend outwards, causing disassembly. The role of magnesium in the process of outward curling has also been demonstrated. This study also showed that the microtubule seam is the most energetically labile inter-dimer interface and could serve as a trigger point for disassembly. Based on a detailed balance of the energetic contributions per amino acid residue in the microtubule, numerous other analyses could be performed to give additional insights into the properties of microtubule dynamic instability. PMID:26030285

  19. BALANCE (Bioengineering Approaches for Lifestyle Activity and Nutrition Continuous Engagement): Developing New Technology for Monitoring Energy Balance in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Deonna C.; Andrew, Adrienne; Denning, Tamara; Hurvitz, Philip; Lester, Jonathan; Beresford, Shirley; Borriello, Gaetano; Bruemmer, Barbara; Moudon, Anne Vernez; Duncan, Glen E.

    2010-01-01

    Methods that measure energy balance accurately in real time represent promising avenues to address the obesity epidemic. We developed an electronic food diary on a mobile phone that includes an energy balance visualization and computes and displays the difference between energy intake from food entries and energy expenditure from a multiple-sensor device that provides objective estimates of energy expenditure in real time. A geographic information system dataset containing locations associated with activity and eating episodes is integrated with an ArcPad mapping application on the phone to provide users with a visual display of food sources and locations associated with physical activity within their proximal environment. This innovative tool captures peoples' movement through space and time under free-living conditions and could potentially have many health-related applications in the future. PMID:20307404

  20. Driving an Active Vibration Balancer to Minimize Vibrations at the Fundamental and Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations of a principal machine are reduced at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies by driving the drive motor of an active balancer with balancing signals at the fundamental and selected harmonics. Vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A balancing signal generator for the fundamental and for each selected harmonic processes the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each frequency to generate a balancing signal for each frequency. Reference inputs for each frequency are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms of each balancing signal generator at the frequency assigned to the generator. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the frequencies are summed and applied to drive the drive motor. The harmonic balancing signals drive the drive motor with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each frequency.

  1. Sensory integration and response to balance perturbation in overweight physically active individuals.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Peggy P Y; Azevedo, Liane B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare sensory integration and response to balance perturbation between physically active normal weight and overweight adults. Physically active young adults were grouped into normal weight (n = 45) or overweight (n = 17) according to the World Health Organization body mass index classification for Asian adults. Participants underwent two balance tests: sensory organization and motor control. Overweight participants presented marginally lower somatosensory score compared to normal weight participants. However, they scored significantly higher in response to balance perturbation. There was no difference in the onset of participants' active response to balance perturbation. Physical activity might have contributed to improved muscle strength and improved the ability of overweight individuals to maintain balance.

  2. Alignment Pins for Assembling and Disassembling Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Oliver C.

    2008-01-01

    Simple, easy-to-use, highly effective tooling has been devised for maintaining alignment of bolt holes in mating structures during assembly and disassembly of the structures. The tooling was originally used during removal of a body flap from the space shuttle Atlantis, in which misalignments during removal of the last few bolts could cause the bolts to bind in their holes. By suitably modifying the dimensions of the tooling components, the basic design of the tooling can readily be adapted to other structures that must be maintained in alignment. The tooling includes tapered, internally threaded alignment pins designed to fit in the bolt holes in one of the mating structures, plus a draw bolt and a cup that are used to install or remove each alignment pin. In preparation for disassembly of two mating structures, external supports are provided to prevent unintended movement of the structures. During disassembly of the structures, as each bolt that joins the structures is removed, an alignment pin is installed in its place. Once all the bolts have been removed and replaced with pins, the pins maintain alignment as the structures are gently pushed or pulled apart on the supports. In assembling the two structures, one reverses the procedure described above: pins are installed in the bolt holes, the structures are pulled or pushed together on the supports, then the pins are removed and replaced with bolts. The figure depicts the tooling and its use. To install an alignment pin in a bolt hole in a structural panel, the tapered end of the pin is inserted from one side of the panel, the cup is placed over the pin on the opposite side of the panel, the draw bolt is inserted through the cup and threaded into the pin, the draw bolt is tightened to pull the pin until the pin is seated firmly in the hole, then the draw bolt and cup are removed, leaving the pin in place. To remove an alignment pin, the cup is placed over the pin on the first-mentioned side of the panel, the draw

  3. Assisting People with Disabilities to Actively Improve Their Collaborative Physical Activities with Nintendo Wii Balance Boards by Controlling Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Chen, Ling-Che; Shih, Ching-Tien

    2012-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology to modify the Nintendo Wii Balance Board functionality and used it to enable two people with developmental disabilities to actively perform physical activities. This study extended the latest research of the Wii Balance Board application to assess whether four people (two groups) with…

  4. Spastin and ESCRT-III coordinate mitotic spindle disassembly and nuclear envelope sealing.

    PubMed

    Vietri, Marina; Schink, Kay O; Campsteijn, Coen; Wegner, Catherine Sem; Schultz, Sebastian W; Christ, Liliane; Thoresen, Sigrid B; Brech, Andreas; Raiborg, Camilla; Stenmark, Harald

    2015-06-11

    At the onset of metazoan cell division the nuclear envelope breaks down to enable capture of chromosomes by the microtubule-containing spindle apparatus. During anaphase, when chromosomes have separated, the nuclear envelope is reassembled around the forming daughter nuclei. How the nuclear envelope is sealed, and how this is coordinated with spindle disassembly, is largely unknown. Here we show that endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III, previously found to promote membrane constriction and sealing during receptor sorting, virus budding, cytokinesis and plasma membrane repair, is transiently recruited to the reassembling nuclear envelope during late anaphase. ESCRT-III and its regulatory AAA (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) ATPase VPS4 are specifically recruited by the ESCRT-III-like protein CHMP7 to sites where the reforming nuclear envelope engulfs spindle microtubules. Subsequent association of another ESCRT-III-like protein, IST1, directly recruits the AAA ATPase spastin to sever microtubules. Disrupting spastin function impairs spindle disassembly and results in extended localization of ESCRT-III at the nuclear envelope. Interference with ESCRT-III functions in anaphase is accompanied by delayed microtubule disassembly, compromised nuclear integrity and the appearance of DNA damage foci in subsequent interphase. We propose that ESCRT-III, VPS4 and spastin cooperate to coordinate nuclear envelope sealing and spindle disassembly at nuclear envelope-microtubule intersection sites during mitotic exit to ensure nuclear integrity and genome safeguarding, with a striking mechanistic parallel to cytokinetic abscission.

  5. Roles of different pools of the mitotic checkpoint complex and the mechanisms of their disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Teichner, Adar; Hershko, Avram

    2013-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system prevents premature separation of sister chromatids in mitosis. When the checkpoint is turned on, the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) inhibits the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins BubR1, Bub3, and Mad2 associated with the APC/C activator Cdc20. The mechanisms of the assembly of MCC when the checkpoint is turned on, and of its disassembly when the checkpoint is inactivated, are not sufficiently understood. Previous reports indicated that APC/C-mediated polyubiquitylation of Cdc20 in MCC is required for the dissociation of APC/C-associated MCC, but not of free MCC. The pool of free MCC is disassembled by an ATP-dependent process stimulated by the Mad2-binding protein p31comet. It remained unknown whether free MCC is the precursor or the dissociation product of APC/C-bound MCC. By characterizing the mechanisms of the disassembly of APC/C-bound MCC in a purified system, we find that it cannot be the source of free MCC, because it is bound at high affinity and is released only in ubiquitylated or partially disassembled forms. By the use of a cell-free system from Xenopus eggs that reproduces the mitotic checkpoint, we show that MCC can be assembled in the absence of APC/C in a checkpoint-dependent manner. We propose that when the checkpoint is turned on, free MCC is the precursor of APC/C-bound MCC. When the mitotic checkpoint is extinguished, both APC/C-bound and free MCC pools have to be disassembled to release APC/C from inhibition. PMID:23754430

  6. Active And Autonomous Balancing System For Satellites Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosset, E.

    2011-10-01

    Lithium-ion technology offers a great number of advantages, compared to the nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) and the nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) ones, and in return, it presents only one major constraint. This unique constraint of lithium-ion technology is linked to the lack of an overcharge mechanism that forbids the overcharge of the lower energy cells, in order to fully charge the higher ones. That means that end of charge sequence shall be carefully controlled, otherwise the lithium-ion cell voltage rises endless (like a capacitor) generating Li-ion plating on the negative electrode leading to a premature ageing (capacity loss & internal resistance increase) or a thermal runaway beyond a threshold. So in order to maximize the energy stored into the cells connected in series and to avoid any risk of overcharge a balancing system is recommended to equalize the state of charge from cell to cell within a cell serial string. Saft is familiar with such systems for various applications and in particular for space applications. However, in order to reduce its cost and improve its efficiency, Saft carry on seeking for innovating solutions. In this frame, a very simple and efficient balancing circuit have been identified which is based on a flight proven component.

  7. The correlation between muscle activity of the quadriceps and balance and gait in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Jung; Park, Seung Kyu; Uhm, Yo Han; Park, Sam Heon; Chun, Dong Whan; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between quadriceps muscle activity and balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five stroke patients (30 males 25 females; mean age 58.7 years; stroke duration 4.82 months; Korean mini-mental state examination score 26.4) participated in this study. MP100 surface electromyography, BioRescue, and LUKOtronic were used to measure the quadriceps muscle activity, balance, and gait, respectively. [Results] There was a significant correlation between quadriceps muscle activity (vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction) and balance (limits of stability) and gait (gait velocity) but there was none between vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction. [Conclusion] An increase in quadriceps muscle activity will improve balance and gait ability. To improve function in stroke patients, training is needed to strengthen the quadriceps muscles. PMID:27630416

  8. Effects of a low alcohol dose on static balance, fine motor activity, and mental performance.

    PubMed

    Mangold, S; Läubli, T; Krueger, H

    1996-01-01

    The effects of a single low alcohol dose (men 0.54 g and women 0.44 g alcohol per kg body weight) were measured by static balance, fine motor activity, and mental performance. In 10 healthy volunteers balance was registered by a temporally and spatially high resolution platform measuring the center of foot pressure and a three-dimensional coordination measurement system. Fine motor activity and mental performance were tested with selected experiments from the NES2 (Neurobehavioral Evaluation System) neuropsychological test battery. Changes of bipedal and monopedal balance could be detected after the alcohol consumption. Neither the fine motor activity nor the mental performance test demonstrated significant effects. Thus, the static balance test proved to be a sensitive, fast, and atraumatic method to identify slight neurotoxic disturbances.

  9. New package for Belleville spring permits rate change, easy disassembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Glashan, W. F.

    1964-01-01

    A spring package, with grooves to hold the spring washers at the inner and outer edges, reduces hysteresis to a minimum. Three-segment retainers permit easy disassembly so that the spring rate can be changed.

  10. 12. View of disassembled steam engine sitting in open shed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View of disassembled steam engine sitting in open shed showing base, columns and entablature. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  11. 13. View of disassembled steam engine showing cylinder, piston rod, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of disassembled steam engine showing cylinder, piston rod, parallel motion links and steam chest. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  12. 17. View of disassembled reduction gear parts including bull and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. View of disassembled reduction gear parts including bull and intermediate gears and pedestal bearing. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  13. Mitophagy: a balance regulator of NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ji; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Ryu, Ji-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by a variety of external or host-derived stimuli and its activation initiates an inflammatory response through caspase-1 activation, resulting in inflammatory cytokine IL-1β maturation and secretion. The NLRP3 inflammasome activation is a kind of innate immune response, most likely mediated by myeloid cells acting as a host defense mechanism. However, if this activation is not properly regulated, excessive inflammation induced by overactivated NLRP3 inflammasome can be detrimental to the host, causing tissue damage and organ dysfunction, eventually causing several diseases. Previous studies have suggested that mitochondrial damage may be a cause of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and autophagy, which is a conserved self-degradation process that negatively regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Recently, mitochondria-selective autophagy, termed mitophagy, has emerged as a central player for maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis through the elimination of damaged mitochondria, leading to the prevention of hyperinflammation triggered by NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In this review, we will first focus on the molecular mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and NLRP3 inflammasome-related diseases. We will then discuss autophagy, especially mitophagy, as a negative regulator of NLPP3 inflammasome activation by examining recent advances in research. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(10): 529-535] PMID:27439607

  14. Systems impacts of spent fuel disassembly alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    Three studies were completed to evaluate four alternatives to the disposal of intact spent fuel assemblies in a geologic repository. A preferred spent fuel waste form for disposal was recommended on consideration of (1) package design and fuel/package interaction, (2) long-term, in-repository performance of the waste form, and (3) overall process performance and costs for packaging, handling, and emplacement. The four basic alternative waste forms considered were (1) end fitting removal, (2) fission gas venting, (3) disassembly and close packing, and (4) shearing/immobilization. None of the findings ruled out any alternative on the basis of waste package considerations or long-term performance of the waste form. The third alternative offers flexibility in loading that may prove attractive in the various geologic media under consideration, greatly reduces the number of packages, and has the lowest unit cost. These studies were completed in October, 1981. Since then Westinghouse Electric Corporation and the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation have completed studies in related fields. This report is now being published to provide publicly the background material that is contained within. 47 references, 28 figures, 31 tables.

  15. The Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Promotes the Herpesvirus-Induced Phosphorylation-Dependent Disassembly of the Nuclear Lamina Required for Nucleocytoplasmic Egress

    PubMed Central

    Milbradt, Jens; Hutterer, Corina; Bahsi, Hanife; Wagner, Sabrina; Sonntag, Eric; Kaufer, Benedikt B.; Mori, Yasuko; Sticht, Heinrich; Fossen, Torgils; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina lines the inner nuclear membrane providing a structural framework for the nucleus. Cellular processes, such as nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis or nuclear export of large ribonucleoprotein complexes, are functionally linked to the disassembly of the nuclear lamina. In general, lamina disassembly is mediated by phosphorylation, but the precise molecular mechanism is still not completely understood. Recently, we suggested a novel mechanism for lamina disassembly during the nuclear egress of herpesviral capsids which involves the cellular isomerase Pin1. In this study, we focused on mechanistic details of herpesviral nuclear replication to demonstrate the general importance of Pin1 for lamina disassembly. In particular, Ser22-specific lamin phosphorylation consistently generates a Pin1-binding motif in cells infected with human and animal alpha-, beta-, and gammaherpesviruses. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we showed that binding of Pin1 to a synthetic lamin peptide induces its cis/trans isomerization in vitro. A detailed bioinformatic evaluation strongly suggests that this structural conversion induces large-scale secondary structural changes in the lamin N-terminus. Thus, we concluded that a Pin1-induced conformational change of lamins may represent the molecular trigger responsible for lamina disassembly. Consistent with this concept, pharmacological inhibition of Pin1 activity blocked lamina disassembly in herpesvirus-infected fibroblasts and consequently impaired virus replication. In addition, a phospho-mimetic Ser22Glu lamin mutant was still able to form a regular lamina structure and overexpression of a Ser22-phosphorylating kinase did not induce lamina disassembly in Pin1 knockout cells. Intriguingly, this was observed in absence of herpesvirus infection proposing a broader importance of Pin1 for lamina constitution. Thus, our results suggest a functional model of similar events leading to disassembly of the nuclear

  16. The activities-specific balance confidence scale and berg balance scale: Reliability and validity in Arabic-speaking vestibular patients.

    PubMed

    Alghwiri, Alia A; Alghadir, Ahmad H; Al-Momani, Murad O; Whitney, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Persons with vestibular disorders are susceptible to imbalance. The Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) have been validated in persons with vestibular disorders. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the Arabic versions of ABC and BBS among Arabic-speaking persons with vestibular disorders in Jordan and Saudi Arabia. Therefore, the A-ABC and A-BBS were administered to a convenience sample of 82 persons with vestibular disorders (age = 43 ± 14), (56% female). The test-retest reliability of the A-ABC item and total score as well as the inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of the A-BBS total score reflected high agreement. Significant and large correlations were found between the A-ABC and the A-BBS (r= 0.54, P< 0.05), the A-ABC and the Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory (A-DHI) (r= -0.76, P< 0.05), and the A-BBS and the A-DHI (r= -0.56, P< 0.05). The A-ABC and the A-BBS demonstrated good reliability and validity and can be utilized with Arabic-speaking persons with vestibular disorders.

  17. Effect of isotonic and isokinetic exercise on muscle activity and balance of the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Yoo, Kyung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to examine how the balance of lower limbs and the muscle activities of the tibialis anterior (TA), the medial gastrocnemius (GCM), and the peroneus longus (PL) are influenced by isotonic and isokinetic exercise of the ankle joint. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were healthy adults (n=20), and they were divided into two groups (isotonic=10, isokinetic=10). [Methods] Isotonic group performed 3 sets of 10 contractions at 50% of MVIC and Isokinetic group performed 3 sets of 60°/sec. Muscle activity was measured by EMG and balance was measured by one-leg standing test. [Results] For muscle activity, a main effect of group was found in the non-dominant TA, and the dominant TA, GCM and PL. For balance, a main effect of time was found in both groups for the sway area measured support was provided by the non-dominant side. [Conclusion] In terms of muscle activity, the two groups showed a significant difference, and the isokinetic group showed higher muscle activities. In terms of balance, there was a significant difference between the pre-test and the post-test. The results of this study may help in the selection of exercises for physical therapy, because they show that muscle activity and balance vary according to the type of exercise. PMID:25729181

  18. Energy intake, physical activity, energy balance, and cancer: epidemiologic evidence.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sai Yi; DesMeules, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Energy intake, physical activity, and obesity are modifiable lifestyle factors. This chapter reviews and summarizes the epidemiologic evidence on the relation of energy intake, physical activity, and obesity to cancer. High energy intake may increase the risk of cancers of colon-rectum, prostate (especially advanced prostate cancer), and breast. However, because physical activity, body size, and metabolic efficiency are highly related to total energy intake and expenditure, it is difficult to assess the independent effect of energy intake on cancer risk. There are sufficient evidences to support a role of physical activity in preventing cancers of the colon and breast, whereas the association is stronger in men than in women for colon cancer and in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women for breast cancer. The evidence also suggests that physical activity likely reduces the risk of cancers of endometrium, lung, and prostate (to a lesser extent). On the other hand, there is little or no evidence that the risk of rectal cancer is related to physical activity, whereas the results have been inconsistent regarding the association between physical activity and the risks of cancers of pancreas, ovary and kidney. Epidemiologic studies provide sufficient evidence that obesity is a risk factor for both cancer incidence and mortality. The evidence supports strong links of obesity with the risk of cancers of the colon, rectum, breast (in postmenopausal women), endometrium, kidney (renal cell), and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Epidemiologic evidence also indicates that obesity is probably related to cancers of the pancreas, liver, and gallbladder, and aggressive prostate cancer, while it seems that obesity is not associated with lung cancer. The role of obesity in other cancer risks is unclear.

  19. Towards a new paradigm: Activity level balanced sustainability reporting.

    PubMed

    Samudhram, Ananda; Siew, Eu-Gene; Sinnakkannu, Jothee; Yeow, Paul H P

    2016-11-01

    Technoeconomic paradigms based economic growth theories suggest that waves of technological innovations drove the economic growth of advanced economies. Widespread economic degradation and pollution is an unintended consequence of such growth. Tackling environmental and social issues at firm levels would help us to overcome such issues at macro-levels. Consequently, the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) reporting approach promotes firm level economic, environmental and social performances. Incorporating Zink's (2014) 3-pillar presentation model, this paper indicates that economic, social and environmental performances tend to be reported at firm level. All three pillars are not covered evenly at the activity levels. Thus, a loophole is identified whereby excellent environmental performance at activity levels could potentially leave poor social performance undisclosed. A refinement of the TBL paradigm, whereby all three pillars are covered at the activity level, is suggested, to enhance sustainability reporting.

  20. AGR-1 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; Lance Cole; Scott Ploger; Philip Winston; Binh Pham; Michael Abbott

    2011-01-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation experiment ended on November 6, 2009, after 620 effective full power days in the Advanced Test Reactor, achieving a peak burnup of 19.6% FIMA. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in March 2010 for post-irradiation examination. The first PIE activities included non-destructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and the graphite fuel holders. Dimensional measurements of the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsules shells were performed using a custom vision measurement system (for outer diameters and lengths) and conventional bore gauges (for inner diameters). Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Neutron radiography of the intact Capsule 2 showed a high degree of detail of interior components and confirmed the observation that there was no major damage to the capsule. Disassembly of the capsules was initiated using procedures qualified during out-of-cell mockup testing. Difficulties were encountered during capsule disassembly due to irradiation-induced changes in some of the capsule components’ properties, including embrittled niobium and molybdenum parts that were susceptible to fracture and swelling of the graphite fuel holders that affected their removal from the capsule shells. This required various improvised modifications to the disassembly procedure to avoid damage to the fuel compacts. Ultimately the capsule disassembly was successful and only one compact from Capsule 4 (out of 72 total in the test train) sustained damage during the disassembly process, along with the associated graphite holder. The compacts were generally in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor

  1. Activeness as a key to counter democratic balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Shen; Liu, Yijun; Galam, Serge

    2015-08-01

    According to the classic Galam model of opinion dynamics, each agent participates at each update of an opinion interaction. While the scheme gives everyone the same chance to influence others, in reality, social activity and influence vary considerably from one agent to another. To account for such a feature, we introduce a new individual attribute-"activeness"-which makes some agents more inclined than others at engaging in local discussions. To enhance the corresponding effect, opinion updates are shifted from all-out agent interaction cycles to few agent interaction cycles. Using dynamic analysis and simulations the resulting model is found to exhibit a "Minority Counteroffensive" phenomenon, which under some initial conditions makes the minority to win the opinion competition despite a threshold tipping point at fifty percent. The associated probabilistic phenomenon persists in the case "activeness" is held equal for all agents. The effect of "opinion leaders" is also investigated. Indeed, a leader is an inflexible agent, i.e., an agent who does not change opinion. The results reveal that two opinion leaders with moderate social influence may have a stronger effect than one opinion leader with a strong social influence. The model may shed a new light to the understanding of opinion formation and public voting.

  2. Activators and repressors: A balancing act for X-inactivation.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Leeanne; Panning, Barbara; Leung, Karen Nicole

    2016-08-01

    In early female embryos X-chromosome inactivation occurs concomitant with up regulation of the non-coding RNA, Xist, on the future inactive X-chromosome. Up regulation of Xist and coating of the future inactive X is sufficient to induce silencing. Therefore unlocking the mechanisms of X-chromosome inactivation requires thorough understanding of the transcriptional regulators, both activators and repressors, which control Xist. Mouse pluripotent embryonic stem cells, which have two active X chromosomes, provide a tractable ex vivo model system for studying X-chromosome inactivation, since this process is triggered by differentiation signals in these cultured cells. Yet there are significant discrepancies found between ex vivo analyses in mouse embryonic stem cells and in vivo studies of early embryos. In this review we elaborate on potential models of how Xist is up regulated on a single X chromosome in female cells and how ex vivo and in vivo analyses enlighten our understanding of the activators and repressors that control this non-coding RNA gene.

  3. Directed disassembly of an interfacial rubisco protein network.

    PubMed

    Onaizi, Sagheer A; Malcolm, Andrew S; He, Lizhong; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2007-05-22

    We present the first study of the directed disassembly of a protein network at the air-water interface by the synergistic action of a surfactant and an enzyme. We seek to understand the fundamentals of protein network disassembly by using rubisco adsorbed at the air-water interface as a model. We propose that rubisco adsorption at the air-water interface results in the formation of a fishnet-like network of interconnected protein molecules, capable of transmitting lateral force. The mechanical properties of the rubisco network during assembly and disassembly at the air-water interface were characterized by direct measurement of laterally transmitted force through the protein network using the Cambridge interfacial tensiometer. We have shown that, when used individually, either 2 ppm of the surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzyl sulfonate (SDOBS), or 2 ppm of the enzyme, subtilisin A (SA), were insufficient to completely disassemble the rubisco network within 1 h of treatment. However, a combination of 2 ppm SDOBS and 2 ppm SA led to almost complete disassembly within 1 h. Increasing the concentration of SA in the mixture from 2 to 10 ppm, while keeping the SDOBS concentration constant, significantly decreased the time required to completely disassemble the rubisco network. Furthermore, the initial rate of network disassembly using formulations containing SDOBS was surprisingly insensitive to this increase in SA concentration. This study gives insight into the role of lateral interactions between protein molecules at interfaces in stabilizing interfacial protein networks and shows that surfactant and enzyme working in combination proves more effective at disrupting and mobilizing the interfacial protein network than the action of either agent alone.

  4. Gait and Balance in Treatment-Naive Active Alcoholics with and without a Lifetime Drug Codependence

    PubMed Central

    Fein, George; Smith, Stan; Greenstein, David

    2012-01-01

    Background Disturbed gait and balance are among the most consistent sequelae of chronic alcoholism. However, although a majority of alcoholics have never sought treatment, most investigations showing ataxia in alcohol dependent individuals have relied on samples drawn from treated populations. In addition, few studies have addressed the associations of codependence on other drugs with alcoholic gait and balance disturbance. Methods The present study employed the Walk-a-line Ataxia Battery (Fregly et al. 1972) to assess gait and balance in treatment-naive, actively drinking alcohol dependent men and women (TNA; n = 69) who were dependent on alcohol only (ALC; n = 43), or who also had a lifetime drug dependence (ALC+DRG; n = 26; i.e., methamphetamine, cocaine, opiates, and/or marijuana), compared with non-substance abusing controls (NSAC; n = 74). We also examined associations between lifetime alcohol use and age with gait and balance measures. Results Our main findings were 1) no evidence of disturbed gait and balance in ALC vs. NSAC and 2) significantly disturbed gait and balance in ALC+DRG, relative to both NSAC and ALC, along with steeper age-associated decline in gait and balance performance in ALC vs. ALC+DRG. Conclusions Our results provide evidence consistent with previous studies that TNA (without a lifetime drug codependence) may represent a population that is different and less impaired (including in gait and balance) than treated alcoholics. Additionally, we provide evidence that ALC+DRG, with greater alcohol use and family drinking density than ALC, have an accelerated effect of age on gait and balance disturbance compared to both NSAC and ALC. The ALC+DRG group likely represents a subset of TNA with different characteristics than ALC. PMID:22390787

  5. Anaphase A: Disassembling Microtubules Move Chromosomes toward Spindle Poles

    PubMed Central

    Asbury, Charles L.

    2017-01-01

    The separation of sister chromatids during anaphase is the culmination of mitosis and one of the most strikingly beautiful examples of cellular movement. It consists of two distinct processes: Anaphase A, the movement of chromosomes toward spindle poles via shortening of the connecting fibers, and anaphase B, separation of the two poles from one another via spindle elongation. I focus here on anaphase A chromosome-to-pole movement. The chapter begins by summarizing classical observations of chromosome movements, which support the current understanding of anaphase mechanisms. Live cell fluorescence microscopy studies showed that poleward chromosome movement is associated with disassembly of the kinetochore-attached microtubule fibers that link chromosomes to poles. Microtubule-marking techniques established that kinetochore-fiber disassembly often occurs through loss of tubulin subunits from the kinetochore-attached plus ends. In addition, kinetochore-fiber disassembly in many cells occurs partly through ‘flux’, where the microtubules flow continuously toward the poles and tubulin subunits are lost from minus ends. Molecular mechanistic models for how load-bearing attachments are maintained to disassembling microtubule ends, and how the forces are generated to drive these disassembly-coupled movements, are discussed. PMID:28218660

  6. A symbolic methodology to improve disassembly process design.

    PubMed

    Rios, Pedro; Blyler, Leslie; Tieman, Lisa; Stuart, Julie Ann; Grant, Ed

    2003-12-01

    Millions of end-of-life electronic components are retired annually due to the proliferation of new models and their rapid obsolescence. The recovery of resources such as plastics from these goods requires their disassembly. The time required for each disassembly and its associated cost is defined by the operator's familiarity with the product design and its complexity. Since model proliferation serves to complicate an operator's learning curve, it is worthwhile to investigate the benefits to be gained in a disassembly operator's preplanning process. Effective disassembly process design demands the application of green engineering principles, such as those developed by Anastas and Zimmerman (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2003, 37, 94A-101A), which include regard for product complexity, structural commonality, separation energy, material value, and waste prevention. This paper introduces the concept of design symbolsto help the operator more efficiently survey product complexity with respect to location and number of fasteners to remove a structure that is common to all electronics: the housing. With a sample of 71 different computers, printers, and monitors, we demonstrate that appropriate symbols reduce the total disassembly planning time by 13.2 min. Such an improvement could well make efficient the separation of plastic that would otherwise be destined for waste-to-energy or landfill. The symbolic methodology presented may also improve Design for Recycling and Design for Maintenance and Support.

  7. Relative efficacy of various strategies for visual feedback in standing balance activities.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Michael W; Crowell, Charles R; Striegel, Aaron D; Villano, Michael; Schmiedeler, James P

    2013-09-01

    Seventy-nine young, healthy adults were led through static balance and weight-shifting activities in order to study the effects of visual feedback on balance. Based on their performance, the relative effects of various feedback properties were analyzed: (1) arrangement [direct center of pressure (CoP) vs. lateral weight distribution feedback], (2) numbers (presence vs. absence of numeric feedback), and (3) dimensionality (1D vs. 2D CoP information). In the static balance activity, subjects were instructed to maintain equal weight across both feet; in the dynamic weight-shifting activity, subjects were instructed to shift their weight to each displayed target location. For static balance, lateral symmetry and sway were measured by classical parameters using CoP, center of gravity (CoG), and the difference between the two (CoP-CoG). Weight-shifting balance performance was measured using the time required to shift between target CoP positions. Results indicated that feedback arrangement had a significant effect on static sway and dynamic weight shifting, with direct CoP feedback resulting in better balance performance than lateral weight distribution. Also, numbers had a significant effect on static sway, reducing lateral sway compared to feedback without numbers. Finally, 2D CoP feedback resulted in faster performance than 1D CoP feedback in dynamic weight shifting. These results show that altering different properties of visual feedback can have significant effects on resulting balance performance; therefore, proper selection of visual feedback strategy needs to take these effects into consideration.

  8. Single-molecule imaging of a three-component ordered actin disassembly mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Chin, Samantha M.; Ydenberg, Casey A.; Gelles, Jeff; Goode, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cells destabilize and rapidly disassemble filamentous actin networks have remained elusive; however, Coronin, Cofilin and AIP1 have been implicated in this process. Here using multi-wavelength single-molecule fluorescence imaging, we show that mammalian Cor1B, Cof1 and AIP1 work in concert through a temporally ordered pathway to induce highly efficient severing and disassembly of actin filaments. Cor1B binds to filaments first, and dramatically accelerates the subsequent binding of Cof1, leading to heavily decorated, stabilized filaments. Cof1 in turn recruits AIP1, which rapidly triggers severing and remains bound to the newly generated barbed ends. New growth at barbed ends generated by severing was blocked specifically in the presence of all three proteins. This activity enabled us to reconstitute and directly visualize single actin filaments being rapidly polymerized by formins at their barbed ends while simultanteously being stochastically severed and capped along their lengths, and disassembled from their pointed ends. PMID:25995115

  9. Overlapping mechanisms promote postsynaptic RAD-51 filament disassembly during meiotic double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jordan D; Muzzini, Diego M; Petalcorin, Mark I R; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Martin, Julie S; Plevani, Paolo; Cassata, Giuseppe; Marini, Federica; Boulton, Simon J

    2010-01-29

    Homologous recombination (HR) is essential for repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although the mechanisms of RAD-51-DNA filament assembly and strand exchange are well characterized, the subsequent steps of HR are less well defined. Here, we describe a synthetic lethal interaction between the C. elegans helicase helq-1 and RAD-51 paralog rfs-1, which results in a block to meiotic DSB repair after strand invasion. Whereas RAD-51-ssDNA filaments assemble at meiotic DSBs with normal kinetics in helq-1, rfs-1 double mutants, persistence of RAD-51 foci and genetic interactions with rtel-1 suggest a failure to disassemble RAD-51 from strand invasion intermediates. Indeed, purified HELQ-1 and RFS-1 independently bind to and promote the disassembly of RAD-51 from double-stranded, but not single-stranded, DNA filaments via distinct mechanisms in vitro. These results indicate that two compensating activities are required to promote postsynaptic RAD-51 filament disassembly, which are collectively essential for completion of meiotic DSB repair.

  10. Effects of activity and energy budget balancing algorithm on laboratory performance of a fish bioenergetics model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; David, Solomon R.; Pothoven, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush that were fed ad libitum in laboratory tanks under regimes of low activity and high activity. In addition, we compared model performance under two different model algorithms: (1) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t and (2) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t + 1. Results indicated that the model significantly underestimated consumption for both inactive and active lake trout when algorithm 1 was used and that the degree of underestimation was similar for the two activity levels. In contrast, model performance substantially improved when using algorithm 2, as no detectable bias was found in model predictions of consumption for inactive fish and only a slight degree of overestimation was detected for active fish. The energy budget was accurately balanced by using algorithm 2 but not by using algorithm 1. Based on the results of this study, we recommend the use of algorithm 2 to estimate food consumption by fish in the field. Our study results highlight the importance of accurately accounting for changes in fish energy density when balancing the energy budget; furthermore, these results have implications for the science of evaluating fish bioenergetics model performance and for more accurate estimation of food consumption by fish in the field when fish energy density undergoes relatively rapid changes.

  11. Planning assembly/disassembly operations for space telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, Arthur C.; Homem De Mello, Luiz

    1987-01-01

    Space telerobotic systems will perform complex tasks of assembly, disassembly, and repair of space-based equipment. Planning such tasks requires reasoning about the functional, physical, and geometrical properties of the equipment, as well as a representation of the characteristics and capabilities of the manipulators and sensors available for the task. The And/Or graph is a useful approach to representation of feasible assembly/disassembly sequences and provides the basis for search among alternative strategies. The paper describes the use of parts entropy measures as evaluation criteria for search in the And/Or graph space. This approach leads to candidate task plans which minimize the complexity of intermediate geometrical states.

  12. Capillarity-induced disassembly of virions in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaobin; Barclay, J. Elaine; Peng, Wenchao; Li, Yang; Li, Xianyu; Zhang, Guoliang; Evans, David J.; Zhang, Fengbao

    2008-04-01

    Studying the transport and fate of viruses through nanochannels is of great importance. By using the nanochannel of a carbon nanotube (CNT) as an ideal model, we evaluated the possibility of capillarity-induced viral transport through a closely fitting nanochannel and explored the mechanisms involved. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that Cowpea mosaic virus can enter CNTs by capillarity. However, when introduced into a nanotube the protein capsid may disassemble. During the initial capillary filling stage, anomalous needle-shaped high pressure exists in the centre of the nanotube's entrance. This high pressure, combining with the significant negative pressure within the nanotube, may account for the disassembly of the virions.

  13. Ninth Graders' Energy Balance Knowledge and Physical Activity Behavior: An Expectancy-Value Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Senlin; Chen, Ang

    2012-01-01

    Expectancy beliefs and task values are two essential motivators in physical education. This study was designed to identify the relation between the expectancy-value constructs (Eccles & Wigfield, 1995) and high school students' physical activity behavior as associated with their energy balance knowledge. High school students (N = 195) in two…

  14. Newcomer Psychological Contracts and Employee Socialization Activities: Does Perceived Balance in Obligations Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Stephanie C.; Culbertson, Satoris S.; Boswell, Wendy R.; Barger, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    We sought to determine the extent to which one's beliefs about the relationship between an employee and an organization at the start of employment influence subsequent socialization activities. The balance of employee exchange relationships, employee perceptions of both their own obligations and the employers' obligations, were collected from 120…

  15. Active Learning and Just-in-Time Teaching in a Material and Energy Balances Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberatore, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of a material and energy balances course is enhanced through a series of in-class and out-of-class exercises. An active learning classroom is achieved, even at class sizes over 150 students, using multiple instructors in a single classroom, problem solving in teams, problems based on YouTube videos, and just-in-time teaching. To avoid…

  16. Teaching Children To Love: 80 Games & Fun Activities for Raising Balanced Children in Unbalanced Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childre, Doc Lew; Paddison, Sara Hatch, Ed.

    Raising children in today's fast-paced society requires love and technique. Ways that parents can teach children to love, teach them values, and help them balance their lives are discussed in this activity book. The text opens with a discussion of heart intelligence (what is sometimes equated with emotional intelligence). Heart intelligence…

  17. Developmental programming of energy balance regulation: is physical activity more 'programmable' than food intake?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaoyu; Eclarinal, Jesse; Baker, Maria S; Li, Ge; Waterland, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Extensive human and animal model data show that environmental influences during critical periods of prenatal and early postnatal development can cause persistent alterations in energy balance regulation. Although a potentially important factor in the worldwide obesity epidemic, the fundamental mechanisms underlying such developmental programming of energy balance are poorly understood, limiting our ability to intervene. Most studies of developmental programming of energy balance have focused on persistent alterations in the regulation of energy intake; energy expenditure has been relatively underemphasised. In particular, very few studies have evaluated developmental programming of physical activity. The aim of this review is to summarise recent evidence that early environment may have a profound impact on establishment of individual propensity for physical activity. Recently, we characterised two different mouse models of developmental programming of obesity; one models fetal growth restriction followed by catch-up growth, and the other models early postnatal overnutrition. In both studies, we observed alterations in body-weight regulation that persisted to adulthood, but no group differences in food intake. Rather, in both cases, programming of energy balance appeared to be due to persistent alterations in energy expenditure and spontaneous physical activity (SPA). These effects were stronger in female offspring. We are currently exploring the hypothesis that developmental programming of SPA occurs via induced sex-specific alterations in epigenetic regulation in the hypothalamus and other regions of the central nervous system. We will summarise the current progress towards testing this hypothesis. Early environmental influences on establishment of physical activity are likely an important factor in developmental programming of energy balance. Understanding the fundamental underlying mechanisms in appropriate animal models will help determine whether early life

  18. The Effect of Programed Physical Activity Measured with Levels of Body Balance Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Mańko, Grzegorz; Kruczkowski, Dariusz; Niźnikowski, Tomasz; Perliński, Jacek; Chantsoulis, Marzena; Pokorska, Joanna; Łukaszewska, Beata; Ziółkowski, Artur; Graczyk, Marek; Starczyńska, Małgorzata; Jaszczur-Nowicki, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the research was an evaluation of 2 training programs covering the same standard physical activity in the initial stage (warm-up) and the main (motor exercises) as well as a separate end part in Program A of stretching and in Programme B of vibration training designed to improve the level of body balance. Material/Methods We tested 40 randomly chosen students of the Academy of Physical Education and Sport in Gdansk, subsequently divided into two 20-person groups: C (average age 21.3±1.2), and E (average age 21.8±1.1). The training of body balance was conducted for 8 weeks: we used in Group C Program A and in group E Program B. The evaluation of body balance was done 3 times: at the beginning, at midway point, and at the end of the experiment. The stabilographic tests with posture-graphical method and the task of 1-leg balance standing with eyes closed was used. Results It was found that in the first examination both groups did not significantly differ in terms of the tested parameters of balance. During the training process we obtained increased time of maintaining balance on 1 leg. This difference was significant between tests 1 and 2 both for Group C (p=0.0002) and for E (p=0.0034), while between the tests 2 and 3 in Group E (p=0.0213) only. Conclusions The training Program B is more effective to maintain balance on 1 leg when compared to Program A. PMID:25284349

  19. Distinctive PSA-NCAM and NCAM hallmarks in glutamate-induced dendritic atrophy and synaptic disassembly.

    PubMed

    Podestá, María Fernanda; Yam, Patricia; Codagnone, Martín Gabriel; Uccelli, Nonthué Alejandra; Colman, David; Reinés, Analía

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic and synapse remodeling are forms of structural plasticity that play a critical role in normal hippocampal function. Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and its polysialylated form (PSA-NCAM) participate in neurite outgrowth and synapse formation and plasticity. However, it remains unclear whether they contribute to dendritic retraction and synaptic disassembly. Cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to glutamate (5 µM) showed a reduced MAP-2 (+) area in the absence of neuronal death 24 h after the insult. Concomitantly, synapse loss, revealed by decreased synaptophysin and post-synaptic density-95 cluster number and area, together with changes in NCAM and PSA-NCAM levels were found. Dendritic atrophy and PSA-NCAM reduction proved NMDA-receptor dependent. Live-imaging experiments evidenced dendritic atrophy 4 h after the insult; this effect was preceded by smaller NCAM clusters (1 h) and decreased surface and total PSA-NCAM levels (3 h). Simultaneously, total NCAM cluster number and area remained unchanged. The subsequent synapse disassembly (6 h) was accompanied by reductions in total NCAM cluster number and area. A PSA mimetic peptide prevented both the dendritic atrophy and the subsequent synaptic changes (6 h) but had no effect on the earliest synaptic remodeling (3 h). Thus, NCAM-synaptic reorganization and PSA-NCAM level decrease precede glutamate-induced dendritic atrophy, whereas the NCAM level reduction is a delayed event related to synapse loss. Consequently, distinctive stages in PSA-NCAM/NCAM balance seem to accompany glutamate-induced dendritic atrophy and synapse loss.

  20. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING -10499

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

    2010-01-04

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the 105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate it from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,384 cubic meters or 31,894 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were designed and tested for the reactor ISD project, and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and material flow considerations, maximum lift heights and differential height requirements were determined. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material

  1. AGR-2 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    SciTech Connect

    Ploger, Scott; Demkowciz, Paul; Harp, Jason

    2015-05-01

    The AGR 2 irradiation experiment began in June 2010 and was completed in October 2013. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in July 2014 for post-irradiation examination (PIE). The first PIE activities included nondestructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and their graphite fuel holders. Dimensional metrology was then performed on the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsule shells. AGR 2 disassembly and metrology were performed with the same equipment used successfully on AGR 1 test train components. Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Disassembly of the AGR 2 test train and its capsules was conducted rapidly and efficiently by employing techniques refined during the AGR 1 disassembly campaign. Only one major difficulty was encountered while separating the test train into capsules when thermocouples (of larger diameter than used in AGR 1) and gas lines jammed inside the through tubes of the upper capsules, which required new tooling for extraction. Disassembly of individual capsules was straightforward with only a few minor complications. On the whole, AGR 2 capsule structural components appeared less embrittled than their AGR 1 counterparts. Compacts from AGR 2 Capsules 2, 3, 5, and 6 were in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor damage or markings were visible using high resolution photographic inspection. Compact dimensional measurements indicated radial shrinkage between 0.8 to 1.7%, with the greatest shrinkage observed on Capsule 2 compacts that were irradiated at higher temperature. Length shrinkage ranged from 0.1 to 0.9%, with by far the lowest axial shrinkage on Capsule 3 compacts

  2. Disassembling "evapotranspiration" in-situ with a complex measurement tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chormanski, Jaroslaw; Kleniewska, Malgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Sporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatylowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2014-05-01

    In this work we present a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them from the total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its components transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project will be the estimation of energy and

  3. The Relationship Between Pedometer-Determined Ambulatory Activity and Balance Variables Within an Older Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Candice; Kress, Jeff; Schroeder, Jan; Donlin, Ayla; Rozenek, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the differences between gender, physical activity level, and balance in an older adult population. A secondary purpose was to examine the relationship between pedometer-determined ambulatory activity and balance. Forty-six older adults aged 73.7 ± 6.2 years participated in the study. Participants completed the Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) Scale and completed a 2-week daily step recording to determine average steps taken per day. Low-level activity participants (<5,000 steps/day) were significantly different from the high-level activity participants (>7,500 steps/day) in weight, age, and the number of medications reported. Males performed better than females on the two-footed jump test and reactive postural test FAB assessments. High-level activity participants performed significantly better than low-level activity participants on all FAB assessments except stand with feet together and eyes closed, reach forward to object, and walk with head turns. PMID:28138503

  4. Does the global temporal activation differ in triceps surae during standing balance?

    PubMed

    Dos Anjos, F V; Fontanella, F; Gazzoni, M; Vieira, T M M

    2015-08-01

    One of the most important muscular groups which contribute to maintain standing balance is triceps surae. However, it is unclear whether the postural controllers of triceps surae, medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (SOL), have different temporal patterns of activation during upright stance. This paper aimed at evaluating whether the global temporal activation in triceps surae differ among young subjects during standing balance. Nine male volunteers performed two tasks: standing quietly and with voluntary back and forward sways over their ankle. Electromyograms (EMGs) from soleus medial (MSOL) and lateral (LSOL) regions and from MG were sampled with linear arrays of surface electrodes. The percentage of muscle activation in time (i.e. temporal index) was computed for each muscle during upright standing. The results revealed that the medial portion of soleus muscle (MSOL) was activated continuously compared to the lateral portion of soleus (LSOL) and MG, which were activated intermittently. Therefore, the global temporal activation differed among the postural muscles of triceps surae during standing balance.

  5. CPAP promotes timely cilium disassembly to maintain neural progenitor pool.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Elke; Wason, Arpit; Ramani, Anand; Gooi, Li Ming; Keller, Patrick; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Poser, Ina; Noack, Florian; Telugu, Narasimha Swamy; Calegari, Federico; Šarić, Tomo; Hescheler, Jürgen; Hyman, Anthony A; Gottardo, Marco; Callaini, Giuliano; Alkuraya, Fowzan Sami; Gopalakrishnan, Jay

    2016-04-15

    A mutation in the centrosomal-P4.1-associated protein (CPAP) causes Seckel syndrome with microcephaly, which is suggested to arise from a decline in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) during development. However, mechanisms ofNPCs maintenance remain unclear. Here, we report an unexpected role for the cilium inNPCs maintenance and identifyCPAPas a negative regulator of ciliary length independent of its role in centrosome biogenesis. At the onset of cilium disassembly,CPAPprovides a scaffold for the cilium disassembly complex (CDC), which includes Nde1, Aurora A, andOFD1, recruited to the ciliary base for timely cilium disassembly. In contrast, mutatedCPAPfails to localize at the ciliary base associated with inefficientCDCrecruitment, long cilia, retarded cilium disassembly, and delayed cell cycle re-entry leading to premature differentiation of patientiPS-derivedNPCs. AberrantCDCfunction also promotes premature differentiation ofNPCs in SeckeliPS-derived organoids. Thus, our results suggest a role for cilia in microcephaly and its involvement during neurogenesis and brain size control.

  6. Assembly via disassembly: A case in machine perceptual development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajcsy, Ruzena K.; Tsikos, Constantine J.

    1989-01-01

    First results in the effort of learning about representations of objects is presented. The questions attempted to be answered are: What is innate and what must be derived from the environment. The problem is casted in the framework of disassembly of an object into two parts.

  7. Desmosome assembly and disassembly are membrane raft-dependent.

    PubMed

    Stahley, Sara N; Saito, Masataka; Faundez, Victor; Koval, Michael; Mattheyses, Alexa L; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Strong intercellular adhesion is critical for tissues that experience mechanical stress, such as the skin and heart. Desmosomes provide adhesive strength to tissues by anchoring desmosomal cadherins of neighboring cells to the intermediate filament cytoskeleton. Alterations in assembly and disassembly compromise desmosome function and may contribute to human diseases, such as the autoimmune skin blistering disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV). We previously demonstrated that PV auto-antibodies directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) cause loss of adhesion by triggering membrane raft-mediated Dsg3 endocytosis. We hypothesized that raft membrane microdomains play a broader role in desmosome homeostasis by regulating the dynamics of desmosome assembly and disassembly. In human keratinocytes, Dsg3 is raft associated as determined by biochemical and super resolution immunofluorescence microscopy methods. Cholesterol depletion, which disrupts rafts, prevented desmosome assembly and adhesion, thus functionally linking rafts to desmosome formation. Interestingly, Dsg3 did not associate with rafts in cells lacking desmosomal proteins. Additionally, PV IgG-induced desmosome disassembly occurred by redistribution of Dsg3 into raft-containing endocytic membrane domains, resulting in cholesterol-dependent loss of adhesion. These findings demonstrate that membrane rafts are required for desmosome assembly and disassembly dynamics, suggesting therapeutic potential for raft targeting agents in desmosomal diseases such as PV.

  8. Desmosome Assembly and Disassembly Are Membrane Raft-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Faundez, Victor; Koval, Michael; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Strong intercellular adhesion is critical for tissues that experience mechanical stress, such as the skin and heart. Desmosomes provide adhesive strength to tissues by anchoring desmosomal cadherins of neighboring cells to the intermediate filament cytoskeleton. Alterations in assembly and disassembly compromise desmosome function and may contribute to human diseases, such as the autoimmune skin blistering disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV). We previously demonstrated that PV auto-antibodies directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) cause loss of adhesion by triggering membrane raft-mediated Dsg3 endocytosis. We hypothesized that raft membrane microdomains play a broader role in desmosome homeostasis by regulating the dynamics of desmosome assembly and disassembly. In human keratinocytes, Dsg3 is raft associated as determined by biochemical and super resolution immunofluorescence microscopy methods. Cholesterol depletion, which disrupts rafts, prevented desmosome assembly and adhesion, thus functionally linking rafts to desmosome formation. Interestingly, Dsg3 did not associate with rafts in cells lacking desmosomal proteins. Additionally, PV IgG-induced desmosome disassembly occurred by redistribution of Dsg3 into raft-containing endocytic membrane domains, resulting in cholesterol-dependent loss of adhesion. These findings demonstrate that membrane rafts are required for desmosome assembly and disassembly dynamics, suggesting therapeutic potential for raft targeting agents in desmosomal diseases such as PV. PMID:24498201

  9. Binary Disassembly Block Coverage by Symbolic Execution vs. Recursive Descent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    19 2.2.2 Defensive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 2.2.3 Understanding... 20 2.2.4 Future-Proofing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 2.3 Issues with Disassembly and Symbolic...Execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 2.3.1 Data Type Inference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2.3.1.1 Variable Recovery

  10. Teaching Assembly for Disassembly; An Under-Graduate Module Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexandri, Eleftheria

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about the experience of teaching Assembly for Disassembly to fourth year architect students within the module of sustainable design. When designing a sustainable building one should take into consideration the fact that the building is going to be demolished in some years; thus the materials should be assembled in such a way so that…

  11. Mucus barrier-triggered disassembly of siRNA nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Troels B.; Li, Leon; Howard, Kenneth A.

    2014-10-01

    The mucus overlying mucosal epithelial surfaces presents not only a biological barrier to the penetration of potential pathogens, but also therapeutic modalities including RNAi-based nanocarriers. Movement of nanomedicines across the mucus barriers of the gastrointestinal mucosa is modulated by interactions of the nanomedicine carriers with mucin glycoproteins inside the mucus, potentiated by the large surface area of the nanocarrier. We have developed a fluorescence activation-based reporter system showing that the interaction between polyanionic mucins and the cationic chitosan/small interfering RNA (siRNA) nanocarriers (polyplexes) results in the disassembly and consequent triggered release of fluorescent siRNA. The quantity of release was found to be dependent on the molar ratio between chitosan amino groups and siRNA phosphate groups (NP ratio) of the polyplexes with a maximal estimated 48.6% release of siRNA over 30 min at NP 60. Furthermore, a microfluidic in vitro model of the gastrointestinal mucus barrier was used to visualize the dynamic interaction between chitosan/siRNA nanocarriers and native purified porcine stomach mucins. We observed strong interactions and aggregations at the mucin-liquid interface, followed by an NP ratio dependent release and consequent diffusion of siRNA across the mucin barrier. This work describes a new model of interaction at the nanocarrier-mucin interface and has important implications for the design and development of nucleic acid-based nanocarrier therapeutics for mucosal disease treatments and also provides insights into nanoscale pathogenic processes.The mucus overlying mucosal epithelial surfaces presents not only a biological barrier to the penetration of potential pathogens, but also therapeutic modalities including RNAi-based nanocarriers. Movement of nanomedicines across the mucus barriers of the gastrointestinal mucosa is modulated by interactions of the nanomedicine carriers with mucin glycoproteins inside the

  12. Rehabilitation Exercises to Induce Balanced Scapular Muscle Activity in an Anti-gravity Posture

    PubMed Central

    Ishigaki, Tomonobu; Yamanaka, Masanori; Hirokawa, Motoki; Tai, Keita; Ezawa, Yuya; Samukawa, Mina; Tohyama, Harukazu; Sugawara, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the intramuscular balance ratios of the upper trapezius muscle (UT) and the lower trapezius muscle (LT), and the intermuscular balance ratios of the UT and the serratus anterior muscle (SA) among prone extension (ProExt), prone horizontal abduction with external rotation (ProHAbd), forward flexion in the side-lying position (SideFlex), side-lying external rotation (SideEr), shoulder flexion with glenohumeral horizontal abduction load (FlexBand), and shoulder flexion with glenohumeral horizontal adduction load (FlexBall) in the standing posture. [Methods] The electromyographic (EMG) activities of the UT, LT and SA were measured during the tasks. The percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was calculated for each muscle, and the UT/LT ratios and the UT/SA ratios were compared among the tasks. [Results] The UT/LT ratio with the FlexBand was not significantly different from those of the four exercises in the side-lying and prone postures. The UT/SA ratio with the FlexBall demonstrated appropriate balanced activity. [Conclusion] In an anti-gravity posture, we recommend the FlexBand and the FlexBall for inducing balanced UT/LT and UT/SA ratios, respectively. PMID:25540485

  13. 401(k) plan asset allocation, account balances, and loan activity in 1998.

    PubMed

    VanDerhei, J; Holden, S; Quick, C

    2000-02-01

    The Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) and the Investment Company Institute (ICI) have been collaborating for the past three years to collect data on participants in 401(k) plans. This effort, known as the EBRI/ICI Participant-Directed Retirement Plan Data Collection Project, has obtained data for 401(k) plan participants from certain of EBRI and ICI members serving as plan record keepers and administrators. The report includes 1998 information on 7.9 million active participants in 30,102 plans holding nearly $372 billion in assets. The data include demographic information, annual contributions, plan balances, asset allocation, and loans, and are broadly representative of the universe of 401(k) plans. The database also includes three years of longitudinal information on approximately 3.3 million participants. Key findings include: For all 401(k) participants in the 1998 EBRI/ICI database, almost three-quarters of plan balances are invested directly or indirectly in equity securities. Specifically, 49.8 percent of total plan balances are invested in equity funds, 17.7 percent in company stock, 11.4 percent in guaranteed investment contracts (GICs), 8.4 percent in balanced funds, 6.1 percent in bond funds, 4.7 percent in money funds, and 0.3 percent in other stable value funds. Participant asset allocation varies considerably with age. Younger participants tend to favor equity funds, while older participants are more disposed to invest in GICs and bond funds. On average, participants in their 20s have 62.1 percent of their account balances invested in equity funds, in contrast to 39.8 percent for those in their 60s. Participants in their 20s invest 4.7 percent of their assets in GICs, while those in their 60s invest 20.6 percent. Bond funds, which represent 4.7 percent of the assets of participants in their 20s, amount to 9.0 percent of the assets of participants in their 60s. Investment options offered by 401(k) plans appear to influence asset allocation

  14. Multi-kanban mechanism for personal computer disassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomsawat, Gun; Gupta, Surendra M.; Kamarthi, Sagar V.

    2004-12-01

    The use of personal computers (PCs) continues to increase every year. According to a 1999 figure, 50 percent of all US households owned PCs, a figure that continues to rise every year. With continuous development of sophisticated software, PCs are becoming increasingly powerful. In addition, the price of a PC continues to steadily decline. Furthermore, the typical life of a PC in the workplace is approximately two to three years while in the home it is three to five years. As these PCs become obsolete, they are replaced and the old PCs are disposed of. It is estimated that between 14 and 20 million PCs are retired annually in the US. While 20 to 30% of the units may be resold, the others are discarded. These discards represent a significant potential source of lead for the waste stream. In some communities, waste cathode ray tubes (CRTs) represent the second largest source of lead in the waste stream after vehicular lead acid batteries. PCs are, therefore, not suitable for dumping in landfills. Besides, several components of a PC can be reused and then there are other valuable materials that can also be harvested. And with the advent of product stewardship, product recovery is the best solution for manufacturers. Disassembly line is perhaps the most suitable set up for disassembling PCs. However, planning and scheduling of disassembly on a disassembly line is complicated. In this paper, we discuss some of the complications including product arrival, demand arrival, inventory fluctuation and production control mechanisms. We then show how to overcome them by implementing a multi-kanban mechanism in the PC disassembly line setting. The multi-kanban mechanism relies on dynamic routing of kanbans according to the state of the system. We investigate the multi-kanban mechanism using simulation and demonstrate that this mechanism is superior to the traditional push system in terms of controlling the system"s inventory while maintaining a decent customer service level.

  15. 30 CFR 817.57 - Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 817.57 Section 817.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.57 Hydrologic balance:...

  16. 30 CFR 817.57 - Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 817.57 Section 817.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.57 Hydrologic balance:...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1404 - Assembly/Disassembly-general requirements (applies to all assembly and disassembly operations).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1404 Assembly/Disassembly—general... collapse. (4) Verifying assist crane loads. When using an assist crane, the loads that will be imposed on the assist crane at each phase of assembly/disassembly must be verified in accordance with §...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1404 - Assembly/Disassembly-general requirements (applies to all assembly and disassembly operations).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1404 Assembly/Disassembly—general... collapse. (4) Verifying assist crane loads. When using an assist crane, the loads that will be imposed on the assist crane at each phase of assembly/disassembly must be verified in accordance with §...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1404 - Assembly/Disassembly-general requirements (applies to all assembly and disassembly operations).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1404 Assembly/Disassembly—general... collapse. (4) Verifying assist crane loads. When using an assist crane, the loads that will be imposed on the assist crane at each phase of assembly/disassembly must be verified in accordance with §...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1404 - Assembly/Disassembly-general requirements (applies to all assembly and disassembly operations).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1404 Assembly/Disassembly—general... collapse. (4) Verifying assist crane loads. When using an assist crane, the loads that will be imposed on the assist crane at each phase of assembly/disassembly must be verified in accordance with §...

  1. Effects of different types of exercise on muscle activity and balance control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Gim, Min-A; Kim, Young-Hwan; Yoo, Kyung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed the effects of isotonic, isokinetic, and isometric exercises of ankle joint muscles on lower extremity muscle activity and balance control. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 healthy adults (15 males) in their 20s who were randomly assigned to three different exercise method groups of 10 people each. The isokinetic exercise group performed three sets at an angular velocity of 60°/sec, including a single rest period after every set of 10 repetitions. The isometric exercise group performed three sets consisting of three 15 repetitions of a 15-second exercise followed by a 5-second rest. [Results] Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that depending on the exercise method, the non-dominant tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius muscle, and peroneus longus showed significant differences in muscle activity for weight-bearing non-dominant sides; when the dominant side was weight-bearing, the dominant gastrocnemius and peroneus longus showed significant differences in muscle activity; and the non-dominant and dominant sides showed significant differences in balance control depending on the duration of support in the area. [Conclusion] Muscle fatigue from the three exercise methods produced a decline in muscle activity and balance control; due to the fatigue before exercise, the side that did not perform the exercises was affected. PMID:26180340

  2. 401(k) plan asset allocation, account balances, and loan activity in 2007.

    PubMed

    VanDerhei, Jack; Holden, Sarah; Alonso, Luis; Copeland, Craig

    2008-12-01

    The bulk of 401(k) assets continued to be invested in stocks. On average, at year-end 2007, about two-thirds of 401(k) participants' assets were invested in equity securities through equity funds, the equity portion of balanced funds, and company stock. About one-third was in fixed-income securities such as stable value investments and bond and money market funds. Although these relative shares have changed little over the past 12 years, the underlying fund composition has changed over time. About two-thirds of 401(k) plans included lifecycle funds in their investment lineup at year-end 2007. New analysis shows that at year-end 2007, more than 7 percent of the assets in the EBRI/ICI database were invested in lifecycle funds and one-quarter of 401(k) participants held lifecycle funds. Also known as "target date" funds, they are designed to simplify investing and automate account rebalancing. New employees continued to utilize balanced funds, including lifecyclefunds. Across all age groups, more new or recent hires invested their 401(k) assets in balanced funds, including lifecycle funds. At year-end 2007, 28 percent of the account balances of recently hired participants in their 20s were invested in balanced funds, compared with 24 percent in 2006, 19 percent in 2005, and about 7 percent in 1998. At year-end 2007, almost 19 percent of the account balances of recently hired participants in their 20s were invested in lifecycle funds compared with 16 percent at year-end 2006. 401(k) participants continued to seek diversification of their investments. The share of 401(k) accounts invested in company stock continued to shrink, falling by 0.5 percentage point (to 10.6 percent) in 2007. That continued a steady decline that started in 1999. Recently hired 401(k) participants contributed to this trend: they were less likely to hold employer stock. Participants' 401(k) loan activity was stable. In 2007, 18 percent of all 401(k) participants eligible for loans had a loan

  3. Changes in cortical activity associated with adaptive behavior during repeated balance perturbation of unpredictable timing

    PubMed Central

    Mierau, Andreas; Hülsdünker, Thorben; Strüder, Heiko K.

    2015-01-01

    The compensation for a sudden balance perturbation, unpracticed and unpredictable in timing and magnitude is accompanied by pronounced postural instability that is suggested to be causal to falls. However, subsequent presentations of an identical perturbation are characterized by a marked decrease of the amplitude of postural reactions; a phenomenon called adaptation or habituation. This study aimed to identify cortical characteristics associated with adaptive behavior during repetitive balance perturbations based on single-trial analyses of the P1 and N1 perturbation-evoked potentials. Thirty-seven young men were exposed to ten transient balance perturbations while balancing on the dominant leg. Thirty two-channel electroencephalography (EEG), surface electromyography (EMG) of the ankle plantar flexor muscles and postural sway (i.e., Euclidean distance of the supporting platform) were recorded simultaneously. The P1 and N1 potentials were localized and the amplitude/latency was analyzed trial by trial. The best match sources for P1 and N1 potentials were located in the parietal (Brodmann area (BA) 5) and midline fronto-central cortex (BA 6), respectively. The amplitude and latency of the P1 potential remained unchanged over trials. In contrast, a significant adaptation of the N1 amplitude was observed. Similar adaptation effects were found with regard to postural sway and ankle plantarflexors EMG activity of the non-dominant (free) leg; i.e., an indicator for reduced muscular co-contraction and/or less temporary bipedal stance to regain stability. Significant but weak correlations were found between N1 amplitude and postural sway as well as EMG activity. These results highlight the important role of the midline fronto-central cortex for adaptive behavior associated with balance control. PMID:26528154

  4. Changes in cortical activity associated with adaptive behavior during repeated balance perturbation of unpredictable timing.

    PubMed

    Mierau, Andreas; Hülsdünker, Thorben; Strüder, Heiko K

    2015-01-01

    The compensation for a sudden balance perturbation, unpracticed and unpredictable in timing and magnitude is accompanied by pronounced postural instability that is suggested to be causal to falls. However, subsequent presentations of an identical perturbation are characterized by a marked decrease of the amplitude of postural reactions; a phenomenon called adaptation or habituation. This study aimed to identify cortical characteristics associated with adaptive behavior during repetitive balance perturbations based on single-trial analyses of the P1 and N1 perturbation-evoked potentials. Thirty-seven young men were exposed to ten transient balance perturbations while balancing on the dominant leg. Thirty two-channel electroencephalography (EEG), surface electromyography (EMG) of the ankle plantar flexor muscles and postural sway (i.e., Euclidean distance of the supporting platform) were recorded simultaneously. The P1 and N1 potentials were localized and the amplitude/latency was analyzed trial by trial. The best match sources for P1 and N1 potentials were located in the parietal (Brodmann area (BA) 5) and midline fronto-central cortex (BA 6), respectively. The amplitude and latency of the P1 potential remained unchanged over trials. In contrast, a significant adaptation of the N1 amplitude was observed. Similar adaptation effects were found with regard to postural sway and ankle plantarflexors EMG activity of the non-dominant (free) leg; i.e., an indicator for reduced muscular co-contraction and/or less temporary bipedal stance to regain stability. Significant but weak correlations were found between N1 amplitude and postural sway as well as EMG activity. These results highlight the important role of the midline fronto-central cortex for adaptive behavior associated with balance control.

  5. Balance recovery is compromised and trunk muscle activity is increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michelle D; Chang, Angela T; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    Increased respiration in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requires greater abdominal muscle activation, which may impact on contribution of the trunk to postural control. This study aimed to determine whether recovery of balance from postural perturbations and trunk muscle activity differs in people with and without COPD before and/or after exercise. Electromyography (EMG) of the obliquus internus (OI) and externus (OE) abdominis, rectus abdominis (RA), erector spinae (ES) and deltoid muscles was recorded with surface electrodes during rapid shoulder flexion and extension. Time taken to regain baseline centre of pressure velocity (vCOP) and the number of postural adjustments following arm movement was calculated from force plate data. Time to recover balance in the direction of postural disturbance (anteroposterior vCOP) was longer in COPD, particularly more severe COPD, than controls. Mediolateral vCOP (perpendicular to the perturbation) and the number of postural adjustments did not differ between groups, but people with more severe COPD were less successful at returning their mediolateral vCOP to baseline. Abdominal muscle EMG was similar between groups, but controls had greater ES EMG during arm movements. Individuals with more severe COPD had greater OE and RA EMG both before and during arm movement compared to those with less severe COPD and controls. Following exercise, OE and ES EMG increased in people with less severe COPD. This study shows that severe COPD is associated with impaired ability to recover balance and greater trunk muscle activity during postural challenges. Augmented trunk muscle activity may limit the contribution of trunk movements to balance recovery and could contribute to increased falls risk.

  6. Design of a perfect balance system for active upper-extremity exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard L; Lobo-Prat, Joan; van der Kooij, Herman; Stienen, Arno H A

    2013-06-01

    Passive gravity compensation in exoskeletons significantly reduces the amount of torque and energy needed from the actuators. So far, no design has been able to achieve perfect balance without compromising the exoskeleton characteristics. Here we propose a novel design that integrates an existing statically-balanced mechanism with two springs and four degrees of freedom into a general-purpose exoskeleton design, that can support any percentage of the combined weight of exoskeleton and arm. As it allows for three rotational degrees of freedom at the shoulder and one at the elbow, it does not compromise exoskeleton characteristics and can be powered with any choice of passive or active actuation method. For instance, with this design a perfectly balanced exoskeleton design with inherently safe, passive actuators on each joint axis becomes possible. The potential reduction in required actuator torque, power and weight, simplification of control, improved dynamic performance, and increased safety margin, all while maintaining perfect balance, are the major advantages of the design, but the integrated systems does add a significant amount of complexity. Future integration in an actual exoskeleton should prove if this tradeoff is beneficial.

  7. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity.

  8. Human muscle spindle sensitivity reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Michael

    2014-10-08

    Muscle spindles are commonly considered as stretch receptors encoding movement, but the functional consequence of their efferent control has remained unclear. The "α-γ coactivation" hypothesis states that activity in a muscle is positively related to the output of its spindle afferents. However, in addition to the above, possible reciprocal inhibition of spindle controllers entails a negative relationship between contractile activity in one muscle and spindle afferent output from its antagonist. By recording spindle afferent responses from alert humans using microneurography, I show that spindle output does reflect antagonistic muscle balance. Specifically, regardless of identical kinematic profiles across active finger movements, stretch of the loaded antagonist muscle (i.e., extensor) was accompanied by increased afferent firing rates from this muscle compared with the baseline case of no constant external load. In contrast, spindle firing rates from the stretching antagonist were lowest when the agonist muscle powering movement (i.e., flexor) acted against an additional resistive load. Stepwise regressions confirmed that instantaneous velocity, extensor, and flexor muscle activity had a significant effect on spindle afferent responses, with flexor activity having a negative effect. Therefore, the results indicate that, as consequence of their efferent control, spindle sensitivity (gain) to muscle stretch reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles rather than only the activity of the spindle-bearing muscle.

  9. Actin-interacting Protein 1 Promotes Disassembly of Actin-depolymerizing Factor/Cofilin-bound Actin Filaments in a pH-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Kazumi; Hayakawa, Kimihide; Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Actin-interacting protein 1 (AIP1) is a conserved WD repeat protein that promotes disassembly of actin filaments when actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin is present. Although AIP1 is known to be essential for a number of cellular events involving dynamic rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, the regulatory mechanism of the function of AIP1 is unknown. In this study, we report that two AIP1 isoforms from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, known as UNC-78 and AIPL-1, are pH-sensitive in enhancement of actin filament disassembly. Both AIP1 isoforms only weakly enhance disassembly of ADF/cofilin-bound actin filaments at an acidic pH but show stronger disassembly activity at neutral and basic pH values. However, a severing-defective mutant of UNC-78 shows pH-insensitive binding to ADF/cofilin-decorated actin filaments, suggesting that the process of filament severing or disassembly, but not filament binding, is pH-dependent. His-60 of AIP1 is located near the predicted binding surface for the ADF/cofilin-actin complex, and an H60K mutation of AIP1 partially impairs its pH sensitivity, suggesting that His-60 is involved in the pH sensor for AIP1. These biochemical results suggest that pH-dependent changes in AIP1 activity might be a novel regulatory mechanism of actin filament dynamics. PMID:26747606

  10. Influence of intense physical activity on energy balance and body fatness.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, A; Doucet, E

    1999-02-01

    The reduced contribution of physical activity to daily energy expenditure and the accessibility to high-fat foods have put an excessive burden on energy balance, resulting in an increase in the prevalence of obesity throughout the world. In this context, fat gain can be seen as a natural adaptation to deal with a fattening lifestyle, since the hormonal adaptations that accompany fat gain favour the readjustment of energy expenditure to energy intake. Intense physical activity would also seem to facilitate the regulation of energy balance, since it increases the energy cost of exercise, increases post-exercise energy expenditure and the potential of skeletal muscles to utilize lipids, and also favours a decrease in post-exercise intake. Moreover, the effects of intense exercise seem to be mediated by an activation of sympathetic nervous system activity that seems to be specific to skeletal muscle. It is also important to manipulate macronutrient composition in order to reduce fat intake, because unhealthy food habits can favour overfeeding and thus overcome the energy deficit caused by regular physical activity. Under free-living conditions, the combination of vigorous activity and healthy food practices can amount to a substantial weight loss which is comparable with that of other non-surgical approaches to treat obesity.

  11. The energy balance and pressure in the solar transition zone for network and active region features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, K. R.; Bartoe, J.-D. F.; Brueckner, G. E.; Vanhoosier, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    The electron pressure and energy balance in the solar transition zone are determined for about 125 network and active region features on the basis of high spectral and spatial resolution extreme ultraviolet spectra. Si III line intensity ratios obtained from the Naval Research Laboratory high-resolution telescope and spectrograph during a rocket flight are used as diagnostics of electron density and pressure for solar features near 3.5 x 10 to the 4th K. Observed ratios are compared with the calculated dependence of the 1301 A/1312 A and 1301 A/1296 A line intensity ratios on electron density, temperature and pressure. Electron densities ranging from 2 x 10 to the 10th/cu cm to 10 to the 12th/cu cm and active region pressures from 3 x 10 to the 15th to 10 to the 16th/cu cm K are obtained. Energy balance calculations reveal the balance of the divergence of the conductive flux and turbulent energy dissipation by radiative energy losses in a plane-parallel homogeneous transition zone (fill factor of 1), and an energy source requirement for a cylindrical zone geometry (fill factor less than 0.04).

  12. Balanced activity in basal ganglia projection pathways is critical for contraversive movements

    PubMed Central

    Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Matias, Sara; Dugue, Guillaume P.; Mainen, Zachary F.; Costa, Rui M.

    2014-01-01

    The basal ganglia, and the striatum in particular, have been implicated in the generation of contraversive movements. The striatum projects to downstream basal ganglia nuclei through two main circuits, originating in striatonigral and striatopallidal neurons, and different models postulate that the two pathways can work in opposition or synergistically. Here we show striatonigral and striatopallidal neurons are concurrently active during spontaneous contraversive movements. Furthermore, we show that unilateral optogenetic inhibition of either or both projection pathways disrupts contraversive movements. Consistently, simultaneous activation of both neuron types produces contraversive movements. Still, we also show that imbalanced activity between the pathways can result in opposing movements being driven by each projection pathway. These data show that balanced activity in both striatal projection pathways is critical for the generation of contraversive movements and highlights that imbalanced activity between the two projection pathways can result in opposing motor output. PMID:25002180

  13. 401(k) plan asset allocation, account balances, and loan activity in 2011.

    PubMed

    VanDerhei, Jack; Holden, Sarah; Alonso, Luis; Bass, Steven

    2012-12-01

    THE BULK OF 401(K) ASSETS CONTINUED TO BE INVESTED IN STOCKS: On average, at year-end 2011, 61 percent of 401(k) participants' assets was invested in equity securities through equity funds, the equity portion of balanced funds, and company stock. Thirty-four percent was in fixed-income securities such as stable-value investments and bond and money funds. SEVENTY-TWO PERCENT OF 401(K) PLANS INCLUDED TARGET-DATE FUNDS IN THEIR INVESTMENT LINEUP AT YEAR-END 2011: At year-end 2011, 13 percent of the assets in the EBRI/ICI 401(k) database was invested in target-date funds and 39 percent of 401(k) participants held target-date funds. Also known as lifecycle funds, these funds are designed to offer a diversified portfolio that automatically rebalances to be more focused on income over time. MORE NEW OR RECENT HIRES INVESTED THEIR 401(K) ASSETS IN BALANCED FUNDS, INCLUDING TARGET-DATE FUNDS: For example, at year-end 2011, 51 percent of the account balances of recently hired participants in their 20s was invested in balanced funds, compared with 44 percent in 2010, and about 7 percent in 1998. A significant subset of that balanced fund category is target-date funds. At year-end 2011, 40 percent of the account balances of recently hired participants in their 20s was invested in target-date funds, compared with 35 percent at year-end 2010. 401(K) PARTICIPANTS CONTINUED TO SEEK DIVERSIFICATION OF THEIR INVESTMENTS: The share of 401(k) accounts invested in company stock remained at 8 percent in 2011. This share has fallen by more than half since 1999. Recently hired 401(k) participants contributed to this trend: They tended to be less likely to hold employer stock. PARTICIPANTS' 401(K) LOAN ACTIVITY REMAINED STEADY, ALTHOUGH LOAN BALANCES INCREASED SLIGHTLY IN 2011: At year-end 2011, 21 percent of all 401(k) participants who were eligible for loans had loans outstanding against their 401(k) accounts, unchanged from year-end 2009 and year-end 2010, and up from 18 percent at year

  14. 401(k) plan asset allocation, account balances, and loan activity in 2009.

    PubMed

    VanDerhei, Jack; Holden, Sarah; Alonso, Luis

    2010-11-01

    of the account balances of recently hired participants in their 20s were invested in balanced funds, compared with 36 percent in 2008, and about 7 percent in 1998. At year-end 2009, 31 percent of the account balances of recently hired participants in their 20s was invested in lifecycle funds, compared with almost 23 percent at year-end 2008. 401(K) PARTICIPANTS CONTINUED TO SEEK DIVERSIFICATION OF THEIR INVESTMENTS: The share of 401(k) accounts invested in company stock continued to shrink, falling by half of a percentage point (to 9.2 percent) in 2009. That continued a steady decline that started in 1999. Recently hired 401(k) participants contributed to this trend: They tended to be less likely to hold employer stock. PARTICIPANTS' 401(K) LOAN ACTIVITY ROSE IN 2009: In 2009, 21 percent of all 401(k) participants eligible for loans had a loan outstanding against their 401(k) account, compared with 18 percent at year-end 2008 and year-end 2007. Loans outstanding amounted to 15 percent of the remaining account balance, on average, at year-end 2009, compared with 16 percent at year-end 2008. Loan amounts remained in line with the past few years in terms of typical dollar amounts.

  15. 401(k) plan asset allocation, account balances, and loan activity in 2008.

    PubMed

    VanDerhei, Jack; Holden, Sarah; Alonso, Luis

    2009-10-01

    28 percent in 2007, and about 7 percent in 1998. At year-end 2008, almost 23 percent of the account balances of recently hired participants in their 20s were invested in lifecycle funds, compared with almost 19 percent at year-end 2007. 401(K) PARTICIPANTS CONTINUED TO SEEK DIVERSIFICATION OF THEIR INVESTMENTS. The share of 401(k) accounts invested in company stock continued to shrink, falling by nearly 1 percentage point (to 9.7 percent) in 2008. That continued a steady decline that started in 1999. Recently hired 401(k) participants contributed to this trend: they were less likely to hold employer stock. PARTICIPANTS' 401(K) LOAN ACTIVITY WAS STABLE. In 2008, 18 percent of all 401(k) participants eligible for loans had a loan outstanding against their 401(k) account, the same percentage as at year-end 2007 and year-end 2006. Loans outstanding amounted to 16 percent of the remaining account balance, on average, at year-end 2008; this is similar to the year-end 2002 level.

  16. Balance of calcineurin Aα and CDK5 activities sets release probability at nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Ryan, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    The control of neurotransmitter release at nerve terminals is of profound importance for neurological function and provides a powerful control system in neural networks. We show that the balance of enzymatic activities of the alpha isoform of the phosphatase calcineurin (CNAα) and the kinase CDK5 has a dramatic influence over single AP-driven exocytosis at nerve terminals. Acute or chronic loss of these enzymatic activities results in a 7-fold impact on single action potential-driven exocytosis. We demonstrate that this control is mediated almost entirely through Cav2.2 (N-type) voltage-gated calcium channels as blocking these channels with a peptide toxin eliminates modulation by these enzymes. We found that a fraction of nerve terminals are kept in a presynaptically silent state with no measurable Ca2+ influx driven by single AP stimuli due to the balance of CNAα and CDK5 activities as blockade of either CNAα or CDK5 activity changes the proportion of presynaptically silent nerve terminals. Thus CNAα and CDK5 enzymatic activities are key determinants of release probability. PMID:23699505

  17. Dietary electrolyte balance affects growth performance, amylase activity and metabolic response in the meagre (Argyrosomus regius).

    PubMed

    Magnoni, Leonardo J; Salas-Leiton, Emilio; Peixoto, Maria-João; Pereira, Luis; Silva-Brito, Francisca; Fontinha, Filipa; Gonçalves, José F M; Wilson, Jonathan M; Schrama, Johan W; Ozório, Rodrigo O A

    2017-03-16

    Dietary ion content is known to alter the acid-base balance in freshwater fish. The current study investigated the metabolic impact of acid-base disturbances produced by differences in dietary electrolyte balance (DEB) in the meagre (Argyrosomus regius), an euryhaline species. Changes in fish performance, gastric chyme characteristics, pH and ion concentrations in the bloodstream, digestive enzyme activities and metabolic rates were analyzed in meagre fed ad libitum two experimental diets (DEB 200 or DEB 700mEq/kg) differing in the Na2CO3 content for 69days. Fish fed the DEB 200 diet had 60-66% better growth performance than the DEB 700 group. Meagre consuming the DEB 200 diet were 90-96% more efficient than fish fed the DEB 700 diet at allocating energy from feed into somatic growth. The pH values in blood were significantly lower in the DEB 700 group 2h after feeding when compared to DEB 200, indicating that acid-base balance in meagre was affected by electrolyte balance in diet. Osmolality, and Na(+) and K(+) concentrations in plasma did not vary with the dietary treatment. Gastric chyme in the DEB 700 group had higher pH values, dry matter, protein and energy contents, but lower lipid content than in the DEB 200 group. Twenty-four hours after feeding, amylase activity was higher in the gastrointestinal tract of DEB 700 group when compared to the DEB 200 group. DEB 700 group had lower routine metabolic (RMR) and standard metabolic (SMR) rates, indicating a decrease in maintenance energy expenditure 48h after feeding the alkaline diet. The current study demonstrates that feeding meagre with an alkaline diet not only causes acid-base imbalance, but also negatively affects digestion and possibly nutrient assimilation, resulting in decreased growth performance.

  18. (HFR-B1 experiment reporting and capsule disassembly)

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.F.

    1991-02-22

    The traveler visited the Joint Research Centre (JRC), Petten, The Netherlands, the Forschungszentrum GmbH (KFA), Juelich, Germany; and the Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung (ZfK), Rossendorf, Germany, during the period January 28 through February 9. At JRC, the analysis of the experiment HFR-B1 was discussed; a new schedule for issuance of the final data report was established. Other discussions at JRC concerned the capabilities of Petten to conduct two reactor experiments being proposed under the US/FRG cooperative program and the initial results of a proof test of Germany fuel spheres. At KFA, the main emphasis was on the disassembly of capsules 2 and 3 of the HFR-B1 experiment and agreement on the examinations and tests to be conducted with the disassembled components. The disassembly of capsule 3 was observed. Extensive discussions were conducted on the work, both experimental and analytical, being conducted in the Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktor Technologie. A major portion of the experimental work is being conducted at ZfK and a visit to this laboratory, sponosored by the KFA, was made on February 6 and 7. Cooperation with the US on the experimental and analytical work in the safety area was strongly emphasized. 1 tab.

  19. On the optimal design of the disassembly and recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Xanthopoulos, A.; Iakovou, E.

    2009-05-15

    This paper tackles the problem of the optimal design of the recovery processes of the end-of-life (EOL) electric and electronic products, with a special focus on the disassembly issues. The objective is to recover as much ecological and economic value as possible, and to reduce the overall produced quantities of waste. In this context, a medium-range tactical problem is defined and a novel two-phased algorithm is presented for a remanufacturing-driven reverse supply chain. In the first phase, we propose a multicriteria/goal-programming analysis for the identification and the optimal selection of the most 'desirable' subassemblies and components to be disassembled for recovery, from a set of different types of EOL products. In the second phase, a multi-product, multi-period mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model is presented, which addresses the optimization of the recovery processes, while taking into account explicitly the lead times of the disassembly and recovery processes. Moreover, a simulation-based solution approach is proposed for capturing the uncertainties in reverse logistics. The overall approach leads to an easy-to-use methodology that could support effectively middle level management decisions. Finally, the applicability of the developed methodology is illustrated by its application on a specific case study.

  20. Disassembly of the cystovirus ϕ6 envelope by montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Block, Karin A; Trusiak, Adrianna; Katz, Al; Gottlieb, Paul; Alimova, Alexandra; Wei, Hui; Morales, Jorge; Rice, William J; Steiner, Jeffrey C

    2014-02-01

    Prior studies of clay-virus interactions have focused on the stability and infectivity of nonenveloped viruses, yielding contradictory results. We hypothesize that the surface charge distribution of the clay and virus envelope dictates how the components react and affect aggregation, viral stability, and infectivity. The bacteriophage Cystoviridae species φ6 used in this study is a good model for enveloped pathogens. The interaction between φ6 and montmorillonite (MMT) clay (the primary component of bentonite) is explored by transmission electron microscopy. The analyses show that MMT-φ6 mixtures undergo heteroaggregation, forming structures in which virtually all the virions are either sequestered between MMT platelet layers or attached to platelet edges. The virions swell and undergo disassembly resulting in partial or total envelope loss. Edge-attached viral envelopes distort to increase contact area with the positively charged platelet edges indicating that the virion surface is negatively charged. The nucleocapsid (NCs) remaining after envelope removal also exhibit distortion, in contrast to detergent-produced NCs which exhibit no distortion. This visually discernible disassembly is a mechanism for loss of infectivity previously unreported by studies of nonenveloped viruses. The MMT-mediated sequestration and disassembly result in reduced infectivity, suggesting that clays may reduce infectivity of enveloped pathogenic viruses in soils and sediments.

  1. On the optimal design of the disassembly and recovery processes.

    PubMed

    Xanthopoulos, A; Iakovou, E

    2009-05-01

    This paper tackles the problem of the optimal design of the recovery processes of the end-of-life (EOL) electric and electronic products, with a special focus on the disassembly issues. The objective is to recover as much ecological and economic value as possible, and to reduce the overall produced quantities of waste. In this context, a medium-range tactical problem is defined and a novel two-phased algorithm is presented for a remanufacturing-driven reverse supply chain. In the first phase, we propose a multicriteria/goal-programming analysis for the identification and the optimal selection of the most 'desirable' subassemblies and components to be disassembled for recovery, from a set of different types of EOL products. In the second phase, a multi-product, multi-period mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model is presented, which addresses the optimization of the recovery processes, while taking into account explicitly the lead times of the disassembly and recovery processes. Moreover, a simulation-based solution approach is proposed for capturing the uncertainties in reverse logistics. The overall approach leads to an easy-to-use methodology that could support effectively middle level management decisions. Finally, the applicability of the developed methodology is illustrated by its application on a specific case study.

  2. Disassembly of the cystovirus ϕ6 envelope by montmorillonite clay

    PubMed Central

    Block, Karin A; Trusiak, Adrianna; Katz, Al; Gottlieb, Paul; Alimova, Alexandra; Wei, Hui; Morales, Jorge; Rice, William J; Steiner, Jeffrey C

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies of clay–virus interactions have focused on the stability and infectivity of nonenveloped viruses, yielding contradictory results. We hypothesize that the surface charge distribution of the clay and virus envelope dictates how the components react and affect aggregation, viral stability, and infectivity. The bacteriophage Cystoviridae species φ6 used in this study is a good model for enveloped pathogens. The interaction between φ6 and montmorillonite (MMT) clay (the primary component of bentonite) is explored by transmission electron microscopy. The analyses show that MMT–φ6 mixtures undergo heteroaggregation, forming structures in which virtually all the virions are either sequestered between MMT platelet layers or attached to platelet edges. The virions swell and undergo disassembly resulting in partial or total envelope loss. Edge-attached viral envelopes distort to increase contact area with the positively charged platelet edges indicating that the virion surface is negatively charged. The nucleocapsid (NCs) remaining after envelope removal also exhibit distortion, in contrast to detergent-produced NCs which exhibit no distortion. This visually discernible disassembly is a mechanism for loss of infectivity previously unreported by studies of nonenveloped viruses. The MMT-mediated sequestration and disassembly result in reduced infectivity, suggesting that clays may reduce infectivity of enveloped pathogenic viruses in soils and sediments. PMID:24357622

  3. RHGF-1/PDZ-RhoGEF and retrograde DLK-1 signaling drive neuronal remodeling on microtubule disassembly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hao; Lee, Albert; Liao, Chien-Po; Liu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Chun-Liang

    2014-11-18

    Neurons remodel their connectivity in response to various insults, including microtubule disruption. How neurons sense microtubule disassembly and mount remodeling responses by altering genetic programs in the soma are not well defined. Here we show that in response to microtubule disassembly, the Caenorhabditis elegans PLM neuron remodels by retracting its synaptic branch and overextending the primary neurite. This remodeling required RHGF-1, a PDZ-Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (PDZ-RhoGEF) that was associated with and inhibited by microtubules. Independent of the myosin light chain activation, RHGF-1 acted through Rho-dependent kinase LET-502/ROCK and activated a conserved, retrograde DLK-1 MAPK (DLK-1/dual leucine zipper kinase) pathway, which triggered synaptic branch retraction and overgrowth of the PLM neurite in a dose-dependent manner. Our data represent a neuronal remodeling paradigm during development that reshapes the neural circuit by the coordinated removal of the dysfunctional synaptic branch compartment and compensatory extension of the primary neurite.

  4. Enabling People with Developmental Disabilities to Actively Follow Simple Instructions and Perform Designated Physical Activities According to Simple Instructions with Nintendo Wii Balance Boards by Controlling Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Chung, Chiao-Chen; Shih, Ching-Tien; Chen, Ling-Che

    2011-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology turning the Nintendo Wii Balance Board into a high performance standing location detector. This study extended Wii Balance Board functionality to assess whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform designated physical activities according to simple…

  5. Static calibration of the RSRA active-isolator rotor balance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) active-isolator system is designed to reduce rotor vibrations transmitted to the airframe and to simultaneously measure all six forces and moments generated by the rotor. These loads are measured by using a combination of load cells, strain gages, and hydropneumatic active isolators with built-in pressure gages. The first static calibration of the complete active-isolator rotor balance system was performed in l983 to verify its load-measurement capabilities. Analysis of the data included the use of multiple linear regressions to determine calibration matrices for different data sets and a hysteresis-removal algorithm to estimate in-flight measurement errors. Results showed that the active-isolator system can fulfill most performance predictions. The results also suggested several possible improvements to the system.

  6. Self-efficacy mediates the relationship between balance/walking performance, activity, and participation after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Meghan F; Pohlig, Ryan; Reisman, Darcy

    2015-01-01

    Background Many outcome measures (OM) that assess individuals’ ability or beliefs in their ability to perform tasks exist to evaluate activity and participation after stroke; however, the relationship between various OM and activity/participation is unclear. Objective The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between different OM and activity and participation in people after stroke. Methods 59 subjects post-stroke participated in an assessment including self-selected walking speed, 6 minute walk test, Timed “Up and Go” Test, Berg Balance Scale, Functional Gait Assessment, Walk 12, and Activity-specific Balance Confidence Scale. Step Activity Monitoring (SAM) was used as a measure of activity and Stroke Impact Scale-Participation (SIS-P) as a measure of participation. Exploratory Factor Analysis was performed including all measures except SAM and SIS-P. Two factors were extracted and termed performance based (PB) and self-efficacy (SE). A Path Analysis assessed the role of SE as a mediator in the relationships of PB and SAM/SIS-P. Results In the path analysis, PB significantly predicts SE (p < 0.001, b=0.44), but not SAM or SIS-P (p > 0.05, b=0.25 and b=0.11 respectively). SE significantly predicts both SAM and SIS-P (p < 0.001, b=0.46 and b=0.59 respectively). The Indirect Effects of PB on SAM and SIS-P were significant (p < 0.001; b=0.20 and b=0.26 respectively). Conclusion These results suggest that SE mediates the relationship between PB and activity and participation after stroke, reinforcing that improving activity and participation is more complicated than only targeting performance. Clinicians should administer SE and PB measures to determine the most accurate view of patients after stroke and seek to improve SE through interventions. PMID:26653764

  7. PDK1 regulates focal adhesion disassembly by modulating endocytosis of αvβ3 integrin.

    PubMed

    di Blasio, Laura; Gagliardi, Paolo Armando; Puliafito, Alberto; Sessa, Roberto; Seano, Giorgio; Bussolino, Federico; Primo, Luca

    2015-03-01

    Non-amoeboid cell migration is characterised by dynamic competition among multiple protrusions to establish new adhesion sites at the cell's leading edge. However, the mechanisms that regulate the decision to disassemble or to grow nascent adhesions are not fully understood. Here we show that, in endothelial cells, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) promotes focal adhesion (FA) turnover by controlling endocytosis of integrin αvβ3 in a PI3K-dependent manner. We demonstrate that PDK1 binds and phosphorylates integrin αvβ3. Downregulation of PDK1 increases FA size and slows down their disassembly. This process requires both PDK1 kinase activity and PI3K activation but does not involve Akt. Moreover, PDK1 silencing stabilises FA in membrane protrusions decreasing migration of endothelial cells on vitronectin. These results indicate that modulation of integrin endocytosis by PDK1 hampers endothelial cell adhesion and migration on extracellular matrix, thus unveiling a novel role for this kinase.

  8. nagZ Triggers Gonococcal Biofilm Disassembly.

    PubMed

    Bhoopalan, Senthil V; Piekarowicz, Andrzej; Lenz, Jonathan D; Dillard, Joseph P; Stein, Daniel C

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial-bacterial interactions play a critical role in promoting biofilm formation. Here we show that NagZ, a protein associated with peptidoglycan recycling, has moonlighting activity that allows it to modulate biofilm accumulation by Neisseria gonorrhoeae. We characterize the biochemical properties of NagZ and demonstrate its ability to function as a dispersing agent for biofilms formed on abiotic surfaces. We extend these observations to cell culture and tissue explant models and show that in nagZ mutants, the biofilms formed in cell culture and on human tissues contain significantly more biomass than those formed by a wild-type strain. Our results demonstrate that an enzyme thought to be restricted to peptidoglycan recycling is able to disperse preformed biofilms.

  9. Intermediates in assembly by photoactivation after thermally accelerated disassembly of the manganese complex of photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Barra, Marcos; Haumann, Michael; Loja, Paola; Krivanek, Roland; Grundmeier, Alexander; Dau, Holger

    2006-12-05

    The Mn4Ca complex bound to photosystem II (PSII) is the active site of photosynthetic water oxidation. Its assembly involves binding and light-driven oxidation of manganese, a process denoted as photoactivation. The disassembly of the Mn complex is a thermally activated process involving distinct intermediates. Starting from intermediate states of the disassembly, which was initiated by a temperature jump to 47 degrees C, we photoactivated PSII membrane particles and monitored the activity recovery by O2 polarography and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. Oxidation state and structural features of the formed intermediates of the Mn complex were assayed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Mn K-edge. The photoactivation time courses, which exhibit a lag phase characteristic of intermediate formation only when starting with the apo-PSII, suggest that within approximately 5 min of photoactivation of apo-PSII, a binuclear Mn complex is formed. It is proposed that a MnIII2(di-mu-oxo) complex is a key intermediate both in the disassembly and in the assembly reaction paths.

  10. The effect of virtual reality-based eccentric training on lower extremity muscle activation and balance in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Kyu; Yang, Dae Jung; Uhm, Yo Han; Heo, Jae Won; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of virtual reality-based eccentric training on lower extremity muscle activity and balance in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients participated, with 15 patients allotted to each of two eccentric training groups: one using a slow velocity (group I) and one using a fast velocity (group II). The virtual reality-based eccentric training was performed by the patients for 30 minutes once a day, 5 days a week, for 8 weeks using an Eccentron system. Surface electromyography was used to measure the lower extremity muscle activity, while a BioRescue was used to measure balancing ability. [Results] A significant difference in lower extremity muscle activation and balance ability was observed in group I compared with group II. [Conclusion] This study showed that virtual reality-based eccentric training using a slow velocity is effective for improving lower extremity muscle activity and balance in stroke patients. PMID:27512263

  11. A Study of the Effect of Preschool Children's Participation in Sensorimotor Activities on Their Understanding of the Mechanical Equilibrium of a Balance Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Anastasiou, Leonidas; Konsolas, Manos; Prevezanou, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether participation in sensorimotor activities by preschool children involving their own bodily balance while walking on a beam over the floor has an effect on their understanding of the mechanical equilibrium of a balance beam. The balance beam consisted of a horizontal stick balancing around its…

  12. Weighing brain activity with the balance: Angelo Mosso's original manuscripts come to light.

    PubMed

    Sandrone, Stefano; Bacigaluppi, Marco; Galloni, Marco R; Cappa, Stefano F; Moro, Andrea; Catani, Marco; Filippi, Massimo; Monti, Martin M; Perani, Daniela; Martino, Gianvito

    2014-02-01

    Neuroimaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging are essential tools for the analysis of organized neural systems in working and resting states, both in physiological and pathological conditions. They provide evidence of coupled metabolic and cerebral local blood flow changes that strictly depend upon cellular activity. In 1890, Charles Smart Roy and Charles Scott Sherrington suggested a link between brain circulation and metabolism. In the same year William James, in his introduction of the concept of brain blood flow variations during mental activities, briefly reported the studies of the Italian physiologist Angelo Mosso, a multifaceted researcher interested in the human circulatory system. James focused on Mosso's recordings of brain pulsations in patients with skull breaches, and in the process only briefly referred to another invention of Mosso's, the 'human circulation balance', which could non-invasively measure the redistribution of blood during emotional and intellectual activity. However, the details and precise workings of this instrument and the experiments Mosso performed with it have remained largely unknown. Having found Mosso's original manuscripts in the archives, we remind the scientific community of his experiments with the 'human circulation balance' and of his establishment of the conceptual basis of non-invasive functional neuroimaging techniques. Mosso unearthed and investigated several critical variables that are still relevant in modern neuroimaging such as the 'signal-to-noise ratio', the appropriate choice of the experimental paradigm and the need for the simultaneous recording of differing physiological parameters.

  13. Balancing act: approaches to healthy eating and physical activity among Boston public housing residents.

    PubMed

    Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Torres, Shioban; Wayman, Julie; Greenwood, Nechama; Thomas, Gerry; Kozlowski, Lauren; Bowen, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Boston public housing residents are more likely to report fair or poor health status, been diagnosed with obesity, and to be physically inactive compared with other Boston residents (Digenis-Bury, Brooks, Chen, Ostrem, & Horsburgh, 2008 ). Little is known about perceptions of and opportunities for healthy eating and physical activity in this population. We conducted eight focus groups at public housing developments to explore residents' views regarding opportunities and barriers to healthy eating and physical activity. Sixty-seven English- and Spanish-speaking residents participated. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. All residents described the challenge of balancing considerations of food quality, access, and affordability. Other findings included underutilized nutritional resources; abundant availability of unhealthy food; and economic and structural barriers to exercise. Transportation-related challenges were a dominant theme. Building opportunities for physical activity and providing access to affordable and quality food choices may be important interventions for promoting health among public housing residents.

  14. Distinctive PSA-NCAM and NCAM Hallmarks in Glutamate-Induced Dendritic Atrophy and Synaptic Disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Podestá, María Fernanda; Yam, Patricia; Codagnone, Martín Gabriel; Uccelli, Nonthué Alejandra; Colman, David; Reinés, Analía

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic and synapse remodeling are forms of structural plasticity that play a critical role in normal hippocampal function. Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and its polysialylated form (PSA-NCAM) participate in neurite outgrowth and synapse formation and plasticity. However, it remains unclear whether they contribute to dendritic retraction and synaptic disassembly. Cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to glutamate (5 µM) showed a reduced MAP-2 (+) area in the absence of neuronal death 24 h after the insult. Concomitantly, synapse loss, revealed by decreased synaptophysin and post-synaptic density-95 cluster number and area, together with changes in NCAM and PSA-NCAM levels were found. Dendritic atrophy and PSA-NCAM reduction proved NMDA-receptor dependent. Live-imaging experiments evidenced dendritic atrophy 4 h after the insult; this effect was preceded by smaller NCAM clusters (1 h) and decreased surface and total PSA-NCAM levels (3 h). Simultaneously, total NCAM cluster number and area remained unchanged. The subsequent synapse disassembly (6 h) was accompanied by reductions in total NCAM cluster number and area. A PSA mimetic peptide prevented both the dendritic atrophy and the subsequent synaptic changes (6 h) but had no effect on the earliest synaptic remodeling (3 h). Thus, NCAM-synaptic reorganization and PSA-NCAM level decrease precede glutamate-induced dendritic atrophy, whereas the NCAM level reduction is a delayed event related to synapse loss. Consequently, distinctive stages in PSA-NCAM/NCAM balance seem to accompany glutamate-induced dendritic atrophy and synapse loss. PMID:25279838

  15. Enabling people with developmental disabilities to actively follow simple instructions and perform designated physical activities according to simple instructions with Nintendo Wii Balance Boards by controlling environmental stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Chung, Chiao-Chen; Shih, Ching-Tien; Chen, Ling-Che

    2011-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology turning the Nintendo Wii Balance Board into a high performance standing location detector. This study extended Wii Balance Board functionality to assess whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform designated physical activities according to simple instructions by controlling their favorite environmental stimulation using Nintendo Wii Balance Boards. This study was carried out according to an A-B-A-B design. Data showed that both participants significantly increased their target response (performing a designated physical activity) by activating the control system to produce their preferred environmental stimulation during the intervention phases.

  16. Balance control and anti‐gravity muscle activity during the experience of fear at heights

    PubMed Central

    Wuehr, Max; Kugler, Guenter; Schniepp, Roman; Eckl, Maria; Pradhan, Cauchy; Jahn, Klaus; Huppert, Doreen; Brandt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fear of heights occurs when a visual stimulus causes the apprehension of losing balance and falling. A moderate form of visual height intolerance (vHI) affects about one third of the general population and has relevant consequences for the quality of life. A quantitative evaluation of balance mechanisms in persons susceptible to vHI during height exposure is missing. VHI‐related changes in postural control were assessed by center‐of‐pressure displacements and electromyographic recordings of selected leg, arm, and neck muscles in 16 subjects with vHI while standing at heights on an emergency balcony versus standing in the laboratory at ground level. Characteristics of open‐ and closed‐loop postural control were analyzed. Body sway and muscle activity parameters were correlated with the subjective estimates of fear at heights. During height exposure, (1) open‐loop control was disturbed by a higher diffusion activity (P < 0.001) and (2) the sensory feedback threshold for closed‐loop control was lowered (P < 0.010). Altered postural control was predominantly associated with increased co‐contraction of leg muscles. Body sway and leg and neck muscle co‐contraction correlated with the severity of subjective anxiety (P < 0.050). Alterations in postural control diminished if there were nearby stationary contrasts in the visual surrounding or if subjects stood with eyes closed. The performance of a cognitive dual task also improved impaired balance. Visual heights have two behavioral effects in vHI subjects: A change occurs in (1) open‐ and closed‐loop postural control strategy and (2) co‐contraction of anti‐gravity leg and neck muscles, both of which depend on the severity of evoked fear at heights. PMID:24744901

  17. Reversible Guest Uptake/Release by Redox-Controlled Assembly/Disassembly of a Coordination Cage.

    PubMed

    Croué, Vincent; Goeb, Sébastien; Szalóki, György; Allain, Magali; Sallé, Marc

    2016-01-26

    Controlling the guest expulsion process from a receptor is of critical importance in various fields. Several coordination cages have been recently designed for this purpose, based on various types of stimuli to induce the guest release. Herein, we report the first example of a redox-triggered process from a coordination cage. The latter integrates a cavity, the panels of which are based on the extended tetrathiafulvalene unit (exTTF). The unique combination of electronic and conformational features of this framework (i.e. high π-donating properties and drastic conformational changes upon oxidation) allows the reversible disassembly/reassembly of the redox-active cavity upon chemical oxidation/reduction, respectively. This cage is able to bind the three-dimensional B12 F12 (2-) anion in a 1:2 host/guest stoichiometry. The reversible redox-triggered disassembly of the cage could also be demonstrated in the case of the host-guest complex, offering a new option for guest-delivering control.

  18. PslG, a self-produced glycosyl hydrolase, triggers biofilm disassembly by disrupting exopolysaccharide matrix

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shan; Su, Tiantian; Wu, Huijun; Liu, Shiheng; Wang, Di; Zhao, Tianhu; Jin, Zengjun; Du, Wenbin; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Chua, Song Lin; Yang, Liang; Zhu, Deyu; Gu, Lichuan; Ma, Luyan Z

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated communities of microorganism embedded in extracellular matrix. Exopolysaccharide is a critical component in the extracellular matrix that maintains biofilm architecture and protects resident biofilm bacteria from antimicrobials and host immune attack. However, self-produced factors that target the matrix exopolysaccharides, are still poorly understood. Here, we show that PslG, a protein involved in the synthesis of a key biofilm matrix exopolysaccharide Psl in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, prevents biofilm formation and disassembles existing biofilms within minutes at nanomolar concentrations when supplied exogenously. The crystal structure of PslG indicates the typical features of an endoglycosidase. PslG mainly disrupts the Psl matrix to disperse bacteria from biofilms. PslG treatment markedly enhances biofilm sensitivity to antibiotics and macrophage cells, resulting in improved biofilm clearance in a mouse implant infection model. Furthermore, PslG shows biofilm inhibition and disassembly activity against a wide range of Pseudomonas species, indicating its great potential in combating biofilm-related complications. PMID:26611635

  19. Asymmetric ring structure of Vps4 required for ESCRT-III disassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillat, Christophe; Macheboeuf, Pauline; Wu, Yuanfei; McCarthy, Andrew A.; Boeri-Erba, Elisabetta; Effantin, Gregory; Göttlinger, Heinrich G.; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Renesto, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    The vacuolar protein sorting 4 AAA-ATPase (Vps4) recycles endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT-III) polymers from cellular membranes. Here we present a 3.6-Å X-ray structure of ring-shaped Vps4 from Metallosphera sedula (MsVps4), seen as an asymmetric pseudohexamer. Conserved key interface residues are shown to be important for MsVps4 assembly, ATPase activity in vitro, ESCRT-III disassembly in vitro and HIV-1 budding. ADP binding leads to conformational changes within the protomer, which might propagate within the ring structure. All ATP-binding sites are accessible and the pseudohexamer binds six ATP with micromolar affinity in vitro. In contrast, ADP occupies one high-affinity and five low-affinity binding sites in vitro, consistent with conformational asymmetry induced on ATP hydrolysis. The structure represents a snapshot of an assembled Vps4 conformation and provides insight into the molecular motions the ring structure undergoes in a concerted action to couple ATP hydrolysis to ESCRT-III substrate disassembly.

  20. TLR ligand–induced podosome disassembly in dendritic cells is ADAM17 dependent

    PubMed Central

    West, Michele A.; Prescott, Alan R.; Chan, Kui Ming; Zhou, Zhongjun; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen; Watts, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling induces a rapid reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured mouse dendritic cells (DC), leading to enhanced antigen endocytosis and a concomitant loss of filamentous actin–rich podosomes. We show that as podosomes are lost, TLR signaling induces prominent focal contacts and a transient reduction in DC migratory capacity in vitro. We further show that podosomes in mouse DC are foci of pronounced gelatinase activity, dependent on the enzyme membrane type I matrix metalloprotease (MT1-MMP), and that DC transiently lose the ability to degrade the extracellular matrix after TLR signaling. Surprisingly, MMP inhibitors block TLR signaling–induced podosome disassembly, although stimulated endocytosis is unaffected, which demonstrates that the two phenomena are not obligatorily coupled. Podosome disassembly caused by TLR signaling occurs normally in DC lacking MT1-MMP, and instead requires the tumor necrosis factor α–converting enzyme ADAM17 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17), which demonstrates a novel role for this “sheddase” in regulating an actin-based structure. PMID:18762577

  1. Asymmetric ring structure of Vps4 required for ESCRT-III disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Caillat, Christophe; Macheboeuf, Pauline; Wu, Yuanfei; McCarthy, Andrew A.; Boeri-Erba, Elisabetta; Effantin, Gregory; Göttlinger, Heinrich G.; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Renesto, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The vacuolar protein sorting 4 AAA–ATPase (Vps4) recycles endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT-III) polymers from cellular membranes. Here we present a 3.6-Å X-ray structure of ring-shaped Vps4 from Metallosphera sedula (MsVps4), seen as an asymmetric pseudohexamer. Conserved key interface residues are shown to be important for MsVps4 assembly, ATPase activity in vitro, ESCRT-III disassembly in vitro and HIV-1 budding. ADP binding leads to conformational changes within the protomer, which might propagate within the ring structure. All ATP-binding sites are accessible and the pseudohexamer binds six ATP with micromolar affinity in vitro. In contrast, ADP occupies one high-affinity and five low-affinity binding sites in vitro, consistent with conformational asymmetry induced on ATP hydrolysis. The structure represents a snapshot of an assembled Vps4 conformation and provides insight into the molecular motions the ring structure undergoes in a concerted action to couple ATP hydrolysis to ESCRT-III substrate disassembly. PMID:26632262

  2. Ipl1/Aurora B kinase coordinates synaptonemal complex disassembly with cell cycle progression and crossover formation in budding yeast meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Philip; Copsey, Alice; Newnham, Louise; Kolar, Elizabeth; Lichten, Michael; Hoffmann, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Several protein kinases collaborate to orchestrate and integrate cellular and chromosomal events at the G2/M transition in both mitotic and meiotic cells. During the G2/M transition in meiosis, this includes the completion of crossover recombination, spindle formation, and synaptonemal complex (SC) breakdown. We identified Ipl1/Aurora B kinase as the main regulator of SC disassembly. Mutants lacking Ipl1 or its kinase activity assemble SCs with normal timing, but fail to dissociate the central element component Zip1, as well as its binding partner, Smt3/SUMO, from chromosomes in a timely fashion. Moreover, lack of Ipl1 activity causes delayed SC disassembly in a cdc5 as well as a CDC5-inducible ndt80 mutant. Crossover levels in the ipl1 mutant are similar to those observed in wild type, indicating that full SC disassembly is not a prerequisite for joint molecule resolution and subsequent crossover formation. Moreover, expression of meiosis I and meiosis II-specific B-type cyclins occur normally in ipl1 mutants, despite delayed formation of anaphase I spindles. These observations suggest that Ipl1 coordinates changes to meiotic chromosome structure with resolution of crossovers and cell cycle progression at the end of meiotic prophase. PMID:19759266

  3. Balancing speed and accuracy of polyclonal T cell activation: a role for extracellular feedback

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Extracellular feedback is an abundant module of intercellular communication networks, yet a detailed understanding of its role is still lacking. Here, we study interactions between polyclonal activated T cells that are mediated by IL-2 extracellular feedback as a model system. Results Using mathematical modeling we show that extracellular feedback can give rise to opposite outcomes: competition or cooperation between interacting T cells, depending on their relative levels of activation. Furthermore, the outcome of the interaction also depends on the relative timing of activation of the cells. A critical time window exists after which a cell that has been more strongly activated nevertheless cannot exclude an inferior competitor. Conclusions In a number of experimental studies of polyclonal T-cell systems, outcomes ranging from cooperation to competition as well as time dependent competition were observed. Our model suggests that extracellular feedback can contribute to these observed behaviors as it translates quantitative differences in T cells’ activation strength and in their relative activation time into qualitatively different outcomes. We propose extracellular feedback as a general mechanism that can balance speed and accuracy – choosing the most suitable responders out of a polyclonal population under the clock of an escalating threat. PMID:22925037

  4. AMP-activated protein kinase and energy balance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Orhan, Yelda C; Zha, Xiaoming; Esencan, Ecem; Chatterton, Robert T; Bulun, Serdar E

    2017-01-01

    Cancer growth and metastasis depends on the availability of energy. Energy-sensing systems are critical in maintaining a balance between the energy supply and utilization of energy for tumor growth. A central regulator in this process is AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In times of energy deficit, AMPK is allosterically modified by the binding of increased levels of AMP and ADP, making it a target of specific AMPK kinases (AMPKKs). AMPK signaling prompts cells to produce energy at the expense of growth and motility, opposing the actions of insulin and growth factors. Increasing AMPK activity may thus prevent the proliferation and metastasis of tumor cells. Activated AMPK also suppresses aromatase, which lowers estrogen formation and prevents breast cancer growth. Biguanides can be used to activate AMPK, but AMPK activity is modified by many different interacting factors; understanding these factors is important in order to control the abnormal growth processes that lead to breast cancer neoplasia. Fatty acids, estrogens, androgens, adipokines, and another energy sensor, sirtuin-1, alter the phosphorylation and activation of AMPK. Isoforms of AMPK differ among tissues and may serve specific functions. Targeting AMPK regulatory processes at points other than the upstream AMPKKs may provide additional approaches for prevention of breast cancer neoplasia, growth, and metastasis. PMID:28337254

  5. Fuel feeds function: Energy balance and bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cell activation.

    PubMed

    Schwarm, A; Viergutz, T; Kuhla, B; Hammon, H M; Schweigel-Röntgen, M

    2013-01-01

    A general phenomenon in peripartum mammals is the breakdown of (acquired) immunity. The incidence of parasite load, disease and inflammation often rise during the specific energetically demanding time of pregnancy and lactation. In this period, blood leukocytes display decreased DNA synthesis in response to mitogens in vitro. Leukocyte activation, the phase of the cell cycle preceding the DNA synthetic phase has hardly been investigated, but the few studies suggest that leukocyte activation may also be impaired by the limited energy/nutrient availability. Leukocyte activation is characterized by manifold processes, thus, we used the cellular oxygen consumption rate (OCR) as a measure of ATP turnover to support all these processes. We hypothesized that the activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) - in terms of oxygen consumed over basal levels after in vitro stimulation - is altered by energy balance around parturition. We studied peripartum high-yielding dairy cows because they undergo substantial fluctuations in energy intake, energy output and body fat mass. We established a fluorescence-based test strategy allowing for long-term (≥24h) quantification of O(2)-consumption and studied the peripartum period from 5 weeks ante partum to 5 weeks postpartum. In addition, we determined cellular lactate production, DNA/RNA synthesis and cell size and zoo-technical parameters such as animal energy intake and milk yield were assessed, as well as selected plasma parameters, e.g. glucose concentration. The basal OCR of PBMC from pregnant, non-lactating cows (n=6, -5 weeks ante partum) was 1.19±0.15 nmol min(-1) (10(7)cells)(-1) and increased to maximum levels of 2.54±0.49 nmol min(-1) (10(7)cells)(-1) in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMC. The basal OCR did not change over the peripartum period. Whereas the activation indices, herein defined as the PHA-induced 24h-increase of OCR above baseline, amounted to 1.1±0.3, 4.2±0.3, 4.1±1.1, 2.1±0.3, and

  6. Spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel bearing components: characterization, disposal cost estimates, and proposed repository acceptance requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Luksic, A.T.; McKee, R.W.; Daling, P.M.; Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Purcell, W.L.

    1986-10-01

    There are two categories of waste considered in this report. The first is the spent fuel disassembly (SFD) hardware. This consists of the hardware remaining after the fuel pins have been removed from the fuel assembly. This includes end fittings, spacer grids, water rods (BWR) or guide tubes (PWR) as appropriate, and assorted springs, fasteners, etc. The second category is other non-fuel-bearing (NFB) components the DOE has agreed to accept for disposal, such as control rods, fuel channels, etc., under Appendix E of the standard utiltiy contract (10 CFR 961). It is estimated that there will be approximately 150 kg of SFD and NFB waste per average metric ton of uranium (MTU) of spent uranium. PWR fuel accounts for approximately two-thirds of the average spent-fuel mass but only 50 kg of the SFD and NFB waste, with most of that being spent fuel disassembly hardware. BWR fuel accounts for one-third of the average spent-fuel mass and the remaining 100 kg of the waste. The relatively large contribution of waste hardware in BWR fuel, will be non-fuel-bearing components, primarily consisting of the fuel channels. Chapters are devoted to a description of spent fuel disassembly hardware and non-fuel assembly components, characterization of activated components, disposal considerations (regulatory requirements, economic analysis, and projected annual waste quantities), and proposed acceptance requirements for spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel assembly components at a geologic repository. The economic analysis indicates that there is a large incentive for volume reduction.

  7. VE-Cadherin Disassembly and Cell Contractility in the Endothelium are Necessary for Barrier Disruption Induced by Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aragon-Sanabria, Virginia; Pohler, Steven E.; Eswar, Vikram J.; Bierowski, Matthew; Gomez, Esther W.; Dong, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    During metastasis, breakdown of the endothelial barrier is critical for tumor cell extravasation through blood vessel walls and is mediated by a combination of tumor secreted soluble factors and receptor-ligand interactions. However, a complete mechanism governing tumor cell transendothelial migration remains unclear. Here, we investigate the roles of tumor-associated signals in regulating endothelial cell contractility and adherens junction disassembly leading to endothelial barrier breakdown. We show that Src mediates VE-cadherin disassembly in response to metastatic melanoma cells. Through the use of pharmacological inhibitors of cytoskeletal contractility we find that endothelial cell contractility is responsive to interactions with metastatic cancer cells and that reducing endothelial cell contractility abrogates migration of melanoma cells across endothelial monolayers. Furthermore, we find that a combination of tumor secreted soluble factors and receptor-ligand interactions mediate activation of Src within endothelial cells that is necessary for phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and for breakdown of the endothelial barrier. Together, these results provide insight into how tumor cell signals act in concert to modulate cytoskeletal contractility and adherens junctions disassembly during extravasation and may aid in identification of therapeutic targets to block metastasis. PMID:28393886

  8. Balancing the stability and the catalytic specificities of OP hydrolases with enhanced V-agent activities.

    PubMed

    Reeves, T E; Wales, M E; Grimsley, J K; Li, P; Cerasoli, D M; Wild, J R

    2008-06-01

    Rational site-directed mutagenesis and biophysical analyses have been used to explore the thermodynamic stability and catalytic capabilities of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and its genetically modified variants. There are clear trade-offs in the stability of modifications that enhance catalytic activities. For example, the H254R/H257L variant has higher turnover numbers for the chemical warfare agents VX (144 versus 14 s(-1) for the native enzyme (wild type) and VR (Russian VX, 465 versus 12 s(-1) for wild type). These increases are accompanied by a loss in stability in which the total Gibb's free energy for unfolding is 19.6 kcal/mol, which is 5.7 kcal/mol less than that of the wild-type enzyme. X-ray crystallographic studies support biophysical data that suggest amino acid residues near the active site contribute to the chemical and thermal stability through hydrophobic and cation-pi interactions. The cation-pi interactions appear to contribute an additional 7 kcal/mol to the overall global stability of the enzyme. Using rational design, it has been possible to make amino acid changes in this region that restored the stability, yet maintained effective V-agent activities, with turnover numbers of 68 and 36 s(-1) for VX and VR, respectively. This study describes the first rationally designed, stability/activity balance for an OPH enzyme with a legitimate V-agent activity, and its crystal structure.

  9. Physical activity, sedentary behaviour and energy balance in the preschool child: opportunities for early obesity prevention.

    PubMed

    Reilly, John J

    2008-08-01

    Prevalence of obesity in preschool children has increased dramatically in recent years. The preschool years (age 3-6 years) have been regarded as critical for the programming of energy balance, via the concept of early 'adiposity rebound'. Children who undergo early adiposity rebound are at increased risk of later obesity. Recent evidence suggests that associations between timing of adiposity rebound and later obesity may not reflect programming, but might denote that 'obesogenic' growth trajectories are often established by the preschool period. Studies of objectively-measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour in preschool children show that levels of physical activity are typically low and sedentary behaviour high. The review of evidence presented here is supportive of the hypothesis that physical activity is protective against obesity in the preschool period, and that sedentary behaviour, particularly television viewing, is obesogenic. Definitive evidence on dose-response relationships between physical activity, sedentary behaviour and obesity remain unclear. Dose-response evidence could be obtained fairly readily by intervention and longitudinal observational studies that use accelerometry in preschool children. The generalisability of much of the evidence base is limited and there is a need for research on the influence of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in the preschool years in the aetiology of obesity in the developing world.

  10. Active influence in dynamical models of structural balance in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Tyler H.; Shames, Iman

    2013-07-01

    We consider a nonlinear dynamical system on a signed graph, which can be interpreted as a mathematical model of social networks in which the links can have both positive and negative connotations. In accordance with a concept from social psychology called structural balance, the negative links play a key role in both the structure and dynamics of the network. Recent research has shown that in a nonlinear dynamical system modeling the time evolution of “friendliness levels” in the network, two opposing factions emerge from almost any initial condition. Here we study active external influence in this dynamical model and show that any agent in the network can achieve any desired structurally balanced state from any initial condition by perturbing its own local friendliness levels. Based on this result, we also introduce a new network centrality measure for signed networks. The results are illustrated in an international-relations network using United Nations voting record data from 1946 to 2008 to estimate friendliness levels amongst various countries.

  11. Reliability of the Chinese Version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Priscilla C.; Miller, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To translate the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale into a Chinese version and assess the reliability between Chinese versions and between Chinese and English versions of this outcome measure. Method Descriptive study using a 4-week test-retest design. Data were collected from a convenience sample of community living Chinese immigrants. Of the 79 participants, data from 71 subjects were included in the analysis. Two subsamples were formed to assess the reliability between Chinese versions (n=33) and between Chinese and English versions (n=38) of the scale. Results Internal consistency of the ABC was 0.98. Test-retest reliability was ICC=0.87 (95% CI, 0.76–0.93) for the Chinese versions and ICC = 0.88 (95% CI, 0.78–0.94) for Chinese and English versions. The total group ICC=.90 (95% CI, 0.84–0.94). Conclusions Balance confidence has been identified as an important area for clinical and research inquiry however collecting this information from Chinese speaking individuals has been limited by a lack of language specific measures. The Chinese version of the ABC has demonstrated acceptable measurement properties in this sample and should permit measurement of this unique construct in the Chinese population. PMID:17083176

  12. Balancing emotional processing with ongoing cognitive activity: the effects of task modality on intrusions and rumination

    PubMed Central

    Curci, Antonietta; Soleti, Emanuela; Lanciano, Tiziana; Doria, Valentina; Rimé, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we aimed to show that competition for resources between post-emotional processes and the execution of a cognitive task will result in two possible effects: (1) an impairment of the cognitive task in the short run and (2) an elongation of intrusions and rumination in the long run. The outcome of this competition is influenced by the interaction of the modality (verbal vs. visuospatial) of cognitive tasks run in the aftermath of an emotional experience and the nature (verbal vs. visuospatial) of the same experience. Non-clinical participants were given a working memory task (OSPAN vs. an analog Visual task) before and after the presentation of negative vs. neutral material (a novel excerpt in Experiment 1 and a video clip in Experiment 2). Intrusions and rumination were measured after a 24-h delay. Rumination was also assessed immediately after the experimental induction. Results showed that exposure to verbal negative material impaired verbal performance (Experiment 1); by contrast, exposure to visual negative material impaired both verbal and visuospatial performance (Experiment 2). Intrusions were only affected by the emotional valence of the original experience, while performing a visuospatial task resulted in enhanced rumination only after exposure to verbal emotional material. The findings of both experiments suggest that emotional processing spreads over time in balance with ongoing cognitive activities, and, in such a balance, the visuospatial processing mode tends to prevail over verbal engagements. PMID:26379598

  13. Functional Brain Activation in Response to a Clinical Vestibular Test Correlates with Balance

    PubMed Central

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Kinnaird, Catherine; DeDios, Yiri; Kofman, Igor S.; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain fMRI activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: Skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either a vestibulo-spinal reflex [saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)], or an ocular muscle response [utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)]. Research suggests that the skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for subjects than the high decibel tones required to elicit VEMPs. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of brain activity. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that pneumatically powered skull taps would elicit a similar pattern of brain activity as shown in previous studies. Our results provide the first evidence of using pneumatically powered skull taps to elicit vestibular activity inside the MRI scanner. A conjunction analysis revealed that skull taps elicit overlapping activation with auditory tone bursts in the canonical vestibular cortical regions. Further, our postural control assessments revealed that greater amplitude of brain activation in response to vestibular stimulation was associated with better balance control for both techniques. Additionally, we found that skull taps elicit more robust vestibular activity compared to auditory tone bursts, with less reported aversive effects, highlighting the utility of this approach for future clinical and basic science research. PMID:28344549

  14. Functional Brain Activation in Response to a Clinical Vestibular Test Correlates with Balance.

    PubMed

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Kinnaird, Catherine; DeDios, Yiri; Kofman, Igor S; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain fMRI activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: Skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either a vestibulo-spinal reflex [saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)], or an ocular muscle response [utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)]. Research suggests that the skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for subjects than the high decibel tones required to elicit VEMPs. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of brain activity. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that pneumatically powered skull taps would elicit a similar pattern of brain activity as shown in previous studies. Our results provide the first evidence of using pneumatically powered skull taps to elicit vestibular activity inside the MRI scanner. A conjunction analysis revealed that skull taps elicit overlapping activation with auditory tone bursts in the canonical vestibular cortical regions. Further, our postural control assessments revealed that greater amplitude of brain activation in response to vestibular stimulation was associated with better balance control for both techniques. Additionally, we found that skull taps elicit more robust vestibular activity compared to auditory tone bursts, with less reported aversive effects, highlighting the utility of this approach for future clinical and basic science research.

  15. Cofilin cooperates with fascin to disassemble filopodial actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Breitsprecher, Dennis; Koestler, Stefan A.; Chizhov, Igor; Nemethova, Maria; Mueller, Jan; Goode, Bruce L.; Small, J. Victor; Rottner, Klemens; Faix, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Cells use a large repertoire of proteins to remodel the actin cytoskeleton. Depending on the proteins involved, F-actin is organized in specialized protrusions such as lamellipodia or filopodia, which serve diverse functions in cell migration and sensing. Although factors responsible for directed filament assembly in filopodia have been extensively characterized, the mechanisms of filament disassembly in these structures are mostly unknown. We investigated how the actin-depolymerizing factor cofilin-1 affects the dynamics of fascincrosslinked actin filaments in vitro and in live cells. By multicolor total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and fluorimetric assays, we found that cofilin-mediated severing is enhanced in fascin-crosslinked bundles compared with isolated filaments, and that fascin and cofilin act synergistically in filament severing. Immunolabeling experiments demonstrated for the first time that besides its known localization in lamellipodia and membrane ruffles, endogenous cofilin can also accumulate in the tips and shafts of filopodia. Live-cell imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins revealed that cofilin is specifically targeted to filopodia upon stalling of protrusion and during their retraction. Subsequent electron tomography established filopodial actin filament and/or bundle fragmentation to precisely correlate with cofilin accumulation. These results identify a new mechanism of filopodium disassembly involving both fascin and cofilin. PMID:21940796

  16. Distinct stages in stress granule assembly and disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Joshua R; Matheny, Tyler; Jain, Saumya; Abrisch, Robert; Parker, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules are non-membrane bound RNA-protein (RNP) assemblies that form when translation initiation is limited and contain a biphasic structure with stable core structures surrounded by a less concentrated shell. The order of assembly and disassembly of these two structures remains unknown. Time course analysis of granule assembly suggests that core formation is an early event in granule assembly. Stress granule disassembly is also a stepwise process with shell dissipation followed by core clearance. Perturbations that alter liquid-liquid phase separations (LLPS) driven by intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDR) of RNA binding proteins in vitro have the opposite effect on stress granule assembly in vivo. Taken together, these observations argue that stress granules assemble through a multistep process initiated by stable assembly of untranslated mRNPs into core structures, which could provide sufficient high local concentrations to allow for a localized LLPS driven by IDRs on RNA binding proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18413.001 PMID:27602576

  17. Low power, biologically benign NIR light triggers polymer disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Fomina, Nadezda; McFearin, Cathryn L.; Sermsakdi, Marleen; Morachis, José M.; Almutairi, Adah

    2011-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) irradiation can penetrate up to 10 cm deep into tissues and be remotely applied with high spatial and temporal precision. Despite its potential for various medical and biological applications, there is a dearth of biomaterials that are responsive at this wavelength region. Herein we report a polymeric material that is able to disassemble in response to biologically benign levels of NIR irradiation upon two-photon absorption. The design relies on the photolysis of the multiple pendant 4-bromo7-hydroxycoumarin protecting groups to trigger a cascade of cyclization and rearrangement reactions leading to the degradation of the polymer backbone. The new material undergoes a 50% Mw loss after 25 sec of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation by single photon absorption and 21 min of NIR irradiation via two-photon absorption. Most importantly, even NIR irradiation at biologically benign laser power is sufficient to cause significant polymer disassembly. Furthermore, this material is well tolerated by cells both before and after degradation. These results demonstrate for the first time a NIR sensitive material with potential to be used for in vivo applications. PMID:22096258

  18. Gene Expression Profiling of Flagellar Disassembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Kara L.; Miller, Steven H.; Keller, Laura R.

    2008-01-01

    Flagella are sensory organelles that interact with the environment through signal transduction and gene expression networks. We used microarray profiling to examine gene regulation associated with flagellar length change in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Microarrays were probed with fluorescently labeled cDNAs synthesized from RNA extracted from cells before and during flagellar assembly or disassembly. Evaluation of the gene expression profiles identified >100 clones showing at least a twofold change in expression during flagellar length changes. Products of these genes are associated not only with flagellar structure and motility but also with other cellular responses, including signal transduction and metabolism. Expression of specific genes from each category was further characterized at higher resolution by using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT–PCR). Analysis and comparison of the gene expression profiles coupled to flagellar assembly and disassembly revealed that each process involves a new and uncharacterized whole-cell response to flagellar length changes. This analysis lays the groundwork for a more comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular networks regulating flagellar length changes. PMID:18493036

  19. A Health Probe in College Students Living in Los Angeles and in Taiwan: Dietary Pattern, Physical Activity and Energy Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Li Hui; Yang, Hsin Ling; Chen, Yin Chang; Davis, Rebecca; Schwartz, Miriam E.; Tam, Chick F.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to examine differences of dietary pattern, physical activity and energy balance in 240 college students with 137 of them enrolled in California State University, Los Angeles (LA) and the other 93 enrolled in China Medical University in Taichung, Taiwan (TW). A three-day dietary record and a 24-hour physical activity journal were…

  20. Coordination of substrate binding and ATP hydrolysis in Vps4-mediated ESCRT-III disassembly.

    PubMed

    Davies, Brian A; Azmi, Ishara F; Payne, Johanna; Shestakova, Anna; Horazdovsky, Bruce F; Babst, Markus; Katzmann, David J

    2010-10-01

    ESCRT-III undergoes dynamic assembly and disassembly to facilitate membrane exvagination processes including multivesicular body (MVB) formation, enveloped virus budding, and membrane abscission during cytokinesis. The AAA-ATPase Vps4 is required for ESCRT-III disassembly, however the coordination of Vps4 ATP hydrolysis with ESCRT-III binding and disassembly is not understood. Vps4 ATP hydrolysis has been proposed to execute ESCRT-III disassembly as either a stable oligomer or an unstable oligomer whose dissociation drives ESCRT-III disassembly. An in vitro ESCRT-III disassembly assay was developed to analyze Vps4 function during this process. The studies presented here support a model in which Vps4 acts as a stable oligomer during ATP hydrolysis and ESCRT-III disassembly. Moreover, Vps4 oligomer binding to ESCRT-III induces coordination of ATP hydrolysis at the level of individual Vps4 subunits. These results suggest that Vps4 functions as a stable oligomer that acts upon individual ESCRT-III subunits to facilitate ESCRT-III disassembly.

  1. Actin-filament disassembly: it takes two to shrink them fast.

    PubMed

    Winterhoff, Moritz; Faix, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Actin-filament disassembly is indispensable for replenishing the pool of polymerizable actin and allows continuous dynamic remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton. A new study now reveals that ADF/cofilin preferentially dismantles branched networks and provides new insights into the collaborative work of ADF/cofilin and Aip1 on filament disassembly at the molecular level.

  2. Activation of TRESK channels by the inflammatory mediator lysophosphatidic acid balances nociceptive signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kollert, Sina; Dombert, Benjamin; Döring, Frank; Wischmeyer, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    In dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons TRESK channels constitute a major current component of the standing outward current IKSO. A prominent physiological role of TRESK has been attributed to pain sensation. During inflammation mediators of pain e.g. lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) are released and modulate nociception. We demonstrate co-expression of TRESK and LPA receptors in DRG neurons. Heterologous expression of TRESK and LPA receptors in Xenopus oocytes revealed augmentation of basal K+ currents upon LPA application. In DRG neurons nociception can result from TRPV1 activation by capsaicin or LPA. Upon co-expression in Xenopus oocytes LPA simultaneously increased both depolarising TRPV1 and hyperpolarising TRESK currents. Patch-clamp recordings in cultured DRG neurons from TRESK[wt] mice displayed increased IKSO after application of LPA whereas under these conditions IKSO in neurons from TRESK[ko] mice remained unaltered. Under current-clamp conditions LPA application differentially modulated excitability in these genotypes upon depolarising pulses. Spike frequency was attenuated in TRESK[wt] neurons and, in contrast, augmented in TRESK[ko] neurons. Accordingly, excitation of nociceptive neurons by LPA is balanced by co-activation of TRESK channels. Hence excitation of sensory neurons is strongly controlled by the activity of TRESK channels, which therefore are good candidates for the treatment of pain disorders. PMID:26224542

  3. The Activity of Menkes Disease Protein ATP7A Is Essential for Redox Balance in Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Ashima; Yang, Haojun; Duffy, Megan; Robinson, Emily; Conrad-Antoville, Arianrhod; Lu, Ya-Wen; Capps, Tony; Braiterman, Lelita; Wolfgang, Michael; Murphy, Michael P.; Yi, Ling; Kaler, Stephen G.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Ralle, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Copper-transporting ATPase ATP7A is essential for mammalian copper homeostasis. Loss of ATP7A activity is associated with fatal Menkes disease and various other pathologies. In cells, ATP7A inactivation disrupts copper transport from the cytosol into the secretory pathway. Using fibroblasts from Menkes disease patients and mouse 3T3-L1 cells with a CRISPR/Cas9-inactivated ATP7A, we demonstrate that ATP7A dysfunction is also damaging to mitochondrial redox balance. In these cells, copper accumulates in nuclei, cytosol, and mitochondria, causing distinct changes in their redox environment. Quantitative imaging of live cells using GRX1-roGFP2 and HyPer sensors reveals highest glutathione oxidation and elevation of H2O2 in mitochondria, whereas the redox environment of nuclei and the cytosol is much less affected. Decreasing the H2O2 levels in mitochondria with MitoQ does not prevent glutathione oxidation; i.e. elevated copper and not H2O2 is a primary cause of glutathione oxidation. Redox misbalance does not significantly affect mitochondrion morphology or the activity of respiratory complex IV but markedly increases cell sensitivity to even mild glutathione depletion, resulting in loss of cell viability. Thus, ATP7A activity protects mitochondria from excessive copper entry, which is deleterious to redox buffers. Mitochondrial redox misbalance could significantly contribute to pathologies associated with ATP7A inactivation in tissues with paradoxical accumulation of copper (i.e. renal epithelia). PMID:27226607

  4. The Activity of Menkes Disease Protein ATP7A Is Essential for Redox Balance in Mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Ashima; Yang, Haojun; Duffy, Megan; Robinson, Emily; Conrad-Antoville, Arianrhod; Lu, Ya-Wen; Capps, Tony; Braiterman, Lelita; Wolfgang, Michael; Murphy, Michael P.; Yi, Ling; Kaler, Stephen G.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Ralle, Martina

    2016-05-16

    Copper-transporting ATPase ATP7A is essential for mammalian copper homeostasis. Loss of ATP7A activity is associated with fatal Menkes disease and various other pathologies. In cells, ATP7A inactivation disrupts copper transport from the cytosol into the secretory pathway. Using fibroblasts from Menkes disease patients and mouse 3T3-L1 cells with a CRISPR/Cas9-inactivated ATP7A, we demonstrate that ATP7A dysfunction is also damaging to mitochondrial redox balance. In these cells, copper accumulates in nuclei, cytosol, and mitochondria, causing distinct changes in their redox environment. Quantitative imaging of live cells using GRX1-roGFP2 and HyPer sensors reveals highest glutathione oxidation and elevation of H2O2 in mitochondria, whereas the redox environment of nuclei and the cytosol is much less affected. Decreasing the H2O2 levels in mitochondria with MitoQ does not prevent glutathione oxidation; i.e. elevated copper and not H2O2 is a primary cause of glutathione oxidation. Redox misbalance does not significantly affect mitochondrion morphology or the activity of respiratory complex IV but markedly increases cell sensitivity to even mild glutathione depletion, resulting in loss of cell viability. Thus, ATP7A activity protects mitochondria from excessive copper entry, which is deleterious to redox buffers. Mitochondrial redox misbalance could significantly contribute to pathologies associated with ATP7A inactivation in tissues with paradoxical accumulation of copper (i.e. renal epithelia).

  5. Assisting people with multiple disabilities actively correct abnormal standing posture with a Nintendo Wii balance board through controlling environmental stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Shih, Ching-Tien; Chu, Chiung-Ling

    2010-01-01

    The latest researches adopted software technology turning the Nintendo Wii Balance Board into a high performance change of standing posture (CSP) detector, and assessed whether two persons with multiple disabilities would be able to control environmental stimulation using body swing (changing standing posture). This study extends Wii Balance Board functionality for standing posture correction (i.e., actively adjust abnormal standing posture) to assessed whether two persons with multiple disabilities would be able to actively correct their standing posture by controlling their favorite stimulation on/off using a Wii Balance Board with a newly developed standing posture correcting program (SPCP). The study was performed according to an ABAB design, in which A represented baseline and B represented intervention phases. Data showed that both participants significantly increased time duration of maintaining correct standing posture (TDMCSP) to activate the control system to produce environmental stimulation during the intervention phases. Practical and developmental implications of the findings were discussed.

  6. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in the midzone membrane domain controls yeast mitotic spindle disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Rafael; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steve P.; Kellogg, Douglas R.; Tallada, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    During each cell cycle, the mitotic spindle is efficiently assembled to achieve chromosome segregation and then rapidly disassembled as cells enter cytokinesis. Although much has been learned about assembly, how spindles disassemble at the end of mitosis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic transport at the membrane domain surrounding the mitotic spindle midzone, here named the midzone membrane domain (MMD), is essential for spindle disassembly in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. We show that, during anaphase B, Imp1-mediated transport of the AAA-ATPase Cdc48 protein at the MMD allows this disassembly factor to localize at the spindle midzone, thereby promoting spindle midzone dissolution. Our findings illustrate how a separate membrane compartment supports spindle disassembly in the closed mitosis of fission yeast. PMID:25963819

  7. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  8. Effects of physical and sporting activities on balance control in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, P. P.; Gauchard, G. C.; Perrot, C.; Jeandel, C.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Balance disorders increase with aging and raise the risk of accidental falls in the elderly. It has been suggested that the practice of physical and sporting activities (PSA) efficiently counteracts these age related disorders, reducing the risk of falling significantly. METHODS: This study, principally based on a period during which the subjects were engaged in PSA, included 65 healthy subjects, aged over 60, who were living at home. Three series of posturographic tests (static, dynamic with a single and fast upward tilt, and dynamic with slow sinusoidal oscillations) analysing the centre of foot pressure displacements or electromyographic responses were conducted to determine the effects of PSA practice on balance control. RESULTS: The major variables of postural control were best in subjects who had always practised PSA (AA group). Those who did not take part in PSA at all (II group) had the worst postural performances, whatever the test. Subjects having lately begun PSA practice (IA group) had good postural performances, close to those of the AA group, whereas the subjects who had stopped the practice of PSA at an early age (AI group) did not perform as well. Overall, the postural control in the group studied decreased in the order AA > IA > AI > II. CONCLUSIONS: The period during which PSA are practised seems to be of major importance, having a positive bearing on postural control. It seems that recent periods of practice have greater beneficial effects on the subject's postural stability than PSA practice only at an early age. These data are compatible with the fact that PSA are extremely useful for elderly people even if it has not been a lifelong habit. 


 PMID:10205695

  9. A Rab1 mutant affecting guanine nucleotide exchange promotes disassembly of the Golgi apparatus

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is a dynamic organelle whose structure is sensitive to vesicular traffic and to cell cycle control. We have examined the potential role for rab1a, a GTPase previously associated with ER to Golgi and intra-Golgi transport, in the formation and maintenance of Golgi structure. Bacterially expressed, recombinant rab1a protein was microinjected into rat embryonic fibroblasts, followed by analysis of Golgi morphology by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Three recombinant proteins were tested: wild-type rab, mutant rab1a(S25N), a constitutively GDP-bound form (Nuoffer, C., H. W. Davidson, J. Matteson, J. Meinkoth, and W. E. Balch, 1994. J. Cell Biol. 125: 225- 237), and mutant rab1a(N124I) defective in guanine nucleotide binding. Microinjection of wild-type rab1a protein or a variety of negative controls (injection buffer alone or activated ras protein) did not affect the appearance of the Golgi, as visualized by immunofluorescence of alpha-mannosidase II (Man II), used as a Golgi marker. In contrast, microinjection of the mutant forms promoted the disassembly of the Golgi stacks into dispersed vesicular structures visualized by immunofluorescence. When S25N-injected cells were analyzed by EM after immunoperoxidase labeling, Man II was found in isolated ministacks and large vesicular elements that were often surrounded by numerous smaller unlabeled vesicles resembling carrier vesicles. Golgi disassembly caused by rab1a mutants differs from BFA-induced disruption, since beta- COP remains membrane associated, and Man II does not redistribute to the ER. BFA can still cause these residual Golgi elements to fuse and disperse, albeit at a slower rate. Moreover, BFA recovery is incomplete in the presence of rab1 mutants or GTP gamma S. We conclude that GTP exchange and hydrolysis by GTPases, specifically rab1a, are required to form and maintain normal Golgi stacks. The similarity of Golgi disassembly seen with rab1a mutants to that occurring during

  10. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M; Ferrández, Julia; Cano, Beatriz; Naranjo, Belén; Nájera, Victoria A; González, Maricruz; Lindahl, Anna M; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs), thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Leptin-Dependent Control of Glucose Balance and Locomotor Activity by POMC Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Lihong; Gamber, Kevin; Greeley, Sarah; Silva, Jose; Huntoon, Nicholas; Leng, Xinghong; Bjørbæk, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Summary Leptin plays a pivotal role in regulation of energy balance. Via unknown central pathways leptin also affects peripheral glucose homeostasis and locomotor activity. We hypothesized that specifically Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons mediate those actions. To examine this possibility we applied Cre-Lox technology to express leptin receptors (ObRb) exclusively in POMC neurons of the morbidly obese, profoundly diabetic, and severely hypoactive leptin receptor deficient Leprdb/db mice. We here show that expression of ObRb only in POMC neurons leads to a marked decrease in energy intake and a modest reduction in body weight in Leprdb/db mice. Remarkably, blood glucose levels are entirely normalized. This normalization occurs independently of changes in food intake and body weight. In addition, physical activity is greatly increased despite profound obesity. Our results suggest that leptin signaling exclusively in POMC neurons is sufficient to stimulate locomotion and prevent diabetes in the severely hypoactive and hyperglycemic obese Leprdb/db mice. PMID:19490908

  12. Sustainable conversion of agriculture wastes into activated carbons: energy balance and arsenic removal from water.

    PubMed

    Dieme, M M; Villot, A; Gerente, C; Andres, Y; Diop, S N; Diawara, C K

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate the production of activated carbons (AC) from Senegal agricultural wastes such as cashew shells, millet stalks and rice husks and to implement them in adsorption processes devoted to arsenic (V) removal. AC were produced by a direct physical activation with water steam without other chemicals. This production of AC has also led to co-products (gas and bio-oil) which have been characterized in terms of physical, chemical and thermodynamical properties for energy recovery. Considering the arsenic adsorption results and the energy balance for the three studied biomasses, the first results have shown that the millet stalks seem to be more interesting for arsenate removal from natural water and an energy recovery with a GEEelec of 18.9%. Cashew shells, which have shown the best energy recovery (34.3%), are not suitable for arsenate removal. This global approach is original and contributes to a recycling of biowastes with a joint recovery of energy and material.

  13. Disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi-rui; Fan, Bin; Zhang, Ming

    2014-09-01

    The success of the large telescope is largely linked to the excellent performance and reliability of the primary mirror. In order to maintain the quality of its reflective surface at the high expectations of astronomers, the primary mirror after almost two or three years of astronomical observations, needs to be removed and reinstalled for its cleaning and re-coating operation. There are a series of procedures such as the primary mirror cell dissembling from telescope, mirror handling, transportation, reintegration, alignment and so on. This paper will describe the experiences of disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror, taking a two meter grade primary mirror for example. As with all advanced and complex opto-mechanical systems, there has been the usual problems and trouble shooting.

  14. Core muscle activity in a series of balance exercises with different stability conditions.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Borreani, Sebastien; Martin, Julio; Martin, Fernando; Flandez, Jorge; Colado, Juan C

    2015-07-01

    Literature that provides progression models based on core muscle activity and postural manipulations is scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the core muscle activity in a series of balance exercises with different stability levels and additional elastic resistance. A descriptive study of electromyography (EMG) was performed with forty-four healthy subjects that completed 12 exercises in a random order. Exercises were performed unipedally or bipedally with or without elastic tubing as resistance on various unstable (uncontrolled multiaxial and uniaxial movement) and stable surfaces. Surface EMG on the lumbar multífidus spinae (LM), thoracic multífidus spinae (TM), lumbar erector spinae (LE), thoracic erector spinae (TE) and gluteus maximus (GM), on the dominant side of the body were collected to quantify the amount of muscle activity and were expressed as a % of the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Significant differences (p<.001) were found between exercises. The three unipedal standing exercises with additional elastic resistance generated the greatest EMG values, ranging from 19% MVIC to 30% MVIC. Postural manipulations with additional elastic resistance and/or unstable devices increase core muscle activity. An adequate exercise progression based on global core EMG could start with seated positions, progressing to bipedal standing stance (i.e., from either multiaxial or stable surface to uniaxial surface). Following this, unipedal standing positions may be performed (i.e., from either multiaxial or stable surface to uniaxial surface) and finally, elastic resistance must be added in order to increase EMG levels (i.e., from stable surface progressing to any of the used unstable surfaces).

  15. A Question of Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claxton, David B.; Troy, Maridy; Dupree, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Most authorities consider balance to be a component of skill-related physical fitness. Balance, however, is directly related to health, especially for older adults. Falls are a leading cause of injury and death among the elderly. Improved balance can help reduce falls and contribute to older people remaining physically active. Balance is a…

  16. Effects of horse-riding exercise on balance, gait, and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Nam; Lee, Dong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of horse-riding exercise on balance, gait, and activities of daily living (ADLs) in stroke patients. [Subjects] Among 20 participants with stroke, 10 were randomly assigned to the experimental group, and 10 were randomly assigned to the control group. The experimental group participated in horse-riding exercise for 30 minutes per day, 5 days a week for 6 weeks. Balance was tested with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Gait was measured using the 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT). ADLs were tested with the Modified Barthel Index (MBI). Differences between pre- and post-experiment values within the two groups were compared using paired t-tests. Between-group differences were compared using independent t-tests. [Results] The experimental group showed significant improvements in balance, gait, and ADLs following horse-riding exercise. Additionally, the experimental group showed significant differences in balance, gait, and ADLs compared with in the control group. [Conclusion] These results support that horse-riding exercise enhances balance, gait, and ADLs in stroke patients. This study supports the need for further research on horse-riding exercise programs. PMID:25931690

  17. The Relationship between Physical Activity and Thermal Protective Clothing on Functional Balance in Firefighters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Pui W.; Suyama, Joe; Cham, Rakie; Hostler, David

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between baseline physical training and the use of firefighting thermal protective clothing (TPC) with breathing apparatus on functional balance. Twenty-three male firefighters performed a functional balance test under four gear/clothing conditions. Participants were divided into groups by physical training status,…

  18. Permo-Triassic anatexis, continental rifting and the disassembly of western Pangaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, Ryan; Spikings, Richard; Gerdes, Axel; Ulianov, Alexey; Mora, Andres; Villagómez, Diego; Putlitz, Benita; Chiaradia, Massimo

    2014-03-01

    Crustal anatectites are frequently observed along ocean-continent active margins, although their origins are disputed with interpretations varying between rift-related and collisional. We report geochemical, isotopic and geochronological data that define an ~ 1500 km long belt of S-type meta-granites along the Andes of Colombia and Ecuador, which formed during 275-223 Ma. These are accompanied by amphibolitized tholeiitic basaltic dykes that yield concordant zircon U-Pb dates ranging between 240 and 223 Ma. A model is presented which places these rocks within a compressive Permian arc setting that existed during the amalgamation of westernmost Pangaea. Anatexis and mafic intrusion during 240-223 Ma are interpreted to have occurred during continental rifting, which culminated in the formation of oceanic crust and initiated the break-up of western Pangaea. Compression during 275-240 Ma generated small volumes of crustal melting. Rifting during 240-225 Ma was characterized by basaltic underplating, the intrusion of tholeiitic basalts and a peak in crustal melting. Tholeiitic intrusions during 225-216 Ma isotopically resemble depleted mantle and yield no evidence for contamination by continental crust, and we assign this period to the onset of continental drift. Dissected ophiolitic sequences in northern Colombia yield zircon U-Pb dates of 216 Ma. The Permo-Triassic margin of Ecuador and Colombia exhibits close temporal, faunal and geochemical similarities with various crustal blocks that form the basement to parts of Mexico, and thus these may represent the relict conjugate margin to NW Gondwana. The magmatic record of the early disassembly of Pangaea spans ~ 20 Ma (240-216 Ma), and the duration of rifting and rift-drift transition is similar to that documented in Cretaceous-Tertiary rift settings such as the West Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins, and the Taupo-Lau-Havre System, where rifting and continental disassembly also occurred over periods lasting ~ 20 Ma.

  19. Physical Activity and Sedentary Time among Young Children in Full-Day Kindergarten: Comparing Traditional and Balanced Day Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderloo, Leigh M.; Tucker, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare physical activity and sedentary time among young children whose schools adhere to traditional (i.e. three outdoor playtimes = 70 minutes) versus balanced day (i.e. two outdoor playtimes = ~55 minutes) schedules in Ontario full-day kindergarten classrooms. Design: The project was part of a larger, 2-year cross-sectional study.…

  20. Dating previously balanced rocks in seismically active parts of California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.W.; Brune, J.N.; Liu, T.; Zreda, M.; Yount, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Precariously balanced boulders that could be knocked down by strong earthquake ground motion are found in some seismically active areas of southern California and Nevada. In this study we used two independent surface-exposure dating techniques - rock-varnish microlamination and cosmogenic 36Cl dating methodologies - to estimate minimum- and maximum-limiting ages, respectively, of the precarious boulders and by inference the elapsed time since the sites were shaken down. The results of the exposure dating indicate that all of the precarious rocks are >10.5 ka and that some may be significantly older. At Victorville and Jacumba, California, these results show that the precarious rocks have not been knocked down for at least 10.5 k.y., a conclusion in apparent conflict with some commonly used probabilistic seismic hazard maps. At Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the ages of the precarious rocks are >10.5 to >27.0 ka, providing an independent measure of the minimum time elapsed since faulting occurred on the Solitario Canyon fault.

  1. Dynamic Alterations to α-Actinin Accompanying Sarcomere Disassembly and Reassembly during Cardiomyocyte Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaohu; Hughes, Bryan G; Ali, Mohammad A M; Cho, Woo Jung; Lopez, Waleska; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Although mammals are thought to lose their capacity to regenerate heart muscle shortly after birth, embryonic and neonatal cardiomyocytes in mammals are hyperplastic. During proliferation these cells need to selectively disassemble their myofibrils for successful cytokinesis. The mechanism of sarcomere disassembly is, however, not understood. To study this, we performed a series of immunofluorescence studies of multiple sarcomeric proteins in proliferating neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and correlated these observations with biochemical changes at different cell cycle stages. During myocyte mitosis, α-actinin and titin were disassembled as early as prometaphase. α-actinin (representing the sarcomeric Z-disk) disassembly precedes that of titin (M-line), suggesting that titin disassembly occurs secondary to the collapse of the Z-disk. Sarcomere disassembly was concurrent with the dissolution of the nuclear envelope. Inhibitors of several intracellular proteases could not block the disassembly of α-actinin or titin. There was a dramatic increase in both cytosolic (soluble) and sarcomeric α-actinin during mitosis, and cytosolic α-actinin exhibited decreased phosphorylation compared to sarcomeric α-actinin. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) induced the quick reassembly of the sarcomere. Sarcomere dis- and re-assembly in cardiomyocyte mitosis is CDK1-dependent and features dynamic differential post-translational modifications of sarcomeric and cytosolic α-actinin.

  2. Clathrin mediates integrin endocytosis for focal adhesion disassembly in migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Ezratty, Ellen J; Bertaux, Claire; Marcantonio, Eugene E; Gundersen, Gregg G

    2009-11-30

    Focal adhesion disassembly is regulated by microtubules (MTs) through an unknown mechanism that involves dynamin. To test whether endocytosis may be involved, we interfered with the function of clathrin or its adaptors autosomal recessive hypercholesteremia (ARH) and Dab2 (Disabled-2) and found that both treatments prevented MT-induced focal adhesion disassembly. Surface labeling experiments showed that integrin was endocytosed in an extracellular matrix-, clathrin-, and ARH- and Dab2-dependent manner before entering Rab5 endosomes. Clathrin colocalized with a subset of focal adhesions in an ARH- and Dab2-dependent fashion. Direct imaging showed that clathrin rapidly accumulated on focal adhesions during MT-stimulated disassembly and departed from focal adhesions with integrin upon their disassembly. In migrating cells, depletion of clathrin or Dab2 and ARH inhibited focal adhesion disassembly and decreased the rate of migration. These results show that focal adhesion disassembly occurs through a targeted mechanism involving MTs, clathrin, and specific clathrin adaptors and that direct endocytosis of integrins from focal adhesions mediates their disassembly in migrating cells.

  3. Intelligent decision making in disassembly process based on fuzzy reasoning petri nets.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meimei; Zhou, MengChu; Tang, Ying

    2004-10-01

    Practical disassembly process planning is extremely important for efficient material recycling and components reuse. The research work for the process planning in literature focuses on the generation of optimal sequences based on the predictive information of products. The used products, unfortunately, exhibit high uncertainty since products may experience very different conditions during their use stage. The indeterminate characteristics associated to used products often makes the predetermined plan unrealistic. Their disassembly process has to be decided dynamically adaptive to the products' specific status. To be able to deal with uncertainty in a dynamic decision making process, this paper presents a fuzzy reasoning Petri net (FRPN) model to represent related decision making rules in disassembly process. Using the proposed fuzzy reasoning algorithm based on the FRPN model, the multicriterion disassembly rules can be considered in the parallel way to make the decision automatically and quickly. Instead of producing the disassembly sequences before disassembling a whole product, the proposed method makes intelligent decisions based on dynamically updated status of components in the product at each disassembly step. Therefore, it is adaptive to the changes that arise during the process. Finally, an example is used to illustrate the application of the proposed methodology.

  4. AGR-3/4 Irradiation Test Train Disassembly and Component Metrology First Look Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stempien, John Dennis; Rice, Francine Joyce; Harp, Jason Michael; Winston, Philip Lon

    2016-03-01

    The AGR-3/4 experiment was designed to study fission product transport within graphitic matrix material and nuclear-grade graphite. To this end, this experiment consisted of 12 capsules, each fueled with 4 compacts containing UCO TRISO particles as driver fuel and 20 UCO designed-to-fail (DTF) fuel particles in each compact. The DTF fuel was fabricated with a thin pyrocarbon layer which was intended to fail during irradiation and provide a source of fission products. These fission products could then migrate through the compact and into the surrounding concentric rings of graphitic matrix material and/or nuclear graphite. Through post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the rings (including physical sampling and gamma scanning) fission product concentration profiles within the rings can be determined. These data can be used to elucidate fission product transport parameters (e.g. diffusion coefficients within the test materials) which will be used to inform and refine models of fission product transport. After irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) had been completed in April 2014, the AGR-3/4 experiment was shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) for inspection, disassembly, and metrology. The AGR-3/4 test train was received at MFC in two separate shipments between February and April 2015. Visual examinations of the test train exterior did not indicate dimensional distortion, and only two small discolored areas were observed at the bottom of Capsules 8 and 9. No corresponding discoloration was found on the inside of these capsules, however. Prior to disassembly, the two test train sections were subject to analysis via the Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS), which did not indicate that any gross fuel relocation had occurred. A series of specialized tools (including clamps, cutters, and drills) had been designed and fabricated in order to carry out test train disassembly and recovery of capsule components (graphite

  5. Development of remote disassembly technology for liquid-metal reactor (LMR) fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.C.; Evans, J.H.; Metz, C.F. III; Weil, B.S.

    1990-01-01

    A major objective of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) is to develop equipment and demonstrate technology to reprocess fast breeder reactor fuel. Experimental work on fuel disassembly cutting methods began in the 1970s. High-power laser cutting was selected as the preferred cutting method for fuel disassembly. Remotely operated development equipment was designed, fabricated, installed, and tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Development testing included remote automatic operation, remote maintenance testing, and laser cutting process development. This paper summarizes the development work performed at ORNL on remote fuel disassembly. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Developmental programming of energy balance regulation: Is physical activity more "programmable" than food intake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extensive human and animal model data show that environmental influences during critical periods of prenatal and early postnatal development can cause persistent alterations in energy balance regulation. Although a potentially important factor in the worldwide obesity epidemic, the fundamental mecha...

  7. Physical Activity Associated with Prayer Regimes Improves Standing Dynamic Balance of Healthy People

    PubMed Central

    AlAbdulwahab, Sami Saleh; Kachanathu, Shaji John; Oluseye, Kamaldeen

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Preparing for prayers, practicing religious meditation and performing prayers are believed to stimulate the visual, vestibular and somatosensory systems, which provide the sensory information that influences human balance. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the Islamic prayer regime on balance. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty healthy male subjects with a mean age of 31 ± 5 years and a mean body mass index of 27 ± 2 kg/cm2 voluntarily participated in this study. The subjects were divided into two equal groups: one group of subjects who regularly practiced Islamic prayer, and another group of non-practicing subjects. The dynamic balance of individuals in both groups was measured using a Balance Master. [Results] Adult healthy subjects practicing Islamic prayer regimes exhibited statistically significantly better dynamic balance than the non-practicing healthy subjects. [Conclusions] The results of this study support the hypothesis that religious meditation and prayers benefit human physiological function, especially balance. PMID:24409021

  8. Balance of activities of alcohol acetyltransferase and esterase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for production of isoamyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, K; Yamamoto, N; Kiyokawa, Y; Yanagiuchi, T; Wakai, Y; Kitamoto, K; Inoue, Y; Kimura, A

    1998-10-01

    Isoamyl acetate is synthesized from isoamyl alcohol and acetyl coenzyme A by alcohol acetyltransferase (AATFase) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is hydrolyzed by esterases at the same time. We hypothesized that the balance of both enzyme activities was important for optimum production of isoamyl acetate in sake brewing. To test this hypothesis, we constructed yeast strains with different numbers of copies of the AATFase gene (ATF1) and the isoamyl acetate-hydrolyzing esterase gene (IAH1) and used these strains in small-scale sake brewing. Fermentation profiles as well as components of the resulting sake were largely alike; however, the amount of isoamyl acetate in the sake increased with an increasing ratio of AATFase/Iah1p esterase activity. Therefore, we conclude that the balance of these two enzyme activities is important for isoamyl acetate accumulation in sake mash.

  9. Balance of Activities of Alcohol Acetyltransferase and Esterase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Important for Production of Isoamyl Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Nagi; Kiyokawa, Yoshifumi; Yanagiuchi, Toshiyasu; Wakai, Yoshinori; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Inoue, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Akira

    1998-01-01

    Isoamyl acetate is synthesized from isoamyl alcohol and acetyl coenzyme A by alcohol acetyltransferase (AATFase) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is hydrolyzed by esterases at the same time. We hypothesized that the balance of both enzyme activities was important for optimum production of isoamyl acetate in sake brewing. To test this hypothesis, we constructed yeast strains with different numbers of copies of the AATFase gene (ATF1) and the isoamyl acetate-hydrolyzing esterase gene (IAH1) and used these strains in small-scale sake brewing. Fermentation profiles as well as components of the resulting sake were largely alike; however, the amount of isoamyl acetate in the sake increased with an increasing ratio of AATFase/Iah1p esterase activity. Therefore, we conclude that the balance of these two enzyme activities is important for isoamyl acetate accumulation in sake mash. PMID:9758847

  10. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Balance Problems About Balance Problems Have you ever felt dizzy, lightheaded, or ... dizziness problem during the past year. Why Good Balance is Important Having good balance means being able ...

  11. [A statistical analysis of factors influencing standing balance, activity of daily living and ambulation in hemiplegic patients].

    PubMed

    Nogaki, H

    1992-04-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate several factors influencing standing balance, activity of daily living and ambulation in hemiplegic patients after cerebro-vascular diseases. A statistical analysis of 121 hemiplegic patients with unilateral supratentorial lesions showed that age, severity of muscle weakness of involved or uninvolved extremities, unilateral spatial neglect and the sense of toe position had influence on standing balance, activity of daily living or ambulation. The patients were divided into five groups based on the degree of unilateral spatial neglect, evaluated by their copies of two daisies who omitted more than three quarters, three quarters, half, one quarter and none of the figures were defined as the USN-4, USN-3, USN-2, USN-1 and no involvement groups, respectively. Those who belonged to the USN-2 group had significantly lower scores for activity of daily living than those who belonged to the no involvement group. In the USN-2 group, 7 of the 8 patients could not keep standing for 50 seconds, while in the no involvement group, this was the case in only 1 of the 15 patients. Activity of daily living scores or sway area during standing showed no statistically significant differences between the USN-1 and no involvement groups. These results suggested that severe or moderate unilateral spatial neglect is one of the most important factors influencing standing balance and activity of daily living.

  12. Differential control of leg and trunk muscle activity by vestibulo-spinal and proprioceptive signals during human balance corrections.

    PubMed

    Allum, J H; Honegger, F; Acuña, H

    1995-03-01

    Knowledge about how proprioceptive signals trigger and modulate human balance corrections has important implications for the rehabilitation of postural and gait disorders, and increases our understanding of normal interactions between these sensory systems. We used combinations of support-surface rotation and rearward translation to examine the triggering effects of ankle and knee movements on balance corrections. By comparing the responses in normal subjects to those in persons with a bilateral peripheral vestibular deficit, we determined the modulating influence of vestibular inputs on balance responses. Differences in normal and vestibular-loss responses under the different proprioceptive conditions revealed four general findings. First, ventral leg muscle responses are strongly modulated by vestibulo-spinal inputs and by proprioceptive inputs from the ankle and knee. Second, triceps surae muscle responses are initially dependent on ankle inputs, and after 100 ms are modulated by knee inputs; they are not altered by vestibular loss. Third, paraspinal responses in vestibular-loss subjects are enhanced because of unstable trunk sway induced by the lack of ventral leg-muscle activity. Fourth, the earliest possible triggering signal for establishing the timing of interlink muscle activity appears to be knee flexion and/or trunk rotation on the pelvis. These results indicate that a confluence of knee and trunk proprioceptive and vestibulo-spinal inputs, rather than either input alone, is involved in establishing the muscle synergy underlying normal balance corrections.

  13. Resistance of Dynamin-related Protein 1 Oligomers to Disassembly Impairs Mitophagy, Resulting in Myocardial Inflammation and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Thomas J; Leo, Vincenzo; Kelly, Matthew; Stockenhuber, Alexander; Kennedy, Nolan W; Bao, Leyuan; Cereghetti, Grazia; Harper, Andrew R; Czibik, Gabor; Lao, Chunyan; Bellahcene, Mohamed; Steeples, Violetta; Ghaffari, Safar; Yavari, Arash; Mayer, Alice; Poulton, Joanna; Ferguson, David J P; Scorrano, Luca; Hettiarachchi, Nishani T; Peers, Chris; Boyle, John; Hill, R Blake; Simmons, Alison; Watkins, Hugh; Dear, T Neil; Ashrafian, Houman

    2015-10-23

    We have reported previously that a missense mutation in the mitochondrial fission gene Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) underlies the Python mouse model of monogenic dilated cardiomyopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of the C452F mutation on Drp1 protein function and to define the cellular sequelae leading to heart failure in the Python monogenic dilated cardiomyopathy model. We found that the C452F mutation increased Drp1 GTPase activity. The mutation also conferred resistance to oligomer disassembly by guanine nucleotides and high ionic strength solutions. In a mouse embryonic fibroblast model, Drp1 C452F cells exhibited abnormal mitochondrial morphology and defective mitophagy. Mitochondria in C452F mouse embryonic fibroblasts were depolarized and had reduced calcium uptake with impaired ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation. In the Python heart, we found a corresponding progressive decline in oxidative phosphorylation with age and activation of sterile inflammation. As a corollary, enhancing autophagy by exposure to a prolonged low-protein diet improved cardiac function in Python mice. In conclusion, failure of Drp1 disassembly impairs mitophagy, leading to a downstream cascade of mitochondrial depolarization, aberrant calcium handling, impaired ATP synthesis, and activation of sterile myocardial inflammation, resulting in heart failure.

  14. Disassembly of micelles to impart donor and acceptor gradation to enhance organic solar cell efficiency.

    PubMed

    Arulkashmir, Arulraj; Krishnamoorthy, Kothandam

    2016-02-28

    A transparent, conducting and low surface energy surface was prepared by disassembly of anionic micelles, which altered the orientation of the donor polymer and imparted gradation between the donor and acceptor. This configuration increased the solar cell device efficiency.

  15. A thermodynamic model of microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    PubMed

    Piette, Bernard M A G; Liu, Junli; Peeters, Kasper; Smertenko, Andrei; Hawkins, Timothy; Deeks, Michael; Quinlan, Roy; Zakrzewski, Wojciech J; Hussey, Patrick J

    2009-08-11

    Microtubules are self-assembling polymers whose dynamics are essential for the normal function of cellular processes including chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Therefore understanding what factors effect microtubule growth is fundamental to our understanding of the control of microtubule based processes. An important factor that determines the status of a microtubule, whether it is growing or shrinking, is the length of the GTP tubulin microtubule cap. Here, we derive a Monte Carlo model of the assembly and disassembly of microtubules. We use thermodynamic laws to reduce the number of parameters of our model and, in particular, we take into account the contribution of water to the entropy of the system. We fit all parameters of the model from published experimental data using the GTP tubulin dimer attachment rate and the lateral and longitudinal binding energies of GTP and GDP tubulin dimers at both ends. Also we calculate and incorporate the GTP hydrolysis rate. We have applied our model and can mimic published experimental data, which formerly suggested a single layer GTP tubulin dimer microtubule cap, to show that these data demonstrate that the GTP cap can fluctuate and can be several microns long.

  16. Active model-based balancing strategy for self-reconfigurable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchhima, Nejmeddine; Schnierle, Marc; Schulte, Sascha; Birke, Kai Peter

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a novel balancing strategy for self-reconfigurable batteries where the discharge and charge rates of each cell can be controlled. While much effort has been focused on improving the hardware architecture of self-reconfigurable batteries, energy equalization algorithms have not been systematically optimized in terms of maximizing the efficiency of the balancing system. Our approach includes aspects of such optimization theory. We develop a balancing strategy for optimal control of the discharge rate of battery cells. We first formulate the cell balancing as a nonlinear optimal control problem, which is modeled afterward as a network program. Using dynamic programming techniques and MATLAB's vectorization feature, we solve the optimal control problem by generating the optimal battery operation policy for a given drive cycle. The simulation results show that the proposed strategy efficiently balances the cells over the life of the battery, an obvious advantage that is absent in the other conventional approaches. Our algorithm is shown to be robust when tested against different influencing parameters varying over wide spectrum on different drive cycles. Furthermore, due to the little computation time and the proved low sensitivity to the inaccurate power predictions, our strategy can be integrated in a real-time system.

  17. Kinesiology Tape or Compression Sleeve Applied to the Thigh Does Not Improve Balance or Muscle Activation Before or Following Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, M Tyler; Quigley, Patrick J; Hodgson, Daniel D; Reid, Jonathan C; Behm, David G

    2016-07-01

    Cavanaugh, MT, Quigley, PJ, Hodgson, DD, Reid, JC, and Behm, DG. Kinesiology tape or compression sleeve applied to the thigh does not improve balance or muscle activation before or following fatigue. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1992-2000, 2016-Compression sleeves (CS) and kinesiology tape (KT) are purported to enhance proprioception, however, there is substantial conflict in the literature. Because the beneficial effects of CS and KT are more evident in the literature with recovery, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of CS and KT on balance under acute nonfatigued and postfatigued conditions. Using a within-subject, repeated-measures design, 12 university participants (5 females and 7 males) performed in a random order CS, KT, and Control conditions. Two trials of each test were conducted before the application of CS or KT (pretest 1), immediately after the application (pretest 2), with posttests at 1 and 10 minutes after 4 sets of unilateral Bulgarian squats to failure (1 minute rest between sets). Tests included a Y balance test (measures: distance reached by nondominant foot in anterior, posterior lateral, and posterior medial directions) and drop jump landing balance test from a 50-cm platform (measures: ground reaction force, electromyography, and center of pressure). The fatigue protocol induced 25.3% decrease in unilateral squat repetitions from set 1 to set 4. There were no significant condition main effects or interactions for any balance measure or EMG before or after fatigue. In conclusion, independent of fatigue, there was no significant effect of CS or KT on balance outcomes immediately and up to 10 minutes following the fatiguing intervention. Thus, nonfatigued or muscles weakened by fatigue did not benefit from CS and KT application.

  18. Force Generation by Microtubule Assembly/Disassembly in Mitosis and Related Movements

    PubMed Central

    Inoué, Shinya; Salmon, Edward D.

    1995-01-01

    In this article, we review the dynamic nature of the filaments (microtubules) that make up the labile fibers of the mitotic spindle and asters, we discuss the roles that assembly and disassembly of microtubules play in mitosis, and we consider how such assembling and disassembling polymer filaments can generate forces that are utilized by the living cell in mitosis and related movements. Images PMID:8590794

  19. The Relationship Between Physical Activity and Thermal Protective Clothing on Functional Balance in Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Pui W.; Suyama, Joe; Cham, Rakié; Hostler, David

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between baseline physical training and the use of firefighting thermal protective clothing (TPC) with breathing apparatus on functional balance. Twenty-three male firefighters performed a functional balance test under four gear/clothing conditions. Participants were divided into groups by physical training status, and task performance was analyzed. There was an effect of equipment and training status on performance with the group reporting both aerobic and resistance training performing better than the group reporting no physical training. In conclusion, firefighters walk more slowly as a strategy to maintain balance when wearing TPC, which may be suboptimal given the emergent nature of fire suppression. This result was most prominent in the group reporting no physical training. PMID:23367817

  20. Absence of lateral gastrocnemius activity and differential motor unit behavior in soleus and medial gastrocnemius during standing balance

    PubMed Central

    Héroux, Martin E.; Dakin, Christopher J.; Luu, Billy L.; Inglis, John Timothy

    2013-01-01

    In a standing position, the vertical projection of the center of mass passes in front of the ankle, which requires active plantar-flexor torque from the triceps surae to maintain balance. We recorded motor unit (MU) activity in the medial (MG) and lateral (LG) gastrocnemius muscle and the soleus (SOL) in standing balance and voluntary isometric contractions to understand the effect of functional requirements and descending drive from different neural sources on motoneuron behavior. Single MU activity was recorded in seven subjects with wire electrodes in the triceps surae. Two 3-min standing balance trials and several ramp-and-hold contractions were performed. Lateral gastrocnemius MU activity was rarely observed in standing. The lowest thresholds for LG MUs in ramp contractions were 20–35 times higher than SOL and MG MUs (P < 0.001). Compared with MUs from the SOL, MG MUs were intermittently active (P < 0.001), had higher recruitment thresholds (P = 0.022), and greater firing rate variability (P < 0.001); this difference in firing rate variability was present in standing balance and isometric contractions. In SOL and MG MUs, both recruitment of new MUs (R2 = 0.59–0.79, P < 0.01) and MU firing rates (R2 = 0.05–0.40, P < 0.05) were associated with anterior-posterior and medio-lateral torque in standing. Our results suggest that the two heads of the gastrocnemius may operate in different ankle ranges with the larger MG being of primary importance when standing, likely due to its fascicle orientation. These differences in MU discharge behavior were independent of the type of descending neural drive, which points to a muscle-specific optimization of triceps surae motoneurons. PMID:24311748

  1. Absence of lateral gastrocnemius activity and differential motor unit behavior in soleus and medial gastrocnemius during standing balance.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Martin E; Dakin, Christopher J; Luu, Billy L; Inglis, John Timothy; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-15

    In a standing position, the vertical projection of the center of mass passes in front of the ankle, which requires active plantar-flexor torque from the triceps surae to maintain balance. We recorded motor unit (MU) activity in the medial (MG) and lateral (LG) gastrocnemius muscle and the soleus (SOL) in standing balance and voluntary isometric contractions to understand the effect of functional requirements and descending drive from different neural sources on motoneuron behavior. Single MU activity was recorded in seven subjects with wire electrodes in the triceps surae. Two 3-min standing balance trials and several ramp-and-hold contractions were performed. Lateral gastrocnemius MU activity was rarely observed in standing. The lowest thresholds for LG MUs in ramp contractions were 20-35 times higher than SOL and MG MUs (P < 0.001). Compared with MUs from the SOL, MG MUs were intermittently active (P < 0.001), had higher recruitment thresholds (P = 0.022), and greater firing rate variability (P < 0.001); this difference in firing rate variability was present in standing balance and isometric contractions. In SOL and MG MUs, both recruitment of new MUs (R(2) = 0.59-0.79, P < 0.01) and MU firing rates (R(2) = 0.05-0.40, P < 0.05) were associated with anterior-posterior and medio-lateral torque in standing. Our results suggest that the two heads of the gastrocnemius may operate in different ankle ranges with the larger MG being of primary importance when standing, likely due to its fascicle orientation. These differences in MU discharge behavior were independent of the type of descending neural drive, which points to a muscle-specific optimization of triceps surae motoneurons.

  2. Vps4 disassembles an ESCRT-III filament by global unfolding and processive translocation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bei; Stjepanovic, Goran; Shen, Qingtao; Martin, Andreas; Hurley, James H.

    2015-01-01

    The AAA+ ATPase Vps4 disassembles ESCRT-III and is essential for HIV-1 budding and other pathways. Vps4 is a paradigmatic member of a class of hexameric AAA+ ATPases that disassemble protein complexes without degradation. To distinguish between local displacement versus global unfolding mechanisms for complex disassembly, we carried out hydrogen-deuterium exchange during Saccharomyces cerevisiae Vps4 disassembly of of a chimeric Vps24-2 ESCRT-III filament. EX1 exchange behavior shows that Vps4 completely unfolds ESCRT-III substrates on a time scale consistent with the disassembly reaction. The established unfoldase ClpX showed the same pattern, demonstrating a common unfolding mechanism. Vps4 hexamers containing a single cysteine residue in the pore loops were cross-linked to ESCRT-III subunits containing unique cysteine within the folded core domain. These data support a mechanism in which Vps4 disassembles its substrates by completely unfolding them and threading them through the central pore. PMID:25938660

  3. The effect of sudden server breakdown on the performance of a disassembly line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomsawat, Gun; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2005-11-01

    Product and material recovery relies on the disassembly process to separate target components or materials from the end-of-life (EOL) products. Disassembly line is especially effective when products in large quantity are disassembled. Unlike an assembly line, a disassembly line is more complex and is subjected to numerous uncertainties including stochastic and multi-level arrivals of component demands, stochastic arrival times for EOL products, and process interruption due to equipment failure. These factors seriously impair the control mechanism in the disassembly line. A common production control mechanism is the traditional push system (TPS). TPS responds to the aforementioned complications by carrying substantial amounts of inventories. An alternative control mechanism is a newly developed multi-kanban pull system (MKS) that relies on dynamic routing of kanbans, which tends to minimize the system's inventories while maintaining demand serviceability. In this paper we explore the impact of sudden breakdown of server on the performance of a disassembly line. We compare the overall performances of the TPS and MKS by considering two scenarios. We present the solution procedure and results for these cases.

  4. Balanced pan-PPAR activator bezafibrate in combination with statin: comprehensive lipids control and diabetes prevention?

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Fisman, Enrique Z

    2012-11-14

    All fibrates are peroxisome proliferators-activated receptors (PPARs)-alpha agonists with ability to decrease triglyceride and increase high density lipoprotein- cholesterol (HDL-C). However, bezafibrate has a unique characteristic profile of action since it activates all three PPAR subtypes (alpha, gamma and delta) at comparable doses. Therefore, bezafibrate operates as a pan-agonist for all three PPAR isoforms. Selective PPAR gamma agonists (thiazolidinediones) are used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). They improve insulin sensitivity by up-regulating adipogenesis, decreasing free fatty acid levels, and reversing insulin resistance. However, selective PPAR gamma agonists also cause water retention, weight gain, peripheral edema, and congestive heart failure. The expression of PPAR beta/ delta in essentially all cell types and tissues (ubiquitous presence) suggests its potential fundamental role in cellular biology. PPAR beta/ delta effects correlated with enhancement of fatty acid oxidation, energy consumption and adaptive thermogenesis. Together, these data implicate PPAR beta/delta in fuel combustion and suggest that pan-PPAR agonists that include a component of PPAR beta/delta activation might offset some of the weight gain issues seen with selective PPAR gamma agonists, as was demonstrated by bezafibrate studies. Suggestively, on the whole body level all PPARs acting as one orchestra and balanced pan-PPAR activation seems as an especially attractive pharmacological goal. Conceptually, combined PPAR gamma and alpha action can target simultaneously insulin resistance and atherogenic dyslipidemia, whereas PPAR beta/delta properties may prevent the development of overweight. Bezafibrate, as all fibrates, significantly reduced plasma triglycerides and increased HDL-C level (but considerably stronger than other major fibrates). Bezafibrate significantly decreased prevalence of small, dense low density lipoproteins particles, remnants, induced

  5. RHGF-1/PDZ-RhoGEF and retrograde DLK-1 signaling drive neuronal remodeling on microtubule disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Hao; Lee, Albert; Liao, Chien-Po; Liu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Chun-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Neurons remodel their connectivity in response to various insults, including microtubule disruption. How neurons sense microtubule disassembly and mount remodeling responses by altering genetic programs in the soma are not well defined. Here we show that in response to microtubule disassembly, the Caenorhabditis elegans PLM neuron remodels by retracting its synaptic branch and overextending the primary neurite. This remodeling required RHGF-1, a PDZ-Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (PDZ-RhoGEF) that was associated with and inhibited by microtubules. Independent of the myosin light chain activation, RHGF-1 acted through Rho-dependent kinase LET-502/ROCK and activated a conserved, retrograde DLK-1 MAPK (DLK-1/dual leucine zipper kinase) pathway, which triggered synaptic branch retraction and overgrowth of the PLM neurite in a dose-dependent manner. Our data represent a neuronal remodeling paradigm during development that reshapes the neural circuit by the coordinated removal of the dysfunctional synaptic branch compartment and compensatory extension of the primary neurite. PMID:25359212

  6. 401(k) plan asset allocation, account balances, and loan activity in 2010.

    PubMed

    VanDerhei, Jack; Holden, Sarah; Alonso, Luis; Bass, Steven

    2011-12-01

    THE BULK OF 401(K) ASSETS CONTINUED TO BE INVESTED IN STOCKS: On average, at year-end 2010, 62 percent of 401(k) participants' assets were invested in equity securities through equity funds, the equity portion of balanced funds, and company stock. Thirty-three percent were in fixed-income securities such as stable value investments and bond and money funds. SEVENTY PERCENT OF 401(K) PLANS INCLUDED TARGET-DATE FUNDS IN THEIR INVESTMENT LINEUP AT YEAR-END 2010: At year-end 2010, 11 percent of the assets in the EBRI/ICI 401(k) database were invested in target-date funds and 36 percent of 401(k) participants held target-date funds. Also known as lifecycle funds, they are designed to offer a diversified portfolio that automatically rebalances to be more focused on income over time. MORE NEW OR RECENT HIRES INVESTED THEIR 401(K) ASSETS IN BALANCED FUNDS, INCLUDING TARGET-DATE FUNDS: For example, at year-end 2010, 44 percent of the account balances of recently hired participants in their 20s were invested in balanced funds, compared with 42 percent in 2009, and about 7 percent in 1998. A significant subset of that balanced fund category is target-date funds. At year-end 2010, 35 percent of the account balances of recently hired participants in their 20s were invested in target-date funds, compared with 31 percent at year-end 2009. 401(K) PARTICIPANTS CONTINUED TO SEEK DIVERSIFICATION OF THEIR INVESTMENTS: The share of 401(k) accounts invested in company stock continued to shrink, falling by more than a percentage point (to 8 percent) in 2010, continuing a steady decline that started in 1999. Recently hired 401(k) participants contributed to this trend: They tended to be less likely to hold employer stock. PARTICIPANTS' 401(K) LOAN BALANCES DECLINED SLIGHTLY IN 2010: In 2010, 21 percent of all 401(k) participants who were eligible for loans had loans outstanding against their 401(k) accounts, unchanged from year-end 2009, and up from 18 percent at year-end 2008. Loans

  7. More gain less pain: balance control learning shifts the activation patterns of leg and neck muscles and increases muscular parsimony.

    PubMed

    Iodice, Pierpaolo; Cesinaro, Stefano; Romani, Gian Luca; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Athletes such as skaters or surfers maintain their balance on very unstable platforms. Remarkably, the most skilled athletes seem to execute these feats almost effortlessly. However, the dynamics that lead to the acquisition of a defined and efficient postural strategy are incompletely known. To understand the posture reorganization process due to learning and expertise, we trained twelve participants in a demanding balance/posture maintenance task for 4 months and measured their muscular activity before and after a (predictable) disturbance cued by an auditory signal. The balance training determined significant delays in the latency of participants' muscular activity: from largely anticipatory muscular activity (prior to training) to a mixed anticipatory-compensatory control strategy (after training). After training, the onset of activation was delayed for all muscles, and the sequence of activation systematically reflected the muscle position in the body from top to bottom: neck/upper body muscles were recruited first and in an anticipatory fashion, whereas leg muscles were recruited after the disturbance onset, producing compensatory adjustments. The resulting control strategy includes a mixture of anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments, with a systematic sequence of muscular activation reflecting the different demands of neck and leg muscles. Our results suggest that subjects learned the precise timing of the disturbance onset and used this information to deploy postural adjustments just-in-time and to transfer at least part of the control of posture from anticipatory to less-demanding feedback-based strategies. In turn, this strategy shift increases the cost-efficiency of muscular activity, which is a key signature of skilled performance.

  8. GROUT TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN 105-R DISASSEMBLY BASIN D AND E CANAL

    SciTech Connect

    Fogle, R.; Collins, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2010-06-03

    The 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin Grout Placement Strategy Report (SRNL-TR-2009-00157) identifies various portions of the facility that will undergo an in-situ decommissioning process. The estimated residual radioactive contamination in the 105-R facility is shown in Figure 1. Cementitious grout formulations developed by SRNL are being used to immobilize and isolate the radioactive contamination in existing below grade portions of the 105-R building as shown by the gray-hatched area in Figure 2. A Zero Bleed flowable fill was formulated for both dry placement and for underwater placement. The first major area in the 105-R Disassembly Basin to undergo the grouting process was the D&E Canal and an underlying void space known as the Chase. Grout temperature data was needed to ensure that the grout mix design was on the correct grout curing trajectory to meet the material compressive strength requirement of 50 pounds per square inch. Initial grout temperature measurements were needed to confirm and optimize grout mix design fresh property characteristics; i.e. material strength, and set time. Grout curing temperature is an integrating fresh property characteristic that is used to estimate cementitious material strength in accordance with the Standard Practice for Estimating Concrete Strength by the Maturity Method, ASTM C 1074. The Maturity Method is used in the construction industry to estimate in-place strength of concrete to allow the start of critical construction activities; e.g. formwork removal, removal of cold weather protection, opening of roadways to traffic, etc. Applying this methodology provides an expeditious means to estimate in-place grout strength based on compressive strength laboratory results. The Maturity Method results define the relationship between strength-time and age-time that may be utilized in the field for estimating strength after a given time of placement. Maturation curves were developed under the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin

  9. ACTIVE IMMUNITY PRODUCED BY SO CALLED BALANCED OR NEUTRAL MIXTURES OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN AND ANTITOXIN.

    PubMed

    Smith, T

    1909-03-01

    would be applicable only as a general protective measure without reference to any immediate danger, since it would take several weeks, perhaps longer, to perfect the attainable immunity. Passing to the theoretical aspects of the facts observed, we find no publications bearing directly upon the subject before us. Madsen has, however, approached it very closely in his experiments on the immunization of animals with mixtures not fully balanced, or, in other words, in which the "toxones" were still free. He found that the injection of such mixtures in rabbits, goats and horses produces an active immunity. He makes the significant remark that perhaps in the immunizing capacity we may possess the keenest reagent for a poison which is not able to exert any toxic action in the body. This is fully borne out by the experiments described, for in these we pass beyond the visible spectrum, so to speak, of the toxin-antitoxin effects, and we are able to recognize toxic action only by the lasting immunizing effects. Another publication which touches upon some phases of the same problem is that of Morgenroth on the union between toxin and antitoxin. Morgenroth brought out the fact that a given toxin-antitoxin mixture is more toxic when injected directly into the circulation than when injected under the skin. Thus, an L(+) dose of 0.78 c.c. toxin + one unit antitoxin applied subcutaneously was of the same toxicity as 0.68 c.c. toxin + one unit antitoxin injected into the circulation. When the mixture had stood twenty-four hours this (L(+)) dose was still 0.78 c.c. subcutaneously, but it had risen to 0.74 c.c. when introduced by the intracardiac route. The author makes two deductions from these results. He assumes that the velocity of reaction between toxin and antitoxin is slow, and that the union is not completed until the mixture has stood twenty-four hours. Hence, the L(+) dose of toxin injected into the blood is higher after twenty-four hours than immediately after mixing the toxin

  10. Disassembly of yeast 80S ribosomes into subunits is a concerted action of ribosome-assisted folding of denatured protein.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-22

    It has been shown by several groups that ribosome can assist folding of denatured protein in vitro and the process is conserved across the species. Domain V of large ribosomal rRNA which occupies the intersubunit side of the large subunit was identified as the key player responsible for chaperoning the folding process. Thus, it is conceivable that denatured protein needs to access the intersubunit space of the ribosome in order to get folded. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of release of the protein from the eukaryotic ribosome following reactivation. We have observed significant splitting of yeast 80S ribosome when incubated with the denatured BCAII protein. Energy-free disassembly mechanism functions in low Mg(+2) ion concentration for prokaryotic ribosomes. Eukaryotic ribosomes do not show significant splitting even at low Mg(+2) ion concentration. In this respect, denatured protein-induced disassembly of eukaryotic ribosome without the involvement of any external energy source is intriguing. For prokaryotic ribosomes, it was reported that the denatured protein induces ribosome splitting into subunits in order to access domain V-rRNA. In contrast, our results suggest an alternative mechanism for eukaryotic ribosomal rRNA-mediated protein folding and subsequent separation of the subunits by which release of the activated-protein occurs.

  11. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... often, it could be a sign of a balance problem. Balance problems can make you feel unsteady or as ... fall-related injuries, such as hip fracture. Some balance problems are due to problems in the inner ...

  12. Actin disassembly by cofilin, coronin, and Aip1 occurs in bursts and is inhibited by barbed-end cappers

    PubMed Central

    Kueh, Hao Yuan; Charras, Guillaume T.; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Brieher, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Turnover of actin filaments in cells requires rapid actin disassembly in a cytoplasmic environment that thermodynamically favors assembly because of high concentrations of polymerizable monomers. We here image the disassembly of single actin filaments by cofilin, coronin, and actin-interacting protein 1, a purified protein system that reconstitutes rapid, monomer-insensitive disassembly (Brieher, W.M., H.Y. Kueh, B.A. Ballif, and T.J. Mitchison. 2006. J. Cell Biol. 175:315–324). In this three-component system, filaments disassemble in abrupt bursts that initiate preferentially, but not exclusively, from both filament ends. Bursting disassembly generates unstable reaction intermediates with lowered affinity for CapZ at barbed ends. CapZ and cytochalasin D (CytoD), a barbed-end capping drug, strongly inhibit bursting disassembly. CytoD also inhibits actin disassembly in mammalian cells, whereas latrunculin B, a monomer sequestering drug, does not. We propose that bursts of disassembly arise from cooperative separation of the two filament strands near an end. The differential effects of drugs in cells argue for physiological relevance of this new disassembly pathway and potentially explain discordant results previously found with these drugs. PMID:18663144

  13. ARC: A compact, high-field, disassemblable fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Palmer, Timothy; Mangiarotti, Franco; Sierchio, Jennifer; Bonoli, Paul; Kasten, Cale; Sutherland, Derek; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Goh, Jon; Sung, Choongki; Whyte, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable, Robust, Compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils with joints to allow disassembly, allowing for removal and replacement of the vacuum vessel as a single component. Inboard-launched current drive of 25 MW LHRF power and 13.6 MW ICRF power is used to provide a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing Fluorine Lithium Beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket acts as a working fluid, coolant, and tritium breeder, and minimizes the solid material that can become activated. The large temperature range over which FLiBe is liquid permits blanket operation at 800-900 K with single phase fluid cooling and allows use of a high-efficiency Brayton cycle for electricity production in the secondary coolant loop.

  14. Instantaneous inactivation of cofilin reveals its function of F-actin disassembly in lamellipodia.

    PubMed

    Vitriol, Eric A; Wise, Ariel L; Berginski, Mathew E; Bamburg, James R; Zheng, James Q

    2013-07-01

    Cofilin is a key regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. It can sever actin filaments, accelerate filament disassembly, act as a nucleation factor, recruit or antagonize other actin regulators, and control the pool of polymerization-competent actin monomers. In cells these actions have complex functional outputs. The timing and localization of cofilin activity are carefully regulated, and thus global, long-term perturbations may not be sufficient to probe its precise function. To better understand cofilin's spatiotemporal action in cells, we implemented chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI) to instantly and specifically inactivate it. In addition to globally inhibiting actin turnover, CALI of cofilin generated several profound effects on the lamellipodia, including an increase of F-actin, a rearward expansion of the actin network, and a reduction in retrograde flow speed. These results support the hypothesis that the principal role of cofilin in lamellipodia at steady state is to break down F-actin, control filament turnover, and regulate the rate of retrograde flow.

  15. Histone Acetylation near the Nucleosome Dyad Axis Enhances Nucleosome Disassembly by RSC and SWI/SNF

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nilanjana; North, Justin A.; Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Manohar, Mridula; Prasad, Rashmi; Luger, Karolin; Ottesen, Jennifer J.; Poirier, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling associated with transcription activation occurs through posttranslational modification of histones and is best exemplified by lysine acetylation. Lysines are acetylated in histone tails and the core domain/lateral surface of histone octamers. While acetylated lysines in histone tails are frequently recognized by other factors referred to as “readers,” which promote transcription, the mechanistic role of the modifications in the lateral surface of the histone octamer remains unclear. By using X-ray crystallography, we found that acetylated lysines 115 and 122 in histone H3 are solvent accessible, but in biochemical assays they appear not to interact with the bromodomains of SWI/SNF and RSC to enhance recruitment or nucleosome mobilization, as previously shown for acetylated lysines in H3 histone tails. Instead, we found that acetylation of lysines 115 and 122 increases the predisposition of nucleosomes for disassembly by SWI/SNF and RSC up to 7-fold, independent of bromodomains, and only in conjunction with contiguous nucleosomes. Thus, in combination with SWI/SNF and RSC, acetylation of lateral surface lysines in the histone octamer serves as a crucial regulator of nucleosomal dynamics distinct from the histone code readers and writers. PMID:26416878

  16. akirin is required for diakinesis bivalent structure and synaptonemal complex disassembly at meiotic prophase I.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Amy M; Brockway, Heather M; Yin, Yizhi; Kasinathan, Bhavatharini; Butterfield, Yaron S; Jones, Steven J M; Colaiácovo, Monica P; Smolikove, Sarit

    2013-04-01

    During meiosis, evolutionarily conserved mechanisms regulate chromosome remodeling, leading to the formation of a tight bivalent structure. This bivalent, a linked pair of homologous chromosomes, is essential for proper chromosome segregation in meiosis. The formation of a tight bivalent involves chromosome condensation and restructuring around the crossover. The synaptonemal complex (SC), which mediates homologous chromosome association before crossover formation, disassembles concurrently with increased condensation during bivalent remodeling. Both chromosome condensation and SC disassembly are likely critical steps in acquiring functional bivalent structure. The mechanisms controlling SC disassembly, however, remain unclear. Here we identify akir-1 as a gene involved in key events of meiotic prophase I in Caenorhabditis elegans. AKIR-1 is a protein conserved among metazoans that lacks any previously known function in meiosis. We show that akir-1 mutants exhibit severe meiotic defects in late prophase I, including improper disassembly of the SC and aberrant chromosome condensation, independently of the condensin complexes. These late-prophase defects then lead to aberrant reconfiguring of the bivalent. The meiotic divisions are delayed in akir-1 mutants and are accompanied by lagging chromosomes. Our analysis therefore provides evidence for an important role of proper SC disassembly in configuring a functional bivalent structure.

  17. The MAP kinase pathway coordinates crossover designation with disassembly of synaptonemal complex proteins during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajan, Saravanapriah; Mohideen, Firaz; Tzur, Yonatan B; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Crawley, Oliver; Montoya, Alex; Faull, Peter; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Cutillas, Pedro R; Jambhekar, Ashwini; Blower, Michael D; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Harper, J Wade; Colaiacovo, Monica P

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric disassembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) is crucial for proper meiotic chromosome segregation. However, the signaling mechanisms that directly regulate this process are poorly understood. Here we show that the mammalian Rho GEF homolog, ECT-2, functions through the conserved RAS/ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway in the C. elegans germline to regulate the disassembly of SC proteins. We find that SYP-2, a SC central region component, is a potential target for MPK-1-mediated phosphorylation and that constitutively phosphorylated SYP-2 impairs the disassembly of SC proteins from chromosomal domains referred to as the long arms of the bivalents. Inactivation of MAP kinase at late pachytene is critical for timely disassembly of the SC proteins from the long arms, and is dependent on the crossover (CO) promoting factors ZHP-3/RNF212/Zip3 and COSA-1/CNTD1. We propose that the conserved MAP kinase pathway coordinates CO designation with the disassembly of SC proteins to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12039.001 PMID:26920220

  18. Disassembly of Simian Virus 40 during Passage through the Endoplasmic Reticulum and in the Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Kuksin, Dmitry

    2012-01-01

    The nonenveloped polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40) is taken up into cells by a caveola-mediated endocytic process that delivers the virus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Within the ER lumen, the capsid undergoes partial disassembly, which exposes its internal capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 to immunostaining with antibodies. We demonstrate here that the SV40 genome does not become accessible to detection while the virus is in the ER. Instead, the genome becomes accessible two distinct detection procedures, one using anti-bromodeoxyuridine antibodies and the other using a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-based chemical reaction, only after the emergence of partially disassembled SV40 particles in the cytoplasm. These cytoplasmic particles retain some of the SV40 capsid proteins, VP1, VP2, and VP3, in addition to the viral genome. Thus, SV40 particles undergo discrete disassembly steps during entry that are separated temporally and topologically. First, a partial disassembly of the particles occurs in the ER, which exposes internal capsid proteins VP2 and VP3. Then, in the cytoplasm, disassembly progresses further to also make the genomic DNA accessible to immune detection. PMID:22090139

  19. Disassembly of simian virus 40 during passage through the endoplasmic reticulum and in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Kuksin, Dmitry; Norkin, Leonard C

    2012-02-01

    The nonenveloped polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40) is taken up into cells by a caveola-mediated endocytic process that delivers the virus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Within the ER lumen, the capsid undergoes partial disassembly, which exposes its internal capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 to immunostaining with antibodies. We demonstrate here that the SV40 genome does not become accessible to detection while the virus is in the ER. Instead, the genome becomes accessible two distinct detection procedures, one using anti-bromodeoxyuridine antibodies and the other using a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-based chemical reaction, only after the emergence of partially disassembled SV40 particles in the cytoplasm. These cytoplasmic particles retain some of the SV40 capsid proteins, VP1, VP2, and VP3, in addition to the viral genome. Thus, SV40 particles undergo discrete disassembly steps during entry that are separated temporally and topologically. First, a partial disassembly of the particles occurs in the ER, which exposes internal capsid proteins VP2 and VP3. Then, in the cytoplasm, disassembly progresses further to also make the genomic DNA accessible to immune detection.

  20. Shugoshin-1 balances Aurora B kinase activity via PP2A to promote chromosome bi-orientation.

    PubMed

    Meppelink, Amanda; Kabeche, Lilian; Vromans, Martijn J M; Compton, Duane A; Lens, Susanne M A

    2015-04-28

    Correction of faulty kinetochore-microtubule attachments is essential for faithful chromosome segregation and dictated by the opposing activities of Aurora B kinase and PP1 and PP2A phosphatases. How kinase and phosphatase activities are appropriately balanced is less clear. Here, we show that a centromeric pool of PP2A-B56 counteracts Aurora B T-loop phosphorylation and is recruited to centromeres through Shugoshin-1 (Sgo1). In non-transformed RPE-1 cells, Aurora B, Sgo1, and PP2A-B56 are enriched on centromeres and levels diminish as chromosomes establish bi-oriented attachments. Elevating Sgo1 levels at centromeres recruits excess PP2A-B56, and this counteracts Aurora B kinase activity, undermining efficient correction of kinetochore-microtubule attachment errors. Conversely, Sgo1-depleted cells display reduced centromeric localization of Aurora B, whereas the remaining kinase is hyperactive due to concomitant reduction of centromeric PP2A-B56. Our data suggest that Sgo1 can tune the stability of kinetochore-microtubule attachments through recruitment of PP2A-B56 that balances Aurora B activity at the centromere.

  1. Active induction balance method for metal detector sensing head utilizing transmitter-bucking and dual current source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambruš, D.; Vasić, D.; Bilas, V.

    2013-06-01

    A central problem in a design of frequency domain electromagnetic induction sensors used in landmine detection is an effective suppression of a direct inductive coupling between the transmitter and the receiver coil (induction balance, IB). In sensing heads based on the transmitter-bucking configuration, IB is achieved by using two concentric transmitter coils with opposing exciter fields in order to create a central magnetic cavity for the receiver coil. This design has numerous advantages over other IB methods in terms of detection sensitivity, spatial resolution, sensor dimensions and suitability for model-based measurements. However, very careful design and precise sensing head geometry are required if a single excitation source is used for driving both transmitter coils. In this paper we analyze the IB sensitivity to small perturbations of geometrical properties of coils. We propose a sensor design with dual current source and active induction balance scheme which overcomes the limitations of geometry-based balancing and potentially provides more efficient compensation of soil effects.

  2. Preliminary results of the first static calibration of the RSRA helicopter active-isolator rotor balance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The helicopter version of the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) is designed to make simultaneous measurements of all rotor forces and moments in flight analogous to a wind tunnel balance. Loads are measured by a combination of load cells, strain gages, and hydropneumatic active isolators which use pressure gages to measure loads. Complete evaluation of system performance required calibration of the rotor force and moment measuring system when installed in the aircraft. Measurement system responses to rotor loads obtained during the first static calibration of the RSRA helicopter are plotted and discussed. Plots of the raw transducer data are included.

  3. Numerical analysis of the first static calibration of the RSRA helicopter active-isolator rotor balance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The helicopter version of the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) is designed to make simultaneous measurements of all rotor forces and moments in a manner analogous to a wind-tunnel balance. Loads are measured by a combination of load cells, strain gages, and hydropneumatic active isolators with built-in pressure gages. Complete evaluation of system performance requires calibration of the rotor force- and moment-measurement system when installed in the aircraft. Derivations of calibration corrections for various combinations of calibration data are discussed.

  4. A Self-produced Trigger for Biofilm Disassembly that Targets Exopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Cao, Shugeng; Chai, Liraz; Böttcher, Thomas; Kolter, Roberto; Clardy, Jon; Losick, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are structured communities of bacteria that are held together by an extracellular matrix consisting of protein and exopolysaccharide. Biofilms often have a limited lifespan, disassembling as nutrients become exhausted and waste products accumulate. D-amino acids were previously identified as a self-produced factor that mediates biofilm disassembly by causing the release of the protein component of the matrix in Bacillus subtilis. Here we report that B. subtilis produces an additional biofilm-disassembly factor, norspermidine. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy experiments indicated that norspermidine interacts directly and specifically with exopolysaccharide. D-amino acids and norspermidine acted together to break down existing biofilms and mutants blocked in the production of both formed long-lived biofilms. Norspermidine, but not closely related polyamines, prevented biofilm formation by B. subtilis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:22541437

  5. Node-by-node disassembly of a mutualistic interaction web driven by species introductions

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cabal, Mariano A.; Barrios-Garcia, M. Noelia; Amico, Guillermo C.; Aizen, Marcelo A.; Sanders, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Interaction webs summarize the diverse interactions among species in communities. The addition or loss of particular species and the alteration of key interactions can lead to the disassembly of the entire interaction web, although the nontrophic effects of species loss on interaction webs are poorly understood. We took advantage of ongoing invasions by a suite of exotic species to examine their impact in terms of the disassembly of an interaction web in Patagonia, Argentina. We found that the reduction of one species (a host of a keystone mistletoe species) resulted in diverse indirect effects that led to the disassembly of an interaction web through the loss of the mistletoe, two key seed-dispersers (a marsupial and a bird), and a pollinator (hummingbird). Our results demonstrate that the gains and losses of species are both consequences and drivers of global change that can lead to underappreciated cascading coextinctions through the disruption of mutualisms. PMID:24067653

  6. Assembly/Disassembly of DNA-Au Nanoparticles: A Strategy of Intervention

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, I-Im S.; Wang, Lingyan; Chandrachud, Uma; ...

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the viability of a strategy for manipulating the assembly/disassembly processes of DNA-Au nanoparticles by molecular intervention. Using the temperature-induced assembly and disassembly processes of DNAs and gold nanoparticles as a model system, the introduction of a molecular recognition probe is demonstrated to lead to the intervention of the assembly/disassembly processes depending on its specific biorecognition. This process can be detected by monitoring the change in the optical properties of gold nanoparticles and their DNA assemblies. Implications of the preliminary results to exploration of the resulting nanostructures for fine-tuning of the interfacial reactivities in DNA-based bioassays and biomaterialmore » engineering are also discussed.« less

  7. Clathrin Coat Disassembly Illuminates the Mechanisms of Hsp70 Force Generation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hsien-Shun; Cuéllar, Jorge; Jin, Suping; Valpuesta, Jose M.; Jin, Albert J.; Lafer, Eileen M.

    2016-01-01

    Hsp70s use ATP hydrolysis to disrupt protein:protein associations or move macromolecules. One example is Hsc70-mediated disassembly of clathrin coats that form on vesicles during endocytosis. We exploit the exceptional features of these coats to test three models—Brownian ratchet, power-stroke and entropic pulling—proposed to explain how Hsp70s transform their substrates. Our data rule out the ratchet and power-stroke models, and instead support a collision pressure mechanism whereby collisions between clathrin coat walls and Hsc70s drive coats apart. Collision pressure is the complement to the pulling force described in the entropic pulling model. We also find that self-association can augment collision pressure to allow disassembly of clathrin lattices predicted to resist disassembly. These results illuminate how Hsp70s generate the forces that transform their substrates. PMID:27478930

  8. Disassembly properties and material characterisation of household small waste electric and electronic equipment.

    PubMed

    Bovea, María D; Pérez-Belis, Victoria; Ibáñez-Forés, Valeria; Quemades-Beltrán, Pilar

    2016-07-01

    This paper is focused on characterising small waste electric and electronic equipment, specifically small household appliances, from two different points of views: disassembly properties and material identification. The sample for this characterisation was obtained from a selective collection campaign organised in Castellón de la Plana (Spain). A total amount of 833.7kg (749 units) of small waste electric and electronic equipment was collected, of which 23.3% by weight and 22.4% by units belonged to the subcategory household equipment. This subcategory, composed of appliances such as vacuum cleaners, toasters, sandwich makers, hand blenders, juicers, coffee makers, hairdryers, scales, irons and heaters, was first disassembled in order to analyse different aspects of the disassembly process for each equipment type: type of joints, ease of identification of materials, ease of access to joints for extracting components, ease of separation of components from the whole, uniformity of tools needed for the disassembly process and possibility of reassembly after disassembly. Results show that the most common joints used in these equipment types are snap-fits and screws, although some permanent joints have also been identified. Next, the material composition of each component of each appliance belonging to each equipment type was identified visually and with additional mechanical trials and testing. It can be observed that plastic and electric/electronic components are present in all the equipment types analysed and are also the material fractions that appear with higher percentages in the material composition: 41.1wt% and 39.1wt% for the plastic fraction and electric/electronic components, respectively. The most common plastics are: polypropylene (PP), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polycarbonate (PC), while the most common electric/electronic components are: cable, plug and printed circuit boards. Results also show that disassembly properties and material

  9. A question of balance: Explaining differences between parental and grandparental perspectives on preschoolers' feeding and physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Eli, Karin; Howell, Kyndal; Fisher, Philip A.; Nowicka, Paulina

    2017-01-01

    Rationale Although one quarter of US and UK families rely on grandparents as the main providers of informal childcare, grandparental perspectives on the feeding and physical activity of young children remain understudied. Objective The study's aim was to elucidate parents' and grandparents' perspectives on young children's feeding and physical activity, and identify how they negotiate potential differences between these perspectives. Methods We interviewed 22 parents and 27 grandparents from 16 families of children aged 3–5 years in the Pacific Northwest, US. Using familial homeostasis as a novel theoretical framework, the interviews were analyzed to assess differences between parental and grandparental perspectives on feeding and physical activity. Results The analysis yielded six thematic categories: (1) disagreements about feeding stem from parents' and grandparents' differing definitions of healthy feeding; (2) differences between parents' and grandparents' feeding practices reflect differences in perceived caretaking roles; (3) parents and grandparents negotiate differences in feeding practices through grandparental compliance and parental compromise; (4) differences in preschoolers' physical activity are influenced by parents' and grandparents' own access to and engagement in physical activity; (5) parents and grandparents express few disagreements about preschoolers' screen-time; (6) parents and grandparents rarely discuss preschoolers' physical activity. The findings suggest that parental and grandparental decision-making about feeding and exercise is informed by ideas of what constitutes familial balance and a balanced lifestyle for a preschool aged child, rather than by the child's weight status. Conclusions Parents and grandparents appear to engage in practices designed to preserve familial homeostasis, which may provide a compelling explanation for the persistent difficulties in implementing family-based childhood obesity interventions. PMID:26943011

  10. A comparison of older adults' subjective experience with virtual and real environments during dynamic balance activities

    PubMed Central

    Proffitt, Rachel; Lange, Belinda; Chen, Christina; Winstein, Carolee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the subjective experience of older adults interacting with both virtual and real environments. Thirty healthy older adults engaged with real and virtual tasks of similar motor demands: reaching to a target in standing and stepping stance. Immersive tendencies and absorption scales were administered before the session. Game engagement and experience questionnaires were completed after each task, followed by a semi-structured interview at the end of the testing session. Data were analyzed respectively using paired t-tests and grounded theory methodology. Participants preferred the virtual task over the real task. They also reported an increase in presence and absorption with the virtual task, describing an external focus of attention. Findings will be used to inform future development of appropriate game-based balance training applications that could be embedded in the home or community settings as part of evidence-based fall prevention programs. PMID:24334299

  11. Highly Selective Nuclide Removal from the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, J. B.; Austin, W. E.; Dukes, H. H.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the results of a deployment of highly selective ion-exchange resin technologies for the in-situ removal of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from the Savannah River Site (SRS) R-Reactor Disassembly Basin. The deployment was supported by the DOE Office of Science and Technology's (OST, EM-50) National Engineering Technology Laboratory (NETL), as a part of an Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project. The Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning (FDD) Program at the SRS conducted this deployment as a part of an overall program to deactivate three of the site's five reactor disassembly basins.

  12. Disassembly of the fusion-1 capsule after irradiation in the BOR-60 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Kazakov, V.A.; Chakin, V.P.

    1997-04-01

    A U.S./Russia (RF) collaborative irradiation experiment, Fusion-1, was completed in June 1996 after reaching a peak exposure of {approx}17 dpa in the BOR-60 fast reactor at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Russia. The specimens were vanadium alloys, mainly of recent heats from both countries. In this reporting period, the capsule was disassembled at the RIAR hot cells and all test specimens were successfully retrieved. For the disassembly, an innovative method of using a heated diffusion oil to melt and separate the lithium bond from the test specimens was adopted. This method proved highly successful.

  13. Exergame and Balance Training Modulate Prefrontal Brain Activity during Walking and Enhance Executive Function in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Eggenberger, Patrick; Wolf, Martin; Schumann, Martina; de Bruin, Eling D.

    2016-01-01

    Different types of exercise training have the potential to induce structural and functional brain plasticity in the elderly. Thereby, functional brain adaptations were observed during cognitive tasks in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that correlated with improved cognitive performance. This study aimed to investigate if exercise training induces functional brain plasticity during challenging treadmill walking and elicits associated changes in cognitive executive functions. Forty-two elderly participants were recruited and randomly assigned to either interactive cognitive-motor video game dancing (DANCE) or balance and stretching training (BALANCE). The 8-week intervention included three sessions of 30 min per week and was completed by 33 participants (mean age 74.9 ± 6.9 years). Prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity during preferred and fast walking speed on a treadmill was assessed applying functional near infrared spectroscopy pre- and post-intervention. Additionally, executive functions comprising shifting, inhibition, and working memory were assessed. The results showed that both interventions significantly reduced left and right hemispheric PFC oxygenation during the acceleration of walking (p < 0.05 or trend, r = 0.25–0.36), while DANCE showed a larger reduction at the end of the 30-s walking task compared to BALANCE in the left PFC [F(1, 31) = 3.54, p = 0.035, r = 0.32]. These exercise training induced modulations in PFC oxygenation correlated with improved executive functions (p < 0.05 or trend, r = 0.31–0.50). The observed reductions in PFC activity may release cognitive resources to focus attention on other processes while walking, which could be relevant to improve mobility and falls prevention in the elderly. This study provides a deeper understanding of the associations between exercise training, brain function during walking, and cognition in older adults. PMID:27148041

  14. Exergame and Balance Training Modulate Prefrontal Brain Activity during Walking and Enhance Executive Function in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Eggenberger, Patrick; Wolf, Martin; Schumann, Martina; de Bruin, Eling D

    2016-01-01

    Different types of exercise training have the potential to induce structural and functional brain plasticity in the elderly. Thereby, functional brain adaptations were observed during cognitive tasks in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that correlated with improved cognitive performance. This study aimed to investigate if exercise training induces functional brain plasticity during challenging treadmill walking and elicits associated changes in cognitive executive functions. Forty-two elderly participants were recruited and randomly assigned to either interactive cognitive-motor video game dancing (DANCE) or balance and stretching training (BALANCE). The 8-week intervention included three sessions of 30 min per week and was completed by 33 participants (mean age 74.9 ± 6.9 years). Prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity during preferred and fast walking speed on a treadmill was assessed applying functional near infrared spectroscopy pre- and post-intervention. Additionally, executive functions comprising shifting, inhibition, and working memory were assessed. The results showed that both interventions significantly reduced left and right hemispheric PFC oxygenation during the acceleration of walking (p < 0.05 or trend, r = 0.25-0.36), while DANCE showed a larger reduction at the end of the 30-s walking task compared to BALANCE in the left PFC [F (1, 31) = 3.54, p = 0.035, r = 0.32]. These exercise training induced modulations in PFC oxygenation correlated with improved executive functions (p < 0.05 or trend, r = 0.31-0.50). The observed reductions in PFC activity may release cognitive resources to focus attention on other processes while walking, which could be relevant to improve mobility and falls prevention in the elderly. This study provides a deeper understanding of the associations between exercise training, brain function during walking, and cognition in older adults.

  15. p31comet promotes disassembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex in an ATP-dependent process

    PubMed Central

    Teichner, Adar; Eytan, Esther; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Dumin, Elena; Gromis, Jonathan; Hershko, Avram

    2011-01-01

    Accurate segregation of chromosomes in mitosis is ensured by a surveillance mechanism called the mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint. It prevents sister chromatid separation until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle through their kinetochores. The checkpoint acts by inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a ubiquitin ligase that targets for degradation securin, an inhibitor of anaphase initiation. The activity of APC/C is inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), composed of the APC/C activator Cdc20 bound to the checkpoint proteins MAD2, BubR1, and Bub3. When all kinetochores acquire bipolar attachment the checkpoint is inactivated, but the mechanisms of checkpoint inactivation are not understood. We have previously observed that hydrolyzable ATP is required for exit from checkpoint-arrested state. In this investigation we examined the possibility that ATP hydrolysis in exit from checkpoint is linked to the action of the Mad2-binding protein p31comet in this process. It is known that p31comet prevents the formation of a Mad2 dimer that it thought to be important for turning on the mitotic checkpoint. This explains how p31comet blocks the activation of the checkpoint but not how it promotes its inactivation. Using extracts from checkpoint-arrested cells and MCC isolated from such extracts, we now show that p31comet causes the disassembly of MCC and that this process requires β,γ-hydrolyzable ATP. Although p31comet binds to Mad2, it promotes the dissociation of Cdc20 from BubR1 in MCC. PMID:21300909

  16. 29 CFR 1926.1407 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-assembly and disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... so that it is in view of the operator and (except for overhead gantry and tower cranes) at least two... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV)—assembly and disassembly...) Assembly/disassembly below power lines prohibited. No part of a crane/derrick, load line, or...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1407 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-assembly and disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... so that it is in view of the operator and (except for overhead gantry and tower cranes) at least two... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV)—assembly and disassembly...) Assembly/disassembly below power lines prohibited. No part of a crane/derrick, load line, or...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1407 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-assembly and disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... so that it is in view of the operator and (except for overhead gantry and tower cranes) at least two... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV)—assembly and disassembly...) Assembly/disassembly below power lines prohibited. No part of a crane/derrick, load line, or...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1407 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-assembly and disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... so that it is in view of the operator and (except for overhead gantry and tower cranes) at least two... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV)—assembly and disassembly...) Assembly/disassembly below power lines prohibited. No part of a crane/derrick, load line, or...

  20. Disassembly Sequence Optimization for Large-Scale Products With Multiresource Constraints Using Scatter Search and Petri Nets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiwang; Liu, Shixin; Zhou, MengChu; Tian, Guangdong

    2016-11-01

    Disassembly modeling and planning are meaningful and important to the reuse, recovery, and recycling of obsolete and discarded products. However, the existing methods pay little or no attention to resources constraints, e.g., disassembly operators and tools. Thus a resulting plan when being executed may be ineffective in actual product disassembly. This paper proposes to model and optimize selective disassembly sequences subject to multiresource constraints to maximize disassembly profit. Moreover, two scatter search algorithms with different combination operators, namely one with precedence preserved crossover combination operator and another with path-relink combination operator, are designed to solve the proposed model. Their validity is shown by comparing them with the optimization results from well-known optimization software CPLEX for different cases. The experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. PTEN ameliorates autoimmune arthritis through down-regulating STAT3 activation with reciprocal balance of Th17 and Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Jin-Sil; Byun, Jae-Kyung; Jhun, JooYeon; Jung, KyungAh; Seo, Hyeon-Beom; Moon, Young-Mee; Kim, Ho-Youn; Park, Sung-Hwan; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-01-01

    PTEN is a tyrosine phosphatase with significant function in inhibiting STAT3 activation. Recently, inactivation of STAT3 has been demonstrated as a therapeutic candidate for autoimmune arthritis. The expression of PTEN controlled by p53 regulates autoimmune arthritis through modulating the balance between Th17 and Treg. We hypothesized that PTEN regulated by p53 might reduce CIA severity and inflammatory response via inhibiting STAT3 activation. Our results revealed that PTEN could ameliorate experimental autoimmune arthritis by reducing STAT3 activity and Th17 differentiation. Systemic infusion of PTEN overexpression downregulated CIA severity. In addition, PTEN overexpression decreased the activation of T cells and modulated reciprocal differentiation of Th17 and Treg cells. We observed that PTEN expression downregulated by p53 deficiency induced the activation of STAT3. Loss of p53 exacerbated autoimmune arthritis and dysregulated the population of Th17 and Treg. These data suggest that induction of STAT3-modulatory activity of PTEN may be a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis therapy. PMID:27708408

  2. PTEN ameliorates autoimmune arthritis through down-regulating STAT3 activation with reciprocal balance of Th17 and Tregs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Jin-Sil; Byun, Jae-Kyung; Jhun, JooYeon; Jung, KyungAh; Seo, Hyeon-Beom; Moon, Young-Mee; Kim, Ho-Youn; Park, Sung-Hwan; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-10-06

    PTEN is a tyrosine phosphatase with significant function in inhibiting STAT3 activation. Recently, inactivation of STAT3 has been demonstrated as a therapeutic candidate for autoimmune arthritis. The expression of PTEN controlled by p53 regulates autoimmune arthritis through modulating the balance between Th17 and Treg. We hypothesized that PTEN regulated by p53 might reduce CIA severity and inflammatory response via inhibiting STAT3 activation. Our results revealed that PTEN could ameliorate experimental autoimmune arthritis by reducing STAT3 activity and Th17 differentiation. Systemic infusion of PTEN overexpression downregulated CIA severity. In addition, PTEN overexpression decreased the activation of T cells and modulated reciprocal differentiation of Th17 and Treg cells. We observed that PTEN expression downregulated by p53 deficiency induced the activation of STAT3. Loss of p53 exacerbated autoimmune arthritis and dysregulated the population of Th17 and Treg. These data suggest that induction of STAT3-modulatory activity of PTEN may be a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

  3. Families Finding the Balance: A Parent Handbook. We Can! Ways to Enhance Children's Activity & Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

    2005-01-01

    We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children's Activity & Nutrition) is a new public education outreach program designed to help children 8-13 years old stay at a healthy weight through improving food choices, increasing physical activity, and reducing screen time. The program is a collaboration of four Institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH):…

  4. Digitalis-like activity in human plasma: Relation to blood pressure and sodium balance

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, A.; Yamada, K.; Ishii, M.; Sugimoto, T. )

    1990-10-01

    PURPOSE: On the assumption that renal tubular cells are more important as the target cells for a natriuretic factor than blood cells, we used a well-characterized cultured renal tubular cell line, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK), cells to monitor the circulating digitalis-like factor in human plasma and examine its role in the regulation of blood pressure and sodium balance. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We investigated the effects of plasma on binding of radioactive ouabain to monolayered MDCK cells in order to determine the level of a circulating digitalis-like factor. First, we measured specific 3H-ouabain binding to MDCK cells in the presence of plasma from 71 outpatients (34 normotensive subjects and 37 hypertensive patients) after incubation for 4 hours. Second, we measured specific 3H-ouabain binding after incubation of cells with plasma from 16 hospitalized subjects (eight normotensive subjects and eight hypertensive patients) receiving low and high sodium diets. RESULTS: In Study 1, ouabain binding was lower by 30% with plasma from hypertensive patients than with plasma from normotensive subjects (p less than 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between individual subject's systolic or mean blood pressure and ouabain binding (r = -0.34, p less than 0.01 or r = -0.29, p less than 0.01). In Study 2, ouabain binding was also significantly reduced by 25% in the presence of plasma from hypertensive subjects as compared with plasma from normotensive subjects irrespective of sodium intake (p less than 0.01). A significant negative correlation was also found for all subjects between either systolic, diastolic, or mean blood pressure and ouabain binding (r = -0.58, p less than 0.01, r = -0.51, p less than 0.01, or r = -0.55, p less than 0.01, respectively).

  5. Mechanical disassembly of single virus particles reveals kinetic intermediates predicted by theory.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Milagros; Pérez, Rebeca; Carrillo, Pablo J P; de Pablo, Pedro J; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2012-06-06

    New experimental approaches are required to detect the elusive transient intermediates predicted by simulations of virus assembly or disassembly. Here, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to mechanically induce partial disassembly of single icosahedral T=1 capsids and virions of the minute virus of mice. The kinetic intermediates formed were imaged by AFM. The results revealed that induced disassembly of single minute-virus-of-mice particles is frequently initiated by loss of one of the 20 equivalent capsomers (trimers of capsid protein subunits) leading to a stable, nearly complete particle that does not readily lose further capsomers. With lower frequency, a fairly stable, three-fourths-complete capsid lacking one pentamer of capsomers and a free, stable pentamer were obtained. The intermediates most frequently identified (capsids missing one capsomer, capsids missing one pentamer of capsomers, and free pentamers of capsomers) had been predicted in theoretical studies of reversible capsid assembly based on thermodynamic-kinetic models, molecular dynamics, or oligomerization energies. We conclude that mechanical manipulation and imaging of simple virus particles by AFM can be used to experimentally identify kinetic intermediates predicted by simulations of assembly or disassembly.

  6. Sequential depletion and acquisition of proteins during Golgi stack disassembly and reformation.

    PubMed

    Schoberer, Jennifer; Runions, John; Steinkellner, Herta; Strasser, Richard; Hawes, Chris; Osterrieder, Anne

    2010-11-01

    Herein, we report the stepwise transport of multiple plant Golgi membrane markers during disassembly of the Golgi apparatus in tobacco leaf epidermal cells in response to the induced expression of the GTP-locked Sar1p or Brefeldin A (BFA), and reassembly on BFA washout. The distribution of fluorescent Golgi-resident N-glycan processing enzymes and matrix proteins (golgins) with specific cis-trans-Golgi sub-locations was followed by confocal microscopy during disassembly and reassembly. The first event during Golgi disassembly was the loss of trans-Golgi enzymes and golgins from Golgi membranes, followed by a sequential redistribution of medial and cis-Golgi enzymes into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whilst golgins were relocated to the ER or cytoplasm. This event was confirmed by fractionation and immuno-blotting. The sequential redistribution of Golgi components in a trans-cis sequence may highlight a novel retrograde trafficking pathway between the trans-Golgi and the ER in plants. Release of Golgi markers from the ER upon BFA washout occurred in the opposite sequence, with cis-matrix proteins labelling Golgi-like structures before cis/medial enzymes. Trans-enzyme location was preceded by trans-matrix proteins being recruited back to Golgi membranes. Our results show that Golgi disassembly and reassembly occur in a highly ordered fashion in plants.

  7. Effect of flow on the freeze-out density and temperature of disassembling hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomo, S.; de, J. N.; Kolomiets, A.

    1997-05-01

    The method of Albergo, Costa, Costanzo, and Rubbino to determine the temperature and free nucleon density of a disassembling hot nuclear source from fragment yields is modified to include the effects of radial collective flow, generated in the system from compression. We find that the freeze-out density increased substantially whereas the extracted temperature is modified only a little.

  8. Nano-mechanical characterization of disassembling amyloid fibrils using the Peak Force QNM method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenpin; Guo, Zongxia; Sun, Jing; Li, Zhibo

    2017-02-01

    The comprehensive understanding of disassembly mechanism of amyloid fibrils requires nano-scale characterization of the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils during the disassembly process. In this work, gemini surfactant C12 C6 C12 Br2 micelles were used as a probe to disassemble Aβ(1-40) fibrils. The microstructure evolution and nano-mechanical properties of Aβ(1-40) fibrils during the disassembly process were systematically investigated by the Peak Force Quantitative Nano-mechanical (PF-QNM) technique. The results show an obvious decrease in Young's modulus of mature fibrils with high β-sheet contents (2.4 ± 1.0 GPa) in comparison to the resulting peptide/surfactant complexes (1.1 ± 0.8 GPa) with loose surface structures. Interestingly, the Young's modulus of spherical peptide/surfactant complexes on the core was more than 3 GPa. This strategy can be used as a standard protocol to investigate the interaction mechanism between amyloid fibrils and small molecules, which may open up new possibilities to explore the mechanism of relevant human diseases.

  9. Primary disassembly of Light Water Breeder Reactor modules for core evaluation (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, R.J.; Miller, E.L.

    1987-10-01

    After successfully operating for 29,047 effective full power hours, the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core was defueled prior to total decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. All nuclear fuel and much of the reactor internal hardware was removed from the reactor vessel. Non-fuel components were prepared for shipment to disposal sites, and the fuel assemblies were partially disassembled and shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) in Idaho. At ECF, the fuel modules underwent further disassembly to provide fuel rods for nondestructive testing to establish the core's breeding efficiency and to provide core components for examinations to assess their performance characteristics. This report presents a basic description of the processes and equipment used to disassemble LWBR fuel modules for subsequent proof-of-breeding (POB) and core examination operations. Included are discussions of module handling fixtures and equipment, the underwater milling machine and bandsaw assemblies, and the associated design and operation of this equipment for LWBR fuel module disassembly.

  10. Mechanical Disassembly of Single Virus Particles Reveals Kinetic Intermediates Predicted by Theory

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Milagros; Pérez, Rebeca; Carrillo, Pablo J.P.; de Pablo, Pedro J.; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2012-01-01

    New experimental approaches are required to detect the elusive transient intermediates predicted by simulations of virus assembly or disassembly. Here, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to mechanically induce partial disassembly of single icosahedral T = 1 capsids and virions of the minute virus of mice. The kinetic intermediates formed were imaged by AFM. The results revealed that induced disassembly of single minute-virus-of-mice particles is frequently initiated by loss of one of the 20 equivalent capsomers (trimers of capsid protein subunits) leading to a stable, nearly complete particle that does not readily lose further capsomers. With lower frequency, a fairly stable, three-fourths-complete capsid lacking one pentamer of capsomers and a free, stable pentamer were obtained. The intermediates most frequently identified (capsids missing one capsomer, capsids missing one pentamer of capsomers, and free pentamers of capsomers) had been predicted in theoretical studies of reversible capsid assembly based on thermodynamic-kinetic models, molecular dynamics, or oligomerization energies. We conclude that mechanical manipulation and imaging of simple virus particles by AFM can be used to experimentally identify kinetic intermediates predicted by simulations of assembly or disassembly. PMID:22713577

  11. Shieldable tumor targeting based on pH responsive self-assembly/disassembly of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiqing; Yang, Chengling; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Zhi

    2014-10-22

    A new approach to shield/deshield ligands for controllable tumor targeting was reported, which was based on amphiphilic self-assembly and disassembly of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Thanks to the excellent pH response of the system, glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) ligands can be buried inside the Au NPs' assembly at normal tissue pH (pH 7.4), while exposed when the nanostructure is disassembled at tumor extracellular pH (pHe 6.8). Hydrophobic GA molecules not only acted as ligands targeting tumor cells but also provided the major interparticle attractive force for Au NPs' assembling. An ordered assembly of Au NPs with regular shape, proper size and ultrasharp pH sensitivity (ΔpH ∼ 0.2) was achieved by fine-tuning of materials modified on Au NPs. Mechanism studies for assembly and disassembly of Au NPs indicated the possibility of a GA shield when the assembly formed, which was further demonstrated by bovine serum albumin absorption and cellular uptake. The assembly/disassembly process was reversible within extrinsic pH changes, which provides a perspective for reversible tumor targeting.

  12. A semi-immersive virtual reality incremental swing balance task activates prefrontal cortex: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Basso Moro, Sara; Bisconti, Silvia; Muthalib, Makii; Spezialetti, Matteo; Cutini, Simone; Ferrari, Marco; Placidi, Giuseppe; Quaresima, Valentina

    2014-01-15

    Previous functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies indicated that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in the maintenance of the postural balance after external perturbations. So far, no studies have been conducted to investigate the PFC hemodynamic response to virtual reality (VR) tasks that could be adopted in the field of functional neurorehabilitation. The aim of this fNIRS study was to assess PFC oxygenation response during an incremental and a control swing balance task (ISBT and CSBT, respectively) in a semi-immersive VR environment driven by a depth-sensing camera. It was hypothesized that: i) the PFC would be bilaterally activated in response to the increase of the ISBT difficulty, as this cortical region is involved in the allocation of attentional resources to maintain postural control; and ii) the PFC activation would be greater in the right than in the left hemisphere considering its dominance for visual control of body balance. To verify these hypotheses, 16 healthy male subjects were requested to stand barefoot while watching a 3 dimensional virtual representation of themselves projected onto a screen. They were asked to maintain their equilibrium on a virtual blue swing board susceptible to external destabilizing perturbations (i.e., randomizing the forward-backward direction of the impressed pulse force) during a 3-min ISBT (performed at four levels of difficulty) or during a 3-min CSBT (performed constantly at the lowest level of difficulty of the ISBT). The center of mass (COM), at each frame, was calculated and projected on the floor. When the subjects were unable to maintain the COM over the board, this became red (error). After each error, the time required to bring back the COM on the board was calculated (returning time). An eight-channel continuous wave fNIRS system was employed for measuring oxygenation changes (oxygenated-hemoglobin, O2Hb; deoxygenated-hemoglobin, HHb) related to the PFC activation (Brodmann Areas 10, 11

  13. 30 CFR 816.57 - Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in perennial or intermittent streams only where those activities would not cause or contribute to the... and provisions have been made for sound future maintenance by the permittee or the landowner...

  14. Gait and balance disorders in Parkinson's disease: impaired active braking of the fall of centre of gravity.

    PubMed

    Chastan, Nathalie; Do, Manh Cuong; Bonneville, Fabrice; Torny, Frédéric; Bloch, Frédéric; Westby, G W Max; Dormont, Didier; Agid, Yves; Welter, Marie-Laure

    2009-01-30

    Gait and balance disorders are common in Parkinson's disease (PD), but its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. Step length, antero-posterior, and vertical velocities of the center of gravity (CG) during gait initiation were analyzed in 32 controls and 32 PD patients, with and without levodopa, using a force platform. Brain volumes and mesencephalic surface area were measured in PD patients. During the swing limb period, controls showed a fall in the CG, which was reversed before foot-contact indicating active braking of the CG fall. In PD patients, without levodopa, step length and velocity were significantly reduced and no braking occurred before foot-contact in 22 patients. With levodopa, step length and velocity increased in all patients and 7 patients improved their braking capacity. PD patients with normal braking (n = 17) had significantly lower gait and balance disorder scores and higher normalized-mesencephalic surface areas compared to patients with impaired braking (n = 15). The decreased step length and velocity, characteristic of PD, mainly result from degeneration of central dopaminergic systems. The markedly decreased braking capacity observed in half the PD patients contributes to their gait disorders and postural instability, perhaps as a result of nondopaminergic lesions, possibly at the mesencephalic level.

  15. Impact of active and break wind spells on the demand-supply balance in wind energy in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Sumeet; Deo, M. C.; Ghosh, Subimal

    2017-01-01

    With an installed capacity of over 19,000 MW, the wind power currently accounts for almost 70% of the total installed capacity among the renewable energy sector in India. The extraction of wind power mainly depends on prevailing meteorology which is strongly influenced by monsoon variability. The monsoon season is characterized by significant fluctuations in between periods of wet and dry spells. During the dry spells, the demand for power from agriculture and cooling equipment increases, whereas during the wet periods, such demand reduces, although, at the same time, the power supply increases because of strong westerly winds contributing to an enhanced production of wind energy. At this backdrop, we aim to assess the impact of intra-seasonal wind variability on the balance of energy supply and demand during monsoon seasons in India. Further, we explore the probable cause of wind variability by relating it to El Nino events. It is observed that the active and break phases in wind significantly impact the overall wind potential output. Although the dry spells are generally found to reduce the overall wind potential, their impact on the potential seems to have declined after the year 2000. The impact of meteorological changes on variations in wind power studied in this work should find applications typically in taking investment decisions on conventional generation facilities, like thermal, which are currently used to maintain the balance of power supply and demand.

  16. Fine Tuning the IRIS Education and Outreach Program: Choosing an Optimal Balance of Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taber, J. J.; Hubenthal, M.; Aster, R. C.

    2003-12-01

    The IRIS Education and Outreach (E&O) Program is committed to making significant and lasting contributions to science education, science literacy and the general public's understanding of the Earth, using seismology and the unique resources of the IRIS consortium. The E&O program has activities that span all educational levels from public outreach to K-12 and college education. The activities are designed for a wide range of individual interaction time, from minutes for a museum display to an entire summer for an undergraduate research internship. In general, the longer the interaction time, the smaller the audience. The educational goals for a particular audience, as stated in the E&O Program plan, define whether an activity is focused more on breadth of audience or depth of content. An activity's ability to meet the educational goals of the E&O program is the most important criteria in assessing its value. However, to help determine which activities are most worthy of continued support and to help select new activities to engage in, we have begun estimating the cost of providing each hour of interaction time for an activity. The lower the cost for each person-hour of interaction, the more efficient the activity, assuming maximum effectiveness of each activity. Thus the importance of assessment is magnified, as a more effective activity could cost more per person-hour and still be supported if no equally effective but more efficient activity is viable. As an example of how resources are divided between different activities, two activities that have similar budgets but very different goals, content depth and audience sizes are our museum program and our professional development workshops. The museum program, a partnership between IRIS, the US Geological Survey, and several major museums across the nation, reaches large audiences (up to 16 million people per year) via 1 traveling and 4 permanent exhibits. The exhibits include real-time earthquake location maps and

  17. Antofine-induced connexin43 gap junction disassembly in rat astrocytes involves protein kinase Cβ.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Fang; Liao, Chih-Kai; Lin, Jau-Chen; Jow, Guey-Mei; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Wu, Jiahn-Chun

    2013-03-01

    Antofine, a phenanthroindolizidine alkaloid derived from Cryptocaryachinensis and Ficusseptica in the Asclepiadaceae milkweed family, is cytotoxic for various cancer cell lines. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment of rat primary astrocytes with antofine induced dose-dependent inhibition of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), as assessed by scrape-loading 6-carboxyfluorescein dye transfer. Levels of Cx43 protein were also decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner following antofine treatment. Double-labeling immunofluorescence microscopy showed that antofine (10ng/ml) induced endocytosis of surface gap junctions into the cytoplasm, where Cx43 was co-localized with the early endosome marker EEA1. Inhibition of lysosomes or proteasomes by co-treatment with antofine and their respective specific inhibitors, NH4Cl or MG132, partially inhibited the antofine-induced decrease in Cx43 protein levels, but did not inhibit the antofine-induced inhibition of GJIC. After 30min of treatment, antofine induced a rapid increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and activation of protein kinase C (PKC)α/βII, which was maintained for at least 6h. Co-treatment of astrocytes with antofine and the intracellular Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM prevented downregulation of Cx43 and inhibition of GJIC. Moreover, co-treatment with antofine and a specific PKCβ inhibitor prevented endocytosis of gap junctions, downregulation of Cx43, and inhibition of GJIC. Taken together, these findings indicate that antofine induces Cx43 gap junction disassembly by the PKCβ signaling pathway. Inhibition of GJIC by antofine may undermine the neuroprotective effect of astrocytes in CNS.

  18. Assembly and disassembly of spliceosomes along a specific pre-messenger RNP fiber.

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, E; Wurtz, T; Visa, N; Daneholt, B

    1994-12-15

    Transcriptionally active Balbiani ring (BR) genes in the salivary glands of the dipteran Chironomus tentans were studied by immunoelectron microscopy to establish the distribution of spliceosome components along a specific pre-messenger ribonucleoprotein (pre-mRNP) fiber. The BR genes are 35-40 kb in size with three introns close to the 5' end and one close to the 3' end; a very large middle portion lacks introns. As a rule the 5' introns are spliced concomitant with transcription in the promoter proximal third of the gene, while the 3' intron is spliced post-transcriptionally. The BR genes with growing pre-mRNPs were visualized in situ, while completed and released pre-mRNPs were isolated from the nucleoplasm and studied unfolded on a grid surface. An anti-snRNP antibody (Y12) bound mainly to the promoter proximal third of the BR gene (86%) and only to a minor extent to the middle and distal thirds (7 and 7% respectively). An antibody to an hnRNP protein reacted with the proximal, middle and distal regions to an increasing extent (17, 38 and 45% respectively), reflecting the increase in size of the growing transcription product. In the nucleoplasmic pre-mRNP particle only one end of the RNP fiber was labeled by Y 12, presumably the 3' end; the anti-hnRNP antibody decorated the entire RNP fiber. Thus, the snRNPs do not associate along the whole pre-mRNP fiber but rather bind to the 5' and 3' ends, i.e. the regions containing the introns. The results also imply that the spliceosomes both assemble and disassemble rapidly on the pre-mRNP fiber.

  19. Low cytoplasmic pH reduces ER-Golgi trafficking and induces disassembly of the Golgi apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Soonthornsit, Jeerawat; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Tamura, Daisuke; Ishida, Ryuichi; Nakakoji, Yoko; Osako, Shiho; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Nakamura, Nobuhiro

    2014-11-01

    The Golgi apparatus was dramatically disassembled when cells were incubated in a low pH medium. The cis-Golgi disassembled quickly, extended tubules and spread to the periphery of cells within 30 min. In contrast, medial- and trans-Golgi were fragmented in significantly larger structures of smaller numbers at a slower rate and remained largely in structures distinct from the cis-Golgi. Electron microscopy revealed the complete disassembly of the Golgi stack in low pH treated cells. The effect of low pH was reversible; the Golgi apparatus reassembled to form a normal ribbon-like structure within 1–2 h after the addition of a control medium. The anterograde ER to Golgi transport and retrograde Golgi to ER transport were both reduced under low pH. Phospholipase A{sub 2} inhibitors (ONO, BEL) effectively suppressed the Golgi disassembly, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} was involved in the Golgi disassembly. Over-expression of Rab1, 2, 30, 33 and 41 also suppressed the Golgi disassembly under low pH, suggesting that they have protective role against Golgi disassembly. Low pH treatment reduced cytoplasmic pH, but not the luminal pH of the Golgi apparatus, strongly suggesting that reduction of the cytoplasmic pH triggered the Golgi disassembly. Because a lower cytoplasmic pH is induced in physiological or pathological conditions, disassembly of the Golgi apparatus and reduction of vesicular transport through the Golgi apparatus may play important roles in cell physiology and pathology. Furthermore, our findings indicated that low pH treatment can serve as an important tool to analyze the molecular mechanisms that support the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus. - Highlights: • The Golgi apparatus reversibly disassembles by low pH treatment. • The cis-Golgi disassembles quickly generating tubular structures. • Both anterograde and retrograde transport between the ER and the Golgi apparatus are reduced. • Phospholipase A{sub 2} inhibitors (ONO

  20. Disassembly and physical separation of electric/electronic components layered in printed circuit boards (PCB).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeryeong; Kim, Youngjin; Lee, Jae-chun

    2012-11-30

    Although printed circuit boards (PCBs) contain various elements, only the major elements (i.e., those with content levels in wt% or over grade) of and precious metals (e.g., Ag, Au, and platinum groups) contained within PCBs can be recycled. To recover other elements from PCBs, the PCBs should be properly disassembled as the first step of the recycling process. The recovery of these other elements would be beneficial for efforts to conserve scarce resources, reuse electric/electronic components (EECs), and eliminate environmental problems. This paper examines the disassembly of EECs from wasted PCBs (WPCBs) and the physical separation of these EECs using a self-designed disassembling apparatus and a 3-step separation process of sieving, magnetic separation, and dense medium separation. The disassembling efficiencies were evaluated by using the ratio of grinding area (E(area)) and the weight ratio of the detached EECs (E(weight)). In the disassembly treatment, these efficiencies were improved with an increase of grinder speed and grinder height. 97.7% (E(area)) and 98% (E(weight)) could be accomplished ultimately by 3 repetitive treatments at a grinder speed of 5500 rpm and a grinder height of 1.5mm. Through a series of physical separations, most groups of the EECs (except for the diode, transistor, and IC chip groups) could be sorted at a relatively high separation efficiency of about 75% or more. To evaluate the separation efficiency with regard to the elemental composition, the distribution ratio (R(dis)) and the concentration ratio (R(conc)) were used. 15 elements could be separated with the highest R(dis) and R(conc) in the same separated division. This result implies that the recyclability of the elements is highly feasible, even though the initial content in EECs is lower than several tens of mg/kg.

  1. A repeatable assembling and disassembling electrochemical aptamer cytosensor for ultrasensitive and highly selective detection of human liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Duanping; Lu, Jing; Chen, Zuanguang; Yu, Yanyan; Mo, Manni

    2015-07-23

    In this work, a repeatable assembling and disassembling electrochemical aptamer cytosensor was proposed for the sensitive detection of human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) based on a dual recognition and signal amplification strategy. A high-affinity thiolated TLS11a aptamer, covalently attached to a gold electrode through Au-thiol interactions, was adopted to recognize and capture the target HepG2 cells. Meanwhile, the G-quadruplex/hemin/aptamer and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) modified gold nanoparticles (G-quadruplex/hemin/aptamer-AuNPs-HRP) nanoprobe was designed. It could be used for electrochemical cytosensing with specific recognition and enzymatic signal amplification of HRP and G-quadruplex/hemin HRP-mimicking DNAzyme. With the nanoprobes as recognizing probes, the HepG2 cancer cells were captured to fabricate an aptamer-cell-nanoprobes sandwich-like superstructure on a gold electrode surface. The proposed electrochemical cytosensor delivered a wide detection range from 1×10(2) to 1×10(7) cells mL(-1) and high sensitivity with a low detection limit of 30 cells mL(-1). Furthermore, after the electrochemical detection, the activation potential of -0.9 to -1.7V was performed to break Au-thiol bond and regenerate a bare gold electrode surface, while maintaining the good characteristic of being used repeatedly. The changes of gold electrode behavior after assembling and desorption processes were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry techniques. These results indicate that the cytosensor has great potential in disease diagnostic of cancers and opens new insight into the reusable gold electrode with repeatable assembling and disassembling in the electrochemical sensing.

  2. Attributing runoff changes to climate variability and human activities: uncertainty analysis using four monthly water balance models

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuai; Xiong, Lihua; Li, Hong-Yi; Leung, L. Ruby; Demissie, Yonas

    2015-05-26

    Hydrological simulations to delineate the impacts of climate variability and human activities are subjected to uncertainties related to both parameter and structure of the hydrological models. To analyze the impact of these uncertainties on the model performance and to yield more reliable simulation results, a global calibration and multimodel combination method that integrates the Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis (SCEM) and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) of four monthly water balance models was proposed. The method was applied to the Weihe River Basin (WRB), the largest tributary of the Yellow River, to determine the contribution of climate variability and human activities to runoff changes. The change point, which was used to determine the baseline period (1956-1990) and human-impacted period (1991-2009), was derived using both cumulative curve and Pettitt’s test. Results show that the combination method from SCEM provides more skillful deterministic predictions than the best calibrated individual model, resulting in the smallest uncertainty interval of runoff changes attributed to climate variability and human activities. This combination methodology provides a practical and flexible tool for attribution of runoff changes to climate variability and human activities by hydrological models.

  3. Implications of cortical balanced excitation and inhibition, functional heterogeneity, and sparseness of neuronal activity in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiansong

    2015-01-01

    Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies often report inconsistent findings, probably due to brain properties such as balanced excitation and inhibition and functional heterogeneity. These properties indicate that different neurons in the same voxels may show variable activities including concurrent activation and deactivation, that the relationships between BOLD signal and neural activity (i.e., neurovascular coupling) are complex, and that increased BOLD signal may reflect reduced deactivation, increased activation, or both. The traditional general-linear-model-based-analysis (GLM-BA) is a univariate approach, cannot separate different components of BOLD signal mixtures from the same voxels, and may contribute to inconsistent findings of fMRI. Spatial independent component analysis (sICA) is a multivariate approach, can separate the BOLD signal mixture from each voxel into different source signals and measure each separately, and thus may reconcile previous conflicting findings generated by GLM-BA. We propose that methods capable of separating mixed signals such as sICA should be regularly used for more accurately and completely extracting information embedded in fMRI datasets. PMID:26341939

  4. Nonhomeostatic control of human appetite and physical activity in regulation of energy balance.

    PubMed

    Borer, Katarina T

    2010-07-01

    Ghrelin and leptin, putative controllers of human appetite, have no effect on human meal-to-meal appetite but respond to variations in energy availability. Nonhomeostatic characteristics of appetite and spontaneous activity stem from inhibition by leptin and ghrelin of brain reward circuit that is responsive to energy deficit, but refractory in obesity, and from the operation of a meal-timing circadian clock.

  5. Sol immobilization technique: a delicate balance between activity, selectivity and stability for gold catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Wang, Di; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Sol immobilization is a widely used method to prepare gold catalysts. The presence of the protective layer can have a significant influence on catalyst properties by mediating metal-support and reactantmetal interactions. This paper details the effect of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) protecting groups on the activity of a supported gold catalysts as well as its selectivity towards glycerol oxidation.

  6. Atypical balance between occipital and fronto-parietal activation for visual shape extraction in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Christodoulou, Joanna A; Gabrieli, John D E

    2013-01-01

    Reading requires the extraction of letter shapes from a complex background of text, and an impairment in visual shape extraction would cause difficulty in reading. To investigate the neural mechanisms of visual shape extraction in dyslexia, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine brain activation while adults with or without dyslexia responded to the change of an arrow's direction in a complex, relative to a simple, visual background. In comparison to adults with typical reading ability, adults with dyslexia exhibited opposite patterns of atypical activation: decreased activation in occipital visual areas associated with visual perception, and increased activation in frontal and parietal regions associated with visual attention. These findings indicate that dyslexia involves atypical brain organization for fundamental processes of visual shape extraction even when reading is not involved. Overengagement in higher-order association cortices, required to compensate for underengagment in lower-order visual cortices, may result in competition for top-down attentional resources helpful for fluent reading.

  7. Atypical Balance between Occipital and Fronto-Parietal Activation for Visual Shape Extraction in Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Christodoulou, Joanna A.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2013-01-01

    Reading requires the extraction of letter shapes from a complex background of text, and an impairment in visual shape extraction would cause difficulty in reading. To investigate the neural mechanisms of visual shape extraction in dyslexia, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine brain activation while adults with or without dyslexia responded to the change of an arrow’s direction in a complex, relative to a simple, visual background. In comparison to adults with typical reading ability, adults with dyslexia exhibited opposite patterns of atypical activation: decreased activation in occipital visual areas associated with visual perception, and increased activation in frontal and parietal regions associated with visual attention. These findings indicate that dyslexia involves atypical brain organization for fundamental processes of visual shape extraction even when reading is not involved. Overengagement in higher-order association cortices, required to compensate for underengagment in lower-order visual cortices, may result in competition for top-down attentional resources helpful for fluent reading. PMID:23825653

  8. On the Origin of Muscle Synergies: Invariant Balance in the Co-activation of Agonist and Antagonist Muscle Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Fumio; Naritomi, Hiroaki; Koba, Keitaro; Oku, Takanori; Uno, Kanna; Uemura, Mitsunori; Nishi, Tomoki; Kageyama, Masayuki; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of neural representation of movement planning has attracted the attention of neuroscientists, as it may reveal the sensorimotor transformation essential to motor control. The analysis of muscle synergies based on the activity of agonist–antagonist (AA) muscle pairs may provide insight into such transformations, especially for a reference frame in the muscle space. In this study, we examined the AA concept using the following explanatory variables: the AA ratio, which is related to the equilibrium-joint angle, and the AA sum, which is associated with joint stiffness. We formulated muscle synergies as a function of AA sums, positing that muscle synergies are composite units of mechanical impedance. The AA concept can be regarded as another form of the equilibrium-point (EP) hypothesis, and it can be extended to the concept of EP-based synergies. We introduce, here, a novel tool for analyzing the neurological and motor functions underlying human movements and review some initial insights from our results about the relationships between muscle synergies, endpoint stiffness, and virtual trajectories (time series of EP). Our results suggest that (1) muscle synergies reflect an invariant balance in the co-activation of AA muscle pairs; (2) each synergy represents the basis for the radial, tangential, and null movements of the virtual trajectory in the polar coordinates centered on the specific joint at the base of the body; and (3) the alteration of muscle synergies (for example, due to spasticity or rigidity following neurological injury) results in significant distortion of endpoint stiffness and concomitant virtual trajectories. These results indicate that muscle synergies (i.e., the balance of muscle mechanical impedance) are essential for motor control. PMID:26636079

  9. On the Origin of Muscle Synergies: Invariant Balance in the Co-activation of Agonist and Antagonist Muscle Pairs.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Fumio; Naritomi, Hiroaki; Koba, Keitaro; Oku, Takanori; Uno, Kanna; Uemura, Mitsunori; Nishi, Tomoki; Kageyama, Masayuki; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of neural representation of movement planning has attracted the attention of neuroscientists, as it may reveal the sensorimotor transformation essential to motor control. The analysis of muscle synergies based on the activity of agonist-antagonist (AA) muscle pairs may provide insight into such transformations, especially for a reference frame in the muscle space. In this study, we examined the AA concept using the following explanatory variables: the AA ratio, which is related to the equilibrium-joint angle, and the AA sum, which is associated with joint stiffness. We formulated muscle synergies as a function of AA sums, positing that muscle synergies are composite units of mechanical impedance. The AA concept can be regarded as another form of the equilibrium-point (EP) hypothesis, and it can be extended to the concept of EP-based synergies. We introduce, here, a novel tool for analyzing the neurological and motor functions underlying human movements and review some initial insights from our results about the relationships between muscle synergies, endpoint stiffness, and virtual trajectories (time series of EP). Our results suggest that (1) muscle synergies reflect an invariant balance in the co-activation of AA muscle pairs; (2) each synergy represents the basis for the radial, tangential, and null movements of the virtual trajectory in the polar coordinates centered on the specific joint at the base of the body; and (3) the alteration of muscle synergies (for example, due to spasticity or rigidity following neurological injury) results in significant distortion of endpoint stiffness and concomitant virtual trajectories. These results indicate that muscle synergies (i.e., the balance of muscle mechanical impedance) are essential for motor control.

  10. Link of NTR-Mediated Spliceosome Disassembly with DEAH-Box ATPases Prp2, Prp16, and Prp22

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Chou; Tseng, Chi-Kang; Tsai, Rong-Tzong; Chung, Che-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The DEAH-box ATPase Prp43 is required for disassembly of the spliceosome after the completion of splicing or after the discard of the spliceosome due to a splicing defect. Prp43 associates with Ntr1 and Ntr2 to form the NTR complex and is recruited to the spliceosome via the interaction of Ntr2 and U5 component Brr2. Ntr2 alone can bind to U5 and to the spliceosome. To understand how NTR might mediate the disassembly of spliceosome intermediates, we arrested the spliceosome at various stages of the assembly pathway and assessed its susceptibility to disassembly. We found that NTR could catalyze the disassembly of affinity-purified spliceosomes arrested specifically after the ATP-dependent action of DEAH-box ATPase Prp2, Prp16, or Prp22 but not at steps before the action of these ATPases or upon their binding to the spliceosome. These results link spliceosome disassembly to the functioning of splicing ATPases. Analysis of the binding of Ntr2 to each splicing complex has revealed that the presence of Prp16 and Slu7, which also interact with Brr2, has a negative impact on Ntr2 binding. Our study provides insights into the mechanism by which NTR can be recruited to the spliceosome to mediate the disassembly of spliceosome intermediates when the spliceosome pathway is retarded, while disassembly is prevented in normal reactions. PMID:23166295

  11. A Standing Location Detector Enabling People with Developmental Disabilities to Control Environmental Stimulation through Simple Physical Activities with Nintendo Wii Balance Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform simple physical activities by controlling their favorite environmental stimulation using Nintendo Wii Balance Boards with a newly developed standing location detection program (SLDP, i.e., a new software program turning a Nintendo Wii Balance…

  12. Low cytoplasmic pH reduces ER-Golgi trafficking and induces disassembly of the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Soonthornsit, Jeerawat; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Tamura, Daisuke; Ishida, Ryuichi; Nakakoji, Yoko; Osako, Shiho; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Nakamura, Nobuhiro

    2014-11-01

    The Golgi apparatus was dramatically disassembled when cells were incubated in a low pH medium. The cis-Golgi disassembled quickly, extended tubules and spread to the periphery of cells within 30 min. In contrast, medial- and trans-Golgi were fragmented in significantly larger structures of smaller numbers at a slower rate and remained largely in structures distinct from the cis-Golgi. Electron microscopy revealed the complete disassembly of the Golgi stack in low pH treated cells. The effect of low pH was reversible; the Golgi apparatus reassembled to form a normal ribbon-like structure within 1-2h after the addition of a control medium. The anterograde ER to Golgi transport and retrograde Golgi to ER transport were both reduced under low pH. Phospholipase A2 inhibitors (ONO, BEL) effectively suppressed the Golgi disassembly, suggesting that the phospholipase A2 was involved in the Golgi disassembly. Over-expression of Rab1, 2, 30, 33 and 41 also suppressed the Golgi disassembly under low pH, suggesting that they have protective role against Golgi disassembly. Low pH treatment reduced cytoplasmic pH, but not the luminal pH of the Golgi apparatus, strongly suggesting that reduction of the cytoplasmic pH triggered the Golgi disassembly. Because a lower cytoplasmic pH is induced in physiological or pathological conditions, disassembly of the Golgi apparatus and reduction of vesicular transport through the Golgi apparatus may play important roles in cell physiology and pathology. Furthermore, our findings indicated that low pH treatment can serve as an important tool to analyze the molecular mechanisms that support the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus.

  13. An investigation of the energy balance of solar active regions using the ACRIM irradiance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    The correlation between the irradiance (as measured by the Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor and the Earth Radiation Budget) as corrected for sunspot flux deficit (which is responsible for most of the variance of the uncorrected signal) and both the 205 nm flux (as measured by Nimbus 7) and a photometric facular index is discussed. The computer program which simulates two-dimensional convection in a compressible, stratified medium is described. Equipment which was acquired to perform high precision, white-light observations of sunspot areas, and procedures were tested. Analysis of observations of large scale convective heat inhomogeneities which were obtained in May 1985 was begun.

  14. Functional balance of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase activities accompanies the emergence of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Zhu, Xueyong; McBride, Ryan; Nycholat, Corwin M; Yu, Wenli; Paulson, James C; Wilson, Ian A

    2012-09-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic is the first human pandemic in decades and was of swine origin. Although swine are believed to be an intermediate host in the emergence of new human influenza viruses, there is still little known about the host barriers that keep swine influenza viruses from entering the human population. We surveyed swine progenitors and human viruses from the 2009 pandemic and measured the activities of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), which are the two viral surface proteins that interact with host glycan receptors. A functional balance of these two activities (HA binding and NA cleavage) is found in human viruses but not in the swine progenitors. The human 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus exhibited both low HA avidity for glycan receptors as a result of mutations near the receptor binding site and weak NA enzymatic activity. Thus, a functional match between the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase appears to be necessary for efficient transmission between humans and may be an indicator of the pandemic potential of zoonotic viruses.

  15. Effect of virtual reality dance exercise on the balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status of Parkinson’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam-Yong; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Seung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we examined the effects of virtual reality dance exercise on the balance, activities of daily living and depressive disorder status of Parkinson’s disease patients. [Subjects] Twenty patients were assigned either the experimental group (n = 10) or the control group (n = 10). All participants received 30 minutes of neurodevelopment treatment and 15 minutes of functional electrical stimulation 5 times per week for 6 weeks. The experimental group additionally performed 30 minutes of dance exercise. Balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status were assessed before and after the 6-week treatment period using the Berg balance scale, the Modified Barthel Index, and the Beck Depression Inventory. The paired t-test was used to detect differences before and after treatment, and the independent t-test was used to detect differences between the treatment groups. [Results] The values for balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status significantly differed between before and after treatment in the experimental group, and significantly differed between the experimental group and control group. [Conclusion] Virtual reality dance exercise has a positive effect on balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status of Parkinson’s disease patients. PMID:25642060

  16. Effect of virtual reality dance exercise on the balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status of Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam-Yong; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Seung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we examined the effects of virtual reality dance exercise on the balance, activities of daily living and depressive disorder status of Parkinson's disease patients. [Subjects] Twenty patients were assigned either the experimental group (n = 10) or the control group (n = 10). All participants received 30 minutes of neurodevelopment treatment and 15 minutes of functional electrical stimulation 5 times per week for 6 weeks. The experimental group additionally performed 30 minutes of dance exercise. Balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status were assessed before and after the 6-week treatment period using the Berg balance scale, the Modified Barthel Index, and the Beck Depression Inventory. The paired t-test was used to detect differences before and after treatment, and the independent t-test was used to detect differences between the treatment groups. [Results] The values for balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status significantly differed between before and after treatment in the experimental group, and significantly differed between the experimental group and control group. [Conclusion] Virtual reality dance exercise has a positive effect on balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status of Parkinson's disease patients.

  17. Phenolic profiles and antioxidant and anticarcinogenic activities of Greek herbal infusions; balancing delight and chemoprevention?

    PubMed

    Kaliora, Andriana C; Kogiannou, Dimitra A A; Kefalas, Panagiotis; Papassideri, Issidora S; Kalogeropoulos, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and phenolic profiles of six herbal infusions - namely rosemary, Cretan dittany, St. John's Wort, sage, marjoram and thyme were assayed. Additionally, the infusion anticarcinogenic effect as to their ability to (a) scavenge free radicals, (b) inhibit cell growth, (c) decrease IL-8 levels and (d) regulate p65 subunit in epithelial colon cancer (HT29) and prostate (PC3) cancer cells was investigated. LC-DAD-MS and GC-MS analyses showed major qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic profiles of the infusions. All herbal infusions exhibited antiradical activity which correlated strongly with their total phenolic content. Infusions exhibited the potential to inhibit cell growth and to reduce IL-8 levels in HT29 colon and PC3 prostate cancer cells. The regulation reported in p65 subunit in HT29 treated with St John's Wort and in PC3 treated with thyme might point to the NF-κB as the molecular target underlying the effect of these infusions.

  18. Critical role for hypothalamic mTOR activity in energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hiroyuki; Inoki, Ken; Münzberg, Heike; Opland, Darren; Faouzi, Miro; Villanueva, Eneida C.; Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Kwiatkowski, David; MacDougald, Ormond A; Myers, Martin G.; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) promotes anabolic cellular processes in response to growth factors and metabolic cues. The TSC1 and TSC2 tumor suppressors are major upstream inhibitory regulators of mTOR signaling. Mice with Rip2/Cre-mediated deletion of Tsc1 (Rip-Tsc1cKO mice) developed hyperphagia and obesity, suggesting that hypothalamic disruption (for which Rip2/Cre is well known) of Tsc1 may dysregulate feeding circuits via mTOR activation. Indeed, Rip-Tsc1cKO mice displayed increased mTOR signaling and enlarged neuron cell size in a number of hypothalamic populations, including Pomc neurons. Furthermore, Tsc1 deletion with Pomc/Cre (Pomc-Tsc1cKO mice) resulted in dysregulation of Pomc neurons and hyperphagic obesity. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, ameliorated the hyperphagia, obesity, and the altered Pomc neuronal morphology in developing or adult Pomc-Tsc1cKO mice, and cessation of treatment reinstated these phenotypes. Thus, ongoing mTOR activation in Pomc neurons blocks the catabolic function of these neurons to promote nutrient intake and increased adiposity. PMID:19356717

  19. Antagonic activities of Trypanosoma cruzi metacaspases affect the balance between cell proliferation, death and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Laverrière, M; Cazzulo, J J; Alvarez, V E

    2012-08-01

    Metacaspases are distant relatives of animal caspases present in plants, fungi and protozoa. At variance with caspases, metacaspases exhibit stringent specificity for basic amino-acid residues and are absolutely dependent on millimolar concentrations of calcium. In the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, metacaspases have been suggested to be involved in an apoptosis-like phenomenon upon exposure of the parasite to fresh human serum (FHS). Nuclear relocalization of metacaspases was observed after FHS treatment and overexpression of metacaspase-5 led to enhanced sensitivity to this stimulus. Here we report some biochemical properties of T. cruzi metacaspases. Performing fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis of epimastigotes inducibly overexpressing metacaspase-3, we demonstrate a role for this metacaspase in cell cycle progression, protection of epimastigotes from naturally occurring cell death and differentiation to infective metacyclic trypomastigotes. We also show that regulation of metacaspase-3 activity is important for cell cycle completion inside the mammalian host. On the other hand, inducible overexpression of metacaspase-5 lacking its C-terminal domain caused an apoptotic-like response. These results suggest that the two T. cruzi metacaspases could play an important role in the life cycle and bring to light the close relationship between cell division, death and differentiation in this ancient unicellular eukaryote.

  20. Dynamic myosin activation promotes collective morphology and migration by locally balancing oppositional forces from surrounding tissue.

    PubMed

    Aranjuez, George; Burtscher, Ashley; Sawant, Ketki; Majumder, Pralay; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2016-06-15

    Migrating cells need to overcome physical constraints from the local microenvironment to navigate their way through tissues. Cells that move collectively have the additional challenge of negotiating complex environments in vivo while maintaining cohesion of the group as a whole. The mechanisms by which collectives maintain a migratory morphology while resisting physical constraints from the surrounding tissue are poorly understood. Drosophila border cells represent a genetic model of collective migration within a cell-dense tissue. Border cells move as a cohesive group of 6-10 cells, traversing a network of large germ line-derived nurse cells within the ovary. Here we show that the border cell cluster is compact and round throughout their entire migration, a shape that is maintained despite the mechanical pressure imposed by the surrounding nurse cells. Nonmuscle myosin II (Myo-II) activity at the cluster periphery becomes elevated in response to increased constriction by nurse cells. Furthermore, the distinctive border cell collective morphology requires highly dynamic and localized enrichment of Myo-II. Thus, activated Myo-II promotes cortical tension at the outer edge of the migrating border cell cluster to resist compressive forces from nurse cells. We propose that dynamic actomyosin tension at the periphery of collectives facilitates their movement through restrictive tissues.

  1. A Study of The Effect of Preschool Children's Participation in Sensorimotor Activities on Their Understanding of the Mechanical Equilibrium of a Balance Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Anastasiou, Leonidas; Konsolas, Manos; Prevezanou, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether participation in sensorimotor activities by preschool children involving their own bodily balance while walking on a beam over the floor has an effect on their understanding of the mechanical equilibrium of a balance beam. The balance beam consisted of a horizontal stick balancing around its center of mass (middle point), while carrying equal-weight objects on either side of it. The study utilized a two-group design, and was conducted in three phases (pre-test, treatment and post-test). The results of the study provide evidence that there was such an effect, since the children (who participated in the sensorimotor activities) could select out of a number of objects those two with the same weight regardless of their shape, size or colour, in order to balance the stick. This effect also can be seen when a comparison is made with a second group of children, which had previously participated in a hands-on activity regarding the equilibrium of a similar balance beam, and which (children), therefore, had a definite advantage over the other children who had participated in the sensorimotor activity. A Chi Square Test showed no significant differences between the two groups on both an immediate and a delayed post-test, while the McNemar Test for the Significance of Change showed a statistically significant difference (that is, a negative change in performance between the first and the second post-test) only within the hands-on group. This difference represents evidence that the children from the sensorimotor group remembered better the rule they were applying (i.e., selecting equal-weight objects) in order to balance the beam.

  2. Balancing protein stability and activity in cancer: a new approach for identifying driver mutations affecting CBL ubiquitin ligase activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghui; Kales, Stephen C.; Ma, Ke; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Cangelosi, Andrew L.; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the monomeric Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl) gene have been found in many tumors, but their significance remains largely unknown. Several human c-Cbl (CBL) structures have recently been solved depicting the protein at different stages of its activation cycle and thus provide mechanistic insight underlying how stability-activity tradeoffs in cancer-related proteins may influence disease onset and progression. In this study, we computationally modeled the effects of missense cancer mutations on structures representing four stages of the CBL activation cycle to identify driver mutations that affect CBL stability, binding, and activity. We found that recurrent, homozygous, and leukemia-specific mutations had greater destabilizing effects on CBL states than did random non-cancer mutations. We further tested the ability of these computational models assessing the changes in CBL stability and its binding to ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2, by performing blind CBL-mediated EGFR ubiquitination assays in cells. Experimental CBL ubiquitin ligase activity was in agreement with the predicted changes in CBL stability and, to a lesser extent, with CBL-E2 binding affinity. Two-thirds of all experimentally tested mutations affected the ubiquitin ligase activity by either destabilizing CBL or disrupting CBL-E2 binding, whereas about one-third of tested mutations were found to be neutral. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that computational methods incorporating multiple protein conformations and stability and binding affinity evaluations can successfully predict the functional consequences of cancer mutations on protein activity, and provide a proof of concept for mutations in CBL. PMID:26676746

  3. NCI Funding Trends and Priorities in Physical Activity and Energy Balance Research Among Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Catherine M; Bluethmann, Shirley M; Tesauro, Gina; Perna, Frank; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Elena, Joanne W; Ross, Sharon A; O'Connell, Mary; Bowles, Heather R; Greenberg, Deborah; Nebeling, Linda

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that a healthy lifestyle consisting of physical activity, healthy diet, and weight control is associated with reduced risk of morbidity and mortality after cancer. However, these behavioral interventions are not widely adopted in practice or community settings. Integrating heath behavior change interventions into standard survivorship care for the growing number of cancer survivors requires an understanding of the current state of the science and a coordinated scientific agenda for the future with focused attention in several priority areas. To facilitate this goal, this paper presents trends over the past decade of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) research portfolio, fiscal year 2004 to 2014, by funding mechanism, research focus, research design and methodology, primary study exposures and outcomes, and study team expertise and composition. These data inform a prioritized research agenda for the next decade focused on demonstrating value and feasibility and creating desire for health behavior change interventions at multiple levels including the survivor, clinician, and healthcare payer to facilitate the development and implementation of appropriately targeted, adaptive, effective, and sustainable programs for all survivors.

  4. Beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity, autonomic balance and serotonergic activity in practitioners of Transcendental Meditation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the acute autonomic effects of the Transcendental Meditation Program (TM) and resolve the conflict arising from discrepant neurochemical and psychophysiological data. Three experimental investigations were performed. The first examined beta{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors (AR's) on peripheral blood lymphocytes, via (I{sup 125})iodocyanopindolol binding, in 10 male mediating and 10 age matched non-meditating control subjects, to test the hypothesis that the long-term practice of TM and the TM Sidhi Program (TMSP) reduces end organ sensitivity to adrenergic agonists. The second investigated respiratory sinus arrhythmia (an indirect measure of cardiac Parasympathetic Nervous System tone), and skin resistance (a measure of Sympathetic Nervous System tone) during periods of spontaneous respiratory apneusis, a phenomenon occurring during TM that is known to mark the subjective experience of transcending. The third was within subject investigation of the acute effects of the TMSP on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) activity. Platelet 5-HT was assayed by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, plasma prolactin (PL) and lutenizing hormone (LH) by radioimmunoassay, tryptophan by spectrofluorimetry, and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP, a modulator of 5-HT uptake) by radial immunodiffusion assay.

  5. Influence of secondary settling tank performance on suspended solids mass balance in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Patziger, M; Kainz, H; Hunze, M; Józsa, J

    2012-05-01

    Secondary settling is the final step of the activated sludge-based biological waste water treatment. Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are therefore an essential unit of producing a clear effluent. A further important function of SSTs is the sufficient thickening to achieve highly concentrated return sludge and biomass within the biological reactor. In addition, the storage of activated sludge is also needed in case of peak flow events (Ekama et al., 1997). Due to the importance of a high SST performance the problem has long been investigated (Larsen, 1977; Krebs, 1991; Takács et al., 1991; Ekama et al., 1997; Freimann, 1999; Patziger et al., 2005; Bürger et al., 2011), however, a lot of questions are still to solve regarding e.g. the geometrical features (inflow, outflow) and operations (return sludge control, scraper mechanism, allowable maximum values of surface overflow rates). In our study we focused on SSTs under dynamic load considering both the overall unsteady behaviour and the features around the peaks, investigating the effect of various sludge return strategies as well as the inlet geometry on SST performance. The main research tool was a FLUENT-based novel mass transport model consisting of two modules, a 2D axisymmetric SST model and a mixed reactor model of the biological reactor (BR). The model was calibrated and verified against detailed measurements of flow and concentration patterns, sludge settling, accompanied with continuous on-line measurement of in- and outflow as well as returned flow rates of total suspended solids (TSS) and water. As to the inlet arrangement a reasonable modification of the geometry could result in the suppression of the large scale flow structures of the sludge-water interface thus providing a significant improvement in the SST performance. Furthermore, a critical value of the overflow rate (q(crit)) was found at which a pronounced large scale circulation pattern develops in the vertical plane, the density current in

  6. Endorepellin causes endothelial cell disassembly of actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions through alpha2beta1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Bix, Gregory; Fu, Jian; Gonzalez, Eva M; Macro, Laura; Barker, Amy; Campbell, Shelly; Zutter, Mary M; Santoro, Samuel A; Kim, Jiyeun K; Höök, Magnus; Reed, Charles C; Iozzo, Renato V

    2004-07-05

    Endorepellin, the COOH-terminal domain of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan, inhibits several aspects of angiogenesis. We provide evidence for a novel biological axis that links a soluble fragment of perlecan protein core to the major cell surface receptor for collagen I, alpha2beta1 integrin, and provide an initial investigation of the intracellular signaling events that lead to endorepellin antiangiogenic activity. The interaction between endorepellin and alpha2beta1 integrin triggers a unique signaling pathway that causes an increase in the second messenger cAMP; activation of two proximal kinases, protein kinase A and focal adhesion kinase; transient activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and heat shock protein 27, followed by a rapid down-regulation of the latter two proteins; and ultimately disassembly of actin stress fibers and focal adhesions. The end result is a profound block of endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. Because perlecan is present in both endothelial and smooth muscle cell basement membranes, proteolytic activity during the initial stages of angiogenesis could liberate antiangiogenic fragments from blood vessels' walls, including endorepellin.

  7. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor defueling and disassembly. Summary status report. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

    1986-05-01

    This document summarizes information relating to the preparations for defueling the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor and disassembly activities being performed concurrently with decontamination of the facility. Data have been collected from activity reports, reactor containment entry records, and other sources and entered in a computerized data sysem which permits extraction/manipulation of specific data which can be used in planning for recovery from a loss of coolant event similar to that experienced at TMI-2 on March 28, 1979. This report contains summaries of man-hours, manpower, and radiation exposures incurred during the period of April 23, 1979 to April 16, 1985, in the completion of activities related to preparation for reactor defueling. Support activities conducted outside of radiation areas are not included within the scope of this report. Computerized reports included in this document are: A chronological summary listing work performed for the period; and summary reports for each major task undertaken in connection with the specific scope of this report. Presented in chronological order for the referenced time period. Manually-assembled table summaries are included for: Labor and exposures by department; and labor and exposures by major activity.

  8. A Camelid-derived Antibody Fragment Targeting the Active Site of a Serine Protease Balances between Inhibitor and Substrate Behavior.

    PubMed

    Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Oldenburg, Emil; Yung, Kristen Wing Yu; Ghassabeh, Gholamreza H; Muyldermans, Serge; Declerck, Paul J; Huang, Mingdong; Andreasen, Peter A; Ngo, Jacky Chi Ki

    2016-07-15

    A peptide segment that binds the active site of a serine protease in a substrate-like manner may behave like an inhibitor or a substrate. However, there is sparse information on which factors determine the behavior a particular peptide segment will exhibit. Here, we describe the first x-ray crystal structure of a nanobody in complex with a serine protease. The nanobody displays a new type of interaction between an antibody and a serine protease as it inserts its complementary determining region-H3 loop into the active site of the protease in a substrate-like manner. The unique binding mechanism causes the nanobody to behave as a strong inhibitor as well as a poor substrate. Intriguingly, its substrate behavior is incomplete, as 30-40% of the nanobody remained intact and inhibitory after prolonged incubation with the protease. Biochemical analysis reveals that an intra-loop interaction network within the complementary determining region-H3 of the nanobody balances its inhibitor versus substrate behavior. Collectively, our results unveil molecular factors, which may be a general mechanism to determine the substrate versus inhibitor behavior of other protease inhibitors.

  9. Neuropilin 1 balances β8 integrin-activated TGFβ signaling to control sprouting angiogenesis in the brain.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Shinya; Clements, Thomas P; Tang, Leung K; Morales, John E; Lee, Hye Shin; Oh, S Paul; Rivera, Gonzalo M; Wagner, Daniel S; McCarty, Joseph H

    2015-12-15

    Angiogenesis in the developing central nervous system (CNS) is regulated by neuroepithelial cells, although the genes and pathways that couple these cells to blood vessels remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we have used biochemical, cell biological and molecular genetic approaches to demonstrate that β8 integrin (Itgb8) and neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) cooperatively promote CNS angiogenesis by mediating adhesion and signaling events between neuroepithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells. β8 integrin in the neuroepithelium promotes the activation of extracellular matrix (ECM)-bound latent transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) ligands and stimulates TGFβ receptor signaling in endothelial cells. Nrp1 in endothelial cells suppresses TGFβ activation and signaling by forming intercellular protein complexes with β8 integrin. Cell type-specific ablation of β8 integrin, Nrp1, or canonical TGFβ receptors results in pathological angiogenesis caused by defective neuroepithelial cell-endothelial cell adhesion and imbalances in canonical TGFβ signaling. Collectively, these data identify a paracrine signaling pathway that links the neuroepithelium to blood vessels and precisely balances TGFβ signaling during cerebral angiogenesis.

  10. Antimicrobial Active Clothes Display No Adverse Effects on the Ecological Balance of the Healthy Human Skin Microflora

    PubMed Central

    Hoefer, Dirk; Hammer, Timo R.

    2011-01-01

    The progressive public use of antimicrobial clothes has raised issues concerning skin health. A placebo-controlled side-to-side study was run with antimicrobial clothes versus fabrics of similar structure but minus the antimicrobial activity, to evaluate possible adverse effects on the healthy skin microflora. Sixty volunteers were enrolled. Each participant received a set of form-fitting T-shirts constructed in 2 halves: an antibacterial half, displaying activities of 3–5 log-step reductions due to silver-finishes or silver-loaded fibres and a nonantibacterial control side. The microflora of the scapular skin was analyzed weekly for opportunistic and pathogenic microorganisms over six weeks. The antibacterial halves did not disturb the microflora in number or composition, whereas a silver-containing deodorant displayed a short-term disturbance. Furthermore, parameters of skin morphology and function (TEWL, pH, moisture) did not show any significant shifts. In summary, antimicrobial clothes did not show adverse effects on the ecological balance of the healthy skin microflora. PMID:22363849

  11. TRANSLUCENT GREEN, an ERF family transcription factor, controls water balance in Arabidopsis by activating the expression of aquaporin genes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Danling; Wu, Zhe; Cao, Guangyu; Li, Jigang; Wei, Jia; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Gu, Hongya; Aoyama, Takashi; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-04-01

    Water is the most abundant molecule in almost all living organisms. Aquaporins are channel proteins that play critical roles in controlling the water content of cells. Here, we report the identification of an AP2/EREBP family transcription factor in Arabidopsis thaliana, TRANSLUCENT GREEN (TG), whose overexpression in transgenic plants gave enhanced drought tolerance and vitrified leaves. TG protein is localized in the nucleus, binds DRE and GCC elements in vitro, and acts as a transcriptional activator in yeast cells. Microarray analysis revealed a total of 330 genes regulated by TG, among which five genes encode aquaporins. A transient expression assay showed that TG directly binds to the promoters of three aquaporin genes, such as AtTIP1;1, AtTIP2;3, and AtPIP2;2, indicating that TG directly regulates the expression of these genes. Moreover, overexpression of AtTIP1;1 resulted in vitrified phenotypes in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, similar to those observed in TG overexpression lines. Water injection into wild-type leaves recapitulated the vitrified leaf phenotypes, which was reversed by cutting off the water supply from vascular bundles. Taken together, our data support that TG controls water balance in Arabidopsis through directly activating the expression of aquaporin genes.

  12. Assembly, operation and disassembly manual for the Battelle Large Volume Water Sampler (BLVWS)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.W.; Campbell, R.M.

    1984-12-01

    Assembly, operation and disassembly of the Battelle Large Volume Water Sampler (BLVWS) are described in detail. Step by step instructions of assembly, general operation and disassembly are provided to allow an operator completely unfamiliar with the sampler to successfully apply the BLVWS to his research sampling needs. The sampler permits concentration of both particulate and dissolved radionuclides from large volumes of ocean and fresh water. The water sample passes through a filtration section for particle removal then through sorption or ion exchange beds where species of interest are removed. The sampler components which contact the water being sampled are constructed of polyvinylchloride (PVC). The sampler has been successfully applied to many sampling needs over the past fifteen years. 9 references, 8 figures.

  13. A Summary Report on the NPH Evaluation of 105-L Disassembly Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, J.R.

    2002-04-30

    The L Area Disassembly Basin (LDB) is evaluated for the natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects due to earthquake, wind, and tornado in accordance with DOE Order 420.1 and DOE-STD-1020. The deterministic analysis is performed for a Performance Category 3 (PC3) level of loads. Savannah River Site (SRS) specific NPH loads and design criteria are obtained from Engineering Standard 01060. It is demonstrated that the demand to capacity (D/C) ratios for primary and significant structural elements are acceptable (equal to or less than 1.0). Thus, 105-L Disassembly Basin building structure is qualified for the PC3 NPH effects in accordance with DOE Order 420.1.

  14. Mucin-mediated nanocarrier disassembly for triggered uptake of oligonucleotides as a delivery strategy for the potential treatment of mucosal tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martirosyan, A.; Olesen, M. J.; Fenton, R. A.; Kjems, J.; Howard, K. A.

    2016-06-01

    This work demonstrates gastric mucin-triggered nanocarrier disassembly for release of antisense oligonucleotides and consequent unassisted cellular entry as a novel oral delivery strategy. A fluorescence activation-based reporter system was used to investigate the interaction and mucin-mediated disassembly of chitosan-based nanocarriers containing a 13-mer DNA oligonucleotide with a flanked locked RNA nucleic acid gapmer design. Gastric mucins were shown to trigger gapmer release from nanocarriers that was dependent on the interaction time, mucin concentration and N : P ratio with a maximal release at N : P 10. In contrast to siRNA, naked gapmers exhibited uptake into mucus producing HT-MTX mono-cultures and HT-MTX co-cultured with the carcinoma epithelial cell line Caco-2. Importantly, in vivo gapmer uptake was observed in epithelial tissue 30 min post-injection in murine intestinal loops. The findings present a mucosal design-based system tailored for local delivery of oligonucleotides that may maximize the effectiveness of gene silencing therapeutics within tumours at mucosal sites.This work demonstrates gastric mucin-triggered nanocarrier disassembly for release of antisense oligonucleotides and consequent unassisted cellular entry as a novel oral delivery strategy. A fluorescence activation-based reporter system was used to investigate the interaction and mucin-mediated disassembly of chitosan-based nanocarriers containing a 13-mer DNA oligonucleotide with a flanked locked RNA nucleic acid gapmer design. Gastric mucins were shown to trigger gapmer release from nanocarriers that was dependent on the interaction time, mucin concentration and N : P ratio with a maximal release at N : P 10. In contrast to siRNA, naked gapmers exhibited uptake into mucus producing HT-MTX mono-cultures and HT-MTX co-cultured with the carcinoma epithelial cell line Caco-2. Importantly, in vivo gapmer uptake was observed in epithelial tissue 30 min post-injection in murine intestinal

  15. Apoptosis induction via microtubule disassembly by an antitumour compound, pironetin.

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, M; Usui, T; Nishikiori, T; Mayumi, T; Osada, H

    1999-01-01

    We reported previously that pironetin and its derivatives were potent inhibitors of cell cycle progression at the M-phase and showed antitumour activity against a murine tumour cell line, P388 leukaemia, transplanted in mice. In this paper, we investigated the mechanism of action of pironetins in antitumour activity and cell cycle arrest at the M-phase. As reported previously for murine leukaemia P388 cells, pironetin showed antitumour activity in a dose-dependent manner in the human leukaemia cell line HL-60. Since DNA fragmentation was observed in both P388 and HL-60 cells, the antitumour activity of pironetin is thought to be due to the induction of apoptosis. Pironetin also induced the rapid phosphorylation of Bcl-2 before formation of the DNA ladder in HL-60 cells, as seen with several tubulin binders. These results suggest that the antitumour activity of pironetin is due to apoptosis caused by the phosphorylation of Bcl-2, and that pironetin targets the microtubules. Pironetin and demethylpironetin exhibited reversible disruption of the cellular microtubule network in normal rat fibroblast 3Y1 cells. However, epoxypironetin, which contains epoxide instead of the double bond of pironetin, showed only weak activity. Since the concentrations that inhibit cell cycle progression at the M-phase were the same as those for disruption of the microtubule network, it was suggested that the mitotic arrest induced by pironetin was the result of the loss of the mitotic spindle. These compounds also inhibited the microtubule-associated protein-induced and glutamate-induced tubulin assembly in vitro. Pironetin inhibited the binding of [3H]vinblastine, but not that of [3H]colchicine, to tubulin, and the Kd values revealed that the affinity of pironetin for tubulin is stronger than that of vinblastine. These results suggest that pironetins are novel antitumour agents which inhibit microtubule assembly. PMID:10333483

  16. Laser Balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical Technology, Incorporated developed a fully automatic laser machining process that allows more precise balancing removes metal faster, eliminates excess metal removal and other operator induced inaccuracies, and provides significant reduction in balancing time. Manufacturing costs are reduced as a result.

  17. Molecular disassembly of rice and lotus starches during thermal processing and its effect on starch digestibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Sun, Yue; Wang, Jinrong; Wang, Shuo; Copeland, Les

    2016-02-01

    The molecular disassembly of starch during thermal processing is a major determinant for the susceptibility of starch to enzymatic digestion. In the present study, the effects of thermal processing on the disassembly of the granular structure and the in vitro enzymatic digestibility of rice and lotus starches were investigated. After heating at 50 °C, rice and lotus starches did not show significant changes in granular morphology, long-range crystallinity and short-range molecular order. As the temperature increased to 60 °C, rice starch underwent a partial gelatinization followed by an incomplete disruption of granular morphology, crystallites and molecular order. In contrast, lotus starch was almost completely gelatinized at 60 °C. At 70 °C or higher, both starches were fully gelatinized with complete disruption of the micro and macro structures. Our results show that gelatinization greatly increased the in vitro enzymatic digestibility of both starches, but that the degree of disassembly of the starch structure during thermal processing was not a major determinant of the digestibility of gelatinized starch.

  18. Artificial biofilms establish the role of matrix interactions in staphylococcal biofilm assembly and disassembly.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Elizabeth J; Ganesan, Mahesh; Younger, John G; Solomon, Michael J

    2015-08-14

    We demonstrate that the microstructural and mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms can be created through colloidal self-assembly of cells and polymers, and thereby link the complex material properties of biofilms to well understood colloidal and polymeric behaviors. This finding is applied to soften and disassemble staphylococcal biofilms through pH changes. Bacterial biofilms are viscoelastic, structured communities of cells encapsulated in an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) comprised of polysaccharides, proteins, and DNA. Although the identity and abundance of EPS macromolecules are known, how these matrix materials interact with themselves and bacterial cells to generate biofilm morphology and mechanics is not understood. Here, we find that the colloidal self-assembly of Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A cells and polysaccharides into viscoelastic biofilms is driven by thermodynamic phase instability of EPS. pH conditions that induce phase instability of chitosan produce artificial S. epidermidis biofilms whose mechanics match natural S. epidermidis biofilms. Furthermore, pH-induced solubilization of the matrix triggers disassembly in both artificial and natural S. epidermidis biofilms. This pH-induced disassembly occurs in biofilms formed by five additional staphylococcal strains, including three clinical isolates. Our findings suggest that colloidal self-assembly of cells and matrix polymers produces biofilm viscoelasticity and that biofilm control strategies can exploit this mechanism.

  19. Design-only conceptual design report for pit disassembly and conversion facility. Rev 0

    SciTech Connect

    Zygmunt, S.; Christensen, L.; Richardson, C.

    1997-12-12

    This design-only conceptual design report (DOCDR) was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Office of Fissile Material Disposition (OFMD) for engineering design of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) Project No. 99-D-141. The PDCF will be used to disassemble the nation`s inventory of surplus nuclear weapons pits and convert the plutonium recovered from those pits into a form suitable for storage, international inspection, and final disposition. The PDCF is a complex consisting of a hardened building that will contain the plutonium processes in a safe and secure manner, and conventional buildings and structures that will house support personnel, systems, and equipment. The PDCF uses the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES), a low waste, modular pyroprocessing system to convert pits to plutonium oxide. The PDCF project consists of engineering and design, and construction of the buildings and structures, and engineering and design, procurement, installation, testing and start-up of equipment to disassemble pits and convert plutonium in pits to oxide form. The facility is planned to operate for 10 years, averaging 3.5 metric tons (3.86 tons) of plutonium metal per year. On conclusion of operations, the PDCF will be decontaminated and decommissioned.

  20. Myosin-dependent remodeling of adherens junctions protects junctions from Snail-dependent disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Although Snail is essential for disassembly of adherens junctions during epithelial–mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), loss of adherens junctions in Drosophila melanogaster gastrula is delayed until mesoderm is internalized, despite the early expression of Snail in that primordium. By combining live imaging and quantitative image analysis, we track the behavior of E-cadherin–rich junction clusters, demonstrating that in the early stages of gastrulation most subapical clusters in mesoderm not only persist, but move apically and enhance in density and total intensity. All three phenomena depend on myosin II and are temporally correlated with the pulses of actomyosin accumulation that drive initial cell shape changes during gastrulation. When contractile myosin is absent, the normal Snail expression in mesoderm, or ectopic Snail expression in ectoderm, is sufficient to drive early disassembly of junctions. In both cases, junctional disassembly can be blocked by simultaneous induction of myosin contractility. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for mechanosensitivity of cell–cell junctions and imply that myosin-mediated tension can prevent Snail-driven EMT. PMID:26754645

  1. CENP-A and H3 Nucleosomes Display a Similar Stability to Force-Mediated Disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Vlijm, Rifka; van der Torre, Jaco; Dalal, Yamini; Dekker, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Centromere-specific nucleosomes are a central feature of the kinetochore complex during mitosis, in which microtubules exert pulling and pushing forces upon the centromere. CENP-A nucleosomes have been assumed to be structurally unique, thereby providing resilience under tension relative to their H3 canonical counterparts. Here, we directly test this hypothesis by subjecting CENP-A and H3 octameric nucleosomes, assembled on random or on centromeric DNA sequences, to varying amounts of applied force by using single-molecule magnetic tweezers. We monitor individual disassembly events of CENP-A and H3 nucleosomes. Regardless of the DNA sequence, the force-mediated disassembly experiments for CENP-A and H3 nucleosomes demonstrate similar rupture forces, life time residency and disassembly steps. From these experiments, we conclude that CENP-A does not, by itself, contribute unique structural features to the nucleosome that lead to a significant resistance against force-mediated disruption. The data present insights into the mechanistic basis for how CENP-A nucleosomes might contribute to the structural foundation of the centromere in vivo. PMID:27820823

  2. Light-induced disassembly of self-assembled vesicle-capped nanotubes observed in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Anthony C.; Beierle, John M.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Maciá, Beatriz; Caroli, Giuseppe; Mika, Jacek T.; van Dijken, Derk Jan; Chen, Jiawen; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2011-09-01

    Molecular self-assembly is the basis for the formation of numerous artificial nanostructures. The self-organization of peptides, amphiphilic molecules composed of fused benzene rings and other functional molecules into nanotubes is of particular interest. However, the design of dynamic, complex self-organized systems that are responsive to external stimuli remains a significant challenge. Here, we report self-assembled, vesicle-capped nanotubes that can be selectively disassembled by irradiation. The walls of the nanotubes are 3-nm-thick bilayers and are made from amphiphilic molecules with two hydrophobic legs that interdigitate when the molecules self-assemble into bilayers. In the presence of phospholipids, a phase separation between the phospholipids and the amphiphilic molecules creates nanotubes, which are end-capped by vesicles that can be chemically altered or removed and reattached without affecting the nanotubes. The presence of a photoswitchable and fluorescent core in the amphiphilic molecules allows fast and highly controlled disassembly of the nanotubes on irradiation, and distinct disassembly processes can be observed in real time using fluorescence microscopy.

  3. Balance of inhibitory and excitatory synaptic activity is altered in fast-spiking interneurons in experimental cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fu-Wen; Chen, Huan-Xin; Roper, Steven N

    2009-10-01

    Cortical dysplasia (CD) is a common cause of intractable epilepsy in children and adults. We have studied rats irradiated in utero as a model of CD to better understand mechanisms that underlie dysplasia-associated epilepsy. Prior studies have shown a reduction in the number of cortical interneurons and in the frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in pyramidal cells in this model. They have also shown a reduced frequency of spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in the surviving cortical interneurons. However, the inhibitory synaptic contacts were not examined in that study. The current experiments were performed to assess inhibitory synaptic activity in fast-spiking (FS) interneurons in irradiated rats and controls and the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity in these cells. Whole cell recordings were obtained from layer IV FS cells in controls and comparable FS cells in irradiated rats. The frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs was reduced in dysplastic cortex, but the amplitude of these currents was unchanged. Stimulus-evoked IPSCs showed short-term depression in control and short-term facilitation in dysplastic cortex. Simultaneous recording of spontaneous EPSCs and IPSCs showed a shift in the ratio of excitation-to-inhibition in favor of inhibition in FS cells from dysplastic cortex. The same shift toward inhibition was seen when miniature EPSCs and IPSCs were examined. These results show that FS cells in dysplastic cortex have a relative lack of excitatory drive. This may result in an important class of inhibitory cells that are less able to perform their normal function especially in periods of increased excitatory activity.

  4. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Burmeister

    2009-06-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 117 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 26-41-01, Pluto Disassembly Facility, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 117 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 117 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From May 2008 through February 2009, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117, Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purpose of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to determine COCs for CAU 117. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities indicated that the final action levels were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) reported as total Aroclor and

  5. Reconceptualizing balance: attributes associated with balance performance.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Julia C; Odonkor, Charles; Griffith, Laura; Holt, Nicole; Percac-Lima, Sanja; Leveille, Suzanne; Ni, Pensheng; Latham, Nancy K; Jette, Alan M; Bean, Jonathan F

    2014-09-01

    Balance tests are commonly used to screen for impairments that put older adults at risk for falls. The purpose of this study was to determine the attributes that were associated with balance performance as measured by the Frailty and Injuries: Cooperative Studies of Intervention Techniques (FICSIT) balance test. This study was a cross-sectional secondary analysis of baseline data from a longitudinal cohort study, the Boston Rehabilitative Impairment Study of the Elderly (Boston RISE). Boston RISE was performed in an outpatient rehabilitation research center and evaluated Boston area primary care patients aged 65 to 96 (N=364) with self-reported difficulty or task-modification climbing a flight of stairs or walking 1/2 of a mile. The outcome measure was standing balance as measured by the FICSIT-4 balance assessment. Other measures included: self-efficacy, pain, depression, executive function, vision, sensory loss, reaction time, kyphosis, leg range of motion, trunk extensor muscle endurance, leg strength and leg velocity at peak power. Participants were 67% female, had an average age of 76.5 (±7.0) years, an average of 4.1 (±2.0) chronic conditions, and an average FICSIT-4 score of 6.7 (±2.2) out of 9. After adjusting for age and gender, attributes significantly associated with balance performance were falls self-efficacy, trunk extensor muscle endurance, sensory loss, and leg velocity at peak power. FICSIT-4 balance performance is associated with a number of behavioral and physiologic attributes, many of which are amenable to rehabilitative treatment. Our findings support a consideration of balance as multidimensional activity as proposed by the current International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) model.

  6. Reliability, Validity, and Sensitivity to Change of Turkish Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale in Patients with Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karapolat, Hale; Eyigor, Sibel; Kirazli, Yesim; Celebisoy, Nese; Bilgen, Cem; Kirazli, Tayfun

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and sensitivity to change of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) in people with peripheral vestibular disorder. Thirty-three patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular disease were included in the study. Patients were…

  7. Parent-Reported Eating and Leisure-Time Activity Selection Patterns Related to Energy Balance in Preschool- and School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raynor, Hollie A.; Jelalian, Elissa; Vivier, Patrick M.; Hart, Chantelle N.; Wing, Rena R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Compare parent-reported preschool- and school-aged children's eating and leisure-time activity patterns that are proposed to influence energy balance. Design: Cross-sectional investigation of children, 2 to 12 years, attending a well visit. Setting: Pediatric private practice/ambulatory pediatric clinic. Participants: One hundred…

  8. Self-heating co-pyrolysis of excessive activated sludge with waste biomass: energy balance and sludge reduction.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong-Sheng; Jiang, Hong

    2013-04-01

    In this work, co-pyrolysis of sludge with sawdust or rice husk was investigated. The results showed that the co-pyrolysis technology could be used to dispose of the excessive activated sludge without external energy input. The results also demonstrated that no obvious synergistic effect occurred except for heat transfer in the co-pyrolysis if the co-feeding biomass and sludge had similar thermogravimetric characteristics. The experimental results combined with calculation showed that adding sawdust accounting for 49.6% of the total feedstock or rice husk accounting for 74.7% could produce bio-oil to keep the energy balance of the co-pyrolysis system and self-heat it. The sludge from solar drying bed can be further reduced by 38.6% and 35.1% by weight when co-pyrolyzed with rice husk and sawdust, respectively. This study indicates that sludge reduction without external heat supply through co-pyrolysis of sludge with waste biomass is practically feasible.

  9. Predicting falls within the elderly community: comparison of postural sway, reaction time, the Berg balance scale and the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale for comparing fallers and non-fallers.

    PubMed

    Lajoie, Y; Gallagher, S P

    2004-01-01

    Simple reaction time, the Berg balance scale, the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale and postural sway were studied in order to determine cut-off scores as well as develop a model used in the prevention of fallers within the elderly community. One hundred and twenty-five subjects, 45 fallers and 80 non-fallers were evaluated throughout the study and results indicated that non-fallers have significantly faster reaction times, have higher scores on the Berg balance scale and the ABC scale as well as sway at slower frequencies when compared to fallers. Furthermore, all risk factors were subsequently entered into a logistic regression analysis and results showed that reaction time, the total Berg score and the total ABC score contributed significantly to the prediction of falls with 89% sensitivity and 96% specificity. A second logistic regression was carried out with the same previous variables as well as all questions of the Berg and ABC scales. Results from the logistic analysis revealed that three variables were associated with fall status with 91% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Results from the following study would seem rather valuable as an assessment tool for health care professionals in the identification and monitoring of potential fallers within nursing homes and throughout the community.

  10. Dissociation of CAK from Core TFIIH Reveals a Functional Link between XP-G/CS and the TFIIH Disassembly State

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Hany H.; Wani, Gulzar; Ray, Alo; Shah, Zubair I.; Zhu, Qianzheng; Wani, Altaf A.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factor II H (TFIIH) is comprised of core TFIIH and Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complexes. Here, we investigated the molecular and cellular manifestation of the TFIIH compositional changes by XPG truncation mutations. We showed that both core TFIIH and CAK are rapidly recruited to damage sites in repair-proficient cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation against TFIIH and CAK components revealed a physical engagement of CAK in nucleotide excision repair (NER). While XPD recruitment to DNA damage was normal, CAK was not recruited in severe XP-G and XP-G/CS cells, indicating that the associations of CAK and XPD to core TFIIH are differentially affected. A CAK inhibition approach showed that CAK activity is not required for assembling pre-incision machinery in vivo or for removing genomic photolesions. Instead, CAK is involved in Ser5-phosphorylation and UV-induced degradation of RNA polymerase II. The CAK inhibition impaired transcription from undamaged and UV-damaged reporter, and partially decreased transcription of p53-dependent genes. The overall results demonstrated that a) XP-G/CS mutations affect the disassembly state of TFIIH resulting in the dissociation of CAK, but not XPD from core TFIIH, and b) CAK activity is not essential for global genomic repair but involved in general transcription and damage-induced RNA polymerase II degradation. PMID:20543986

  11. Disassembly of microtubules and inhibition of neurite outgrowth, neuroblastoma cell proliferation, and MAP kinase tyrosine dephosphorylation by dibenzyl trisulphide.

    PubMed

    Rösner, H; Williams, L A; Jung, A; Kraus, W

    2001-08-22

    Dibenzyl trisulphide (DTS), a main lipophilic compound in Petiveria alliacea L. (Phytolaccaceae), was identified as one of the active immunomodulatory compounds in extracts of the plant. To learn more about its biological activities and molecular mechanisms, we conducted one-dimensional NMR interaction studies with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and tested DTS and related compounds in two well-established neuronal cell-and-tissue culture systems. We found that DTS preferentially binds to an aromatic region of BSA which is rich in tyrosyl residues. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, DTS attenuates the dephosphorylation of tyrosyl residues of MAP kinase (erk1/erk2). In the same neuroblastoma cell line and in Wistar 38 human lung fibroblasts, DTS causes a reversible disassembly of microtubules, but it did not affect actin dynamics. Probably due to the disruption of the microtubule dynamics, DTS also inhibits neuroblastoma cell proliferation and neurite outgrowth from spinal cord explants. Related dibenzyl compounds with none, one, or two sulphur atoms were found to be significantly less effective. These data confirmed that the natural compound DTS has a diverse spectrum of biological properties, including cytostatic and neurotoxic actions in addition to immunomodulatory activities.

  12. FAK-MAPK-dependent adhesion disassembly downstream of L1 contributes to semaphorin3A-induced collapse.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Ahmad; Nawabi, Homaira; Moret, Frédéric; Yaron, Avraham; Weaver, Eli; Bozon, Muriel; Abouzid, Karima; Guan, Jun-Lin; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Lemmon, Vance; Castellani, Valérie

    2008-06-04

    Axonal receptors for class 3 semaphorins (Sema3s) are heterocomplexes of neuropilins (Nrps) and Plexin-As signalling coreceptors. In the developing cerebral cortex, the Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecule L1 associates with Nrp1. Intriguingly, the genetic removal of L1 blocks axon responses of cortical neurons to Sema3A in vitro despite the expression of Plexin-As in the cortex, suggesting either that L1 substitutes for Plexin-As or that L1 and Plexin-A are both required and mediate distinct roles. We report that association of Nrp1 with L1 but not Plexin-As mediates the recruitment and activation of a Sema3A-induced focal adhesion kinase-mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade. This signalling downstream of L1 is needed for the disassembly of adherent points formed in growth cones and subsequently their collapse response to Sema3A. Plexin-As and L1 are coexpressed and present in common complexes in cortical neurons and both dominant-negative forms of Plexin-A and L1 impair their response to Sema3A. Consistently, Nrp1-expressing cortical projections are defective in mice lacking Plexin-A3, Plexin-A4 or L1. This reveals that specific signalling activities downstream of L1 and Plexin-As cooperate for mediating the axon guidance effects of Sema3A.

  13. Pelvic Belt Effects on Pelvic Morphometry, Muscle Activity and Body Balance in Patients with Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Soisson, Odette; Lube, Juliane; Germano, Andresa; Hammer, Karl-Heinz; Josten, Christoph; Sichting, Freddy; Winkler, Dirk; Milani, Thomas L.; Hammer, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is frequently involved in low back and pelvic girdle pain. However, morphometrical and functional characteristics related to SIJ pain are poorly defined. Pelvic belts represent one treatment option, but evidence still lacks as to their pain-reducing effects and the mechanisms involved. Addressing these two issues, this case-controlled study compares morphometric, functional and clinical data in SIJ patients and healthy controls and evaluates the effects of short-term pelvic belt application. Methods Morphometric and functional data pertaining to pelvic belt effects were compared in 17 SIJ patients and 17 controls. Lumbar spine and pelvis morphometries were obtained from 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Functional electromyography data of pelvis and leg muscles and center of pressure excursions were measured in one-leg stance. The numerical rating scale was used to evaluate immediate pain-reducing effects. Results Pelvic morphometry was largely unaltered in SIJ patients and also by pelvic belt application. The angle of lumbar lateral flexion was significantly larger in SIJ patients without belt application. Muscle activity and center of pressure were unaffected by SIJ pain or by belt application in one-leg stance. Nine of 17 patients reported decreased pain intensities under moderate belt application, four reported no change and four reported increased pain intensity. For the entire population investigated here, this qualitative description was not confirmed on a statistical significant level. Discussion Minute changes were observed in the alignment of the lumbar spine in the frontal plane in SIJ patients. The potential pain-decreasing effects of pelvic belts could not be attributed to altered muscle activity, pelvic morphometry or body balance in a static short-term application. Long-term belt effects will therefore be of prospective interest. PMID:25781325

  14. Balancing Acts

    MedlinePlus

    ... a new type of balance therapy using computerized, virtual reality. UPMC associate professor Susan Whitney, Ph.D., ... involves simulated trips down the aisles of a virtual grocery store in the university's Medical Virtual Reality ...

  15. Role of phosphorylation of Cdc20 in p31comet-stimulated disassembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex

    PubMed Central

    Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Eytan, Esther; Ganoth, Dvora; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Dumin, Elena; Hershko, Avram

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint system delays anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. When the checkpoint is turned on, it promotes the formation of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), which inhibits the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins BubR1, Bub3, and Mad2 bound to the APC/C activator Cdc20. When the checkpoint is satisfied, MCC is disassembled and APC/C becomes active. Previous studies have shown that the Mad2-binding protein p31comet promotes the dissociation of Cdc20 from BubR1 in MCC in a process that requires ATP. We now show that a part of MCC dissociation is blocked by inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and that purified Cdk1–cyclin B stimulates this process. The mutation of all eight potential Cdk phosphorylation sites of Cdc20 partially prevented its release from BubR1. Furthermore, p31comet stimulated Cdk-catalyzed phosphorylation of Cdc20 in MCC. It is suggested that the binding of p31comet to Mad2 in MCC may trigger a conformational change in Cdc20 that facilitates its phosphorylation by Cdk, and that the latter process may promote its dissociation from BubR1. PMID:22566641

  16. Disassembly of Lys11 and Mixed Linkage Polyubiquitin Conjugates Provides Insights into Function of Proteasomal Deubiquitinases Rpn11 and Ubp6*

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Wissam; Nakasone, Mark A.; von Delbrück, Maximilian; Yu, Zanlin; Krutauz, Daria; Reis, Noa; Kleifeld, Oded; Sommer, Thomas; Fushman, David; Glickman, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis is largely dependent on proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Diverse polyubiquitin modifications are reported to target cellular proteins to the proteasome. At the proteasome, deubiquitination is an essential preprocessing event that contributes to degradation efficiency. We characterized the specificities of two proteasome-associated deubiquitinases (DUBs), Rpn11 and Ubp6, and explored their impact on overall proteasome DUB activity. This was accomplished by constructing a panel of well defined ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, including homogeneous linkages of varying lengths as well as a heterogeneously modified target. Rpn11 and Ubp6 processed Lys11 and Lys63 linkages with comparable efficiencies that increased with chain length. In contrast, processing of Lys48 linkages by proteasome was inversely correlated to chain length. Fluorescently labeled tetra-Ub chains revealed endo-chain preference for Ubp6 acting on Lys48 and random action for Rpn11. Proteasomes were more efficient at deconjugating identical substrates than their constituent DUBs by roughly 2 orders of magnitude. Incorporation into proteasomes significantly enhanced enzymatic efficiency of Rpn11, due in part to alleviation of the autoinhibitory role of its C terminus. The broad specificity of Rpn11 could explain how proteasomes were more effective at disassembling a heterogeneously modified conjugate compared with homogeneous Lys48-linked chains. The reduced ability to disassemble homogeneous Lys48-linked chains longer than 4 Ub units may prolong residency time on the proteasome. PMID:25389291

  17. Thermoregulation of water foraging honeybees--balancing of endothermic activity with radiative heat gain and functional requirements.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Anton; Schmaranzer, Sigurd

    2010-12-01

    Foraging honeybees are subjected to considerable variations of microclimatic conditions challenging their thermoregulatory ability. Solar heat is a gain in the cold but may be a burden in the heat. We investigated the balancing of endothermic activity with radiative heat gain and physiological functions of water foraging Apis mellifera carnica honeybees in the whole range of ambient temperatures (T(a)) and solar radiation they are likely to be exposed in their natural environment in Middle Europe. The mean thorax temperature (T(th)) during foraging stays was regulated at a constantly high level (37.0-38.5 °C) in a broad range of T(a) (3-30 °C). At warmer conditions (T(a)=30-39 °C) T(th) increased to a maximal level of 45.3 °C. The endothermic temperature excess (difference of T(body)-T(a) of living and dead bees) was used to assess the endogenously generated temperature elevation as a correlate of energy turnover. Up to a T(a) of ∼30 °C bees used solar heat gain for a double purpose: to reduce energetic expenditure and to increase T(th) by about 1-3 °C to improve force production of flight muscles. At higher T(a) they exhibited cooling efforts to get rid of excess heat. A high T(th) also allowed regulation of the head temperature high enough to guarantee proper function of the bees' suction pump even at low T(a). This shortened the foraging stays and this way reduced energetic costs. With decreasing T(a) bees also reduced arrival body weight and crop loading to do both minimize costs and optimize flight performance.

  18. Aggregate Size and Architecture Determine Microbial Activity Balance for One-Stage Partial Nitritation and Anammox ▿

    PubMed Central

    Vlaeminck, Siegfried E.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.; De Clippeleir, Haydée; Schaubroeck, Thomas; Bolca, Selin; Demeestere, Lien; Mast, Jan; Boon, Nico; Carballa, Marta; Verstraete, Willy

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB) and anoxic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) cooperate in partial nitritation/anammox systems to remove ammonium from wastewater. In this process, large granular microbial aggregates enhance the performance, but little is known about granulation so far. In this study, three suspended-growth oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification (OLAND) reactors with different inoculation and operation (mixing and aeration) conditions, designated reactors A, B, and C, were used. The test objectives were (i) to quantify the AerAOB and AnAOB abundance and the activity balance for the different aggregate sizes and (ii) to relate aggregate morphology, size distribution, and architecture putatively to the inoculation and operation of the three reactors. A nitrite accumulation rate ratio (NARR) was defined as the net aerobic nitrite production rate divided by the anoxic nitrite consumption rate. The smallest reactor A, B, and C aggregates were nitrite sources (NARR, >1.7). Large reactor A and C aggregates were granules capable of autonomous nitrogen removal (NARR, 0.6 to 1.1) with internal AnAOB zones surrounded by an AerAOB rim. Around 50% of the autotrophic space in these granules consisted of AerAOB- and AnAOB-specific extracellular polymeric substances. Large reactor B aggregates were thin film-like nitrite sinks (NARR, <0.5) in which AnAOB were not shielded by an AerAOB layer. Voids and channels occupied 13 to 17% of the anoxic zone of AnAOB-rich aggregates (reactors B and C). The hypothesized granulation pathways include granule replication by division and budding and are driven by growth and/or decay based on species-specific physiology and by hydrodynamic shear and mixing. PMID:19948857

  19. The Diet Quality of Competitive Adolescent Male Rugby Union Players with Energy Balance Estimated Using Different Physical Activity Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Tracy; Harries, Simon K.; Williams, Rebecca L.; Lum, Cheryl; Callister, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of the current study were to comprehensively assess the dietary intakes and diet quality of a sample of Australian competitive adolescent rugby union players and compare these intakes with National and Sports Dietitians Association (SDA) Recommendations for adolescent athletes. A secondary aim investigated applying different physical activity level (PAL) coefficients to determine total energy expenditure (TEE) in order to more effectively evaluate the adequacy of energy intakes. Design: Cross-sectional. Methods: Anthropometrics and dietary intakes were assessed in 25 competitive adolescent male rugby union players (14 to 18 years old). Diet was assessed using the validated Australian Eating Survey (AES) food frequency questionnaire and diet quality was assessed through the Australian Recommended Food Score. Results: The median dietary intakes of participants met national recommendations for percent energy (% E) from carbohydrate, protein and total fat, but not carbohydrate intake when evaluated as g/day as proposed in SDA guidelines. Median intakes of fibre and micronutrients including calcium and iron also met national recommendations. Overall diet quality was classified as ‘good’ with a median diet quality score of 34 (out of a possible 73); however, there was a lack of variety within key food groups including carbohydrates and proteins. Non-core food consumption exceeded recommended levels at 38% of the daily total energy intake, with substantial contributions from takeaway foods and sweetened beverages. A PAL coefficient of 1.2–1.4 was found to best balance the energy intakes of these players in their pre-season. Conclusions: Adolescent rugby players met the percent energy recommendations for macronutrients and attained an overall ‘good’ diet quality score. However, it was identified that when compared to specific recommendations for athletes, carbohydrate intakes were below recommendations and these players in their pre

  20. The effect of different skin-ankle brace application pressures on quiet single-limb balance and electromyographic activation onset of lower limb muscles

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Emmanuel S; Nikolopoulos, Christos; Badekas, Athanasios; Vagenas, George; Papadakis, Stamatios A; Athanasopoulos, Spyros

    2007-01-01

    Background Several studies have been carried out in order to investigate the effect of ankle bracing on ankle joint function and performance. However, no study so far has examined the role of skin-brace interface pressure in neuromuscular control. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different skin-ankle brace interface pressures on quiet single limb balance and the electromyographic (EMG) activation sequence of four lower limb muscles. Methods Thirty three male physical education students who volunteered to take part in the study were measured under three ankle brace conditions: i) without brace, ii) with brace and 30 kPa application pressure and iii) with brace and 60 kPa application pressure. Single limb balance (anteroposterior and mediolateral parameter) was assessed on the dominant lower limb, with open and closed eyes, on a force platform, simultaneously with the EMG recording of four lower lower limb muscles' (gastrocnemius, peroneus longus, rectus femoris and biceps femoris) activation onset. Results The results showed that overall balance (total stability parameter) was not significantly affected in any of the three ankle brace conditions. However, the anteroposterior centre of pressure excursion and centre of pressure excursion velocity were significantly increased with the application of ankle brace, both with 30 and 60 kPa application pressures. Furthermore, it was found that single limb balance was significantly worse with closed eyes compared to open eyes. EMG measurements showed that the sequence of lower limb activation onset was not affected in any of the three ankle brace application conditions. The results of this study showed that the application of an ankle brace with two different skin-brace interface pressures had no effect on overall single limb balance and the sequence of lower limb muscle activation. Conclusion These findings suggest that peripheral joint receptors are either not adequately stimulated by the brace

  1. Microtubule-sliding activity of a kinesin-8 promotes spindle assembly and spindle-length control.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaolei; Arellano-Santoyo, Hugo; Portran, Didier; Gaillard, Jeremie; Vantard, Marylin; Thery, Manuel; Pellman, David

    2013-08-01

    Molecular motors play critical roles in the formation of mitotic spindles, either through controlling the stability of individual microtubules, or by crosslinking and sliding microtubule arrays. Kinesin-8 motors are best known for their regulatory roles in controlling microtubule dynamics. They contain microtubule-destabilizing activities, and restrict spindle length in a wide variety of cell types and organisms. Here, we report an antiparallel microtubule-sliding activity of the budding yeast kinesin-8, Kip3. The in vivo importance of this sliding activity was established through the identification of complementary Kip3 mutants that separate the sliding activity and microtubule-destabilizing activity. In conjunction with Cin8, a kinesin-5 family member, the sliding activity of Kip3 promotes bipolar spindle assembly and the maintenance of genome stability. We propose a slide-disassemble model where the sliding and destabilizing activity of Kip3 balance during pre-anaphase. This facilitates normal spindle assembly. However, the destabilizing activity of Kip3 dominates in late anaphase, inhibiting spindle elongation and ultimately promoting spindle disassembly.

  2. Fruit softening and pectin disassembly: an overview of nanostructural pectin modifications assessed by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Candelas; Posé, Sara; Morris, Victor J.; Kirby, Andrew R.; Quesada, Miguel A.; Mercado, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the main factors that reduce fruit quality and lead to economically important losses is oversoftening. Textural changes during fruit ripening are mainly due to the dissolution of the middle lamella, the reduction of cell-to-cell adhesion and the weakening of parenchyma cell walls as a result of the action of cell wall modifying enzymes. Pectins, major components of fruit cell walls, are extensively modified during ripening. These changes include solubilization, depolymerization and the loss of neutral side chains. Recent evidence in strawberry and apple, fruits with a soft or crisp texture at ripening, suggests that pectin disassembly is a key factor in textural changes. In both these fruits, softening was reduced as result of antisense downregulation of polygalacturonase genes. Changes in pectic polymer size, composition and structure have traditionally been studied by conventional techniques, most of them relying on bulk analysis of a population of polysaccharides, and studies focusing on modifications at the nanostructural level are scarce. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the study of individual polymers at high magnification and with minimal sample preparation; however, AFM has rarely been employed to analyse pectin disassembly during fruit ripening. Scope In this review, the main features of the pectin disassembly process during fruit ripening are first discussed, and then the nanostructural characterization of fruit pectins by AFM and its relationship with texture and postharvest fruit shelf life is reviewed. In general, fruit pectins are visualized under AFM as linear chains, a few of which show long branches, and aggregates. Number- and weight-average values obtained from these images are in good agreement with chromatographic analyses. Most AFM studies indicate reductions in the length of individual pectin chains and the frequency of aggregates as the fruits ripen. Pectins extracted with sodium carbonate, supposedly located within

  3. Late Disassembly of Femoral Head and Neck of A Modular Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Parvej; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Modular total hip arthroplasty system are now widely used, as these components increase the flexibility during primary and revision total hip arthoplasty. But this modularity itself associated with some risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. Case Report: We report a case of late disassembly of a primary total arthroplasty in a 42 years old patient five years after the replacement surgery where the femoral head remained in the acetabular socket. Conclusion: Femoral head should be solidly impacted onto the stem and confirm that it has been assembled correctly before reduction. PMID:27299010

  4. Distribution Coefficients (Kd Values) for Waste Resins Generated from the K and L Disassembly Basin Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2002-12-02

    The objective of this study was to measure 14C, 129I, and 99Tc Kd values of spent resin generated from the K and L Disassembly Basin Facilities. The scope of the work was to conduct Kd measurements of resins combined in the ratio that they are disposed, 42:58 cation:anion. Because it was not known how these spent resins would be buried, it was necessary to measure the Kd values in such a manner as to simulate both trench and vault disposal. This was accomplished by using an acid-rain simulant (a standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency protocol) and a cement leachate simulant .

  5. Fractional processes and nuclear disassembly in very-heavy-ion collisions in the Fermi energy regime

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, W.U.

    1991-01-01

    Exclusive measurements of charged products and neutrons were performed for the reactions {sup 197}Au + (29 MeV/u) {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi + (28.2 MeV/u) {sup 136}Xe. The multiplicities of neutrons and charged particles are found to indicate collision impact parameters with different sensitivities. Characteristic correlations observed between massive products and light particles suggest the dominance of the damped-reaction mechanism in the Fermi energy domain. For central collisions, massive fragments are no longer observed, and a considerable fraction of the mass of the system is found disassembled into light particles and clusters. 75 refs., 19 figs.

  6. Demonstrate fuel disassembly/encapsulation. Technical progress report, April 1981-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1981-08-03

    Work on this project is focused on demonstrating disassembly and encapsulation of nuclear fuels as a means to increase spent fuel storage. The effort commenced on April 17, 1980, and is progressing satisfactorily. The Equipment/Procedure Preparation sub-task is essentially complete. The Equipment Demonstration sub-task and the Process Assessment Studies sub-task continue. The equipment design effort associated with the first sub-task, the component testing and checking associated with the second sub-task, and the technical studies and investigations associated with the latter sub-task continue to verify the feasibility of this concept to enhance the use of fuel storage resources.

  7. Biomedical Exploitation of Chitin and Chitosan via Mechano-Chemical Disassembly, Electrospinning, Dissolution in Imidazolium Ionic Liquids, and Supercritical Drying

    PubMed Central

    Muzzarelli, Riccardo A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently developed technology permits to optimize simultaneously surface area, porosity, density, rigidity and surface morphology of chitin-derived materials of biomedical interest. Safe and ecofriendly disassembly of chitin has superseded the dangerous acid hydrolysis and provides higher yields and scaling-up possibilities: the chitosan nanofibrils are finding applications in reinforced bone scaffolds and composite dressings for dermal wounds. Electrospun chitosan nanofibers, in the form of biocompatible thin mats and non-wovens, are being actively studied: composites of gelatin + chitosan + polyurethane have been proposed for cardiac valves and for nerve conduits; fibers are also manufactured from electrospun particles that self-assemble during subsequent freeze-drying. Ionic liquids (salts of alkylated imidazolium) are suitable as non-aqueous solvents that permit desirable reactions to occur for drug delivery purposes. Gel drying with supercritical CO2 leads to structures most similar to the extracellular matrix, even when the chitosan is crosslinked, or in combination with metal oxides of interest in orthopedics. PMID:22131955

  8. Balance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    TherEx Inc.'s AT-1 Computerized Ataxiameter precisely evaluates posture and balance disturbances that commonly accompany neurological and musculoskeletal disorders. Complete system includes two-strain gauged footplates, signal conditioning circuitry, a computer monitor, printer and a stand-alone tiltable balance platform. AT-1 serves as assessment tool, treatment monitor, and rehabilitation training device. It allows clinician to document quantitatively the outcome of treatment and analyze data over time to develop outcome standards for several classifications of patients. It can evaluate specifically the effects of surgery, drug treatment, physical therapy or prosthetic devices.

  9. The influence of broiler activity, growth rate, and litter on carbon dioxide balances for the determination of ventilation flow rates in broiler production.

    PubMed

    Calvet, S; Estellés, F; Cambra-López, M; Torres, A G; Van den Weghe, H F A

    2011-11-01

    Carbon dioxide balances are useful in determining ventilation rates in livestock buildings. These balances need an accurate estimation of the CO(2) produced by animals and their litter to determine the ventilation flows. To estimate the daily variation in ventilation flow, it is necessary to precisely know the daily variation pattern of CO(2) production, which mainly depends on animal activity. The objective of this study was to explore the applicability of CO(2) balances for determining ventilation flows in broiler buildings. More specifically, this work aimed to quantify the amount of CO(2) produced by the litter, as well as the amount of CO(2) produced by the broilers, as a function of productive parameters, and to analyze the influence of broiler activity on CO(2) emissions. Gas concentrations and ventilation flows were simultaneously measured in 3 trials, with 1 under experimental conditions and the other 2 in a commercial broiler farm. In the experimental assay, broiler activity was also determined. At the end of the experimental trial, on the day after the removal of the broilers, the litter accounted for 20% of the total CO(2) produced, and the broilers produced 3.71 L/h of CO(2) per kg of metabolic weight. On the commercial farm, CO(2) production was the same for the 2 cycles (2.60 L/h per kg of metabolic weight, P > 0.05). However, substantial differences were found between CO(2) and broiler activity patterns after changes in light status. A regression model was used to explain these differences (R(2) = 0.52). Carbon dioxide increased with bird activity, being on average 3.02 L/h per kg of metabolic weight for inactive birds and 4.73 L/h per kg of metabolic weight when bird activity was highest. Overall, CO(2) balances are robust tools for determining the daily average ventilation flows in broiler farms. These balances could also be applied at more frequent intervals, but in this case, particular care is necessary after light status changes because of

  10. Balancing Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Theory predicts that an egg-shaped body should rest in stable equilibrium when on its side, balance vertically in metastable equilibrium on its broad end and be completely unstable on its narrow end. A homogeneous solid egg made from wood, clay or plastic behaves in this way, but a real egg will not stand on either end. It is shown that this…

  11. Repeated Cycles of Rapid Actin Assembly and Disassembly on Epithelial Cell PhagosomesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Patricia T.; Theriot, Julie A.

    2004-01-01

    We have found that early in infection of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells expressing actin conjugated to green fluorescent protein, F-actin rapidly assembles (∼25 s) and disassembles (∼30 s) around the bacteria, a phenomenon we call flashing. L. monocytogenes strains unable to perform actin-based motility or unable to escape the phagosome were capable of flashing, suggesting that the actin assembly occurs on the phagosome membrane. Cycles of actin assembly and disassembly could occur repeatedly on the same phagosome. Indirect immunofluorescence showed that most bacteria were fully internalized when flashing occurred, suggesting that actin flashing does not represent phagocytosis. Escherichia coli expressing invA, a gene product from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis that mediates cellular invasion, also induced flashing. Furthermore, polystyrene beads coated with E-cadherin or transferrin also induced flashing after internalization. This suggests that flashing occurs downstream of several distinct molecular entry mechanisms and may be a general consequence of internalization of large objects by epithelial cells. PMID:15456901

  12. Molecular disassembly of starch granules during gelatinization and its effect on starch digestibility: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Copeland, Les

    2013-11-01

    Starch is the most important glycemic carbohydrate in foods. The relationship between the rate and extent of starch digestion to produce glucose for absorption into the bloodstream and risk factors for diet-related diseases is of considerable nutritional interest. Native starch is attacked slowly by enzymes, but after hydrothermal processing its susceptibility to enzymatic breakdown is greatly increased. Most starch consumed by humans has undergone some form of processing or cooking, which causes native starch granules to gelatinize, followed by retrogradation on cooling. The extent of gelatinization and retrogradation are major determinants of the susceptibility of starch to enzymatic digestion and its functional properties for food processing. The type and extent of changes that occur in starch as a result of gelatinization, pasting and retrogradation are determined by the type of the starch, processing and storage conditions. A mechanistic understanding of the molecular disassembly of starch granules during gelatinization is critical to explaining the effects of processing or cooking on starch digestibility. This review focuses on the molecular disassembly of starch granules during starch gelatinization over a wide range of water levels, and its consequential effect on in vitro starch digestibility and in vivo glycemic index.

  13. Synthesis of Zeolites Using the ADOR (Assembly-Disassembly-Organization-Reassembly) Route.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Paul S; Čejka, Jiří; Morris, Russell E

    2016-04-03

    Zeolites are an important class of materials that have wide ranging applications such as heterogeneous catalysts and adsorbents which are dependent on their framework topology. For new applications or improvements to existing ones, new zeolites with novel pore systems are desirable. We demonstrate a method for the synthesis of novel zeolites using the ADOR route. ADOR is an acronym for Assembly, Disassembly, Organization and Reassembly. This synthetic route takes advantage of the assembly of a relatively poorly stable that which can be selectively disassembled into a layered material. The resulting layered intermediate can then be organized in different manners by careful chemical manipulation and then reassembled into zeolites with new topologies. By carefully controlling the organization step of the synthetic pathway, new zeolites with never before seen topologies are capable of being synthesized. The structures of these new zeolites are confirmed using powder X-ray diffraction and further characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. This new synthetic pathway for zeolites demonstrates its capability to produce novel frameworks that have never been prepared by traditional zeolite synthesis techniques.

  14. Disassembly of the reconstituted synaptic vesicle membrane fusion complex in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, T; Yamasaki, S; Nauenburg, S; Binz, T; Niemann, H

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of the presynaptic membrane proteins SNAP-25 and syntaxin with the synaptic vesicle protein synaptobrevin (VAMP) plays a key role in the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters. Clostridial neurotoxins, which proteolyze these polypeptides, are potent inhibitors of neurotransmission. The cytoplasmic domains of the three membrane proteins join into a tight SDS-resistant complex (Hayashi et al., 1994). Here, we show that this reconstituted complex, as well as heterodimers composed of syntaxin and SNAP-25, can be disassembled by the concerted action of the N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor, NSF, and the soluble NSF attachment protein, alpha-SNAP. alpha-SNAP binds to predicted alpha-helical coiled-coil regions of syntaxin and SNAP-25, shown previously to be engaged in their direct interaction. Synaptobrevin, although incapable of binding alpha-SNAP individually, induced a third alpha-SNAP binding site when associated with syntaxin and SNAP-25 into heterotrimers. NSF released prebound alpha-SNAP from full-length syntaxin but not from a syntaxin derivative truncated at the N-terminus. Disassembly of complexes containing this syntaxin mutant was impaired, indicating a critical role for the N-terminal domain in the alpha-SNAP/NSF-mediated dissociation process. Complexes containing C-terminally deleted SNAP-25 derivatives, as generated by botulinal toxins type A and E, were dissociated more efficiently. In contrast, the N-terminal fragment generated from synaptobrevin by botulinal toxin type F produced an SDS-sensitive complex that was poorly dissociated. Images PMID:7774590

  15. Plastics disassembly versus bulk recycling: engineering design for end-of-life electronics resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Rios, Pedro; Stuart, Julie Ann; Grant, Ed

    2003-12-01

    Annual plastic flows through the business and consumer electronics manufacturing supply chain include nearly 3 billion lb of high-value engineering plastics derived from petroleum. The recovery of resource value from this stream presents critical challenges in areas of materials identification and recycling process design that demand new green engineering technologies applied together with life cycle assessment and ecological supply chain analysis to create viable plastics-to-plastics supply cycles. The sustainable recovery of potentially high-value engineering plastics streams requires that recyclers either avoid mixing plastic parts or purify later by separating smaller plastic pieces created in volume reduction (shredding) steps. Identification and separation constitute significant barriers in the plastics-to-plastics recycling value proposition. In the present work, we develop a model that accepts randomly arriving electronic products to study scenarios by which a recycler might identify and separate high-value engineering plastics as well as metals. Using discrete eventsimulation,we compare current mixed plastics recovery with spectrochemical plastic resin identification and subsequent sorting. Our results show that limited disassembly with whole-part identification can produce substantial yields in separated streams of recovered engineering thermoplastics. We find that disassembly with identification does not constitute a bottleneck, but rather, with relatively few workers, can be configured to pull the process and thus decrease maximum staging space requirements.

  16. Synthesis of Zeolites Using the ADOR (Assembly-Disassembly-Organization-Reassembly) Route

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Paul S.; Čejka, Jiří; Morris, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    Zeolites are an important class of materials that have wide ranging applications such as heterogeneous catalysts and adsorbents which are dependent on their framework topology. For new applications or improvements to existing ones, new zeolites with novel pore systems are desirable. We demonstrate a method for the synthesis of novel zeolites using the ADOR route. ADOR is an acronym for Assembly, Disassembly, Organization and Reassembly. This synthetic route takes advantage of the assembly of a relatively poorly stable that which can be selectively disassembled into a layered material. The resulting layered intermediate can then be organized in different manners by careful chemical manipulation and then reassembled into zeolites with new topologies. By carefully controlling the organization step of the synthetic pathway, new zeolites with never before seen topologies are capable of being synthesized. The structures of these new zeolites are confirmed using powder X-ray diffraction and further characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. This new synthetic pathway for zeolites demonstrates its capability to produce novel frameworks that have never been prepared by traditional zeolite synthesis techniques. PMID:27078165

  17. The cellular prion protein traps Alzheimer's Aβ in an oligomeric form and disassembles amyloid fibers

    PubMed Central

    Younan, Nadine D.; Sarell, Claire J.; Davies, Paul; Brown, David R.; Viles, John H.

    2013-01-01

    There is now strong evidence to show that the presence of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) mediates amyloid-β (Aβ) neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we probe the molecular details of the interaction between PrPC and Aβ and discover that substoichiometric amounts of PrPC, as little as 1/20, relative to Aβ will strongly inhibit amyloid fibril formation. This effect is specific to the unstructured N-terminal domain of PrPC. Electron microscopy indicates PrPC is able to trap Aβ in an oligomeric form. Unlike fibers, this oligomeric Aβ contains antiparallel β sheet and binds to a oligomer specific conformational antibody. Our NMR studies show that a specific region of PrPC, notably residues 95–113, binds to Aβ oligomers, but only once Aβ misfolds. The ability of PrPC to trap and concentrate Aβ in an oligomeric form and disassemble mature fibers suggests a mechanism by which PrPC might confer Aβ toxicity in AD, as oligomers are thought to be the toxic form of Aβ. Identification of a specific recognition site on PrPC that traps Aβ in an oligomeric form is potentially a therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.—Younan, N. D., Sarell, C. J., Davies, P., Brown, D. R., Viles, J. H. The cellular prion protein traps Alzheimer's Aβ in an oligomeric form and disassembles amyloid fibers. PMID:23335053

  18. Extracellular Inhibitors, Repellents, and Semaphorin/Plexin/MICAL-mediated Actin Filament Disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ruei-Jiun; Terman, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple extracellular signals have been identified that regulate actin dynamics within motile cells, but how these instructive cues present on the cell surface exert their precise effects on the internal actin cytoskeleton is still poorly understood. One particularly interesting class of these cues is a group of extracellular proteins that negatively alter the movement of cells and their processes. Over the years, these types of events have been described using a variety of terms and herein we provide an overview of inhibitory/repulsive cellular phenomena and highlight the largest known protein family of repulsive extracellular cues, the Semaphorins. Specifically, the Semaphorins (Semas) utilize Plexin cell-surface receptors to dramatically collapse the actin cytoskeleton and we summarize what is known of the direct molecular and biochemical mechanisms of Sema-triggered actin filament (F-actin) disassembly. We also discuss new observations from our lab that reveal that the multi-domain oxidoreductase (Redox) enzyme MICAL, an important mediator of Sema/Plexin repulsion, is a novel F-actin disassembly factor. Our results indicate that MICAL triggers Sema/Plexin-mediated reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton and suggest a role for specific Redox signaling events in regulating actin dynamics. PMID:21800438

  19. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Balance Training on Physical Activity in Older Adults With Osteoporosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hagströmer, Maria; Hellénius, Mai-Lis; Ståhle, Agneta

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: We have developed a 12-week balance training program for older adults shown to improve fall-related concerns, gait speed, balance performance, and physical function. We hypothesized that this balance training would also contribute to higher habitual physical activity (PA) levels and improved health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The primary aim was to evaluate short- and long-term effects of the balance training program on objectively measured habitual PA in older adults with osteoporosis. Secondary aims were to assess the effects of the balance training on HRQoL, and to study whether any effects on PA were associated with changes in HRQoL, gait speed, balance performance, fall-related concerns, and physical function. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with follow-up at 3, 9, and 15 months, including 91 participants with osteoporosis (75.6 ± 5.4 years), compared a balance training group (n = 61) with a control group (n = 30). The primary outcome was effect on habitual PA measured as steps/day, dichotomized into less than 5000 or 5000 or more steps/day. Physical activity was assessed with pedometers (Yamax) and accelerometers (Actigraph), HRQoL with the Short Form-36 (SF-36), gait with a GAITRite walkway, balance performance with Modified-Figure-Eight test and one-leg stance, fall-related concerns with Falls Efficacy Scale International, and physical function with the advanced lower extremity subscale of the questionnaire Late Life Function and Disability Instrument. Statistical methods used were multivariate logistic regression and logistic generalized estimating equation. Results: Sixty-eight participants completed the short-term follow-up at 3 months, and 53 participants completed the long-term follow-up at 15 months. Per-protocol analysis (n = 68) showed that the odds ratio for having a daily step count of 5000 or more at 3 months was 6.17 (95% confidence interval, 1.23-30.91), P = .027, for the intervention group compared with the

  20. Breast Cancer Antiestrogen Resistance 3 (BCAR3) – p130Cas Interactions Promote Adhesion Disassembly and Invasion in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Allison M.; Wilson, Ashley L.; Guerrero, Michael S.; Thomas, Keena S.; Bachir, Alexia I.; Kubow, Kristopher E.; Horwitz, A. Rick; Bouton, Amy H.

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion turnover is critical for cell motility and invasion. We previously demonstrated that the adaptor molecule Breast Cancer Antiestrogen Resistance 3 (BCAR3) promotes adhesion disassembly and breast tumor cell invasion. One of two established binding partners of BCAR3 is the adaptor molecule, p130Cas. In this study, we sought to determine whether signaling through the BCAR3/Cas complex was responsible for the cellular functions of BCAR3. We show that the entire pool of BCAR3 is in complex with Cas in invasive breast tumor cells and that these proteins co-localize in dynamic cellular adhesions. While accumulation of BCAR3 in adhesions did not require Cas binding, a direct interaction between BCAR3 and Cas was necessary for efficient dissociation of BCAR3 from adhesions. The dissociation rates of Cas and two other adhesion molecules, α-actinin and talin, were also significantly slower in the presence of a Cas-binding mutant of BCAR3, suggesting that turnover of the entire adhesion complex was delayed under these conditions. As was the case for adhesion turnover, BCAR3-Cas interactions were found to be important for BCAR3-mediated breast tumor cell chemotaxis toward serum and invasion in Matrigel. Previous work demonstrated that BCAR3 is a potent activator of Rac1, which in turn is an important regulator of adhesion dynamics and invasion. However, in contrast to wildtype BCAR3, ectopic expression of the Cas-binding mutant of BCAR3 failed to induce Rac1 activity in breast cancer cells. Together, these data show that the ability of BCAR3 to promote adhesion disassembly, tumor cell migration and invasion, and Rac1 activity is dependent on its ability to bind to Cas. The activity of BCAR3-Cas complexes as a functional unit in breast cancer is further supported by the co-expression of these molecules in multiple subtypes of human breast tumors. PMID:27109104

  1. Kinetics of Surface-Driven Self-Assembly and Fatigue-Induced Disassembly of a Virus-Based Nanocoating.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, Alejandro; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2017-02-28

    Self-assembling protein layers provide a "bottom-up" approach for precisely organizing functional elements at the nanoscale over a large solid surface area. The design of protein sheets with architecture and physical properties suitable for nanotechnological applications may be greatly facilitated by a thorough understanding of the principles that underlie their self-assembly and disassembly. In a previous study, the hexagonal lattice formed by the capsid protein (CA) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was self-assembled as a monomolecular layer directly onto a solid substrate, and its mechanical properties and dynamics at equilibrium were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Here, we use atomic force microscopy to analyze the kinetics of self-assembly of the planar CA lattice on a substrate and of its disassembly, either spontaneous or induced by materials fatigue. Both self-assembly and disassembly of the CA layer are cooperative reactions that proceed until a phase equilibrium is reached. Self-assembly requires a critical protein concentration and is initiated by formation of nucleation points on the substrate, followed by lattice growth and eventual merging of CA patches into a continuous monolayer. Disassembly of the CA layer showed hysteresis and appears to proceed only after large enough defects (nucleation points) are formed in the lattice, whose number is largely increased by inducing materials fatigue that depends on mechanical load and its frequency. Implications of the kinetic results obtained for a better understanding of self-assembly and disassembly of the HIV capsid and protein-based two-dimensional nanomaterials and the design of anti-HIV drugs targeting (dis)assembly and biocompatible nanocoatings are discussed.

  2. Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Public / Hearing and Balance Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation Audiologic (hearing), balance, and medical diagnostic tests help ... whether you are a candidate for vestibular (balance) rehabilitation. Vestibular rehabilitation is an individualized balance retraining exercise ...

  3. Energy Balance and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hill, James O.; Wyatt, Holly R.; Peters, John C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the interplay among energy intake, energy expenditure and body energy stores and illustrates how an understanding of energy balance can help develop strategies to reduce obesity. First, reducing obesity will require modifying both energy intake and energy expenditure and not simply focusing on either alone. Food restriction alone will not be effective in reducing obesity if human physiology is biased toward achieving energy balance at a high energy flux (i.e. at a high level of energy intake and expenditure). In previous environments a high energy flux was achieved with a high level of physical activity but in today's sedentary environment it is increasingly achieved through weight gain. Matching energy intake to a high level of energy expenditure will likely be more a more feasible strategy for most people to maintain a healthy weight than restricting food intake to meet a low level of energy expenditure. Second, from an energy balance point of view we are likely to be more successful in preventing excessive weight gain than in treating obesity. This is because the energy balance system shows much stronger opposition to weight loss than to weight gain. While large behavior changes are needed to produce and maintain reductions in body weight, small behavior changes may be sufficient to prevent excessive weight gain. In conclusion, the concept of energy balance combined with an understanding of how the body achieves balance may be a useful framework in helping develop strategies to reduce obesity rates. PMID:22753534

  4. Balance ability and athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Hrysomallis, Con

    2011-03-01

    The relationship between balance ability and sport injury risk has been established in many cases, but the relationship between balance ability and athletic performance is less clear. This review compares the balance ability of athletes from different sports, determines if there is a difference in balance ability of athletes at different levels of competition within the same sport, determines the relationship of balance ability with performance measures and examines the influence of balance training on sport performance or motor skills. Based on the available data from cross-sectional studies, gymnasts tended to have the best balance ability, followed by soccer players, swimmers, active control subjects and then basketball players. Surprisingly, no studies were found that compared the balance ability of rifle shooters with other athletes. There were some sports, such as rifle shooting, soccer and golf, where elite athletes were found to have superior balance ability compared with their less proficient counterparts, but this was not found to be the case for alpine skiing, surfing and judo. Balance ability was shown to be significantly related to rifle shooting accuracy, archery shooting accuracy, ice hockey maximum skating speed and simulated luge start speed, but not for baseball pitching accuracy or snowboarding ranking points. Prospective studies have shown that the addition of a balance training component to the activities of recreationally active subjects or physical education students has resulted in improvements in vertical jump, agility, shuttle run and downhill slalom skiing. A proposed mechanism for the enhancement in motor skills from balance training is an increase in the rate of force development. There are limited data on the influence of balance training on motor skills of elite athletes. When the effectiveness of balance training was compared with resistance training, it was found that resistance training produced superior performance results for

  5. An analysis of thermionic space nuclear reactor power system: I. Effect of disassembling radial reflector, following a reactivity initiated accident

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Paramonov, D. )

    1993-01-10

    An analysis is performed to determine the effect of disassembling the radial reflector of the TOPAZ-II reactor, following a hypothetical severe Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA). Such an RIA is assumed to occur during the system start-up in orbit due to a malfunction of the drive mechanism of the control drums, causing the drums to rotate the full 180[degree] outward at their maximum speed of 1.4[degree]/s. Results indicate that disassembling only three of twelve radial reflector panels would successfully shutdown the reactor, with little overheating of the fuel and the moderator.

  6. Regulation of leaf photosynthetic rate correlating with leaf carbohydrate status and activation state of Rubisco under a variety of photosynthetic source/sink balances.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Minobu

    2008-09-01

    There is evidence suggesting that in plants changes in the photosynthetic source/sink balance are an important factor that regulates leaf photosynthetic rate through affects on the leaf carbohydrate status. However, to resolve the regulatory mechanism of leaf photosynthetic rate associated with photosynthetic source/sink balance, information, particularly on mutual relationships of experimental data that are linked with a variety of photosynthetic source/sink balances, seems to be still limited. Thus, a variety of manipulations altering the plant source/sink ratio were carried out with soybean plants, and the mutual relationships of various characteristics such as leaf photosynthetic rate, carbohydrate content and the source/sink ratio were analyzed in manipulated and non-manipulated control plants. The manipulations were removal of one-half or all pods, removal of one-third or two-third leaves, and shading of one-third or one-half leaves with soybean plants grown for 8 weeks under 10 h light (24 degrees C) and 14 h darkness (17 degrees C). It was shown that there were significant negative correlations between source/sink ratio (dry weight ratio of attached leaves to other all organs) and leaf photosynthetic rate; source/sink ratio and activation ratio (percentage of initial activity to total activity) of Rubisco in leaf extract; leaf carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and photosynthetic rate; carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and activation ratio of Rubisco; amount of protein-bound ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) in leaf extract and leaf photosynthetic rate; and the amount of protein-bound RuBP and activation ratio of Rubisco. In addition, there were significant positive correlations between source/sink ratio and leaf carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content; source/sink ratio and the amount of protein-bound RuBP; carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and amount of protein-bound RuBP and the activation ratio of Rubisco and leaf photosynthetic rate

  7. Effects of a High-Intensity Functional Exercise Program on Dependence in Activities of Daily Living and Balance in Older Adults with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Toots, Annika; Littbrand, Håkan; Lindelöf, Nina; Wiklund, Robert; Holmberg, Henrik; Nordström, Peter; Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor; Gustafson, Yngve; Rosendahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of a high-intensity functional exercise program on independence in activities of  daily living (ADLs) and balance in older people with dementia and whether exercise effects differed between dementia types. Design Cluster-randomized controlled trial: Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study. Setting Residential care facilities, Umeå, Sweden. Participants Individuals aged 65 and older with a dementia diagnosis, a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 10 or greater, and dependence in ADLs (N = 186). Intervention Ninety-three participants each were allocated to the high-intensity functional exercise program, comprising lower limb strength and balance exercises, and 93 to a seated control activity. Measurements Blinded assessors measured ADL independence using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and Barthel Index (BI) and balance using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) at baseline and 4 (directly after intervention completion) and 7 months. Results Linear mixed models showed no between-group effect on ADL independence at 4 (FIM=1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI)=−1.6–4.3; BI=0.6, 95% CI=−0.2–1.4) or 7 (FIM=0.8, 95% CI=−2.2–3.8; BI=0.6, 95% CI=−0.3–1.4) months. A significant between-group effect on balance favoring exercise was observed at 4 months (BBS=4.2, 95% CI=1.8–6.6). In interaction analyses, exercise effects differed significantly between dementia types. Positive between-group exercise effects were found in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia according to the FIM at 7 months and BI and BBS at 4 and 7 months. Conclusion In older people with mild to moderate dementia living in residential care facilities, a 4-month high-intensity functional exercise program appears to slow decline in ADL independence and improve balance, albeit only in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia. PMID:26782852

  8. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Cc of... - Assembly/Disassembly: Sample Procedures for Minimizing the Risk of Unintended Dangerous Boom...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Assembly/Disassembly: Sample Procedures for Minimizing the Risk of Unintended Dangerous Boom Movement B Appendix B to Subpart CC of Part 1926 Labor Regulations..., App. B Appendix B to Subpart CC of Part 1926—Assembly/Disassembly: Sample Procedures for...

  9. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Cc of... - Assembly/Disassembly: Sample Procedures for Minimizing the Risk of Unintended Dangerous Boom...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Assembly/Disassembly: Sample Procedures for Minimizing the Risk of Unintended Dangerous Boom Movement B Appendix B to Subpart CC of Part 1926 Labor Regulations..., App. B Appendix B to Subpart CC of Part 1926—Assembly/Disassembly: Sample Procedures for...

  10. Validity and Reliability of the Swedish Version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale in People with Chronic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Anette; Nilsagård, Ylva

    2013-01-01

    Objectif : Évaluer la validité et la fiabilité de la version suédoise de l'échelle ABC (Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale) de confiance de la personne en son équilibre associé à des gestes de la vie quotidienne chez les personnes >1 an après un AVC. Concept : Collecte initiale de données transversales multicentres avec suivi à l'aide de l'échelle ABC en Suède. Méthode : Un test de locomotion TUG (timed up-and-go), 10 mètres de marche chronométrée (10MWT) et un test de marche de 6 minutes (6MWT) ont été effectués; une évaluation à l'échelle ABC et le questionnaire Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) ont été réalisés; des données sur l'historique des chutes ont aussi été recueillies au cours d'une séance. Une semaine plus tard, l'échelle ABC a été envoyée aux participants pour une deuxième évaluation. Les coefficients de corrélation de Spearman ont été calculés, et la fiabilité a été évaluée à l'aide du coefficient de corrélation intraclasse (CCI) et du coefficient alpha de Cronbach. Résultats : Un échantillon de commodité de 67 personnes a été inclus (âge moyen: 68 ans). Le pointage moyen à l'échelle ABC est passé de 57 à la première évaluation à 43 lors de la seconde; 19 participants (28%) ont signalé des chutes au cours des trois mois précédents. Les pointages à l'échelle ABC affichaient une corrélation modérée avec le test TUG (r=0,48), le 10 MWT (r=0,52), avec le 6MWT (r=0,45) et avec le pointage sommaire de la composante physique du questionnaire SF-36 (r=0,43). La cohérence interne était élevée pour l'échelle ABC au test-retest (α=0,95–0,97). Le CCI était de 0,82 (I.C. de 95%, 0,72–0,88). Conclusions. La version suédoise de l'échelle ABC constitue un outil de mesure valable et fiable pour sonder la confiance en son équilibre chez les personnes >1 an après un AVC.

  11. Effect of balance exercise in combination with whole-body vibration on muscle activity of the stepping limb during a forward fall in older women: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Akira; Abe, Tomokazu; Yamada, Kazumasa; Ibuki, Satoko; Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of balance exercise combined with whole-body vibration (WBV) on step performance and lower limb muscle activity during simulated forward falls using the tether-release method in older women. Twenty older women were assigned to either a WBV plus balance exercise group (WBV, n=10) or a balance exercise without vibration group (standard balance exercise group [STE], n=10). WBV performed weight-bearing exercises on a WBV platform combined with other balance exercises as a home program, whereas STE performed the same exercises without WBV. The exercise volume was equal in both intervention groups (3×/week for 12 weeks×30 min/session). The EMG and kinematic data of the stepping leg from the balance recovery step were examined before and after the intervention. While both groups extended step length during forward falls after the intervention, only WBV increased step velocity. EMG analysis of the balance recovery step showed that both groups increased peak EMG of knee flexor and extensor muscles after intervention. After intervention, WBV increased peak EMG of the plantar flexors, which are used to exert the push-off forces just before the leg swing. Balance exercise in older women resulted in significant improvements in the balance recovery step after a simulated forward fall. WBV also had the additional benefit of improved step velocity, which was reflected in increased activity of the plantar flexors in the stepping leg.

  12. Balancing Family and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahnke, Sally; And Others

    The purpose of this monograph is to present a series of activities designed to teach strategies needed for effectively managing the multiple responsibilities of family and work. The guide contains 11 lesson plans dealing with balancing family and work that can be used in any home economics class, from middle school through college. The lesson…

  13. PTP1B Dephosphorylates N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive Factor and Elicits SNARE Complex Disassembly during Human Sperm Exocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Zarelli, Valeria E. P.; Ruete, Maria C.; Roggero, Carlos M.; Mayorga, Luis S.; Tomes, Claudia N.

    2009-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in proteins is a cornerstone of the signaling pathways that regulate numerous cellular responses. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled through the concerted actions of protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. The goal of the present study was to unveil the mechanisms by which protein tyrosine dephosphorylation modulates secretion. The acrosome reaction, a specialized type of regulated exocytosis undergone by sperm, is initiated by calcium and carried out by a number of players, including tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, and fusion-related proteins such as Rab3A, α-SNAP, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), SNAREs, complexin, and synaptotagmin VI. We report here that inducers were unable to elicit the acrosome reaction when permeabilized human sperm were loaded with anti-PTP1B antibodies or with the dominant-negative mutant PTP1B D181A; subsequent introduction of wild type PTP1B or NSF rescued exocytosis. Wild type PTP1B, but not PTP1B D181A, caused cis SNARE complex dissociation during the acrosome reaction through a mechanism involving NSF. Unlike its non-phosphorylated counterpart, recombinant phospho-NSF failed to dissociate SNARE complexes from rat brain membranes. These results strengthen our previous observation that NSF activity is regulated rather than constitutive during sperm exocytosis and indicate that NSF must be dephosphorylated by PTP1B to disassemble SNARE complexes. Interestingly, phospho-NSF served as a substrate for PTP1B in an in vitro assay. Our findings demonstrate that phosphorylation of NSF on tyrosine residues prevents its SNARE complex dissociation activity and establish for the first time a role for PTP1B in the modulation of the membrane fusion machinery. PMID:19208619

  14. The balance of NMDA- and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated activity in normal adult goldfish and during optic nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew L; Rodger, Jennifer; Stirling, R Victoria; Beazley, Lyn D; Dunlop, Sarah A

    2005-10-01

    Retinotectal topography is established during development and relies on the sequential recruitment of glutamate receptors within postsynaptic tectal cells. NMDA receptors underpin plastic changes at early stages when retinal ganglion cell (RGC) terminal arbors are widespread and topography is coarse; AMPA/kainate receptors mediate fast secure neurotransmission characteristic of mature circuits once topography is refined. Here, we have examined the relative contributions of these receptors to visually evoked activity in normal adult goldfish, in which retinotectal topography is constantly adjusted to compensate for the continual neurogenesis and the addition of new RGC arbors. Furthermore, we examined animals at two stages of optic nerve regeneration. In the first, RGC arbors are widespread and receptive fields large resulting in coarse topography; in the second, RGC arbors are pruned to reduce receptive fields leading to refined topography. Antagonists were applied to the tectum during multiunit recording of postsynaptic responses. Normal goldfish have low levels of NMDA receptor-mediated activity and high levels of AMPA/kainate. When coarse topography has been restored, NMDA receptor-mediated activity is increased and that of AMPA/kainate decreased. Once topography has been refined, the balance of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated activity returns to normal. The data suggest that glutamatergic neurotransmission in normal adult goldfish is dual with NMDA receptors fine-tuning topography and AMPA receptors allowing stable synaptic function. Furthermore, the normal operation of both receptors allows a response to injury in which the balance can be transiently reversed to restore topography and vision.

  15. Correlation of physical aptitude; functional capacity, corporal balance and quality of life (QoL) among elderly women submitted to a post-menopausal physical activities program.

    PubMed

    de Souza Santos, César Augusto; Dantas, Estélio Enrique Martin; Moreira, Maria Helena Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of physical activity from the "Menopause in Form" program on physical aptitude, functional capacity, corporal balance and QoL among elderly women. In addition, correlations among these variables were examined. The present work was a longitudinal study that was quasi-experimental and correlational. A total of 323 elderly women (age: 69.0±5.53 years) participated in this study. Subjects were non-institutionalized, post-menopausal individuals residing at the Elderly Care Center in Belém Municipality (Pará, Brazil) and practiced one activity (i.e., dancing or walking) over a 10-month period. The assessment protocols used were the following: the Fullerton functional fitness test battery (physical aptitude); the activities of daily living (ADL) indices (functional capacity); the Tinetti-scale (corporal balance); and the WHOQOL-OLD questionnaire (QoL). The adopted significance level was p<0.05. Results from the Wilcoxon test demonstrated significant differences for the post-test assessment of functional capacity (Δ%=5.63%; p=0.0001) and general QoL (Δ%=9.19%; p=0.001). These results suggest that the physical activities employed during the "Menopause in Form" program resulted in significant improvements in the functional capacity and QoL of post-menopausal elderly women.

  16. The Association between Post-Stroke Depression and the Activities of Daily Living/Gait Balance in Patients with First-Onset Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geun-Young; Im, Sun; Lee, Soo-Jung

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the association between post-stroke depression (PSD) and clinical outcomes, including activities of daily living (ADL) and gait balance, in patients with first-onset stroke. One hundred and eighty inpatients were recruited and followed-up for a 6-month. The depressive, cognitive, and stroke symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), the modified Rankin Scale (MRS), and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). All patients were assessed at baseline and at the end of the observation (6-month). Among 180 patients, 127 (70.6%) were diagnosed with minimal-to-mild depression (MMD) while 53 (29.4%) were diagnosed with moderate-to-severe depression (MSD). The odd ratio (OR) for poor outcome in the MSD group was approximately 3.7 relative to the MMD group. The proportion of patients with better balance classified by the BBS score at 6-month was significantly higher in the MMD group than in the MSD group (OR=1.375). Our findings demonstrate the potential relationship between PSD and rehabilitation outcomes measured by different rating scales in Korean stroke patients. Our study suggests that clinicians should carefully evaluate depressive symptoms in patients with stroke during routine clinical practice. Adequately-powered and well-controlled further studies are necessary to confirm and fully characterize this relationship. PMID:27909458

  17. Cavendish Balance Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    This is the final report for a project carried out to modify a manual commercial Cavendish Balance for automated use in cryostat. The scope of this project was to modify an off-the-shelf manually operated Cavendish Balance to allow for automated operation for periods of hours or days in cryostat. The purpose of this modification was to allow the balance to be used in the study of effects of superconducting materials on the local gravitational field strength to determine if the strength of gravitational fields can be reduced. A Cavendish Balance was chosen because it is a fairly simple piece of equipment for measuring gravity, one the least accurately known and least understood physical constants. The principle activities that occurred under this purchase order were: (1) All the components necessary to hold and automate the Cavendish Balance in a cryostat were designed. Engineering drawings were made of custom parts to be fabricated, other off-the-shelf parts were procured; (2) Software was written in LabView to control the automation process via a stepper motor controller and stepper motor, and to collect data from the balance during testing; (3)Software was written to take the data collected from the Cavendish Balance and reduce it to give a value for the gravitational constant; (4) The components of the system were assembled and fitted to a cryostat. Also the LabView hardware including the control computer, stepper motor driver, data collection boards, and necessary cabling were assembled; and (5) The system was operated for a number of periods, data collected, and reduced to give an average value for the gravitational constant.

  18. Ufd1-Npl4 Recruit Cdc48 for Disassembly of Ubiquitylated CMG Helicase at the End of Chromosome Replication.

    PubMed

    Maric, Marija; Mukherjee, Progya; Tatham, Michael H; Hay, Ronald; Labib, Karim

    2017-03-28

    Disassembly of the Cdc45-MCM-GINS (CMG) DNA helicase is the key regulated step during DNA replication termination in eukaryotes, involving ubiquitylation of the Mcm7 helicase subunit, leading to a disassembly process that requires the Cdc48 "segregase". Here, we employ a screen to identify partners of budding yeast Cdc48 that are important for disassembly of ubiquitylated CMG helicase at the end of chromosome replication. We demonstrate that the ubiquitin-binding Ufd1-Npl4 complex recruits Cdc48 to ubiquitylated CMG. Ubiquitylation of CMG in yeast cell extracts is dependent upon lysine 29 of Mcm7, which is the only detectable site of ubiquitylation both in vitro and in vivo (though in vivo other sites can be modified when K29 is mutated). Mutation of K29 abrogates in vitro recruitment of Ufd1-Npl4-Cdc48 to the CMG helicase, supporting a model whereby Ufd1-Npl4 recruits Cdc48 to ubiquitylated CMG at the end of chromosome replication, thereby driving the disassembly reaction.

  19. Chromatin remodeller Fun30Fft3 induces nucleosome disassembly to facilitate RNA polymerase II elongation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Junwoo; Shik Choi, Eun; David Seo, Hogyu; Kang, Keunsoo; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Choe, Joonho; Workman, Jerry L.; Lee, Daeyoup

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed that nucleosomes impede elongation of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Recent observations suggest a role for ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers in modulating this process, but direct in vivo evidence for this is unknown. Here using fission yeast, we identify Fun30Fft3 as a chromatin remodeller, which localizes at transcribing regions to promote RNAPII transcription. Fun30Fft3 associates with RNAPII and collaborates with the histone chaperone, FACT, which facilitates RNAPII elongation through chromatin, to induce nucleosome disassembly at transcribing regions during RNAPII transcription. Mutants, resulting in reduced nucleosome-barrier, such as deletion mutants of histones H3/H4 themselves and the genes encoding components of histone deacetylase Clr6 complex II suppress the defects in growth and RNAPII occupancy of cells lacking Fun30Fft3. These data suggest that RNAPII utilizes the chromatin remodeller, Fun30Fft3, to overcome the nucleosome barrier to transcription elongation. PMID:28218250

  20. Regulation of ceramide channel formation and disassembly: Insights on the initiation of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Ghali, Majdouline; Stiban, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipid research has surged in the past two decades and has produced a wide variety of evidence supporting the role of this class of molecules in mediating cellular growth, differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis. Ceramides are a subgroup of sphingolipids (SLs) that are directly involved in the process of initiation of apoptosis. We, and others, have recently shown that ceramides are capable of the formation of protein-permeable channels in mitochondrial outer membranes under physiological conditions. These pores are indeed good candidates for the pathway of release of pro-apoptotic proteins from the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) into the cytosol to initiate intrinsic apoptosis. Here, we review recent findings on the regulation of ceramide channel formation and disassembly, highlighting possible implications on the initiation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:26587005

  1. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10¹⁶ W/cm²) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the available experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.

  2. Microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins in the regulation of assembly, disassembly, and length of cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhangfeng; Liang, Yinwen; Meng, Dan; Wang, Liang; Pan, Junmin

    2015-01-01

    Defects in ciliary assembly, maintenance, and signaling are associated with various human diseases and developmental disorders, termed ciliopathies. Eukaryotic flagella and cilia (interchangeable terms) are microtubule-based organelles. Thus, microtubule dynamics and microtubule-dependent transport are predicted to affect the structural integrity and functionality of cilia profoundly. Kinesin-2 is well known for its role in intraflagellar transport to transport ciliary precursors and signaling molecules. Recently, microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins found in kinesin-8, -13, and -14A families have emerged as regulators of cilia. We first discuss ciliary kinesins identified in the flagellar or ciliary proteome, and then focus on the function and regulation of microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins. Lastly, we review the recent advances of microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins in controlling ciliary assembly, disassembly, and length.

  3. Neuroprotective Effects Against POCD by Photobiomodulation: Evidence from Assembly/Disassembly of the Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Liebert, Ann D.; Chow, Roberta T.; Bicknell, Brian T.; Varigos, Euahna

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a decline in memory following anaesthesia and surgery in elderly patients. While often reversible, it consumes medical resources, compromises patient well-being, and possibly accelerates progression into Alzheimer’s disease. Anesthetics have been implicated in POCD, as has neuroinflammation, as indicated by cytokine inflammatory markers. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is an effective treatment for a number of conditions, including inflammation. PBM also has a direct effect on microtubule disassembly in neurons with the formation of small, reversible varicosities, which cause neural blockade and alleviation of pain symptoms. This mimics endogenously formed varicosities that are neuroprotective against damage, toxins, and the formation of larger, destructive varicosities and focal swellings. It is proposed that PBM may be effective as a preconditioning treatment against POCD; similar to the PBM treatment, protective and abscopal effects that have been demonstrated in experimental models of macular degeneration, neurological, and cardiac conditions. PMID:26848276

  4. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10¹⁶ W/cm²) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the availablemore » experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.« less

  5. Remote disassembly of the absorber open-test assembly at the FFTF/IEM cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, E.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) interim examination and maintenance (IEM) cell is used for the remote disassembly of irradiated fuel and material experiments. The absorber open-test assembly (AOTA) is a 12-m (40-ft)-long instrumented absorber (control-rod-material) test assembly. Its primary purpose is to characterize the FFTF control-rod-material reaction rate during reactor operation. Instrumentation allowed temperature and pressure measurements at various locations in several absorber pins during reactor operation. After residing several months in the reactor, the assembly was transferred to the IEM cell by the closed-loop ex-vessel machine (CLEM) for separation of the irradiated portion of the experiment from the instrument stalk. After separation, the 3.6-m (12-ft)-long assembly was processed through the sodium removal system and shipped off-site for examination. This success allowed the timely completion of a major task on the FFTF operations schedule.

  6. QIL1 mutation causes MICOS disassembly and early onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guarani, Virginia; Jardel, Claude; Chrétien, Dominique; Lombès, Anne; Bénit, Paule; Labasse, Clémence; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Bourillon, Agnès; Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Dorboz, Imen; Gilleron, Mylène; Goetzman, Eric S; Gaignard, Pauline; Slama, Abdelhamid; Elmaleh-Bergès, Monique; Romero, Norma B; Rustin, Pierre; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Paulo, Joao A; Harper, J Wade; Schiff, Manuel

    2016-09-13

    Previously, we identified QIL1 as a subunit of mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex and demonstrated a role for QIL1 in MICOS assembly, mitochondrial respiration, and cristae formation critical for mitochondrial architecture (Guarani et al., 2015). Here, we identify QIL1 null alleles in two siblings displaying multiple clinical symptoms of early-onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease, including defects in respiratory chain function in patient muscle. QIL1 absence in patients' fibroblasts was associated with MICOS disassembly, abnormal cristae, mild cytochrome c oxidase defect, and sensitivity to glucose withdrawal. QIL1 expression rescued cristae defects, and promoted re-accumulation of MICOS subunits to facilitate MICOS assembly. MICOS assembly and cristae morphology were not efficiently rescued by over-expression of other MICOS subunits in patient fibroblasts. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence of altered MICOS assembly linked with a human mitochondrial disease and confirm a central role for QIL1 in stable MICOS complex formation.

  7. Multi-criteria decision-making for optimization of product disassembly under multiple situations.

    PubMed

    Hula, Aaron; Jalali, Kiumars; Hamza, Karim; Skerlos, Steven J; Saitou, Kazuhiro

    2003-12-01

    With growing interest in recovering materials and subassemblies within consumer products at the end of their useful life, there has been an increasing interest in developing decision-making methodologies that determine how to maximize the environmental benefits of end-of-life (EOL) processing while minimizing costs under variable EOL situations. This paper describes a methodology to analyze how product designs and situational variables impact the Pareto set of optimal EOL strategies with the greatest environmental benefit for a given economic cost or profit. Since the determination of this Pareto set via enumeration of all disassembly sequences and EOL fates is prohibitively time-consuming even for relatively simple products, multi-objective genetic algorithms (GA) are utilized to rapidly approximate the Pareto set of optimal EOL trade-offs between cost and environmentally conscious actions. Such rapid calculations of the Pareto set are critical to better understand the influence of situational variables on how disassembly and recycling decisions change under different EOL scenarios (e.g., undervariable regulatory, infrastructure, or market situations). To illustrate the methodology, a case study involving the EOL treatment of a coffee maker is described. Impacts of situational variables on trade-offs between recovered energy and cost in Aachen, Germany, and in Ann Arbor, MI, are elucidated, and a means of presenting the results in the form of a multi-situational EOL strategy graph is described. The impact of the European Union Directive regarding Waste Electric and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) on EOL trade-offs between energy recovery and cost was also considered for both locations.

  8. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY STATION DEVELOPMENT FOR THE PIT DISASSEMBLY AND CONVERSION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Dalmaso, M.; Gibbs, K.; Gregory, D.

    2011-05-22

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed prototype equipment to demonstrate remote surveying of Inner and Outer DOE Standard 3013 containers for fixed and transferable contamination in accordance with DOE Standard 3013 and 10 CFR 835 Appendix B. When fully developed the equipment will be part of a larger suite of equipment used to package material in accordance with DOE Standard 3013 at the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Project slated for installation at the Savannah River Site. The prototype system consists of a small six-axis industrial robot with an end effector consisting of a force sensor, vacuum gripper and a three fingered pneumatic gripper. The work cell also contains two alpha survey instruments, swipes, swipe dispenser, and other ancillary equipment. An external controller interfaces with the robot controller, survey instruments and other ancillary equipment to control the overall process. SRNL is developing automated equipment for the Pit Disassembly and Conversion (PDC) Project that is slated for the Savannah River Site (SRS). The equipment being developed is automated packaging equipment for packaging plutonium bearing materials in accordance with DOE-STD-3013-2004. The subject of this paper is the development of a prototype Radiological Survey Station (RSS). Other automated equipment being developed for the PDC includes the Bagless transfer System, Outer Can Welder, Gantry Robot System (GRS) and Leak Test Station. The purpose of the RSS is to perform a frisk and swipe of the DOE Standard 3013 Container (either inner can or outer can) to check for fixed and transferable contamination. This is required to verify that the contamination levels are within the limits specified in DOE-STD-3013-2004 and 10 CFR 835, Appendix D. The surface contamination limit for the 3013 Outer Can (OC) is 500 dpm/100 cm2 (total) and 20 dpm/100 cm2 (transferable). This paper will concentrate on the RSS developments for the 3013 OC but the system for the

  9. Assembly and disassembly of the Golgi complex: two processes arranged in a cis-trans direction

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the disassembly and assembly of two morphologically and functionally distinct parts of the Golgi complex, the cis/middle and trans cisterna/trans network compartments. For this purpose we have followed the redistribution of three cis/middle- (GMPc-1, GMPc-2, MG 160) and two trans- (GMPt-1 and GMPt-2) Golgi membrane proteins during and after treatment of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells with brefeldin A (BFA). BFA induced complete disassembly of the cis/middle- and trans- Golgi complex and translocation of GMPc and GMPt to the ER. Cells treated for short times (3 min) with BFA showed extensive disorganization of both cis/middle- and trans-Golgi complexes. However, complete disorganization of the trans part required much longer incubations with the drug. Upon removal of BFA the Golgi complex was reassembled by a process consisting of three steps: (a) exist of cis/middle proteins from the ER and their accumulation into vesicular structures scattered throughout the cytoplasm; (b) gradual relocation and accumulation of the trans proteins in the vesicles containing the cis/middle proteins; and (c) assembly of the cisternae, and reconstruction of the Golgi complex within an area located in the vicinity of the centrosome from which the ER was excluded. Reconstruction of the cis/middle-Golgi complex occurred under temperature conditions inhibitory of the reorganization of the trans- Golgi complex, and was dependent on microtubules. Reconstruction of the trans-Golgi complex, disrupted with nocodazole after selective fusion of the cis/middle-Golgi complex with the ER, occurred after the release of cis/middle-Golgi proteins from the ER and the assembly of the cis/middle cisternae. PMID:1730750

  10. The effects of t’ai chi on muscle activity, pain, and balance in females in their 20s with acute low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jee-Hun; Cho, Tae-Yong; Cho, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted in order to examine the effects of t’ai chi on females in their 20s with acute low back pain. The subjects were 30 females in their 20s with acute low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] They were equally and randomly divided into a t’ai chi group and a stretching group. The intervention was applied three times per week, one hour each time, for a total of eight weeks. During the one hour, the subjects conducted warm-up exercises for 10 min, primary exercises for 40 min, and cool-down exercises for 10 min. In order to examine changes in low back pain in the patients according to the intervention method, muscle activity, pain, and balance elements (left and right side movement distance, forward and backward movement distance) were measured. [Results] Muscle activity and the visual analog scale score significantly decreased in both the t’ai chi group and the stretching group. Regarding changes in balance elements, the t’ai chi group’s left and right side movement distance decreased, which was statistically significant. However, the t’ai chi group’s forward and backward movement distance and the stretching group’s forward and backward movement distance and left and right side movement distance did not change. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, t’ai chi is considered an appropriate exercise program to reduce acute low back pain in females in their 20s. This is because when compared with stretching, it enables posture maintenance with lesser force due to decreased muscle activity, it is more helpful for improvements in balance ability, and it is effective in decreasing pain. PMID:25931717

  11. Interferon-alpha regulates the dynamic balance between human activated regulatory and effector T cells: implications for antiviral and autoimmune responses.

    PubMed

    Golding, Amit; Rosen, Antony; Petri, Michelle; Akhter, Ehtisham; Andrade, Felipe

    2010-09-01

    An adequate effector response against pathogens and its subsequent inactivation after pathogen clearance are critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. This process involves an initial phase of T-cell effector (Teff) activation followed by the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs), a unique cell population that limits Teff functions. However, significant questions remain unanswered about the mechanisms that regulate the balance between these cell populations. Using an in vitro system to mimic T-cell activation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we analysed the patterns of Treg and Teff activation, with special attention to the role of type I interferon (IFN-I). Interestingly, we found that IFN-alpha, either exogenously added or endogenously induced, suppressed the generation of CD4(+) FoxP3(HI )IFN-gamma(Neg) activated Tregs (aTregs) while simultaneously promoting propagation of CD4(+) FoxP3(Low/Neg )IFN-gamma(Pos) activated Teffs (aTeffs). We also showed that IFN-alpha-mediated inhibition of interleukin (IL)-2 production may play an essential role in IFN-alpha-induced suppression of aTregs. In order to test our findings in a disease state with chronically elevated IFN-alpha, we investigated systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Plasma from patients with SLE was found to contain IFN-I activity that suppressed aTreg generation. Furthermore, anti-CD3 activated SLE PBMCs exhibited preferential expansion of aTeffs with a very limited increase in aTreg numbers. Together, these observations support a model whereby a transient production of IFN-alpha (such as is seen in an early antiviral response) may promote CD4 effector functions by delaying aTreg generation, but a chronic elevation of IFN-alpha may tip the aTeff:aTreg balance towards aTeffs and autoimmunity.

  12. PHYSICAL EFFECTS OCCURRING DURING GENERATION AND AMPLIFICATION OF LASER RADIATION: Discharge energy balance in the nitrogen-containing active medium of an electron-beam-controlled CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinina, V. I.; Koterov, V. N.; Pyatakhin, Mikhail V.; Urin, B. M.

    1989-02-01

    Numerical methods were used to investigate theoretically the dynamics of the energy balance of a discharge in a CO-N2 mixture, taking into account the mutual influence of the distributions of the electron energy and of the populations of the molecules over the vibrational levels. It was shown that this influence plays a decisive part in substantially redistributing the pump energy between the vibrational levels of the CO and N2 molecules in favor of the N2 molecules. A stabilizing action of the nitrogen on the thermal regime of the CO laser-active medium was discovered and the range of optimal CO:N2 ratios was determined.

  13. Shaft balancing

    DOEpatents

    Irwin, John A.

    1979-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has an internal drive shaft including one end connected to a driven load and an opposite end connected to a turbine wheel and wherein the shaft has an in situ adjustable balance system near the critical center of a bearing span for the shaft including two 360.degree. rings piloted on the outer diameter of the shaft at a point accessible through an internal engine panel; each of the rings has a small amount of material removed from its periphery whereby both of the rings are precisely unbalanced an equivalent amount; the rings are locked circumferentially together by radial serrations thereon; numbered tangs on the outside diameter of each ring identify the circumferential location of unbalance once the rings are locked together; an aft ring of the pair of rings has a spline on its inside diameter that mates with a like spline on the shaft to lock the entire assembly together.

  14. Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-09-30

    This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or “clean,” building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, “Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201”) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room

  15. Wearable Sensor-Based In-Home Assessment of Gait, Balance, and Physical Activity for Discrimination of Frailty Status: Baseline Results of the Arizona Frailty Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwenk, Michael; Mohler, Jane; Wendel, Christopher; D’Huyvetter, Karen; Fain, Mindy; Taylor-Piliae, Ruth; Najafi, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Frailty is a geriatric syndrome resulting from age-related cumulative decline across multiple physiologic systems, impaired homeostatic reserve, and reduced capacity to resist stress. Based on recent estimates, 10% of community-dwelling older persons are frail and another 41.6% are pre-frail. Frail elders account for the highest healthcare costs in industrialized nations. Impaired physical function is a major indicator of frailty and functional performance tests are useful for identification of frailty. Objective instrumented assessments of physical functioning that are feasible for home frailty screening have not been adequately developed. OBJECTIVE To examine the ability of wearable, sensor-based, in-home assessment of gait, balance, and physical activity (PA) to discriminate between frailty levels (non-frail, pre-frail, frail). METHODS In an observational cross-sectional study; in-home visits were completed in 125 older adults (non-frail n=44, pre-frail n=60, frail n=21) in Tucson, Arizona between September, 2012 and November, 2013. Temporal-spatial gait parameters (speed, stride length, stride time, double support, variability of stride velocity), postural balance (sway of hip, ankle, center of mass), and PA (percentage of walking, standing, sitting, lying; mean duration and variability of single walking, standing, sitting, and lying bouts) were measured in the participant’s home using validated wearable sensor-technology. Logistic regression was used to identify the most sensitive gait, balance, and PA variables for identifying pre-frail participants (vs. non-frail). Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify variables sensitive to discriminate three frailty levels. RESULTS Gait speed (area under the curve, AUC= .802), hip sway (AUC= .734), and steps/day (AUC= .736) were the most sensitive parameters for identification of pre-frailty. Multinomial regression revealed that stride length (AUC= .857) and double support (AUC= .841) were most

  16. Dynamic actin cycling through mitochondrial subpopulations locally regulates the fission–fusion balance within mitochondrial networks

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Andrew S.; Wong, Yvette C.; Simpson, Cory L.; Holzbaur, Erika L. F.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria form interconnected networks that dynamically remodel in response to cellular needs. Using live-cell imaging, we investigate the role of the actin cytoskeleton in regulating mitochondrial fission and fusion. We identify cycling of actin filaments onto and off of subsets of cellular mitochondria. The association of actin filaments with mitochondrial subpopulations is transient; actin quickly disassembles, then reassembles around a distinct subpopulation, efficiently cycling through all cellular mitochondria within 14 min. The focal assembly of actin induces local, Drp1-dependent fragmentation of the mitochondrial network. On actin disassembly, fragmented mitochondria undergo rapid fusion, leading to regional recovery of the tubular mitochondrial network. Cycling requires dynamic actin polymerization and is blocked by inhibitors of both Arp2/3 and formins. We propose that cyclic assembly of actin onto mitochondria modulates the fission/fusion balance, promotes network remodelling and content mixing, and thus may serve as an essential mechanism regulating mitochondrial network homeostasis. PMID:27686185

  17. Sport-specific balance.

    PubMed

    Zemková, Erika

    2014-05-01

    This review includes the latest findings based on experimental studies addressing sport-specific balance, an area of research that has grown dramatically in recent years. The main objectives of this work were to investigate the postural sway response to different forms of exercise under laboratory and sport-specific conditions, to examine how this effect can vary with expertise, and to provide examples of the association of impaired balance with sport performance and/or increasing risk of injury. In doing so, sports where body balance is one of the limiting factors of performance were analyzed. While there are no significant differences in postural stability between athletes of different specializations and physically active individuals during standing in a standard upright position (e.g., bipedal stance), they have a better ability to maintain balance in specific conditions (e.g., while standing on a narrow area of support). Differences in magnitude of balance impairment after specific exercises (rebound jumps, repeated rotations, etc.) and mainly in speed of its readjustment to baseline are also observed. Besides some evidence on an association of greater postural sway with the increasing risk of injuries, there are many myths related to the negative influence of impaired balance on sport performance. Though this may be true for shooting or archery, findings have shown that in many other sports, highly skilled athletes are able to perform successfully in spite of increased postural sway. These findings may contribute to better understanding of the postural control system under various performance requirements. It may provide useful knowledge for designing training programs for specific sports.

  18. WWTP design in warm climates - guideline comparison and parameter adaptation for a full-scale activated sludge plant using mass balancing.

    PubMed

    Walder, C; Lindtner, S; Proesl, A; Klegraf, F; Weissenbacher, N

    2013-01-01

    The ATV-A-131 guideline and the design approach published in 'Wastewater Engineering, Treatment and Reuse (WE)' are widely used for the design of activated sludge plants. They are both based on simplified steady-state assumptions tailored to the boundary conditions of temperate climates. Using design guidelines beyond the designated temperature range may lead to inappropriate results. The objectives of this paper are (1) to summarise temperature relevant differences between ATV-A-131 and WE; (2) to show the related design components; and (3) to demonstrate a procedure for design parameter adaptation for a full-scale activated sludge plant located in a warm climate region. To gain steady-state data required for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) design according to ATV-A-131 and WE, full-scale plant data were acquired for a period of 6 months as a basis for analyses and adaptation. Mass balances were calculated for the verification of the measurements and for analysing excess sludge production. The two approaches showed relevant temperature related differences. WE default application resulted in lower deviation in the mass balance results for excess sludge production. However, with the adaptation of the heterotrophic decay rates for both approaches and the inert organic and mineral solids fraction additionally for ATV-A-131, a good fit to the observed excess sludge production could be achieved.

  19. Food reward without a timing component does not alter the timing of activity under positive energy balance.

    PubMed

    van der Vinne, V; Akkerman, J; Lanting, G D; Riede, S J; Hut, R A

    2015-09-24

    Circadian clocks drive daily rhythms in physiology and behavior which allow organisms to anticipate predictable daily changes in the environment. In most mammals, circadian rhythms result in nocturnal activity patterns although plasticity of the circadian system allows activity patterns to shift to different times of day. Such plasticity is seen when food access is restricted to a few hours during the resting (light) phase resulting in food anticipatory activity (FAA) in the hours preceding food availability. The mechanisms underlying FAA are unknown but data suggest the involvement of the reward system and homeostatic regulation of metabolism. We previously demonstrated the isolated effect of metabolism by inducing diurnality in response to energetic challenges. Here the importance of reward timing in inducing daytime activity is assessed. The daily activity distribution of mice earning palatable chocolate at their preferred time by working in a running wheel was compared with that of mice receiving a timed palatable meal at noon. Mice working for chocolate (WFC) without being energetically challenged increased their total daily activity but this did not result in a shift to diurnality. Providing a chocolate meal at noon each day increased daytime activity, identifying food timing as a factor capable of altering the daily distribution of activity and rest. These results show that timing of food reward and energetic challenges are both independently sufficient to induce diurnality in nocturnal mammals. FAA observed following timed food restriction is likely the result of an additive effect of distinct regulatory pathways activated by energetic challenges and food reward.

  20. A novel quantitative model of cell cycle progression based on cyclin-dependent kinases activity and population balances.

    PubMed

    Pisu, Massimo; Concas, Alessandro; Cao, Giacomo

    2015-04-01

    Cell cycle regulates proliferative cell capacity under normal or pathologic conditions, and in general it governs all in vivo/in vitro cell growth and proliferation processes. Mathematical simulation by means of reliable and predictive models represents an important tool to interpret experiment results, to facilitate the definition of the optimal operating conditions for in vitro cultivation, or to predict the effect of a specific drug in normal/pathologic mammalian cells. Along these lines, a novel model of cell cycle progression is proposed in this work. Specifically, it is based on a population balance (PB) approach that allows one to quantitatively describe cell cycle progression through the different phases experienced by each cell of the entire population during its own life. The transition between two consecutive cell cycle phases is simulated by taking advantage of the biochemical kinetic model developed by Gérard and Goldbeter (2009) which involves cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) whose regulation is achieved through a variety of mechanisms that include association with cyclins and protein inhibitors, phosphorylation-dephosphorylation, and cyclin synthesis or degradation. This biochemical model properly describes the entire cell cycle of mammalian cells by maintaining a sufficient level of detail useful to identify check point for transition and to estimate phase duration required by PB. Specific examples are discussed to illustrate the ability of the proposed model to simulate the effect of drugs for in vitro trials of interest in oncology, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  1. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis Cataracts Fainting (Syncope) Falls Prevention Hearing Loss Macular Degeneration Physical Activity Related News Older Adults’ Use of Mobility Devices is on the Rise Thursday, May 7, ...

  2. A Balanced Scorecard-Based Model for Evaluating E-Learning and Conventional Pedagogical Activities in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovelja, Tomaž; Vavpotic, Damjan; Žvanut, Boštjan

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of e-learning and conventional pedagogical activities in nursing programmes has focused either on a single pedagogical activity or the entire curriculum, and only on students' or teachers' perspective. The goal of this study was to design and test a novel approach for evaluation of e-learning and conventional pedagogical activities…

  3. 46 CFR 232.4 - Balance sheet accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Balance sheet accounts. 232.4 Section 232.4 Shipping... ACTIVITIES UNIFORM FINANCIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Balance Sheet § 232.4 Balance sheet accounts. (a.... (b) Purpose of balance sheet accounts. The balance sheet accounts are intended to disclose...

  4. 46 CFR 232.4 - Balance sheet accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Balance sheet accounts. 232.4 Section 232.4 Shipping... ACTIVITIES UNIFORM FINANCIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Balance Sheet § 232.4 Balance sheet accounts. (a.... (b) Purpose of balance sheet accounts. The balance sheet accounts are intended to disclose...

  5. 46 CFR 232.4 - Balance sheet accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Balance sheet accounts. 232.4 Section 232.4 Shipping... ACTIVITIES UNIFORM FINANCIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Balance Sheet § 232.4 Balance sheet accounts. (a.... (b) Purpose of balance sheet accounts. The balance sheet accounts are intended to disclose...

  6. 30 CFR 817.57 - Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in perennial or intermittent streams only where those activities would not cause or contribute to the... and provisions have been made for sound future maintenance by the permittee or the landowner...

  7. Adaptations of Prefrontal Brain Activity, Executive Functions, and Gait in Healthy Elderly Following Exergame and Balance Training: A Randomized-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Schättin, Alexandra; Arner, Rendel; Gennaro, Federico; de Bruin, Eling D.

    2016-01-01

    During aging, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) undergoes age-dependent neuronal changes influencing cognitive and motor functions. Motor-learning interventions are hypothesized to ameliorate motor and cognitive deficits in older adults. Especially, video game-based physical exercise might have the potential to train motor in combination with cognitive abilities in older adults. The aim of this study was to compare conventional balance training with video game-based physical exercise, a so-called exergame, on the relative power (RP) of electroencephalographic (EEG) frequencies over the PFC, executive function (EF), and gait performance. Twenty-seven participants (mean age 79.2 ± 7.3 years) were randomly assigned to one of two groups. All participants completed 24 trainings including three times a 30 min session/week. The EEG measurements showed that theta RP significantly decreased in favor of the exergame group [L(14) = 6.23, p = 0.007]. Comparing pre- vs. post-test, EFs improved both within the exergame (working memory: z = −2.28, p = 0.021; divided attention auditory: z = −2.51, p = 0.009; divided attention visual: z = −2.06, p = 0.040; go/no-go: z = −2.55, p = 0.008; set-shifting: z = −2.90, p = 0.002) and within the balance group (set-shifting: z = −2.04, p = 0.042). Moreover, spatio-temporal gait parameters primarily improved within the exergame group under dual-task conditions (speed normal walking: z = −2.90, p = 0.002; speed fast walking: z = −2.97, p = 0.001; cadence normal walking: z = −2.97, p = 0.001; stride length fast walking: z = −2.69, p = 0.005) and within the balance group under single-task conditions (speed normal walking: z = −2.54, p = 0.009; speed fast walking: z = −1.98, p = 0.049; cadence normal walking: z = −2.79, p = 0.003). These results indicate that exergame training as well as balance training positively influence prefrontal cortex activity and/or function in varying proportion. PMID:27932975

  8. IL-36γ signaling controls the induced regulatory T cell-Th9 cell balance via NFκB activation and STAT transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Harusato, A; Abo, H; Ngo, V L; Yi, S W; Mitsutake, K; Osuka, S; Kohlmeier, J E; Li, J D; Gewirtz, A T; Nusrat, A; Denning, T L

    2017-03-22

    Regulatory and effector T helper (Th) cells are abundant at mucosal surfaces, especially in the intestine, where they control the critical balance between tolerance and inflammation. However, the key factors that reciprocally dictate differentiation along these specific lineages remain incompletely understood. Here we report that the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family member IL-36γ signals through IL-36 receptor, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, and nuclear factor-κBp50 in CD4(+) T cells to potently inhibit Foxp3-expressing induced regulatory T cell (Treg) development, while concomitantly promoting the differentiation of Th9 cells via a IL-2-STAT5- (signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 5) and IL-4-STAT6-dependent pathway. Consistent with these findings, mice deficient in IL-36γ were protected from Th cell-driven intestinal inflammation and exhibited increased colonic Treg cells and diminished Th9 cells. Our findings thus reveal a fundamental contribution for the IL-36/IL-36R axis in regulating the Treg-Th9 cell balance with broad implications for Th cell-mediated disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and particularly ulcerative colitis.Mucosal Immunology (2017) 0, 000-000. doi:10.1038/mi.2017.21.

  9. Effect of thermal pretreatment on the biogas production and microbial communities balance during anaerobic digestion of urban and industrial waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ennouri, Hajer; Miladi, Baligh; Diaz, Soraya Zahedi; Güelfo, Luis Alberto Fernández; Solera, Rosario; Hamdi, Moktar; Bouallagui, Hassib

    2016-08-01

    The effect of thermal pre-treatment on the microbial populations balance and biogas production was studied during anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) coming from urban (US: urban sludge) and industrial (IS: industrial sludge) wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). The highest biogas yields of 0.42l/gvolatile solid (VS) removed and 0.37l/gVS removed were obtained with urban and industrial sludge pre-treated at 120°C, respectively. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to quantify the major Bacteria and Archaea groups. Compared to control trails without pretreatment, Archaea content increased from 34% to 86% and from 46% to 83% for pretreated IS and US, respectively. In fact, the thermal pre-treatment of WAS enhanced the growth of hydrogen-using methanogens (HUMs), which consume rapidly the H2 generated to allow the acetogenesis. Therefore, the stable and better performance of digesters was observed involving the balance and syntrophic associations between the different microbial populations.

  10. Evaluation on simultaneous removal of particles and off-flavors using population balance for application of powdered activated carbon in dissolved air flotation process.

    PubMed

    Kwak, D H; Yoo, S J; Lee, E J; Lee, J W

    2010-01-01

    Most of the water treatment plants applying the DAF process are faced with off-flavors control problems. For simultaneous control of particles of impurities and dissolved organics that cause pungent taste and odor in water, an effective method would be the simple application of powdered activated carbon (PAC) in the DAF process. A series of experiments were carried out to explore the feasibility for simultaneous removal of kaolin particles and organic compounds that produce off-flavors (2-MIB and geosmin). In addition, the flotation efficiency of kaolin and PAC particles adsorbing organics in the DAF process was evaluated by employing the population balance theory. The removal efficiency of 2-MIB and geosmin under the treatment condition with kaolin particles for simultaneous treatment was lower than that of the individual treatment. The decrease in the removal efficiency was probably caused by 2-MIB and geosmin remaining in the PAC particle in the treated water of DAF after bubble flotation. Simulation results obtained by the population balance model indicate, that the initial collision-attachment efficiency of PAC particles was lower than that of kaolin particles.

  11. Web-enabled feedback control over energy balance promotes an increase in physical activity and a reduction of body weight and disease risk in overweight sedentary adults.

    PubMed

    Kraushaar, Lutz Erwin; Krämer, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to investigate whether a Web-based tool will facilitate the adoption of feedback control over calorie balance in overweight individuals, thereby promoting an increase of physical activity and a reduction of body weight and cardiovascular risk factors. This is a prospective exercise intervention study, commencing with a minimum weekly 3 × 20-min requirement of high-intensity interval training and requirement for Web-based self-monitoring and self-reporting of exercise and body weight. Subjects of this study include 83 overweight, sedentary, otherwise healthy adults aged 26-68 years. Anthropometric parameters, body fat, peak oxygen consumption, self-reported physical activity, frequency of use of the Web-based tool are among the characters measured in this study. This 24-week intervention substantially increased time spent for exercise (mean and median of 135 and 170 min/week, respectively) among the 72 % of participants who had adopted cognitive feedback control vs. no increase in the remaining participants of nonadopters. Adopters witnessed significantly improved peak oxygen consumption of >1 metabolic equivalent vs. no improvement among nonadopters. Adopters also reduced body mass index, body weight, and body fat by 1.6 kg/m(2), 4.8 kg, and 3.6 kg, respectively vs. 0.4 kg/m(2), 1.4 kg, and 1.1 kg in the control group. The increase in physical activity came at virtually no intervention effort of the investigators. This study demonstrates for the first time that adoption of cognitive feedback control over energy balance is possible with the help of a simple Web-based tool and that overweight adopters self-regulate exercise volume to significantly reduce body weight and improve biomarkers of fitness and cardiovascular risk.

  12. Formation and Assembly-Disassembly Processes of ZnO Hexagonal Pyramids Driven by Dipolar and Excluded Volume Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ming; Sun, Kai; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2010-01-20

    ZnO hexagonal pyramids were obtained in hydrophilic media without any traditional stabilizers (capping agents). The absence of a thick organic shell reducing the anisotropy of nanoparticle (NP) interactions, oxide nature of the materials, and new geometry of the nanocrystals makes possible the observation of new self-organization phenomena. Several new features not present in the previous cases of NP self-organization were identified and discussed. The formation of ZnO pyramids involved recrystallization of larger amorphous NPs followed by the multistage disassembly of intermediate aggregates into individual virtually perfectly shaped nanocrystals. The evolution of NPs begins with crystallization of clustered plates within the original amorphous spherical colloids, and then agglomerated truncated pyramids are formed. These agglomerates further transform into chained pyramids, which eventually separate from each other. The crystallization and disassembly processes can be associated with the decrease of potential and anisotropy of the attractive force field around the crystallites represented in part by dipole moments. The reassembly of the pyramids can still be attained via engaging excluded volume interaction after adding similarly charged polymer. Overall, in this system, we see the first examples of (1) coupled crystallization and disassembly process; (2) induced assembly of nanoscale particles using excluded volume interactions, which were previously used only for aggregation of microscale colloids; and (3) nanoparticle assemblies with variable and experimentally verifiable relative orientation of dipoles including head-to-tail, tail-to-tail pairs, and antiparallel chains. Described assemblies of ZnO pyramids with collective behavior of individual building blocks as well as distinct and experimentally controlled stages of assembly and disassembly present a fundamentally interesting nanoparticle system with rich dynamic behavior.

  13. Formation and assembly-disassembly processes of ZnO hexagonal pyramids driven by dipolar and excluded volume interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Sun, Kai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2010-02-17

    ZnO hexagonal pyramids were obtained in hydrophilic media without any traditional stabilizers (capping agents). The absence of a thick organic shell reducing the anisotropy of nanoparticle (NP) interactions, oxide nature of the materials, and new geometry of the nanocrystals makes possible the observation of new self-organization phenomena. Several new features not present in the previous cases of NP self-organization were identified and discussed. The formation of ZnO pyramids involved recrystallization of larger amorphous NPs followed by the multistage disassembly of intermediate aggregates into individual virtually perfectly shaped nanocrystals. The evolution of NPs begins with crystallization of clustered plates within the original amorphous spherical colloids, and then agglomerated truncated pyramids are formed. These agglomerates further transform into chained pyramids, which eventually separate from each other. The crystallization and disassembly processes can be associated with the decrease of potential and anisotropy of the attractive force field around the crystallites represented in part by dipole moments. The reassembly of the pyramids can still be attained via engaging excluded volume interaction after adding similarly charged polymer. Overall, in this system, we see the first examples of (1) coupled crystallization and disassembly process; (2) induced assembly of nanoscale particles using excluded volume interactions, which were previously used only for aggregation of microscale colloids; and (3) nanoparticle assemblies with variable and experimentally verifiable relative orientation of dipoles including head-to-tail, tail-to-tail pairs, and antiparallel chains. Described assemblies of ZnO pyramids with collective behavior of individual building blocks as well as distinct and experimentally controlled stages of assembly and disassembly present a fundamentally interesting nanoparticle system with rich dynamic behavior.

  14. Disassembly of actin structures by nanosecond pulsed electric field is a downstream effect of cell swelling.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N; Semenov, Iurii; Kuipers, Marjorie A; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-12-01

    Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton structures was reported as one of the characteristic effects of nanosecond-duration pulsed electric field (nsPEF) in both mammalian and plant cells. We utilized CHO cells that expressed the monomeric fluorescent protein (mApple) tagged to actin to test if nsPEF modifies the cell actin directly or as a consequence of cell membrane permeabilization. A train of four 600-ns pulses at 19.2 kV/cm (2 Hz) caused immediate cell membrane poration manifested by YO-PRO-1 dye uptake, gradual cell rounding and swelling. Concurrently, bright actin features were replaced by dimmer and uniform fluorescence of diffuse actin. To block the nsPEF-induced swelling, the bath buffer was isoosmotically supplemented with an electropore-impermeable solute (sucrose). A similar addition of a smaller, electropore-permeable solute (adonitol) served as a control. We demonstrated that sucrose efficiently blocked disassembly of actin features by nsPEF, whereas adonitol did not. Sucrose also attenuated bleaching of mApple-tagged actin in nsPEF-treated cells (as integrated over the cell volume), although did not fully prevent it. We conclude that disintegration of the actin cytoskeleton was a result of cell swelling, which, in turn, was caused by cell permeabilization by nsPEF and transmembrane diffusion of solutes which led to the osmotic imbalance.

  15. Role of a reducing environment in disassembly of the herpesvirus tegument

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, William W.; Jones, Lisa M.; Dee, Alexander; Chaudhry, Farid; Brown, Jay C.

    2012-09-15

    Initiation of infection by herpes family viruses involves a step in which most of the virus tegument becomes detached from the capsid. Detachment takes place in the host cell cytosol near the virus entry site and it is followed by dispersal of tegument proteins and disappearance of the tegument as a distinct entity. Here we describe the results of experiments designed to test the idea that the reducing environment of the cytosol may contribute to tegument detachment and disassembly. Non-ionic detergent was used to remove the membrane of purified herpes simplex virus under control and reducing conditions. The effects on the tegument were then examined by SDS-PAGE and electron microscopy. Protein analysis demonstrated that most major tegument proteins were removed under both oxidizing and reducing conditions except for UL49 which required a reducing environment. It is proposed therefore that the reducing conditions in the cytosol are involved in removal of UL49 protein. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that capsids produced under oxidizing conditions contained a coating of protein that was absent in reduced virions and which correlated uniquely with the presence of UL49. This capsid-associated layer is suggested to be the location of UL49 in the extracted virion.

  16. QIL1 mutation causes MICOS disassembly and early onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Guarani, Virginia; Jardel, Claude; Chrétien, Dominique; Lombès, Anne; Bénit, Paule; Labasse, Clémence; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Bourillon, Agnès; Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Dorboz, Imen; Gilleron, Mylène; Goetzman, Eric S; Gaignard, Pauline; Slama, Abdelhamid; Elmaleh-Bergès, Monique; Romero, Norma B; Rustin, Pierre; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Paulo, Joao A; Harper, J Wade; Schiff, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we identified QIL1 as a subunit of mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex and demonstrated a role for QIL1 in MICOS assembly, mitochondrial respiration, and cristae formation critical for mitochondrial architecture (Guarani et al., 2015). Here, we identify QIL1 null alleles in two siblings displaying multiple clinical symptoms of early-onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease, including defects in respiratory chain function in patient muscle. QIL1 absence in patients’ fibroblasts was associated with MICOS disassembly, abnormal cristae, mild cytochrome c oxidase defect, and sensitivity to glucose withdrawal. QIL1 expression rescued cristae defects, and promoted re-accumulation of MICOS subunits to facilitate MICOS assembly. MICOS assembly and cristae morphology were not efficiently rescued by over-expression of other MICOS subunits in patient fibroblasts. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence of altered MICOS assembly linked with a human mitochondrial disease and confirm a central role for QIL1 in stable MICOS complex formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17163.001 PMID:27623147

  17. Myosin flares and actin leptomeres as myofibril assembly/disassembly intermediates in sonic muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Nahirney, Patrick C; Fischman, Donald A; Wang, Kuan

    2006-04-01

    The sonic muscle of type 1 male midshipman fish produces loud and enduring mating calls. Each sonic muscle fiber contains a tubular contractile apparatus with radially arranged myofibrillar plates encased in a desmin-rich cytoskeleton that is anchored to broad Z bands (approximately 1.2 micro m wide). Immunomicroscopy has revealed patches of myosin-rich "flares" emanating from the contractile tubes into the peripheral sarcoplasm along the length of the fibers. These flares contain swirls of thick filaments devoid of associated thin filaments. In other regions of the sarcoplasm at the inner surface of the sarcolemma and near Z bands, abundant ladder-like leptomeres occur with rungs every 160 nm. Leptomeres consist of dense arrays of filaments (approximately 4 nm) with a structure that resembles myofibrillar Z band structure. We propose that flares and leptomeres are distinct filamentous arrays representing site-specific processing of myofibrillar components during the assembly and disassembly of the sarcomere. Recent reports that myosin assembles into filamentous aggregates before incorporating into the A band in the skeletal muscles of vertebrates and Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that sonic fibers utilize a similar pathway. Thus, sonic muscle fibers, with their tubular design and abundant sarcoplasmic space, may provide an attractive muscle model to identify myofibrillar intermediates by structural and molecular techniques.

  18. Variations in Spontaneous Assembly and Disassembly of Molecules on Unmodified Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ng Zhang; Anniebell, Stanley; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Chen, Yeng

    2016-09-01

    Electrostatic attraction, covalent binding, and hydrophobic absorption are spontaneous processes to assemble and disassemble the molecules of gold nanoparticles (GNP). This dynamic change can be performed in the presence of ions, such as NaCl or charged molecules. Current research encompasses the GNP in mediating non-biofouling and investigating the molecular attachment and detachment. Experiments were performed with different sizes of GNP and polymers. As a proof of concept, poly(ethylene glycol)- b-poly(acrylic acid), called PEG-PAAc, attachment and binding events between factor IX and factor IX-bp from snake venom were demonstrated, and the variations with these molecular attachment on GNP were shown. Optimal concentration of NaCl for GNP aggregation was 250 mM, and the optimal size of GNP used was 30 nm. The polymer PEG-PAAc (1 mg/ml) has a strong affinity to the GNP as indicated by the dispersed GNP. The concentration of 5800 nM of factor IX was proved to be optimal for dispersion of GNP, and at least 100 nM of factor IX-bp was needed to remove factor IX from the surface of GNP. This study delineates the usage of unmodified GNP for molecular analysis and downstream applications.

  19. Interface-induced disassembly of a self-assembled two-component nanoparticle system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Duc, Le T; Ali, Affira; Liang, Beverly; Liang, Jenn-Tai; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2013-03-19

    We present a study of static and dynamic interfacial properties of self-assembled polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles (size 110-120 nm) containing entrapped surfactant molecules at a fluid/fluid interface. Surface tension vs time measurements of an aqueous solution of these polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles (PCNs) show a concentration-dependent biphasic adsorption to the air/water interface while interfacial microrheology data show a concentration-dependent initial increase in the surface viscosity (up to 10(-7) N·m/s), followed by a sharp decrease (10(-9) N·m/s). Direct visualization of the air/water interface shows disappearance of particles from the interface over time. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the PCNs at fluid/fluid interfaces exist in two states: initial accumulation of PCNs at the air/water interface as nanoparticles, followed by interface induced disassembly of the accumulated PCNs into their components. The lack of change in particle size, charge, and viscosity of the bulk aqueous solution of PCNs with time indicates that this disintegration of the self-assembled PCNs is an interfacial phenomenon. Changes in energy encountered by the PCNs at the interface lead to instability of the self-assembled system and dissociation into its components. Such systems can be used for applications requiring directed delivery and triggered release of entrapped surfactants or macromolecules at fluid/fluid interfaces.

  20. The acetylation of alpha-tubulin and its relationship to the assembly and disassembly of microtubules

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    A tight association between Chlamydomonas alpha-tubulin acetyltransferase (TAT) and flagellar axonemes, and the cytoplasmic localization of both tubulin deacetylase (TDA) and an inhibitor of tubulin acetylation have been demonstrated by the use of calf brain tubulin as substrate for these enzymes. A major axonemal TAT of 130 kD has been solubilized by high salt treatment, purified, and characterized. Using the Chlamydomonas TAT with brain tubulin as substrate, we have studied the effects of acetylation on the assembly and disassembly of microtubules in vitro. We also determined the relative rates of acetylation of tubulin dimers and polymers. The acetylation does not significantly affect the temperature-dependent polymerization or depolymerization of tubulin in vitro. Furthermore, polymerization of tubulin is not a prerequisite for the acetylation, although the polymer is a better substrate for TAT than the dimer. The acetylation is sensitive to calcium ions which completely inhibit the acetylation of both dimers and polymers of tubulin. Acetylation of the dimer is not inhibited by colchicine; the effect of colchicine on acetylation of the polymer can be explained by its depolymerizing effect on the polymer. PMID:3733880

  1. Modulation of p-eIF2α cellular levels and stress granule assembly/disassembly by trehalose

    PubMed Central

    Dimasi, Pasquale; Quintiero, Annamaria; Shelkovnikova, Tatyana A.; Buchman, Vladimir L.

    2017-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are an important component of cellular stress response. Compromised assembly of SGs as well as their premature or delayed disassembly affect physiology and survival of cells under stress or during recovery from stress. Consequently, abnormal turnover of SGs has been implicated in the development of various pathologies, including neurodegeneration. We found that pretreatment of cells with a natural disaccharide trehalose, a known autophagy enhancer, delays SG assembly and facilitates their premature post-stress disassembly. Mechanistically, the effect of trehalose on SGs is mediated via the p-eIF2α rather than autophagosome pathway. Trehalose increases pre-stress levels of p-eIF2α and its phosphatase subunits and promotes post-stress translational recovery. Upon prolonged treatment, trehalose impairs basal translation affecting production of transiently expressed proteins. Early translational recovery and SG disassembly induced by trehalose pretreatment can sensitise cells to stress and impair survival. Our study has important implications for the use of trehalose in studies of autophagic clearance of misfolded proteins and for targeting SGs as a possible therapeutic approach in neurodegenerative and other diseases. PMID:28276506

  2. Activated microglia provide a neuroprotective role by balancing glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor and tumor necrosis factor-α secretion after subacute cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Yang, Zhitang; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Yuanzheng; Chen, Yibing

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are the major immune cells in the central nervous system and play a key role in brain injury pathology. However, the role of activated microglia after subacute cerebral ischemia (SCI) remains unknown. To address this issue, we established a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) rat model and treated pMCAO rats with N-(6-oxo-5,6-dihydro-phenanthridin-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylacetamide (PJ34) (an inhibitor of microglial activation), or with vehicle alone. Finally, we determined the differences between the PJ34-and vehicle-treated rats with respect to neurological deficits, infarct volume, neuronal loss and the expression of CD11b (a marker of microglial activation), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) at 1, 3 and 7 days after treatment. We found that the PJ34-treated rats had more severe neurological deficits and a larger infarct volume and exhibited a decreased CD11b expression, more neuronal loss, decreased expression of GDNF mRNA and protein but increased expression of TNF-α mRNA and protein compared with the vehicle-treated rats at 3 and 7 days after treatment. These results indicate that activated microglia provide a neuroprotective role through balancing GDNF and TNF-α expression following SCI.

  3. Prefrontal cortex activated bilaterally by a tilt board balance task: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study in a semi-immersive virtual reality environment.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Marco; Bisconti, Silvia; Spezialetti, Matteo; Basso Moro, Sara; Di Palo, Caterina; Placidi, Giuseppe; Quaresima, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prefrontal cortex (PFC) oxygenation response to a 5-min incremental tilt board balance task (ITBBT) in a semi-immersive virtual reality (VR) environment driven by a depth-sensing camera. It was hypothesized that the PFC would be bilaterally activated in response to the increase of the ITBBT difficulty, given the PFC involvement in the allocation of the attentional resources to maintain postural control. Twenty-two healthy male subjects were asked to use medial-lateral postural sways to maintain their equilibrium on a virtual tilt board (VTB) balancing over a pivot. When the subject was unable to maintain the VTB angle within ± 35° the VTB became red (error). An eight-channel fNIRS system was employed for measuring changes in PFC oxygenated-deoxygenated hemoglobin (O2Hb-HHb, respectively). Results revealed that the number of the performed board sways and errors augmented with the increasing of the ITBBT difficulty. A PFC activation was observed with a tendency to plateau for both O2Hb-HHb changes within the last 2 min of the task. A significant main effect of the level of difficulty was found in O2Hb and HHb (p < 0.001). The study has demonstrated that the oxygenation increased over the PFC while the subject was performing an ITBBT in a semi-immersive VR environment. This increase was modulated by the task difficulty, suggesting that the PFC is bilaterally involved in attention-demanding tasks. This task could be considered useful for diagnostic testing and functional neurorehabilitation given its adaptability in elderly and in patients with movement disorders.

  4. An integrative review of Tai Chi research: an alternative form of physical activity to improve balance and prevent falls in older adults.

    PubMed

    Wooton, Angela Conrad

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this integrative review is to analyze the current research literature on Tai Chi (TC) and its potential effect on balance and prevention of falls in older adults. The evidence for improving balance is somewhat conflicting because few research studies identify which balance exercises are effective. The question of how TC achieves improvements in balance remains. To promote functional independence and improve quality of life in the later years of one's life, it is important to improve balance and prevent falls in older adults. TC poses challenges related to the complexity of the practice. By reviewing the current research literature on TC focusing on balance and falls in older adults, strategies may be developed to incorporate TC to improve balance and modify the known risk factors for falling. This article also discusses potential applications and limitations of the current research.

  5. Excitation-inhibition balance in the CA3 network--neuronal specificity and activity-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario; Vivar, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2011-05-01

    Activation of the axons of the granule cells, the mossy fibers, excites pyramidal cells and interneurons in the CA3 area, which, in turn, inhibit pyramidal cells. The integration of the various inputs that converge onto CA3 cells has been studied by pharmacological dissection of either the excitatory or inhibitory components. This strategy has the disadvantage of partially isolating the recorded cell from the network, ignoring the sources and the impact of concurrent inputs. To overcome this limitation, we dissociated excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances by mathematical extraction techniques, and analysed the dynamics of the integration of excitatory and inhibitory inputs in pyramidal cells and stratum lucidum interneurons (Sl-Ints) of CA3. We have uncovered a shunting mechanism that decreases the responsiveness of CA3 output cells to mossy fiber input after a period of enhanced excitability. The activation of the dentate gyrus (DG) after applying a kindling-like protocol in vitro, or after producing one or several seizures in vivo, results in a graded and reversible increase of inhibitory conductances in pyramidal cells, while in Sl-Ints, an increase of excitatory conductances occurs. Thus, interneurons reach more depolarized membrane potentials on DG activation yielding a high excitatory postsynaptic potential-spike coupling, while the contrary occurs in pyramidal cells. This effective activation of feedforward inhibition is synergized by the emergence of direct DG-mediated inhibition on pyramidal cells. These factors force the synaptic conductance to peak at a potential value close to resting membrane potential, thus producing shunt inhibition and decreasing the responsiveness of CA3 output cells to mossy fiber input.

  6. Dizziness and Balance

    MedlinePlus

    AUDIOLOGY Dizziness and Balance Inform ation Seri es Our balance system helps us walk, run, and move without falling. ... if I have a problem with balance or dizziness? It is important to see your doctor if ...

  7. Determination of C0-60 in Cobalt Slugs and Slabs and Radionuclides in Curium Sampler Slugs L-Reactor Disassembly Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, V.R.

    2004-01-23

    Co-60 was historically produced in the SRS reactors. Cobalt slugs were irradiated in the early 1970s. Post-production, remaining cobalt slugs (including slab form) were consolidated for storage. There are approximately nine hundred cobalt slugs currently stored awaiting final disposition. These slugs had historically incomplete documentation for activity rates; therefore, assaying was required in order to determine their activity levels. Since the gamma dose rate from these slugs is extremely high, the most cost effective way to shield a source of this magnitude from personnel and the radiation detector was to use the basin water in which the slugs are stored as the shield. A sodium iodide gamma detector was placed above a specially designed air collimator assembly, so that slug was at least eight feet from the detector and was shielded by the basin water. Using a sodium iodide detector and multichannel analyzer system and an underwater collimator assembly, Co-60 concentrations we re determined for Disassembly Basin cobalt slugs and slabs and 18 curium sampler slugs. The total activity of all of the assayed slugs summed to 31,783 curies. From the Co-60 concentrations of the curium sampler slugs, the irradiation flux was determined for the known irradiation time. The amounts of Pu-238, 239, 240, 241, 242; Am-241, 243; and Cm-242, 244 produced were then obtained based on the original amount of Pu-239 irradiated.

  8. Conformational changes in a hyperthermostable glycoside hydrolase: enzymatic activity is a consequence of the loop dynamics and protonation balance.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Leandro C; da Silva, Viviam M; Colussi, Francieli; Cabral, Aline D; de Oliveira Neto, Mario; Squina, Fabio M; Garcia, Wanius

    2015-01-01

    Endo-β-1, 4-mannanase from Thermotoga petrophila (TpMan) is a modular hyperthermostable enzyme involved in the degradation of mannan-containing polysaccharides. The degradation of these polysaccharides represents a key step for several industrial applications. Here, as part of a continuing investigation of TpMan, the region corresponding to the GH5 domain (TpManGH5) was characterized as a function of pH and temperature. The results indicated that the enzymatic activity of the TpManGH5 is pH-dependent, with its optimum activity occurring at pH 6. At pH 8, the studies demonstrated that TpManGH5 is a molecule with a nearly spherical tightly packed core displaying negligible flexibility in solution, and with size and shape very similar to crystal structure. However, TpManGH5 experiences an increase in radius of gyration in acidic conditions suggesting expansion of the molecule. Furthermore, at acidic pH values, TpManGH5 showed a less globular shape, probably due to a loop region slightly more expanded and flexible in solution (residues Y88 to A105). In addition, molecular dynamics simulations indicated that conformational changes caused by pH variation did not change the core of the TpManGH5, which means that only the above mentioned loop region presents high degree of fluctuations. The results also suggested that conformational changes of the loop region may facilitate polysaccharide and enzyme interaction. Finally, at pH 6 the results indicated that TpManGH5 is slightly more flexible at 65°C when compared to the same enzyme at 20°C. The biophysical characterization presented here is well correlated with the enzymatic activity and provide new insight into the structural basis for the temperature and pH-dependent activity of the TpManGH5. Also, the data suggest a loop region that provides a starting point for a rational design of biotechnological desired features.

  9. Conformational Changes in a Hyperthermostable Glycoside Hydrolase: Enzymatic Activity Is a Consequence of the Loop Dynamics and Protonation Balance

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Leandro C.; da Silva, Viviam M.; Colussi, Francieli; Cabral, Aline D.; de Oliveira Neto, Mario; Squina, Fabio M.; Garcia, Wanius

    2015-01-01

    Endo-β-1, 4-mannanase from Thermotoga petrophila (TpMan) is a modular hyperthermostable enzyme involved in the degradation of mannan-containing polysaccharides. The degradation of these polysaccharides represents a key step for several industrial applications. Here, as part of a continuing investigation of TpMan, the region corresponding to the GH5 domain (TpManGH5) was characterized as a function of pH and temperature. The results indicated that the enzymatic activity of the TpManGH5 is pH-dependent, with its optimum activity occurring at pH 6. At pH 8, the studies demonstrated that TpManGH5 is a molecule with a nearly spherical tightly packed core displaying negligible flexibility in solution, and with size and shape very similar to crystal structure. However, TpManGH5 experiences an increase in radius of gyration in acidic conditions suggesting expansion of the molecule. Furthermore, at acidic pH values, TpManGH5 showed a less globular shape, probably due to a loop region slightly more expanded and flexible in solution (residues Y88 to A105). In addition, molecular dynamics simulations indicated that conformational changes caused by pH variation did not change the core of the TpManGH5, which means that only the above mentioned loop region presents high degree of fluctuations. The results also suggested that conformational changes of the loop region may facilitate polysaccharide and enzyme interaction. Finally, at pH 6 the results indicated that TpManGH5 is slightly more flexible at 65°C when compared to the same enzyme at 20°C. The biophysical characterization presented here is well correlated with the enzymatic activity and provide new insight into the structural basis for the temperature and pH-dependent activity of the TpManGH5. Also, the data suggest a loop region that provides a starting point for a rational design of biotechnological desired features. PMID:25723179

  10. THB1 regulates nitrate reductase activity and THB1 and THB2 transcription differentially respond to NO and the nitrate/ammonium balance in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Ocaña-Calahorro, Francisco; Galván, Aurora; Fernández, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as an important regulator of the nitrogen assimilation pathway in plants. Nevertheless, this free radical is a double-edged sword for cells due to its high reactivity and toxicity. Hemoglobins, which belong to a vast and ancestral family of proteins present in all kingdoms of life, have arisen as important NO scavengers, through their NO dioxygenase (NOD) activity. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has 12 hemoglobins (THB1–12) belonging to the truncated hemoglobins family. THB1 and THB2 are regulated by the nitrogen source and respond differentially to NO and the nitrate/ammonium balance. THB1 expression is upregulated by NO in contrast to THB2, which is downregulated. THB1 has NOD activity and thus a role in nitrate assimilation. In fact, THB1 is upregulated by nitrate and is under the control of NIT2, the major transcription factor in nitrate assimilation. In Chlamydomonas, it has been reported that nitrate reductase (NR) has a redox regulation and is inhibited by NO through an unknown mechanism. Now, a model in which THB1 interacts with NR is proposed for its regulation. THB1 takes electrons from NR redirecting them to NO dioxygenation. Thus, when cells are assimilating nitrate and NO appears (i.e. as a consequence of nitrite accumulation), THB1 has a double role: 1) to scavenge NO avoiding its toxic effects and 2) to control the nitrate reduction activity. PMID:26252500

  11. Children and adults minimise activated muscle volume by selecting gait parameters that balance gross mechanical power and work demands

    PubMed Central

    Hubel, Tatjana Y.; Usherwood, James R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Terrestrial locomotion on legs is energetically expensive. Compared with cycling, or with locomotion in swimming or flying animals, walking and running are highly uneconomical. Legged gaits that minimise mechanical work have previously been identified and broadly match walking and running at appropriate speeds. Furthermore, the ‘cost of muscle force’ approaches are effective in relating locomotion kinetics to metabolic cost. However, few accounts have been made for why animals deviate from either work-minimising or muscle-force-minimising strategies. Also, there is no current mechanistic account for the scaling of locomotion kinetics with animal size and speed. Here, we report measurements of ground reaction forces in walking children and adult humans, and their stance durations during running. We find that many aspects of gait kinetics and kinematics scale with speed and size in a manner that is consistent with minimising muscle activation required for the more demanding between mechanical work and power: spreading the duration of muscle action reduces activation requirements for power, at the cost of greater work demands. Mechanical work is relatively more demanding for larger bipeds – adult humans – accounting for their symmetrical M-shaped vertical force traces in walking, and relatively brief stance durations in running compared with smaller bipeds – children. The gaits of small children, and the greater deviation of their mechanics from work-minimising strategies, may be understood as appropriate for their scale, not merely as immature, incompletely developed and energetically sub-optimal versions of adult gaits. PMID:26400978

  12. The Shc1 adaptor simultaneously balances Stat1 and Stat3 activity to promote breast cancer immune suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ryuhjin; Sabourin, Valérie; Bolt, Alicia M.; Hébert, Steven; Totten, Stephanie; De Jay, Nicolas; Festa, Maria Carolina; Young, Yoon Kow; Im, Young Kyuen; Pawson, Tony; Koromilas, Antonis E.; Muller, William J.; Mann, Koren K.; Kleinman, Claudia L.; Ursini-Siegel, Josie

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase signalling within cancer cells is central to the establishment of an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors act, in part, to augment adaptive immunity, the increased heterogeneity and functional redundancy of the tyrosine kinome is a hurdle to achieving durable responses to immunotherapies. We previously identified the Shc1 (ShcA) scaffold, a central regulator of tyrosine kinase signalling, as essential for promoting breast cancer immune suppression. Herein we show that the ShcA pathway simultaneously activates STAT3 immunosuppressive signals and impairs STAT1-driven immune surveillance in breast cancer cells. Impaired Y239/Y240-ShcA phosphorylation selectively reduces STAT3 activation in breast tumours, profoundly sensitizing them to immune checkpoint inhibitors and tumour vaccines. Finally, the ability of diminished tyrosine kinase signalling to initiate STAT1-driven immune surveillance can be overcome by compensatory STAT3 hyperactivation in breast tumours. Our data indicate that inhibition of pY239/240-ShcA-dependent STAT3 signalling may represent an attractive therapeutic strategy to sensitize breast tumours to multiple immunotherapies. PMID:28276425

  13. Balance between Coiled-Coil Stability and Dynamics Regulates Activity of BvgS Sensor Kinase in Bordetella

    PubMed Central

    Lesne, E.; Krammer, E.-M.; Dupre, E.; Locht, C.; Lensink, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The two-component system BvgAS controls the expression of the virulence regulon of Bordetella pertussis. BvgS is a prototype of bacterial sensor kinases with extracytoplasmic Venus flytrap perception domains. Following its transmembrane segment, BvgS harbors a cytoplasmic Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain and then a predicted 2-helix coiled coil that precede the dimerization-histidine-phosphotransfer domain of the kinase. BvgS homologs have a similar domain organization, or they harbor only a predicted coiled coil between the transmembrane and the dimerization-histidine-phosphotransfer domains. Here, we show that the 2-helix coiled coil of BvgS regulates the enzymatic activity in a mechanical manner. Its marginally stable hydrophobic interface enables a switch between a state of great rotational dynamics in the kinase mode and a more rigid conformation in the phosphatase mode in response to signal perception by the periplasmic domains. We further show that the activity of BvgS is controlled in the same manner if its PAS domain is replaced with the natural α-helical sequences of PAS-less homologs. Clamshell motions of the Venus flytrap domains trigger the shift of the coiled coil’s dynamics. Thus, we have uncovered a general mechanism of regulation for the BvgS family of Venus flytrap-containing two-component sensor kinases. PMID:26933056

  14. The Shc1 adaptor simultaneously balances Stat1 and Stat3 activity to promote breast cancer immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ryuhjin; Sabourin, Valérie; Bolt, Alicia M; Hébert, Steven; Totten, Stephanie; De Jay, Nicolas; Festa, Maria Carolina; Young, Yoon Kow; Im, Young Kyuen; Pawson, Tony; Koromilas, Antonis E; Muller, William J; Mann, Koren K; Kleinman, Claudia L; Ursini-Siegel, Josie

    2017-03-09

    Tyrosine kinase signalling within cancer cells is central to the establishment of an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors act, in part, to augment adaptive immunity, the increased heterogeneity and functional redundancy of the tyrosine kinome is a hurdle to achieving durable responses to immunotherapies. We previously identified the Shc1 (ShcA) scaffold, a central regulator of tyrosine kinase signalling, as essential for promoting breast cancer immune suppression. Herein we show that the ShcA pathway simultaneously activates STAT3 immunosuppressive signals and impairs STAT1-driven immune surveillance in breast cancer cells. Impaired Y239/Y240-ShcA phosphorylation selectively reduces STAT3 activation in breast tumours, profoundly sensitizing them to immune checkpoint inhibitors and tumour vaccines. Finally, the ability of diminished tyrosine kinase signalling to initiate STAT1-driven immune surveillance can be overcome by compensatory STAT3 hyperactivation in breast tumours. Our data indicate that inhibition of pY239/240-ShcA-dependent STAT3 signalling may represent an attractive therapeutic strategy to sensitize breast tumours to multiple immunotherapies.

  15. Visualization of poly(ADP-ribose) bound to PARG reveals inherent balance between exo- and endo-glycohydrolase activities

    PubMed Central

    Barkauskaite, Eva; Brassington, Amy; Tan, Edwin S.; Warwicker, Jim; Dunstan, Mark S.; Banos, Benito; Lafite, Pierre; Ahel, Marijan; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Ahel, Ivan; Leys, David

    2013-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification that regulates processes involved in genome stability. Breakdown of the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer is catalysed by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), whose endo-glycohydrolase activity generates PAR fragments. Here we present the crystal structure of PARG incorporating the PAR substrate. The two terminal ADP-ribose units of the polymeric substrate are bound in exo-mode. Biochemical and modelling studies reveal that PARG acts predominantly as an exo-glycohydrolase. This preference is linked to Phe902 (human numbering), which is responsible for low-affinity binding of the substrate in endo-mode. Our data reveal the mechanism of poly-ADP-ribosylation reversal, with ADP-ribose as the dominant product, and suggest that the release of apoptotic PAR fragments occurs at unusual PAR/PARG ratios. PMID:23917065

  16. IL-17 promotes bone erosion in murine collagen-induced arthritis through loss of the receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand/osteoprotegerin balance.

    PubMed

    Lubberts, Erik; van den Bersselaar, Liduine; Oppers-Walgreen, Birgitte; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Coenen-de Roo, Christina J J; Kolls, Jay K; Joosten, Leo A B; van den Berg, Wim B

    2003-03-01

    IL-17 is a T cell-derived proinflammatory cytokine in experimental arthritis and is a stimulator of osteoclastogenesis in vitro. In this study, we report the effects of IL-17 overexpression (AdIL-17) in the knee joint of type II collagen-immunized mice on bone erosion and synovial receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL)/receptor activator of NF-kappa B/osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression. Local IL-17 promoted osteoclastic bone destruction, which was accompanied with marked tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity at sites of bone erosion in cortical, subchondral, and trabecular bone. Accelerated expression of RANKL and its receptor, receptor activator of NF-kappa B, was found in the synovial infiltrate and at sites of focal bone erosion, using specific immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, AdIL-17 not only enhanced RANKL expression but also strongly up-regulated the RANKL/OPG ratio in the synovium. Comparison of arthritic mice from the AdIL-17 collagen-induced arthritis group with full-blown collagen-arthritic mice having similar clinical scores for joint inflammation revealed lower RANKL/OPG ratio and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity in the latter group. Interestingly, systemic OPG treatment prevented joint damage induced by local AdIL-17 gene transfer in type II collagen-immunized mice. These findings suggest T cell IL-17 to be an important inducer of RANKL expression leading to loss of the RANKL/OPG balance, stimulating osteoclastogenesis and bone erosion in arthritis.

  17. The MinCDJ System in Bacillus subtilis Prevents Minicell Formation by Promoting Divisome Disassembly

    PubMed Central

    van Baarle, Suey; Bramkamp, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Background Cell division in Bacillus subtilis takes place precisely at midcell, through the action of Noc, which prevents division from occurring over the nucleoids, and the Min system, which prevents cell division from taking place at the poles. Originally it was thought that the Min system acts directly on FtsZ, preventing the formation of a Z-ring and, therefore, the formation of a complete cytokinetic ring at the poles. Recently, a new component of the B. subtilis Min system was identified, MinJ, which acts as a bridge between DivIVA and MinCD. Methodology/Principal Findings We used fluorescence microscopy and molecular genetics to examine the molecular role of MinJ. We found that in the absence of a functional Min system, FtsA, FtsL and PBP-2B remain associated with completed division sites. Evidence is provided that MinCDJ are responsible for the failure of these proteins to localize properly, indicating that MinCDJ can act on membrane integral components of the divisome. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, we postulate that the main function of the Min system is to prevent minicell formation adjacent to recently completed division sites by promoting the disassembly of the cytokinetic ring, thereby ensuring that cell division occurs only once per cell cycle. Thus, the role of the Min system in rod-shaped bacteria seems not to be restricted to an inhibitory function on FtsZ polymerization, but can act on different levels of the divisome. PMID:20352045

  18. Preparation of Segmented Microtubules to Study Motions Driven by the Disassembling Microtubule Ends

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Vladimir A.; Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule depolymerization can provide force to transport different protein complexes and protein-coated beads in vitro. The underlying mechanisms are thought to play a vital role in the microtubule-dependent chromosome motions during cell division, but the relevant proteins and their exact roles are ill-defined. Thus, there is a growing need to develop assays with which to study such motility in vitro using purified components and defined biochemical milieu. Microtubules, however, are inherently unstable polymers; their switching between growth and shortening is stochastic and difficult to control. The protocols we describe here take advantage of the segmented microtubules that are made with the photoablatable stabilizing caps. Depolymerization of such segmented microtubules can be triggered with high temporal and spatial resolution, thereby assisting studies of motility at the disassembling microtubule ends. This technique can be used to carry out a quantitative analysis of the number of molecules in the fluorescently-labeled protein complexes, which move processively with dynamic microtubule ends. To optimize a signal-to-noise ratio in this and other quantitative fluorescent assays, coverslips should be treated to reduce nonspecific absorption of soluble fluorescently-labeled proteins. Detailed protocols are provided to take into account the unevenness of fluorescent illumination, and determine the intensity of a single fluorophore using equidistant Gaussian fit. Finally, we describe the use of segmented microtubules to study microtubule-dependent motions of the protein-coated microbeads, providing insights into the ability of different motor and nonmotor proteins to couple microtubule depolymerization to processive cargo motion. PMID:24686554

  19. Microbial activity balance in size fractionated suspended growth biomass from full-scale sidestream combined nitritation-anammox reactors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yijing; Wells, George; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance, distribution and activity of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox in size fractionated aggregates from full-scale suspended growth combined nitritation-anammox sidestream reactors. Plants with or without a cyclone device were also studied to assess a purported enrichment of anammox granules. Specific aerobic ammonium oxidation rates (p=0.01) and specific oxygen uptake rates (p=0.02) were significantly greater in flocs than in granules. AOB abundance measured using quantitative FISH was significantly higher in flocs than in granules (p=0.01). Conversely, anammox abundance was significantly greater in granules (p=0.03). The average ratio of anammox/AOB in systems employing hydrocyclone separation devices was 2.4, significantly higher (p=0.02) than the average ratio (0.5) in a system without a hydrocyclone. Our results demonstrate substantial functional and population-level segregation between floccular and granular fractions, and provide a key corroboration that cyclone separation devices can increase anammox levels in such systems.

  20. Soil climate and decomposer activity in Sub-Saharan Africa estimated from standard weather station data: a simple climate index for soil carbon balance calculations.

    PubMed

    Andrén, Olof; Kihara, Job; Bationo, André; Vanlauwe, Bernard; Kätterer, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Soil biological activity was calculated on a daily basis, using standard meteorological data from African weather stations, a simple soil water model, and commonly used assumptions regarding the relations between temperature, soil water content, and biological activity. The activity factor r(e_clim) is calculated from daily soil moisture and temperature, thereby taking the daily interaction between temperature and moisture into account. Annual mean r(e_clim) was normalized to 1 in Central Sweden (clay loam soil, no crop), where the original calibration took place. Since soils vary in water storage capacity and plant cover will affect transpiration, we used this soil under no crop for all sites, thereby only including climate differences. The Swedish r(e_clim) value, 1, corresponds to ca. 50% annual mass loss of, e.g., cereal straw incorporated into the topsoil. African mean annual r(e_clim) values varied between 1.1 at a hot and dry site (Faya, Chad) and 4.7 at a warm and moist site (Brazzaville, Congo). Sites in Kenya ranged between r(e_clim) = 2.1 at high altitude (Matanya) and 4.1 in western Kenya (Ahero). This means that 4.1 times the Swedish C input to soil is necessary to maintain Swedish soil carbon levels in Ahero, if soil type and management are equal. Diagrams showing daily r(e_clim) dynamics are presented for all sites, and differences in within-year dynamics are discussed. A model experiment indicated that a Swedish soil in balance with respect to soil carbon would lose 41% of its soil carbon during 30 y, if moved to Ahero, Kenya. If the soil was in balance in Ahero with respect to soil carbon, and then moved to Sweden, soil carbon mass would increase by 64% in 30 y. The validity of the methodology and results is discussed, and r(e_clim) is compared with other climate indices. A simple method to produce a rough estimate of r(e_clim) is suggested.

  1. Interactive learning activities for the middle school classroom to promote healthy energy balance and decrease diabetes risk in the HEALTHY primary prevention trial.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Elizabeth M; Giles, Catherine; Firrell, L Suzanne; Zeveloff, Abigail D; Hirst, Kathryn; Marcus, Marsha D

    2014-01-01

    The HEALTHY trial evaluated the effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention program to reduce risk for type 2 diabetes in middle school students. The comprehensive intervention addressed nutrition, physical activity, and behavior in the context of a social marketing-based communications campaign to promote healthy energy balance. One element was a classroom-based program called FLASH (Fun Learning Activities for Student Health). Five FLASH modules were delivered, one per semester. Process evaluation data were collected from teachers at 21 schools and study staff at seven national sites via survey, interview, and in-class observation. Data from the first four modules were evaluated and showed that FLASH was delivered with high fidelity. Sessions that required peer interaction were rated as the most effective in engaging students and promoting knowledge. Study-provided material resources and on-site support were identified as key facilitators. Student misbehavior was viewed as the greatest barrier. Although the high level of support provided by the study is not likely to be replicated in school systems, those developing wellness policies, health curricula, and teacher training programs may benefit from using the evidence-supported, publicly available HEALTHY materials in their efforts to reduce diabetes risk factors in middle school youth.

  2. Interactive Learning Activities for the Middle School Classroom to Promote Healthy Energy Balance and Decrease Diabetes Risk in the HEALTHY Primary Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Venditti, Elizabeth M.; Giles, Catherine; Firrell, L. Suzanne; Zeveloff, Abigail D.; Hirst, Kathryn; Marcus, Marsha D.

    2013-01-01

    The HEALTHY trial evaluated the effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention program to reduce risk for type 2 diabetes in middle school students. The comprehensive intervention addressed nutrition, physical activity, and behavior in the context of a social marketing–based communications campaign to promote healthy energy balance. One element was a classroom-based program called FLASH (Fun Learning Activities for Student Health). Five FLASH modules were delivered, one per semester. Process evaluation data were collected from teachers at 21 schools and study staff at seven national sites via survey, interview, and in-class observation. Data from the first four modules were evaluated and showed that FLASH was delivered with high fidelity. Sessions that required peer interaction were rated as the most effective in engaging students and promoting knowledge. Study-provided material resources and onsite support were identified as key facilitators. Student misbehavior was viewed as the greatest barrier. Although the high level of support provided by the study is not likely to be replicated in school systems, those developing wellness policies, health curricula, and teacher training programs may benefit from using the evidence-supported, publicly available HEALTHY materials in their efforts to reduce diabetes risk factors in middle school youth. PMID:23271717

  3. Xylosylation of the Notch receptor preserves the balance between its activation by trans-Delta and inhibition by cis-ligands in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tom V; Pandey, Ashutosh; Jafar-Nejad, Hamed

    2017-04-10

    The Drosophila glucoside xylosyltransferase Shams xylosylates Notch and inhibits Notch signaling in specific contexts including wing vein development. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying context-specificity of the shams phenotype is not known. Considering the role of Delta-Notch signaling in wing vein formation, we hypothesized that Shams might affect Delta-mediated Notch signaling in Drosophila. Using genetic interaction studies, we find that altering the gene dosage of Delta affects the wing vein and head bristle phenotypes caused by loss of Shams or by mutations in the Notch xylosylation sites. Clonal analysis suggests that loss of shams promotes Delta-mediated Notch activation. Further, Notch trans-activation by ectopically overexpressed Delta shows a dramatic increase upon loss of shams. In agreement with the above in vivo observations, cell aggregation and ligand-receptor binding assays show that shams knock-down in Notch-expressing cells enhances the binding between Notch and trans-Delta without affecting the binding between Notch and trans-Serrate and cell surface levels of Notch. Loss of Shams does not impair the cis-inhibition of Notch by ectopic overexpression of ligands in vivo or the interaction of Notch and cis-ligands in S2 cells. Nevertheless, removing one copy of endogenous ligands mimics the effects of loss shams on Notch trans-activation by ectopic Delta. This favors the notion that trans-activation of Notch by Delta overcomes the cis-inhibition of Notch by endogenous ligands upon loss of shams. Taken together, our data suggest that xylosylation selectively impedes the binding of Notch with trans-Delta without affecting its binding with cis-ligands and thereby assists in determining the balance of Notch receptor's response to cis-ligands vs. trans-Delta during Drosophila development.

  4. upSET, the Drosophila homologue of SET3, Is Required for Viability and the Proper Balance of Active and Repressive Chromatin Marks

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Kyle A.; Jung, Youngsook L.; Zee, Barry M.; Wang, Charlotte I.; Park, Peter J.; Kuroda, Mitzi I.

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin plays a critical role in faithful implementation of gene expression programs. Different post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins reflect the underlying state of gene activity, and many chromatin proteins write, erase, bind, or are repelled by, these histone marks. One such protein is UpSET, the Drosophila homolog of yeast Set3 and mammalian KMT2E (MLL5). Here, we show that UpSET is necessary for the proper balance between active and repressed states. Using CRISPR/Cas-9 editing, we generated S2 cells that are mutant for upSET. We found that loss of UpSET is tolerated in S2 cells, but that heterochromatin is misregulated, as evidenced by a strong decrease in H3K9me2 levels assessed by bulk histone PTM quantification. To test whether this finding was consistent in the whole organism, we deleted the upSET coding sequence using CRISPR/Cas-9, which we found to be lethal in both sexes in flies. We were able to rescue this lethality using a tagged upSET transgene, and found that UpSET protein localizes to transcriptional start sites (TSS) of active genes throughout the genome. Misregulated heterochromatin is apparent by suppressed position effect variegation of the wm4 allele in heterozygous upSET-deleted flies. Using nascent-RNA sequencing in the upSET-mutant S2 lines, we show that this result applies to heterochromatin genes generally. Our findings support a critical role for UpSET in maintaining heterochromatin, perhaps by delimiting the active chromatin environment. PMID:28064188

  5. Balance in Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The review by Black and Wiliam of national systems makes clear the complexity of assessment, and identifies important issues. One of these is "balance": balance between local and central responsibilities, balance between the weights given to various purposes of schooling, balance between weights for various functions of assessment, and balance…

  6. Dynamic balance improvement program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    The reduction of residual unbalance in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) high pressure turbopump rotors was addressed. Elastic rotor response to unbalance and balancing requirements, multiplane and in housing balancing, and balance related rotor design considerations were assessed. Recommendations are made for near term improvement of the SSME balancing and for future study and development efforts.

  7. Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta: Balance of Subsidence, Sea level and Sedimentation in a Tectonically-Active Delta (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckler, M. S.; Goodbred, S. L.; Akhter, S. H.; Seeber, L.; Reitz, M. D.; Paola, C.; Nooner, S. L.; DeWolf, S.; Ferguson, E. K.; Gale, J.; Hossain, S.; Howe, M.; Kim, W.; McHugh, C. M.; Mondal, D. R.; Petter, A. L.; Pickering, J.; Sincavage, R.; Williams, L. A.; Wilson, C.; Zumberge, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Bangladesh is vulnerable to a host of short and long-term natural hazards - widespread seasonal flooding, river erosion and channel avulsions, permanent land loss from sea level rise, natural groundwater arsenic, recurrent cyclones, landslides and huge earthquakes. These hazards derive from active fluvial processes related to the growth of the delta and the tectonics at the India-Burma-Tibet plate junctions. The Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers drain 3/4 of the Himalayas and carry ~1 GT/y of sediment, 6-8% of the total world flux. In Bangladesh, these two great rivers combine with the Meghna River to form the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Delta (GBMD). The seasonality of the rivers' water and sediment discharge is a major influence causing widespread flooding during the summer monsoon. The mass of the water is so great that it causes 5-6 cm of seasonal elastic deformation of the delta discerned by our GPS data. Over the longer-term, the rivers are also dynamic. Two centuries ago, the Brahmaputra River avulsed westward up to 100 km and has since captured other rivers. The primary mouth of the Ganges has shifted 100s of km eastward from the Hooghly River over the last 400y, finally joining the Brahmaputra in the 19th century. These avulsions are influenced by the tectonics of the delta. On the east side of Bangladesh, the >16 km thick GBMD is being overridden by the Burma Arc where the attempted subduction of such a thick sediment pile has created a huge accretionary prism. The foldbelt is up to 250-km wide and its front is buried beneath the delta. The main Himalayan thrust front is <100 km north, but adjacent to the GBMD is the Shillong Massif, a 300-km long, 2-km high block of uplifted Indian basement that is overthrusting and depressing GBMD sediments to the south. The overthrusting Shillong Massif may represent a forward jump of the Himalayan front to a new plate boundary. This area ruptured in a ~M8 1897 earthquake. Subsidence from the tectonics and differential

  8. Wii Fit balance training or progressive balance training in patients with chronic stroke: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yatar, Gozde Iyigun; Yildirim, Sibel Aksu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Wii Fit balance training (WBT) and progressive balance training (PBT) approaches on balance functions, balance confidence, and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] A total of 30 patients were randomized into the WBT (n=15) and PBT (n=15) groups. [Methods] All of the subjects received exercise training based on a neurodevelopemental approach in addition to either Wii Fit or progressive balance training for total of 1 hour a day, 3 days per week for 4 weeks. Primary measurements were static balance function measured with a Wii Balance Board and dynamic balance function assessed with the Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up and Go test, Dynamic Gait Index, and Functional Reach Test. Secondary measures were balance confidence assessed with the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale and activities of daily living evaluated with the Frenchay Activity Index. [Results] There was not remarkable difference between the two treatments in dynamic balance functions, balance confidence, and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Although both of the approaches were found to be effective in improving the balance functions, balance confidence, and activities of daily living, neither of them were more preferable than the other for the treatment of balance in patients with chronic stroke. PMID:25995576

  9. Modulation of Potassium Channel Activity in the Balance of ROS and ATP Production by Durum Wheat Mitochondria—An Amazing Defense Tool Against Hyperosmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Trono, Daniela; Laus, Maura N.; Soccio, Mario; Alfarano, Michela; Pastore, Donato

    2015-01-01

    (mannitol or NaCl), PmitoKATP was found to be activated by ROS, so inhibiting further large-scale ROS production according to a feedback mechanism; moreover, a stress-activated phospholipase A2 may generate FFAs, further activating the channel. In conclusion, a main property of PmitoKATP is the ability to keep in balance the control of harmful ROS with the mitochondrial/cellular bioenergetics, thus preserving ATP for energetic needs of cell defense under stress. PMID:26648958

  10. Balancing Vanguard Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkovich, A.; Baumann, Robert C.

    1961-01-01

    The Vanguard satellites and component parts were balanced within the specified limits by using a Gisholt Type-S balancer in combination with a portable International Research and Development vibration analyzer and filter, with low-frequency pickups. Equipment and procedures used for balancing are described; and the determination of residual imbalance is accomplished by two methods: calculation, and graphical interpretation. Between-the-bearings balancing is recommended for future balancing of payloads.

  11. Lesson "Balance in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapanova, V.

    2012-04-01

    Lesson "Balance in Nature" This simulation game-lesson (Balance in Nature) gives an opportunity for the students to show creativity, work independently, and to create models and ideas. It creates future-oriented thought connected to their experience, allowing them to propose solutions for global problems and personal responsibility for their activities. The class is divided in two teams. Each team chooses questions. 1. Question: Pollution in the environment. 2. Question: Care for nature and climate. The teams work on the chosen tasks. They make drafts, notes and formulate their solutions on small pieces of paper, explaining the impact on nature and society. They express their points of view using many different opinions. This generates alternative thoughts and results in creative solutions. With the new knowledge and positive behaviour defined, everybody realizes that they can do something positive towards nature and climate problems and the importance of individuals for solving global problems is evident. Our main goal is to recover the ecological balance, and everybody explains his or her own well-grounded opinions. In this work process the students obtain knowledge, skills and more responsible behaviour. This process, based on his or her own experience, dialogue and teamwork, helps the participant's self-development. Making the model "human↔ nature" expresses how human activities impact the natural Earth and how these impacts in turn affect society. Taking personal responsibility, we can reduce global warming and help the Earth. By helping nature we help ourselves. Teacher: Veselina Boycheva-Chapanova " Saint Patriarch Evtimii" Scholl Str. "Ivan Vazov"-19 Plovdiv Bulgaria

  12. Activation of Neck and Low-Back Muscles Is Reduced with the Use of a Neck Balance System Together with a Lumbar Support in Urban Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Menotti, Federica; Labanca, Luciana; Laudani, Luca; Giombini, Arrigo; Pigozzi, Fabio; Macaluso, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Driving is associated with high activation of low-back and neck muscles due to the sitting position and perturbations imposed by the vehicle. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a neck balance system together with a lumbar support on the activation of low-back and neck muscles during driving. Twelve healthy male subjects (age 32±6.71 years) were asked to drive in two conditions: 1) with devices; 2) without devices. During vehicle accelerations and decelerations root mean square (RMS) of surface electromyography (sEMG) was recorded from the erector spinae, semispinalis capitis and sternocleidomastoid muscles and expressed as a percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The pitch of the head was obtained by means of an inertial sensor placed on the subjects’ head. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess the level of perceived comfort. RMS of the low back muscles was lower with than without devices during both acceleration and deceleration of the vehicle (1.40±0.93% vs 29 2.32±1.90% and 1.88±1.45% vs 2.91±2.33%, respectively), while RMS of neck extensor muscles was reduced only during acceleration (5.18±1.96% vs 5.91±2.16%). There were no differences between the two conditions in RMS of neck flexor muscles, the pitch of the head and the VAS score. The use of these two ergonomic devices is therefore effective in reducing the activation of low-back and neck muscles during driving with no changes in the level of perceived comfort, which is likely due to rebalancing weight on the neck and giving a neutral position to lumbar segments. PMID:26474160

  13. Voltammetric characterization of the aerobic energy-dissipating nitrate reductase of Paracoccus pantotrophus: exploring the activity of a redox-balancing enzyme as a function of electrochemical potential.

    PubMed

    Gates, Andrew J; Richardson, David J; Butt, Julea N

    2008-01-01

    Paracoccus pantotrophus expresses two nitrate reductases associated with respiratory electron transport, termed NapABC and NarGHI. Both enzymes derive electrons from ubiquinol to reduce nitrate to nitrite. However, while NarGHI harnesses the energy of the quinol/nitrate couple to generate a transmembrane proton gradient, NapABC dissipates the energy associated with these reducing equivalents. In the present paper we explore the nitrate reductase activity of purified NapAB as a function of electrochemical potential, substrate concentration and pH using protein film voltammetry. Nitrate reduction by NapAB is shown to occur at potentials below approx. 0.1 V at pH 7. These are lower potentials than required for NarGH nitrate reduction. The potentials required for Nap nitrate reduction are also likely to require ubiquinol/ubiquinone ratios higher than are needed to activate the H(+)-pumping oxidases expressed during aerobic growth where Nap levels are maximal. Thus the operational potentials of P. pantotrophus NapAB are consistent with a productive role in redox balancing. A Michaelis constant (K(M)) of approx. 45 muM was determined for NapAB nitrate reduction at pH 7. This is in line with studies on intact cells where nitrate reduction by Nap was described by a Monod constant (K(S)) of less than 15 muM. The voltammetric studies also disclosed maximal NapAB activity in a narrow window of potential. This behaviour is resistant to change of pH, nitrate concentration and inhibitor concentration and its possible mechanistic origins are discussed.

  14. FRET-labeled siRNA probes for tracking assembly and disassembly of siRNA nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Alabi, Christopher A; Love, Kevin T; Sahay, Gaurav; Stutzman, Tina; Young, Whitney T; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-07-24

    The assembly, stability, and timely disassembly of short interfering RNA (siRNA) nanocomplexes have the potential to affect the efficiency of siRNA delivery and gene silencing. As such, the design of new probes that can measure these properties without significantly perturbing the nanocomplexes or their environment may facilitate the study and further development of new siRNA nanocomplexes. Herein, we study Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-labeled siRNA probes that can track the assembly, stability, and disassembly of siRNA nanocomplexes in different environments. The probe is composed of two identical siRNAs, each labeled with a fluorophore. Upon nanocomplex formation, the siRNA-bound fluorophores become locally aggregated within the nanocomplex and undergo FRET. A key advantage of this technique is that the delivery vehicle (DV) need not be labeled, thus enabling the characterization of a large variety of nanocarriers, some of which may be difficult or even impossible to label. We demonstrate proof-of-concept by measuring the assembly of various DVs with siRNAs and show good agreement with gel electrophoresis experiments. As a consequence of not having to label the DV, we are able to determine nanocomplex biophysical parameters such as the extracellular apparent dissociation constants (K(D)) and intracellular disassembly half-life for several in-house and proprietary commercial DVs. Furthermore, the lack of DV modification allows for a true direct comparison between DVs as well as correlation between their biophysical properties and gene silencing.

  15. Basic residue at position 14 is not required for fast assembly and disassembly kinetics in neural cadherin.

    PubMed

    Vunnam, Nagamani; Hammer, Nathan I; Pedigo, Susan

    2015-01-27

    In spite of their structural similarities, epithelial (E-) and neural (N-) cadherin are expressed at different types of synapses and differ significantly in their dimerization kinetics. Recent studies proposed a transient intermediate in E-cadherin as the key requirement for rapid disassembly kinetics of the adhesive dimer. This E-cadherin intermediate comprises four intermolecular ionic and H-bonding interactions between adhesive partners. These interactions are not preserved in N-cadherin except for a basic residue at the 14th position, which could stabilize the intermediate through either H-bonding or ionic interactions with the partner protomer. To investigate the origin of the rapid dimerization kinetics of N-cadherin in the presence of calcium, studies reported here systematically test the role of ionic and H-bonding interactions in dimerization kinetics using R14S, R14A, and R14E mutants of N-cadherin. Analytical size-exclusion chromatographic and bead aggregation studies showed two primary results. First, N-cadherin/R14S and N-cadherin/R14A mutants showed fast assembly and disassembly kinetics in the calcium-saturated state similar to that of wild-type N-cadherin. These results indicate that the fast disassembly of the calcium-saturated dimer of N-cadherin does not require a basic residue at the 14th position. Second, the dimerization kinetics of N-cadherin/R14E were slow in the calcium-saturated state, indicating that negative charge destabilizes the intermediate state. Taken together, these results indicate that the basic residue at the 14th position does not promote rapid dimerization kinetics but that an acidic amino acid in that position significantly impairs dimerization kinetics.

  16. Energy balance, leptin, NEFA and IGF-I plasma concentrations and resumption of post partum ovarian activity in swedish red and white breed cows

    PubMed Central

    Konigsson, Kristian; Savoini, Giovanni; Govoni, Nadia; Invernizzi, Guido; Prandi, Alberto; Kindahl, Hans; Veronesi, Maria Cristina

    2008-01-01

    In the purpose to provide further information in respect of the relationship between metabolism and post partum (PP) ovarian activity resumption in dairy cows, the aim of the present study was to characterize the energy balance (EB) and leptin, NEFA and IGF-I plasma levels in Swedish Red and White (SRW) cows with and without ovarian activity re-initiation within 7 weeks PP. The study was conducted on 12 primiparous SRW cows fed the same diet as total mixed ration for ad libitum intake. The EB was calculated weekly from parturition until seven weeks PP. Blood samples were collected weekly from one week before until 7 weeks after calving for leptin, NEFA and IGF-I analysis. For progesterone (P4) analysis, blood samples were collected two times per week from parturition until the end of the study. P4 profile was used in addition to the clinical examination to detect cows with and without ovarian activity resumption. The clinical and ultrasonographic examination, coupled with P4 profile analysis showed the resumption of ovarian activity within 7 weeks after calving in 8 (group A) and no ovarian resumption in 4 cows (group B). No significant differences were detected in the whole period of observation in the amount of milk production between the two groups, while the mean milk protein content was significantly lower in group B at the third week PP. The calculated EB was negative in both groups in the first three weeks after calving, but more marked in group B. NEFA and Leptin plasma levels did not show significant differences between the two groups. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed that, when low milk producing primiparous cows are concerned, no significant differences in BW loss, milk yield, EB and leptin and NEFA plasma levels between the cows with and without resumption of ovarian activity within 7 weeks post partum were seen. However, significantly higher IGF-I levels in the first two weeks after calving were found in cows with post partum

  17. Sequence-defined Energetic Shifts Control the Disassembly Kinetics and Microstructure of Amelogenin Adsorbed onto Hydroxyapatite (100)

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Jinhui; Buchko, Garry W.; Shaw, Wendy J.; De Yoreo, Jim; Tarasevich, Barbara J.

    2015-11-03

    The interactions between proteins and surfaces are critical to a number of important processes including biomineralization, the biocompatibility of biomaterials, and the function of biosensors. Although many proteins exist as monomers or small oligomers, amelogenin is a unique protein that self-assembles into supramolecular structures called “nanospheres,” aggregates of 100’s of monomers that are 20-60 nm in diameter. The nanosphere quaternary structure is observed in solution, however, the quaternary structure of amelogenin adsorbed onto hydroxyapatite (HAP) surfaces is not known even though it may be important to amelogenin’s function in forming highly elongated and intricately assembled HAP crystallites during enamel formation. We report studies of the interactions of the enamel protein, amelogenin (rpM179), with a well-defined (100) face prepared by synthesis of large crystals of HAP. High resolution, in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to directly observe protein adsorption onto HAP at the molecular level within an aqueous solution environment. Our study shows that the amelogenin nanospheres disassemble onto the HAP surface, breaking down into oligomeric (25-mer) subunits of the larger nanosphere. In some cases, the disassembly event is directly observed by in situ imaging for the first time. Quantification of the adsorbate amounts by size analysis led to the determination of a protein binding energy (17.1 kbT) to a specific face of HAP (100). The kinetics of disassembly are greatly slowed in aged solutions, indicating there are time-dependent increases in oligomer-oligomer binding interactions within the nanosphere. A small change in the sequence of amelogenin by the attachment of a histidine tag to the N-terminus of rpM179 to form rp(H)M180 results in the adsorption of a complete second layer on top of the underlying first layer. Our research elucidates how supramolecular protein structures interact and break down at surfaces and how small

  18. Intra-procedural Path-insensitve Grams (I-GRAMS) and Disassembly Based Features for Packer Tool Classification and Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-14

    Captain, USAF AFIT/ GCE /ENG/12-07 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio...Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States AFIT/ GCE /ENG/12-07 INTRA-PROCEDURAL PATH-INSENSITIVE GRAMS (I-GRAMS) AND...PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT/ GCE /ENG/12-07 INTRA-PROCEDURAL PATH-INSENSITIVE GRAMS (I-GRAMS) AND DISASSEMBLY BASED FEATURES FOR PACKER

  19. Telomere targeting with a novel G-quadruplex-interactive ligand BRACO-19 induces T-loop disassembly and telomerase displacement in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangtong; Liu, Xinrui; Li, Yunqian; Xu, Songbai; Ma, Chengyuan; Wu, Xinmin; Cheng, Ye; Yu, Zhiyun; Zhao, Gang; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Interference with telomerase and telomere maintenance is emerging as an attractive target for anticancer therapies. Ligand-induced stabilization of G-quadruplex formation by the telomeric DNA 3′-overhang inhibits telomerase from catalyzing telomeric DNA synthesis and from capping telomeric ends, making these ligands good candidates for chemotherapeutic purposes. BRACO-19 is one of the most effective and specific ligand for telomeric G4. It is shown here that BRACO-19 suppresses proliferation and reduces telomerase activity in human glioblastoma cells, paralleled by the displacement of telomerase from nuclear to cytoplasm. Meanwhile, BRACO-19 triggers extensive DNA damage response at telomere, which may result from uncapping and disassembly of telomeric T-loop structure, characterized by the formation of anaphase bridge and telomere fusion, as well as the release of telomere-binding protein from telomere. The resulting dysfunctional telomere ultimately provokes p53 and p21-mediated cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence. Notably, normal primary astrocytes do not respond to the treatment of BRACO-19, suggesting the agent's good selectivity for cancer cells. These results reinforce the notion that G-quadruplex binding compounds can act as broad inhibitors of telomere-related processes and have potential as selective antineoplastic drugs for various tumors including malignant gliomas. PMID:26908447

  20. A Two-Generation Study of Body Mass Index, Energy Balance and Specific Physical Activity of College Students and Their Respective Parents Living in the Same Household at Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Ying; Lee, Judy; Tam, Chick F.; Bridges, Elizabeth; Keating, Xiaofen D.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose was to compare the differences in body mass index (BMI), energy balance (EB) and specific physical activity (SPA) between 30 CSULA college students (Y) and their respective parents (O) living in the same household at Los Angeles, California, U.S.A. Each student completed a 24-hour dietary record with SPA journal, and the same for…

  1. Nitrogen and sodium balance and sympathetic-nervous-system activity in obese subjects treated with a low-calorie protein or mixed diet.

    PubMed

    DeHaven, J; Sherwin, R; Hendler, R; Felig, P

    1980-02-28

    Seven obese subjects were placed on a 400-kcal protein diet and on an isocaloric mixed diet (50 per cent protein and 50 per cent carbohydrate), three to 5 1/2 weeks for each diet. Despite twofold to fivefold increases in ketone levels in the blood and urine with the protein diet, net nitrogen balance was no different from that with the mixed diet (-2.1 +/- 0.9 vs. -2.6 +/- 0.4 g per day; mean +/- S.E.M.). However, net sodium loss with the protein diet (-382 +/- 117 mmol) was significantly greater than with the mixed diet (-25 +/- 105 mmol; P less than 0.02). Furthermore, maximal orthostatic decreases in systolic blood pressure with the protein diet (-28 +/- 3 mm Hg) were greater than with the mixed diet (-18 +/- 3 mm Hg; P less than 0.02) and were accompanied by symptoms of orthostatic hypotension in all patients. The protein diet (but not the mixed diet) also resulted in a 40 per cent decline in basal plasma levels of norepinephrine (P less than 0.01) and a failure of plasma norepinephrine to rise after two minutes of standing. We conclude that as compared with mixed diets, hypocaloric protein diets offer no advantage with respect to nitrogen metabolism but result in greater sodium depletion, a decrease in sympathetic-nervous-system activity, and the development of orthostatic hypotension.

  2. Effects of quebracho tannin extract (Schinopsis balansae Engl.) and activated charcoal on nitrogen balance, rumen microbial protein synthesis and faecal composition of growing Boer goats.

    PubMed

    Al-Kindi, Amal; Dickhoefer, Uta; Schlecht, Eva; Sundrum, Albert; Schiborra, Anne

    2016-08-01

    Under irrigated arid conditions, organic fertiliser rich in slowly decomposable nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) is needed for soil fertility maintenance. Feeding ruminants with condensed tannins will lower ruminal protein degradation, reduce urinary N excretion and might increase the faecal fraction of slowly decomposable N. Supplementation with activated charcoal (AC) might enrich manure with slowly degrading C. Therefore, we investigated the effects of feeding quebracho tannin extract (QTE) and AC on the N balance of goats, the efficiency of microbial protein synthesis in the rumen (EMPS) and the composition of faeces. The feeding trial comprised three periods; in each period, 12 male Boer goats (28 ± 3.9 kg live weight) were assigned to six treatments: a Control diet (per kg diet 500 g grass hay and 500 g concentrate) and to further five treatments the Control diet was supplemented with QTE (20 g and 40 g/kg; diets QTE2 and QTE4, respectively), with AC (15 g and 30 g/kg, diets AC1.5 and AC3.0, respectively) and a mixture of QTE (20 g/kg) plus AC (15 g/kg) (diet QTEAC). In addition to the N balance, EMPS was calculated from daily excretions of purine derivatives, and the composition of faecal N was determined. There was no effect of QTE and AC supplementation on the intake of organic matter (OM), N and fibre, but apparent total tract digestibility of OM was reduced (p = 0.035). Feeding QTE induced a shift in N excretion from urine to faeces (p ≤ 0.001) without altering N retention. Total N excretion tended to decrease with QTE treatments (p = 0.053), but EMPS was not different between treatments. Faecal C excretion was higher in QTE and AC treatments (p = 0.001) compared with the Control, while the composition of faecal N differed only in concentration of undigested dietary N (p = 0.001). The results demonstrate that QTE can be included into diets of goats up to 40 g/kg, without affecting N utilisation, but simultaneously increasing the

  3. Discovery of a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) modulator with balanced PPARalpha activity for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiguo; Liu, Kun; Wood, Harold B; McCann, Margaret E; Doebber, Thomas W; Chang, Ching H; Akiyama, Taro E; Einstein, Monica; Berger, Joel P; Meinke, Peter T

    2009-07-23

    A series of 3-acylindole-1-benzylcarboxylic acids were designed and synthesized while searching for a PPARgamma modulator with additional moderate intrinsic PPARalpha agonistic activity. 2-[3-[[3-(4-Chlorobenzoyl)-2-methyl-6-(trifluoromethoxy)-1H-indol-1-yl]methyl]phenoxy]-(2R)-butanoic acid (12d) was identified as such an agent which demonstrated potent efficacy in lowering both glucose and lipids in multiple animal models with significantly attenuated side effects such as fluid retention and heart weight gain associated with PPARgamma full agonists. The moderate PPARalpha activity of 12d not only contributed to the agent's ability to manage lipid profiles but also appears to have potentiated its PPARgamma efficacy in lowering glucose levels in preclinical diabetic animal models.

  4. The acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on postural sway and gastrocnemius muscle activity during single-leg balance tasks.

    PubMed

    Lima, Bráulio N; Lucareli, Paulo R G; Gomes, Willy A; Silva, Josinaldo J; Bley, Andre S; Hartigan, Erin H; Marchetti, Paulo H

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on surface electromyography (sEMG) and the center of pressure (COP) during a single-leg balance task in both lower limbs. Fourteen young healthy, non-athletic individuals performed unipodal quiet standing for 30s before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch) a unilateral ankle plantar flexor static- stretching protocol [6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort (POD)]. Postural sway was described using the COP area, COP speed (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions) and COP frequency (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions). Surface EMG (EMG integral [IEMG] and Median frequency[FM]) was used to describe the muscular activity of gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion increased in the stretched limb before and after the static-stretching protocol (mean ± SD: 15.0° ± 6.0 and 21.5° ± 7.0 [p < 0.001]). COP area and IEMG increased in the stretch limb between pre-stretching and immediately post-stretching (p = 0.015 and p = 0.036, respectively). In conclusion, our static- stretching protocol effectively increased passive ankle ROM. The increased ROM appears to increase postural sway and muscle activity; however these finding were only a temporary or transient effect. Key PointsThe postural control can be affected by static- stretching protocol.The lateral gastrocnemius muscle action was increased after the static- stretching protocol.The static- stretching effects remain for less than 10 minutes.

  5. Genetic Background Specific Hypoxia Resistance in Rat is Correlated with Balanced Activation of a Cross-Chromosomal Genetic Network Centering on Physiological Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism's response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN), Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic (CS) rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic back