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Sample records for active disease model

  1. Time series for modelling counts from a relapsing-remitting disease: application to modelling disease activity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Albert, P S; McFarland, H F; Smith, M E; Frank, J A

    Many chronic diseases are relapsing-remitting diseases, in which subjects alternate between periods with increasing and decreasing disease activity; relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis is an example. This paper proposes two classes of models for sequences of counts observed from a relapsing-remitting disease. In the first, the relapsing-remitting nature of the data is modelled by a Poisson time series with a periodic trend in the mean. In this approach, the mean is expressed as a function of a sinusoidal trend and past observations of the time series. An algorithm that uses GLIM is developed, and it results in maximum-likelihood estimation for the amplitude, frequency and autoregressive effects. In the second class of models, the relapsing-remitting behaviour is described by a Poisson time series in which changes in the mean follow a latent Markov chain. An EM algorithm is developed for maximum-likelihood estimation for this model. The two models are illustrated and compared with data from a study evaluating the use of serial magnetic resonance imaging as a measure of disease activity in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. PMID:8023028

  2. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Meiling; Jia, Dongwei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  3. Analysis of Oscillatory Neural Activity in Series Network Models of Parkinson's Disease During Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Clare M; de Paor, Annraoi M; Cagnan, Hayriye; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by hallmark motor symptoms. It is associated with pathological, oscillatory neural activity in the basal ganglia. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is often successfully used to treat medically refractive Parkinson's disease. However, the selection of stimulation parameters is based on qualitative assessment of the patient, which can result in a lengthy tuning period and a suboptimal choice of parameters. This study explores fourth-order, control theory-based models of oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia. Describing function analysis is applied to examine possible mechanisms for the generation of oscillations in interacting nuclei and to investigate the suppression of oscillations with high-frequency stimulation. The theoretical results for the suppression of the oscillatory activity obtained using both the fourth-order model, and a previously described second-order model, are optimized to fit clinically recorded local field potential data obtained from Parkinsonian patients with implanted DBS. Close agreement between the power of oscillations recorded for a range of stimulation amplitudes is observed ( R(2)=0.69-0.99 ). The results suggest that the behavior of the system and the suppression of pathological neural oscillations with DBS is well described by the macroscopic models presented. The results also demonstrate that in this instance, a second-order model is sufficient to model the clinical data, without the need for added complexity. Describing the system behavior with computationally efficient models could aid in the identification of optimal stimulation parameters for patients in a clinical environment.

  4. Finasteride inhibits the disease-modifying activity of progesterone in the hippocampus kindling model of epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Samba Reddy, Doodipala; Ramanathan, G

    2012-09-01

    Progesterone (P) plays an important role in seizure susceptibility in women with epilepsy. Preclinical and experimental studies suggest that P appears to interrupt epileptogenesis, which is a process whereby a normal brain becomes progressively susceptible to recurrent, unprovoked seizures due to precipitating risk factors. Progesterone has not been investigated widely for its potential disease-modifying activity in epileptogenic models. Recently, P has been shown to exert disease-modifying effects in the kindling model of epileptogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of P against epileptogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of P-derived neurosteroids in the disease-modifying activity of P. It is hypothesized that 5α-reductase converts P to allopregnanolone and related neurosteroids that retard epileptogenesis in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we utilized the mouse hippocampus kindling model of epileptogenesis and investigated the effect of finasteride, a 5α-reductase and neurosteroid synthesis inhibitor. Progesterone markedly retarded the development of epileptogenesis and inhibited the rate of kindling acquisition to elicit stage 5 seizures. Pretreatment with finasteride led to complete inhibition of the P-induced retardation of the limbic epileptogenesis in mice. Finasteride did not significantly influence the acute seizure expression in fully kindled mice expressing stage 5 seizures. Thus, neurosteroids that potentiate phasic and tonic inhibition in the hippocampus, such as allopregnanolone, may mediate the disease-modifying effect of P, indicating a new role of neurosteroids in acquired limbic epileptogenesis and temporal lobe epilepsy.

  5. Active learning to understand infectious disease models and improve policy making.

    PubMed

    Willem, Lander; Stijven, Sean; Vladislavleva, Ekaterina; Broeckhove, Jan; Beutels, Philippe; Hens, Niel

    2014-04-01

    Modeling plays a major role in policy making, especially for infectious disease interventions but such models can be complex and computationally intensive. A more systematic exploration is needed to gain a thorough systems understanding. We present an active learning approach based on machine learning techniques as iterative surrogate modeling and model-guided experimentation to systematically analyze both common and edge manifestations of complex model runs. Symbolic regression is used for nonlinear response surface modeling with automatic feature selection. First, we illustrate our approach using an individual-based model for influenza vaccination. After optimizing the parameter space, we observe an inverse relationship between vaccination coverage and cumulative attack rate reinforced by herd immunity. Second, we demonstrate the use of surrogate modeling techniques on input-response data from a deterministic dynamic model, which was designed to explore the cost-effectiveness of varicella-zoster virus vaccination. We use symbolic regression to handle high dimensionality and correlated inputs and to identify the most influential variables. Provided insight is used to focus research, reduce dimensionality and decrease decision uncertainty. We conclude that active learning is needed to fully understand complex systems behavior. Surrogate models can be readily explored at no computational expense, and can also be used as emulator to improve rapid policy making in various settings.

  6. Active Learning to Understand Infectious Disease Models and Improve Policy Making

    PubMed Central

    Vladislavleva, Ekaterina; Broeckhove, Jan; Beutels, Philippe; Hens, Niel

    2014-01-01

    Modeling plays a major role in policy making, especially for infectious disease interventions but such models can be complex and computationally intensive. A more systematic exploration is needed to gain a thorough systems understanding. We present an active learning approach based on machine learning techniques as iterative surrogate modeling and model-guided experimentation to systematically analyze both common and edge manifestations of complex model runs. Symbolic regression is used for nonlinear response surface modeling with automatic feature selection. First, we illustrate our approach using an individual-based model for influenza vaccination. After optimizing the parameter space, we observe an inverse relationship between vaccination coverage and cumulative attack rate reinforced by herd immunity. Second, we demonstrate the use of surrogate modeling techniques on input-response data from a deterministic dynamic model, which was designed to explore the cost-effectiveness of varicella-zoster virus vaccination. We use symbolic regression to handle high dimensionality and correlated inputs and to identify the most influential variables. Provided insight is used to focus research, reduce dimensionality and decrease decision uncertainty. We conclude that active learning is needed to fully understand complex systems behavior. Surrogate models can be readily explored at no computational expense, and can also be used as emulator to improve rapid policy making in various settings. PMID:24743387

  7. Two Analogues of Fenarimol Show Curative Activity in an Experimental Model of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), is an increasing threat to global health. Available medicines were introduced over 40 years ago, have undesirable side effects, and give equivocal results of cure in the chronic stage of the disease. We report the development of two compounds, 6 and (S)-7, with PCR-confirmed curative activity in a mouse model of established T. cruzi infection after once daily oral dosing for 20 days at 20 mg/kg 6 and 10 mg/kg (S)-7. Compounds 6 and (S)-7 have potent in vitro activity, are noncytotoxic, show no adverse effects in vivo following repeat dosing, are prepared by a short synthetic route, and have druglike properties suitable for preclinical development. PMID:24304150

  8. Altered Theta Oscillations and Aberrant Cortical Excitatory Activity in the 5XFAD Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siwek, Magdalena Elisabeth; Müller, Ralf; Henseler, Christina; Trog, Astrid; Lundt, Andreas; Wormuth, Carola; Broich, Karl; Weiergräber, Marco; Papazoglou, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impairment of memory function. The 5XFAD mouse model was analyzed and compared with wild-type (WT) controls for aberrant cortical excitability and hippocampal theta oscillations by using simultaneous video-electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. Seizure staging revealed that 5XFAD mice exhibited cortical hyperexcitability whereas controls did not. In addition, 5XFAD mice displayed a significant increase in hippocampal theta activity from the light to dark phase during nonmotor activity. We also observed a reduction in mean theta frequency in 5XFAD mice compared to controls that was again most prominent during nonmotor activity. Transcriptome analysis of hippocampal probes and subsequent qPCR validation revealed an upregulation of Plcd4 that might be indicative of enhanced muscarinic signalling. Our results suggest that 5XFAD mice exhibit altered cortical excitability, hippocampal dysrhythmicity, and potential changes in muscarinic signaling. PMID:25922768

  9. Hydrogel scaffolds as in vitro models to study fibroblast activation in wound healing and disease

    PubMed Central

    Smithmyer, Megan E.; Sawicki, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing results from complex signaling between cells and their environment in response to injury. Fibroblasts residing within the extracellular matrix (ECM) of various connective tissues are critical for matrix synthesis and repair. Upon injury or chronic insult, these cells activate into wound-healing cells, called myofibroblasts, and repair the damaged tissue through enzyme and protein secretion. However, misregulation and persistence of myofibroblasts can lead to uncontrolled accumulation of matrix proteins, tissue stiffening, and ultimately disease. Extracellular cues are important regulators of fibroblast activation and have been implicated in their persistence. Hydrogel-based culture models have emerged as useful tools to examine fibroblast response to ECM cues presented during these complex processes. In this Mini-Review, we will provide an overview of these model systems, which are built upon naturally-derived or synthetic materials, and mimic relevant biophysical and biochemical properties of the native ECM with different levels of control. Additionally, we will discuss the application of these hydrogel-based systems for the examination of fibroblast function and fate, including adhesion, migration, and activation, as well as approaches for mimicking both static and temporal aspects of extracellular environments. Specifically, we will highlight hydrogels that have been used to investigate the effects of matrix rigidity, protein binding, and cytokine signaling on fibroblast activation. Last, we will describe future directions for the design of hydrogels to develop improved synthetic models that mimic the complex extracellular environment. PMID:25379176

  10. Physical activity delays hippocampal neurodegeneration and rescues memory deficits in an Alzheimer disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Hüttenrauch, M; Brauß, A; Kurdakova, A; Borgers, H; Klinker, F; Liebetanz, D; Salinas-Riester, G; Wiltfang, J; Klafki, H W; Wirths, O

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for a protective role of physical activity on the risk and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been growing in the last years. Here we studied the influence of a prolonged physical and cognitive stimulation on neurodegeneration, with special emphasis on hippocampal neuron loss and associated behavioral impairment in the Tg4-42 mouse model of AD. Tg4-42 mice overexpress Aβ4-42 without any mutations, and develop an age-dependent hippocampal neuron loss associated with a severe memory decline. We demonstrate that long-term voluntary exercise diminishes CA1 neuron loss and completely rescues spatial memory deficits in different experimental settings. This was accompanied by changes in the gene expression profile of Tg4-42 mice. Deep sequencing analysis revealed an upregulation of chaperones involved in endoplasmatic reticulum protein processing, which might be intimately linked to the beneficial effects seen upon long-term exercise. We believe that we provide evidence for the first time that enhanced physical activity counteracts neuron loss and behavioral deficits in a transgenic AD mouse model. The present findings underscore the relevance of increased physical activity as a potential strategy in the prevention of dementia. PMID:27138799

  11. Physical activity delays hippocampal neurodegeneration and rescues memory deficits in an Alzheimer disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hüttenrauch, M; Brauß, A; Kurdakova, A; Borgers, H; Klinker, F; Liebetanz, D; Salinas-Riester, G; Wiltfang, J; Klafki, H W; Wirths, O

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for a protective role of physical activity on the risk and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been growing in the last years. Here we studied the influence of a prolonged physical and cognitive stimulation on neurodegeneration, with special emphasis on hippocampal neuron loss and associated behavioral impairment in the Tg4-42 mouse model of AD. Tg4-42 mice overexpress Aβ4-42 without any mutations, and develop an age-dependent hippocampal neuron loss associated with a severe memory decline. We demonstrate that long-term voluntary exercise diminishes CA1 neuron loss and completely rescues spatial memory deficits in different experimental settings. This was accompanied by changes in the gene expression profile of Tg4-42 mice. Deep sequencing analysis revealed an upregulation of chaperones involved in endoplasmatic reticulum protein processing, which might be intimately linked to the beneficial effects seen upon long-term exercise. We believe that we provide evidence for the first time that enhanced physical activity counteracts neuron loss and behavioral deficits in a transgenic AD mouse model. The present findings underscore the relevance of increased physical activity as a potential strategy in the prevention of dementia. PMID:27138799

  12. In vivo characterization of endothelial cell activation in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, Caroline; Blechert, Birgit; Gaertner, Florian C; Drecoll, Enken; Mueller, Jan; Weber, Georg F; Drzezga, Alexander; Essler, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. AD is characterized by an excessive cerebral amyloid deposition leading to degeneration of neurons and eventually to dementia. It has been shown by epidemiological studies that cardiovascular drugs with an anti-angiogenic effect can influence the outcome of AD patients. Therefore, it has been speculated that in AD angiogenesis in the brain vasculature may play an important role. Here we report that in the brain of APP23 mice--a transgenic model of AD--after deposition of amyloid in blood vessels endothelial cell activation occurs in an age-dependent manner. Amyloid deposition is followed by the expression of beta3-integrin, a specific marker molecule of activated endothelium. The beta3-integrin expression is restricted to amyloid-positive vessels. Moreover, homogenates of the brains of APP23 mice induced the formation of new vessels in an in vivo angiogenesis assay. Vessel formation could be blocked by the VEGF antagonist SU 4312 as well as by statins, suggesting that these drugs may interfere with endothelial cell activation in AD. In conclusion our results indicate that amyloid deposition in the vasculature leads to endothelial cell apoptosis and endothelial cell activation, which can be modulated by anti-angiogenic drugs.

  13. Genetic Suppression of Transgenic APP Rescues Hypersynchronous Network Activity in a Mouse Model of Alzeimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Born, Heather A.; Kim, Ji-Yoen; Savjani, Ricky R.; Das, Pritam; Dabaghian, Yuri A.; Guo, Qinxi; Yoo, Jong W.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Cirrito, John R.; Zheng, Hui; Golde, Todd E.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with an elevated risk for seizures that may be fundamentally connected to cognitive dysfunction. Supporting this link, many mouse models for AD exhibit abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in addition to the expected neuropathology and cognitive deficits. Here, we used a controllable transgenic system to investigate how network changes develop and are maintained in a model characterized by amyloid β (Aβ) overproduction and progressive amyloid pathology. EEG recordings in tet-off mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP) from birth display frequent sharp wave discharges (SWDs). Unexpectedly, we found that withholding APP overexpression until adulthood substantially delayed the appearance of epileptiform activity. Together, these findings suggest that juvenile APP overexpression altered cortical development to favor synchronized firing. Regardless of the age at which EEG abnormalities appeared, the phenotype was dependent on continued APP overexpression and abated over several weeks once transgene expression was suppressed. Abnormal EEG discharges were independent of plaque load and could be extinguished without altering deposited amyloid. Selective reduction of Aβ with a γ-secretase inhibitor has no effect on the frequency of SWDs, indicating that another APP fragment or the full-length protein was likely responsible for maintaining EEG abnormalities. Moreover, transgene suppression normalized the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory innervation in the cortex, whereas secretase inhibition did not. Our results suggest that APP overexpression, and not Aβ overproduction, is responsible for EEG abnormalities in our transgenic mice and can be rescued independently of pathology. PMID:24623762

  14. Resveratrol-activated AMPK/SIRT1/autophagy in cellular models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuncheng; Li, Xinqun; Zhu, Julie Xiaohong; Xie, Wenjie; Le, Weidong; Fan, Zhen; Jankovic, Joseph; Pan, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    Excessive misfolded proteins and/or dysfunctional mitochondria, which may cause energy deficiency, have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Enhanced clearance of misfolded proteins or injured mitochondria via autophagy has been reported to have neuroprotective roles in PD models. The fact that resveratrol is a known compound with multiple beneficial effects similar to those associated with energy metabolism led us to explore whether neuroprotective effects of resveratrol are related to its role in autophagy regulation. We tested whether modulation of mammalian silent information regulator 2 (SIRT1) and/or metabolic energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) are involved in autophagy induction by resveratrol, leading to neuronal survival. Our results showed that resveratrol protected against rotenone-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells and enhanced degradation of α-synucleins in α-synuclein-expressing PC12 cell lines via autophagy induction. We found that suppression of AMPK and/or SIRT1 caused decrease of protein level of LC3-II, indicating that AMPK and/or SIRT1 are required in resveratrol-mediated autophagy induction. Moreover, suppression of AMPK caused inhibition of SIRT1 activity and attenuated protective effects of resveratrol on rotenone-induced apoptosis, further suggesting that AMPK-SIRT1-autophagy pathway plays an important role in the neuroprotection by resveratrol on PD cellular models.

  15. Disease Activity Measures in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Nadia J.; Feldman, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Disease activity refers to potentially reversible aspects of a disease. Measurement of disease activity in paediatric rheumatic diseases is a critical component of patient care and clinical research. Disease activity measures are developed systematically, often involving consensus methods. To be useful, a disease activity measure must be feasible, valid, and interpretable. There are several challenges in quantifying disease activity in paediatric rheumatology; namely, the conditions are multidimensional, the level of activity must be valuated in the context of treatment being received, there is no gold standard for disease activity, and it is often difficult to incorporate the patient's perspective of their disease activity. To date, core sets of response variables are defined for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile dermatomyositis, as well as definitions for improvement in response to therapy. Several specific absolute disease activity measures also exist for each condition. Further work is required to determine the optimal disease activity measures in paediatric rheumatology. PMID:24089617

  16. Memory retrieval by activating engram cells in mouse models of early Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Dheeraj S.; Arons, Autumn; Mitchell, Teryn I.; Pignatelli, Michele; Ryan, Tomás J.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Summary Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory decline and subsequent loss of broader cognitive functions1. Memory decline in early stages of Alzheimer’s is mostly limited to episodic memory, for which the hippocampus (HPC) plays a crucial role2. However, it has been uncertain whether the observed amnesia in early stages of Alzheimer’s is due to disrupted encoding and consolidation of episodic information, or an impairment in the retrieval of stored memory information. Here we show that in transgenic mouse models of early Alzheimer’s, direct optogenetic activation of hippocampal memory engram cells results in memory retrieval despite the fact that these mice are amnesic in long-term memory tests when natural recall cues are utilized, revealing a retrieval, rather than a storage impairment. Prior to amyloid plaque deposition, the amnesia in these mice is age-dependent3–5, which correlates with a progressive reduction of spine density of hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) engram cells. We show that optogenetic induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) at perforant path (PP) synapses of DG engram cells restores both spine density and long-term memory. We also demonstrate that an ablation of DG engram cells containing restored spine density prevents the rescue of long-term memory. Thus, selective rescue of spine density in engram cells may lead to an effective strategy for treating memory loss in early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26982728

  17. Promiscuous activity of the LXR antagonist GSK2033 in a mouse model of fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Griffett, Kristine; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The liver X receptor (LXR) functions as a receptor for oxysterols and plays a critical role in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. We recently described a synthetic LXR inverse agonist that displayed efficacy in treatment of hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This compound, SR9238, was designed to display liver specificity so as to avoid potential detrimental effects on reverse cholesterol transport in peripheral tissues. Here, we examined the effects of a LXR antagonist/inverse agonist, GSK2033, which displays systemic exposure. Although GSK2033 performed as expected in cell-based models as a LXR inverse agonist, it displayed unexpected activity in the mouse NAFLD model. The expression of lipogenic enzyme genes such as fatty acid synthase and sterol regulatory binding protein 1c were induced rather than suppressed and no effect on hepatic steatosis was found. Further characterization of the specificity of GSK2033 revealed that it displayed a significant degree of promiscuity, targeting a number of other nuclear receptors that could clearly alter hepatic gene expression. PMID:27680310

  18. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone ameliorates disease activity in an induced murine lupus-like model.

    PubMed

    Botte, D A C; Noronha, I L; Malheiros, D M A C; Peixoto, T V; de Mello, S B V

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity in experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, no studies thus far have examined the effects of α-MSH on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to determine the effects of an α-MSH agonist in induced murine lupus. Here we employed female Balb/cAn mice in which lupus was induced by pristane. Groups of lupus animals were treated daily with the α-MSH analogue [Nle4, DPhe7]-α-MSH (NDP-MSH) (1·25 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally or saline for 180 days. Normal animals comprised the control group. Arthritis incidence, plasma immunoglobulin (Ig)G isotypes, anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and plasma cytokines were evaluated. Renal function was assessed by proteinuria and histopathological lesion. Glomerular levels of IgG, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), C3, CD3, melanocortin receptors (MCR)1, corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and α-MSH was estimated by immunohistochemistry. When compared with normal controls, lupus animals exhibited increased arthritis, IgG levels, ANA, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, proteinuria and mesangial cell proliferation together with glomerular expression of α-SMA and iNOS. Glomerular expression of MCR1 was reduced in lupus animals. NDP-MSH treatment reduced arthritis scores by 70% and also diminished IgG1 and IgG2a levels and ANA incidence. In the glomerulus, NDP-MSH treatment reduced cellularity by 50% together with reducing IgG deposits, and expression levels of α-SMA, iNOS and CRF were also all decreased. Taken together, our results suggest for the first time that α-MSH treatment improves several parameters of SLE disease activity in mice, and indicate that this hormone is an interesting potential future treatment option.

  19. Titration of biologically active amyloid–β seeds in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Rodrigo; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Soto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that misfolded Amyloid-β (Aβ) spreads in disease following a prion-like mechanism. Several properties characteristics of infectious prions have been shown for the induction of Aβ aggregates. However, a detailed titration of Aβ misfolding transmissibility and estimation of the minimum concentration of biologically active Aβ seeds able to accelerate pathological changes has not yet been performed. In this study, brain extracts from old tg2576 animals were serially diluted and intra-cerebrally injected into young subjects from the same transgenic line. Animals were sacrificed several months after treatment and brain slices were analyzed for amyloid pathology. We observed that administration of misfolded Aβ was able to significantly accelerate amyloid deposition in young mice, even when the original sample was diluted a million times. The titration curve obtained in this experiment was compared to the natural Aβ load spontaneously accumulated by these mice overtime. Our findings suggest that administration of the largest dose of Aβ seeds led to an acceleration of pathology equivalent to over a year. These results show that active Aβ seeds present in the brain can seed amyloidosis in a titratable manner, similarly as observed for infectious prions. PMID:25879692

  20. LXR activation protects hippocampal microvasculature in very old triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Hernández, Adrián G; Restrepo, Alejandro; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P; Arboleda, Gonzalo

    2016-05-16

    The vascular hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease postulates that disruption of the brain microvasculature is important for the accumulation of amyloid beta and increased neuroinflammation. Liver X Receptor agonist, GW3965, has been demonstrated to successfully modulate neuroinflammation and lipid metabolism in murine models of AD. This is partially due to increased expression of ApoE levels and increased mobility of endothelial progenitor cells. This paper analyzes changes in the neurovascular unit and in astrocytes and microglia markers following oral administration of GW3965 in a very old triple transgenic AD mice (3xTg-AD mice). We found that astrogliosis, but not activation of microglia, decreased in very old (24 months) 3xTg-AD mice treated with GW965. In addition, GW3965 increased LRP1 levels in neuron-like cells and partially restored microvascular morphology by decreasing tortuosity and increasing length as shown by Lectin immunostaining. Interestingly, these changes were associated with decreased Aβ in blood vessels. In conclusion, short-term treatment of 3xTg-AD mice with GW3965 restored microvascular architecture which may be important in the cognitive improvement previously shown.

  1. Renal Primordia Activate Kidney Regenerative Events in a Rat Model of Progressive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  2. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration.

  3. Memory retrieval by activating engram cells in mouse models of early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dheeraj S; Arons, Autumn; Mitchell, Teryn I; Pignatelli, Michele; Ryan, Tomás J; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2016-03-24

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory decline and subsequent loss of broader cognitive functions. Memory decline in the early stages of AD is mostly limited to episodic memory, for which the hippocampus has a crucial role. However, it has been uncertain whether the observed amnesia in the early stages of AD is due to disrupted encoding and consolidation of episodic information, or an impairment in the retrieval of stored memory information. Here we show that in transgenic mouse models of early AD, direct optogenetic activation of hippocampal memory engram cells results in memory retrieval despite the fact that these mice are amnesic in long-term memory tests when natural recall cues are used, revealing a retrieval, rather than a storage impairment. Before amyloid plaque deposition, the amnesia in these mice is age-dependent, which correlates with a progressive reduction in spine density of hippocampal dentate gyrus engram cells. We show that optogenetic induction of long-term potentiation at perforant path synapses of dentate gyrus engram cells restores both spine density and long-term memory. We also demonstrate that an ablation of dentate gyrus engram cells containing restored spine density prevents the rescue of long-term memory. Thus, selective rescue of spine density in engram cells may lead to an effective strategy for treating memory loss in the early stages of AD. PMID:26982728

  4. LXR activation protects hippocampal microvasculature in very old triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Hernández, Adrián G; Restrepo, Alejandro; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P; Arboleda, Gonzalo

    2016-05-16

    The vascular hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease postulates that disruption of the brain microvasculature is important for the accumulation of amyloid beta and increased neuroinflammation. Liver X Receptor agonist, GW3965, has been demonstrated to successfully modulate neuroinflammation and lipid metabolism in murine models of AD. This is partially due to increased expression of ApoE levels and increased mobility of endothelial progenitor cells. This paper analyzes changes in the neurovascular unit and in astrocytes and microglia markers following oral administration of GW3965 in a very old triple transgenic AD mice (3xTg-AD mice). We found that astrogliosis, but not activation of microglia, decreased in very old (24 months) 3xTg-AD mice treated with GW965. In addition, GW3965 increased LRP1 levels in neuron-like cells and partially restored microvascular morphology by decreasing tortuosity and increasing length as shown by Lectin immunostaining. Interestingly, these changes were associated with decreased Aβ in blood vessels. In conclusion, short-term treatment of 3xTg-AD mice with GW3965 restored microvascular architecture which may be important in the cognitive improvement previously shown. PMID:27057732

  5. SIRT2- and NRF2-Targeting Thiazole-Containing Compound with Therapeutic Activity in Huntington's Disease Models.

    PubMed

    Quinti, Luisa; Casale, Malcolm; Moniot, Sébastien; Pais, Teresa F; Van Kanegan, Michael J; Kaltenbach, Linda S; Pallos, Judit; Lim, Ryan G; Naidu, Sharadha Dayalan; Runne, Heike; Meisel, Lisa; Rauf, Nazifa Abdul; Leyfer, Dmitriy; Maxwell, Michele M; Saiah, Eddine; Landers, John E; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Abagyan, Ruben; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Steegborn, Clemens; Marsh, J Lawrence; Lo, Donald C; Thompson, Leslie M; Kazantsev, Aleksey G

    2016-07-21

    There are currently no disease-modifying therapies for the neurodegenerative disorder Huntington's disease (HD). This study identified novel thiazole-containing inhibitors of the deacetylase sirtuin-2 (SIRT2) with neuroprotective activity in ex vivo brain slice and Drosophila models of HD. A systems biology approach revealed an additional SIRT2-independent property of the lead-compound, MIND4, as an inducer of cytoprotective NRF2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-derived factor 2) activity. Structure-activity relationship studies further identified a potent NRF2 activator (MIND4-17) lacking SIRT2 inhibitory activity. MIND compounds induced NRF2 activation responses in neuronal and non-neuronal cells and reduced production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen intermediates. These drug-like thiazole-containing compounds represent an exciting opportunity for development of multi-targeted agents with potentially synergistic therapeutic benefits in HD and related disorders. PMID:27427231

  6. Silibinin suppresses astroglial activation in a mouse model of acute Parkinson's disease by modulating the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujeong; Chun, Hye Jeong; Lee, Kyung Moon; Jung, Young-Suk; Lee, Jaewon

    2015-11-19

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second-most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, and is characterized by dopaminergic neuronal loss in midbrain. The MPTP-induced PD model has been well characterized by motor deficits and selective dopaminergic neuronal death accompanied by glial activation. Silibinin is a constituent of silymarin, an extract of milk thistle seeds, and has been proposed to have hepatoprotective, anti-cancer, anti-oxidative, and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, the authors studied the neuroprotective effects of silibinin in an acute MPTP model of PD. Silibinin was administered for 2 weeks, and then MPTP was administered to mice over 1 day (acute MPTP induced PD). Silibinin pretreatment effectively ameliorated motor dysfunction, dopaminergic neuronal loss, and glial activations caused by MPTP. In addition, an in vitro study demonstrated that silibinin suppressed astroglial activation and ERK and JNK phosphorylation in primary astrocytes in response to MPP(+) treatment. These findings show silibinin protected dopaminergic neurons in an acute MPTP-induced mouse model of PD, and suggest its neuroprotective effects might be mediated by the suppression of astrocyte activation via the inhibition of ERK and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the study indicates silibinin should be viewed as a potential treatment for PD and other neurodegenerative diseases associated with neuroinflammation. PMID:26434409

  7. Modelling Rift Valley fever (RVF) disease vector habitats using active and passive remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrosia, Vincent G.; Linthicum, K. G.; Bailey, C. L.; Sebesta, P.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Ames Ecosystem Science and Technology Branch and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases are conducting research to detect Rift Valley fever (RVF) vector habitats in eastern Africa using active and passive remote-sensing. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) calculated from Landsat TM and SPOT data is used to characterize the vegetation common to the Aedes mosquito. Relationships have been found between the highest NDVI and the 'dambo' habitat areas near Riuru, Kenya on both wet and dry data. High NDVI values, when combined with the vegetation classifications, are clearly related to the areas of vector habitats. SAR data have been proposed for use during the rainy season when optical systems are of minimal use and the short frequency and duration of the optimum RVF mosquito habitat conditions necessitate rapid evaluation of the vegetation/moisture conditions; only then can disease potential be stemmed and eradication efforts initiated.

  8. Implementation of an active aging model in Mexico for prevention and control of chronic diseases in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; Martínez-Maldonado, María de la Luz; Correa-Muñoz, Elsa

    2009-01-01

    Background World Health Organization cites among the main challenges of populational aging the dual disease burden: the greater risk of disability, and the need for care. In this sense, the most frequent chronic diseases during old age worldwide are high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, arthritis, osteoporosis, depression, and dementia. Chronic disease-associated dependency represents an onerous sanitary and financial burden for the older adult, the family, and the health care system. Thus, it is necessary to propose community-level models for chronic disease prevention and control in old age. The aim of the present work is to show our experience in the development and implementation of a model for chronic disease prevention and control in old age at the community level under the active aging paradigm. Methods/Design A longitudinal study will be carried out in a sample of 400 elderly urban and rural-dwelling individuals residing in Hidalgo State, Mexico during five years. All participants will be enrolled in the model active aging. This establishes the formation of 40 gerontological promoters (GPs) from among the older adults themselves. The GPs function as mutual-help group coordinators (gerontological nuclei) and establish self-care and self-promotion actions for elderly well-being and social development. It will be conformed a big-net of social network of 40 mutual-help groups of ten elderly adults each one, in which self-care is a daily practice for chronic disease prevention and control, as well as for achieving maximal well-being and life quality in old age. Indicators of the model's impact will be (i) therapeutic adherence; (ii) the incidence of the main chronic diseases in old age; (iii) life expectancy without chronic diseases at 60 years of age; (iv) disability adjusted life years lost; (v) years of life lost due to premature mortality, and (vi) years lived with disability. Discussion We propose that the implementation of the model active

  9. AMPK activation protects from neuronal dysfunction and vulnerability across nematode, cellular and mouse models of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Manrique, Rafael P.; Farina, Francesca; Cambon, Karine; Dolores Sequedo, María; Parker, Alex J.; Millán, José María; Weiss, Andreas; Déglon, Nicole; Neri, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The adenosine monophosphate activated kinase protein (AMPK) is an evolutionary-conserved protein important for cell survival and organismal longevity through the modulation of energy homeostasis. Several studies suggested that AMPK activation may improve energy metabolism and protein clearance in the brains of patients with vascular injury or neurodegenerative disease. However, in Huntington's disease (HD), AMPK may be activated in the striatum of HD mice at a late, post-symptomatic phase of the disease, and high-dose regiments of the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide may worsen neuropathological and behavioural phenotypes. Here, we revisited the role of AMPK in HD using models that recapitulate the early features of the disease, including Caenorhabditis elegans neuron dysfunction before cell death and mouse striatal cell vulnerability. Genetic and pharmacological manipulation of aak-2/AMPKα shows that AMPK activation protects C. elegans neurons from the dysfunction induced by human exon-1 huntingtin (Htt) expression, in a daf-16/forkhead box O-dependent manner. Similarly, AMPK activation using genetic manipulation and low-dose metformin treatment protects mouse striatal cells expressing full-length mutant Htt (mHtt), counteracting their vulnerability to stress, with reduction of soluble mHtt levels by metformin and compensation of cytotoxicity by AMPKα1. Furthermore, AMPK protection is active in the mouse brain as delivery of gain-of-function AMPK-γ1 to mouse striata slows down the neurodegenerative effects of mHtt. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of considering the dynamic of HD for assessing the therapeutic potential of stress-response targets in the disease. We postulate that AMPK activation is a compensatory response and valid approach for protecting dysfunctional and vulnerable neurons in HD. PMID:26681807

  10. Neuroprotective activity of peripherally administered liver growth factor in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Gobernado, Rafael; Calatrava-Ferreras, Lucía; Reimers, Diana; Herranz, Antonio Sánchez; Rodríguez-Serrano, Macarena; Miranda, Cristina; Jiménez-Escrig, Adriano; Díaz-Gil, Juan José; Bazán, Eulalia

    2013-01-01

    Liver growth factor (LGF) is a hepatic mitogen purified some years ago that promotes proliferation of different cell types and the regeneration of damaged tissues, including brain tissue. Considering the possibility that LGF could be used as a therapeutic agent in Parkinson's disease, we analyzed its potential neuroregenerative and/or neuroprotective activity when peripherally administered to unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. For these studies, rats subjected to nigrostriatal lesions were treated intraperitoneally twice a week with LGF (5 microg/rat) for 3 weeks. Animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after the last LGF treatment. The results show that LGF stimulates sprouting of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive terminals and increases tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter expression, as well as dopamine levels in the denervated striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. In this structure, LGF activates microglia and raises tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein levels, which have been reported to have a role in neuroregeneration and neuroprotection. Besides, LGF stimulates the phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK1/2 and CREB, and regulates the expression of proteins which are critical for cell survival such as Bcl2 and Akt. Because LGF partially protects dopamine neurons from 6-OHDA neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra, and reduces motor deficits in these animals, we propose LGF as a novel factor that may be useful in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  11. DNA methylase and demethylase activities are modulated by one-carbon metabolism in Alzheimer's disease models.

    PubMed

    Fuso, Andrea; Nicolia, Vincenzina; Cavallaro, Rosaria A; Scarpa, Sigfrido

    2011-03-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer's disease seems to be a multi-factorial disease with both genetic and non-genetic, environmental, possible causes. Recently, epigenomics is achieving a major role in Alzheimer's research due to its involvement in different molecular pathways leading to neurodegeneration. Among the different epigenetic modifications, DNA methylation is one of the most relevant to the disease. We previously demonstrated that presenilin1 (PSEN1), a gene involved in amyloidogenesis, is modulated by DNA methylation in neuroblastoma cells and Alzheimer's mice in an experimental model of nutritionally altered one-carbon metabolism. This alteration, obtained by nutritional deficiency of B vitamins (folate, B12 and B6) hampered S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent methylation reactions. The aim of the present paper was to investigate the regulation of DNA methylation machinery in response to hypomethylating (B vitamin deficiency) and hypermethylating (SAM supplementation) alterations of the one-carbon metabolism. We found that DNA methylases (DNMT1, 3a and 3b) and a putative demethylase (MBD2) were differently modulated, in line with the previously observed changes of PSEN1 methylation pattern in the same experimental conditions.

  12. A three-step multimodal analysis framework for modeling corticomuscular activity with application to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xun; Wang, Z Jane; McKeown, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    Corticomuscular coupling analysis based on multiple datasets such as electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) signals provides a useful tool for understanding human motor control systems. A popular conventional method to assess corticomuscular coupling has been the pair-wise magnitude-squared coherence (MSC) between EEG and concomitant EMG recordings. However, there are certain limitations associated with the MSC, including the difficulty in robustly assessing group inference, only dealing with two types of datasets simultaneously and the biologically implausible assumption of pair-wise interactions. To overcome such limitations, in this paper, we propose assessing corticomuscular coupling by combining multiset canonical correlation analysis (M-CCA) and joint independent component analysis (jICA). The proposed method takes advantage of the M-CCA and jICA to ensure that the extracted components are maximally correlated across multiple datasets and meanwhile statistically independent within each dataset. Simulations were performed to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. We also applied the proposed method to concurrent EEG, EMG, and behavior data collected in a Parkinson's disease (PD) study. The results reveal highly correlated temporal patterns among the three types of signals and corresponding spatial activation patterns. In addition to the expected motor areas, the corresponding spatial activation patterns demonstrate enhanced occipital connectivity in the PD subjects, consistent with previous medical findings.

  13. Modeling Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... MIDAS models require a breadth of knowledge, the network draws together an interdisciplinary team of researchers with expertise in epidemiology, infectious diseases, computational biology, statistics, social sciences, physics, computer sciences and informatics. In 2006, MIDAS modelers simulated ...

  14. Activation of the factor XII-driven contact system in Alzheimer’s disease patient and mouse model plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zamolodchikov, Daria; Chen, Zu-Lin; Conti, Brooke A.; Renné, Thomas; Strickland, Sidney

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), which likely contributes to disease via multiple mechanisms. Increasing evidence implicates inflammation in AD, the origins of which are not completely understood. We investigated whether circulating Aβ could initiate inflammation in AD via the plasma contact activation system. This proteolytic cascade is triggered by the activation of the plasma protein factor XII (FXII) and leads to kallikrein-mediated cleavage of high molecular-weight kininogen (HK) and release of proinflammatory bradykinin. Aβ has been shown to promote FXII-dependent cleavage of HK in vitro. In addition, increased cleavage of HK has been found in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with AD. Here, we show increased activation of FXII, kallikrein activity, and HK cleavage in AD patient plasma. Increased contact system activation is also observed in AD mouse model plasma and in plasma from wild-type mice i.v. injected with Aβ42. Our results demonstrate that Aβ42-mediated contact system activation can occur in the AD circulation and suggest new pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tests, and therapies for AD. PMID:25775543

  15. Cortical Efferents Lacking Mutant huntingtin Improve Striatal Neuronal Activity and Behavior in a Conditional Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Sánchez, Ana María; Burroughs, Courtney L.; Cavaliere, Stephen; Barton, Scott J.; Chen, Shirley; Yang, X. William

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal electrophysiological activity in the striatum, which receives dense innervation from the cerebral cortex, is believed to set the stage for the behavioral phenotype observed in Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative condition caused by mutation of the huntingtin (mhtt) protein. However, cortical involvement is far from clear. To determine whether abnormal striatal processing can be explained by mhtt alone (cell-autonomous model) or by mhtt in the corticostriatal projection cell–cell interaction model, we used BACHD/Emx1–Cre (BE) mice, a conditional HD model in which full-length mhtt is genetically reduced in cortical output neurons, including those that project to the striatum. Animals were assessed beginning at 20 weeks of age for at least the next 40 weeks, a range over which presymptomatic BACHD mice become symptomatic. Both open-field and nest-building behavior deteriorated progressively in BACHD mice relative to both BE and wild-type (WT) mice. Neuronal activity patterns in the dorsal striatum, which receives input from the primary motor cortex (M1), followed a similar age progression because BACHD activity changed more rapidly than either BE or WT mice. However, in the M1, BE neuronal activity differed significantly from both WT and BACHD. Although abnormal cortical activity in BE mice likely reflects input from mhtt-expressing afferents, including cortical interneurons, improvements in BE striatal activity and behavior suggest a critical role for mhtt in cortical output neurons in shaping the onset and progression of striatal dysfunction. PMID:25762686

  16. A novel human model of the neurodegenerative disease GM1 gangliosidosis using induced pluripotent stem cells demonstrates inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Son, Mi-Young; Kwak, Jae Eun; Seol, Binna; Lee, Da Yong; Jeon, Hyejin; Cho, Yee Sook

    2015-09-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the lysosomal β-galactosidase (β-gal) gene. Insufficient β-gal activity leads to abnormal accumulation of GM1 gangliosides in tissues, particularly in the central nervous system, resulting in progressive neurodegeneration. Here, we report an in vitro human GM1 model, based on induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology. Neural progenitor cells differentiated from GM1 patient-derived iPSCs (GM1-NPCs) recapitulated the biochemical and molecular phenotypes of GM1, including defective β-gal activity and increased lysosomes. Importantly, the characterization of GM1-NPCs established that GM1 is significantly associated with the activation of inflammasomes, which play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases. Specific inflammasome inhibitors potently alleviated the disease-related phenotypes of GM1-NPCs in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrate that GM1-NPCs are a valuable in vitro human GM1 model and suggest that inflammasome activation is a novel target pathway for GM1 drug development.

  17. Factors Predicting Nutrition and Physical Activity Behaviors Due to Cardiovascular Disease in Tehran University Students: Application of Health Belief Model

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati-Najarkolaei, Fatemeh; Tavafian, Sedigheh Sadat; Gholami Fesharaki, Mohammad; Jafari, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disease preventing methods focus mostly on lifestyle factors such as physical activity, healthy diet and not smoking. Previous studies verified using theory and models to change unhealthy behaviors, so that health belief model (HBM) is a useful framework for describing the healthy nutrition behavior. Objectives: This study aimed to predict factors related to unhealthy nutrition and inactive life in students of Tehran University, Tehran, Iran based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). Patients and Methods: In this cross sectional study, proportional quota sampling from three different educational levels was conducted from October to December 2012. A self-administered validated instrument based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) with 69 items and four sections was used to collect data. In this study through using linear and logistic regression, the effect of body mass index, age, gender, marriage, self-efficacy, cues to action, knowledge, perceived severity, susceptibility, benefits and barriers on nutrition and physical activity behavior were assessed. SPSS version 18 was used to analyze data. Results: Totally, 368 students including 318 female students (86.4%) and 50 male students (13.6%) with a mean age of 24.9 years (SD = 4.55) took part in the study. Among all independent variables, gender (P < 0.001), knowledge (P = 0.023) and perceived barriers (P = 0.004) predicted nutrition behavior. In case of physical activity, knowledge (P = 0.011), perceived severity (P = 0.009), perceived barriers (P = 0.019) and self-efficacy (P = 0.033) had significance association with physical activity behavior. Conclusions: This study indicated that health belief model contrasts could predict the risky behavior of university students due to heart disease. However, more researches are needed to verify the predictors of high risky behaviors in students. PMID:26019896

  18. Sir2 is induced by oxidative stress in a yeast model of Huntington disease and its activation reduces protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sorolla, M Alba; Nierga, Clara; Rodríguez-Colman, M José; Reverter-Branchat, Gemma; Arenas, Alicia; Tamarit, Jordi; Ros, Joaquim; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2011-06-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of CAG trinucleotide repeats, leading to an elongated polyglutamine sequence (polyQ) in the huntingtin protein. Misfolding of mutant polyQ proteins with expanded tracts results in aggregation, causing cytotoxicity. Oxidative stress in HD has been documented in humans as important to disease progression. Using yeast cells as a model of HD, we report that when grown at high glucose concentration, cells expressing mutant polyQ do not show apparent oxidative stress. At higher cell densities, when glucose becomes limiting and cells are metabolically shifting from fermentation to respiration, protein oxidation and catalase activity increases in relation to the length of the polyQ tract. Oxidative stress, either endogenous as a result of mutant polyQ expression or exogenously generated, increases Sir2 levels. Δ sir2 cells expressing expanded polyQ lengths show signs of oxidative stress even at the early exponential phase. In a wild-type background, isonicotinamide, a Sir2 activator, decreases mutant polyQ aggregation and the stress generated by expanded polyQ. Taken together, these results describe mutant polyQ proteins as being more toxic in respiring cells, causing oxidative stress and an increase in Sir2 levels. Activation of Sir2 would play a protective role against this toxicity. PMID:21513696

  19. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans. PMID:24814483

  20. Restoration of Glyoxalase Enzyme Activity Precludes Cognitive Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Pathologically high brain levels of reactive dicarbonyls such as methylglyoxal or glyoxal initiate processes that lead ultimately to neurodegeneration, presented clinically as Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive or motor impairment disorders. Methylglyoxal and glyoxal result from glycolysis and normal metabolic pathways. Their reaction products with proteins (advanced glycation end products), and their primary chemical toxicities are both linked unequivocally to the primary pathologies of Alzheimer’s disease, namely, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Generation of dicarbonyls is countered through the reduction of dicarbonyls by the glutathione-dependent glyoxalase enzyme system. Although glyoxalase-I is overexpressed in early and middle stages of Alzheimer’s disease, glutathione depletion in the Alzheimer’s afflicted brain cripples its efficacy. Due to the lack of a suitable pharmacological tool, the restoration of glyoxalase enzyme activity in pre-Alzheimer’s or manifest Alzheimer’s remains yet unvalidated as a means for anti-Alzheimer’s therapy development. Disclosed herein are the results of a preclinical study into the therapeutic efficacy of ψ-GSH, a synthetic cofactor of glyoxalase, in mitigating Alzheimer’s indicators in a transgenic mouse model (APP/PS1) that is predisposed to Alzheimer’s disease. ψ-GSH administration completely averts the development of spatial mnemonic and long-term cognitive/cued-recall impairment. Amyloid β deposition and oxidative stress indicators are drastically reduced in the ψ-GSH-treated APP/PS1 mouse. ψ-GSH lacks discernible toxicity at strikingly high doses of 2000 mg/kg. The hypothesis that restoring brain glyoxalase activity would ameliorate neurogeneration stands validated, thus presenting a much needed new target for design of anti-Alzheimer’s therapeutics. Consequently, ψ-GSH is established as a candidate for drug-development. PMID:23421684

  1. Modulation of Mitochondrial Complex I Activity Averts Cognitive Decline in Multiple Animal Models of Familial Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Song; Maezawa, Izumi; Trushin, Sergey; Minhas, Paras; Pinto, Matthew; Jin, Lee-Way; Prasain, Keshar; Nguyen, Thi D.T.; Yamazaki, Yu; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Bu, Guojun; Gateno, Benjamin; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Nath, Karl A.; Nemutlu, Emirhan; Dzeja, Petras; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Hua, Duy H.; Trushina, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Development of therapeutic strategies to prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of great importance. We show that mild inhibition of mitochondrial complex I with small molecule CP2 reduces levels of amyloid beta and phospho-Tau and averts cognitive decline in three animal models of familial AD. Low-mass molecular dynamics simulations and biochemical studies confirmed that CP2 competes with flavin mononucleotide for binding to the redox center of complex I leading to elevated AMP/ATP ratio and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in neurons and mouse brain without inducing oxidative damage or inflammation. Furthermore, modulation of complex I activity augmented mitochondrial bioenergetics increasing coupling efficiency of respiratory chain and neuronal resistance to stress. Concomitant reduction of glycogen synthase kinase 3β activity and restoration of axonal trafficking resulted in elevated levels of neurotrophic factors and synaptic proteins in adult AD mice. Our results suggest that metabolic reprogramming induced by modulation of mitochondrial complex I activity represents promising therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:26086035

  2. Additive reductions in zebrafish PRPS1 activity result in a spectrum of deficiencies modeling several human PRPS1-associated diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Wuhong; Xu, Lisha; Varshney, Gaurav K.; Carrington, Blake; Bishop, Kevin; Jones, MaryPat; Huang, Sunny C.; Idol, Jennifer; Pretorius, Pamela R.; Beirl, Alisha; Schimmenti, Lisa A.; Kindt, Katie S.; Sood, Raman; Burgess, Shawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase-1 (PRPS1) is a key enzyme in nucleotide biosynthesis, and mutations in PRPS1 are found in several human diseases including nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-5, and Arts Syndrome. We utilized zebrafish as a model to confirm that mutations in PRPS1 result in phenotypic deficiencies in zebrafish similar to those in the associated human diseases. We found two paralogs in zebrafish, prps1a and prps1b and characterized each paralogous mutant individually as well as the double mutant fish. Zebrafish prps1a mutants and prps1a;prps1b double mutants showed similar morphological phenotypes with increasingly severe phenotypes as the number of mutant alleles increased. Phenotypes included smaller eyes and reduced hair cell numbers, consistent with the optic atrophy and hearing impairment observed in human patients. The double mutant also showed abnormal development of primary motor neurons, hair cell innervation, and reduced leukocytes, consistent with the neuropathy and recurrent infection of the human patients possessing the most severe reductions of PRPS1 activity. Further analyses indicated the phenotypes were associated with a prolonged cell cycle likely resulting from reduced nucleotide synthesis and energy production in the mutant embryos. We further demonstrated the phenotypes were caused by delays in the tissues most highly expressing the prps1 genes. PMID:27425195

  3. Selenoprotein T Exerts an Essential Oxidoreductase Activity That Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boukhzar, Loubna; Hamieh, Abdallah; Cartier, Dorthe; Tanguy, Yannick; Alsharif, Ifat; Castex, Matthieu; Arabo, Arnaud; Hajji, Sana El; Bonnet, Jean-Jacques; Errami, Mohammed; Falluel-Morel, Anthony; Chagraoui, Abdeslam; Lihrmann, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Oxidative stress is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the mechanisms involved in the control of this stress in dopaminergic cells are not fully understood. There is increasing evidence that selenoproteins play a central role in the control of redox homeostasis and cell defense, but the precise contribution of members of this family of proteins during the course of neurodegenerative diseases is still elusive. Results: We demonstrated first that selenoprotein T (SelT) whose gene disruption is lethal during embryogenesis, exerts a potent oxidoreductase activity. In the SH-SY5Y cell model of dopaminergic neurons, both silencing and overexpression of SelT affected oxidative stress and cell survival. Treatment with PD-inducing neurotoxins such as 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) or rotenone triggered SelT expression in the nigrostriatal pathway of wild-type mice, but provoked rapid and severe parkinsonian-like motor defects in conditional brain SelT-deficient mice. This motor impairment was associated with marked oxidative stress and neurodegeneration and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase activity and dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal system. Finally, in PD patients, we report that SelT is tremendously increased in the caudate putamen tissue. Innovation: These results reveal the activity of a novel selenoprotein enzyme that protects dopaminergic neurons against oxidative stress and prevents early and severe movement impairment in animal models of PD. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that selenoproteins such as SelT play a crucial role in the protection of dopaminergic neurons against oxidative stress and cell death, providing insight into the molecular underpinnings of this stress in PD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 557–574. PMID:26866473

  4. Magnetite-Amyloid-β deteriorates activity and functional organization in an in vitro model for Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teller, Sara; Tahirbegi, Islam Bogachan; Mir, Mònica; Samitier, Josep; Soriano, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    The understanding of the key mechanisms behind human brain deterioration in Alzheimer’ disease (AD) is a highly active field of research. The most widespread hypothesis considers a cascade of events initiated by amyloid-β peptide fibrils that ultimately lead to the formation of the lethal amyloid plaques. Recent studies have shown that other agents, in particular magnetite, can also play a pivotal role. To shed light on the action of magnetite and amyloid-β in the deterioration of neuronal circuits, we investigated their capacity to alter spontaneous activity patterns in cultured neuronal networks. Using a versatile experimental platform that allows the parallel monitoring of several cultures, the activity in controls was compared with the one in cultures dosed with magnetite, amyloid-β and magnetite-amyloid-β complex. A prominent degradation in spontaneous activity was observed solely when amyloid-β and magnetite acted together. Our work suggests that magnetite nanoparticles have a more prominent role in AD than previously thought, and may bring new insights in the understanding of the damaging action of magnetite-amyloid-β complex. Our experimental system also offers new interesting perspectives to explore key biochemical players in neurological disorders through a controlled, model system manner.

  5. Magnetite-Amyloid-β deteriorates activity and functional organization in an in vitro model for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Teller, Sara; Tahirbegi, Islam Bogachan; Mir, Mònica; Samitier, Josep; Soriano, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the key mechanisms behind human brain deterioration in Alzheimer’ disease (AD) is a highly active field of research. The most widespread hypothesis considers a cascade of events initiated by amyloid-β peptide fibrils that ultimately lead to the formation of the lethal amyloid plaques. Recent studies have shown that other agents, in particular magnetite, can also play a pivotal role. To shed light on the action of magnetite and amyloid-β in the deterioration of neuronal circuits, we investigated their capacity to alter spontaneous activity patterns in cultured neuronal networks. Using a versatile experimental platform that allows the parallel monitoring of several cultures, the activity in controls was compared with the one in cultures dosed with magnetite, amyloid-β and magnetite-amyloid-β complex. A prominent degradation in spontaneous activity was observed solely when amyloid-β and magnetite acted together. Our work suggests that magnetite nanoparticles have a more prominent role in AD than previously thought, and may bring new insights in the understanding of the damaging action of magnetite-amyloid-β complex. Our experimental system also offers new interesting perspectives to explore key biochemical players in neurological disorders through a controlled, model system manner. PMID:26608215

  6. Environmental enrichment does not influence hypersynchronous network activity in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bezzina, Charlotte; Verret, Laure; Halley, Hélène; Dahan, Lionel; Rampon, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis claims that the brain can overcome pathology by reinforcing preexistent processes or by developing alternative cognitive strategies. Epidemiological studies have revealed that this reserve can be built throughout life experiences as education or leisure activities. We previously showed that an early transient environmental enrichment (EE) durably improves memory performances in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recently, we evidenced a hypersynchronous brain network activity in young adult Tg2576 mice. As aberrant oscillatory activity can contribute to memory deficits, we wondered whether the long-lasting memory improvements observed after EE were associated with a reduction of neuronal network hypersynchrony. Thus, we exposed non-transgenic (NTg) and Tg2576 mice to standard or enriched housing conditions for 10 weeks, starting at 3 months of age. Two weeks after EE period, Tg2576 mice presented similar seizure susceptibility to a GABA receptor antagonist. Immediately after and 2 weeks after this enrichment period, standard and enriched-housed Tg2576 mice did not differ with regards to the frequency of interictal spikes on their electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. Thus, the long-lasting effect of this EE protocol on memory capacities in Tg2576 mice is not mediated by a reduction of their cerebral aberrant neuronal activity at early ages. PMID:26441640

  7. Environmental enrichment does not influence hypersynchronous network activity in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bezzina, Charlotte; Verret, Laure; Halley, Hélène; Dahan, Lionel; Rampon, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis claims that the brain can overcome pathology by reinforcing preexistent processes or by developing alternative cognitive strategies. Epidemiological studies have revealed that this reserve can be built throughout life experiences as education or leisure activities. We previously showed that an early transient environmental enrichment (EE) durably improves memory performances in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, we evidenced a hypersynchronous brain network activity in young adult Tg2576 mice. As aberrant oscillatory activity can contribute to memory deficits, we wondered whether the long-lasting memory improvements observed after EE were associated with a reduction of neuronal network hypersynchrony. Thus, we exposed non-transgenic (NTg) and Tg2576 mice to standard or enriched housing conditions for 10 weeks, starting at 3 months of age. Two weeks after EE period, Tg2576 mice presented similar seizure susceptibility to a GABA receptor antagonist. Immediately after and 2 weeks after this enrichment period, standard and enriched-housed Tg2576 mice did not differ with regards to the frequency of interictal spikes on their electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. Thus, the long-lasting effect of this EE protocol on memory capacities in Tg2576 mice is not mediated by a reduction of their cerebral aberrant neuronal activity at early ages. PMID:26441640

  8. A liquid phase based C. elegans behavioral analysis system identifies motor activity loss in a nematode Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Maohua; Gorelenkova, Olga; Yang, Jiong; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2012-03-15

    Motor activity of Caenorhabditis elegans is widely used to study the mechanisms ranging from basic neuronal functions to human neurodegenerative diseases. It may also serve as a paradigm to screen for potential therapeutic reagents treating these diseases. Here, we developed an automated, 96-well plate and liquid phase based system that quantifies nematode motor activity in real time. Using this system, we identified an adult-onset, ageing-associated motor activity loss in a transgenic nematode line expressing human pathogenic G2019S mutant LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2), the leading genetic cause of Parkinson's disease characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration associated motor deficient mainly in elder citizens. Thus, our system may be used as a platform to screen for potential therapeutic drugs treating Parkinson's disease. It can also be used to monitor motor activity of nematodes in liquid phase at similar scenario.

  9. Transduced PEP-1-PON1 proteins regulate microglial activation and dopaminergic neuronal death in a Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Park, Meeyoung; Kim, Dae Won; Shin, Min Jea; Son, Ora; Jo, Hyo Sang; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Kim, Duk-Soo; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Kim, Joon; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an oxidative stress-mediated neurodegenerative disorder caused by selective dopaminergic neuronal death in the midbrain substantia nigra. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a potent inhibitor of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) against oxidation by destroying biologically active phospholipids with potential protective effects against oxidative stress-induced inflammatory disorders. In a previous study, we constructed protein transduction domain (PTD) fusion PEP-1-PON1 protein to transduce PON1 into cells and tissue. In this study, we examined the role of transduced PEP-1-PON1 protein in repressing oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory response in microglial BV2 cells after exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, we identified the functions of transduced PEP-1-PON1 proteins which include, mitigating mitochondrial damage, decreasing reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression and protecting against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, transduced PEP-1-PON1 protein reduced MMP-9 expression and protected against dopaminergic neuronal cell death in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced PD mice model. Taken together, these results suggest a promising therapeutic application of PEP-1-PON1 proteins against PD and other inflammation and oxidative stress-related neuronal diseases.

  10. Bicyclic-Capped Histone Deacetylase 6 Inhibitors with Improved Activity in a Model of Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    PubMed

    Shen, Sida; Benoy, Veronick; Bergman, Joel A; Kalin, Jay H; Frojuello, Mariana; Vistoli, Giulio; Haeck, Wanda; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-02-17

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a disorder of the peripheral nervous system where progressive degeneration of motor and sensory nerves leads to motor problems and sensory loss and for which no pharmacological treatment is available. Recently, it has been shown in a model for the axonal form of CMT that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) can serve as a target for the development of a pharmacological therapy. Therefore, we aimed at developing new selective and activity-specific HDAC6 inhibitors with improved biochemical properties. By utilizing a bicyclic cap as the structural scaffold from which to build upon, we developed several analogues that showed improved potency compared to tubastatin A while maintaining excellent selectivity compared to HDAC1. Further screening in N2a cells examining both the acetylation of α-tubulin and histones narrowed down the library of compounds to three potent and selective HDAC6 inhibitors. In mutant HSPB1-expressing DRG neurons, serving as an in vitro model for CMT2, these inhibitors were able to restore the mitochondrial axonal transport deficits. Combining structure-based development of HDAC6 inhibitors, screening in N2a cells and in a neuronal model for CMT2F, and preliminary ADMET and pharmacokinetic profiles, resulted in the selection of compound 23d that possesses improved biochemical, functional, and druglike properties compared to tubastatin A.

  11. [Moving activity and wakefulness-sleep cycle changes in a mouse MPTP model of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Manolov, A I; Dolgikh, V V; Ukraintseva, Iu V; Zavalko, I M; Revishchin, A V; Pavlova, G V; Pronina, T S; Ugriumov, M V; Dorokhov, V B; Koval'zon, V M

    2014-11-01

    A group of mice with preliminary implanted (under general anesthesia) electrodes for cortical EEG and nuchal EMG was subjected to continuous baseline 24-hr video and digital polysomnographic recording with the 12/12 light/dark schedule, and then injected subcutaneously with 24 or 48 mg/kg of MPTP toxin or (the control group) saline. The recordings were continued for 2 weeks more. A significant increase in activity and the waking percentage as well as decrease in REM sleep and NREM sleep (tendency) during the dark period as compared to the baseline and control recordings was found. The effect was seen just on the 7th day following MPTP administration and became significant by the 14th day. The effect was more pronounced after 48 mg/kg injection than after 24. There were no changes during the light period. Morphological control revealed a 70% and 35% decreases in the amount of tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons in substancia nigra/pars compacta after 48 and 24 mg/kg of MPTP, respectively, as compared to the saline group.

  12. Neuroprotective Role of Novel Triazine Derivatives by Activating Wnt/β Catenin Signaling Pathway in Rodent Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Anshuman; Tamboli, Riyaj S; Seth, Brashket; Kanhed, Ashish M; Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Agarwal, Swati; Nair, Saumya; Giridhar, Rajani; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Yadav, Mange Ram

    2015-08-01

    It has been reported in the literature that cholinesterase inhibitors provide protection in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent reports have implicated triazine derivatives as cholinesterase inhibitors. These findings led us to investigate anti-cholinestrase property of some novel triazine derivatives synthesized in this laboratory. In vitro cholinesterase inhibition assay was performed using Ellman method. The potent compounds screened out from in vitro assay were further evaluated using scopolamine-induced amnesic mice model. Further, in vitro reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and anti-apoptotic property of the potent compounds were demonstrated against Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity in rat hippocampal cells. Their neuroprotective role was assessed using Aβ1-42-induced Alzheimer's-like phenotype in rats. Further, the role of compounds on the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway was studied. The results showed that the chosen compounds are having protective effect in Alzheimer's-like condition; the ex vivo results advocated their anti-cholinestrase and anti-oxidant activities. Treatment with TRZ-15 and TRZ-20 showed neuroprotective ability of the compounds as evidenced from the improved cognitive ability in the animals, and decrease in Aβ1-42 burden and cytochrome c and cleaved caspase-3 levels in the brain. This study also demonstrates positive involvement of the novel triazine derivatives in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence data suggested that ratio of pGSK3/GSK3 and β-catenin got dramatically improved after treatment with TRZ-15 and TRZ-20. TRZ-15 and TRZ-20 showed neuroprotection in scopolamine-induced amnesic mice and Aβ1-42-induced Alzheimer's rat model and also activate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These findings conclude that TRZ-15 and TRZ-20 could be a therapeutic approach to treat AD.

  13. Inhibition of BACE1 Activity by a DNA Aptamer in an Alzheimer’s Disease Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Zhewen; Peng, Yonghua; Chen, Wenjun; Li, Xiaowen; Li, Shuji; Wang, Ying; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Xingmei

    2015-01-01

    An initial step in amyloid-β (Aβ) production includes amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavage via β-Site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). Increased levels of brain Aβ have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Thus, β-secretase represents a primary target for inhibitor drug development in AD. In this study, aptamers were obtained from combinatorial oligonucleotide libraries using a technology referred to as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). A purified human BACE1 extracellular domain was used as a target to conduct an in vitro selection process using SELEX. Two DNA aptamers were capable of binding to BACE1 with high affinity and good specificity, with Kd values in the nanomolar range. We subsequently confirmed that one aptamer, A1, exhibited a distinct inhibitory effect on BACE1 activity in an AD cell model. We detected the effects of M17-APPsw cells that stably expressed Swedish mutant APP after aptamer A1 treatment. Aβ40 and Aβ42 concentrations secreted by M17-APPsw cells decreased intracellularly and in culture media. Furthermore, Western blot analysis indicated that sAPPβ expression significantly decreased in the A1 treated versus control groups. These findings support the preliminary feasibility of an aptamer evolved from a SELEX strategy to function as a potential BACE1 inhibitor. To our knowledge, this is the first study to acquire a DNA aptamer that exhibited binding specificity to BACE1 and inhibited its activity. PMID:26473367

  14. Pharmacologic activation of mitochondrial biogenesis exerts widespread beneficial effects in a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Johri, Ashu; Calingasan, Noel Y; Hennessey, Thomas M; Sharma, Abhijeet; Yang, Lichuan; Wille, Elizabeth; Chandra, Abhishek; Beal, M Flint

    2012-03-01

    There is substantial evidence that impairment of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) levels and activity play an important role in Huntington's disease (HD) pathogenesis. We tested whether pharmacologic treatment with the pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate would correct a deficiency of PGC-1α and exert beneficial effects in a transgenic mouse model of HD. We found that administration of bezafibrate in the diet restored levels of PGC-1α, PPARs and downstream genes to levels which occur in wild-type mice. There were significant improvements in phenotype and survival. In the striatum, astrogliosis and neuronal atrophy were attenuated and numbers of mitochondria were increased. Bezafibrate treatment prevented conversion of type I oxidative to type II glycolytic muscle fibers and increased the numbers of muscle mitochondria. Finally, bezafibrate rescued lipid accumulation and apparent vacuolization of brown adipose tissue in the HD mice. These findings provide strong evidence that treatment with bezafibrate exerts neuroprotective effects which may be beneficial in the treatment of HD. PMID:22095692

  15. Fasting activates macroautophagy in neurons of Alzheimer's disease mouse model but is insufficient to degrade amyloid-beta.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xigui; Kondo, Kanoh; Motoki, Kazumi; Homma, Hidenori; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new technique to observe macroautophagy in the brain in vivo, and examined whether fasting induced macroautophagy in neurons and how the induction was different between Alzheimer's disease (AD) model and control mice. Lentivirus for EGFP-LC3 injected into the brain successfully visualized autophagosome in living neurons by two-photon microscopy. The time-lapse imaging revealed that fasting increased the number, size and signal intensity of autophagosome in neurons. In AD model mice, these parameters of autophagosome were higher at the basal levels before starvation, and increased more rapidly by fasting than in control mice. However, metabolism of exogenous labeled Aβ evaluated by the new technique suggested that the activated macroautophagy was insufficient to degrade the intracellular Aβ increased by enhanced uptake from extracellular space after fasting. Ordinary immunohistochemistry also revealed that fasting increased intracellular accumulation of endogenous Aβ, triggered cell dysfunction but did not mostly decrease extracellular Aβ accumulation. Moreover, we unexpectedly discovered a circadian rhythm of basal level of macroautophagy. These results revealed new aspects of neuronal autophagy in normal/AD states and indicated usefulness of our method for evaluating autophagy functions in vivo. PMID:26169250

  16. Fasting activates macroautophagy in neurons of Alzheimer's disease mouse model but is insufficient to degrade amyloid-beta.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xigui; Kondo, Kanoh; Motoki, Kazumi; Homma, Hidenori; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new technique to observe macroautophagy in the brain in vivo, and examined whether fasting induced macroautophagy in neurons and how the induction was different between Alzheimer's disease (AD) model and control mice. Lentivirus for EGFP-LC3 injected into the brain successfully visualized autophagosome in living neurons by two-photon microscopy. The time-lapse imaging revealed that fasting increased the number, size and signal intensity of autophagosome in neurons. In AD model mice, these parameters of autophagosome were higher at the basal levels before starvation, and increased more rapidly by fasting than in control mice. However, metabolism of exogenous labeled Aβ evaluated by the new technique suggested that the activated macroautophagy was insufficient to degrade the intracellular Aβ increased by enhanced uptake from extracellular space after fasting. Ordinary immunohistochemistry also revealed that fasting increased intracellular accumulation of endogenous Aβ, triggered cell dysfunction but did not mostly decrease extracellular Aβ accumulation. Moreover, we unexpectedly discovered a circadian rhythm of basal level of macroautophagy. These results revealed new aspects of neuronal autophagy in normal/AD states and indicated usefulness of our method for evaluating autophagy functions in vivo.

  17. Modeling disease elimination.

    PubMed

    Somerville, Kevin; Francombe, Paula

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the elimination of mortality from heart disease and cancer was modelled mathematically to allow for the effect of other competing causes of death. The model allows for potential dependence between heart disease or cancer and other causes of death by using cupola functions, which analyse the individual risk itself and the dependence structure between causes of death by using correlation coefficients. As the strength of these risk associations is unknown, the study investigated both full positive and negative dependence and compared this with no dependence. Depending upon the degree and type of correlation assumed, positive or negative, the life expectancy at birth is increased by between 3 months and 6.5 years if cancer mortality was eliminated, and between 5 months and 7.5 years in the case of heart disease. In addition, estimates of these effects on life insurance premia can be made with the greatest reduction for women with the elimination of cancer mortality. These figures provide a range of improvements in life expectancy and the consequent effect on life insurance risk premium rates which elimination of either of these important diseases would produce.

  18. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide protects dopaminergic neurons and improves behavioral deficits in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Reglodi, Dóra; Lubics, Andrea; Tamás, Andrea; Szalontay, Luca; Lengvári, István

    2004-05-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a pleiotropic neuropeptide, exerting different actions in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Among others, it has neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of PACAP in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Rats were given unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the substantia nigra. PACAP-treated animals received 0.1 microg PACAP as a pretreatment. Control animals without PACAP treatment displayed severe hypokinesia at 1 and 10 days postlesion when compared to animals receiving saline only. In only 1 day postlesion, by contrast, PACAP-treated rats showed no hypokinesia. Asymmetrical signs, such as turning, rearing and biased thigmotaxic scanning were observed in all lesioned animals 1 day postlesion. PACAP-treated animals, however, showed better recovery as they ceased to display asymmetrical signs 10 days later and showed markedly less apomorphine-induced rotations. Tyrosine-hydroxylase immunohistochemistry revealed that control animals had more than 95% loss of the dopaminergic cells in the ipsilateral substantia nigra, while PACAP-treated animals had only approximately 50% loss of dopaminergic cells. In summary, the present results show the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in 6-OHDA-induced lesion of substantia nigra, with less severe acute neurological symptoms and a more rapid amelioration of behavioral deficits.

  19. GPR40 receptor activation leads to CREB phosphorylation and improves cognitive performance in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Zahid; Zhuang, Xuxu; He, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder as neuronal loss is a prominent and initial feature of AD. This loss correlates with cognitive deficits more closely than amyloid load. GPR40 receptor belongs to the class of G-protein coupled receptors, is expressed in wide parts of the brain including the hippocampus which is involved in spatial learning and memory. Till now, there are few studies investigating the functional role of GPR40 in brain. In this study, we evaluated the functional role of GPR40 receptor in the A-beta AD mice model. Administration of Aβ1-42 (410pmol) intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) once at the beginning of experiment significantly impaired cognitive performance (in step-through passive test), the ability of spatial learning and memory in (Morris water maze test), working memory, attention, anxiety in (Novel object recognition test), and spatial working and reference-memory in (Hole board discrimination test) compared with the control group. The results revealed that GPR40 receptor treatment groups significantly ameliorated model mice cognitive performance. All GPR40 receptor agonist GW9508, treatment groups enhanced the learning and memory ability in Step-through passive test, Morris water maze test, Hole board discrimination test, Novel object recognition test. Furthermore, we have observed that activation of GPR40 receptor provoked the phosphorylation of the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and significant increase in neurotropic factors including brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), neurotrohin-4 (NT-4) in mouse hippocampal neurons and contribute to neurogenesis. These results suggest that GPR40 is a suitable therapeutic candidate for neurogenesis and neuroprotection in the treatment and prevention of AD.

  20. SUBCHRONIC PULMONARY PATHOLOGY, IRON-OVERLOAD AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVITY AFTER LIBBY AMPHIBOLE EXPOSURE IN RAT MODELS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Surface-available iron (Fe) is proposed to contribute to asbestos-induced toxicity through the production of reactive oxygen species.Objective: Our goal was to evaluate the hypothesis that rat models of cardiovascular disease with coexistent Fe overload would be incre...

  1. Pomegranate Polyphenols and Extract Inhibit Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Cell Activity and Microglial Activation In Vitro and in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease123

    PubMed Central

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Puig, Kendra L.; Combs, Colin K.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) brain is characterized by extracellular plaques of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide with reactive microglia. This study aimed to determine whether a dietary intervention could attenuate microgliosis. Memory was assessed in 12-mo-old male amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice via Barnes maze testing followed by division into either a control-fed group provided free access to normal chow and water or a treatment group provided free access to normal chow and drinking water supplemented with pomegranate extract (6.25 mL/L) for 3 mo followed by repeat Barnes maze testing for both groups. Three months of pomegranate feeding decreased the path length to escape of mice compared with their initial 12-mo values (P < 0.05) and their control-fed counterparts (P < 0.05). Brains of the 3-mo study pomegranate-fed mice had lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) concentrations (P < 0.05) and lower nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) transcriptional activity (P < 0.05) compared with controls. Brains of the 3-mo pomegranate or control mice were also compared with an additional control group of 12-mo-old mice for histologic analysis. Immunocytochemistry showed that pomegranate- but not control-fed mice had attenuated microgliosis (P < 0.05) and Aβ plaque deposition (P < 0.05) compared with 12-mo-old mice. An additional behavioral study again used 12-mo-old male APP/PS1 mice tested by T-maze followed by division into a control group provided with free access to normal chow and sugar supplemented drinking water or a treatment group provided with normal chow and pomegranate extract–supplemented drinking water (6.25 mL/L) for 1 mo followed by repeat T-maze testing in both groups. One month of pomegranate feeding increased spontaneous alternations versus control-fed mice (P < 0.05). Cell culture experiments verified that 2 polyphenol components of pomegranate extract, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated NFAT activity in a reporter

  2. A 3D Alzheimer's disease culture model and the induction of P21-activated kinase mediated sensing in iPSC derived neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Pekkanen-Mattila, Mari; Shahsavani, Mansoureh; Falk, Anna; Teixeira, Ana I; Herland, Anna

    2014-02-01

    The recent progress in stem cell techniques has broadened the horizon for in vitro disease modeling. For desired in vivo like phenotypes, not only correct cell type specification will be critical, the microenvironmental context will be essential to achieve relevant responses. We demonstrate how a three dimensional (3D) culture of stem cell derived neurons can induce in vivo like responses related to Alzheimer's disease, not recapitulated with conventional 2D cultures. To acquire a neural population of cells we differentiated neurons from neuroepithelial stem cells, derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. p21-activated kinase mediated sensing of Aβ oligomers was only possible in the 3D environment. Further, the 3D phenotype showed clear effects on F-actin associated proteins, connected to the disease processes. We propose that the 3D in vitro model has higher resemblance to the AD pathology than conventional 2D cultures and could be used in further studies of the disease. PMID:24290439

  3. Genetically Engineered Pig Models for Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Prather, Randall S.; Lorson, Monique; Ross, Jason W.; Whyte, Jeffrey J.; Walters, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Although pigs are used widely as models of human disease, their utility as models has been enhanced by genetic engineering. Initially, transgenes were added randomly to the genome, but with the application of homologous recombination, zinc finger nucleases, and transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technologies, now most any genetic change that can be envisioned can be completed. To date these genetic modifications have resulted in animals that have the potential to provide new insights into human diseases for which a good animal model did not exist previously. These new animal models should provide the preclinical data for treatments that are developed for diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis, retinitis pigmentosa, spinal muscular atrophy, diabetes, and organ failure. These new models will help to uncover aspects and treatments of these diseases that were otherwise unattainable. The focus of this review is to describe genetically engineered pigs that have resulted in models of human diseases. PMID:25387017

  4. Neuroprotective effect of bee venom is mediated by reduced astrocyte activation in a subchronic MPTP-induced model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Eun; Lee, Joo Yeon; Lee, Kyung Moon; Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Eunjin; Lee, Yujeong; Lee, Jun Sik; Lee, Jaewon

    2016-08-01

    Bee venom (BV), also known as apitoxin, is widely used in traditional oriental medicine to treat immune-related diseases. Recent studies suggest that BV could be beneficial for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease next to Alzheimer's disease, and PD pathologies are closely associated with neuroinflammation. Previous studies have suggested the neuroprotective effects of BV in animal models of PD are due to the modulation of inflammation. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the anti-neuroinflammatory effect of BV have not been elucidated in astrocytes. Here, the authors investigated the neuroprotective effects of BV and pramipexole (PPX; a positive control) in a subchronic MPTP-induced murine PD model. Both BV and PPX prevented MPTP-induced impairments in motor performance and reduced dopaminergic neuron loss, and furthermore, these neuroprotective effects of BV and PPX were found to be associated with reduced astroglial activation in vivo PD model. However, in MPP(+) treated primary cultured astrocytes, BV modulated astrocyte activation, whereas PPX did not, indicating that the neuroprotective effects of PPX were not mediated by neuroinflammation. These findings suggest that BV should be considered a potential therapeutic or preventive agent for PD and other neuroinflammatory associated disorders. PMID:27469335

  5. Complement activation in progressive renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Fearn, Amy; Sheerin, Neil Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and the cause of significant morbidity and mortality. The replacement of functioning nephrons by fibrosis is characteristic of progressive disease. The pathways that lead to fibrosis are not fully understood, although chronic non-resolving inflammation in the kidney is likely to drive the fibrotic response that occurs. In patients with progressive CKD there is histological evidence of inflammation in the interstitium and strategies that reduce inflammation reduce renal injury in pre-clinical models of CKD. The complement system is an integral part of the innate immune system but also augments adaptive immune responses. Complement activation is known to occur in many diverse renal diseases, including glomerulonephritis, thrombotic microangiopathies and transplant rejection. In this review we discuss current evidence that complement activation contributes to progression of CKD, how complement could cause renal inflammation and whether complement inhibition would slow progression of renal disease. PMID:25664245

  6. Phloroglucinol attenuates motor functional deficits in an animal model of Parkinson's disease by enhancing Nrf2 activity.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Junghwa; Zhang, Rui; Hong, Bo-Hyun; Yang, Eun-Jung; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Choi, Moonseok; Kim, Ki Cheon; Noh, Su-Jin; Kim, Hee Soo; Lee, Nam-Ho; Hyun, Jin Won; Kim, Hye-Sun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene) has therapeutic effects in cellular and animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD). PD is the second most common, chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disease, and is clinically characterized with motor dysfunctions such as bradykinesia, rigidity, postural instability, gait impairment, and resting tremor. In the brains of PD patients, dopaminergic neuronal loss is observed in the Substantia nigra. Although the exact mechanisms underlying PD are largely unknown, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are thought to be critical factors that induce the onset of the disease. Here, phloroglucinol administration was shown to attenuate motor functional deficits evaluated with rota-rod and apomorphine-induced rotation tests in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced PD animal models. Moreover, phloroglucinol ameliorated the loss of synapses as assessed with protein levels and immunoreactivity against synaptophysin in the midbrain region of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. In addition, in SH-SY5Y cultures, the cytotoxicity of 6-OHDA was reduced by pre-treatment with phloroglucinol. The increase in the reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation and 8-hydroxyguanine caused by treatment with 6-OHDA was attenuated by phloroglucinol in SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, phloroglucinol treatment rescued the reduced levels of nuclear Nrf2, antioxidant enzymes, i.e., catalase and glutathione peroxidase, in 6-OHDA-treated cells. Taken together, phloroglucinol has a therapeutic potential for treatment of PD.

  7. Effects of squalene/squalane on dopamine levels, antioxidant enzyme activity, and fatty acid composition in the striatum of Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kabuto, Hideaki; Yamanushi, Tomoko T; Janjua, Najma; Takayama, Fusako; Mankura, Mitsumasa

    2013-01-01

    Active oxygen has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD); therefore, antioxidants have attracted attention as a potential way to prevent this disease. Squalene, a natural triterpene and an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, is known to have active oxygen scavenging activities. Squalane, synthesized by complete hydrogenation of squalene, does not have active oxygen scavenging activities. We examined the effects of oral administration of squalene or squalane on a PD mouse model, which was developed by intracerebroventricular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Squalene administration 7 days before and 7 days after one 6-OHDA injection prevented a reduction in striatal dopamine (DA) levels, while the same administration of squalane enhanced the levels. Neither squalene nor squalane administration for 7 days changed the levels of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, or superoxide dismutase activities in the striatum. Squalane increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a marker of lipid peroxidation, in the striatum. Both squalane and squalene increased the ratio of linoleic acid/linolenic acid in the striatum. These results suggest that the administration of squalene or squalane induces similar changes in the composition of fatty acids and has no effect on the activities of active oxygen scavenging enzymes in the striatum. However, squalane increases oxidative damage in the striatum and exacerbates the toxicity of 6-OHDA, while squalene prevents it. The effects of squalene or squalane treatment in this model suggest their possible uses and risks in the treatment of PD.

  8. Neuroprotective Activity of Peripherally Administered Liver Growth Factor in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo-Gobernado, Rafael; Calatrava-Ferreras, Lucía; Reimers, Diana; Herranz, Antonio Sánchez; Rodríguez-Serrano, Macarena; Miranda, Cristina; Jiménez-Escrig, Adriano; Díaz-Gil, Juan José; Bazán, Eulalia

    2013-01-01

    Liver growth factor (LGF) is a hepatic mitogen purified some years ago that promotes proliferation of different cell types and the regeneration of damaged tissues, including brain tissue. Considering the possibility that LGF could be used as a therapeutic agent in Parkinson’s disease, we analyzed its potential neuroregenerative and/or neuroprotective activity when peripherally administered to unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. For these studies, rats subjected to nigrostriatal lesions were treated intraperitoneally twice a week with LGF (5 microg/rat) for 3 weeks. Animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after the last LGF treatment. The results show that LGF stimulates sprouting of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive terminals and increases tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter expression, as well as dopamine levels in the denervated striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. In this structure, LGF activates microglia and raises tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein levels, which have been reported to have a role in neuroregeneration and neuroprotection. Besides, LGF stimulates the phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK1/2 and CREB, and regulates the expression of proteins which are critical for cell survival such as Bcl2 and Akt. Because LGF partially protects dopamine neurons from 6-OHDA neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra, and reduces motor deficits in these animals, we propose LGF as a novel factor that may be useful in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23861803

  9. Drosophila Models of Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Nicole; Wessells, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a useful model for cardiac diseases, both developmental abnormalities and adult functional impairment. Using the tools of both classical and molecular genetics, the study of the developing fly heart has been instrumental in identifying the major signaling events of cardiac field formation, cardiomyocyte specification, and the formation of the functioning heart tube. The larval stage of fly cardiac development has become an important model system for testing isolated preparations of living hearts for the effects of biological and pharmacological compounds on cardiac activity. Meanwhile, the recent development of effective techniques to study adult cardiac performance in the fly has opened new uses for the Drosophila model system. The fly system is now being used to study long-term alterations in adult performance caused by factors such as diet, exercise, and normal aging. The fly is a unique and valuable system for the study of such complex, long-term interactions, as it is the only invertebrate genetic model system with a working heart developmentally homologous to the vertebrate heart. Thus, the fly model combines the advantages of invertebrate genetics (such as large populations, facile molecular genetic techniques, and short lifespan) with physiological measurement techniques that allow meaningful comparisons with data from vertebrate model systems. As such, the fly model is well situated to make important contributions to the understanding of complicated interactions between environmental factors and genetics in the long-term regulation of cardiac performance. PMID:21377627

  10. Models for managing wildlife disease.

    PubMed

    McCALLUM, Hamish

    2016-06-01

    Modelling wildlife disease poses some unique challenges. Wildlife disease systems are data poor in comparison with human or livestock disease systems, and the impact of disease on population size is often the key question of interest. This review concentrates specifically on the application of dynamic models to evaluate and guide management strategies. Models have proved useful particularly in two areas. They have been widely used to evaluate vaccination strategies, both for protecting endangered species and for preventing spillover from wildlife to humans or livestock. They have also been extensively used to evaluate culling strategies, again both for diseases in species of conservation interest and to prevent spillover. In addition, models are important to evaluate the potential of parasites and pathogens as biological control agents. The review concludes by identifying some key research gaps, which are further development of models of macroparasites, deciding on appropriate levels of complexity, modelling genetic management and connecting models to data. PMID:26283059

  11. Data on amyloid precursor protein accumulation, spontaneous physical activity, and motor learning after traumatic brain injury in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Shishido, Hajime; Sawanishi, Mayumi; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    This data article contains supporting information regarding the research article entitled "Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease" (H. Shishido, Y. Kishimoto, N. Kawai, Y. Toyota, M. Ueno, T. Kubota, Y. Kirino, T. Tamiya, 2016) [1]. Triple-transgenic (3×Tg)-Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) model mice exhibited significantly poorer spatial learning than sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Correspondingly, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition within the hippocampus was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. However, data regarding the short-term and long-term influences of TBI on amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation in AD model mice remain limited. Furthermore, there is little data showing whether physical activity and motor learning are affected by TBI in AD model mice. Here, we provide immunocytochemistry data confirming that TBI induces significant increases in APP accumulation in 3×Tg-AD mice at both 7 days and 28 days after TBI. Furthermore, 3×Tg-AD model mice exhibit a reduced ability to acquire conditioned responses (CRs) during delay eyeblink conditioning compared to sham-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice 28 days after TBI. However, physical activity and motor performance are not significantly changed in TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice. PMID:27656663

  12. Data on amyloid precursor protein accumulation, spontaneous physical activity, and motor learning after traumatic brain injury in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Shishido, Hajime; Sawanishi, Mayumi; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    This data article contains supporting information regarding the research article entitled "Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease" (H. Shishido, Y. Kishimoto, N. Kawai, Y. Toyota, M. Ueno, T. Kubota, Y. Kirino, T. Tamiya, 2016) [1]. Triple-transgenic (3×Tg)-Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) model mice exhibited significantly poorer spatial learning than sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Correspondingly, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition within the hippocampus was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. However, data regarding the short-term and long-term influences of TBI on amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation in AD model mice remain limited. Furthermore, there is little data showing whether physical activity and motor learning are affected by TBI in AD model mice. Here, we provide immunocytochemistry data confirming that TBI induces significant increases in APP accumulation in 3×Tg-AD mice at both 7 days and 28 days after TBI. Furthermore, 3×Tg-AD model mice exhibit a reduced ability to acquire conditioned responses (CRs) during delay eyeblink conditioning compared to sham-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice 28 days after TBI. However, physical activity and motor performance are not significantly changed in TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice.

  13. Animal models of cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Carlos; Gomez-Guerrero, Carmen; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis; Blanco-Colio, Luis; Lavin, Begoña; Mallavia, Beñat; Tarin, Carlos; Mas, Sebastian; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the first leading cause of death and morbidity in developed countries. The use of animal models have contributed to increase our knowledge, providing new approaches focused to improve the diagnostic and the treatment of these pathologies. Several models have been developed to address cardiovascular complications, including atherothrombotic and cardiac diseases, and the same pathology have been successfully recreated in different species, including small and big animal models of disease. However, genetic and environmental factors play a significant role in cardiovascular pathophysiology, making difficult to match a particular disease, with a single experimental model. Therefore, no exclusive method perfectly recreates the human complication, and depending on the model, additional considerations of cost, infrastructure, and the requirement for specialized personnel, should also have in mind. Considering all these facts, and depending on the budgets available, models should be selected that best reproduce the disease being investigated. Here we will describe models of atherothrombotic diseases, including expanding and occlusive animal models, as well as models of heart failure. Given the wide range of models available, today it is possible to devise the best strategy, which may help us to find more efficient and reliable solutions against human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21403831

  14. Parathyroid diseases and animal models.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Yasuo; Nagata, Yuki; Inaba, Masaaki

    2012-01-01

    CIRCULATING CALCIUM AND PHOSPHATE ARE TIGHTLY REGULATED BY THREE HORMONES: the active form of vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D), fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23, and parathyroid hormone (PTH). PTH acts to stimulate a rapid increment in serum calcium and has a crucial role in calcium homeostasis. Major target organs of PTH are kidney and bone. The oversecretion of the hormone results in hypercalcemia, caused by increased intestinal calcium absorption, reduced renal calcium clearance, and mobilization of calcium from bone in primary hyperparathyroidism. In chronic kidney disease, secondary hyperparathyroidism of uremia is observed in its early stages, and this finally develops into the autonomous secretion of PTH during maintenance hemodialysis. Receptors in parathyroid cells, such as the calcium-sensing receptor, vitamin D receptor, and FGF receptor (FGFR)-Klotho complex have crucial roles in the regulation of PTH secretion. Genes such as Cyclin D1, RET, MEN1, HRPT2, and CDKN1B have been identified in parathyroid diseases. Genetically engineered animals with these receptors and the associated genes have provided us with valuable information on the patho-physiology of parathyroid diseases. The application of these animal models is significant for the development of new therapies.

  15. A novel antibody against human factor B that blocks formation of the C3bB proconvertase and inhibits complement activation in disease models.

    PubMed

    Subías, Marta; Tortajada, Agustín; Gastoldi, Sara; Galbusera, Miriam; López-Perrote, Andrés; Lopez, Lucia de Juana; González-Fernández, Fernando Ataúlfo; Villegas-Martínez, Ana; Dominguez, Mercedes; Llorca, Oscar; Noris, Marina; Morgan, B Paul; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2014-12-01

    The alternative pathway (AP) is critical for the efficient activation of complement regardless of the trigger. It is also a major player in pathogenesis, as illustrated by the long list of diseases in which AP activation contributes to pathology. Its relevance to human disease is further emphasized by the high prevalence of pathogenic inherited defects and acquired autoantibodies disrupting components and regulators of the AP C3-convertase. Because pharmacological downmodulation of the AP emerges as a broad-spectrum treatment alternative, there is a powerful interest in developing new molecules to block formation and/or activity of the AP C3-convertase. In this paper, we describe the generation of a novel mAb targeting human factor B (FB). mAb FB48.4.2, recognizing with high affinity an evolutionary-conserved epitope in the Ba fragment of FB, very efficiently inhibited formation of the AP C3-proconvertase by blocking the interaction between FB and C3b. In vitro assays using rabbit and sheep erythrocytes demonstrated that FB28.4.2 was a potent AP inhibitor that blocked complement-mediated hemolysis in several species. Using ex vivo models of disease we demonstrated that FB28.4.2 protected paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria erythrocytes from complement-mediated hemolysis and inhibited both C3 fragment and C5b-9 deposition on ADP-activated HMEC-1 cells, an experimental model for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Moreover, i.v. injection of FB28.4.2 in rats blocked complement activation in rat serum and prevented the passive induction of experimental autoimmune Myasthenia gravis. As a whole, these data demonstrate the potential value of FB28.4.2 for the treatment of disorders associated with AP complement dysregulation in man and animal models.

  16. Lysosomal and phagocytic activity is increased in astrocytes during disease progression in the SOD1 G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David J.; Blackburn, Daniel J.; Keatinge, Marcus; Sokhi, Dilraj; Viskaitis, Paulius; Heath, Paul R.; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Kirby, Janine; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previously, gene expression profiling of astrocytes from the pre-symptomatic stage of the SOD1G93A model of ALS has revealed reduced lactate metabolism and altered trophic support. Here, we have performed microarray analysis of symptomatic and late-stage disease astrocytes isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from the lumbar spinal cord of the SOD1G93A mouse to complete the picture of astrocyte behavior throughout the disease course. Astrocytes at symptomatic and late-stage disease show a distinct up-regulation of transcripts defining a reactive phenotype, such as those involved in the lysosome and phagocytic pathways. Functional analysis of hexosaminidase B enzyme activity in the spinal cord and of astrocyte phagocytic ability has demonstrated a significant increase in lysosomal enzyme activity and phagocytic activity in SOD1G93A vs. littermate controls, validating the findings of the microarray study. In addition to the increased reactivity seen at both stages, astrocytes from late-stage disease showed decreased expression of many transcripts involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Staining for the master regulator of cholesterol synthesis, SREBP2, has revealed an increased localization to the cytoplasm of astrocytes and motor neurons in late-stage SOD1G93A spinal cord, indicating that down-regulation of transcripts may be due to an excess of cholesterol in the CNS during late-stage disease possibly due to phagocytosis of neuronal debris. Our data reveal that SOD1G93A astrocytes are characterized more by a loss of supportive function than a toxic phenotype during ALS disease progression and future studies should focus upon restorative therapies. PMID:26528138

  17. Engineered in vitro disease models.

    PubMed

    Benam, Kambez H; Dauth, Stephanie; Hassell, Bryan; Herland, Anna; Jain, Abhishek; Jang, Kyung-Jin; Karalis, Katia; Kim, Hyun Jung; MacQueen, Luke; Mahmoodian, Roza; Musah, Samira; Torisawa, Yu-suke; van der Meer, Andries D; Villenave, Remi; Yadid, Moran; Parker, Kevin K; Ingber, Donald E

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal of most biomedical research is to gain greater insight into mechanisms of human disease or to develop new and improved therapies or diagnostics. Although great advances have been made in terms of developing disease models in animals, such as transgenic mice, many of these models fail to faithfully recapitulate the human condition. In addition, it is difficult to identify critical cellular and molecular contributors to disease or to vary them independently in whole-animal models. This challenge has attracted the interest of engineers, who have begun to collaborate with biologists to leverage recent advances in tissue engineering and microfabrication to develop novel in vitro models of disease. As these models are synthetic systems, specific molecular factors and individual cell types, including parenchymal cells, vascular cells, and immune cells, can be varied independently while simultaneously measuring system-level responses in real time. In this article, we provide some examples of these efforts, including engineered models of diseases of the heart, lung, intestine, liver, kidney, cartilage, skin and vascular, endocrine, musculoskeletal, and nervous systems, as well as models of infectious diseases and cancer. We also describe how engineered in vitro models can be combined with human inducible pluripotent stem cells to enable new insights into a broad variety of disease mechanisms, as well as provide a test bed for screening new therapies.

  18. Being active when you have heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - activity ... Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may also help you be more active without chest pain or ...

  19. Impacts of aging and amyloid-β deposition on plasminogen activators and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bi Oh, Shin; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Inki; Lee, Joo-Yong

    2015-02-01

    Plasminogen activators (PAs), which convert plasminogen into the fibrinolytic protease plasmin, may initiate the degradation of amyloid-β (Aβ) to suppress the amyloid pathogenesis. In that way, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-mediated plasmin activation could maintain a low level of Aβ deposition to delay the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In a previous study, we reported that tPA/plasmin proteolytic activity is attenuated throughout the brain during aging or with Aβ accumulation but clustered intense around the amyloid plaques in AD brain. The present study demonstrates that the altered proteolytic activity primarily results from the competition between the expressions of tPA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the brains of Tg2576 Aβ-transgenic mice, as revealed by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot assays. Compared with that in the brains of younger Tg2576 mice, tPA protein is generally reduced throughout the brain in older Tg2576 mice but elevated near amyloid plaques. In contrary, PAI-1 expression increases during aging or Aβ deposition with its clusters surrounding amyloid plaques. No significant alteration in the expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is detected. These results suggest reciprocal feedback influences between tPA, PAI-1 and Aβ during aging and amyloid pathogenesis in AD brain; tPA-mediated plasmin activity is declined throughout the brain causing Aβ deposition during aging, and the Aβ deposits locally attract the cluster of tPA and/or PAI-1 around their deposits to competitively determine tPA/plasmin-mediated Aβ proteolysis.

  20. Phenotypic changes in mouse pancreatic stellate cell Ca2+ signaling events following activation in culture and in a disease model of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Hak; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Baoan; Logsdon, Craig D; Yule, David I

    2011-02-01

    The specific characteristics of intracellular Ca 2+ signaling and the downstream consequences of these events were investigated in mouse pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) in culture and in situ using multiphoton microscopy in pancreatic lobules. PSC undergo a phenotypic transformation from a quiescent state to a myofibroblast-like phenotype in culture. This is believed to parallel the induction of an activated state observed in pancreatic disease such as chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. By day 7 in culture, the complement of cell surface receptors coupled to intracellular Ca 2+ signaling was shown to be markedly altered. Specifically, protease-activated receptors (PAR) 1 and 2, responsive to thrombin and trypsin, respectively, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors were expressed only in activated PSC (aPSC). PAR-1, ATP, and PDGF receptor activation resulted in prominent nuclear Ca 2+ signals. Nuclear Ca 2+ signals and aPSC proliferation were abolished by expression of parvalbumin targeted to the nucleus. In pancreatic lobules, PSC responded to agonists consistent with the presence of only quiescent PSC. aPSC were observed following induction of experimental pancreatitis. In contrast, in a mouse model of pancreatic disease harboring elevated K-Ras activity in acinar cells, aPSC were present under control conditions and their number greatly increased following induction of pancreatitis. These data are consistent with nuclear Ca 2+ signaling generated by agents such as trypsin and thrombin, likely present in the pancreas in disease states, resulting in proliferation of "primed" aPSC to contribute to the severity of pancreatic disease.

  1. Drosophila Models of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bingwei; Vogel, Hannes

    2011-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are progressive disorders of the nervous system that affect specific cellular populations in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although most cases are sporadic, genes associated with familial cases have been identified, thus enabling the development of animal models. Invertebrates such as Drosophila have recently emerged as model systems for studying mechanisms of neurodegeneration in several major neurodegenerative diseases. These models are also excellent in vivo systems for the testing of therapeutic compounds. Genetic studies using these animal models have provided novel insights into the disease process. We anticipate that further exploration of the animal models will further our understanding of mechanisms of neurodegeneration as well as facilitate the development of rational treatments for debilitating degenerative diseases. PMID:18842101

  2. Chinese herbal medicine (Tuhuai extract) exhibits topical anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activity in murine disease models

    PubMed Central

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Shi, Yuejun; Man, Mona; Lee, Seung Hun; Demerjian, Marianne; Chang, Sandra; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Elias, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    While psoriasis is one of the most common skin disorders in humans, effective, safe and inexpensive treatments are still largely unavailable. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been used for centuries for treating psoriasis and several reports claim that systemic administration of one such CHM, Tuhuai, mainly composed of flos sophorae, smilax glabra roxb and licorice, is effective in psoriasis. However, the mechanisms by which this CHM improves psoriasis are not yet clear. Two universal features of psoriasis are epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. Moreover, drugs that specifically inhibit epidermal hyperplasia and/or inflammation are widely used to treat psoriasis. Here, we investigated whether topical applications of Tuhuai extract exhibit anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities in two murine models of inflammatory dermatoses. To assess Tuhuai's potential anti-proliferative effect, we disrupted epidermal barrier function twice-daily for 4 days in normal hairless mice followed by topical applications of either 1% Tuhuai extract or Vehicle to both flanks immediately after each barrier perturbation. Changes in epidermal proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL staining. To assess the anti-inflammatory effects of Tuhuai, both irritant (phorbol ester) and acute allergic contact dermatitis (oxazolone) models were used. Whereas topical Tuhuai extract did not alter epidermal proliferation or induce irritation in normal skin, it both reduced epidermal hyperplasia in the epidermal hyperproliferative model, and reduced inflammation in both irritant and allergic contact dermatitis models. As topical Tuhuai extract exhibits anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties in a variety of human models of inflammatory dermatoses, Tuhuai could provide an effective, relatively safe and inexpensive therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses, including psoriasis. PMID:18341576

  3. Ultrafine carbon black particles cause early airway inflammation and have adjuvant activity in a mouse allergic airway disease model.

    PubMed

    de Haar, Colin; Hassing, Ine; Bol, Marianne; Bleumink, Rob; Pieters, Raymond

    2005-10-01

    To gain more insight into the mechanisms of particulate matter (PM)-induced adjuvant activity, we studied the kinetics of airway toxicity/inflammation and allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) in response to ultrafine carbon black particles (CBP). Mice were exposed intranasally to OVA alone or in combination with different concentrations of CBP. Airway toxicity and inflammation were assessed at days 4 and 8. Immune adjuvant effects were studied in the lung draining peribronchial lymph nodes (PBLN) at day 8. Antigen-specific IgE was measured at days 21 and 28, whereas allergic airway inflammation was studied after OVA challenges (day 28). Results show that a total dose of 200 microg CBP per mouse, but not 20 microg or 2 microg, induced immediate airway inflammation. This 200 microg CBP was the only dose that had immune adjuvant activity, by inducing enlargement of the PBLN and increasing OVA-specific production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). The immune adjuvant activity of 200 microg CBP dosing was further examined. Whereas increased OVA-specific IgE levels in serum on day 21 confirms systemic sensitization, this was further supported by allergic airway inflammation after challenges with OVA. Our data show a link between early airway toxicity and adjuvant effects of CBP. In addition, results indicate that local cytokine production early after exposure to CBP is predictive of allergic airway inflammation. In addition this model appears suitable for studying the role of airway toxicity, inflammation and other mechanisms of particle adjuvant activity, and predicting the adjuvant potential of different particles.

  4. Detailed protocol to assess in vivo and ex vivo myeloperoxidase activity in mouse models of vascular inflammation and disease using hydroethidine.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Cheng, David; Stocker, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity contributes to arterial inflammation, vascular dysfunction and disease, including atherosclerosis. Current assessment of MPO activity in biological systems in vivo utilizes 3-chlorotyrosine (3-Cl-Tyr) as a biomarker of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and other chlorinating species. However, 3-Cl-Tyr is formed in low yield and is subject to further metabolism. Recently, we reported a method to selectively assess MPO-activity in vivo by measuring the conversion of hydroethidine to 2-chloroethidium (2-Cl-E(+)) by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (J. Biol. Chem., 289, 2014, pp. 5580-5595). The hydroethidine-based method has greater sensitivity for MPO activity than measurement of 3-Cl-Tyr. The current methods paper provides a detailed protocol to determine in vivo and ex vivo MPO activity in arteries from mouse models of vascular inflammation and disease by utilizing the conversion of hydroethidine to 2-Cl-E(+). Procedures for the synthesis of standards, preparation of tissue homogenates and the generation of 2-Cl-E(+) are also provided in detail, as are the conditions for LC-MS/MS detection of 2-Cl-E(+). PMID:27184954

  5. Random modelling of contagious diseases.

    PubMed

    Demongeot, J; Hansen, O; Hessami, H; Jannot, A S; Mintsa, J; Rachdi, M; Taramasco, C

    2013-03-01

    Modelling contagious diseases needs to include a mechanistic knowledge about contacts between hosts and pathogens as specific as possible, e.g., by incorporating in the model information about social networks through which the disease spreads. The unknown part concerning the contact mechanism can be modelled using a stochastic approach. For that purpose, we revisit SIR models by introducing first a microscopic stochastic version of the contacts between individuals of different populations (namely Susceptible, Infective and Recovering), then by adding a random perturbation in the vicinity of the endemic fixed point of the SIR model and eventually by introducing the definition of various types of random social networks. We propose as example of application to contagious diseases the HIV, and we show that a micro-simulation of individual based modelling (IBM) type can reproduce the current stable incidence of the HIV epidemic in a population of HIV-positive men having sex with men (MSM). PMID:23525763

  6. Increased numbers of motor activity peaks during light cycle are associated with reductions in adrenergic alpha(2)-receptor levels in a transgenic Huntington's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Bode, Felix J; Stephan, Michael; Wiehager, Sara; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Björkqvist, Maria; von Hörsten, Stephan; Bauer, Andreas; Petersén, Asa

    2009-12-14

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HD gene. Besides psychiatric, motor and cognitive symptoms, HD patients suffer from sleep disturbances. In order to screen a rat model transgenic for HD (tgHD rats) for sleep-wake cycle dysregulation, we monitored their circadian activity peaks in the present study. TgHD rats of both sexes showed hyperactivity during the dark cycle and more frequent light cycle activity peaks indicative for a disturbed sleep-wake cycle. Focusing on males at the age of 4 and 14 months, analyses of receptor levels in the hypothalamus and the basal forebrain revealed that 5-HT(2A)- and adrenergic alpha(2)-receptor densities in these regions were significantly altered in tgHD rats compared to their wild-type littermates. Adrenergic receptor densities correlated negatively with the light cycle hyperactivity peaks at later stages of the disease in male tgHD rats. Furthermore, reduced leptin levels, a feature associated with circadian misalignment, were present. Our study demonstrates that the male tgHD rat is a suitable model to investigate HD associated sleep alterations. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the role of adrenergic- and 5-HT(2A)-receptors as therapeutic targets for dysregulation of the circadian activity in HD.

  7. Hesperidin Produces Cardioprotective Activity via PPAR-γ Pathway in Ischemic Heart Disease Model in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yogeeta O.; Sharma, Pankaj Kumar; Shrivastava, Birendra; Ojha, Shreesh; Upadhya, Harshita M.; Arya, Dharamvir Singh; Goyal, Sameer N.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of hesperidin, a natural flavonoid, in cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury in diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats with diabetes were divided into five groups and were orally administered saline once daily (IR-sham and IR-control), Hesperidin (100 mg/kg/day; IR-Hesperidin), GW9962 (PPAR-γ receptor antagonist), or combination of both for 14 days. On the 15th day, in the IR-control and IR-treatment groups, rats were subjected to left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery occlusion for 45 minutes followed by a one-hour reperfusion. Haemodynamic parameters were recorded and rats were sacrificed; hearts were isolated for biochemical, histopathological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemistry. In the IR-control group, significant ventricular dysfunctions were observed along with enhanced expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax. A decline in cardiac injury markers lactate dehydrogenase activity, CK-MB and increased content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a marker of lipid peroxidation, and TNF-α were observed. Hesperidin pretreatment significantly improved mean arterial pressure, reduced left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and improved both inotropic and lusitropic function of the heart (+LVdP/dt and –LVdP/dt) as compared to IR-control. Furthermore, hesperidin treatment significantly decreased the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and reversed the activity of lactate dehydrogenase towards normal value. Hesperidin showed anti-apoptotic effects by upregulating Bcl-2 protein and decreasing Bax protein expression. Additionally, histopathological and ultrastructural studies reconfirmed the protective action of hesperidin. On the other hand, GW9662, selective PPAR-γ receptor antagonist, produced opposite effects and attenuated the hesperidin induced improvements. The study for the first time evidence the involvement of PPAR-γ pathway in the cardioprotective activity of hesperidin in I

  8. Dihydromyricetin protects neurons in an MPTP-induced model of Parkinson's disease by suppressing glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta activity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhao-xiang; Zhao, Ya-fei; Cao, Ting; Zhen, Xue-chu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: It is general believed that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress play critical roles in the pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Dihydromyricetin (DHM), a natural flavonoid extracted from Ampelopsis grossedentata, has recently been found to elicit potent anti-oxidative effects. In the present study, we explored the role of DHM in protecting dopaminergic neurons. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1-methyl4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) for 7 d to induce PD. Additionally, mice were treated with either 5 or 10 mg/kg DHM for a total of 13 d (3 d before the start of MPTP, during MPTP administration (7 d) and 3 d after the end of MPTP). For the saline or DHM alone treatment groups, mice were injected with saline or DHM for 13 d. On d 14, behavioral tests (locomotor activity, the rotarod test and the pole test) were administered. After the behavioral tests, the mice were sacrificed, and brain tissue was collected for immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. In addition, MES23.5 cells were treated with MPP+ and DHM, and evaluated using cell viability assays, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements, apoptosis analysis and Western blotting. Results: DHM significantly attenuated MPTP-induced mouse behavioral impairments and dopaminergic neuron loss. In the MES23.5 cells, DHM attenuated MPP+-induced cell injury and ROS production in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, DHM increased glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which may be associated with DHM-induced dopaminergic neuronal protection. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that DHM is a potent neuroprotective agent for DA neurons by modulating the Akt/GSK-3β pathway, which suggests that DHM may be a promising therapeutic candidate for PD. PMID:27374489

  9. Curcumin Attenuates Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neuroinflammation via Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-Gamma Function in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zun-Jing; Li, Zhong-Hao; Liu, Lei; Tang, Wen-Xiong; Wang, Yu; Dong, Ming-Rui; Xiao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is known to have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and curcumin has been reported to have therapeutical effects on AD because of its anti-inflammatory effects. Curcumin is not only a potent PPARγ agonist, but also has neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemic injury. However, whether PPARγ activated by curcumin is responsible for the anti-neuroinflammation and neuroprotection on AD remains unclear, and needs to be further investigated. Here, using both APP/PS1 transgenic mice and beta-amyloid-induced neuroinflammation in mixed neuronal/glial cultures, we showed that curcumin significantly alleviated spatial memory deficits in APP/PS1 mice and promoted cholinergic neuronal function in vivo and in vitro. Curcumin also reduced the activation of microglia and astrocytes, as well as cytokine production and inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway, suggesting the beneficial effects of curcumin on AD are attributable to the suppression of neuroinflammation. Attenuation of these beneficial effects occurred when co-administrated with PPARγ antagonist GW9662 or silence of PPARγ gene expression, indicating that PPARγ might be involved in anti-inflammatory effects. Circular dichroism and co-immunoprecipitation analysis showed that curcumin directly bound to PPARγ and increased the transcriptional activity and protein levels of PPARγ. Taking together, these data suggested that PPARγ might be a potential target of curcumin, acting to alleviate neuroinflammation and improve neuronal function in AD. PMID:27594837

  10. Curcumin Attenuates Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neuroinflammation via Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-Gamma Function in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zun-Jing; Li, Zhong-Hao; Liu, Lei; Tang, Wen-Xiong; Wang, Yu; Dong, Ming-Rui; Xiao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is known to have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and curcumin has been reported to have therapeutical effects on AD because of its anti-inflammatory effects. Curcumin is not only a potent PPARγ agonist, but also has neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemic injury. However, whether PPARγ activated by curcumin is responsible for the anti-neuroinflammation and neuroprotection on AD remains unclear, and needs to be further investigated. Here, using both APP/PS1 transgenic mice and beta-amyloid-induced neuroinflammation in mixed neuronal/glial cultures, we showed that curcumin significantly alleviated spatial memory deficits in APP/PS1 mice and promoted cholinergic neuronal function in vivo and in vitro. Curcumin also reduced the activation of microglia and astrocytes, as well as cytokine production and inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway, suggesting the beneficial effects of curcumin on AD are attributable to the suppression of neuroinflammation. Attenuation of these beneficial effects occurred when co-administrated with PPARγ antagonist GW9662 or silence of PPARγ gene expression, indicating that PPARγ might be involved in anti-inflammatory effects. Circular dichroism and co-immunoprecipitation analysis showed that curcumin directly bound to PPARγ and increased the transcriptional activity and protein levels of PPARγ. Taking together, these data suggested that PPARγ might be a potential target of curcumin, acting to alleviate neuroinflammation and improve neuronal function in AD.

  11. Curcumin Attenuates Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neuroinflammation via Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-Gamma Function in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zun-Jing; Li, Zhong-Hao; Liu, Lei; Tang, Wen-Xiong; Wang, Yu; Dong, Ming-Rui; Xiao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is known to have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and curcumin has been reported to have therapeutical effects on AD because of its anti-inflammatory effects. Curcumin is not only a potent PPARγ agonist, but also has neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemic injury. However, whether PPARγ activated by curcumin is responsible for the anti-neuroinflammation and neuroprotection on AD remains unclear, and needs to be further investigated. Here, using both APP/PS1 transgenic mice and beta-amyloid-induced neuroinflammation in mixed neuronal/glial cultures, we showed that curcumin significantly alleviated spatial memory deficits in APP/PS1 mice and promoted cholinergic neuronal function in vivo and in vitro. Curcumin also reduced the activation of microglia and astrocytes, as well as cytokine production and inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway, suggesting the beneficial effects of curcumin on AD are attributable to the suppression of neuroinflammation. Attenuation of these beneficial effects occurred when co-administrated with PPARγ antagonist GW9662 or silence of PPARγ gene expression, indicating that PPARγ might be involved in anti-inflammatory effects. Circular dichroism and co-immunoprecipitation analysis showed that curcumin directly bound to PPARγ and increased the transcriptional activity and protein levels of PPARγ. Taking together, these data suggested that PPARγ might be a potential target of curcumin, acting to alleviate neuroinflammation and improve neuronal function in AD. PMID:27594837

  12. Dual activities of the anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204 provide neuroprotection in brain slice models for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke

    PubMed Central

    Van Kanegan, Michael J.; Dunn, Denise E.; Kaltenbach, Linda S.; Shah, Bijal; He, Dong Ning; McCoy, Daniel D.; Yang, Peiying; Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Li; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H.; Newman, Robert A.; Lo, Donald C.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported neuroprotective activity of the botanical anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, in brain slice and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. We showed that one component of this neuroprotective activity is mediated through its principal cardiac glycoside constituent, oleandrin, via induction of the potent neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, we also noted that the concentration-relation for PBI-05204 in the brain slice oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model is considerably broader than that for oleandrin as a single agent. We thus surmised that PBI-05204 contains an additional neuroprotective component(s), distinct from oleandrin. We report here that neuroprotective activity is also provided by the triterpenoid constituents of PBI-05204, notably oleanolic acid. We demonstrate that a sub-fraction of PBI-05204 (Fraction 0–4) containing oleanolic and other triterpenoids, but without cardiac glycosides, induces the expression of cellular antioxidant gene transcription programs regulated through antioxidant transcriptional response elements (AREs). Finally, we show that Fraction 0–4 provides broad neuroprotection in organotypic brain slice models for neurodegeneration driven by amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau implicated in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementias, respectively, in addition to ischemic injury modeled by OGD. PMID:27172999

  13. Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Student Awareness Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, James H., Comp.

    Awareness activities pertaining to cancer and cardiovascular disease are presented as a supplement for high school science classes. The exercises can be used to enrich units of study dealing with the circulatory system, the cell, or human diseases. Eight activities deal with the following topics: (1) cardiovascular disease risk factors; (2)…

  14. Chronic consumption of a western diet induces robust glial activation in aging mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Graham, Leah C; Harder, Jeffrey M; Soto, Ileana; de Vries, Wilhelmine N; John, Simon W M; Howell, Gareth R

    2016-01-01

    Studies have assessed individual components of a western diet, but no study has assessed the long-term, cumulative effects of a western diet on aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, we have formulated the first western-style diet that mimics the fat, carbohydrate, protein, vitamin and mineral levels of western diets. This diet was fed to aging C57BL/6J (B6) mice to identify phenotypes that may increase susceptibility to AD, and to APP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of AD, to determine the effects of the diet in AD. Astrocytosis and microglia/monocyte activation were dramatically increased in response to diet and was further increased in APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet. This increase in glial responses was associated with increased plaque burden in the hippocampus. Interestingly, given recent studies highlighting the importance of TREM2 in microglia/monocytes in AD susceptibility and progression, B6 and APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet showed significant increases TREM2+ microglia/monocytes. Therefore, an increase in TREM2+ microglia/monocytes may underlie the increased risk from a western diet to age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. This study lays the foundation to fully investigate the impact of a western diet on glial responses in aging and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26888450

  15. Chronic consumption of a western diet induces robust glial activation in aging mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Leah C.; Harder, Jeffrey M.; Soto, Ileana; de Vries, Wilhelmine N.; John, Simon W. M.; Howell, Gareth R.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have assessed individual components of a western diet, but no study has assessed the long-term, cumulative effects of a western diet on aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Therefore, we have formulated the first western-style diet that mimics the fat, carbohydrate, protein, vitamin and mineral levels of western diets. This diet was fed to aging C57BL/6J (B6) mice to identify phenotypes that may increase susceptibility to AD, and to APP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of AD, to determine the effects of the diet in AD. Astrocytosis and microglia/monocyte activation were dramatically increased in response to diet and was further increased in APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet. This increase in glial responses was associated with increased plaque burden in the hippocampus. Interestingly, given recent studies highlighting the importance of TREM2 in microglia/monocytes in AD susceptibility and progression, B6 and APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet showed significant increases TREM2+ microglia/monocytes. Therefore, an increase in TREM2+ microglia/monocytes may underlie the increased risk from a western diet to age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. This study lays the foundation to fully investigate the impact of a western diet on glial responses in aging and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26888450

  16. Chronic consumption of a western diet induces robust glial activation in aging mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Graham, Leah C; Harder, Jeffrey M; Soto, Ileana; de Vries, Wilhelmine N; John, Simon W M; Howell, Gareth R

    2016-02-18

    Studies have assessed individual components of a western diet, but no study has assessed the long-term, cumulative effects of a western diet on aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, we have formulated the first western-style diet that mimics the fat, carbohydrate, protein, vitamin and mineral levels of western diets. This diet was fed to aging C57BL/6J (B6) mice to identify phenotypes that may increase susceptibility to AD, and to APP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of AD, to determine the effects of the diet in AD. Astrocytosis and microglia/monocyte activation were dramatically increased in response to diet and was further increased in APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet. This increase in glial responses was associated with increased plaque burden in the hippocampus. Interestingly, given recent studies highlighting the importance of TREM2 in microglia/monocytes in AD susceptibility and progression, B6 and APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet showed significant increases TREM2+ microglia/monocytes. Therefore, an increase in TREM2+ microglia/monocytes may underlie the increased risk from a western diet to age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. This study lays the foundation to fully investigate the impact of a western diet on glial responses in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Reversal of disease-related pathologies in the fragile X mouse model by selective activation of GABAB receptors with arbaclofen.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Christina; Wijetunge, Lasani; Kinoshita, Mika Nakamoto; Shumway, Matthew; Hammond, Rebecca S; Postma, Friso R; Brynczka, Christopher; Rush, Roger; Thomas, Alexia; Paylor, Richard; Warren, Stephen T; Vanderklish, Peter W; Kind, Peter C; Carpenter, Randall L; Bear, Mark F; Healy, Aileen M

    2012-09-19

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism, results from the transcriptional silencing of FMR1 and loss of the mRNA translational repressor protein fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Patients with FXS exhibit changes in neuronal dendritic spine morphology, a pathology associated with altered synaptic function. Studies in the mouse model of fragile X have shown that loss of FMRP causes excessive synaptic protein synthesis, which results in synaptic dysfunction and altered spine morphology. We tested whether the pharmacologic activation of the γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B)) receptor could correct or reverse these phenotypes in Fmr1-knockout mice. Basal protein synthesis, which is elevated in the hippocampus of Fmr1-knockout mice, was corrected by the in vitro application of the selective GABA(B) receptor agonist STX209 (arbaclofen, R-baclofen). STX209 also reduced to wild-type values the elevated AMPA receptor internalization in Fmr1-knockout cultured neurons, a known functional consequence of increased protein synthesis. Acute administration of STX209 in vivo, at doses that modify behavior, decreased mRNA translation in the cortex of Fmr1-knockout mice. Finally, the chronic administration of STX209 in juvenile mice corrected the increased spine density in Fmr1-knockout mice without affecting spine density in wild-type mice. Thus, activation of the GABA(B) receptor with STX209 corrected synaptic abnormalities considered central to fragile X pathophysiology, a finding that suggests that STX209 may be a potentially effective therapy to treat the core symptoms of FXS.

  18. Minimal disease activity in Gaucher disease: criteria for definition.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Maja; Andria, Generoso; Bembi, Bruno; Carubbi, Francesca; Giona, Fiorina; Giuffrida, Gaetano; Linari, Silvia; Sibilio, Michelina; Spina, Vincenzo; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2012-11-01

    Gaucher disease type I is a metabolic disorder caused by a genetic deficiency of lysosomal β-glucocerebrosidase that leads to accumulation of glucocerebroside in macrophages, thus causing damage in different organ systems. Enzyme replacement therapy with imiglucerase improves organ impairment and clinical manifestations, but patients differ in response to treatment. While clinical remission is the most desirable therapeutic outcome, a more realistic goal in patients with high disease burden is reasonably good clinical status despite persistence of residual biochemical or imaging abnormalities. Therefore, the concept of minimal disease activity--used in certain haematological or rheumatologic conditions--needs to be introduced in Gaucher disease, with a level of disease activity that patients and physicians consider a useful treatment target. In this paper, we propose specific parameters and criteria for defining minimal disease activity in Gaucher disease and its stability over time, based on three major systemic domains typically involved: haematological, visceral, and skeletal. Biomarker parameters were not included as criteria, because currently they do not adequately reflect disease evolution in individual patients. Neurological and respiratory domains were also excluded, as their involvement per se indicates severe disease unlikely to respond to enzyme replacement therapy and achieve minimal disease status. Our goal in defining minimal disease activity and stability is to identify a tool to facilitate treatment decisions in clinical practice. PMID:22954583

  19. Neuromuscular Disease Models and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Robert W; Cox, Gregory A; Seburn, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases can affect the survival of peripheral neurons, their axons extending to peripheral targets, their synaptic connections onto those targets, or the targets themselves. Examples include motor neuron diseases such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, peripheral neuropathies such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, myasthenias, and muscular dystrophies. Characterizing these phenotypes in mouse models requires an integrated approach, examining both the nerve and muscle histologically, anatomically, and functionally by electrophysiology. Defects observed at these levels can be related back to onset, severity, and progression, as assessed by "Quality of life measures" including tests of gross motor performance such as gait or grip strength. This chapter describes methods for assessing neuromuscular disease models in mice, and how interpretation of these tests can be complicated by the inter-relatedness of the phenotypes. PMID:27150099

  20. α-Asarone attenuates microglia-mediated neuroinflammation by inhibiting NF kappa B activation and mitigates MPTP-induced behavioral deficits in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Wook; Koppula, Sushruta; Kumar, Hemant; Park, Ju-Young; Kim, Il-Woung; More, Sandeep V; Kim, In-Su; Han, Sang-Don; Kim, Si-Kwan; Yoon, Sung-Hwa; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2015-10-01

    The selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with microglial activation. Therefore, the importance of early therapeutic intervention to inhibit microglial activation would be an effective strategy to alleviate the progression of PD. α-Asarone, an active compound found in Araceae and Annonaceae plant species has been used to improve various disease conditions including central nervous system disorders. In the present study the in vitro and in vivo therapeutic effects of α-asarone isolated from the rhizome of Acorus gramineus Solander was evaluated on microglia-mediated neuroinflammation and neuroprotection. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 microglial cells were used to evaluate in vitro effects. 1-methyl-4 phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mouse model of PD was developed to study the neuroprotective effects of α-asarone in vivo. The results indicated that α-asarone significantly attenuated the LPS-stimulated increase in neuroinflammatory responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production in BV-2 cells. Mechanistic study revealed that α-asarone inhibited the LPS-stimulated activation via regulation of nuclear factor kappa-B by blocking degradation of inhibitor kappa B-alpha signaling in BV-2 microglial cells. In in vivo studies, MPTP intoxication to mice resulted in brain microglial activation and significant behavioral deficits. Prophylactic treatment with α-asarone suppressed microglial activation and attenuated PD-like behavioral impairments as assessed by the Y-maze and pole tests. Taken together, these data demonstrate that α-asarone is a promising neuroprotective agent that should be further evaluated and developed for future prevention and treatment of microglia-mediated neuroinflammatory conditions including PD.

  1. In Vivo Screening of Traditional Medicinal Plants for Neuroprotective Activity against Aβ42 Cytotoxicity by Using Drosophila Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan Feng; Lee, Jang Ho; Kim, Young-Mi; Lee, Soojin; Hong, Yoon Ki; Hwang, Soojin; Oh, Youngje; Lee, Kyungho; Yun, Hye Sup; Lee, Im-Soon; Jeon, Songhee; Chin, Young-Won; Koo, Byung-Soo; Cho, Kyoung Sang

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by progressive neuronal loss with amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plaques. Despite several drugs currently used to treat AD, their beneficial effects on AD progress remains under debate. Here, we established a rapid in vivo screening system using Drosophila AD models to assess the neuroprotective activities of medicinal plants that have been used in traditional Chinese medicine. Among 23 medicinal plants tested, the extracts from five plants, Coriandrum sativum, Nardostachys jatamansi, Polygonum multiflorum (P. multiflorum), Rehmannia glutinosa, and Sorbus commixta (S. commixta), showed protective effects against the Aβ42 neurotoxicity. We further characterized the neuroprotective activity of ethanol extracts from P. multiflorum and S. commixta. Aβ42-expressing flies that we used showed AD neurological phenotypes, such as decreased survival and motility and increased cell death and reactive oxygen species level. However, feeding these flies extracts from P. multiflorum or S. commixta showed strong suppression of such phenotypes. Similar results were observed in human cells, so that the treatment of P. multiflorum and S. commixta extracts increased the viability of Aβ-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside, one of the main constituents of P. multiflorum, also showed similar protective activity against Aβ42 cytotoxicity in both Drosophila and human cells. Taken together, our results suggest that both P. multiflorum and S. commixta have therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD. PMID:26458335

  2. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Brian A; Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  3. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  4. Towards the evaluation in an animal disease model: Fluorinated 17β-HSD1 inhibitors showing strong activity towards both the human and the rat enzyme.

    PubMed

    Abdelsamie, Ahmed S; Bey, Emmanuel; Gargano, Emanuele M; van Koppen, Chris J; Empting, Martin; Frotscher, Martin

    2015-10-20

    17β-Estradiol (E2), the most potent human estrogen, is known to be involved in the etiology of estrogen-dependent diseases (EDD) like breast cancer and endometriosis. 17β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17β-HSD1) catalyses the last step of E2 biosynthesis and is thus a promising target for the treatment of EDD. The previously described bicyclic substituted hydroxyphenylmethanones (BSHs) display high inhibitory potency towards human 17β-HSD1, but marginal activity towards rodent 17β-HSD1, precluding a proof of principle study in an animal endometriosis model. The aim of this work was to perform structural optimizations in the BSHs class to enhance inhibitory activity against rodent (mouse and rat) 17β-HSD1 while maintaining activity against the human enzyme. The introduction of fluorine atoms on the benzoyl moiety resulted in compounds with the desired properties. Molecular docking and homology modeling were applied to elucidate the binding mode and interspecies differences in activity. Compound 33 is the most potent inhibitor of both human and rat 17β-HSD1 up to date (IC₅₀ = 2 nM and 97 nM, respectively).

  5. Animal models of Kennedy disease.

    PubMed

    Merry, Diane E

    2005-07-01

    Since the identification of the polyglutamine repeat expansion responsible for Kennedy disease (KD) more than a decade ago, several laboratories have created animal models for KD. The slowly progressive nature of KD, its X-linked dominant mode of inheritance, and its recently elucidated hormone dependence have made the modeling of this lower motor neuron disease uniquely challenging. Several models have been generated in which variations in specificity, age of onset, and rate of progression have been achieved. Animal models that precisely reproduce the motor neuron specificity, delayed onset, and slow progression of disease may not support preclinical therapeutics testing, whereas models with rapidly progressing symptoms may preclude the ability to fully elucidate pathogenic pathways. Drosophila models of KD provide unique opportunities to use the power of genetics to identify pathogenic pathways at work in KD. This paper reviews the new wealth of transgenic mouse and Drosophila models for KD. Whereas differences, primarily in neuropathological findings, exist in these models, these differences may be exploited to begin to elucidate the most relevant pathological features of KD.

  6. Improvement of spatial learning by facilitating large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel with transcranial magnetic stimulation in Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Furong; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Li; Sun, Peng; Luo, Xianwen; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Sugai, Tokio; Yamamoto, Ryo; Kato, Nobuo

    2015-10-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is fragmentarily reported to be beneficial to Alzheimer's patients. Its underlying mechanism was investigated. TMS was applied at 1, 10 or 15 Hz daily for 4 weeks to young Alzheimer's disease model mice (3xTg), in which intracellular soluble amyloid-β is notably accumulated. Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) was tested after behavior. TMS ameliorated spatial learning deficits and enhanced LTP in the same frequency-dependent manner. Activity of the large conductance calcium-activated potassium (Big-K; BK) channels was suppressed in 3xTg mice and recovered by TMS frequency-dependently. These suppression and recovery were accompanied by increase and decrease in cortical excitability, respectively. TMS frequency-dependently enhanced the expression of the activity-dependently expressed scaffold protein Homer1a, which turned out to enhance BK channel activity. Isopimaric acid, an activator of the BK channel, magnified LTP. Amyloid-β lowering was detected after TMS in 3xTg mice. In 3xTg mice with Homer1a knocked out, amyloid-β lowering was not detected, though the TMS effects on BK channel and LTP remained. We concluded that TMS facilitates BK channels both Homer1a-dependently and -independently, thereby enhancing hippocampal LTP and decreasing cortical excitability. Reduced excitability contributed to amyloid-β lowering. A cascade of these correlated processes, triggered by TMS, was likely to improve learning in 3xTg mice.

  7. 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein Reduction Ameliorates Cognitive Deficit, Synaptic Dysfunction, and Neuropathology in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Phillip F.; Chu, Jin; Joshi, Yash B.; Sperow, Margaret; Li, Jin-Guo; Kirby, Lynn G.; Praticò, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Background 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) is abundantly present in the central nervous system. Although its function has been extensively interrogated in the context of peripheral inflammation, novel roles for this protein are emerging in the central nervous system. The objective of our study was to investigate the functional role that FLAP plays in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with plaques and tangles (i.e., 3×Tg mice). Methods By implementing a genetic knockout of FLAP and pharmacologic inhibition with a FLAP inhibitor (MK-591), we evaluated the effect on the AD-like neuropathology, cognition, and synaptic plasticity in the 3×Tg mice. Results We show that reduction of FLAP leads to amelioration of cognition and memory along with the rescuing of synaptic dysfunction at an early age before the development of overt neuropathology. Genetic knockout and pharmacologic inhibition of FLAP also yielded an improvement in AD pathology through a reduction in Aβ via the γ-secretase pathway and a decrease in tau phosphorylation through the cdk5 pathway. Conclusions Our studies identify a novel functional role for FLAP in regulating memory and synaptic plasticity. They establish this protein at the crossroad of multiple pathways that ultimately contribute to the development of the entire AD-like phenotype, making it a viable therapeutic target with disease-modifying capacity for the treatment of this disease. PMID:23683389

  8. Inflammatory diseases modelling in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Morales Fénero, Camila Idelí; Colombo Flores, Alicia Angelina; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2016-01-01

    The ingest of diets with high content of fats and carbohydrates, low or no physical exercise and a stressful routine are part of the everyday lifestyle of most people in the western world. These conditions are triggers for different diseases with complex interactions between the host genetics, the metabolism, the immune system and the microbiota, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), obesity and diabetes. The incidence of these disorders is growing worldwide; therefore, new strategies for its study are needed. Nowadays, the majority of researches are in use of murine models for understand the genetics, physiopathology and interaction between cells and signaling pathways to find therapeutic solutions to these diseases. The zebrafish, a little tropical water fish, shares 70% of our genes and conserves anatomic and physiological characteristics, as well as metabolical pathways, with mammals, and is rising as a new complementary model for the study of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Its high fecundity, fast development, transparency, versatility and low cost of maintenance makes the zebrafish an interesting option for new researches. In this review, we offer a discussion of the existing genetic and induced zebrafish models of two important Western diseases that have a strong inflammatory component, the IBD and the obesity. PMID:26929916

  9. Red Grape Skin Polyphenols Blunt Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 Activity and Expression in Cell Models of Vascular Inflammation: Protective Role in Degenerative and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Calabriso, Nadia; Massaro, Marika; Scoditti, Egeria; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Ingrosso, Ilaria; Giovinazzo, Giovanna; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata

    2016-08-29

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are endopeptidases responsible for the hydrolysis of various components of extracellular matrix. MMPs, namely gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, contribute to the progression of chronic and degenerative diseases. Since gelatinases' activity and expression are regulated by oxidative stress, we sought to evaluate whether supplementation with polyphenol-rich red grape skin extracts modulated the matrix-degrading capacity in cell models of vascular inflammation. Human endothelial and monocytic cells were incubated with increasing concentrations (0.5-25 μg/mL) of Negroamaro and Primitivo red grape skin polyphenolic extracts (NSPE and PSPE, respectively) or their specific components (0.5-25 μmol/L), before stimulation with inflammatory challenge. NSPE and PSPE inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, endothelial invasion as well as the MMP-9 and MMP-2 release in stimulated endothelial cells, and MMP-9 production in inflamed monocytes, without affecting tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2. The matrix degrading inhibitory capacity was the same for both NSPE and PSPE, despite their different polyphenolic profiles. Among the main polyphenols of grape skin extracts, trans-resveratrol, trans-piceid, kaempferol and quercetin exhibited the most significant inhibitory effects on matrix-degrading enzyme activities. Our findings appreciate the grape skins as rich source of polyphenols able to prevent the dysregulation of vascular remodelling affecting degenerative and inflammatory diseases.

  10. Red Grape Skin Polyphenols Blunt Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 Activity and Expression in Cell Models of Vascular Inflammation: Protective Role in Degenerative and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Calabriso, Nadia; Massaro, Marika; Scoditti, Egeria; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Ingrosso, Ilaria; Giovinazzo, Giovanna; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are endopeptidases responsible for the hydrolysis of various components of extracellular matrix. MMPs, namely gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, contribute to the progression of chronic and degenerative diseases. Since gelatinases' activity and expression are regulated by oxidative stress, we sought to evaluate whether supplementation with polyphenol-rich red grape skin extracts modulated the matrix-degrading capacity in cell models of vascular inflammation. Human endothelial and monocytic cells were incubated with increasing concentrations (0.5-25 μg/mL) of Negroamaro and Primitivo red grape skin polyphenolic extracts (NSPE and PSPE, respectively) or their specific components (0.5-25 μmol/L), before stimulation with inflammatory challenge. NSPE and PSPE inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, endothelial invasion as well as the MMP-9 and MMP-2 release in stimulated endothelial cells, and MMP-9 production in inflamed monocytes, without affecting tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2. The matrix degrading inhibitory capacity was the same for both NSPE and PSPE, despite their different polyphenolic profiles. Among the main polyphenols of grape skin extracts, trans-resveratrol, trans-piceid, kaempferol and quercetin exhibited the most significant inhibitory effects on matrix-degrading enzyme activities. Our findings appreciate the grape skins as rich source of polyphenols able to prevent the dysregulation of vascular remodelling affecting degenerative and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27589705

  11. Fluoro-Jade B staining as useful tool to identify activated microglia and astrocytes in a mouse transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Damjanac, Milena; Rioux Bilan, Agnès; Barrier, Laurence; Pontcharraud, Raymond; Anne, Cantereau; Hugon, Jacques; Page, Guylène

    2007-01-12

    Fluoro-Jade B is known as a high affinity fluorescent marker for the localization of neuronal degeneration during acute neuronal distress. However, one study suggested that fluoro-Jade B stains reactive astroglia in the primate cerebral cortex. In this study, we analyzed the staining of fluoro-Jade B alone or combined with specific markers for detection of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or activated CD68 microglia in the double APP(SL)/PS1 KI transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which display a massive neuronal loss in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Our results showed that fluoro-Jade B did not stain normal and degenerating neurons in this double mouse transgenic model. Fluoro-Jade B was co-localized with Abeta in the core of amyloid deposits and in glia-like cells expressing Abeta. Furthermore, fluoro-Jade B was co-localized with CD68/macrosialin, a specific marker of activated microglia, and with GFAP for astrocytes in APP(SL)/PS1 KI transgenic mice of AD. Taken together, these findings showed that fluoro-Jade B can be used to label activated microglia and astrocytes which are abundant in the brain of these AD transgenic mice. It could stain degenerating neurons as a result of acute insult while it could label activated microglia and astrocytes during a chronic neuronal degenerative process such as AD for example.

  12. Cognitive-enhancing and antioxidant activities of inhaled coriander volatile oil in amyloid β(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cioanca, Oana; Hritcu, Lucian; Mihasan, Marius; Hancianu, Monica

    2013-08-15

    Coriandrum sativum L., commonly known as coriander and belonging to the Apiaceae family is cultivated throughout the world for its nutritional value. In traditional medicine, coriander is recommended for the relief of pain, anxiety, flatulence, loss of appetite and convulsions. In the present study, the effects of inhaled coriander volatile oil (1% and 3%, daily, for 21days) extracted from C. sativum var. microcarpum on spatial memory performance were assessed in an Aβ(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The Aβ(1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of spontaneous alternations percentage within Y-maze task and increase of working memory errors, reference memory errors and time taken to consume all five baits within radial arm maze task. Exposure to coriander volatile oil significantly improved these parameters, suggesting positive effects on spatial memory formation. Assessments of oxidative stress markers in the hippocampal tissue of Aβ(1-42)-treated rats showed a significant increase of superoxide dismutase (SOD), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and a decrease of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) specific activities along with an elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Coriander volatile oil significantly decreased SOD and LDH specific activities, increased GPX specific activity and attenuated the increased MDA level. Also, DNA cleavage patterns were absent in the coriander rats, thus suggesting antiapoptotic activity of the volatile oil. Therefore, our results suggest that exposure to coriander volatile oil ameliorates Aβ(1-42)-induced spatial memory impairment by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

  13. Animal models for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Rust, J H

    1982-01-01

    The use of animal models for the study of human disease is, for the most part, a recent development. This discussion of the use of animal models for human diseases directs attention to the sterile period, early advances, some personal experiences, the human as the model, biological oddities among common laboratory animals, malignancies in laboratory animals, problems created by federal regulations, cancer tests with animals, and what the future holds in terms of the use of animal models as an aid to understanding human disease. In terms of early use of animal models, there was a school of rabbis, some of whom were also physicians, in Babylon who studied and wrote extensively on ritual slaughter and the suitability of birds and beasts for food. Considerable detailed information on animal pathology, physiology, anatomy, and medicine in general can be found in the Soncino Babylonian Talmudic Translations. The 1906 edition of the "Jewish Encyclopedia," has been a rich resource. Although it has not been possible to establish what diseases of animals were studied and their relationship to the diseases of humans, there are fascinating clues to pursue, despite the fact that these were sterile years for research in medicine. The quotation from the Talmud is of interest: "The medical knowledge of the Talmudist was based upon tradition, the dissection of human bodies, observation of disease and experiments upon animals." A bright light in the lackluster years of medical research was provided by Galen, considered the originator of research in physiology and anatomy. His dissection of animals and work on apes and other lower animals were models for human anatomy and physiology and the bases for many treatises. Yet, Galen never seemed to suggest that animals could serve as models for human diseases. Most early physicians who can be considered to have been students of disease developed their medical knowledge by observing the sick under their care. 1 early medical investigator

  14. Testing the impact of virus importation rates and future climate change on dengue activity in Malaysia using a mechanistic entomology and disease model.

    PubMed

    Williams, C R; Gill, B S; Mincham, G; Mohd Zaki, A H; Abdullah, N; Mahiyuddin, W R W; Ahmad, R; Shahar, M K; Harley, D; Viennet, E; Azil, A; Kamaluddin, A

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to reparameterize and validate an existing dengue model, comprising an entomological component (CIMSiM) and a disease component (DENSiM) for application in Malaysia. With the model we aimed to measure the effect of importation rate on dengue incidence, and to determine the potential impact of moderate climate change (a 1 °C temperature increase) on dengue activity. Dengue models (comprising CIMSiM and DENSiM) were reparameterized for a simulated Malaysian village of 10 000 people, and validated against monthly dengue case data from the district of Petaling Jaya in the state of Selangor. Simulations were also performed for 2008-2012 for variable virus importation rates (ranging from 1 to 25 per week) and dengue incidence determined. Dengue incidence in the period 2010-2012 was modelled, twice, with observed daily weather and with a 1 °C increase, the latter to simulate moderate climate change. Strong concordance between simulated and observed monthly dengue cases was observed (up to r = 0·72). There was a linear relationship between importation and incidence. However, a doubling of dengue importation did not equate to a doubling of dengue activity. The largest individual dengue outbreak was observed with the lowest dengue importation rate. Moderate climate change resulted in an overall decrease in dengue activity over a 3-year period, linked to high human seroprevalence early on in the simulation. Our results suggest that moderate reductions in importation with control programmes may not reduce the frequency of large outbreaks. Moderate increases in temperature do not necessarily lead to greater dengue incidence. PMID:25591942

  15. Testing the impact of virus importation rates and future climate change on dengue activity in Malaysia using a mechanistic entomology and disease model.

    PubMed

    Williams, C R; Gill, B S; Mincham, G; Mohd Zaki, A H; Abdullah, N; Mahiyuddin, W R W; Ahmad, R; Shahar, M K; Harley, D; Viennet, E; Azil, A; Kamaluddin, A

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to reparameterize and validate an existing dengue model, comprising an entomological component (CIMSiM) and a disease component (DENSiM) for application in Malaysia. With the model we aimed to measure the effect of importation rate on dengue incidence, and to determine the potential impact of moderate climate change (a 1 °C temperature increase) on dengue activity. Dengue models (comprising CIMSiM and DENSiM) were reparameterized for a simulated Malaysian village of 10 000 people, and validated against monthly dengue case data from the district of Petaling Jaya in the state of Selangor. Simulations were also performed for 2008-2012 for variable virus importation rates (ranging from 1 to 25 per week) and dengue incidence determined. Dengue incidence in the period 2010-2012 was modelled, twice, with observed daily weather and with a 1 °C increase, the latter to simulate moderate climate change. Strong concordance between simulated and observed monthly dengue cases was observed (up to r = 0·72). There was a linear relationship between importation and incidence. However, a doubling of dengue importation did not equate to a doubling of dengue activity. The largest individual dengue outbreak was observed with the lowest dengue importation rate. Moderate climate change resulted in an overall decrease in dengue activity over a 3-year period, linked to high human seroprevalence early on in the simulation. Our results suggest that moderate reductions in importation with control programmes may not reduce the frequency of large outbreaks. Moderate increases in temperature do not necessarily lead to greater dengue incidence.

  16. Relationship between subthalamic nucleus neuronal activity and electrocorticogram is altered in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Joshua W; Abercrombie, Elizabeth D

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder in which impairments in the processing of information between the cortex and basal ganglia are fundamental to the onset and progression of the HD phenotype. The corticosubthalamic hyperdirect pathway plays a pivotal role in motor selection and blockade of neuronal activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) results in a hyperkinetic movement syndrome, similar to the HD phenotype. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between neuronal activity in the STN and cortex in an animal model of HD. We performed in vivo extracellular recordings in the STN to measure single-unit activity and local field potentials in the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of HD. These recordings were obtained during epochs of simultaneously acquired electrocorticogram (ECoG) in discrete brain states representative of global cortical network synchronization or desynchronization. Cortically patterned STN neuronal activity was less phase-locked in R6/2 mice, which is likely to result in less efficient coding of cortical inputs by the basal ganglia. In R6/2 mice, the power of the ECoG in lower frequencies (0.5–4 Hz) was diminished while the power expressed in higher frequencies (13–100 Hz) was increased. In addition, the spontaneous activity of STN neurons in R6/2 mice was reduced and neurons exhibited a more irregular firing pattern. Glutamatergic STN neurons provide the major excitatory drive to the output nuclei of the basal ganglia and altered discharge patterns could lead to aberrant basal ganglia output and disordered motor control in HD. PMID:25952461

  17. Temporal gene profiling of the 5XFAD transgenic mouse model highlights the importance of microglial activation in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The 5XFAD early onset mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is gaining momentum. Behavioral, electrophysiological and anatomical studies have identified age-dependent alterations that can be reminiscent of human AD. However, transcriptional changes during disease progression have not yet been investigated. To this end, we carried out a transcriptomic analysis on RNAs from the neocortex and the hippocampus of 5XFAD female mice at the ages of one, four, six and nine months (M1, M4, M6, M9). Results Our results show a clear shift in gene expression patterns between M1 and M4. At M1, 5XFAD animals exhibit region-specific variations in gene expression patterns whereas M4 to M9 mice share a larger proportion of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that are common to both regions. Analysis of DEGs from M4 to M9 underlines the predominance of inflammatory and immune processes in this AD mouse model. The rise in inflammation, sustained by the overexpression of genes from the complement and integrin families, is accompanied by an increased expression of transcripts involved in the NADPH oxidase complex, phagocytic processes and IFN-γ related pathways. Conclusions Overall, our data suggest that, from M4 to M9, sustained microglial activation becomes the predominant feature and point out that both detrimental and neuroprotective mechanisms appear to be at play in this model. Furthermore, our study identifies a number of genes already known to be altered in human AD, thus confirming the use of the 5XFAD strain as a valid model for understanding AD pathogenesis and for screening potential therapeutic molecules. PMID:25213090

  18. Cognitive-enhancing activities of the polyprenol preparation Ropren® in gonadectomized β-amyloid (25-35) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fedotova, Julia; Soultanov, Vagif; Nikitina, Tamara; Roschin, Victor; Ordyan, Natalia; Hritcu, Lucian

    2016-04-01

    The present preclinical study was designed to examine the effects of prolonged Ropren® administration (8.6 mg/kg, orally, once daily, 28 days) in a β-amyloid (25-35) rat model of Alzheimer's disease following gonadectomy. The experimental model was created by intracerebroventricular injection of β-amyloid (25-35) into gonadectomized (GDX) rats and GDX rats with testosterone propionate (TP, 0.5mg/kg, subcutaneous, once daily, 28 days) supplementation. Ropren® was administered to the GDX rats and GDX rats treated with TP. Memory performance was assessed using the passive avoidance and the Morris water maze tests and the spontaneous locomotor activity was assessed using the open field test. Treatment with Ropren® significantly improved and restored the cognitive ability of GDX rats with β-amyloid (25-35)-induced amnesia in the passive avoidance test and Morris water maze. Co-administration of Ropren® with TP exerted a markedly synergistic memory-enhancing effect in the GDX rats with β-amyloid (25-35)-induced amnesia on the same models of memory testing. Ropren® administered alone or together with TP significantly enhanced crossing, frequency of rearing and grooming of the GDX rats with β-amyloid (25-35)-induced amnesia in the open field test. These results indicate that Ropren® has a marked memory-enhancing action in the experimental model of Alzheimer's disease in male rats with altered levels of androgens. PMID:26821186

  19. Dimethyl fumarate attenuates 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells and in animal model of Parkinson's disease by enhancing Nrf2 activity.

    PubMed

    Jing, X; Shi, H; Zhang, C; Ren, M; Han, M; Wei, X; Zhang, X; Lou, H

    2015-02-12

    Oxidative stress is central to the pathology of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), and therapeutics designed to enhance antioxidant potential could have clinical value. In this study, we investigated whether dimethyl fumarate (DMF) has therapeutic effects in cellular and animal model of PD, and explore the role of nuclear transcription factor related to NF-E2 (Nrf2) in this process. Treatment of animals and dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells with DMF resulted in increased nuclear levels of active Nrf2, with subsequent upregulation of antioxidant target genes. The cytotoxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was reduced by pre-treatment with DMF in SH-SY5Y cells. The increase in the reactive oxygen species caused by 6-OHDA treatment was also attenuated by DMF in SH-SY5Y cells. The neuroprotective effects of DMF against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity were dependent on Nrf2, since treatment with Nrf2 siRNA failed to block against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity and induce Nrf2-dependent cytoprotective genes in SH-SY5Y cells. In vivo, DMF oral administration was shown to upregulate mRNA and protein levels of Nrf2 and Nrf2-regulated cytoprotective genes, attenuate 6-OHDA induced striatal oxidative stress and inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, DMF ameliorated dopaminergic neurotoxicity in 6-OHDA-induced PD animal models as evidenced by amelioration of locomotor dysfunction, loss in striatal dopamine, and reductions in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that DMF may be beneficial for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases like PD. PMID:25449120

  20. Revisiting rodent models: Octodon degus as Alzheimer's disease model?

    PubMed

    Steffen, Johannes; Krohn, Markus; Paarmann, Kristin; Schwitlick, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Marreiros, Rita; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Korth, Carsten; Braun, Katharina; Pahnke, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease primarily occurs as sporadic disease and is accompanied with vast socio-economic problems. The mandatory basic research relies on robust and reliable disease models to overcome increasing incidence and emerging social challenges. Rodent models are most efficient, versatile, and predominantly used in research. However, only highly artificial and mostly genetically modified models are available. As these 'engineered' models reproduce only isolated features, researchers demand more suitable models of sporadic neurodegenerative diseases. One very promising animal model was the South American rodent Octodon degus, which was repeatedly described as natural 'sporadic Alzheimer's disease model' with 'Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology'. To unveil advantages over the 'artificial' mouse models, we re-evaluated the age-dependent, neurohistological changes in young and aged Octodon degus (1 to 5-years-old) bred in a wild-type colony in Germany. In our hands, extensive neuropathological analyses of young and aged animals revealed normal age-related cortical changes without obvious signs for extensive degeneration as seen in patients with dementia. Neither significant neuronal loss nor enhanced microglial activation were observed in aged animals. Silver impregnation methods, conventional, and immunohistological stains as well as biochemical fractionations revealed neither amyloid accumulation nor tangle formation. Phosphoepitope-specific antibodies against tau species displayed similar intraneuronal reactivity in both, young and aged Octodon degus.In contrast to previous results, our study suggests that Octodon degus born and bred in captivity do not inevitably develop cortical amyloidosis, tangle formation or neuronal loss as seen in Alzheimer's disease patients or transgenic disease models. PMID:27566602

  1. Therapeutic Effects of CUR-Activated Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridine-Induced Parkinson's Disease Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Jinfeng, Li; Yunliang, Wang; Xinshan, Liu; Yutong, Wang; Shanshan, Wang; Peng, Xue; Xiaopeng, Yang; Zhixiu, Xu; Qingshan, Lu; Honglei, Yin; Xia, Cao; Hongwei, Wang; Bingzhen, Cao

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSC) activated by curcumin (CUR) on PC12 cells induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+), a cell model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The supernatant of hUC-MSC and hUC-MSC activated by 5 µmol/L CUR (hUC-MSC-CUR) were collected in accordance with the same concentration. The cell proliferation and differentiation potential to dopaminergic neuronal cells and antioxidation were observed in PC12 cells after being treated with the above two supernatants and 5 µmol/L CUR. The results showed that the hUC-MSC-CUR could more obviously promote the proliferation and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP2) and significantly decreased the expression of nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in PC12 cells. Furtherly, cytokines detection gave a clue that the expression of IL-6, IL-10, and NGF was significantly higher in the group treated with the hUC-MSC-CUR compared to those of other two groups. Therefore, the hUC-MSC-CUR may be a potential strategy to promote the proliferation and differentiation of PD cell model, therefore providing new insights into a novel therapeutic approach in PD. PMID:27340670

  2. Cinnamon and Its Metabolite Sodium Benzoate Attenuate the Activation of p21rac and Protect Memory and Learning in an Animal Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Modi, Khushbu K; Roy, Avik; Brahmachari, Saurabh; Rangasamy, Suresh B; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    This study underlines the importance of cinnamon, a commonly used natural spice and flavoring material, and its metabolite sodium benzoate (NaB) in attenuating oxidative stress and protecting memory and learning in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). NaB, but not sodium formate, was found to inhibit LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mouse microglial cells. Similarly, NaB also inhibited fibrillar amyloid beta (Aβ)- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium(+)-induced microglial production of ROS. Although NaB reduced the level of cholesterol in vivo in mice, reversal of the inhibitory effect of NaB on ROS production by mevalonate, and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, but not cholesterol, suggests that depletion of intermediates, but not end products, of the mevalonate pathway is involved in the antioxidant effect of NaB. Furthermore, we demonstrate that an inhibitor of p21rac geranylgeranyl protein transferase suppressed the production of ROS and that NaB suppressed the activation of p21rac in microglia. As expected, marked activation of p21rac was observed in the hippocampus of subjects with AD and 5XFAD transgenic (Tg) mouse model of AD. However, oral feeding of cinnamon (Cinnamonum verum) powder and NaB suppressed the activation of p21rac and attenuated oxidative stress in the hippocampus of Tg mice as evident by decreased dihydroethidium (DHE) and nitrotyrosine staining, reduced homocysteine level and increased level of reduced glutathione. This was accompanied by suppression of neuronal apoptosis, inhibition of glial activation, and reduction of Aβ burden in the hippocampus and protection of memory and learning in transgenic mice. Therefore, cinnamon powder may be a promising natural supplement in halting or delaying the progression of AD.

  3. [Animal models of cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Chorro, Francisco J; Such-Belenguer, Luis; López-Merino, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    The use of animal models to study cardiovascular disease has made a substantial contribution to increasing our understanding of disease pathogenesis, has led to the development of diagnostic techniques, and has made it possible to verify the effectiveness of different preventative and therapeutic approaches, whether pharmacological or interventional. The main limitations stem from differences between human and experimentally induced pathology, in terms of both genetic regulatory mechanisms and factors that influence cardiovascular function. The experimental models and preparations used in cardiovascular research include those based on isolated cells or tissues or structures immersed in organ baths. The Langendorff system enables isolated perfused hearts to be studied directly under conditions of either no load or controlled loading. In small mammals, a number of models have been developed of cardiovascular conditions that result from spontaneous genetic mutations or, alternatively, that may be induced by specific genomic modification. One of the techniques employed is gene transfer, which can involve the controlled induction of mutations that result in the expression of abnormalities associated with the development of a broad range of different types of cardiovascular disease. Larger animals are used in experimental models in which it is important that physiological regulatory and homeostatic mechanisms are present.

  4. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Teneligliptin Attenuates Hepatic Lipogenesis via AMPK Activation in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ideta, Takayasu; Shirakami, Yohei; Miyazaki, Tsuneyuki; Kochi, Takahiro; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome, is increasingly a major cause of hepatic disorder. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors, anti-diabetic agents, are expected to be effective for the treatment of NAFLD. In the present study, we established a novel NAFLD model mouse using monosodium glutamate (MSG) and a high-fat diet (HFD) and investigated the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor, teneligliptin, on the progression of NAFLD. Male MSG/HFD-treated mice were divided into two groups, one of which received teneligliptin in drinking water. Administration of MSG and HFD caused mice to develop severe fatty changes in the liver, but teneligliptin treatment improved hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evaluated by the NAFLD activity score. Serum alanine aminotransferase and intrahepatic triglyceride levels were significantly decreased in teneligliptin-treated mice (p < 0.05). Hepatic mRNA levels of the genes involved in de novo lipogenesis were significantly downregulated by teneligliptin (p < 0.05). Moreover, teneligliptin increased hepatic expression levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein. These findings suggest that teneligliptin attenuates lipogenesis in the liver by activating AMPK and downregulating the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis. DPP-4 inhibitors may be effective for the treatment of NAFLD and may be able to prevent its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26670228

  5. Modeling Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease with Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Immature Hepatocyte-Like Cells Reveals Activation of PLIN2 and Confirms Regulatory Functions of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Graffmann, Nina; Ring, Sarah; Kawala, Marie-Ann; Wruck, Wasco; Ncube, Audrey; Trompeter, Hans-Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD/steatosis) is a metabolic disease characterized by the incorporation of fat into hepatocytes. In this study, we developed an in vitro model for NAFLD based on hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells. We induced fat storage in these HLCs and detected major expression changes of metabolism-associated genes, as well as an overall reduction of liver-related microRNAs. We observed an upregulation of the lipid droplet coating protein Perilipin 2 (PLIN2), as well as of numerous genes of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) pathway, which constitutes a regulatory hub for metabolic processes. Interference with PLIN2 and PPARα resulted in major alterations in gene expression, especially affecting lipid, glucose, and purine metabolism. Our model recapitulates many metabolic changes that are characteristic for NAFLD. It permits the dissection of disease-promoting molecular pathways and allows us to investigate the influences of distinct genetic backgrounds on disease progression. PMID:27308945

  6. Cannabinoid Type 2 (CB2) Receptors Activation Protects against Oxidative Stress and Neuroinflammation Associated Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in Rotenone Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Hayate; Azimullah, Sheikh; Haque, M. Emdadul; Ojha, Shreesh K.

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type two receptors (CB2), an important component of the endocannabinoid system, have recently emerged as neuromodulators and therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). The downregulation of CB2 receptors has been reported in the brains of PD patients. Therefore, both the activation and the upregulation of the CB2 receptors are believed to protect against the neurodegenerative changes in PD. In the present study, we investigated the CB2 receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of β-caryophyllene (BCP), a naturally occurring CB2 receptor agonist, in, a clinically relevant, rotenone (ROT)-induced animal model of PD. ROT (2.5 mg/kg BW) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) once daily for 4 weeks to induce PD in male Wistar rats. ROT injections induced a significant loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and DA striatal fibers, following activation of glial cells (astrocytes and microglia). ROT also caused oxidative injury evidenced by the loss of antioxidant enzymes and increased nitrite levels, and induction of proinflammatory cytokines: IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, as well as inflammatory mediators: NF-κB, COX-2, and iNOS. However, treatment with BCP attenuated induction of proinflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators in ROT-challenged rats. BCP supplementation also prevented depletion of glutathione concomitant to reduced lipid peroxidation and augmentation of antioxidant enzymes: SOD and catalase. The results were further supported by tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry, which illustrated the rescue of the DA neurons and fibers subsequent to reduced activation of glial cells. Interestingly, BCP supplementation demonstrated the potent therapeutic effects against ROT-induced neurodegeneration, which was evidenced by BCP-mediated CB2 receptor activation and the fact that, prior administration of the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630 diminished the beneficial

  7. Cannabinoid Type 2 (CB2) Receptors Activation Protects against Oxidative Stress and Neuroinflammation Associated Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in Rotenone Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Javed, Hayate; Azimullah, Sheikh; Haque, M Emdadul; Ojha, Shreesh K

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type two receptors (CB2), an important component of the endocannabinoid system, have recently emerged as neuromodulators and therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). The downregulation of CB2 receptors has been reported in the brains of PD patients. Therefore, both the activation and the upregulation of the CB2 receptors are believed to protect against the neurodegenerative changes in PD. In the present study, we investigated the CB2 receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of β-caryophyllene (BCP), a naturally occurring CB2 receptor agonist, in, a clinically relevant, rotenone (ROT)-induced animal model of PD. ROT (2.5 mg/kg BW) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) once daily for 4 weeks to induce PD in male Wistar rats. ROT injections induced a significant loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and DA striatal fibers, following activation of glial cells (astrocytes and microglia). ROT also caused oxidative injury evidenced by the loss of antioxidant enzymes and increased nitrite levels, and induction of proinflammatory cytokines: IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, as well as inflammatory mediators: NF-κB, COX-2, and iNOS. However, treatment with BCP attenuated induction of proinflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators in ROT-challenged rats. BCP supplementation also prevented depletion of glutathione concomitant to reduced lipid peroxidation and augmentation of antioxidant enzymes: SOD and catalase. The results were further supported by tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry, which illustrated the rescue of the DA neurons and fibers subsequent to reduced activation of glial cells. Interestingly, BCP supplementation demonstrated the potent therapeutic effects against ROT-induced neurodegeneration, which was evidenced by BCP-mediated CB2 receptor activation and the fact that, prior administration of the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630 diminished the beneficial

  8. Mouse models of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The use of mice as model organisms to study human biology is predicated on the genetic and physiological similarities between the species. Nonetheless, mice and humans have evolved in and become adapted to different environments and so, despite their phylogenetic relatedness, they have become very different organisms. Mice often respond to experimental interventions in ways that differ strikingly from humans. Mice are invaluable for studying biological processes that have been conserved during the evolution of the rodent and primate lineages and for investigating the developmental mechanisms by which the conserved mammalian genome gives rise to a variety of different species. Mice are less reliable as models of human disease, however, because the networks linking genes to disease are likely to differ between the two species. The use of mice in biomedical research needs to take account of the evolved differences as well as the similarities between mice and humans. PMID:27121451

  9. Comparison of soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators and activators in models of cardiovascular disease associated with oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Costell, Melissa H; Ancellin, Nicolas; Bernard, Roberta E; Zhao, Shufang; Upson, John J; Morgan, Lisa A; Maniscalco, Kristeen; Olzinski, Alan R; Ballard, Victoria L T; Herry, Kenny; Grondin, Pascal; Dodic, Nerina; Mirguet, Olivier; Bouillot, Anne; Gellibert, Francoise; Coatney, Robert W; Lepore, John J; Jucker, Beat M; Jolivette, Larry J; Willette, Robert N; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Behm, David J

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the primary mediator of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity, exists as reduced (NO-sensitive) and oxidized (NO-insensitive) forms. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiovascular protective effects of NO-insensitive sGC activation would be potentiated under conditions of oxidative stress compared to those of NO-sensitive sGC stimulation. The cardiovascular effects of the NO-insensitive sGC activator GSK2181236A [a low, non-depressor dose, and a high dose which lowered mean arterial pressure (MAP) by 5-10 mmHg] and those of equi-efficacious doses of the NO-sensitive sGC stimulator BAY 60-4552 were assessed in (1) Sprague Dawley rats during coronary artery ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and (2) spontaneously hypertensive stroke prone rats (SHR-SP) on a high salt/fat diet (HSFD). In I/R, neither compound reduced infarct size 24 h after reperfusion. In SHR-SP, HSFD increased MAP, urine output, microalbuminuria, and mortality, caused left ventricular hypertrophy with preserved ejection fraction, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The low dose of BAY 60-4552, but not that of GSK2181236A, decreased urine output, and improved survival. Conversely, the low dose of GSK2181236A, but not that of BAY 60-4552, attenuated the development of cardiac hypertrophy. The high doses of both compounds similarly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and improved survival. In addition to these effects, the high dose of BAY 60-4552 reduced urine output and microalbuminuria and attenuated the increase in MAP to a greater extent than did GSK2181236A. Neither compound improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. In SHR-SP isolated aorta, the vasodilatory responses to the NO-dependent compounds carbachol and sodium nitroprusside were attenuated by HSFD. In contrast, the vasodilatory responses to both GSK2181236A and BAY 60-4552 were unaltered by HSFD, indicating that reduced NO-bioavailability and not changes in the oxidative state of sGC is responsible

  10. Comparison of Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators and Activators in Models of Cardiovascular Disease Associated with Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Costell, Melissa H.; Ancellin, Nicolas; Bernard, Roberta E.; Zhao, Shufang; Upson, John J.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Maniscalco, Kristeen; Olzinski, Alan R.; Ballard, Victoria L. T.; Herry, Kenny; Grondin, Pascal; Dodic, Nerina; Mirguet, Olivier; Bouillot, Anne; Gellibert, Francoise; Coatney, Robert W.; Lepore, John J.; Jucker, Beat M.; Jolivette, Larry J.; Willette, Robert N.; Schnackenberg, Christine G.; Behm, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the primary mediator of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity, exists as reduced (NO-sensitive) and oxidized (NO-insensitive) forms. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiovascular protective effects of NO-insensitive sGC activation would be potentiated under conditions of oxidative stress compared to those of NO-sensitive sGC stimulation. The cardiovascular effects of the NO-insensitive sGC activator GSK2181236A [a low, non-depressor dose, and a high dose which lowered mean arterial pressure (MAP) by 5–10 mmHg] and those of equi-efficacious doses of the NO-sensitive sGC stimulator BAY 60-4552 were assessed in (1) Sprague Dawley rats during coronary artery ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and (2) spontaneously hypertensive stroke prone rats (SHR-SP) on a high salt/fat diet (HSFD). In I/R, neither compound reduced infarct size 24 h after reperfusion. In SHR-SP, HSFD increased MAP, urine output, microalbuminuria, and mortality, caused left ventricular hypertrophy with preserved ejection fraction, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The low dose of BAY 60-4552, but not that of GSK2181236A, decreased urine output, and improved survival. Conversely, the low dose of GSK2181236A, but not that of BAY 60-4552, attenuated the development of cardiac hypertrophy. The high doses of both compounds similarly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and improved survival. In addition to these effects, the high dose of BAY 60-4552 reduced urine output and microalbuminuria and attenuated the increase in MAP to a greater extent than did GSK2181236A. Neither compound improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. In SHR-SP isolated aorta, the vasodilatory responses to the NO-dependent compounds carbachol and sodium nitroprusside were attenuated by HSFD. In contrast, the vasodilatory responses to both GSK2181236A and BAY 60-4552 were unaltered by HSFD, indicating that reduced NO-bioavailability and not changes in the oxidative state of sGC is responsible

  11. An aluminum-based rat model for Alzheimer's disease exhibits oxidative damage, inhibition of PP2A activity, hyperphosphorylated tau, and granulovacuolar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Walton, J R

    2007-09-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), oxidative damage leads to the formation of amyloid plaques while low PP2A activity results in hyperphosphorylated tau that polymerizes to form neurofibrillary tangles. We probed these early events, using brain tissue from a rat model for AD that develops memory deterioration and AD-like behaviors in old age after chronically ingesting 1.6 mg aluminum/kg bodyweight/day, equivalent to the high end of the human dietary aluminum range. A control group consumed 0.4 mg aluminum/kg/day. We stained brain sections from the cognitively-damaged rats for evidence of amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, aluminum, oxidative damage, and hyperphosphorylated tau. PP2A activity levels measured 238.71+/-17.56 pmol P(i)/microg protein and 580.67+/-111.70 pmol P(i)/microg protein (p<0.05) in neocortical/limbic homogenates prepared from cognitively-damaged and control rat brains, respectively. Thus, PP2A activity in cognitively-damaged brains was 41% of control value. Staining results showed: (1) aluminum-loading occurs in some aged rat neurons as in some aged human neurons; (2) aluminum-loading in rat neurons is accompanied by oxidative damage, hyperphosphorylated tau, neuropil threads, and granulovacuolar degeneration; and (3) amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles were absent from all rat brain sections examined. Known species difference can reasonably explain why plaques and tangles are unable to form in brains of genetically-normal rats despite developing the same pathological changes that lead to their formation in human brain. As neuronal aluminum can account for early stages of plaque and tangle formation in an animal model for AD, neuronal aluminum could also initiate plaque and tangle formation in humans with AD.

  12. Effects of L-dopa priming on cortical high beta and high gamma oscillatory activity in a rodent model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Dupre, Kristin B.; Cruz, Ana V.; McCoy, Alex J.; Delaville, Claire; Gerber, Colin M.; Eyring, Katherine W.; Walters, Judith R.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged L-dopa treatment in Parkinson’s disease (PD) often leads to the expression of abnormal involuntary movements known as L-dopa-induced dyskinesia. Recently, dramatic 80 Hz oscillatory local field potential (LFP) activity within the primary motor cortex has been linked to dyskinetic symptoms in a rodent model of PD and attributed to stimulation of cortical dopamine D1 receptors. To characterize the relationship between high gamma (70–110 Hz) cortical activity and the development of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia, cortical LFP and spike signals were recorded in hemiparkinsonian rats treated with L-dopa for 7 days, and dyskinesia was quantified using the abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) scale. The relationship between high gamma and dyskinesia was further probed by assessment of the effects of pharmacological agents known to induce or modulate dyskinesia expression. Findings demonstrate that AIMs and high gamma LFP power increase between days 1 and 7 of L-dopa priming. Notably, high beta (25–35 Hz) power associated with parkinsonian bradykinesia decreased as AIMs and high gamma LFP power increased during priming. After priming, rats were treated with the D1 agonist SKF81297 and the D2 agonist quinpirole. Both dopamine agonists independently induced AIMs and high gamma cortical activity that were similar to that induced by L-dopa, showing that this LFP activity is neither D1 nor D2 receptor specific. The serotonin 1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT reduced L-dopa- and DA agonist-induced AIMs and high gamma power to varying degrees, while the serotonin 1A antagonist WAY100635 reversed these effects. Unexpectedly, as cortical high gamma power increased, phase locking of cortical pyramidal spiking to high gamma oscillations decreased, raising questions regarding the neural substrate(s) responsible for high gamma generation and the functional correlation between high gamma and dyskinesia. PMID:26586558

  13. Increased neuronal PreP activity reduces Aβ accumulation, attenuates neuroinflammation and improves mitochondrial and synaptic function in Alzheimer disease's mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fang, Du; Wang, Yongfu; Zhang, Zhihua; Du, Heng; Yan, Shiqiang; Sun, Qinru; Zhong, Changjia; Wu, Long; Vangavaragu, Jhansi Rani; Yan, Shijun; Hu, Gang; Guo, Lan; Rabinowitz, Molly; Glaser, Elzbieta; Arancio, Ottavio; Sosunov, Alexander A; McKhann, Guy M; Chen, John Xi; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2015-09-15

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in synaptic mitochondria is associated with mitochondrial and synaptic injury. The underlying mechanisms and strategies to eliminate Aβ and rescue mitochondrial and synaptic defects remain elusive. Presequence protease (PreP), a mitochondrial peptidasome, is a novel mitochondrial Aβ degrading enzyme. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that increased expression of active human PreP in cortical neurons attenuates Alzheimer disease's (AD)-like mitochondrial amyloid pathology and synaptic mitochondrial dysfunction, and suppresses mitochondrial oxidative stress. Notably, PreP-overexpressed AD mice show significant reduction in the production of proinflammatory mediators. Accordingly, increased neuronal PreP expression improves learning and memory and synaptic function in vivo AD mice, and alleviates Aβ-mediated reduction of long-term potentiation (LTP). Our results provide in vivo evidence that PreP may play an important role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity and function by clearance and degradation of mitochondrial Aβ along with the improvement in synaptic and behavioral function in AD mouse model. Thus, enhancing PreP activity/expression may be a new therapeutic avenue for treatment of AD.

  14. Resveratrol modulates autophagy and NF-κB activity in a murine model for treating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Lake; Hai, Jie; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yongli; Peng, Hua; Li, Kun; Weng, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects and involved mechanisms of resveratrol on an established non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) murine model. Wild-type and autophagic mediator ULK1 heterozygous knockout mice were induced to have NAFLD by high-fat diet for 8weeks. After that, resveratrol treatment was applied with the high-fat diet feeding for another 4weeks. Typical features of NAFLD, including histological changes, fibrosis, insulin resistance, oxidative status, and inflammation were characterized. After-treatment with resveratrol showed ameliorative effects on all measured features of NAFLD, from histology, insulin resistance, glucose tolerance to oxidative stress and inflammation. resveratrol treatment also reduced the activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) through the restoration of its inhibitor IκBα. Partial inhibition of ULK1 expression impaired the ameliorative effects of resveratrol on hepatic histology, fibrosis, oxidative status, inflammation, and NF-κB activity. In conclusion, resveratrol improved NAFLD-caused hepatic injury partially through regulating autophagic and IκBα-NF-κB pathways.

  15. Modeling Disease Progression with Longitudinal Markers.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Lurdes Y T; Etzioni, Ruth; Morrell, Christopher; Müller, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we propose a Bayesian natural history model for disease progression based on the joint modeling of longitudinal biomarker levels, age at clinical detection of disease and disease status at diagnosis. We establish a link between the longitudinal responses and the natural history of the disease by using an underlying latent disease process which describes the onset of the disease and models the transition to an advanced stage of the disease as dependent on the biomarker levels. We apply our model to the data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging on prostate specific antigen (PSA) to investigate the natural history of prostate cancer. PMID:24453387

  16. EPO-dependent activation of PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a signalling mediates neuroprotection in in vitro and in vivo models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yu; Mo, Shi-Jing; Feng, Qi-Qi; Zhan, Ma-Li; OuYang, Li-Si; Chen, Jia-Chang; Ma, Yu-Xin; Wu, Jia-Jia; Lei, Wan-Long

    2014-05-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) may become a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of the neurodegenerative disorder -- Parkinson's disease (PD), since EPO has been found to prevent neuron apoptosis through the activation of cell survival signalling. However, the underlying mechanisms of how EPO exerts its neuroprotective effect are not fully elucidated. Here we investigated the mechanism by which EPO suppressed 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neuron death in in vitro and in vivo models of PD. EPO knockdown conferred 6-OHDA-induced cytotoxicity. This effect was reversed by EPO administration. Treatment of PC12 cells with EPO greatly diminished the toxicity induced by 6-OHDA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. EPO effectively reduced apoptosis of striatal neurons and induced a significant improvement on the neurological function score in the rat models of PD. Furthermore, EPO increased the expression of phosphorylated Akt and phosphorylated FoxO3a, and abrogated the 6-OHDA-induced dysregulation of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3 in PC12 cells and in striatal neurons. Meanwhile, the EPO-dependent neuroprotection was notably reversed by pretreatment with LY294002, a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Our data suggest that PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a signalling pathway may be a possible mechanism involved in the neuroprotective effect of EPO in PD. PMID:24390959

  17. Dopaminergic neurotoxicant 6-OHDA induces oxidative damage through proteolytic activation of PKC{delta} in cell culture and animal models of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2011-11-15

    The neurotoxicant 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is used to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress and caspase activation contribute to the 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death of dopaminergic neurons. In the present study, we sought to systematically characterize the key downstream signaling molecule involved in 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic degeneration in cell culture and animal models of PD. Treatment of mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal N27 cells with 6-OHDA (100 {mu}M) for 24 h significantly reduced mitochondrial activity and increased cytosolic cytochrome c, followed by sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Co-treatment with the free radical scavenger MnTBAP (10 {mu}M) significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced caspase activities. Interestingly, 6-OHDA induced proteolytic cleavage and activation of protein kinase C delta (PKC{delta}) was completely suppressed by treatment with a caspase-3-specific inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK (50 {mu}M). Furthermore, expression of caspase-3 cleavage site-resistant mutant PKC{delta}{sup D327A} and kinase dead PKC{delta}{sup K376R} or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKC{delta} protected against 6-OHDA-induced neuronal cell death, suggesting that caspase-3-dependent PKC{delta} promotes oxidative stress-induced dopaminergic degeneration. Suppression of PKC{delta} expression by siRNA also effectively protected N27 cells from 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death. PKC{delta} cleavage was also observed in the substantia nigra of 6-OHDA-injected C57 black mice but not in control animals. Viral-mediated delivery of PKC{delta}{sup D327A} protein protected against 6-OHDA-induced PKC{delta} activation in mouse substantia nigra. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that proteolytic activation of PKC{delta} is a key downstream event in dopaminergic degeneration, and these results may have important translational value for

  18. Increased Na+/H+ exchanger activity on the apical surface of a cilium-deficient cortical collecting duct principal cell model of polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Olteanu, Dragos; Liu, Xiaofen; Liu, Wen; Roper, Venus C.; Sharma, Neeraj; Yoder, Bradley K.; Satlin, Lisa M.; Schwiebert, Erik M.

    2012-01-01

    Pathophysiological anomalies in autosomal dominant and recessive forms of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) may derive from impaired function/formation of the apical central monocilium of ductal epithelia such as that seen in the Oak Ridge polycystic kidney or orpk (Ift88Tg737Rpw) mouse and its immortalized cell models for the renal collecting duct. According to a previous study, Na/H exchanger (NHE) activity may contribute to hyperabsorptive Na+ movement in cilium-deficient (“mutant”) cortical collecting duct principal cell monolayers derived from the orpk mice compared with cilium-competent (“rescued”) monolayers. To examine NHE activity, we measured intracellular pH (pHi) by fluorescence imaging with the pH-sensitive dye BCECF, and used a custom-designed perfusion chamber to control the apical and basolateral solutions independently. Both mutant and rescued monolayers exhibited basolateral Na+-dependent acid-base transporter activity in the nominal absence of CO2/HCO3−. However, only the mutant cells displayed appreciable apical Na+-induced pHi recoveries from NH4+ prepulse-induced acid loads. Similar results were obtained with isolated, perfused collecting ducts from orpk vs. wild-type mice. The pHi dependence of basolateral cariporide/HOE-694-sensitive NHE activity under our experimental conditions was similar in both mutant and rescued cells, and 3.5- to 4.5-fold greater than apical HOE-sensitive NHE activity in the mutant cells (pHi 6.23–6.68). Increased apical NHE activity correlated with increased apical NHE1 expression in the mutant cells, and increased apical localization in collecting ducts of kidney sections from orpk vs. control mice. A kidney-specific conditional cilium-knockout mouse produced a more acidic urine compared with wild-type littermates and became alkalotic by 28 days of age. This study provides the first description of altered NHE activity, and an associated acid-base anomaly in any form of PKD. PMID:22301060

  19. TrkB activation by 7, 8-dihydroxyflavone increases synapse AMPA subunits and ameliorates spatial memory deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Tian, Mi; Zhao, Hong-Yun; Xu, Qian-Qian; Huang, Yu-Ming; Si, Qun-Cao; Tian, Qing; Wu, Qing-Ming; Hu, Xia-Min; Sun, Li-Bo; McClintock, Shawn M; Zeng, Yan

    2016-02-01

    We recently demonstrated that activation of tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) by 7, 8-dihydroxyflavone (7, 8-DHF), the selective TrkB agonist, increased surface alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPARs) AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 (GluA1) subunit expression at the synapses of Fragile X Syndrome mutant mice. This present study investigated the effects of 7, 8-DHF on both memory function and synapse structure in relation to the synapse protein level of AMPARs in the Tg2576 Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model. The study found that chronic oral administration of 7, 8-DHF significantly improved spatial memory and minimized dendrite loss in the hippocampus of Tg2576 mice. A key feature of 7, 8-DHF action was the increased expression of both GluA1 and GluA2 at synapses. Interestingly, 7, 8-DHF had no effect on the attenuation of amyloid precursor protein or Aβ exhibiting in the Tg2576 AD brains, yet it activated the phosphorylation of TrkB receptors and its downstream signals including CaMKII, Akt, Erk1/2, and cAMP-response element-binding protein. Importantly, cyclotraxin B (a TrkB inhibitor), U0126 (a Ras-ERK pathway inhibitor), Wortmannin (an Akt phosphorylation inhibitor), and KN-93 (a CaMKII inhibitor) counteracted the enhanced expression and phosphorylation of AMPAR subunits induced by 7, 8-DHF. Collectively, our results demonstrated that 7, 8-DHF acted on TrkB and resolved learning and memory impairments in the absence of reduced amyloid in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice partially through improved synaptic structure and enhanced synaptic AMPARs. The findings suggest that the application of 7, 8-DHF may be a promising new approach to improve cognitive abilities in AD. We provided extensive data demonstrating that 7, 8-dihydroflavone, the TrkB agonist, improved Tg2576 mice spatial memory. This improvement is correlated with a reversion to normal values of GluA1 and GluA2 AMPA receptor subunits and dendritic

  20. Survival, Differentiation, and Neuroprotective Mechanisms of Human Stem Cells Complexed With Neurotrophin-3-Releasing Pharmacologically Active Microcarriers in an Ex Vivo Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Daviaud, Nicolas; Garbayo, Elisa; Sindji, Laurence; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto; Schiller, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). We recently reported the repair and functional recovery after treatment with human marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells adhered to neurotrophin-3 (NT3) releasing pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs) in hemiparkinsonian rats. In order to comprehend this effect, the goal of the present work was to elucidate the survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms of MIAMI cells and human neural stem cells (NSCs), both adhering to NT3-releasing PAMs in an ex vivo organotypic model of nigrostriatal degeneration made from brain sagittal slices. It was shown that PAMs led to a marked increase in MIAMI cell survival and neuronal differentiation when releasing NT3. A significant neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells adhering to PAMs was also demonstrated. NSCs barely had a neuroprotective effect and differentiated mostly into dopaminergic neuronal cells when adhering to PAM-NT3. Moreover, those cells were able to release dopamine in a sufficient amount to induce a return to baseline levels. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stanniocalcin-1 as potential mediators of the neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells and NSCs, respectively. It was also shown that VEGF locally stimulated tissue vascularization, which might improve graft survival, without excluding a direct neuroprotective effect of VEGF on dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate a prospective interest of human NSC/PAM and MIAMI cell/PAM complexes in tissue engineering for PD. Significance Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). The present work elucidates and compares the survival, differentiation, and

  1. TrkB activation by 7, 8-dihydroxyflavone increases synapse AMPA subunits and ameliorates spatial memory deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Tian, Mi; Zhao, Hong-Yun; Xu, Qian-Qian; Huang, Yu-Ming; Si, Qun-Cao; Tian, Qing; Wu, Qing-Ming; Hu, Xia-Min; Sun, Li-Bo; McClintock, Shawn M; Zeng, Yan

    2016-02-01

    We recently demonstrated that activation of tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) by 7, 8-dihydroxyflavone (7, 8-DHF), the selective TrkB agonist, increased surface alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPARs) AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 (GluA1) subunit expression at the synapses of Fragile X Syndrome mutant mice. This present study investigated the effects of 7, 8-DHF on both memory function and synapse structure in relation to the synapse protein level of AMPARs in the Tg2576 Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model. The study found that chronic oral administration of 7, 8-DHF significantly improved spatial memory and minimized dendrite loss in the hippocampus of Tg2576 mice. A key feature of 7, 8-DHF action was the increased expression of both GluA1 and GluA2 at synapses. Interestingly, 7, 8-DHF had no effect on the attenuation of amyloid precursor protein or Aβ exhibiting in the Tg2576 AD brains, yet it activated the phosphorylation of TrkB receptors and its downstream signals including CaMKII, Akt, Erk1/2, and cAMP-response element-binding protein. Importantly, cyclotraxin B (a TrkB inhibitor), U0126 (a Ras-ERK pathway inhibitor), Wortmannin (an Akt phosphorylation inhibitor), and KN-93 (a CaMKII inhibitor) counteracted the enhanced expression and phosphorylation of AMPAR subunits induced by 7, 8-DHF. Collectively, our results demonstrated that 7, 8-DHF acted on TrkB and resolved learning and memory impairments in the absence of reduced amyloid in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice partially through improved synaptic structure and enhanced synaptic AMPARs. The findings suggest that the application of 7, 8-DHF may be a promising new approach to improve cognitive abilities in AD. We provided extensive data demonstrating that 7, 8-dihydroflavone, the TrkB agonist, improved Tg2576 mice spatial memory. This improvement is correlated with a reversion to normal values of GluA1 and GluA2 AMPA receptor subunits and dendritic

  2. GDF-15 secreted from human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells delivered through the cerebrospinal fluid promotes hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic activity in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Dahm; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Jung Won; Kim, Ju-Yeon; Kyung, Jae Won; Kim, Sung Hyun; Oh, Jeong Su; Shim, Sang Mi; Na, Duk Lyul; Oh, Wonil; Chang, Jong Wook

    2015-10-15

    Our previous studies demonstrated that transplantation of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) into the hippocampus of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) reduced amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and enhanced cognitive function through paracrine action. Due to the limited life span of hUCB-MSCs after their transplantation, the extension of hUCB-MSC efficacy was essential for AD treatment. In this study, we show that repeated cisterna magna injections of hUCB-MSCs activated endogenous hippocampal neurogenesis and significantly reduced Aβ42 levels. To identify the paracrine factors released from the hUCB-MSCs that stimulated endogenous hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, we cocultured adult mouse neural stem cells (NSCs) with hUCB-MSCs and analyzed the cocultured media with cytokine arrays. Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) levels were significantly increased in the media. GDF-15 suppression in hUCB-MSCs with GDF-15 small interfering RNA reduced the proliferation of NSCs in cocultures. Conversely, recombinant GDF-15 treatment in both in vitro and in vivo enhanced hippocampal NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Repeated administration of hUBC-MSCs markedly promoted the expression of synaptic vesicle markers, including synaptophysin, which are downregulated in patients with AD. In addition, in vitro synaptic activity through GDF-15 was promoted. Taken together, these results indicated that repeated cisterna magna administration of hUCB-MSCs enhanced endogenous adult hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic activity through a paracrine factor of GDF-15, suggesting a possible role of hUCB-MSCs in future treatment strategies for AD.

  3. GDF-15 Secreted from Human Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells Delivered Through the Cerebrospinal Fluid Promotes Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Synaptic Activity in an Alzheimer's Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Dahm; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Jung Won; Kim, Ju-Yeon; Kyung, Jae Won; Kim, Sung Hyun; Oh, Jeong Su; Shim, Sang Mi; Na, Duk Lyul; Oh, Wonil

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that transplantation of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) into the hippocampus of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) reduced amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and enhanced cognitive function through paracrine action. Due to the limited life span of hUCB-MSCs after their transplantation, the extension of hUCB-MSC efficacy was essential for AD treatment. In this study, we show that repeated cisterna magna injections of hUCB-MSCs activated endogenous hippocampal neurogenesis and significantly reduced Aβ42 levels. To identify the paracrine factors released from the hUCB-MSCs that stimulated endogenous hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, we cocultured adult mouse neural stem cells (NSCs) with hUCB-MSCs and analyzed the cocultured media with cytokine arrays. Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) levels were significantly increased in the media. GDF-15 suppression in hUCB-MSCs with GDF-15 small interfering RNA reduced the proliferation of NSCs in cocultures. Conversely, recombinant GDF-15 treatment in both in vitro and in vivo enhanced hippocampal NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Repeated administration of hUBC-MSCs markedly promoted the expression of synaptic vesicle markers, including synaptophysin, which are downregulated in patients with AD. In addition, in vitro synaptic activity through GDF-15 was promoted. Taken together, these results indicated that repeated cisterna magna administration of hUCB-MSCs enhanced endogenous adult hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic activity through a paracrine factor of GDF-15, suggesting a possible role of hUCB-MSCs in future treatment strategies for AD. PMID:26154268

  4. Biomarker Modeling of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Clifford R; Holtzman, David M

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a slowly progressing disorder in which pathophysiological abnormalities, detectable in vivo by biomarkers, precede overt clinical symptoms by many years to decades. Five AD biomarkers are sufficiently validated to have been incorporated into clinical diagnostic criteria and commonly used in therapeutic trials. Current AD biomarkers fall into 2 categories: biomarkers of amyloid-β plaques and of tau-related neurodegeneration. Three of the 5 are imaging measures and two are cerebrospinal fluid analytes. AD biomarkers do not evolve in an identical manner but rather in a sequential but temporally overlapping manner. Models of the temporal evolution of AD biomarkers can take the form of plots of biomarker severity (degree of abnormality) vs. time. In this review we discuss several time-dependent models of AD which take into consideration varying age of onset (early vs. late) and the influence of aging and co-occurring brain pathologies that commonly arise in the elderly. PMID:24360540

  5. Physical Activity Fundamental to Preventing Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Regular physical activity, fitness, and exercise are critically important for all people's health and wellbeing. It can reduce morbidity and mortality from many chronic diseases. Despite its well-known benefits, most U.S. adults, and many children, are not active enough to achieve these health benefits. Physical inactivity and related health…

  6. Meningeal Infiltration of the Spinal Cord by Non-Classically Activated B Cells is Associated with Chronic Disease Course in a Spontaneous B Cell-Dependent Model of CNS Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Amy K.; Tesfagiorgis, Yodit; Jain, Rajiv W.; Craig, Heather C.; Kerfoot, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    We characterized B cell infiltration of the spinal cord in a B cell-dependent spontaneous model of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity that develops in a proportion of mice with mutant T and B cell receptors specific for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. We found that, while males are more likely to develop disease, females are more likely to have a chronic rather than monophasic disease course. B cell infiltration of the spinal cord was investigated by histology and FACs. CD4+ T cell infiltration was pervasive throughout the white and in some cases gray matter. B cells were almost exclusively restricted to the meninges, often in clusters reminiscent of those described in human multiple sclerosis. These clusters were typically found adjacent to white matter lesions and their presence was associated with a chronic disease course. Extensive investigation of these clusters by histology did not identify features of lymphoid follicles, including organization of T and B cells into separate zones, CD35+ follicular dendritic cells, or germinal centers. The majority of cluster B cells were IgD+ with little evidence of class switch. Consistent with this, B cells isolated from the spinal cord were of the naïve/memory CD38hi CD95lo phenotype. Nevertheless, they were CD62Llo and CD80hi compared to lymph node B cells suggesting that they were at least partly activated and primed to present antigen. Therefore, if meningeal B cells contribute to CNS pathology in autoimmunity, follicular differentiation is not necessary for the pathogenic mechanism. PMID:26441975

  7. Complement activation in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, L E; De Villiers, D; Markham, D; Whaley, K; Thomas, H C

    1982-01-01

    Patients with HBsAg positive chronic active liver disease (CALD) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) exhibit increased C3d concentrations and changes in the serum concentrations of the complement components consistent with activation of the classical and alternative pathways. In these patients the concentrations of the regulatory proteins, C3b inactivator (C3bINA) and beta IH globulin, are normal. Patients with HBsAg negative CALD and alcohol induced liver disease (ALD) exhibit no evidence of an increased level of complement system activation. In these patients diminished serum concentrations of complement components appear to be related to diminished hepatic synthetic function. C4 synthesis may be specifically reduced in autoimmune chronic active liver disease. PMID:7083631

  8. Auraptene and Other Prenyloxyphenylpropanoids Suppress Microglial Activation and Dopaminergic Neuronal Cell Death in a Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama, Satoshi; Semba, Tomoki; Toyoda, Nobuki; Epifano, Francesco; Genovese, Salvatore; Fiorito, Serena; Taddeo, Vito Alessandro; Sawamoto, Atsushi; Nakajima, Mitsunari; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2016-01-01

    In patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), hyperactivated inflammation in the brain, particularly microglial hyperactivation in the substantia nigra (SN), is reported to be one of the triggers for the delayed loss of dopaminergic neurons and sequential motor functional impairments. We previously reported that (1) auraptene (AUR), a natural prenyloxycoumain, suppressed inflammatory responses including the hyperactivation of microglia in the ischemic brain and inflamed brain, thereby inhibiting neuronal cell death; (2) 7-isopentenyloxycoumarin (7-IP), another natural prenyloxycoumain, exerted anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects against excitotoxicity; and (3) 4′-geranyloxyferulic acid (GOFA), a natural prenyloxycinnamic acid, also exerted anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, using an intranigral lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PD-like mouse model, we investigated whether AUR, 7-IP, and GOFA suppress microglial activation and protect against dopaminergic neuronal cell death in the SN. We successfully showed that these prenyloxyphenylpropanoids exhibited these prospective abilities, suggesting the potential of these compounds as neuroprotective agents for patients with PD. PMID:27763495

  9. Complex-1 activity and 18F-DOPA uptake in genetically engineered mouse model of Parkinson's disease and the neuroprotective role of coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushil K; El Refaey, Hesham; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2006-06-15

    Regional distribution of coenzyme Q10 and mitochondrial complex-1 activity were estimated in the brains of control-(C57BL/6), metallothionein knock out-, metallothionein transgenic-, and homozygous weaver mutant mice; and human dopaminergic (SK-N-SH) cells with a primary objective to determine the neuroprotective potential of coenzyme Q10 in Parkinson's disease. Complex-1 activity as well as coenzyme Q10 were significantly higher in the cerebral cortex as compared to the striatum in all the genotypes examined. Complex-1 activity and coenzyme Q10 were significantly reduced in weaver mutant mice and metallothionein knock out mice, but were significantly increased in metallothionein transgenic mice. The reduced complex-1 activity and 18F-DOPA uptake occurred concomitantly with negligible differences in the coenzyme Q10 between in the cerebral cortex and striatum of weaver mutant mice. Administration of coenzyme Q10 increased complex-1 activity and partially improved motoric performance in weaver mutant mice. Direct exposure of rotenone also reduced coenzyme Q10, complex-1 activity, and mitochondrial membrane potential in SK-N-SH cells. Rotenone-induced down-regulation of complex-1 activity was attenuated by coenzyme Q10 treatment, suggesting that complex-1 may be down regulated due to depletion of coenzyme Q10 in the brain. Therefore, metallothionein-induced coenzyme Q10 synthesis may provide neuroprotection by augmenting mitochondrial complex-1 activity in Parkinson's disease.

  10. Release and activity of histone in diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, R; Kang, R; Fan, X-G; Tang, D

    2014-01-01

    Histones and their post-translational modifications have key roles in chromatin remodeling and gene transcription. Besides intranuclear functions, histones act as damage-associated molecular pattern molecules when they are released into the extracellular space. Administration of exogenous histones to animals leads to systemic inflammatory and toxic responses through activating Toll-like receptors and inflammasome pathways. Anti-histone treatment (e.g., neutralizing antibodies, activated protein C, recombinant thrombomodulin, and heparin) protect mice against lethal endotoxemia, sepsis, ischemia/reperfusion injury, trauma, pancreatitis, peritonitis, stroke, coagulation, and thrombosis. In addition, elevated serum histone and nucleosome levels have been implicated in multiple pathophysiological processes and progression of diseases including autoimmune diseases, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Therefore, extracellular histones could serve as biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets in human diseases. PMID:25118930

  11. [Animal models of Peyronie's disease: An update].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-hong; Yuan, Jiu-hong

    2016-05-01

    Peyronie's disease is characterized by local fibrosis of the tunica albuginea and relatively rare clinically. Few relevant basic researches could be retrieved, which might be attributed to the absence of a robust animal model of the disease as well as to its rareness. At present, some animal models available for Peyronie's disease have their own merits and demerits. TGF-β1-induced and Fibrin-induced models are lack of penile curvature and calcification/ossification. A surgical model might be established for the acute phase of the disease. The characteristic of a widespread fibrotic process involving many organs in the spontaneous model is quite different from that of human Peyronie's disease. Therefore, choosing the right model is essential for researches. This paper presents an overview of the animal models of Peyronie's disease, meant to provide some reference for the basic research of the disease. PMID:27416671

  12. Chronic Disease Modeling and Simulation Software

    PubMed Central

    Barhak, Jacob; Isaman, Deanna JM; Ye, Wen; Lee, Donghee

    2010-01-01

    Computers allow describing the progress of a disease using computerized models. These models allow aggregating expert and clinical information to allow researchers and decision makers to forecast disease progression. To make this forecast reliable, good models and therefore good modeling tools are required. This paper will describe a new computer tool designed for chronic disease modeling. The modeling capabilities of this tool were used to model the Michigan model for diabetes. The modeling approach and its advantages such as simplicity, availability, and transparency are discussed. PMID:20558320

  13. A review of disease progression models of Parkinson's disease and applications in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Venuto, Charles S; Potter, Nicholas B; Ray Dorsey, E; Kieburtz, Karl

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative disease progression models for neurodegenerative disorders are gaining recognition as important tools for drug development and evaluation. In Parkinson's disease (PD), several models have described longitudinal changes in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), one of the most utilized outcome measures for PD trials assessing disease progression. We conducted a literature review to examine the methods and applications of quantitative disease progression modeling for PD using a combination of key words including "Parkinson disease," "progression," and "model." For this review, we focused on models of PD progression quantifying changes in the total UPDRS scores against time. Four different models reporting equations and parameters have been published using linear and nonlinear functions. The reasons for constructing disease progression models of PD thus far have been to quantify disease trajectories of PD patients in active and inactive treatment arms of clinical trials, to quantify and discern symptomatic and disease-modifying treatment effects, and to demonstrate how model-based methods may be used to design clinical trials. The historical lack of efficiency of PD clinical trials begs for model-based simulations in planning for studies that result in more informative conclusions, particularly around disease modification. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Thirteen challenges in modelling plant diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The underlying structure of epidemiological models, and the questions that models can be used to address, do not necessarily depend on the identity of the host. This means that certain preoccupations of plant disease modelers are similar to those of modelers of diseases in animals and humans. Howeve...

  15. Practical Disease Modelling with Fruits, Seeds, Bulbs and Tubers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Plant material can be used for classroom investigations of factors influencing infection. Plant responses to infection can be used as teaching models for animal as well as plant diseases. Three activities are discussed. (Author/CW)

  16. Active shape models unleashed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    Active Shape Models (ASMs) are a popular family of segmentation algorithms which combine local appearance models for boundary detection with a statistical shape model (SSM). They are especially popular in medical imaging due to their ability for fast and accurate segmentation of anatomical structures even in large and noisy 3D images. A well-known limitation of ASMs is that the shape constraints are over-restrictive, because the segmentations are bounded by the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) subspace learned from the training data. To overcome this limitation, we propose a new energy minimization approach which combines an external image energy with an internal shape model energy. Our shape energy uses the Distance From Feature Space (DFFS) concept to allow deviations from the PCA subspace in a theoretically sound and computationally fast way. In contrast to previous approaches, our model does not rely on post-processing with constrained free-form deformation or additional complex local energy models. In addition to the energy minimization approach, we propose a new method for liver detection, a new method for initializing an SSM and an improved k-Nearest Neighbour (kNN)-classifier for boundary detection. Our ASM is evaluated with leave-one-out tests on a data set with 34 tomographic CT scans of the liver and is compared to an ASM with standard shape constraints. The quantitative results of our experiments show that we achieve higher segmentation accuracy with our energy minimization approach than with standard shape constraints.nym

  17. Glia, sympathetic activity and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Teschemacher, Anja G.; Kasparov, Sergey; Gourine, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? In this review, we discuss recent findings that provide a novel insight into the mechanisms that link glial cell function with the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, including systemic arterial hypertension and chronic heart failure. What advances does it highlight? We discuss how glial cells may influence central presympathetic circuits, leading to maladaptive and detrimental increases in sympathetic activity and contributing to the development and progression of cardiovascular disease. Increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and may contribute to its progression. Vasomotor and cardiac sympathetic activities are generated by the neuronal circuits located in the hypothalamus and the brainstem. These neuronal networks receive multiple inputs from the periphery and other parts of the CNS and, at a local level, may be influenced by their non‐neuronal neighbours, in particular glial cells. In this review, we discuss recent experimental evidence suggesting that astrocytes and microglial cells are able to modulate the activity of sympathoexcitatory neural networks in disparate physiological and pathophysiological conditions. We focus on the chemosensory properties of astrocytes residing in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata and discuss signalling mechanisms leading to glial activation during brain hypoxia and inflammation. Alterations in these mechanisms may lead to heightened activity of sympathoexcitatory CNS circuits and contribute to maladaptive and detrimental increases in sympathetic tone associated with systemic arterial hypertension and chronic heart failure. PMID:26988631

  18. Viral capsid assembly as a model for protein aggregation diseases: Active processes catalyzed by cellular assembly machines comprising novel drug targets.

    PubMed

    Marreiros, Rita; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Bader, Verian; Selvarajah, Suganya; Dey, Debendranath; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Korth, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    therapeutics. A key basis for the commonality between viral and neurodegenerative disease aggregation is a broader definition of assembly as more than just simple aggregation, particularly suited for the crowded cytoplasm. The assembly machines are collections of proteins that catalytically accelerate an assembly reaction that would occur spontaneously but too slowly to be relevant in vivo. Being an enzyme complex with a functional allosteric site, appropriated for a non-physiological purpose (e.g. viral infection or conformational disease), these assembly machines present a superior pharmacological target because inhibition of their active site will amplify an effect on their substrate reaction. Here, we present this hypothesis based on recent proof-of-principle studies against Aβ assembly relevant in Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Hooked! Modeling human disease in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Santoriello, Cristina; Zon, Leonard I

    2012-07-01

    Zebrafish have been widely used as a model system for studying developmental processes, but in the last decade, they have also emerged as a valuable system for modeling human disease. The development and function of zebrafish organs are strikingly similar to those of humans, and the ease of creating mutant or transgenic fish has facilitated the generation of disease models. Here, we highlight the use of zebrafish for defining disease pathways and for discovering new therapies. PMID:22751109

  20. Early onset of hypersynchronous network activity and expression of a marker of chronic seizures in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bezzina, Charlotte; Verret, Laure; Juan, Cécile; Remaud, Jessica; Halley, Hélène; Rampon, Claire; Dahan, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Cortical and hippocampal hypersynchrony of neuronal networks seems to be an early event in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Many mouse models of the disease also present neuronal network hypersynchrony, as evidenced by higher susceptibility to pharmacologically-induced seizures, electroencephalographic seizures accompanied by spontaneous interictal spikes and expression of markers of chronic seizures such as neuropeptide Y ectopic expression in mossy fibers. This network hypersynchrony is thought to contribute to memory deficits, but whether it precedes the onset of memory deficits or not in mouse models remains unknown. The earliest memory impairments in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease have been observed at 3 months of age. We thus assessed network hypersynchrony in Tg2576 and non-transgenic male mice at 1.5, 3 and 6 months of age. As soon as 1.5 months of age, Tg2576 mice presented higher seizure susceptibility to systemic injection of a GABAA receptor antagonist. They also displayed spontaneous interictal spikes on EEG recordings. Some Tg2576 mice presented hippocampal ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y which incidence seems to increase with age among the Tg2576 population. Our data reveal that network hypersynchrony appears very early in Tg2576 mice, before any demonstrated memory impairments. PMID:25768013

  1. Early Onset of Hypersynchronous Network Activity and Expression of a Marker of Chronic Seizures in the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bezzina, Charlotte; Verret, Laure; Juan, Cécile; Remaud, Jessica; Halley, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Cortical and hippocampal hypersynchrony of neuronal networks seems to be an early event in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. Many mouse models of the disease also present neuronal network hypersynchrony, as evidenced by higher susceptibility to pharmacologically-induced seizures, electroencephalographic seizures accompanied by spontaneous interictal spikes and expression of markers of chronic seizures such as neuropeptide Y ectopic expression in mossy fibers. This network hypersynchrony is thought to contribute to memory deficits, but whether it precedes the onset of memory deficits or not in mouse models remains unknown. The earliest memory impairments in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease have been observed at 3 months of age. We thus assessed network hypersynchrony in Tg2576 and non-transgenic male mice at 1.5, 3 and 6 months of age. As soon as 1.5 months of age, Tg2576 mice presented higher seizure susceptibility to systemic injection of a GABAA receptor antagonist. They also displayed spontaneous interictal spikes on EEG recordings. Some Tg2576 mice presented hippocampal ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y which incidence seems to increase with age among the Tg2576 population. Our data reveal that network hypersynchrony appears very early in Tg2576 mice, before any demonstrated memory impairments. PMID:25768013

  2. An SEIQR model for childhood diseases.

    PubMed

    Gerberry, David J; Milner, Fabio A

    2009-10-01

    It has been shown that the inclusion of an isolated class in the classical SIR model for childhood diseases can be responsible for self-sustained oscillations. Hence, the recurrent outbreaks of such diseases can be caused by autonomous, deterministic factors. We extend the model to include a latent class (i.e. individuals who are infected with the disease, but are not yet able to pass the disease to others) and study the resulting dynamics. The existence of Hopf bifurcations is shown for the model, as well as a homoclinic bifurcation for a perturbation to the model. For historical data on scarlet fever in England, our model agrees with the epidemiological data much more closely than the model without the latent class. For other childhood diseases, our model suggests that isolation is unlikely to be a major factor in sustained oscillations.

  3. The fecal microbiota as a biomarker for disease activity in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Tedjo, Danyta. I.; Smolinska, Agnieszka; Savelkoul, Paul H.; Masclee, Ad A.; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Pierik, Marieke J.; Penders, John; Jonkers, Daisy M. A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring mucosal inflammation is crucial to prevent complications and disease progression in Crohn’s disease (CD). Endoscopy is the current standard, but is invasive. Clinical activity scores and non-invasive biochemical markers do not correlate well with mucosal inflammation. Microbial perturbations have been associated with disease activity in CD. Therefore, we aimed to investigate its potential use to differentiate CD patients in remission from those with an exacerbation. From 71 CD patients repeated fecal samples were collected, resulting in 97 active disease and 97 remission samples based on a combination of biochemical and clinical parameters. The microbiota composition was assessed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA V1-V3 region. Random Forest analysis was used to find the most discriminatory panel of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between active and remission samples. An independent internal validation set was used to validate the model. A combination of 50 OTUs was able to correctly predict 73% of remission and 79% of active samples with an AUC of 0.82 (sensitivity: 0.79, specificity: 0.73). This study demonstrates that fecal microbial profiles can be used to differentiate between active and remission CD and underline the potential of the fecal microbiota as a non-invasive tool to monitor disease activity in CD. PMID:27734914

  4. In vivo PET imaging of beta-amyloid deposition in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease with a high specific activity PET imaging agent [18F]flutemetamol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to evaluate the applicability of 18F-labelled amyloid imaging positron emission tomography (PET) agent [18F]flutemetamol to detect changes in brain beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in vivo in APP23, Tg2576 and APPswe-PS1dE9 mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. We expected that the high specific activity of [18F]flutemetamol would make it an attractive small animal Aβ imaging agent. Methods [18F]flutemetamol uptake in the mouse brain was evaluated in vivo at 9 to 22 months of age with an Inveon Multimodality PET/CT camera (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Knoxville, TN, USA). Retention in the frontal cortex (FC) was evaluated by Logan distribution volume ratios (DVR) and FC/cerebellum (CB) ratios during the late washout phase (50 to 60 min). [18F]flutemetamol binding to Aβ was also evaluated in brain slices by in vitro and ex vivo autoradiography. The amount of Aβ in the brain slices was determined with Thioflavin S and anti-Aβ1−40 immunohistochemistry. Results In APP23 mice, [18F]flutemetamol retention in the FC increased from 9 to 18 months. In younger mice, DVR and FC/CB50-60 were 0.88 (0.81) and 0.88 (0.89) at 9 months (N = 2), and 0.98 (0.93) at 12 months (N = 1), respectively. In older mice, DVR and FC/CB50-60 were 1.16 (1.15) at 15 months (N = 1), 1.13 (1.16) and 1.35 (1.35) at 18 months (N = 2), and 1.05 (1.31) at 21 months (N = 1). In Tg2576 mice, DVR and FC/CB50-60 showed modest increasing trends but also high variability. In APPswe-PS1dE9 mice, DVR and FC/CB50-60 did not increase with age. Thioflavin S and anti-Aβ1−40 positive Aβ deposits were present in all transgenic mice at 19 to 22 months, and they co-localized with [18F]flutemetamol binding in the brain slices examined with in vitro and ex vivo autoradiography. Conclusions Increased [18F]flutemetamol retention in the brain was detected in old APP23 mice in vivo. However, the high specific activity of [18F]flutemetamol did not

  5. Types of disease and models for their genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Elston, R C; Namboodiri, K K

    1980-01-01

    The authors compare schizophrenia with several other diseases and discuss how a few simple models that have already been successfully applied in other cases could be used in the genetic analysis of schizophrenia and MAO activity. Among the diseases discussed are Huntington's disease, xanthomatosis, and diabetes. The authors recommend undertaking multivariate studies of monoamine oxidase, dopamine beta-hydroxylase, and other traits associated with schizophrenia in single, large pedigrees ascertained through schizophrenic probands.

  6. Oriented active shape models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiamin; Udupa, Jayaram K

    2009-04-01

    Active shape models (ASM) are widely employed for recognizing anatomic structures and for delineating them in medical images. In this paper, a novel strategy called oriented active shape models (OASM) is presented in an attempt to overcome the following five limitations of ASM: 1) lower delineation accuracy, 2) the requirement of a large number of landmarks, 3) sensitivity to search range, 4) sensitivity to initialization, and 5) inability to fully exploit the specific information present in the given image to be segmented. OASM effectively combines the rich statistical shape information embodied in ASM with the boundary orientedness property and the globally optimal delineation capability of the live wire methodology of boundary segmentation. The latter characteristics allow live wire to effectively separate an object boundary from other nonobject boundaries with similar properties especially when they come very close in the image domain. The approach leads to a two-level dynamic programming method, wherein the first level corresponds to boundary recognition and the second level corresponds to boundary delineation, and to an effective automatic initialization method. The method outputs a globally optimal boundary that agrees with the shape model if the recognition step is successful in bringing the model close to the boundary in the image. Extensive evaluation experiments have been conducted by utilizing 40 image (magnetic resonance and computed tomography) data sets in each of five different application areas for segmenting breast, liver, bones of the foot, and cervical vertebrae of the spine. Comparisons are made between OASM and ASM based on precision, accuracy, and efficiency of segmentation. Accuracy is assessed using both region-based false positive and false negative measures and boundary-based distance measures. The results indicate the following: 1) The accuracy of segmentation via OASM is considerably better than that of ASM; 2) The number of landmarks

  7. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Mark E; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Within the past several decades, a brigade of dedicated researchers from around the world has provided essential insights into the critical niche of immune-mediated inflammation in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Yet, the question has lingered as to whether disease-initiating events are more or less dependent on isolated immune-related responses, unimpeded inflammation, endogenous pathways of age-related cell senescence and oxidative stress, or any of the other numerous molecular derangements that have been identified in the natural history of AMD. There is now an abundant cache of data signifying immune system activation as an impetus in the pathogenesis of this devastating condition. Furthermore, recent rigorous investigations have revealed multiple inciting factors, including several important complement-activating components, thus creating a new array of disease-modulating targets for the research and development of molecular therapeutic interventions. While the precise in vivo effects of complement activation and inhibition in the progression and treatment of AMD remain to be determined, ongoing clinical trials of the first generation of complement-targeted therapeutics are hoped to yield critical data on the contribution of this pathway to the disease process. PMID:26501209

  8. Active music therapy and Parkinson's disease: methods.

    PubMed

    Pacchetti, C; Aglieri, R; Mancini, F; Martignoni, E; Nappi, G

    1998-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is an unconventional, multisensorial therapy poorly assessed in medical care but widely used to different ends in a variety of settings. MT has two branches: active and passive. In active MT the utilisation of instruments is structured to correspond to all sensory organs so as to obtain suitable motor and emotional responses. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the effects of MT in the neurorehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD), a common degenerative disorder involving movement and emotional impairment. Sixteen PD patients took part in 13 weekly sessions of MT each lasting 2 hours. At the beginning and at the end of the session, every 2 weeks, the patients were evaluated by a neurologist, who assessed PD severity with UPDRS, emotional functions with Happiness Measures (HM) and quality of life using the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL). After every session a significant improvement in motor function, particularly in relation to hypokinesia, was observed both in the overall and in the pre-post session evaluations. HM, UPDRS-ADL and PDQL changes confirmed an improving effect of MT on emotional functions, activities of daily living and quality of life. In conclusion, active MT, operating at a multisensorial level, stimulates motor, affective and behavioural functions. Finally, we propose active MT as new method to include in PD rehabilitation programmes. This article describes the methods adopted during MT sessions with PD patients. PMID:9584875

  9. Effect of Curcumin on Lifespan, Activity Pattern, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in the Brains of Transgenic Drosophila Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Yasir Hasan; Naz, Falaq; Jyoti, Smita

    2014-01-01

    Background. A time dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons and the formation of intracellular aggregates of alpha synuclein have been reported in PD model flies. Methods. The progeny (PD flies) expressing human alpha synuclein was exposed to 25, 50, and 100 µM of curcumin mixed in the diet for 24 days. The effect of curcumin was studied on lifespan, activity pattern, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in the brains of PD model flies. The activity of PD model flies was monitored by using Drosophila activity monitors (DAMs). For the estimation of oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content were estimated in the flies brains of each treated groups. The cell death in Drosophila brain was analyzed by isolating brains in Ringer's solution placing them in 70% ethanol and stained in acridine orange to calculate the gray scale values. Results. The exposure of flies to 25, 50, and 100 µM of curcumin showed a dose dependent significant delay in the loss of activity pattern, reduction in the oxidative stress and apoptosis, and increase in the life span of PD model flies. Conclusion. Curcumin is potent in reducing PD symptoms. PMID:24860828

  10. Activation of Salmonella Typhi-specific regulatory T cells in typhoid disease in a wild-type S. Typhi challenge model.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Monica A; Fresnay, Stephanie; Magder, Laurence S; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Dougan, Gordon; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi), the causative agent of typhoid fever, causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently available vaccines are moderately efficacious, and identification of immunological responses associated with protection or disease will facilitate the development of improved vaccines. We investigated S. Typhi-specific modulation of activation and homing potential of circulating regulatory T cells (Treg) by flow and mass cytometry using specimens obtained from a human challenge study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from volunteers pre- and at multiple time-points post-challenge with wild-type S. Typhi. We identified differing patterns of S. Typhi-specific modulation of the homing potential of circulating Treg between volunteers diagnosed with typhoid (TD) and those who were not (No TD). TD volunteers demonstrated up-regulation of the gut homing molecule integrin α4ß7 pre-challenge, followed by a significant down-regulation post-challenge consistent with Treg homing to the gut. Additionally, S. Typhi-specific Treg from TD volunteers exhibited up-regulation of activation molecules post-challenge (e.g., HLA-DR, LFA-1). We further demonstrate that depletion of Treg results in increased S. Typhi-specific cytokine production by CD8+ TEM in vitro. These results suggest that the tissue distribution of activated Treg, their characteristics and activation status may play a pivotal role in typhoid fever, possibly through suppression of S. Typhi-specific effector T cell responses. These studies provide important novel insights into the regulation of immune responses that are likely to be critical in protection against typhoid and other enteric infectious diseases.

  11. Animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rial, Sandra; Girón-Martínez, Álvaro; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2015-03-01

    Animal models of disease have always been welcomed by the scientific community because they provide an approach to the investigation of certain aspects of the disease in question. Animal models of COPD cannot reproduce the heterogeneity of the disease and usually only manage to represent the disease in its milder stages. Moreover, airflow obstruction, the variable that determines patient diagnosis, not always taken into account in the models. For this reason, models have focused on the development of emphysema, easily detectable by lung morphometry, and have disregarded other components of the disease, such as airway injury or associated vascular changes. Continuous, long-term exposure to cigarette smoke is considered the main risk factor for this disease, justifying the fact that the cigarette smoke exposure model is the most widely used. Some variations on this basic model, related to exposure time, the association of other inducers or inhibitors, exacerbations or the use of transgenic animals to facilitate the identification of pathogenic pathways have been developed. Some variations or heterogeneity of this disease, then, can be reproduced and models can be designed for resolving researchers' questions on disease identification or treatment responses. PMID:25201221

  12. Animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rial, Sandra; Girón-Martínez, Álvaro; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2015-03-01

    Animal models of disease have always been welcomed by the scientific community because they provide an approach to the investigation of certain aspects of the disease in question. Animal models of COPD cannot reproduce the heterogeneity of the disease and usually only manage to represent the disease in its milder stages. Moreover, airflow obstruction, the variable that determines patient diagnosis, not always taken into account in the models. For this reason, models have focused on the development of emphysema, easily detectable by lung morphometry, and have disregarded other components of the disease, such as airway injury or associated vascular changes. Continuous, long-term exposure to cigarette smoke is considered the main risk factor for this disease, justifying the fact that the cigarette smoke exposure model is the most widely used. Some variations on this basic model, related to exposure time, the association of other inducers or inhibitors, exacerbations or the use of transgenic animals to facilitate the identification of pathogenic pathways have been developed. Some variations or heterogeneity of this disease, then, can be reproduced and models can be designed for resolving researchers' questions on disease identification or treatment responses.

  13. Flightless Flies: Drosophila models of neuromuscular disease

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Thomas E.; Taylor, J. Paul

    2010-01-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has a long and rich history as an important model organism for biologists. In particular, study of the fruit fly has been essential to much of our fundamental understanding of the development and function of the nervous system. In recent years, studies using fruit flies have provided important insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases. Fly models of spinal muscular atrophy, spinobulbar muscular atrophy, myotonic dystrophy, dystrophinopathies and other inherited neuromuscular diseases recapitulate many of the key pathologic features of the human disease. The ability to perform genetic screens holds promise for uncovering the molecular mechanisms of disease, and indeed, for identifying novel therapeutic targets. This review will summarize recent progress in developing fly models of neuromuscular diseases and will emphasize the contribution that Drosophila has made to our understanding of these diseases. PMID:20329357

  14. Glucocerebrosidase activity in Parkinson's disease with and without GBA mutations.

    PubMed

    Alcalay, Roy N; Levy, Oren A; Waters, Cheryl C; Fahn, Stanley; Ford, Blair; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Mazzoni, Pietro; Pauciulo, Michael W; Nichols, William C; Gan-Or, Ziv; Rouleau, Guy A; Chung, Wendy K; Wolf, Pavlina; Oliva, Petra; Keutzer, Joan; Marder, Karen; Zhang, Xiaokui

    2015-09-01

    idiopathic Parkinson's disease (after exclusion of all GBA and LRRK2 carriers; 11.53 µmol/l/h, versus 12.11 µmol/l/h, P = 0.036) and after adjustment for age and gender (P = 0.012). Interestingly, LRRK2 G2019S carriers (n = 36), most of whom had Parkinson's disease, had higher enzymatic activity than non-carriers (13.69 µmol/l/h versus 11.93 µmol/l/h, P = 0.002). In patients with idiopathic Parkinson's, higher glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity was associated with longer disease duration (P = 0.002) in adjusted models, suggesting a milder disease course. We conclude that lower glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity is strongly associated with GBA mutations, and modestly with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. The association of lower glucocerebrosidase activity in both GBA mutation carriers and Parkinson's patients without GBA mutations suggests that loss of glucocerebrosidase function contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. High glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity in LRRK2 G2019S carriers may reflect a distinct pathogenic mechanism. Taken together, these data suggest that glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity could be a modifiable therapeutic target.

  15. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-01-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia–lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  16. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-12-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  17. Evaluation of Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jagmag, Shail A.; Tripathi, Naveen; Shukla, Sunil D.; Maiti, Sankar; Khurana, Sukant

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. Animal models have contributed a large part to our understanding and therapeutics developed for treatment of PD. There are several more exhaustive reviews of literature that provide the initiated insights into the specific models; however a novel synthesis of the basic advantages and disadvantages of different models is much needed. Here we compare both neurotoxin based and genetic models while suggesting some novel avenues in PD modeling. We also highlight the problems faced and promises of all the mammalian models with the hope of providing a framework for comparison of various systems. PMID:26834536

  18. A Prediction Model for Chronic Kidney Disease Includes Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Taylor, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Background An estimated 75% of the seven million Americans with moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease are undiagnosed. Improved prediction models to identify high-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease enhance the ability of health care providers to prevent or delay serious sequelae, including kidney failure, cardiovascular disease, and premature death. Methods We identified 11,955 adults ≥18 years of age in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 ml/minute/1.73 m2. High-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease were identified by estimating the individual probability using β coefficients from the model of traditional and non-traditional risk factors. To evaluate this model, we performed standard diagnostic analyses of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value using 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% probability cutoff points. Results The estimated probability of chronic kidney disease ranged from virtually no probability (0%) for an individual with none of the 12 risk factors to very high probability (98%) for an older, non-Hispanic white edentulous former smoker, with diabetes ≥10 years, hypertension, macroalbuminuria, high cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein, high C-reactive protein, lower income, and who was hospitalized in the past year. Evaluation of this model using an estimated 5% probability cutoff point resulted in 86% sensitivity, 85% specificity, 18% positive predictive value, and 99% negative predictive value. Conclusion This United States population–based study suggested the importance of considering multiple risk factors, including periodontal status, because this improves the identification of individuals at high risk for chronic kidney disease and may ultimately reduce its burden. PMID:19228085

  19. The new disease model of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J

    1990-05-01

    The new biopsychosocial disease model of alcoholism is examined from the perspective of recent biologic research. Studies of animal and human genetic predispositions suggest the presence of genetic influences over drinking behavior as well as biologic risk factors related to deficiencies in various neurochemicals. Ethanol affects the fluidity of cell membrane lipids, eventually causing membrane dysfunction. It also adversely affects the activity of two enzymes, monoamine oxidase and adenylate cyclase, that have important functions in the information processing system of the brain. Research on condensation products formed in the brain after alcohol consumption has provided clues to the development of alcoholism, but many questions remain unanswered. Alcoholism is clearly a multidimensional phenomenon in which biologic, psychological, and sociocultural factors interact to produce illness.

  20. Animal models of chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Meyer, Christoph; Xu, Chengfu; Weng, Honglei; Hellerbrand, Claus; ten Dijke, Peter; Dooley, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Chronic liver diseases are frequent and potentially life threatening for humans. The underlying etiologies are diverse, ranging from viral infections, autoimmune disorders, and intoxications (including alcohol abuse) to imbalanced diets. Although at early stages of disease the liver regenerates in the absence of the insult, advanced stages cannot be healed and may require organ transplantation. A better understanding of underlying mechanisms is mandatory for the design of new drugs to be used in clinic. Therefore, rodent models are being developed to mimic human liver disease. However, no model to date can completely recapitulate the "corresponding" human disorder. Limiting factors are the time frame required in humans to establish a certain liver disease and the fact that rodents possess a distinct immune system compared with humans and have different metabolic rates affecting liver homeostasis. These features account for the difficulties in developing adequate rodent models for studying disease progression and for testing new pharmaceuticals to be translated into the clinic. Nevertheless, traditional and new promising animal models that mimic certain attributes of chronic liver diseases are established and being used to deepen our understanding in the underlying mechanisms of distinct liver diseases. This review aims at providing a comprehensive overview of recent advances in animal models recapitulating different features and etiologies of human liver diseases. PMID:23275613

  1. Indicators of periodontal disease activity: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fine, D H; Mandel, I D

    1986-05-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that the traditional clinical criteria are inadequate for: determining active disease sites in periodontitis, monitoring quantitatively the response to therapy or measuring the degree of susceptibility to future breakdown. In an attempt to develop objective measures, a wide variety of studies have been undertaken using saliva, blood, plaque and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) as the specimen source. Examination has included: specific bacteria and their products; host cells and their products (enzymatic and antibacterial, both immunologic and non-immunologic); products of tissue injury derived from local epithelial and connective tissues and bone. Although most of the work to date has failed to provide reliable aids to the clinician, refinements in techniques for sampling and the availability of more sophisticated analytic techniques give cause for optimism. Methods proposed for detection of disease-associated bacteria in subgingival plaque vary in their sensitivity and specificity. Dark field microscopy shows some correlation with existing disease; however, the limited specificity of this method imposes severe restrictions on its usefulness. Highly specific polyclonal and monoclonal antisera to suspected pathogens Bacteroides gingivalis and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans have been developed and improved methods of identification of these microbes in plaque by ELISA immunofluorescence and flow cytometry are under development. With respect to the host response, a strong correlation between antibody patterns to specific bacteria and periodontal disease categories appears to be emerging. Although most studies have focused on serum antibody derived from peripheral blood, a shift to detection of local antibody response appears to be likely. Techniques of measurement that are exquisitely sensitive have been developed for detection of major immune recognition proteins such as antibody and complement in crevicular fluid. Research

  2. Dmp53, basket and drICE gene knockdown and polyphenol gallic acid increase life span and locomotor activity in a Drosophila Parkinson’s disease model

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Arellano, Hector Flavio; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) by which dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons are eroded in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is critical for effective therapeutic strategies. By using the binary tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Gal4/UAS-X RNAi Drosophila melanogaster system, we report that Dmp53, basket and drICE gene knockdown in dopaminergic neurons prolong life span (p < 0.05; log-rank test) and locomotor activity (p < 0.05; χ2 test) in D. melanogaster lines chronically exposed to (1 mM) paraquat (PQ, oxidative stress (OS) generator) compared to untreated transgenic fly lines. Likewise, knockdown flies displayed higher climbing performance than control flies. Amazingly, gallic acid (GA) significantly protected DAergic neurons, ameliorated life span, and climbing abilities in knockdown fly lines treated with PQ compared to flies treated with PQ only. Therefore, silencing specific gene(s) involved in neuronal death might constitute an excellent tool to study the response of DAergic neurons to OS stimuli. We propose that a therapy with antioxidants and selectively “switching off” death genes in DAergic neurons could provide a means for pre-clinical PD individuals to significantly ameliorate their disease condition. PMID:24385865

  3. Ameliorative effect of membrane-associated estrogen receptor G protein coupled receptor 30 activation on object recognition memory in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takashi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kirino, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Membrane-associated estrogen receptor "G protein-coupled receptor 30" (GPR30) has been implicated in spatial recognition memory and protection against neuronal death. The present study investigated the role of GPR30 in object recognition memory in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model (5XFAD) by using novel object recognition (NOR) test. Impairment of long-term (24 h) recognition memory was observed in both male and female 5XFAD mice. Selective GPR30 agonist, G-1, ameliorated this impairment in female 5XFAD mice, but not in male mice. Our study demonstrated the ameliorative role of GPR30 in NOR memory impaired by AD pathology in female mice. PMID:27423484

  4. Animal models for prion-like diseases.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Eraña, Hasier; Venegas, Vanesa; Elezgarai, Saioa R; Harrathi, Chafik; Castilla, Joaquín

    2015-09-01

    Prion diseases or Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders affecting several mammalian species being Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease (CJD) the most representative in human beings, scrapie in ovine, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in bovine and Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in cervids. As stated by the "protein-only hypothesis", the causal agent of TSEs is a self-propagating aberrant form of the prion protein (PrP) that through a misfolding event acquires a β-sheet rich conformation known as PrP(Sc) (from scrapie). This isoform is neurotoxic, aggregation prone and induces misfolding of native cellular PrP. Compelling evidence indicates that disease-specific protein misfolding in amyloid deposits could be shared by other disorders showing aberrant protein aggregates such as Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Parkinson's Disease (PD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and systemic Amyloid A amyloidosis (AA amyloidosis). Evidences of shared mechanisms of the proteins related to each disease with prions will be reviewed through the available in vivo models. Taking prion research as reference, typical prion-like features such as seeding and propagation ability, neurotoxic species causing disease, infectivity, transmission barrier and strain evidences will be analyzed for other protein-related diseases. Thus, prion-like features of amyloid β peptide and tau present in AD, α-synuclein in PD, SOD-1, TDP-43 and others in ALS and serum α-amyloid (SAA) in systemic AA amyloidosis will be reviewed through models available for each disease. PMID:25907990

  5. Prostaglandin E2 EP2 activation reduces memory decline in R6/1 mouse model of Huntington's disease by the induction of BDNF-dependent synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Anglada-Huguet, Marta; Vidal-Sancho, Laura; Giralt, Albert; García-Díaz Barriga, Gerardo; Xifró, Xavier; Alberch, Jordi

    2016-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) patients and mouse models show learning and memory impairment even before the onset of motor symptoms. Deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity have been involved in the HD memory impairment. Several studies show that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) EP2 receptor stimulates synaptic plasticity and memory formation. However, this role was not explored in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we investigated the capacity of PGE2 EP2 receptor to promote synaptic plasticity and memory improvements in a model of HD, the R6/1 mice, by administration of the agonist misoprostol. We found that misoprostol increases dendritic branching in cultured hippocampal neurons in a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent manner. Then, we implanted an osmotic mini-pump system to chronically administrate misoprostol to R6/1 mice from 14 to 18weeks of age. We observed that misoprostol treatment ameliorates the R6/1 long-term memory deficits as analyzed by the T-maze spontaneous alternation task and the novel object recognition test. Importantly, administration of misoprostol promoted the expression of hippocampal BDNF. Moreover, the treatment with misoprostol in R6/1 mice blocked the reduction in the number of PSD-95 and VGluT-1 positive particles observed in hippocampus of vehicle-R6/1 mice. In addition, we observed an increase of cAMP levels in the dentate ` of WT and R6/1 mice treated with misoprostol. Accordingly, we showed a reduction in the number of mutant huntingtin nuclear inclusions in the dentate gyrus of R6/1 mice. Altogether, these results suggest a putative therapeutic effect of PGE2 EP2 receptor in reducing cognitive deficits in HD.

  6. Editorial: Mathematical modelling of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Andy

    2016-06-01

    The field of disease ecology - the study of the spread and impact of parasites and pathogens within their host populations and communities - has a long history of using mathematical models. Dating back over 100 years, researchers have used mathematics to describe the spread of disease-causing agents, understand the relationship between host density and transmission and plan control strategies. The use of mathematical modelling in disease ecology exploded in the late 1970s and early 1980s through the work of Anderson and May (Anderson and May, 1978, 1981, 1992; May and Anderson, 1978), who developed the fundamental frameworks for studying microparasite (e.g. viruses, bacteria and protozoa) and macroparasite (e.g. helminth) dynamics, emphasizing the importance of understanding features such as the parasite's basic reproduction number (R 0) and critical community size that form the basis of disease ecology research to this day. Since the initial models of disease population dynamics, which primarily focused on human diseases, theoretical disease research has expanded hugely to encompass livestock and wildlife disease systems, and also to explore evolutionary questions such as the evolution of parasite virulence or drug resistance. More recently there have been efforts to broaden the field still further, to move beyond the standard 'one-host-one-parasite' paradigm of the original models, to incorporate many aspects of complexity of natural systems, including multiple potential host species and interactions among multiple parasite species. PMID:27027318

  7. Seven challenges in modeling vaccine preventable diseases.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, C J E; Andreasen, V; Bjørnstad, O N; Eames, K; Edmunds, W J; Funk, S; Hollingsworth, T D; Lessler, J; Viboud, C; Grenfell, B T

    2015-03-01

    Vaccination has been one of the most successful public health measures since the introduction of basic sanitation. Substantial mortality and morbidity reductions have been achieved via vaccination against many infections, and the list of diseases that are potentially controllable by vaccines is growing steadily. We introduce key challenges for modeling in shaping our understanding and guiding policy decisions related to vaccine preventable diseases.

  8. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease progression model.

    PubMed

    Gomeni, Roberto; Fava, Maurizio

    2014-03-01

    Our objective was to develop: 1) a longitudinal model to describe amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) disease progression using the revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R); and 2) a probabilistic model to estimate the presence of clusters of trajectories in ALS progression over 12 months of treatment. Three hundred and thirty-eight patients treated with placebo from the PRO-ACT database were included in the analyses. A non-linear Weibull model best described the ALS disease progression, and a stepwise logistic regression approach was used to select the variables predicting a slow or fast disease progression. Results identified two clusters of trajectories: 1) slow disease progressors (46% of patients with a change from baseline of 13%); 2) fast disease progressors (54% of patients with a change from baseline of 49%). ROC curve analysis estimated the optimal cut-off for classifying patients as slow or fast disease progressors given ALSFRS-R measurements at 2-4 weeks. Results showed that the degree of ALS disease progression quantified by the ALSFRS-R symptomatic change on placebo is highly heterogeneous. In conclusion, this finding indicates the potential interest of disease progression models for implementing a population enrichment strategy to control the level of heterogeneity in the patients included in new trials.

  9. Conditional Lineage Ablation to Model Human Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Paul; Morley, Gregory; Huang, Qian; Fischer, Avi; Seiler, Stephanie; Horner, James W.; Factor, Stephen; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Jalife, Jose; Fishman, Glenn I.

    1998-09-01

    Cell loss contributes to the pathogenesis of many inherited and acquired human diseases. We have developed a system to conditionally ablate cells of any lineage and developmental stage in the mouse by regulated expression of the diphtheria toxin A (DTA) gene by using tetracycline-responsive promoters. As an example of this approach, we targeted expression of DTA to the hearts of adult mice to model structural abnormalities commonly observed in human cardiomyopathies. Induction of DTA expression resulted in cell loss, fibrosis, and chamber dilatation. As in many human cardiomyopathies, transgenic mice developed spontaneous arrhythmias in vivo, and programmed electrical stimulation of isolated-perfused transgenic hearts demonstrated a strikingly high incidence of spontaneous and inducible ventricular tachycardia. Affected mice showed marked perturbations of cardiac gap junction channel expression and localization, including a subset with disorganized epicardial activation patterns as revealed by optical action potential mapping. These studies provide important insights into mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis and suggest that conditional lineage ablation may have wide applicability for studies of disease pathogenesis.

  10. Engineering large animal models of human disease.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Sheets, Timothy P; Lillico, Simon G; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of gene editing tools and methodology for use in livestock enables the production of new animal disease models. These tools facilitate site-specific mutation of the genome, allowing animals carrying known human disease mutations to be produced. In this review, we describe the various gene editing tools and how they can be used for a range of large animal models of diseases. This genomic technology is in its infancy but the expectation is that through the use of gene editing tools we will see a dramatic increase in animal model resources available for both the study of human disease and the translation of this knowledge into the clinic. Comparative pathology will be central to the productive use of these animal models and the successful translation of new therapeutic strategies.

  11. Modeling Graves' Orbitopathy in Experimental Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Banga, J P; Moshkelgosha, S; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, U; Eckstein, A

    2015-09-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO), also known as thyroid eye disease is an inflammatory disease of the orbital tissue of the eye that arises as a consequence of autoimmune thyroid disease. The central feature of the disease is the production of antibodies to the thyrotropin hormone receptor (TSHR) that modulate the function of the receptor leading to autoimmune hyperthyroidism and GO. Over the years, all viable preclinical models of Graves' disease have been incomplete and singularly failed to progress in the treatment of orbital complications. A new mouse model of GO based upon immunogenic presentation of human TSHR A-subunit plasmid by close field electroporation is shown to lead to induction of prolonged functional antibodies to TSHR resulting in chronic disease with subsequent progression to GO. The stable preclinical GO model exhibited pathologies reminiscent of human disease characterized by orbital remodeling by inflammation and adipogenesis. Inflammatory lesions characterized by CD3+ T cells and macrophages were localized in the orbital muscle tissue. This was accompanied by extensive adipogenesis of orbital fat in some immune animals. Surprisingly, other signs of orbital involvement were reminiscent of eyelid inflammation involving chemosis, with dilated and congested orbital blood vessels. More recently, the model is replicated in the author's independent laboratories. The pre-clinical model will provide the basis to study the pathogenic and regulatory roles of immune T and B cells and their subpopulations to understand the initiation, pathophysiology, and progression of GO.

  12. Modeling Addictive Consumption as an Infectious Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Alamar, Benjamin; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2011-01-01

    The dominant model of addictive consumption in economics is the theory of rational addiction. The addict in this model chooses how much they are going to consume based upon their level of addiction (past consumption), the current benefits and all future costs. Several empirical studies of cigarette sales and price data have found a correlation between future prices and consumption and current consumption. These studies have argued that the correlation validates the rational addiction model and invalidates any model in which future consumption is not considered. An alternative to the rational addiction model is one in which addiction spreads through a population as if it were an infectious disease, as supported by the large body of empirical research of addictive behaviors. In this model an individual's probability of becoming addicted to a substance is linked to the behavior of their parents, friends and society. In the infectious disease model current consumption is based only on the level of addiction and current costs. Price and consumption data from a simulation of the infectious disease model showed a qualitative match to the results of the rational addiction model. The infectious disease model can explain all of the theoretical results of the rational addiction model with the addition of explaining initial consumption of the addictive good. PMID:21339848

  13. Other model organisms for sarcomeric muscle diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, John; Hughes, Simon M.; Segalat, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Model organisms are vital to our understanding of human muscle biology and disease. The potential of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster and the zebrafish, Danio rerio, as model genetic organisms for the study of human muscle disease is discussed by examining their muscle biology, muscle genetics and development. The powerful genetic tools available with each organism are outlined. It is concluded that these organisms have already demonstrated potential in facilitating the study of muscle disease and in screening for therapeutic agents. PMID:19181102

  14. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program.

    PubMed

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-03-31

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs.

  15. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs. PMID:27032986

  16. Trientine Reduces BACE1 Activity and Mitigates Amyloidosis via the AGE/RAGE/NF-κB Pathway in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing-Wei; Xu, Ye; Wang, Tao; Cai, Jian-Hui; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Bao-Lu; An, Li

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: There is mounting evidence that the transition metal copper may play an important role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Triethylene tetramine dihydrochloride (trientine), a CuII-selective chelator, is a commonly used treatment for Wilson's disease to decrease accumulated copper, and thereby decreases oxidative stress. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of a 3-month treatment course of trientine (Trien) on amyloidosis in 7-month-old β-amyloid (Aβ) precursor protein and presenilin-1 (APP/PS1) double transgenic (Tg) AD model mice. Results: We observed that Trien reduced the level of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and decreased Aβ deposition and synapse loss in brain of APP/PS1 mice. Importantly, we found that Trien blocked the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), downregulated β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), inhibited amyloidogenic APP cleavage, and subsequently reduced Aβ levels. In vitro, in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing Swedish mutant APP, Trien-mediated downregulation of BACE1 occurred via inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Innovation: In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that Trien inhibited amyloidogenic pathway including targeting the downregulation of RAGE and NF-κB. Conclusion: Trien might mitigate amyloidosis in AD by inhibiting the RAGE/NF-κB/BACE1 pathway. Our study demonstrates that Trien may be a viable therapeutic strategy for the intervention and treatment of AD and other AD-like pathologies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 2024–2039. PMID:23541064

  17. Immune-competent human skin disease models.

    PubMed

    Bergers, Lambert I J C; Reijnders, Christianne M A; van den Broek, Lenie J; Spiekstra, Sander W; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Weijers, Ester M; Gibbs, Susan

    2016-09-01

    All skin diseases have an underlying immune component. Owing to differences in animal and human immunology, the majority of drugs fail in the preclinical or clinical testing phases. Therefore animal alternative methods that incorporate human immunology into in vitro skin disease models are required to move the field forward. This review summarizes the progress, using examples from fibrosis, autoimmune diseases, psoriasis, cancer and contact allergy. The emphasis is on co-cultures and 3D organotypic models. Our conclusion is that current models are inadequate and future developments with immune-competent skin-on-chip models based on induced pluripotent stem cells could provide a next generation of skin models for drug discovery and testing.

  18. Synchronizing activity of basal ganglia and pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Heimer, G; Rivlin, M; Israel, Z; Bergman, H

    2006-01-01

    Early physiological studies emphasized changes in the discharge rate of basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD), whereas recent studies stressed the role of the abnormal oscillatory activity and neuronal synchronization of pallidal cells. However, human observations cast doubt on the synchronization hypothesis since increased synchronization may be an epi-phenomenon of the tremor or of independent oscillators with similar frequency. Here, we show that modern actor/ critic models of the basal ganglia predict the emergence of synchronized activity in PD and that significant non-oscillatory and oscillatory correlations are found in MPTP primates. We conclude that the normal fluctuation of basal ganglia dopamine levels combined with local cortico-striatal learning rules lead to noncorrelated activity in the pallidum. Dopamine depletion, as in PD, results in correlated pallidal activity, and reduced information capacity. We therefore suggest that future deep brain stimulation (DBS) algorithms may be improved by desynchronizing pallidal activity. PMID:17017503

  19. A nonlocal spatial model for Lyme disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of a nonlocal and time-delayed reaction-diffusion model for Lyme disease with a spatially heterogeneous structure. In the case of a bounded domain, we first prove the existence of the positive steady state and a threshold type result for the disease-free system, and then establish the global dynamics for the model system in terms of the basic reproduction number. In the case of an unbound domain, we obtain the existence of the disease spreading speed and its coincidence with the minimal wave speed. At last, we use numerical simulations to verify our analytic results and investigate the influence of model parameters and spatial heterogeneity on the disease infection risk.

  20. Polycystic ovarian disease: animal models.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, D K

    1988-12-01

    The reproductive systems of human beings and other vertebrates are grossly similar. In the ovary particularly, the biochemical and physiologic processes are identical not only in the formation of germ cells, the development of primordial follicles and their subsequent growth to Graafian follicles, and eventual ovulation but also in anatomic structure. In a noncarcinogenic human ovary, hypersecretion of androgen causes PCOD. Such hypersecretion may result from a nonpulsatile, constant elevated level of circulating LH or a disturbance in the action of neurotransmitters in the hypothalamus. In studying the pathophysiology of PCOD in humans, one must be aware of the limitations for manipulating the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Although the rat is a polytocous rodent, the female has a regular ovarian cyclicity of 4 or 5 days, with distinct proestrus, estrus, and diestrus phases. Inasmuch as PCOD can be experimentally produced in the rat, that species is a good model for studying the pathophysiology of human PCOD. These PCOD models and their validity have been described: (1) estradiol-valerate, (2) DHA, (3) constant-light (LL), and (4) neonatally androgenized. Among these, the LL model is noninvasive and seems superior to the others for study of the pathophysiology of PCOD. The production of the polycystic ovarian condition in the rat by the injection of estrogens or androgens in neonate animals, or estradiol or DHA in adult rats, or the administration of antigonadotropins to these animals all cause a sudden appearance of the persistent estrus state by disturbing the metabolic and physiologic processes, whereas exposure of the adult rat to LL causes polycystic ovaries gradually, similar to what is seen in human idiopathic PCOD. After about 50 days of LL, the rat becomes anovulatory and the ovaries contain thickened tunica albuginea and many atretic follicles, and the tertiary follicles are considerably distended and cystic. The granulosa and theca cells appear normal

  1. Animal models of human disease: inflammation.

    PubMed

    Webb, David R

    2014-01-01

    Animals have been used as models to study inflammation and autoimmunity for more than 80 years. During that time it has been understood that although the use of such models is an important and necessary part of understanding human disease, they inevitably display significant differences from the human disease state. Since our understanding of human inflammation and autoimmunity is necessarily incomplete, it may be concluded that the animal models will also be reflective of the state of knowledge regarding such diseases. Nevertheless, animal models of rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and multiple sclerosis have been successfully used to enhance the understanding of the human disease and have made significant contributions to the development of powerful new therapies. However, there are exceptions. One of the most persistent has been the study of sepsis where the animal models have been woefully inadequate in uncovering targets for drug discovery and have led to repeated clinical failures. As will be explained, only by using newly developed genomics tools has it been possible to uncover the differences between sepsis in mice and sepsis in man. It is concluded that approaches using the newer genomic and proteomic data derived from human tissues, will make possible the development of animal models with more predictive power as aids to drug discovery.

  2. Animal Models in Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    Behçet's disease is a chronic, recurrent, multisystemic, inflammatory disorder affecting mainly the oral and urogenital mucosa and the uveal tract. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of Behçet's disease are unknown, numerous etiologies have been proposed, including environmental, infectious, and immunological factors; an autoimmune basis, characterized by circulating immune complexes and complement activation, has gained increasing acceptance. To test and understand immunopathogenesis of Behçet's disease, animal models were developed based on enviromental pollutants, bacterial and human heat shock protein derived peptides, and virus injections. Using these animal models separately and/or concurrently allows for a more effective investigation into Behçet's disease. Animal models developed in the last 10 years aim at the development of efficient and safe treatment options. PMID:22482083

  3. High-Throughput LC-MS/MS Proteomic Analysis of a Mouse Model of Mesiotemporal Lobe Epilepsy Predicts Microglial Activation Underlying Disease Development.

    PubMed

    Bitsika, Vasiliki; Duveau, Venceslas; Simon-Areces, Julia; Mullen, William; Roucard, Corinne; Makridakis, Manousos; Mermelekas, George; Savvopoulos, Pantelis; Depaulis, Antoine; Vlahou, Antonia

    2016-05-01

    Uncovering the molecular mechanisms of mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is critical to identify therapeutic targets. In this study, we performed global protein expression analysis of a kainic acid (KA) MTLE mouse model at various time-points (1, 3, and 30 days post-KA injection -dpi), representing specific stages of the syndrome. High-resolution liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), in combination with label-free protein quantification using three processing approaches for quantification, was applied. Following comparison of KA versus NaCl-injected mice, 22, 53, and 175 proteins were differentially (statistically significant) expressed at 1, 3 and 30dpi, respectively, according to all three quantification approaches. Selected findings were confirmed by multiple reaction monitoring LC-MS/MS. As a positive control, the astrocyte marker GFAP was found to be upregulated (3dpi: 1.9 fold; 30dpi: 12.5 fold), also verified by IHC. The results collectively suggest that impairment in synaptic transmission occurs even right after initial status epilepticus (1dpi), with neurodegeneration becoming more extensive during epileptogenesis (3dpi) and sustained at the chronic phase (30dpi), where also extensive glial- and astrocyte-mediated inflammation is evident. This molecular profile is in line with observed phenotypic changes in human MTLE, providing the basis for future studies on new molecular targets for the disease. PMID:27057777

  4. Small mammalian animal models of heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Paula; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; He, Jia-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent clinical need to develop new therapeutic approaches for treating cardiovascular disease, but the biology of cardiovascular regeneration is complex. Model systems are required to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis, progression, and mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease as well as to test therapeutic approaches to regenerate tissue and restore cardiac function following injury. An ideal model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, reproducible, physiologically representative of human disease, and ethically sound. The choice of animal model needs to be considered carefully since it affects experimental outcomes and whether findings of the study can be reasonably translated to humans. This review presents a guideline for the commonly used small animal models (mice, rats, rabbits, and cats) used in cardiac research as an effort to standardize the most relevant procedures and obtain translatable and reproducible results.

  5. Small mammalian animal models of heart disease.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Paula; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; He, Jia-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent clinical need to develop new therapeutic approaches for treating cardiovascular disease, but the biology of cardiovascular regeneration is complex. Model systems are required to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis, progression, and mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease as well as to test therapeutic approaches to regenerate tissue and restore cardiac function following injury. An ideal model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, reproducible, physiologically representative of human disease, and ethically sound. The choice of animal model needs to be considered carefully since it affects experimental outcomes and whether findings of the study can be reasonably translated to humans. This review presents a guideline for the commonly used small animal models (mice, rats, rabbits, and cats) used in cardiac research as an effort to standardize the most relevant procedures and obtain translatable and reproducible results. PMID:27679742

  6. Small mammalian animal models of heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Paula; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; He, Jia-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent clinical need to develop new therapeutic approaches for treating cardiovascular disease, but the biology of cardiovascular regeneration is complex. Model systems are required to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis, progression, and mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease as well as to test therapeutic approaches to regenerate tissue and restore cardiac function following injury. An ideal model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, reproducible, physiologically representative of human disease, and ethically sound. The choice of animal model needs to be considered carefully since it affects experimental outcomes and whether findings of the study can be reasonably translated to humans. This review presents a guideline for the commonly used small animal models (mice, rats, rabbits, and cats) used in cardiac research as an effort to standardize the most relevant procedures and obtain translatable and reproducible results. PMID:27679742

  7. Disease prediction models and operational readiness.

    PubMed

    Corley, Courtney D; Pullum, Laura L; Hartley, David M; Benedum, Corey; Noonan, Christine; Rabinowitz, Peter M; Lancaster, Mary J

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to present a systematic review of biosurveillance models that operate on select agents and can forecast the occurrence of a disease event. We define a disease event to be a biological event with focus on the One Health paradigm. These events are characterized by evidence of infection and or disease condition. We reviewed models that attempted to predict a disease event, not merely its transmission dynamics and we considered models involving pathogens of concern as determined by the US National Select Agent Registry (as of June 2011). We searched commercial and government databases and harvested Google search results for eligible models, using terms and phrases provided by public health analysts relating to biosurveillance, remote sensing, risk assessments, spatial epidemiology, and ecological niche modeling. After removal of duplications and extraneous material, a core collection of 6,524 items was established, and these publications along with their abstracts are presented in a semantic wiki at http://BioCat.pnnl.gov. As a result, we systematically reviewed 44 papers, and the results are presented in this analysis. We identified 44 models, classified as one or more of the following: event prediction (4), spatial (26), ecological niche (28), diagnostic or clinical (6), spread or response (9), and reviews (3). The model parameters (e.g., etiology, climatic, spatial, cultural) and data sources (e.g., remote sensing, non-governmental organizations, expert opinion, epidemiological) were recorded and reviewed. A component of this review is the identification of verification and validation (V&V) methods applied to each model, if any V&V method was reported. All models were classified as either having undergone Some Verification or Validation method, or No Verification or Validation. We close by outlining an initial set of operational readiness level guidelines for disease prediction models based upon established Technology Readiness

  8. Disease Prediction Models and Operational Readiness

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Courtney D.; Pullum, Laura L.; Hartley, David M.; Benedum, Corey; Noonan, Christine; Rabinowitz, Peter M.; Lancaster, Mary J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to present a systematic review of biosurveillance models that operate on select agents and can forecast the occurrence of a disease event. We define a disease event to be a biological event with focus on the One Health paradigm. These events are characterized by evidence of infection and or disease condition. We reviewed models that attempted to predict a disease event, not merely its transmission dynamics and we considered models involving pathogens of concern as determined by the US National Select Agent Registry (as of June 2011). We searched commercial and government databases and harvested Google search results for eligible models, using terms and phrases provided by public health analysts relating to biosurveillance, remote sensing, risk assessments, spatial epidemiology, and ecological niche modeling. After removal of duplications and extraneous material, a core collection of 6,524 items was established, and these publications along with their abstracts are presented in a semantic wiki at http://BioCat.pnnl.gov. As a result, we systematically reviewed 44 papers, and the results are presented in this analysis. We identified 44 models, classified as one or more of the following: event prediction (4), spatial (26), ecological niche (28), diagnostic or clinical (6), spread or response (9), and reviews (3). The model parameters (e.g., etiology, climatic, spatial, cultural) and data sources (e.g., remote sensing, non-governmental organizations, expert opinion, epidemiological) were recorded and reviewed. A component of this review is the identification of verification and validation (V&V) methods applied to each model, if any V&V method was reported. All models were classified as either having undergone Some Verification or Validation method, or No Verification or Validation. We close by outlining an initial set of operational readiness level guidelines for disease prediction models based upon established Technology Readiness

  9. Disease Prediction Models and Operational Readiness

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Courtney D.; Pullum, Laura L.; Hartley, David M.; Benedum, Corey M.; Noonan, Christine F.; Rabinowitz, Peter M.; Lancaster, Mary J.

    2014-03-19

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this manuscript is to present a systematic review of biosurveillance models that operate on select agents and can forecast the occurrence of a disease event. One of the primary goals of this research was to characterize the viability of biosurveillance models to provide operationally relevant information for decision makers to identify areas for future research. Two critical characteristics differentiate this work from other infectious disease modeling reviews. First, we reviewed models that attempted to predict the disease event, not merely its transmission dynamics. Second, we considered models involving pathogens of concern as determined by the US National Select Agent Registry (as of June 2011). Methods: We searched dozens of commercial and government databases and harvested Google search results for eligible models utilizing terms and phrases provided by public health analysts relating to biosurveillance, remote sensing, risk assessments, spatial epidemiology, and ecological niche-modeling, The publication date of search results returned are bound by the dates of coverage of each database and the date in which the search was performed, however all searching was completed by December 31, 2010. This returned 13,767 webpages and 12,152 citations. After de-duplication and removal of extraneous material, a core collection of 6,503 items was established and these publications along with their abstracts are presented in a semantic wiki at http://BioCat.pnnl.gov. Next, PNNL’s IN-SPIRE visual analytics software was used to cross-correlate these publications with the definition for a biosurveillance model resulting in the selection of 54 documents that matched the criteria resulting Ten of these documents, However, dealt purely with disease spread models, inactivation of bacteria, or the modeling of human immune system responses to pathogens rather than predicting disease events. As a result, we systematically reviewed 44 papers and the

  10. Comparative study of the neuroprotective and nootropic activities of the carboxylate and amide forms of the HLDF-6 peptide in animal models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bogachouk, Anna P; Storozheva, Zinaida I; Solovjeva, Olga A; Sherstnev, Vyacheslav V; Zolotarev, Yury A; Azev, Vyacheslav N; Rodionov, Igor L; Surina, Elena A; Lipkin, Valery M

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of the neuroprotective and nootropic activities of two pharmaceutical substances, the HLDF-6 peptide (HLDF-6-OH) and its amide form (HLDF-6-NH2), was conducted. The study was performed in male rats using two models of a neurodegenerative disorder. Cognitive deficit in rats was induced by injection of the beta-amyloid fragment 25-35 (βA 25-35) into the giant-cell nucleus basalis of Meynert or by coinjection of βA 25-35 and ibotenic acid into the hippocampus. To evaluate cognitive functions in animals, three tests were used: the novel object recognition test, the conditioned passive avoidance task and the Morris maze. Comparative analysis of the data demonstrated that the neuroprotective activity of HLDF-6-NH2, evaluated by improvement of cognitive functions in animals, surpassed that of the native HLDF-6-OH peptide. The greater cognitive/ behavioral effects can be attributed to improved kinetic properties of the amide form of the peptide, such as the character of biodegradation and the half-life time. The effects of HLDF-6-NH2 are comparable to, or exceed, those of the reference compounds. Importantly, HLDF-6-NH2 exerts its effects at much lower doses than the reference compounds.

  11. The promises of neurodegenerative disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Lepesant, Jean-Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The rise in the prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases parallels the rapid increase in human lifespan. Despite intensive research, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of these devastating diseases with age are still poorly understood. Many aspects of these diseases have been modelled successfully in experimental animals such as the mouse, the zebrafish Brachydanio rero, the nematode worm Caenorhaditis elegans and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This review will focus on the advantages offered by the genetic tools available in Drosophila for combining powerful strategies in order to tackle the causative factors of these complex pathologies and help to elaborate efficient drugs to treat them.

  12. Large genetic animal models of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Morton, A Jennifer; Howland, David S

    2013-01-01

    The dominant nature of the Huntington's disease gene mutation has allowed genetic models to be developed in multiple species, with the mutation causing an abnormal neurological phenotype in all animals in which it is expressed. Many different rodent models have been generated. The most widely used of these, the transgenic R6/2 mouse, carries the mutation in a fragment of the human huntingtin gene and has a rapidly progressive and fatal neurological phenotype with many relevant pathological changes. Nevertheless, their rapid decline has been frequently questioned in the context of a disease that takes years to manifest in humans, and strenuous efforts have been made to make rodent models that are genetically more 'relevant' to the human condition, including full length huntingtin gene transgenic and knock-in mice. While there is no doubt that we have learned, and continue to learn much from rodent models, their usefulness is limited by two species constraints. First, the brains of rodents differ significantly from humans in both their small size and their neuroanatomical organization. Second, rodents have much shorter lifespans than humans. Here, we review new approaches taken to these challenges in the development of models of Huntington's disease in large brained, long-lived animals. We discuss the need for such models, and how they might be used to fill specific niches in preclinical Huntington's disease research, particularly in testing gene-based therapeutics. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of animals in which the prodromal period of disease extends over a long time span. We suggest that there is considerable 'value added' for large animal models in preclinical Huntington's disease research.

  13. Glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibition limits osteoclast activation and myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Adel; Xu, Ke; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Butters, Terry D.; Santo, Ana Espirito; Vattakuzhi, Youridies; Williams, Lynn M.; Goudevenou, Katerina; Danks, Lynett; Freidin, Andrew; Spanoudakis, Emmanouil; Parry, Simon; Papaioannou, Maria; Hatjiharissi, Evdoxia; Chaidos, Aristeidis; Alonzi, Dominic S.; Twigg, Gabriele; Hu, Ming; Dwek, Raymond A.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Roberts, Irene; Dell, Anne; Rahemtulla, Amin; Horwood, Nicole J.; Karadimitris, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are essential constituents of cell membranes and lipid rafts and can modulate signal transduction events. The contribution of GSLs in osteoclast (OC) activation and osteolytic bone diseases in malignancies such as the plasma cell dyscrasia multiple myeloma (MM) is not known. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pathological activation of OCs in MM requires de novo GSL synthesis and is further enhanced by myeloma cell–derived GSLs. Glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitors, including the clinically approved agent N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ), prevented OC development and activation by disrupting RANKL-induced localization of TRAF6 and c-SRC into lipid rafts and preventing nuclear accumulation of transcriptional activator NFATc1. GM3 was the prevailing GSL produced by patient-derived myeloma cells and MM cell lines, and exogenous addition of GM3 synergistically enhanced the ability of the pro-osteoclastogenic factors RANKL and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) to induce osteoclastogenesis in precursors. In WT mice, administration of GM3 increased OC numbers and activity, an effect that was reversed by treatment with NB-DNJ. In a murine MM model, treatment with NB-DNJ markedly improved osteolytic bone disease symptoms. Together, these data demonstrate that both tumor-derived and de novo synthesized GSLs influence osteoclastogenesis and suggest that NB-DNJ may reduce pathological OC activation and bone destruction associated with MM. PMID:25915583

  14. Modelling human disease with pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, In-Hyun; Sullivan, Gareth J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of cellular reprogramming has opened up the doors to a new era of disease modelling, as pluripotent stem cells representing a myriad of genetic diseases can now be produced from patient tissue. These cells can be expanded and differentiated to produce a potentially limitless supply of the affected cell type, which can then be used as a tool to improve understanding of disease mechanisms and test therapeutic interventions. This process requires high levels of scrutiny and validation at every stage, but international standards for the characterisation of pluripotent cells and their progeny have yet to be established. Here we discuss the current state of the art with regard to modelling diseases affecting the ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal lineages, focussing on studies which have demonstrated a disease phenotype in the tissue of interest. We also discuss the utility of pluripotent cell technology for the modelling of cancer and infectious disease. Finally, we spell out the technical and scientific challenges which must be addressed if the field is to deliver on its potential and produce improved patient outcomes in the clinic. PMID:23444871

  15. A quantitative model for hyaline membrane disease.

    PubMed

    Rojas, J; Green, R S; Fannon, L; Olssen, T; Lindstrom, D P; Stahlman, M T; Cotton, R B

    1982-01-01

    A model based on the course of 31 infants with uncomplicated hyaline membrane disease is described. Based on data collected over the first 12 hr of life, it predicts the course of an infant for the next 60 hr, and estimates the outcome in terms of length of oxygen requirement and assisted ventilation. For the construction of the model, right-to-left intra- and extra-pulmonary shunting, expressed as venous admixture, was considered as the principal mechanism of hypoxemia in hyaline membrane disease and mean applied proximal airway pressure was used to quantify management. The model provides an objective estimate of severity early in the course of disease, uses variables routinely available in an intensive care unit, and its use would strengthen the interpretation of clinical studies in which the comparability of experimental and control groups is critical. PMID:7070873

  16. Avian models with spontaneous autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Georg; Andersson, Leif; Hala, Karel; Gershwin, M. Eric; Selmi, Carlo F.; Erf, Gisela F.; Lamont, Susan J.; Sgonc, Roswitha

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases in human patients only become clinically manifest when the disease process has developed to a stage where functional compensation by the afflicted organ or system is not possible any more. In order to understand the initial etiologic and pathogenic events that are generally not yet accessible in humans, appropriate animal models are required. In this respect, spontaneously developing models - albeit rare – reflect the situation in humans much more closely than experimentally induced models, including knockout and transgenic mice. The present review describes three spontaneous chicken models for human autoimmune diseases, the Obese strain (OS) with a Hashimoto-like autoimmune thyroiditis, the University of California at Davis lines 200 and 206 (UCD-200 and 206) with a scleroderma-like disease and the amelanotic Smyth line with a vitiligo-like syndrome (SLV). Special emphasis is given to the new opportunities to unravel the genetic basis of these diseases in view of the recently completed sequencing of the chicken genome. PMID:17145302

  17. Activation and blockade of serotonin7 receptors in the prelimbic cortex regulate depressive-like behaviors in a 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q J; Du, C X; Tan, H H; Zhang, L; Li, L B; Zhang, J; Niu, X L; Liu, J

    2015-12-17

    The role of serotonin7 (5-HT7) receptors in the regulation of depression is poorly understood, particularly in Parkinson's disease-associated depression. Here we examined whether 5-HT7 receptors in the prelimbic (PrL) sub-region of the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) involve in the regulation of depressive-like behaviors in sham-operated rats and rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle. The lesion induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. Intra-PrL injection of 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS19 (0.5, 1 and 2 μg/rat) increased sucrose consumption, and decreased immobility time in sham-operated and the lesioned rats, indicating the induction of antidepressant-like effects. Further, intra-PrL injection of 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB269970 (1.5, 3 and 6 μg/rat) decreased sucrose consumption, and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like responses. However, the doses producing these effects in the lesioned rats were higher than those in sham-operated rats. Neurochemical results showed that intra-PrL injection of AS19 (2 μg/rat) increased dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the mPFC, habenula and ventral hippocampus (vHip) in sham-operated and the lesioned rats; whereas SB269970 (6 μg/rat) decreased 5-HT levels in the habenula and vHip, and the levels of NA in the mPFC, habenula and vHip in the two groups of rats. The results suggest that 5-HT7 receptors in the PrL play an important role in the regulation of these behaviors, which attribute to changes in monoamine levels in the limbic and limbic-related brain regions after activation and blockade of 5-HT7 receptors.

  18. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  19. Modeling of protein misfolding in disease.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta B

    2008-01-01

    A short review of the results of molecular modeling of prion disease is presented in this chapter. According to the "one-protein theory" proposed by Prusiner, prion proteins are misfolded naturally occurring proteins, which, on interaction with correctly folded proteins may induce misfolding and propagate the disease, resulting in insoluble amyloid aggregates in cells of affected specimens. Because of experimental difficulties in measurements of origin and growth of insoluble amyloid aggregations in cells, theoretical modeling is often the only one source of information regarding the molecular mechanism of the disease. Replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations presented in this chapter indicate that proteins in the native state, N, on interaction with an energetically higher structure, R, can change their conformation into R and form a dimer, R(2). The addition of another protein in the N state to R(2) may lead to spontaneous formation of a trimer, R(3). These results reveal the molecular basis for a model of prion disease propagation or conformational diseases in general. PMID:18446294

  20. Modeling approaches for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Sven; Atzrodt, Heiko; Mayer, Dirk; Thomaier, Martin

    2006-03-01

    To solve a wide range of vibration problems with the active structures technology, different simulation approaches for several models are needed. The selection of an appropriate modeling strategy is depending, amongst others, on the frequency range, the modal density and the control target. An active system consists of several components: the mechanical structure, at least one sensor and actuator, signal conditioning electronics and the controller. For each individual part of the active system the simulation approaches can be different. To integrate the several modeling approaches into an active system simulation and to ensure a highly efficient and accurate calculation, all sub models must harmonize. For this purpose, structural models considered in this article are modal state-space formulations for the lower frequency range and transfer function based models for the higher frequency range. The modal state-space formulations are derived from finite element models and/or experimental modal analyses. Consequently, the structure models which are based on transfer functions are directly derived from measurements. The transfer functions are identified with the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method. To convert them from the z-domain to the s-domain a least squares solution is implemented. An analytical approach is used to derive models of active interfaces. These models are transferred into impedance formulations. To couple mechanical and electrical sub-systems with the active materials, the concept of impedance modeling was successfully tested. The impedance models are enhanced by adapting them to adequate measurements. The controller design strongly depends on the frequency range and the number of modes to be controlled. To control systems with a small number of modes, techniques such as active damping or independent modal space control may be used, whereas in the case of systems with a large number of modes or with modes that are not well separated, other control

  1. Data in support of a central role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 polymorphism in recurrent cardiovascular disease risk in the setting of high HDL cholesterol and C-reactive protein using Bayesian network modeling.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, James P; Salzman, Peter; Ryan, Dan; Moss, Arthur J; Zareba, Wojciech; Sparks, Charles E

    2016-09-01

    Data is presented that was utilized as the basis for Bayesian network modeling of influence pathways focusing on the central role of a polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) on recurrent cardiovascular disease risk in patients with high levels of HDL cholesterol and C-reactive protein (CRP) as a marker of inflammation, "Influences on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-2 Polymorphism-Associated Recurrent Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Patients with High HDL Cholesterol and Inflammation" (Corsetti et al., 2016; [1]). The data consist of occurrence of recurrent coronary events in 166 post myocardial infarction patients along with 1. clinical data on gender, race, age, and body mass index; 2. blood level data on 17 biomarkers; and 3. genotype data on 53 presumptive CVD-related single nucleotide polymorphisms. Additionally, a flow diagram of the Bayesian modeling procedure is presented along with Bayesian network subgraphs (root nodes to outcome events) utilized as the data from which PAI-2 associated influence pathways were derived (Corsetti et al., 2016; [1]).

  2. Spontaneous and transgenic rodent models of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Jurjus, Abdo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder with many different putative influences mediating disease onset, severity, progression and diminution. Spontaneous natural IBD is classically expressed as Crohn's Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC) commonly found in primates; lymphoplasmocytic enteritis, eosinophilic gastritis and colitis, and ulcerative colitis with neuronal hyperplasia in dogs; and colitis in horses. Spontaneous inflammatory bowel disease has been noted in a number of rodent models which differ in genetic strain background, induced mutation, microbiota influences and immunopathogenic pathways. Histological lesions in Crohn's Disease feature noncaseating granulomatous inflammation while UC lesions typically exhibit ulceration, lamina propria inflammatory infiltrates and lack of granuloma development. Intestinal inflammation caused by CD and UC is also associated with increased incidence of intestinal neoplasia. Transgenic murine models have determined underlying etiological influences and appropriate therapeutic targets in IBD. This literature review will discuss current opinion and findings in spontaneous IBD, highlight selected transgenic rodent models of IBD and discuss their respective pathogenic mechanisms. It is very important to provide accommodation of induced putative deficits in activities of daily living and to assess discomfort and pain levels in the face of significant morbidity and/or mortality in these models. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis, and evaluating ways in which they influence disease expression represent potential investigative approaches with the greatest potential for new discoveries. PMID:26155200

  3. Neuroprotective and neurorestorative activities of a novel iron chelator-brain selective monoamine oxidase-A/monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor in animal models of Parkinson's disease and aging.

    PubMed

    Bar-Am, Orit; Amit, Tamar; Kupershmidt, Lana; Aluf, Yuval; Mechlovich, Danit; Kabha, Hoda; Danovitch, Lena; Zurawski, Vincent R; Youdim, Moussa B H; Weinreb, Orly

    2015-03-01

    Recently, we have designed and synthesized a novel multipotent, brain-permeable iron-chelating drug, VAR10303 (VAR), possessing both propargyl and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory moieties. The present study was undertaken to determine the multiple pharmacological activities of VAR in neurodegenerative preclinical models. We demonstrate that VAR affords iron chelating/iron-induced lipid-peroxidation inhibitory potency and brain selective MAO-A and MAO-B inhibitory effects, with only limited tyramine-cardiovascular potentiation of blood pressure. The results show that in 6-hydroxydopamine rat (neuroprotection) and in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse (neurorescue) Parkinson's disease models, VAR significantly attenuated the loss of striatal dopamine levels, markedly reduced dopamine turnover, and increased tyrosine-hydroxylase levels. Furthermore, chronic systemic treatment of aged rats with VAR improved cognitive behavior deficits and enhanced the expression levels of neurotrophic factors (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and nerve growth factor), Bcl-2 family members and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Our study indicates that the multitarget compound VAR exerted neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease and aging, further suggesting that a drug that can regulate multiple brain targets could be an ideal treatment-strategy for age-associated neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease - model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Gloster, J; Jones, A; Redington, A; Burgin, L; Sorensen, J H; Turner, R; Dillon, M; Hullinger, P; Simpson, M; Astrup, P; Garner, G; Stewart, P; D'Amours, R; Sellers, R; Paton, D

    2008-09-04

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly infectious vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. It spreads by direct contact between animals, by animal products (milk, meat and semen), by mechanical transfer on people or fomites and by the airborne route - with the relative importance of each mechanism depending on the particular outbreak characteristics. Over the years a number of workers have developed or adapted atmospheric dispersion models to assess the risk of foot-and-mouth disease virus spread through the air. Six of these models were compared at a workshop hosted by the Institute for Animal Health/Met Office during 2008. A number of key issues emerged from the workshop and subsequent modelling work: (1) in general all of the models predicted similar directions for 'at risk' livestock with much of the remaining differences strongly related to differences in the meteorological data used; (2) determination of an accurate sequence of events is highly important, especially if the meteorological conditions vary substantially during the virus emission period; and (3) differences in assumptions made about virus release, environmental fate, and subsequent infection can substantially modify the size and location of the downwind risk area. Close relationships have now been established between participants, which in the event of an outbreak of disease could be readily activated to supply advice or modelling support.

  5. [Experimental model of ocular ischemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, T N; Chudin, A V

    2014-01-01

    The review presents the most common methods of modeling of retinal ischemia in vitro (chemical ischemia with iodoacetic acid, incubation of the retinal pigment epithelium cells with oligomycin, deprivation of oxygen and glucose) and in vivo (a model with increased intraocular pressure, cerebral artery occlusion, chronic ligation of the carotid arteries, photocoagulation of the retinal vessels, occlusion of the central retinal artery, endothelin-1 administration). Modeling ischemic injury in rats is the most frequently used method in studies, because the blood supply of their eyes is similar to blood flow in the human eyes. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. Application of methods depends on the purpose of the experimental study. Currently model of ocular ischemic disease can be obtained easily by injecting vasoconstrictive drug endothelin-1. It is the most widely used method of high intraocular pressure induced ocular ischemic damage similar to glaucoma, occlusion of central retinal artery or ophthalmic artery in human. The development of experimental models of ocular ischemic diseases and detailed investigation of mechanisms of impairment of microcirculation are useful for improve the efficiency of diagnostic and treatment of ischemic diseases of retina and optic nerve. PMID:25971134

  6. The development of the disease activity score (DAS) and the disease activity score using 28 joint counts (DAS28).

    PubMed

    van Riel, P L C M

    2014-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity cannot be measured using a single variable. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) has been developed as a quantitative index to be able to measure, study and manage disease activity in RA in daily clinical practice, clinical trials, and long term observational studies. The DAS is a continuous measure of RA disease activity that combines information from swollen joints, tender joints, acute phase response and patient self-report of general health. Cut points were developed to classify patients in remission, as well as low, moderate, and severe disease activity in the 1990s. DAS-based EULAR response criteria were primarily developed to be used in clinical trials to classify individual patients as non-, moderate, or good responders, depending on the magnitude of change and absolute level of disease activity at the conclusion of the test.

  7. Asymptotic theory of an infectious disease model.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Alan M; Ashrafiuon, Hashem

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we present asymptotic theory as a viable alternative solution method for infectious disease models. We consider a particular model of a pathogen attacking a host whose immune system responds defensively, that has been studied previously [Mohtashemi and Levins in J. Math. Biol. 43: 446-470 (2001)]. On rendering this model dimensionless, we can reduce the number of parameters to two and note that one of them has a large value that suggests an asymptotic analysis. On doing this analysis, we obtain a satisfying qualitative description of the dynamic evolution of each population, together with simple analytic expressions for their main features, from which we can compute accurate quantitative values.

  8. Concise Review: Stem Cell Trials Using Companion Animal Disease Models.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Andrew M; Dow, Steven W

    2016-07-01

    Studies to evaluate the therapeutic potential of stem cells in humans would benefit from more realistic animal models. In veterinary medicine, companion animals naturally develop many diseases that resemble human conditions, therefore, representing a novel source of preclinical models. To understand how companion animal disease models are being studied for this purpose, we reviewed the literature between 2008 and 2015 for reports on stem cell therapies in dogs and cats, excluding laboratory animals, induced disease models, cancer, and case reports. Disease models included osteoarthritis, intervertebral disc degeneration, dilated cardiomyopathy, inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's fistulas, meningoencephalomyelitis (multiple sclerosis-like), keratoconjunctivitis sicca (Sjogren's syndrome-like), atopic dermatitis, and chronic (end-stage) kidney disease. Stem cells evaluated in these studies included mesenchymal stem-stromal cells (MSC, 17/19 trials), olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC, 1 trial), or neural lineage cells derived from bone marrow MSC (1 trial), and 16/19 studies were performed in dogs. The MSC studies (13/17) used adipose tissue-derived MSC from either allogeneic (8/13) or autologous (5/13) sources. The majority of studies were open label, uncontrolled studies. Endpoints and protocols were feasible, and the stem cell therapies were reportedly safe and elicited beneficial patient responses in all but two of the trials. In conclusion, companion animals with naturally occurring diseases analogous to human conditions can be recruited into clinical trials and provide realistic insight into feasibility, safety, and biologic activity of novel stem cell therapies. However, improvements in the rigor of manufacturing, study design, and regulatory compliance will be needed to better utilize these models. Stem Cells 2016;34:1709-1729.

  9. Computational disease modeling – fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Tegnér, Jesper N; Compte, Albert; Auffray, Charles; An, Gary; Cedersund, Gunnar; Clermont, Gilles; Gutkin, Boris; Oltvai, Zoltán N; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Thomas, Randy; Villoslada, Pablo

    2009-01-01

    Background Biomedical research is changing due to the rapid accumulation of experimental data at an unprecedented scale, revealing increasing degrees of complexity of biological processes. Life Sciences are facing a transition from a descriptive to a mechanistic approach that reveals principles of cells, cellular networks, organs, and their interactions across several spatial and temporal scales. There are two conceptual traditions in biological computational-modeling. The bottom-up approach emphasizes complex intracellular molecular models and is well represented within the systems biology community. On the other hand, the physics-inspired top-down modeling strategy identifies and selects features of (presumably) essential relevance to the phenomena of interest and combines available data in models of modest complexity. Results The workshop, "ESF Exploratory Workshop on Computational disease Modeling", examined the challenges that computational modeling faces in contributing to the understanding and treatment of complex multi-factorial diseases. Participants at the meeting agreed on two general conclusions. First, we identified the critical importance of developing analytical tools for dealing with model and parameter uncertainty. Second, the development of predictive hierarchical models spanning several scales beyond intracellular molecular networks was identified as a major objective. This contrasts with the current focus within the systems biology community on complex molecular modeling. Conclusion During the workshop it became obvious that diverse scientific modeling cultures (from computational neuroscience, theory, data-driven machine-learning approaches, agent-based modeling, network modeling and stochastic-molecular simulations) would benefit from intense cross-talk on shared theoretical issues in order to make progress on clinically relevant problems. PMID:19497118

  10. Endophenotype Network Models: Common Core of Complex Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Menche, Jörg; Chasman, Daniel I; Giulianini, Franco; Wang, Ruisheng; Ricchiuto, Piero; Aikawa, Masanori; Iwata, Hiroshi; Müller, Christian; Zeller, Tania; Sharma, Amitabh; Wild, Philipp; Lackner, Karl; Singh, Sasha; Ridker, Paul M; Blankenberg, Stefan; Barabási, Albert-László; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Historically, human diseases have been differentiated and categorized based on the organ system in which they primarily manifest. Recently, an alternative view is emerging that emphasizes that different diseases often have common underlying mechanisms and shared intermediate pathophenotypes, or endo(pheno)types. Within this framework, a specific disease's expression is a consequence of the interplay between the relevant endophenotypes and their local, organ-based environment. Important examples of such endophenotypes are inflammation, fibrosis, and thrombosis and their essential roles in many developing diseases. In this study, we construct endophenotype network models and explore their relation to different diseases in general and to cardiovascular diseases in particular. We identify the local neighborhoods (module) within the interconnected map of molecular components, i.e., the subnetworks of the human interactome that represent the inflammasome, thrombosome, and fibrosome. We find that these neighborhoods are highly overlapping and significantly enriched with disease-associated genes. In particular they are also enriched with differentially expressed genes linked to cardiovascular disease (risk). Finally, using proteomic data, we explore how macrophage activation contributes to our understanding of inflammatory processes and responses. The results of our analysis show that inflammatory responses initiate from within the cross-talk of the three identified endophenotypic modules. PMID:27278246

  11. Endophenotype Network Models: Common Core of Complex Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Menche, Jörg; Chasman, Daniel I; Giulianini, Franco; Wang, Ruisheng; Ricchiuto, Piero; Aikawa, Masanori; Iwata, Hiroshi; Müller, Christian; Zeller, Tania; Sharma, Amitabh; Wild, Philipp; Lackner, Karl; Singh, Sasha; Ridker, Paul M; Blankenberg, Stefan; Barabási, Albert-László; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-06-09

    Historically, human diseases have been differentiated and categorized based on the organ system in which they primarily manifest. Recently, an alternative view is emerging that emphasizes that different diseases often have common underlying mechanisms and shared intermediate pathophenotypes, or endo(pheno)types. Within this framework, a specific disease's expression is a consequence of the interplay between the relevant endophenotypes and their local, organ-based environment. Important examples of such endophenotypes are inflammation, fibrosis, and thrombosis and their essential roles in many developing diseases. In this study, we construct endophenotype network models and explore their relation to different diseases in general and to cardiovascular diseases in particular. We identify the local neighborhoods (module) within the interconnected map of molecular components, i.e., the subnetworks of the human interactome that represent the inflammasome, thrombosome, and fibrosome. We find that these neighborhoods are highly overlapping and significantly enriched with disease-associated genes. In particular they are also enriched with differentially expressed genes linked to cardiovascular disease (risk). Finally, using proteomic data, we explore how macrophage activation contributes to our understanding of inflammatory processes and responses. The results of our analysis show that inflammatory responses initiate from within the cross-talk of the three identified endophenotypic modules.

  12. Animal models for genetic neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Vainzof, Mariz; Ayub-Guerrieri, Danielle; Onofre, Paula C G; Martins, Poliana C M; Lopes, Vanessa F; Zilberztajn, Dinorah; Maia, Lucas S; Sell, Karen; Yamamoto, Lydia U

    2008-03-01

    The neuromuscular disorders are a heterogeneous group of genetic diseases, caused by mutations in genes coding sarcolemmal, sarcomeric, and citosolic muscle proteins. Deficiencies or loss of function of these proteins leads to variable degree of progressive loss of motor ability. Several animal models, manifesting phenotypes observed in neuromuscular diseases, have been identified in nature or generated in laboratory. These models generally present physiological alterations observed in human patients and can be used as important tools for genetic, clinic, and histopathological studies. The mdx mouse is the most widely used animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although it is a good genetic and biochemical model, presenting total deficiency of the protein dystrophin in the muscle, this mouse is not useful for clinical trials because of its very mild phenotype. The canine golden retriever MD model represents a more clinically similar model of DMD due to its larger size and significant muscle weakness. Autosomal recessive limb-girdle MD forms models include the SJL/J mice, which develop a spontaneous myopathy resulting from a mutation in the Dysferlin gene, being a model for LGMD2B. For the human sarcoglycanopahties (SG), the BIO14.6 hamster is the spontaneous animal model for delta-SG deficiency, whereas some canine models with deficiency of SG proteins have also been identified. More recently, using the homologous recombination technique in embryonic stem cell, several mouse models have been developed with null mutations in each one of the four SG genes. All sarcoglycan-null animals display a progressive muscular dystrophy of variable severity and share the property of a significant secondary reduction in the expression of the other members of the sarcoglycan subcomplex and other components of the Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Mouse models for congenital MD include the dy/dy (dystrophia-muscularis) mouse and the allelic mutant dy(2J)/dy(2J) mouse

  13. Exercise Decreases Risk of Future Active Disease in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Patricia D.; Kappelman, Michael D.; Martin, Christopher F.; Chen, Wenli; Sandler, Robert S.; Long, Millie D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although exercise impacts quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), little is known about its role in disease activity. Among IBD patients in remission, we aimed to evaluate the association between exercise and subsequent active disease. Methods We performed a prospective study using the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) Partners Internet-based cohort of individuals with self-reported IBD. We identified participants in remission, defined as short Crohn's disease activity index (sCDAI) <150 or simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI) ≤2. The primary exposure was exercise status, measured using the validated Godin leisure time activity index. The primary study outcome, assessed after six months, was active disease defined using the above disease activity index thresholds. We used bivariate and multivariate analyses to describe the independent association between exercise and risk of active disease. Results We identified 1308 patients with Crohn's Disease (CD) and 549 with ulcerative or indeterminate colitis (UC/IC) in remission, of whom 227(17.4%) with CD and 135 (24.6%) with UC/IC developed active disease after 6 months. Higher exercise level was associated with decreased risk of active disease for CD (adjusted RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.55-0.94) and UC/IC (adjusted RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.54-1.13). Conclusions In patients with CD in remission, those with higher exercise levels were significantly less likely to develop active disease at six months. In patients with UC/IC in remission, patients with higher exercise levels were less likely to develop active disease at six months, however this was not statistically significant. PMID:25723616

  14. A Small-Molecule Probe for Selective Profiling and Imaging of Monoamine Oxidase B Activities in Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Ge, Jingyan; Qian, Linghui; Chai, Bing-Han; Zhu, Qing; Lee, Jun-Seok; Lim, Kah-Leong; Yao, Shao Q

    2015-09-01

    The design of the first dual-purpose activity-based probe of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) is reported. This probe is highly selective towards MAO-B, even at high MAO-A expression levels, and could sensitively report endogenous MAO-B activities by both in situ proteome profiling and live-cell bioimaging. With a built-in imaging module as part of the probe design, the probe was able to accomplish what all previously reported MAO-B imaging probes failed to do thus far: the live-cell imaging of MAO-B activities without encountering diffusion problems.

  15. Disease activity in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: CT and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Müller, N L; Staples, C A; Miller, R R; Vedal, S; Thurlbeck, W M; Ostrow, D N

    1987-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scans were compared with pathologic determinants of disease activity in 12 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The theory was that intraalveolar and interstitial cellularity would result in areas of opacification of air spaces on CT scans. All patients underwent open lung biopsy, and disease activity was assessed with a pathologic grading system. Seven patients had mild disease activity, five had moderate to marked disease activity. Opacification of air spaces was patchy in distribution, predominantly peripheral, and seen better on 1.5-mm rather than 10-mm collimation scans. Disease activity on CT scans was graded independently from 0 to 3 based on the presence and relative density of the areas of air space consolidation compared with the surrounding parenchyma. The pathologic score was significantly greater in the patients with high CT scores than in those with low CT scores (P = .001). Five patients with marked disease activity and five of seven patients with mild disease activity were correctly identified. CT may be useful in the assessment of disease activity in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  16. Meclizine is neuroprotective in models of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Vishal M; Offner, Nicolas; Walker, James A; Sheth, Sunil A; Fossale, Elisa; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Neri, Christian; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2011-01-15

    Defects in cellular energy metabolism represent an early feature in a variety of human neurodegenerative diseases. Recent studies have shown that targeting energy metabolism can protect against neuronal cell death in such diseases. Here, we show that meclizine, a clinically used drug that we have recently shown to silence oxidative metabolism, suppresses apoptotic cell death in a murine cellular model of polyglutamine (polyQ) toxicity. We further show that this protective effect extends to neuronal dystrophy and cell death in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster models of polyQ toxicity. Meclizine's mechanism of action is not attributable to its anti-histaminergic or anti-muscarinic activity, but rather, strongly correlates with its ability to suppress mitochondrial respiration. Since meclizine is an approved drug that crosses the blood-brain barrier, it may hold therapeutic potential in the treatment of polyQ toxicity disorders, such as Huntington's disease. PMID:20977989

  17. Meclizine is neuroprotective in models of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gohil, Vishal M.; Offner, Nicolas; Walker, James A.; Sheth, Sunil A.; Fossale, Elisa; Gusella, James F.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Neri, Christian; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2011-01-01

    Defects in cellular energy metabolism represent an early feature in a variety of human neurodegenerative diseases. Recent studies have shown that targeting energy metabolism can protect against neuronal cell death in such diseases. Here, we show that meclizine, a clinically used drug that we have recently shown to silence oxidative metabolism, suppresses apoptotic cell death in a murine cellular model of polyglutamine (polyQ) toxicity. We further show that this protective effect extends to neuronal dystrophy and cell death in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster models of polyQ toxicity. Meclizine's mechanism of action is not attributable to its anti-histaminergic or anti-muscarinic activity, but rather, strongly correlates with its ability to suppress mitochondrial respiration. Since meclizine is an approved drug that crosses the blood–brain barrier, it may hold therapeutic potential in the treatment of polyQ toxicity disorders, such as Huntington's disease. PMID:20977989

  18. Constitutive Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors and Diseases: Insights into Mechanisms of Activation and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ya-Xiong

    2008-01-01

    The existence of constitutive activity for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) was first described in 1980s. In 1991, the first naturally occurring constitutively active mutations in GPCRs that cause diseases were reported in rhodopsin. Since then, numerous constitutively active mutations that cause human diseases were reported in several additional receptors. More recently, loss of constitutive activity was postulated to also cause diseases. Animal models expressing some of these mutants confirmed the roles of these mutations in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Detailed functional studies of these naturally occurring mutations, combined with homology modeling using rhodopsin crystal structure as the template, lead to important insights into the mechanism of activation in the absence of crystal structure of GPCRs in active state. Search for inverse agonists on these receptors will be critical for correcting the diseases cause by activating mutations in GPCRs. Theoretically, these inverse agonists are better therapeutics than neutral antagonists in treating genetic diseases caused by constitutively activating mutations in GPCRs. PMID:18768149

  19. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, José R; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C; Arrabal, María D; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-02-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD.

  20. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, José R; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C; Arrabal, María D; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-02-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  1. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, José R.; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M.; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C.; Arrabal, María D.; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  2. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  3. TSPO in a murine model of Sandhoff disease: presymptomatic marker of neurodegeneration and disease pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Loth, Meredith K; Choi, Judy; McGlothan, Jennifer L; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Pomper, Martin G; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2016-01-01

    Translocator protein (18 kDa), formerly known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), has been extensively used as a biomarker of active brain disease and neuroinflammation. TSPO expression increases dramatically in glial cells, particularly in microglia and astrocytes, as a result of brain injury, and this phenomenon is a component of the hallmark response of the brain to injury. In this study, we used a mouse model of Sandhoff disease (SD) to assess the longitudinal expression of TSPO as a function of disease progression and its relationship to behavioral and neuropathological endpoints. Focusing on the presymptomatic period of the disease, we used ex vivo [(3)H]DPA-713 quantitative autoradiography and in vivo [(125)I]IodoDPA-713 small animal SPECT imaging to show that brain TSPO levels markedly increase prior to physical and behavioral manifestation of disease. We further show that TSPO upregulation coincides with early neuronal GM2 ganglioside aggregation and is associated with ongoing neurodegeneration and activation of both microglia and astrocytes. In brain regions with increased TSPO levels, there is a differential pattern of glial cell activation with astrocytes being activated earlier than microglia during the progression of disease. Immunofluorescent confocal imaging confirmed that TSPO colocalizes with both microglia and astrocyte markers, but the glial source of the TSPO response differs by brain region and age in SD mice. Notably, TSPO colocalization with the astrocyte marker GFAP was greater than with the microglia marker, Mac-1. Taken together, our findings have significant implications for understanding TSPO glial cell biology and for detecting neurodegeneration prior to clinical expression of disease.

  4. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor in Crohn's disease: relation of serum concentrations to disease activity.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, J E; Juby, L D; Heatley, R V; Lobo, A J; Bullimore, D W; Axon, A T

    1990-09-01

    Serum concentrations of soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) were measured as a marker of immune activation in a group of 30 patients with Crohn's disease. sIL-2R concentrations were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay during periods of active and inactive disease and correlated with standard parameters of disease activity. Serum concentrations of sIL-2R were significantly raised in patients with active Crohn's disease compared with patients with inactive disease (p less than 0.001) and control subjects. There was a significant correlation between serum sIL-2R concentrations and disease activity as assessed by the Harvey-Bradshaw index (r = 0.42, p less than 0.01), platelet numbers (r = 0.49, p less than 0.01), and orosomucoid (r = 0.47, p less than 0.01), alpha 1 antitrypsin (r = 0.44, p less than 0.01), and C reactive protein concentrations (r = 0.48, p less than 0.001) but not with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Measurement of serum sIL-2R concentration is a simple and useful laboratory means of assessing disease activity. Raised concentrations in patients with active Crohn's disease is further evidence for in vivo immune activation occurring in this disease.

  5. Gastrointestinal tract modelling in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Dong-Hua; Zhao, Jing-Bo; Gregersen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the system of organs within multi-cellular animals that takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining waste. The various patterns of GI tract function are generated by the integrated behaviour of multiple tissues and cell types. A thorough study of the GI tract requires understanding of the interactions between cells, tissues and gastrointestinal organs in health and disease. This depends on knowledge, not only of numerous cellular ionic current mechanisms and signal transduction pathways, but also of large scale GI tissue structures and the special distribution of the nervous network. A unique way of coping with this explosion in complexity is mathematical and computational modelling; providing a computational framework for the multilevel modelling and simulation of the human gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology. The aim of this review is to describe the current status of biomechanical modelling work of the GI tract in humans and animals, which can be further used to integrate the physiological, anatomical and medical knowledge of the GI system. Such modelling will aid research and ensure that medical professionals benefit, through the provision of relevant and precise information about the patient’s condition and GI remodelling in animal disease models. It will also improve the accuracy and efficiency of medical procedures, which could result in reduced cost for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19132766

  6. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok

    2011-01-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes. PMID:26421020

  7. Theoretical Modeling of Prion Disease Incubation

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, R. V.; Slepoy, A.; Singh, R. R. P.; Cox, D. L.; Pázmándi, F.

    2003-01-01

    We apply a theoretical aggregation model to laboratory and epidemiological prion disease incubation time data. In our model, slow growth of misfolded protein aggregates from small initial seeds controls the latent or lag phase; aggregate fissioning and subsequent spreading leads to an exponential growth phase. Our model accounts for the striking reproducibility of incubation times for high dose inoculation of lab animals. In particular, low dose yields broad incubation time distributions, and increasing dose narrows distributions and yields sharply defined onset times. We also explore how incubation time statistics depend upon aggregate morphology. We apply our model to fit the experimental dose-incubation curves for distinct strains of scrapie, and explain logarithmic variation at high dose and deviations from logarithmic behavior at low dose. We use this to make testable predictions for infectivity time-course experiments. PMID:12885622

  8. Inhibition of akt phosphorylation diminishes mitochondrial biogenesis regulators, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity and exacerbates recognition memory deficit in rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shaerzadeh, Fatemeh; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Khodagholi, Fariba

    2014-11-01

    3-Methyladenine (3-MA), as a PI3K inhibitor, is widely used for inhibition of autophagy. Inhibition of PI3K class I leads to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation, a central molecule involved in diverse arrays of intracellular cascades in nervous system. Accordingly, in the present study, we aimed to determine the alterations of specific mitochondrial biogenesis markers and mitochondrial function in 3-MA-injected rats following amyloid beta (Aβ) insult. Our data revealed that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation downregulates master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α). Our data also showed that decrease in PGC-1α level presumably is due to decrease in the phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding and AMP-activated kinase, two upstream activators of PGC-1α. As a consequence, the level of some mitochondrial biogenesis factors including nuclear respiratory factor-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, and Cytochrome c decreased significantly. Also, activities of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) enzymes such as Aconitase, a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase reduced in the presence of 3-MA with or without Aβ insult. Decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis factors and TCA enzyme activity in the rats receiving 3-MA and Aβ were more compared to the rats that received either alone; indicating the additive destructive effects of these two agents. In agreement with our molecular results, data obtained from behavioral test (using novel objective recognition test) indicated that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation with or without Aβ injection impaired novel recognition (non-spatial) memory. Our results suggest that 3-MA amplified deleterious effects of Aβ by targeting central molecule Akt.

  9. Activity enhances dopaminergic long-duration response in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Auinger, Peggy; Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C. Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhao, Hongwei; Reyes, Lydia; Shinaman, Aileen; Comella, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Christopher; Blasucci, Lucia M.; Samanta, Johan; Stacy, Mark; Williamson, Kelli; Harrigan, Mary; Greene, Paul; Ford, Blair; Moskowitz, Carol; Truong, Daniel D.; Pathak, Mayank; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William; Atassi, Farah; Hunter, Christine; Jacques, Carol; Friedman, Joseph H.; Lannon, Margaret; Russell, David S.; Jennings, Danna; Fussell, Barbara; Standaert, David; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Growdon, John H.; Tennis, Marsha; Gauthier, Serge; Panisset, Michel; Hall, Jean; Gancher, Stephen; Hammerstad, John P.; Stone, Claudia; Alexander-Brown, Barbara; Factor, Stewart A.; Molho, Eric; Brown, Diane; Evans, Sharon; Clark, Jeffrey; Manyam, Bala; Simpson, Patricia; Wulbrecht, Brian; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Martin, Wayne; Roberts, Ted; King, Pamela; Hauser, Robert; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Gauger, Lisa; Trugman, Joel; Wooten, G. Frederick; Rost-Ruffner, Elke; Perlmutter, Joel; Racette, Brad A.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Wood, Susan; Pantella, Carol; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Pearson, Nancy; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles; Lind, Marlene; Simuni, Tanya; Siderowf, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Lloyd, Mary; Weiner, William; Shulman, Lisa; Koller, William; Lyons, Kelly; Feldman, Robert G.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Ellias, Samuel; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Juncos, Jorge; Watts, Ray; Partlow, Anna; Tetrud, James; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Stewart, Tracy; Mark, Margery H.; Sage, Jacob I.; Caputo, Debbie; Gould, Harry; Rao, Jayaraman; McKendrick, Ann; Brin, Mitchell; Danisi, Fabio; Benabou, Reina; Hubble, Jean; Paulson, George W.; Reider, Carson; Birnbaum, Alex; Miyasaki, Janis; Johnston, Lisa; So, Julie; Pahwa, Rajesh; Dubinsky, Richard M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Uitti, Ryan; Turk, Margaret; Tuite, Paul; Rottenberg, David; Hansen, Joy; Ramos, Serrano; Waters, Cheryl; Lew, Mark; Welsh, Mickie; Kawai, Connie; O'Brien, Christopher; Kumar, Rajeev; Seeberger, Lauren; Judd, Deborah; Barclay, C. Lynn; Grimes, David A.; Sutherland, Laura; Dawson, Ted; Reich, Stephen; Dunlop, Rebecca; Albin, Roger; Frey, Kirk; Wernette, Kristine; Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C. Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhao, Hongwei; Reyes, Lydia; Shinaman, Aileen; Comella, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Christopher; Blasucci, Lucia M.; Samanta, Johan; Stacy, Mark; Williamson, Kelli; Harrigan, Mary; Greene, Paul; Ford, Blair; Moskowitz, Carol; Truong, Daniel D.; Pathak, Mayank; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William; Atassi, Farah; Hunter, Christine; Jacques, Carol; Friedman, Joseph H.; Lannon, Margaret; Russell, David S.; Jennings, Danna; Fussell, Barbara; Standaert, David; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Growdon, John H.; Tennis, Marsha; Gauthier, Serge; Panisset, Michel; Hall, Jean; Gancher, Stephen; Hammerstad, John P.; Stone, Claudia; Alexander-Brown, Barbara; Factor, Stewart A.; Molho, Eric; Brown, Diane; Evans, Sharon; Clark, Jeffrey; Manyam, Bala; Simpson, Patricia; Wulbrecht, Brian; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Martin, Wayne; Roberts, Ted; King, Pamela; Hauser, Robert; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Gauger, Lisa; Trugman, Joel; Wooten, G. Frederick; Rost-Ruffner, Elke; Perlmutter, Joel; Racette, Brad A.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Wood, Susan; Pantella, Carol; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Pearson, Nancy; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles; Lind, Marlene; Simuni, Tanya; Siderowf, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Lloyd, Mary; Weiner, William; Shulman, Lisa; Koller, William; Lyons, Kelly; Feldman, Robert G.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Ellias, Samuel; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Juncos, Jorge; Watts, Ray; Partlow, Anna; Tetrud, James; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Stewart, Tracy; Mark, Margery H.; Sage, Jacob I.; Caputo, Debbie; Gould, Harry; Rao, Jayaraman; McKendrick, Ann; Brin, Mitchell; Danisi, Fabio; Benabou, Reina; Hubble, Jean; Paulson, George W.; Reider, Carson; Birnbaum, Alex; Miyasaki, Janis; Johnston, Lisa; So, Julie; Pahwa, Rajesh; Dubinsky, Richard M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Uitti, Ryan; Turk, Margaret; Tuite, Paul; Rottenberg, David; Hansen, Joy; Ramos, Serrano; Waters, Cheryl; Lew, Mark; Welsh, Mickie; Kawai, Connie; O'Brien, Christopher; Kumar, Rajeev; Seeberger, Lauren; Judd, Deborah; Barclay, C. Lynn; Grimes, David A.; Sutherland, Laura; Dawson, Ted; Reich, Stephen; Dunlop, Rebecca; Albin, Roger; Frey, Kirk; Wernette, Kristine; Mendis, Tilak

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that dopamine-dependent motor learning mechanism underlies the long-duration response to levodopa in Parkinson disease (PD) based on our studies in a mouse model. By data-mining the motor task performance in dominant and nondominant hands of the subjects in a double-blind randomized trial of levodopa therapy, the effects of activity and dopamine therapy were examined. Methods: We data-mined the Earlier versus Later Levodopa Therapy in Parkinson's Disease (ELLDOPA) study published in 2005 and performed statistical analysis comparing the effects of levodopa and dominance of handedness over 42 weeks. Results: The mean change in finger-tapping counts from baseline before the initiation of therapy to predose at 9 weeks and 40 weeks increased more in the dominant compared to nondominant hand in levodopa-treated subjects in a dose-dependent fashion. There was no significant difference in dominant vs nondominant hands in the placebo group. The short-duration response assessed by the difference of postdose performance compared to predose performance at the same visit did not show any significant difference between dominant vs nondominant hands. Conclusions: Active use of the dominant hand and dopamine replacement therapy produces synergistic effect on long-lasting motor task performance during “off” medication state. Such effect was confined to dopamine-responsive symptoms and not seen in dopamine-resistant symptoms such as gait and balance. We propose that long-lasting motor learning facilitated by activity and dopamine is a form of disease modification that is often seen in trials of medications that have symptomatic effects. PMID:22459675

  10. Endophenotype Network Models: Common Core of Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Menche, Jörg; Chasman, Daniel I.; Giulianini, Franco; Wang, Ruisheng; Ricchiuto, Piero; Aikawa, Masanori; Iwata, Hiroshi; Müller, Christian; Zeller, Tania; Sharma, Amitabh; Wild, Philipp; Lackner, Karl; Singh, Sasha; Ridker, Paul M.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Barabási, Albert-László; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Historically, human diseases have been differentiated and categorized based on the organ system in which they primarily manifest. Recently, an alternative view is emerging that emphasizes that different diseases often have common underlying mechanisms and shared intermediate pathophenotypes, or endo(pheno)types. Within this framework, a specific disease’s expression is a consequence of the interplay between the relevant endophenotypes and their local, organ-based environment. Important examples of such endophenotypes are inflammation, fibrosis, and thrombosis and their essential roles in many developing diseases. In this study, we construct endophenotype network models and explore their relation to different diseases in general and to cardiovascular diseases in particular. We identify the local neighborhoods (module) within the interconnected map of molecular components, i.e., the subnetworks of the human interactome that represent the inflammasome, thrombosome, and fibrosome. We find that these neighborhoods are highly overlapping and significantly enriched with disease-associated genes. In particular they are also enriched with differentially expressed genes linked to cardiovascular disease (risk). Finally, using proteomic data, we explore how macrophage activation contributes to our understanding of inflammatory processes and responses. The results of our analysis show that inflammatory responses initiate from within the cross-talk of the three identified endophenotypic modules. PMID:27278246

  11. [Estimation of activity of bis-netropsin derivatives based on a model of an experimental cutaneous herpes simplex virus disease of guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    andronova, V L; Grokhovskiĭ, S L; Surovaia, A N; Gurskiĭ, G V; Deriabin, P G; L'vov, D K; Galegov, G A

    2013-01-01

    Using the model of an experimental cutaneous infection of guinea pig males caused by herpes simple virus type 1, it is shown that application of dimerico derivatives of netropsin Lys-bis Nt and 15Lys-bis Nt in the form of polietilenglicol-based ointment suppresses viral infection more effectively than acyclovir.

  12. The role of activated T lymphocytes in gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, T T

    1990-05-01

    Activated T cells can be visualized in the intestinal lamina propria in a number of gastrointestinal diseases including food-sensitive enteropathy (coeliac disease), inflammatory bowel disease and intractable diarrhoea of infancy. Experimental studies have shown that T-cell activation in human intestinal lamina propria in vitro produces an increase in crypt cell proliferation, villous atrophy, increased HLA-DR expression on enterocytes, increased intra-epithelial lymphocyte numbers, and phenotypically, macrophage activation. All of these features are seen in human gastrointestinal disorders and it is proposed that T-cell activation to wheat (in coeliac disease), milk (cows' milk-sensitive enteropathy), and unidentified luminal antigens (Crohn's disease) plays a primary role in the pathogenesis of these disorders.

  13. A Japanese model of disease management.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Naoki; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Nishida, Daisuke; Tanaka, Naomi; Nakazono, Hiromi; Hoshino, Akihiko; Soejima, Hidehisa; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Nawata, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    We started a disease management model, Carna, that includes two programs: one for primary prevention of lifestyle diseases and one for secondary/tertiary prevention of diabetes mellitus. These programs support the family doctor system and education for participants to allow the concept of disease management to take root in Japan. We developed a critical pathway system that can optimize health care of individual participants by matching individual status. This is the core technology of the project. Under the primary prevention program, we can perform the health check-up/ instruction tasks in the 'Tokutei Kenshin', which will start for all Japanese citizens aged 40-74 years in April 2008. In the diabetic program, Carna matches doctors and new patients, prevents patient dropout, supports detection of early-stage complications by distributing questionnaires periodically, and facilitates medical specialists' cooperation with family doctors. Carna promotes periodic medical examinations and quickly provides the result of blood tests to patients. We are conducting a study to assess the medical outcomes and business model. The study will continue until the end of 2007.

  14. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Block, Valerie A. J.; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Allen, Diane D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Methods Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. Results 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. Conclusions These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability. PMID:27124611

  15. Concepts of disability: the Activity Space Model.

    PubMed

    Kopec, J A

    1995-03-01

    This paper describes a new conceptual framework for functional assessment, the Activity Space Model (ASM). According to this model, functional impairments may lead to restrictions in an individual's activity space, a multidimensional space that represents human potential for activity. For each elementary ability, restrictions in the corresponding dimension of the activity space can be evaluated by deriving a difficulty curve that depicts the relationship between the level of performance and the psychophysical cost of activity. The effect of disease on daily functioning is explained in terms of a tradeoff between the psychophysical cost and the value of each act of behavior to the disabled individual. These two constructs are measured on the same scale and expressed in units of difficulty. The location of each task within the activity space in relation to the difficulty curve determines whether it will be performed or avoided at a given point in time. The ASM has both theoretical and practical implications. It offers a new, integrated perspective on disability and suggests new strategies for developing and evaluating functional assessment measures.

  16. Germ Smart: Children's Activities in Disease Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheer, Judith K.

    This booklet is part of the "Children's Activity Series," a set of four supplemental teaching resources that promote awareness about health, family life, and cultural diversity for children in kindergarten through third grade. Nine activities are included in this booklet to help children be "germ smart" help children in kindergarten through third…

  17. Silicosis: a disease with an active present.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Cristina; Prieto, Amador; García, Laura; Quero, Aida; González, Susana; Casan, Pere

    2010-02-01

    Silicosis, an interstitial lung disease caused by the inhalation of crystalline silica powder, despite being one of the oldest occupational diseases, continues being a cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world. The World Health Organisation and the International Labour Organisation (OMS/ILO), aware of the current problem, have designed the World Programme for the Elimination of Silicosis, which includes the identification of occupational groups at risk amongst its actions. We present 3 cases of silicosis in young workers in the construction sector, with exposure to high concentrations of silica due to handling artificial silica conglomerates. The main interest of this observation lies in the identification of new risk sources, in the need to draw attention to the dangers involved in its use without prevention measures, and in the importance of the occupational history to avoid under-diagnosis. PMID:19818543

  18. Olfactory impairment in the rotenone model of Parkinson’s disease is associated with bulbar dopaminergic D2 activity after REM sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Lais S.; Targa, Adriano D. S.; Noseda, Ana Carolina D.; Aurich, Mariana F.; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Lima, Marcelo M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deficits are commonly found in untreated subjects with a recent diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Additionally, different studies report declines in olfactory performance during a short period of sleep deprivation. Mechanisms underlying these clinical manifestations are poorly understood, and impairment of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the olfactory bulb and the nigrostriatal pathway may have important roles in olfaction and REM sleep disturbances. Therefore, we hypothesized that modulation of the dopaminergic D2 receptors in the olfactory bulb could provide a more comprehensive understanding of the olfactory deficits in PD and REM sleep deprivation (REMSD). We decided to investigate the olfactory, neurochemical, and histological alterations generated through the administration of piribedil (a selective D2 agonist) or raclopride (a selective D2 antagonist) within the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb, in rats subjected to intranigral rotenone and REMSD. Our findings provide evidence of the occurrence of a negative correlation (r = −0.52, P = 0.04) between the number of periglomerular TH-ir neurons and the bulbar levels of DA in the rotenone, but not sham, groups. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.34, P = 0.03) was observed between nigrostriatal DA levels and olfactory discrimination index (DI) for the sham groups, indicating that increased DA levels in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) are associated with enhanced olfactory discrimination performance. Also, increased levels in bulbar and striatal DA were induced by piribedil in the rotenone control and rotenone REMSD groups, consistent with reductions in the DI. The present evidence reinforce the idea that DA produced by periglomerular neurons, particularly the bulbar dopaminergic D2 receptors, is an essential participant in olfactory discrimination processes, as the SNpc, and the striatum. PMID:25520618

  19. Olfactory impairment in the rotenone model of Parkinson's disease is associated with bulbar dopaminergic D2 activity after REM sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Lais S; Targa, Adriano D S; Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Aurich, Mariana F; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deficits are commonly found in untreated subjects with a recent diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Additionally, different studies report declines in olfactory performance during a short period of sleep deprivation. Mechanisms underlying these clinical manifestations are poorly understood, and impairment of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the olfactory bulb and the nigrostriatal pathway may have important roles in olfaction and REM sleep disturbances. Therefore, we hypothesized that modulation of the dopaminergic D2 receptors in the olfactory bulb could provide a more comprehensive understanding of the olfactory deficits in PD and REM sleep deprivation (REMSD). We decided to investigate the olfactory, neurochemical, and histological alterations generated through the administration of piribedil (a selective D2 agonist) or raclopride (a selective D2 antagonist) within the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb, in rats subjected to intranigral rotenone and REMSD. Our findings provide evidence of the occurrence of a negative correlation (r = -0.52, P = 0.04) between the number of periglomerular TH-ir neurons and the bulbar levels of DA in the rotenone, but not sham, groups. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.34, P = 0.03) was observed between nigrostriatal DA levels and olfactory discrimination index (DI) for the sham groups, indicating that increased DA levels in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) are associated with enhanced olfactory discrimination performance. Also, increased levels in bulbar and striatal DA were induced by piribedil in the rotenone control and rotenone REMSD groups, consistent with reductions in the DI. The present evidence reinforce the idea that DA produced by periglomerular neurons, particularly the bulbar dopaminergic D2 receptors, is an essential participant in olfactory discrimination processes, as the SNpc, and the striatum.

  20. Modeling Activities in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Kathy

    2014-05-01

    Students usually find science to be quite abstract. This is especially true of disciplines like Earth Science where it is difficult for the students to conduct and design hands-on experiments in areas such as Plate Tectonics that would allow them to develop predictive models. In the United States the new Next Generation Science Standards explicitly requires students to experience the science disciplines via modeling based activities. This poster presentation will discuss an activity that demonstrates how modeling, plate tectonics and student discourse converge in the earth science classroom. The activities featured on the poster will include using cardboard and shaving cream to demonstrate convergent plate boundaries, a Milky Way candy bar to demonstrate divergent boundaries and silly putty to demonstrate a strike slip boundary. I will discuss how students report back to the group about the findings from the lab and the techniques that can be used to heighten the student discourse. The activities outlined in this poster were originally designed for a middle school Earth Science class by Suzi Shoemaker for a graduate thesis at Arizona State University.

  1. Animal models of skin disease for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Pinar; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; De Melo, Wanessa CMA; Huang, Ying-Ying; Yin, Rui; Rakkiyappan, Chandran; Kumar, Raj; Otufowora, Ayodeji; Nyame, Theodore; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Discovery of novel drugs, treatments, and testing of consumer products in the field of dermatology is a multi-billion dollar business. Due to the distressing nature of many dermatological diseases, and the enormous consumer demand for products to reverse the effects of skin photodamage, aging, and hair loss, this is a very active field. Areas covered In this paper, we will cover the use of animal models that have been reported to recapitulate to a greater or lesser extent the features of human dermatological disease. There has been a remarkable increase in the number and variety of transgenic mouse models in recent years, and the basic strategy for constructing them is outlined. Expert opinion Inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases are all represented by a range of mouse models both transgenic and normal. Skin cancer is mainly studied in mice and fish. Wound healing is studied in a wider range of animal species, and skin infections such as acne and leprosy also have been studied in animal models. Moving to the more consumer-oriented area of dermatology, there are models for studying the harmful effect of sunlight on the skin, and testing of sunscreens, and several different animal models of hair loss or alopecia. PMID:23293893

  2. Subchronic memantine administration on spatial learning, exploratory activity, and nest-building in an APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Filali, Mohammed; Lalonde, Robert; Rivest, Serge

    2011-05-01

    Glutamate neurotoxicity has been proposed to be involved in Alzheimer pathogenesis, with clinical data supporting successful treatment with the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine. In the present study, the effects of subchronic memantine administration were assessed on spatial and non-spatial learning as well as exploratory activity and nest-building in APP/PS1 mutant mice. Memantine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was better than placebo during the reversal phase of left-right discrimination, though equivalent to saline for Morris water maze and passive avoidance learning. The drug had no effect on non-learned behaviors in elevated plus-maze exploration and nest-building. These results support a specific action of the NMDA receptor antagonist on behavioral flexibility in mutant mice with amyloid pathology.

  3. A customizable model for chronic disease coordination: Lessons learned from the coordinated chronic disease program

    DOE PAGES

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-03-31

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managedmore » resources, and 6) relationship building. Furthermore, these elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs.« less

  4. Mathematical modeling of infectious disease dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Siettos, Constantinos I.; Russo, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Over the last years, an intensive worldwide effort is speeding up the developments in the establishment of a global surveillance network for combating pandemics of emergent and re-emergent infectious diseases. Scientists from different fields extending from medicine and molecular biology to computer science and applied mathematics have teamed up for rapid assessment of potentially urgent situations. Toward this aim mathematical modeling plays an important role in efforts that focus on predicting, assessing, and controlling potential outbreaks. To better understand and model the contagious dynamics the impact of numerous variables ranging from the micro host–pathogen level to host-to-host interactions, as well as prevailing ecological, social, economic, and demographic factors across the globe have to be analyzed and thoroughly studied. Here, we present and discuss the main approaches that are used for the surveillance and modeling of infectious disease dynamics. We present the basic concepts underpinning their implementation and practice and for each category we give an annotated list of representative works. PMID:23552814

  5. Understanding impacts of climatic extremes on diarrheal disease epidemics: Insights from mechanistic disease propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    An epidemic outbreak of diarrheal diseases (primarily cholera) in Haiti in 2010 is a reminder that our understanding on disease triggers, transmission and spreading mechanisms is incomplete. Cholera can occur in two forms - epidemic (defined as sudden outbreak in a historically disease free region) and endemic (recurrence and persistence of the disease for several consecutive years). Examples of countries with epidemic cholera include Pakistan (2008), Congo (2008), and most recently Haiti (2010). A significant difference between endemic and epidemic regions is the mortality rate, i.e., 1% or lower in an endemic regions versus 3-7% during recent epidemic outbreaks. A fundamentally transformational approach - a warning system with several months prediction lead time - is needed to prevent disease outbreak and minimize its impact on population. Lack of information on spatial and temporal variability of disease incidence as well as transmission in human population continues to be significant challenge in the development of early-warning systems for cholera. Using satellite data on regional hydroclimatic processes, water and sanitation infrastructure indices, and biological pathogen growth information, here we present a Simple, Mechanistic, Adaptive, Remote sensing based Regional Transmission or SMART model to (i) identify regions of potential cholera outbreaks and (ii) quantify mechanism of spread of the disease in previously disease free region. Our results indicate that epidemic regions are located near regional rivers and are characterized by sporadic outbreaks, which are likely to be initiated during episodes of prevailing warm air temperature with low river flows, creating favorable environmental conditions for the growth of cholera bacteria. Heavy rainfall, through inundation or breakdown of sanitary infrastructure, accelerates interaction between contaminated water and human activities, resulting in an epidemic. We discuss the above findings in light of

  6. Modeling rapidly disseminating infectious disease during mass gatherings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We discuss models for rapidly disseminating infectious diseases during mass gatherings (MGs), using influenza as a case study. Recent innovations in modeling and forecasting influenza transmission dynamics at local, regional, and global scales have made influenza a particularly attractive model scenario for MG. We discuss the behavioral, medical, and population factors for modeling MG disease transmission, review existing model formulations, and highlight key data and modeling gaps related to modeling MG disease transmission. We argue that the proposed improvements will help integrate infectious-disease models in MG health contingency plans in the near future, echoing modeling efforts that have helped shape influenza pandemic preparedness plans in recent years. PMID:23217051

  7. Evaluation of Traditional Medicines for Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Drosophila Models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soojin; Bang, Se Min; Lee, Joon Woo; Cho, Kyoung Sang

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila is one of the oldest and most powerful genetic models and has led to novel insights into a variety of biological processes. Recently, Drosophila has emerged as a model system to study human diseases, including several important neurodegenerative diseases. Because of the genomic similarity between Drosophila and humans, Drosophila neurodegenerative disease models exhibit a variety of human-disease-like phenotypes, facilitating fast and cost-effective in vivo genetic modifier screening and drug evaluation. Using these models, many disease-associated genetic factors have been identified, leading to the identification of compelling drug candidates. Recently, the safety and efficacy of traditional medicines for human diseases have been evaluated in various animal disease models. Despite the advantages of the Drosophila model, its usage in the evaluation of traditional medicines is only nascent. Here, we introduce the Drosophila model for neurodegenerative diseases and some examples demonstrating the successful application of Drosophila models in the evaluation of traditional medicines. PMID:24790636

  8. In vivo and in vitro models of demyelinating disease: activation of the adenylate cyclase system influences JHM virus expression in explanted rat oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Beushausen, S; Narindrasorasak, S; Sanwal, B D; Dales, S

    1987-01-01

    The specificity of JHM virus (JHMV) tropism for rat oligodendrocytes, as one of the primary host cells in the central nervous system, is maintained after explanation (S. Beushausen and S. Dales, Virology 141:89-101, 1985). The temporal correlation between onset of resistance to JHMV infection in vivo, completion of myelination, and maturation of the central nervous system can be simulated in vitro by inducers of oligodendrocyte differentiation (Beushausen and Dales, Virology, 1985). Stimulation of differentiation through the elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels suggests a possible connection between activation of the adenylate cyclase system and coronavirus expression. Chromatographic analysis of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity in cytosol extracts prepared from astrocytes or oligodendrocytes revealed that both glial cell types were deficient in protein kinase I, indicating that expression of coronavirus in differentiated cells was not contingent upon the presence of protein kinase I. However, treatment with N6,2'-O-dibutyryladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (dbcAMP) resulted in a severalfold enhancement of the free regulatory subunit (RI) in oligodendrocytes but not in astrocytes. The RII subunit in both neural cell types was relatively unaffected. Rapid increase in RI due to dbcAMP treatment was correlated with inhibition of JHMV expression. Other differentiation inducers, including 8-Br cAMP and forskolin which, by contrast, caused a decrease in detectable RI, also blocked JHMV expression. This apparent anomaly can be attributed to an increased turnover of RI due to destabilization of the molecule which occurs upon site-specific binding of the cyclic nucleotides. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that the state of oligodendrocyte differentiation manifested with the modulation of RI regulates JHMV expression. The differentiation process did not affect either virus adsorption or sequestration but appeared to inhibit the

  9. Supermarket model for vascular disease care.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dhiraj M; Bruni, Karen; Darling, R Clement

    2002-09-01

    A supermarket model for vascular patient care proposes an interdisciplinary group of health care teams such as vascular nurses, interventional radiologists, vascular surgeons, angiologists, internists, cardiologists, and neurologists and facilities such as diagnostic testing laboratories, subcenters such as wound care and foot care centers, atherosclerotic risk prevention centers, rehabilitation centers, vein centers, and socioeconomic follow-up centers that would provide health care of vascular disease in a comprehensive manner in terms of quality care, convenience for patients, 1-stop shopping, education and training, and research and development.

  10. Rest/Activity Rhythms and Cardiovascular Disease in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Misti L.; Taylor, Brent C.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Stone, Katie L.; Tranah, Greg; Redline, Susan; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Ensrud, Kristine E.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested an increased risk of CVD-related mortality in older adults with disturbed circadian rest/activity rhythms (RARs). The objective goal of this study was to examine the association between disrupted RARs and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in older men. A total of 2,968 men aged 67 yrs and older wore wrist actigraphs for 115±18 consecutive hours. RAR parameters were computed from wrist actigraphy data and expressed as quartiles (Q). CVD events consisted of a composite outcome of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) events. Secondary analyses examined associations between RARs and individual components of the composite outcome (CHD, stroke, and PVD). There were 490 CVD events over an average of 4.0±1.2 yrs. Overall, reduced amplitude (HR = 1.31, 95%CI 1.01–1.71 for Q2 vs. Q4) and greater minimum (HR = 1.33, 95%CI 1.01–1.73 for Q4 vs. Q1) were associated with an increased risk of CVD events in multivariable-adjusted models. In secondary analyses, there was an independent association between reduced amplitude (HR = 1.36, 95%CI 1.00–1.86) and greater minimum activity counts (HR = 1.39, 95%CI 1.02–1.91) with increased risk of CHD events. Reduced F-value (HR = 2.88, 95%CI 1.41–5.87 for Q1 vs. Q4 and HR = 2.71, 95%CI 1.34–5.48 for Q2 vs. Q4) and later occurring acrophase of the RAR (HR = 1.65, 95%CI 1.04–2.63 for Q4 vs. Q2–3) were associated with an increased risk of PVD events. Results were similar in men without a history of CVD events. The findings revealed among older men, measures of decreased circadian activity rhythm robustness (reduced amplitude and greater minimum activity) were associated with an increased risk of CVD events, primarily through increased risk of CHD or stroke events, whereas measures of reduced circadian activity rhythm robustness were not associated with risk of CVD events overall, but were associated with an increased risk of PVD events. These results

  11. A Stage Model of Stress and Disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sheldon; Gianaros, Peter J; Manuck, Stephen B

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we argued that the term stress has served as a valuable heuristic, helping researchers to integrate traditions that illuminate different stages of the process linking stressful life events to disease. We provided a short history of three traditions in the study of stress: the epidemiological, psychological, and biological. The epidemiological tradition focuses on defining which circumstances and experiences are deemed stressful on the basis of consensual agreement that they constitute threats to social or physical well-being. The psychological tradition focuses on individuals' perceptions of the stress presented by life events on the basis of their appraisals of the threats posed and the availability of effective coping resources. The biological tradition focuses on brain-based perturbations of physiological systems that are otherwise essential for normal homeostatic regulation and metabolic control. The foci of these three traditions have informed elements of a stage model of disease, wherein events appraised as stressful are viewed as triggering affective states that in turn engender behavioral and biological responses having possible downstream implications for disease. PMID:27474134

  12. Gut microbiome composition and function in experimental colitis during active disease and treatment-induced remission

    PubMed Central

    Rooks, Michelle G; Veiga, Patrick; Wardwell-Scott, Leslie H; Tickle, Timothy; Segata, Nicola; Michaud, Monia; Gallini, Carey Ann; Beal, Chloé; van Hylckama-Vlieg, Johan ET; Ballal, Sonia A; Morgan, Xochitl C; Glickman, Jonathan N; Gevers, Dirk; Huttenhower, Curtis; Garrett, Wendy S

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated immune responses to gut microbes are central to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and gut microbial activity can fuel chronic inflammation. Examining how IBD-directed therapies influence gut microbiomes may identify microbial community features integral to mitigating disease and maintaining health. However, IBD patients often receive multiple treatments during disease flares, confounding such analyses. Preclinical models of IBD with well-defined disease courses and opportunities for controlled treatment exposures provide a valuable solution. Here, we surveyed the gut microbiome of the T-bet−/− Rag2−/− mouse model of colitis during active disease and treatment-induced remission. Microbial features modified among these conditions included altered potential for carbohydrate and energy metabolism and bacterial pathogenesis, specifically cell motility and signal transduction pathways. We also observed an increased capacity for xenobiotics metabolism, including benzoate degradation, a pathway linking host adrenergic stress with enhanced bacterial virulence, and found decreased levels of fecal dopamine in active colitis. When transferred to gnotobiotic mice, gut microbiomes from mice with active disease versus treatment-induced remission elicited varying degrees of colitis. Thus, our study provides insight into specific microbial clades and pathways associated with health, active disease and treatment interventions in a mouse model of colitis. PMID:24500617

  13. Gut microbiome composition and function in experimental colitis during active disease and treatment-induced remission.

    PubMed

    Rooks, Michelle G; Veiga, Patrick; Wardwell-Scott, Leslie H; Tickle, Timothy; Segata, Nicola; Michaud, Monia; Gallini, Carey Ann; Beal, Chloé; van Hylckama-Vlieg, Johan E T; Ballal, Sonia A; Morgan, Xochitl C; Glickman, Jonathan N; Gevers, Dirk; Huttenhower, Curtis; Garrett, Wendy S

    2014-07-01

    Dysregulated immune responses to gut microbes are central to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and gut microbial activity can fuel chronic inflammation. Examining how IBD-directed therapies influence gut microbiomes may identify microbial community features integral to mitigating disease and maintaining health. However, IBD patients often receive multiple treatments during disease flares, confounding such analyses. Preclinical models of IBD with well-defined disease courses and opportunities for controlled treatment exposures provide a valuable solution. Here, we surveyed the gut microbiome of the T-bet(-/-) Rag2(-/-) mouse model of colitis during active disease and treatment-induced remission. Microbial features modified among these conditions included altered potential for carbohydrate and energy metabolism and bacterial pathogenesis, specifically cell motility and signal transduction pathways. We also observed an increased capacity for xenobiotics metabolism, including benzoate degradation, a pathway linking host adrenergic stress with enhanced bacterial virulence, and found decreased levels of fecal dopamine in active colitis. When transferred to gnotobiotic mice, gut microbiomes from mice with active disease versus treatment-induced remission elicited varying degrees of colitis. Thus, our study provides insight into specific microbial clades and pathways associated with health, active disease and treatment interventions in a mouse model of colitis.

  14. The Fuzzy Model for Diagnosis of Animal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianhua, Xiao; Luyi, Shi; Yu, Zhang; Li, Gao; Honggang, Fan; Haikun, Ma; Hongbin, Wang

    The knowledge of animal disease diagnosis was fuzzy; the fuzzy model can imitate the character of clinical diagnosis for veterinary. The fuzzy model of disease, the methods for class the disease group of differential diagnosis and the fuzzy diagnosis model were discussed in this paper.

  15. Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Disease Activity in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dweck, Marc R; Aikawa, Elena; Newby, David E; Tarkin, Jason M; Rudd, James H F; Narula, Jagat; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-07-01

    Major focus has been placed on the identification of vulnerable plaques as a means of improving the prediction of myocardial infarction. However, this strategy has recently been questioned on the basis that the majority of these individual coronary lesions do not in fact go on to cause clinical events. Attention is, therefore, shifting to alternative imaging modalities that might provide a more complete pan-coronary assessment of the atherosclerotic disease process. These include markers of disease activity with the potential to discriminate between patients with stable burnt-out disease that is no longer metabolically active and those with active atheroma, faster disease progression, and increased risk of infarction. This review will examine how novel molecular imaging approaches can provide such assessments, focusing on inflammation and microcalcification activity, the importance of these processes to coronary atherosclerosis, and the advantages and challenges posed by these techniques. PMID:27390335

  16. Low serum alkaline phosphatase activity in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shaver, W A; Bhatt, H; Combes, B

    1986-01-01

    Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase activity were observed early in the course of two patients with Wilson's disease presenting with the combination of severe liver disease and Coombs' negative acute hemolytic anemia. A review of other cases of Wilson's disease revealed that 11 of 12 patients presenting with hemolytic anemia had values for serum alkaline phosphatase less than their respective sex- and age-adjusted mean values; in eight, serum alkaline phosphatase activity was less than the lower value for the normal range of the test. Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase were much less common in Wilson's disease patients with more chronic forms of presentation. Copper added in high concentration to serum in vitro did not have an important effect on serum alkaline phosphatase activity. The mechanism responsible for the decrease in serum alkaline phosphatase activity in patients is uncertain.

  17. Effect of 2 Psychotherapies on Depression and Disease Activity in Pediatric Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Youk, Ada O.; Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph; Bujoreanu, Simona I.; Weisz, John; Fairclough, Diane; Ducharme, Peter; Jones, Neil; Lotrich, Francis; Keljo, David; Srinath, Arvind; Bousvaros, Athos; Kupfer, David; DeMaso, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with depression. It is unclear if psychosocial interventions offer benefit for depressive symptoms during active CD. In this secondary analysis of a larger study of treating depression in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease, we assessed whether cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) would differentiate from supportive nondirective therapy in treating depression and disease activity in youth with CD. We also explored whether somatic depressive symptoms showed a different pattern of response in the overall sample and the subset with active inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: Youth with depression and CD (n = 161) were randomized to 3 months of CBT (teaching coping skills) or supportive nondirective therapy (supportive listening). Depressive severity was measured using the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) with the somatic depressive subtype consisting of those CDRS-R items, which significantly correlated with CD activity. Disease activity was measured by the Pediatric Crohn's disease Activity Index. Given the potential confound of higher dose steroids, subanalyses excluded subjects on >20 mg/d prednisone equivalent (n = 34). Results: Total CDRS-R scores in the overall sample significantly decreased over time after both treatments (P < 0.0001). Treatment with CBT was associated with a significantly greater improvement in the Pediatric Crohn's disease Activity Index (P = 0.05) and somatic depressive subtype (P = 0.03) in those with active inflammatory bowel disease (n = 95) compared with supportive nondirective therapy. After excluding those on steroids (n = 34), there was a significant improvement in total CDRS-R (P = 0.03) and in Pediatric Crohn's disease Activity Index (P = 0.03) after CBT. Conclusions: Psychotherapy may be a useful adjunct to treat depression in the context of CD-related inflammation in youth who are not concurrently on higher dose steroids. PMID:25822010

  18. Clinical Candidate VT-1161's Antiparasitic Effect In Vitro, Activity in a Murine Model of Chagas Disease, and Structural Characterization in Complex with the Target Enzyme CYP51 from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, William J; Hargrove, Tatiana Y; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; da Gama Jaen Batista, Denise; da Silva, Cristiane F; Nefertiti, Aline S G; Rachakonda, Girish; Schotzinger, Robert J; Villalta, Fernando; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C; Lepesheva, Galina I

    2016-02-01

    A novel antifungal drug candidate, the 1-tetrazole-based agent VT-1161 [(R)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1,1-difluoro-3-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)-1-{5-[4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenyl]pyridin-2-yl}propan-2-ol], which is currently in two phase 2b antifungal clinical trials, was found to be a tight-binding ligand (apparent dissociation constant [Kd], 24 nM) and a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi. Moreover, VT-1161 revealed a high level of antiparasitic activity against amastigotes of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi in cellular experiments (50% effective concentration, 2.5 nM) and was active in vivo, causing >99.8% suppression of peak parasitemia in a mouse model of infection with the naturally drug-resistant Y strain of the parasite. The data strongly support the potential utility of VT-1161 in the treatment of Chagas disease. The structural characterization of T. cruzi CYP51 in complex with VT-1161 provides insights into the molecular basis for the compound's inhibitory potency and paves the way for the further rational development of this novel, tetrazole-based inhibitory chemotype both for antiprotozoan chemotherapy and for antifungal chemotherapy. PMID:26643331

  19. Clinical Candidate VT-1161's Antiparasitic Effect In Vitro, Activity in a Murine Model of Chagas Disease, and Structural Characterization in Complex with the Target Enzyme CYP51 from Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Hoekstra, William J.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; da Gama Jaen Batista, Denise; da Silva, Cristiane F.; Nefertiti, Aline S. G.; Rachakonda, Girish; Schotzinger, Robert J.; Villalta, Fernando; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C.

    2015-01-01

    A novel antifungal drug candidate, the 1-tetrazole-based agent VT-1161 [(R)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1,1-difluoro-3-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)-1-{5-[4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenyl]pyridin-2-yl}propan-2-ol], which is currently in two phase 2b antifungal clinical trials, was found to be a tight-binding ligand (apparent dissociation constant [Kd], 24 nM) and a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi. Moreover, VT-1161 revealed a high level of antiparasitic activity against amastigotes of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi in cellular experiments (50% effective concentration, 2.5 nM) and was active in vivo, causing >99.8% suppression of peak parasitemia in a mouse model of infection with the naturally drug-resistant Y strain of the parasite. The data strongly support the potential utility of VT-1161 in the treatment of Chagas disease. The structural characterization of T. cruzi CYP51 in complex with VT-1161 provides insights into the molecular basis for the compound's inhibitory potency and paves the way for the further rational development of this novel, tetrazole-based inhibitory chemotype both for antiprotozoan chemotherapy and for antifungal chemotherapy. PMID:26643331

  20. Clinical Candidate VT-1161's Antiparasitic Effect In Vitro, Activity in a Murine Model of Chagas Disease, and Structural Characterization in Complex with the Target Enzyme CYP51 from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, William J; Hargrove, Tatiana Y; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; da Gama Jaen Batista, Denise; da Silva, Cristiane F; Nefertiti, Aline S G; Rachakonda, Girish; Schotzinger, Robert J; Villalta, Fernando; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C; Lepesheva, Galina I

    2016-02-01

    A novel antifungal drug candidate, the 1-tetrazole-based agent VT-1161 [(R)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-1,1-difluoro-3-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)-1-{5-[4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenyl]pyridin-2-yl}propan-2-ol], which is currently in two phase 2b antifungal clinical trials, was found to be a tight-binding ligand (apparent dissociation constant [Kd], 24 nM) and a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi. Moreover, VT-1161 revealed a high level of antiparasitic activity against amastigotes of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi in cellular experiments (50% effective concentration, 2.5 nM) and was active in vivo, causing >99.8% suppression of peak parasitemia in a mouse model of infection with the naturally drug-resistant Y strain of the parasite. The data strongly support the potential utility of VT-1161 in the treatment of Chagas disease. The structural characterization of T. cruzi CYP51 in complex with VT-1161 provides insights into the molecular basis for the compound's inhibitory potency and paves the way for the further rational development of this novel, tetrazole-based inhibitory chemotype both for antiprotozoan chemotherapy and for antifungal chemotherapy.

  1. Temporal Effect of Depressive Symptoms on the Longitudinal Evolution of Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rathbun, Alan M.; Harrold, Leslie R.; Reed, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Depression is common in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population, yet little is known of its effect on the course of disease activity. The aim of our study was to determine if prevalent and incident depressive symptoms influenced longitudinal changes in RA disease activity. Methods RA patients with and without depressive symptoms were identified using single-item questions from an existing registry sample. Mixed-effects models were used to examine changes in disease activity over 2 years in those with and without prevalent and incident depressive symptoms. Outcome variables included composite disease activity, joint counts, global assessments, pain, function, and acute-phase reactants. Model-based outcome estimations at the index dates and corresponding 1- and 2-year changes were calculated. Results Rates of disease activity change were significantly different in patients with a lifetime prevalence of symptomology, but not incident depressive symptoms, when compared to controls. Prior symptoms were associated with slower rates of disease activity decline, evidenced by the estimated 1-year Clinical Disease Activity Index changes: −3.0 (−3.3, −2.6) and −4.0 (−4.3, −3.6) in patients with and without lifetime prevalence, respectively. Analogous results were obtained for most of the other disease activity outcomes; although, there was no temporal effect of prevalent symptoms of depression on swollen joints and acute-phase reactants. Conclusion Depressive symptoms temporally influence the evolution of RA disease activity, and the magnitude is dependent on the time of symptomatic onset. However, the effect is limited to patient-reported pain, global assessment, and function, as well as physician-reported global assessment and tender joints. PMID:25384985

  2. Abnormalities in the tricarboxylic Acid cycle in Huntington disease and in a Huntington disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Nima N; Xu, Hui; Bonica, Joseph; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Cortes, Etty P; Park, Larry C; Arjomand, Jamshid; Gibson, Gary E

    2015-06-01

    Glucose metabolism is reduced in the brains of patients with Huntington disease (HD). The mechanisms underlying this deficit, its link to the pathology of the disease, and the vulnerability of the striatum in HD remain unknown. Abnormalities in some of the key mitochondrial enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, including the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, may contribute to these deficits. Here, activities for these enzymes and select protein levels were measured in human postmortem cortex and in striatum and cortex of an HD mouse model (Q175); mRNA levels encoding for these enzymes were also measured in the Q175 mouse cortex. The activities of PDHC and nearly all of the TCA cycle enzymes were dramatically lower (-50% to 90%) in humans than in mice. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase increased with HD in human (35%) and mouse (23%) cortex. No other changes were detected in the human HD cortex or mouse striatum. In Q175 cortex, there were increased activities of PDHC (+12%) and aconitase (+32%). Increased mRNA levels for succinyl thiokinase (+88%) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (+64%) suggested an upregulation of the TCA cycle. These patterns of change differ from those reported in other diseases, which may offer unique metabolic therapeutic opportunities for HD patients.

  3. Modeling Electrically Active Viscoelastic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sitikantha; Brownell, William E.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric) force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism. PMID:22701528

  4. A surface hydrology model for regional vector borne disease models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, Adrian; Asare, Ernest; Bomblies, Arne; Amekudzi, Leonard

    2016-04-01

    Small, sun-lit temporary pools that form during the rainy season are important breeding sites for many key mosquito vectors responsible for the transmission of malaria and other diseases. The representation of this surface hydrology in mathematical disease models is challenging, due to their small-scale, dependence on the terrain and the difficulty of setting soil parameters. Here we introduce a model that represents the temporal evolution of the aggregate statistics of breeding sites in a single pond fractional coverage parameter. The model is based on a simple, geometrical assumption concerning the terrain, and accounts for the processes of surface runoff, pond overflow, infiltration and evaporation. Soil moisture, soil properties and large-scale terrain slope are accounted for using a calibration parameter that sets the equivalent catchment fraction. The model is calibrated and then evaluated using in situ pond measurements in Ghana and ultra-high (10m) resolution explicit simulations for a village in Niger. Despite the model's simplicity, it is shown to reproduce the variability and mean of the pond aggregate water coverage well for both locations and validation techniques. Example malaria simulations for Uganda will be shown using this new scheme with a generic calibration setting, evaluated using district malaria case data. Possible methods for implementing regional calibration will be briefly discussed.

  5. Active ingredients of ginger as potential candidates in the prevention and treatment of diseases via modulation of biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Arshad H; shabrmi, Fahad M Al; Aly, Salah M

    2014-01-01

    The current mode of treatment based on synthetic drugs is expensive and also causes genetic and metabolic alterations. However, safe and sound mode of treatment is needed to control the diseases development and progression. In this regards, medicinal plant and its constituents play an important role in diseases management via modulation of biological activities. Ginger, the rhizome of the Zingiber officinale, has shown therapeutic role in the health management since ancient time and considered as potential chemopreventive agent. Numerous studies based on clinical trials and animal model has shown that ginger and its constituents shows significant role in the prevention of diseases via modulation of genetic and metabolic activities. In this review, we focused on the therapeutics effects of ginger and its constituents in the diseases management, and its impact on genetic and metabolic activities. PMID:25057339

  6. Immunologic findings, thrombocytopenia and disease activity in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W. F.; Linton, A. L.; Cordy, P. E.; Keown, P. E.; Lohmann, R. C.; Lindsay, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty patients with nephritis due to systemic lupus erythematosus were followed up for a mean of 34 months after renal biopsy with serial determinations of total serum complement and C3 and C4 concentrations, binding of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), antinuclear antibody pattern and platelet count. There were 25 episodes of nonhematologic observed disease activity in 16 of the 20 patients; elevated DNA binding and thrombocytopenia correlated well with these episodes. The mean platelet count during episodes of observed disease activity was 96 +/- 42 X 10(9)/L, which was significantly different from the mean count of 248 +/- 90 X 10(9)/L during disease quiescence. The proportion of false-positive results with the immunologic tests varied from 25% to 67% and with platelet counts it was 11%. It is suggested that thrombocytopenia may be a simple and accurate index of disease activity in lupus nephritis. PMID:350367

  7. Liposomes for Targeted Delivery of Active Agents against Neurodegenerative Diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Spuch, Carlos; Navarro, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease represent a huge unmet medical need. The prevalence of both diseases is increasing, but the efficacy of treatment is still very limited due to various factors including the blood brain barrier (BBB). Drug delivery to the brain remains the major challenge for the treatment of all neurodegenerative diseases because of the numerous protective barriers surrounding the central nervous system. New therapeutic drugs that cross the BBB are critically needed for treatment of many brain diseases. One of the significant factors on neurotherapeutics is the constraint of the blood brain barrier and the drug release kinetics that cause peripheral serious side effects. Contrary to common belief, neurodegenerative and neurological diseases may be multisystemic in nature, and this presents numerous difficulties for their potential treatment. Overall, the aim of this paper is to summarize the last findings and news related to liposome technology in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of novel therapeutics and the possible applications of liposomes in the two most widespread neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. PMID:22203906

  8. Vitiligo: A Possible Model of Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bellei, Barbara; Pitisci, Angela; Ottaviani, Monica; Ludovici, Matteo; Cota, Carlo; Luzi, Fabiola; Dell'Anna, Maria Lucia; Picardo, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo is characterized by the progressive disappearance of pigment cells from skin and hair follicle. Several in vitro and in vivo studies show evidence of an altered redox status, suggesting that loss of cellular redox equilibrium might be the pathogenic mechanism in vitiligo. However, despite the numerous data supporting a pathogenic role of oxidative stress, there is still no consensus explanation underlying the oxidative stress-driven disappear of melanocytes from the epidermis. In this study, in vitro characterization of melanocytes cultures from non-lesional vitiligo skin revealed at the cellular level aberrant function of signal transduction pathways common with neurodegenerative diseases including modification of lipid metabolism, hyperactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), constitutive p53-dependent stress signal transduction cascades, and enhanced sensibility to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Notably, these long-term effects of subcytotoxic oxidative stress are also biomarkers of pre-senescent cellular phenotype. Consistent with this, vitiligo cells showed a significant increase in p16 that did not correlate with the chronological age of the donor. Moreover, vitiligo melanocytes produced many biologically active proteins among the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SAPS), such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), matrix metallo proteinase-3 (MMP3), cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 and 7 (IGFBP3, IGFBP7). Together, these data argue for a complicated pathophysiologic puzzle underlying melanocytes degeneration resembling, from the biological point of view, neurodegenerative diseases. Our results suggest new possible targets for intervention that in combination with current therapies could correct melanocytes intrinsic defects. PMID:23555779

  9. Reductions in disease activity in the AMPLE trial: clinical response by baseline disease duration

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, Michael; Weinblatt, Michael E; Valente, Robert; Citera, Gustavo; Maldonado, Michael; Massarotti, Elena; Yazici, Yusuf; Fleischmann, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate clinical response by baseline disease duration using 2-year data from the AMPLE trial. Methods Patients were randomised to subcutaneous abatacept 125 mg weekly or adalimumab 40 mg bi-weekly, with background methotrexate. As part of a post hoc analysis, the achievement of validated definitions of remission (Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) ≤2.8, Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤3.3, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3) ≤3.0, Boolean score ≤1), low disease activity (CDAI <10, SDAI <11, RAPID3 ≤6.0), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index response and American College of Rheumatology responses were evaluated by baseline disease duration (≤6 vs >6 months). Disease Activity Score 28 (C-reactive protein) <2.6 or ≤3.2 and radiographic non-progression in patients achieving remission were also evaluated. Results A total of 646 patients were randomised and treated (abatacept, n=318; adalimumab, n=328). In both treatment groups, comparable responses were achieved in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (≤6 months) and in those with later disease (>6 months) across multiple clinical measures. Conclusions Abatacept or adalimumab with background methotrexate were associated with similar onset and sustainability of response over 2 years. Patients treated early or later in the disease course achieved comparable clinical responses. Trial registration number NCT00929864, Post-results. PMID:27110385

  10. Cerebral Oedema, Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and the Decrease in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase Activity in the Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus are Prevented by Dexamethasone in an Animal Model of Maple Syrup Urine Disease.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luciana; Galant, Leticia S; Dall'Igna, Dhébora M; Kolling, Janaina; Siebert, Cassiana; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Wyse, Angela T S; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emilio L

    2016-08-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare metabolic disorder associated with acute and chronic brain dysfunction. This condition has been shown to lead to macroscopic cerebral alterations that are visible on imaging studies. Cerebral oedema is widely considered to be detrimental for MSUD patients; however, the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated whether acute administration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) causes cerebral oedema, modifies the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, affects the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and alters the levels of cytokines in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of 10-day-old rats. Additionally, we investigated the influence of concomitant administration of dexamethasone on the alterations caused by BCAA. Our results showed that the animals submitted to the model of MSUD exhibited an increase in the brain water content, both in the cerebral cortex and in the hippocampus. By investigating the mechanism of cerebral oedema, we discovered an association between H-BCAA and the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and the permeability of the BBB to small molecules. Moreover, the H-BCAA administration increases Il-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, whereas IL-10 levels were decreased in the hippocampus. Interestingly, we showed that the administration of dexamethasone successfully reduced cerebral oedema, preventing the inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, BBB breakdown and the increase in the cytokines levels. In conclusion, these findings suggest that dexamethasone can improve the acute cerebral oedema and brain injury associated with high levels of BCAA, either through a direct effect on brain capillary Na(+),K(+)-ATPase or through a generalized effect on the permeability of the BBB to all compounds. PMID:26133302

  11. Cerebral Oedema, Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and the Decrease in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase Activity in the Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus are Prevented by Dexamethasone in an Animal Model of Maple Syrup Urine Disease.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luciana; Galant, Leticia S; Dall'Igna, Dhébora M; Kolling, Janaina; Siebert, Cassiana; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Wyse, Angela T S; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emilio L

    2016-08-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare metabolic disorder associated with acute and chronic brain dysfunction. This condition has been shown to lead to macroscopic cerebral alterations that are visible on imaging studies. Cerebral oedema is widely considered to be detrimental for MSUD patients; however, the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated whether acute administration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) causes cerebral oedema, modifies the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, affects the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and alters the levels of cytokines in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of 10-day-old rats. Additionally, we investigated the influence of concomitant administration of dexamethasone on the alterations caused by BCAA. Our results showed that the animals submitted to the model of MSUD exhibited an increase in the brain water content, both in the cerebral cortex and in the hippocampus. By investigating the mechanism of cerebral oedema, we discovered an association between H-BCAA and the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and the permeability of the BBB to small molecules. Moreover, the H-BCAA administration increases Il-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, whereas IL-10 levels were decreased in the hippocampus. Interestingly, we showed that the administration of dexamethasone successfully reduced cerebral oedema, preventing the inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, BBB breakdown and the increase in the cytokines levels. In conclusion, these findings suggest that dexamethasone can improve the acute cerebral oedema and brain injury associated with high levels of BCAA, either through a direct effect on brain capillary Na(+),K(+)-ATPase or through a generalized effect on the permeability of the BBB to all compounds.

  12. Combining nitric oxide release with anti-inflammatory activity preserves nigrostriatal dopaminergic innervation and prevents motor impairment in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Current evidence suggests a role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of basal ganglia injury. Reportedly, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) mitigate DAergic neurotoxicity in rodent models of PD. Consistent with these findings, epidemiological analysis indicated that certain NSAIDs may prevent or delay the progression of PD. However, a serious impediment of chronic NSAID therapy, particularly in the elderly, is gastric, renal and cardiac toxicity. Nitric oxide (NO)-donating NSAIDs, have a safer profile while maintaining anti-inflammatory activity of parent compounds. We have investigated the oral activity of the NO-donating derivative of flurbiprofen, [2-fluoro-α-methyl (1,1'-biphenyl)-4-acetic-4-(nitrooxy)butyl ester], HCT1026 (30 mg kg-1 daily in rodent chow) in mice exposed to the parkinsonian neurotoxin MPTP. Methods Ageing mice were fed with a control, flurbiprofen, or HCT1026 diet starting ten days before MPTP administration and continuing for all the experimental period. Striatal high affinity synaptosomial dopamine up-take, motor coordination assessed with the rotarod, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)- and dopamine transporter (DAT) fiber staining, stereological cell counts, immunoblotting and gene expression analyses were used to assess MPTP-induced nigrostriatal DAergic toxicity and glial activation 1-40 days post-MPTP. Results HCT1026 was well tolerated and did not cause any measurable toxic effect, whereas flurbiprofen fed mice showed severe gastrointestinal side-effects. HCT1026 efficiently counteracted motor impairment and reversed MPTP-induced decreased synaptosomal [3H]dopamine uptake, TH- and DAT-stained fibers in striatum and TH+ neuron loss in subtantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), as opposed to age-matched mice fed with a control diet. These effects were associated to a significant decrease in reactive macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1

  13. Raised serum activity of phospholipase A2 immunochemically related to group II enzyme in inflammatory bowel disease: its correlation with disease activity of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Minami, T; Tojo, H; Shinomura, Y; Tarui, S; Okamoto, M

    1992-01-01

    Calcium dependent phospholipase A2 activity in the mixed micelles of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol and cholate was measured in sera of 39 patients with Crohn's disease, 40 patients with ulcerative colitis, and 40 healthy controls. The phospholipase A2 activity was significantly raised in those sera of the patients with active Crohn's disease and those with moderate and severe ulcerative colitis. The major phospholipase A2 activity derived from the sera was separated into two peaks by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. The phospholipase A2 active fractions were immunochemically characterised using specific antibody directed against human group II phospholipase A2 purified from rheumatoid synovial fluid. The results suggest that raised serum phospholipase A2 activity in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis was mainly attributed to the two forms of phospholipase A2 immunochemically related to group II enzyme. In patients with Crohn's disease, serum phospholipase A2 activity decreased in parallel with clinical improvement, and correlated with serum C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The results suggest that serum phospholipase A2 activity may serve as an additional indicator of disease activity. Serum phospholipase A2 activity in patients with ulcerative colitis tends to increase in relation with endoscopic severity, and may be a more sensitive laboratory index than serum C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate to evaluate disease activity. Images Figure 3 PMID:1644331

  14. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  15. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  16. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  17. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  18. Serum Renalase Levels Correlate with Disease Activity in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minfang; Shao, Xinghua; Chang, Xinbei; Fan, Zhuping; Cao, Qin; Mou, Shan; Wang, Qin; Yan, Yucheng; Desir, Gary; Ni, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lupus nephritis (LN) is among the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which causes significant morbidity and mortality. Renalase is a novel, kidney-secreted cytokine-like protein that promotes cell survival. Here, we aimed to investigate the relationship of serum renalase levels with LN and its role in the disease progression of LN. Methods For this cross-sectional study, 67 LN patients and 35 healthy controls were enrolled. Seventeen active LN patients who received standard therapies were followed up for six months. Disease activity was determined by the SLE Disease Activity–2000 (SLEDAI-2K) scoring system and serum renalase amounts were determined by ELISA. Predictive value of renalase for disease activity was assessed. Furthermore, the expression of renalase in the kidneys of patients and macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Serum renalase amounts were significantly higher in LN patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, patients with proliferative LN had more elevated serum renalase levels than Class V LN patients. In proliferative LN patients, serum renalase levels were significantly higher in patients with active LN than those with inactive LN. Serum renalase levels were positively correlated with SLEDAI-2K, 24-h urine protein excretion, ds-DNA and ESR but inversely correlated with serum albumin and C3. Renalase amounts decreased significantly after six-months of standard therapy. The performance of renalase as a marker for diagnosis of active LN was 0.906 with a cutoff value of 66.67 μg/ml. We also observed that the amount of renalase was significantly higher in glomerular of proliferative LN along with the co-expression of macrophages. Conclusion Serum renalase levels were correlated with disease activity in LN. Serum renalase might serve as a potential indicator for disease activity in LN. The marked increase of glomerular renalase and its association with macrophages suggest

  19. Drosophila as a model for human neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Bilen, Julide; Bonini, Nancy M

    2005-01-01

    Among many achievements in the neurodegeneration field in the past decade, two require special attention due to the huge impact on our understanding of molecular and cellular pathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases. First is defining specific mutations in familial neurodegenerative diseases and second is modeling these diseases in easily manipulable model organisms including the fruit fly, nematode, and yeast. The power of these genetic systems has revealed many genetic factors involved in the various pathways affected, as well as provided potential drug targets for therapeutics. This review focuses on fruit fly models of human neurodegenerative diseases, with emphasis on how fly models have provided new insights into various aspects of human diseases.

  20. Advances in huntington disease drug discovery: novel approaches to model disease phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Bard, Jonathan; Wall, Michael D; Lazari, Ovadia; Arjomand, Jamshid; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio

    2014-02-01

    Huntington disease is a monogenic, autosomal dominant, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a trinucleotide CAG repeat expansion in exon 1 of the huntingtin (HTT) gene; age of onset of clinical symptoms inversely correlates with expanded CAG repeat length. HD leads to extensive degeneration of the basal ganglia, hypothalamic nuclei, and selected cortical areas, and a wide range of molecular mechanisms have been implicated in disease pathology in animal or cellular models expressing mutated HTT (mHTT) proteins, either full-length or amino-terminal fragments. However, HD cellular models that recapitulate the slow progression of the disease have not been available due to the toxicity of overexpressed exogenous mHTT or to limitations with using primary cells for long-term studies. Most investigations of the effects of mHTT relied on cytotoxicity or aggregation end points in heterologous systems or in primary embryonic neuroglial cultures derived from HD mouse models. More innovative approaches are currently under active investigation, including screening using electrophysiological endpoints, as well as the recent use of primary blood mononuclear cells and of human embryonic stem cells derived from a variety of HD research participants. Here we describe how these cellular systems are being used to investigate HD biology as well as to identify mechanisms with therapeutic potential.

  1. Disease activity and response assessment in psoriatic arthritis using the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA). A brief review.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Schoels, Monika; Aletaha, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In this review we provide reasons to use joint specific composite measures of disease activity for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) rather than composite scores that combine several manifestations of psoriatic disease, including skin involvement. Based on a principal component analysis, which, indeed, excluded skin involvement as a major factor in PsA, the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) was validated using clinical trial and observational data. Further, disease activity states and response criteria were recently defined. The DAPSA is simply calculated by summing swollen + tender joint counts + patient pain + patient global assessments + CRP, using 66/68 joint counts. DAPSA has meanwhile been validated in other studies and has shown to have a very high level of validity, also when compared with joint sonography. Thus, DAPSA is useful in clinical practice, clinical trials and observational studies.

  2. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Spruill, Tanya; Shan, Ying; Reed, George; Kremer, Joel M.; Potter, Jeffrey; Yazici, Yusuf; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Harrold, Leslie R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies of patients with rheumatoid arthritis have suggested that racial and ethnic disparities exist for minority populations. We compared disease activity and clinical outcomes across racial and ethnic groups using data from a large, contemporary United States registry. Methods We analyzed data from two time periods (2005-2007 and 2010-2012). The Clinical Disease Activity Index was examined as both a continuous measure and as dichotomous measures of disease activity states. Outcomes were compared in unadjusted and a series of cross-sectional and longitudinal multivariable regression models. Results For 2005-2007, significant differences of mean disease activity level (p<0.001) were observed across racial and ethnic groups. Over the five-year period, modest improvements in disease activity were observed across all groups, including whites [3.7 (95% CI 3.2 - 4.1) compared with African Americans [4.3 (95% CI 2.7 – 5.8)] and Hispanics [2.7 (95% CI 1.2 – 4.3)]. For 2010-2012, significant differences of mean disease activity level persisted (p<0.046) across racial and ethnic groups, ranging from 11.6 (95% CI 10.4-12.8) in Hispanics to 10.7 (95% CI 9.6-11.7) in whites. Remission rates remained significantly different across racial/ethnic groups across all models for 2010-2012, ranging from 22.7 (95% CI 19.5-25.8) in African Americans to 27.4 (95% CI 24.9-29.8) in whites. Conclusions Despite improvements in disease activity across racial and ethnic groups over a 5-year period, disparities persist in disease activity and clinical outcomes for minority groups versus white patients. PMID:24262723

  3. A unifying modeling framework for highly multivariate disease mapping.

    PubMed

    Botella-Rocamora, P; Martinez-Beneito, M A; Banerjee, S

    2015-04-30

    Multivariate disease mapping refers to the joint mapping of multiple diseases from regionally aggregated data and continues to be the subject of considerable attention for biostatisticians and spatial epidemiologists. The key issue is to map multiple diseases accounting for any correlations among themselves. Recently, Martinez-Beneito (2013) provided a unifying framework for multivariate disease mapping. While attractive in that it colligates a variety of existing statistical models for mapping multiple diseases, this and other existing approaches are computationally burdensome and preclude the multivariate analysis of moderate to large numbers of diseases. Here, we propose an alternative reformulation that accrues substantial computational benefits enabling the joint mapping of tens of diseases. Furthermore, the approach subsumes almost all existing classes of multivariate disease mapping models and offers substantial insight into the properties of statistical disease mapping models. PMID:25645551

  4. A unifying modeling framework for highly multivariate disease mapping.

    PubMed

    Botella-Rocamora, P; Martinez-Beneito, M A; Banerjee, S

    2015-04-30

    Multivariate disease mapping refers to the joint mapping of multiple diseases from regionally aggregated data and continues to be the subject of considerable attention for biostatisticians and spatial epidemiologists. The key issue is to map multiple diseases accounting for any correlations among themselves. Recently, Martinez-Beneito (2013) provided a unifying framework for multivariate disease mapping. While attractive in that it colligates a variety of existing statistical models for mapping multiple diseases, this and other existing approaches are computationally burdensome and preclude the multivariate analysis of moderate to large numbers of diseases. Here, we propose an alternative reformulation that accrues substantial computational benefits enabling the joint mapping of tens of diseases. Furthermore, the approach subsumes almost all existing classes of multivariate disease mapping models and offers substantial insight into the properties of statistical disease mapping models.

  5. Computer Models of Stress, Allostasis, and Acute and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The past century has seen a profound shift in diseases of humankind. Acute, unifactorial diseases are being replaced increasingly by multifactorial disorders that arise from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities and treatments, and time. According to the concept of allostasis, there is no single, ideal set of steady-state conditions in life. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple, interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators “homeostats.” Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. “Allostatic load” refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of a home temperature control system, the temperature can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states) by multiple means (effectors), regulated by a comparator thermostat (homeostat). Stress might exert adverse health consequences via allostatic load. This presentation describes models of homeostatic systems that incorporate negative feedback regulation, multiple effectors, effector sharing, environmental influences, intrinsic obsolescence, and destabilizing positive feedback loops. These models can be used to predict effects of environmental and genetic alterations on allostatic load and therefore on the development of multi-system disorders and failures. PMID:19120114

  6. Using the zebrafish model for Alzheimer’s disease research

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Morgan; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Lardelli, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rodent models have been extensively used to investigate the cause and mechanisms behind Alzheimer’s disease. Despite many years of intensive research using these models we still lack a detailed understanding of the molecular events that lead to neurodegeneration. Although zebrafish lack the complexity of advanced cognitive behaviors evident in rodent models they have proven to be a very informative model for the study of human diseases. In this review we give an overview of how the zebrafish has been used to study Alzheimer’s disease. Zebrafish possess genes orthologous to those mutated in familial Alzheimer’s disease and research using zebrafish has revealed unique characteristics of these genes that have been difficult to observe in rodent models. The zebrafish is becoming an increasingly popular model for the investigation of Alzheimer’s disease and will complement studies using other models to help complete our understanding of this disease. PMID:25071820

  7. Sleep disorders and inflammatory disease activity: chicken or the egg?

    PubMed

    Parekh, Parth J; Oldfield Iv, Edward C; Challapallisri, Vaishnavi; Ware, J Catsby; Johnson, David A

    2015-04-01

    Sleep dysfunction is a highly prevalent condition that has long been implicated in accelerating disease states characterized by having an inflammatory component such as systemic lupus erythematosus, HIV, and multiple sclerosis. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, debilitating disease that is characterized by waxing and waning symptoms, which are a direct result of increased circulating inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have demonstrated sleep dysfunction and the disruption of the circadian rhythm to result in an upregulation of inflammatory cytokines. Not only does this pose a potential trigger for disease flares but also an increased risk of malignancy in this subset of patients. This begs to question whether or not there is a therapeutic role of sleep cycle and circadian rhythm optimization in the prevention of IBD flares. Further research is needed to clarify the role of sleep dysfunction and alterations of the circadian rhythm in modifying disease activity and also in reducing the risk of malignancy in patients suffering from IBD.

  8. Antibacterial Activity of Hawaiian Corals: Possible Protection from Disease?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochfeld, D. J.; Aeby, G. S.; Miller, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    Reports of coral diseases in the Caribbean have appeared with increasing frequency over the past two decades; however, records of coral diseases in the Pacific have lagged far behind. Recent surveys of coral disease in the Hawaiian Islands indicate relatively low, but consistent, levels of disease throughout the inhabited Main and uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, and demonstrate variation in levels of disease among the major genera of Hawaiian corals. Although little is known about immune defense to disease in corals, one potential mechanism of defense is the production of antimicrobial compounds that protect corals from pathogens. A preliminary survey of antibacterial chemical defenses among three dominant species of Hawaiian corals was undertaken. Crude aqueous extracts of Porites lobata, Pocillopora meandrina and Montipora capitata were tested against nine strains of bacteria in a growth inhibition assay. Inhibitory extracts were further tested to determine whether their effects were cytostatic or cytotoxic. The bacteria selected included known coral pathogens, potential marine pathogens found in human waste and strains previously identified from the surfaces of Hawaiian corals. Extracts from all three species of coral exhibited a high degree of antibacterial activity, but also a high degree of selectivity against different bacterial strains. In addition, some extracts were stimulatory to some bacteria. In addition to interspecific variability, extracts also exhibited intraspecific variability, both within and between sites. Hawaiian corals have significant antibacterial activity, which may explain the relatively low prevalence of disease in these corals; however, further characterization of pathogens specifically responsible for disease in Hawaiian corals is necessary before we can conclude that antibacterial activity protects Hawaiian corals from disease.

  9. [Animal models for bone and joint disease. CIA, CAIA model].

    PubMed

    Hirose, Jun; Tanaka, Sakae

    2011-02-01

    The collagen-induced arthritis (collagen-induced arthritis, CIA) is an autoimmune arthritis that resembles rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in many ways, therefore it has been used most commonly as a model of RA. CIA is induced by immunization with an emulsion of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and type II collagen (C II ) . Collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) is induced by the administration of a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies recognizing conserved epitopes located within the CB11 fragment. CAIA offers several advantages over CIA, including rapid disease onset, high uptake rate, and the capacity to use genetically modified mice, such as transgenics and knockouts.

  10. Central Nervous System and its Disease Models on a Chip.

    PubMed

    Yi, YoonYoung; Park, JiSoo; Lim, Jaeho; Lee, C Justin; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Technologies for microfluidics and biological microelectromechanical systems have been rapidly progressing over the past decade, enabling the development of unique microplatforms for in vitro human central nervous system (CNS) and related disease models. Most fundamental techniques include manipulation of axons, synapses, and neuronal networks, and different culture conditions are possible, such as compartmental, co-culturing, and 3D. Various CNS disease models, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple sclerosis (MS), epilepsy, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis, migraine, diffuse axonal injury, and neuronal migration disorders, have been successfully established on microplatforms. In this review, we summarize fundamental technologies and current existing CNS disease models on microplatforms. We also discuss possible future directions, including application of these methods to pathological studies, drug screening, and personalized medicine, with 3D and personalized disease models that could generate more realistic CNS disease models. PMID:26497426

  11. Agent-Based Modeling of Noncommunicable Diseases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed the use of agent-based modeling (ABM), a systems science method, in understanding noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and their public health risk factors. We systematically reviewed studies in PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Sciences published from January 2003 to July 2014. We retrieved 22 relevant articles; each had an observational or interventional design. Physical activity and diet were the most-studied outcomes. Often, single agent types were modeled, and the environment was usually irrelevant to the studied outcome. Predictive validation and sensitivity analyses were most used to validate models. Although increasingly used to study NCDs, ABM remains underutilized and, where used, is suboptimally reported in public health studies. Its use in studying NCDs will benefit from clarified best practices and improved rigor to establish its usefulness and facilitate replication, interpretation, and application. PMID:25602871

  12. Natural Compounds Preventing Neurodegenerative Diseases Through Autophagic Activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhe; Adachi, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) are a group of intractable diseases that significantly affect human health. To date, the pathogenesis of NDDs is still poorly understood and effective disease-modifying therapies for NDDs have not been established. NDDs share the common morphological characteristic of the deposition of abnormal proteins in the nervous system, including neurons. Autophagy is one of the major processes by which damaged organelles and abnormal proteins are removed from cells. Impairment of autophagy has been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of NDDs, and the regulation of autophagy may become a therapeutic strategy for NDDs. In recent years, some active compounds from plants have been found to regulate autophagy and exert neuroprotection against NDDs, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, spinocerebellar ataxia 3, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, via activating autophagy. In this paper, we review recent advances in the use of active ingredients from plants for the regulation of autophagy and treatment of NDDs. PMID:27302727

  13. Predictive modeling of coral disease distribution within a reef system.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gareth J; Aeby, Greta S; Cowie, Rebecca O M; Davy, Simon K

    2010-01-01

    Diseases often display complex and distinct associations with their environment due to differences in etiology, modes of transmission between hosts, and the shifting balance between pathogen virulence and host resistance. Statistical modeling has been underutilized in coral disease research to explore the spatial patterns that result from this triad of interactions. We tested the hypotheses that: 1) coral diseases show distinct associations with multiple environmental factors, 2) incorporating interactions (synergistic collinearities) among environmental variables is important when predicting coral disease spatial patterns, and 3) modeling overall coral disease prevalence (the prevalence of multiple diseases as a single proportion value) will increase predictive error relative to modeling the same diseases independently. Four coral diseases: Porites growth anomalies (PorGA), Porites tissue loss (PorTL), Porites trematodiasis (PorTrem), and Montipora white syndrome (MWS), and their interactions with 17 predictor variables were modeled using boosted regression trees (BRT) within a reef system in Hawaii. Each disease showed distinct associations with the predictors. Environmental predictors showing the strongest overall associations with the coral diseases were both biotic and abiotic. PorGA was optimally predicted by a negative association with turbidity, PorTL and MWS by declines in butterflyfish and juvenile parrotfish abundance respectively, and PorTrem by a modal relationship with Porites host cover. Incorporating interactions among predictor variables contributed to the predictive power of our models, particularly for PorTrem. Combining diseases (using overall disease prevalence as the model response), led to an average six-fold increase in cross-validation predictive deviance over modeling the diseases individually. We therefore recommend coral diseases to be modeled separately, unless known to have etiologies that respond in a similar manner to particular

  14. Predictive Modeling of Coral Disease Distribution within a Reef System

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gareth J.; Aeby, Greta S.; Cowie, Rebecca O. M.; Davy, Simon K.

    2010-01-01

    Diseases often display complex and distinct associations with their environment due to differences in etiology, modes of transmission between hosts, and the shifting balance between pathogen virulence and host resistance. Statistical modeling has been underutilized in coral disease research to explore the spatial patterns that result from this triad of interactions. We tested the hypotheses that: 1) coral diseases show distinct associations with multiple environmental factors, 2) incorporating interactions (synergistic collinearities) among environmental variables is important when predicting coral disease spatial patterns, and 3) modeling overall coral disease prevalence (the prevalence of multiple diseases as a single proportion value) will increase predictive error relative to modeling the same diseases independently. Four coral diseases: Porites growth anomalies (PorGA), Porites tissue loss (PorTL), Porites trematodiasis (PorTrem), and Montipora white syndrome (MWS), and their interactions with 17 predictor variables were modeled using boosted regression trees (BRT) within a reef system in Hawaii. Each disease showed distinct associations with the predictors. Environmental predictors showing the strongest overall associations with the coral diseases were both biotic and abiotic. PorGA was optimally predicted by a negative association with turbidity, PorTL and MWS by declines in butterflyfish and juvenile parrotfish abundance respectively, and PorTrem by a modal relationship with Porites host cover. Incorporating interactions among predictor variables contributed to the predictive power of our models, particularly for PorTrem. Combining diseases (using overall disease prevalence as the model response), led to an average six-fold increase in cross-validation predictive deviance over modeling the diseases individually. We therefore recommend coral diseases to be modeled separately, unless known to have etiologies that respond in a similar manner to particular

  15. Inflammation activation and resolution in human tendon disease

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Stephanie G; Martinez, Fernando O; Yapp, Clarence; Wells, Graham; Oppermann, Udo; Dean, Benjamin JF; Smith, Richard DJ; Wheway, Kim; Watkins, Bridget; Roche, Lucy; Carr, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Improved understanding of the role of inflammation in tendon disease is required to facilitate therapeutic target discovery. We studied supraspinatus tendons from patients experiencing pain before and after surgical subacromial decompression treatment. Tendons were classified as having early, intermediate or advanced disease and inflammation was characterized through activation of pathways mediated by Interferon, NF-κB, glucocorticoid receptor and STAT-6. Inflammation signatures revealed expression of genes and proteins induced by Interferon and NF-κB in early stage disease and genes and proteins induced by STAT-6 and glucocorticoid receptor activation in advanced stage disease. The pro-resolving proteins FPR2/ALX and ChemR23 were increased in early stage disease compared to intermediate-advanced stage disease. Patients who were pain-free post-treatment had tendons with increased expression of CD206 and ALOX15 mRNA compared to tendons from patients who continued to experience pain post-treatment, suggesting that these genes and their pathways may moderate tendon pain. Stromal cells from diseased tendons cultured in vitro showed increased expression of NF-κB and Interferon target genes after treatment with lipopolysaccharide or IFNγ compared to stromal cells derived from healthy tendons. We identified 15-epi Lipoxin A4, a stable lipoxin metabolite derived from aspirin treatment, as potentially beneficial in the resolution of tendon inflammation. PMID:26511510

  16. Entacapone, a catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitor, improves the motor activity and dopamine content of basal ganglia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease induced by Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Hamaue, Naoya; Ogata, Akihiko; Terado, Mutsuko; Tsuchida, Shirou; Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao; Hirafuji, Masahiko; Togashi, Hiroko; Aoki, Takashi

    2010-01-14

    Levodopa is the main medication used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, dyskinesia and wearing-off appear after the administration of high-dose levodopa for a long period. To combat the dyskinesia and wearing-off, levodopa is used together with a dopamine (DA) receptor agonist, and the amount of levodopa is decreased. We have reported the monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor selegiline to be effective for treating motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease model rats. We analyzed the improvement in motor functions and catecholamine contents in various brain regions induced by a combination of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor entacapone and a levodopa/dopadecarboxylase inhibitor (DDCI) in Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) induced Parkinson's disease model rats. Entacapone (10 mg/kg) was administered via a single oral administration with levodopa/DDCI (10 mg/kg). The motor functions of the JEV model rats were significantly worsened, compared with those of the healthy control rats. The motor functions in the Parkinson's disease model rats were significantly recovered to the same levels as the healthy control rats by the combined administration of entacapone and levodopa/DDCI. A significant improvement in motor function was not demonstrated in the case of the administration of levodopa/DDCI alone. The striatal DA concentrations in the model rat brains were significantly increased by using levodopa/DDCI together with entacapone. Motor function was recovered by raising the striatum DA density in the model rats. Thus, COMT inhibitors are useful for decreasing the amount of levodopa administered to Parkinson's disease patients.

  17. A Genetic Model for Neurodevelopmental Disease

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Bradley P.; Girirajan, Santhosh; Eichler, Evan E.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic basis of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric diseases has been advanced by the discovery of large and recurrent copy number variants significantly enriched in cases when compared to controls. The pattern of this variation strongly implies that rare variants contribute significantly to neurological disease; that different genes will be responsible for similar diseases in different families; and that the same “primary” genetic lesions can result in a different disease outcome depending potentially on the genetic background. Next-generation sequencing technologies are beginning to broaden the spectrum of disease-causing variation and provide specificity by pinpointing both genes and pathways for future diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:22560351

  18. Models of marine molluscan diseases: Trends and challenges.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eric N; Hofmann, Eileen E

    2015-10-01

    Disease effects on host population dynamics and the transmission of pathogens between hosts are two important challenges for understanding how epizootics wax and wane and how disease influences host population dynamics. For the management of marine shellfish resources, marine diseases pose additional challenges in early intervention after the appearance of disease, management of the diseased population to limit a decline in host abundance, and application of measures to restrain that decline once it occurs. Mathematical models provide one approach for quantifying these effects and addressing the competing goals of managing the diseased population versus managing the disease. The majority of models for molluscan diseases fall into three categories distinguished by these competing goals. (1) Models that consider disease effects on the host population tend to focus on pathogen proliferation within the host. Many of the well-known molluscan diseases are pandemic, in that they routinely reach high prevalence rapidly over large geographic expanses, are characterized by transmission that does not depend upon a local source, and exert a significant influence on host population dynamics. Models focused on disease proliferation examine the influence of environmental change on host population metrics and provide a basis to better manage diseased stocks. Such models are readily adapted to questions of fishery management and habitat restoration. (2) Transmission models are designed to understand the mechanisms triggering epizootics, identify factors impeding epizootic development, and evaluate controls on the rate of disease spread over the host's range. Transmission models have been used extensively to study terrestrial diseases, yet little attention has been given to their potential for understanding the epidemiology of marine molluscan diseases. For management of diseases of wild stocks, transmission models open up a range of options, including the application of area

  19. Models of marine molluscan diseases: Trends and challenges.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eric N; Hofmann, Eileen E

    2015-10-01

    Disease effects on host population dynamics and the transmission of pathogens between hosts are two important challenges for understanding how epizootics wax and wane and how disease influences host population dynamics. For the management of marine shellfish resources, marine diseases pose additional challenges in early intervention after the appearance of disease, management of the diseased population to limit a decline in host abundance, and application of measures to restrain that decline once it occurs. Mathematical models provide one approach for quantifying these effects and addressing the competing goals of managing the diseased population versus managing the disease. The majority of models for molluscan diseases fall into three categories distinguished by these competing goals. (1) Models that consider disease effects on the host population tend to focus on pathogen proliferation within the host. Many of the well-known molluscan diseases are pandemic, in that they routinely reach high prevalence rapidly over large geographic expanses, are characterized by transmission that does not depend upon a local source, and exert a significant influence on host population dynamics. Models focused on disease proliferation examine the influence of environmental change on host population metrics and provide a basis to better manage diseased stocks. Such models are readily adapted to questions of fishery management and habitat restoration. (2) Transmission models are designed to understand the mechanisms triggering epizootics, identify factors impeding epizootic development, and evaluate controls on the rate of disease spread over the host's range. Transmission models have been used extensively to study terrestrial diseases, yet little attention has been given to their potential for understanding the epidemiology of marine molluscan diseases. For management of diseases of wild stocks, transmission models open up a range of options, including the application of area

  20. Fatigue in inflammatory bowel diseases: relationship with age and disease activity.

    PubMed

    Pellino, Gianluca; Sciaudone, Guido; Caserta, Violetta; Candilio, Giuseppe; De Fatico, G Serena; Gagliardi, Silvana; Landino, Isabella; Patturelli, Marta; Riegler, Gabriele; Di Caprio, Ester Livia; Canonico, Silvestro; Gritti, Paolo; Selvaggi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    A higher rate of patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are reported to experience the symptom of fatigue compared with general population. Fatigue can impair quality of life of IBD patients by limiting their daily functioning. However, this problem is poorly understood and addressed. Our aim was to investigate the impact of fatigue in IBD patients compared with controls, and to seek for relation between age and disease activity. IBD patients aged between 16 and 75 years observed at our Unit from June 2011 through June 2012 were evaluated for fatigue. Patients were asked to fill the fatigue impact scale (FIS) questionnaire. A cohort of age- and sex-matched patients observed for other-than-IBD diseases were prospectively enrolled to act as controls. Patients diagnosed with malignancies were excluded from evaluation. Each group included 16 patients, of whom half aged over 65 years. Fatigue was more severe in IBD patients than in controls (p = 0.02), irrespective of age and disease activity. IBD patients with moderate to severe disease activity showed worse fatigue compared with controls at any age (p < 0.0001). Young IBD patients with low disease activity showed a trend toward worse FIS score when compared with old IBD counterparts (p = 0.06). IBD significantly impacted on fatigue in our series. Considering IBD patients in remission, younger patients may experience worse fatigue. Further studies are needed to explore the effects of fatigue on quality of life and the potential of appropriate intervention strategies.

  1. [Disease and disability. The ICF model].

    PubMed

    Linden, M

    2015-01-01

    Diagnoses alone, e.g. according to the international classification of diseases 10 (ICD-10), do not give information on the illness severity, treatment needs and consequences. This depends on the functional health status, e.g. according to the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) which discriminates between impairment of functions, limitations in activity and capacity and participation restrictions. The German social law (SGB IX) defines disability as a chronic health status which lasts longer than 6 months and which results in participation restrictions. Participation restrictions are impaired capacities which not allow context or role requirements to be fulfilled. There are many instruments to measure capacities, such as the Mini-ICF-APP which was especially developed for mental disorders. As most mental disorders are chronic illnesses which lead to participation restrictions they must be conceptualized as mental disabilities. The consequence is that they must be treated under a social psychiatric perspective focussing on functions, capacities and context alike. PMID:25575629

  2. Type-1 cannabinoid receptor activity during Alzheimer's disease progression.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Iván; González de San Román, Estíbaliz; Giralt, M Teresa; Ferrer, Isidro; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The activity of CB1 cannabinoid receptors was studied in postmortem brain samples of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients during clinical deterioration. CB1 activity was higher at earlier AD stages in limited hippocampal areas and internal layers of frontal cortex, but a decrease was observed at the advanced stages. The pattern of modification appears to indicate initial hyperactivity of the endocannabinoid system in brain areas that lack classical histopathological markers at earlier stages of AD, indicating an attempt to compensate for the initial synaptic impairment, which is then surpassed by disease progression. These results suggest that initial CB1 stimulation might have therapeutic relevance.

  3. Physical activity of workers with and without chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Loef, Bette; de Hollander, Ellen L.; Boot, Cécile R.L.; Proper, Karin I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To contribute to the development of measures that increase physical activity (PA) levels in workers with and without chronic diseases, insight into workers' PA level is needed. Therefore, this study examined the association between the number of chronic diseases and PA in a Dutch working population. Methods Data of 131,032 workers from the Dutch Public Health Monitor 2012 were used in this cross-sectional study conducted in 2015 in the Netherlands. PA was operationalized as adherence (yes/no) to three PA guidelines. One of these was the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guideline (≥ 3 days/week, ≥ 20 min/day of vigorous-intensity activities). Also, the amount of moderate- and vigorous-intensity PA in min/week for those who were physically active for > 0 min/week was calculated. Associations between chronic diseases (0, 1, ≥ 2 chronic diseases) and PA were examined using logistic regression and Generalized Estimating Equations stratified for age (19–54 years/55–64 years). Results Workers aged 19–54 years with one (OR = 0.90 (99% CI = 0.84–0.95)) and multiple chronic diseases (OR = 0.76 (99% CI = 0.69–0.83)) had lower odds of adhering to the ACSM-guideline than workers without chronic diseases. Similar patterns were found for older workers. Younger workers with one (B = 24.44 (99% CI = 8.59–40.30)) and multiple chronic diseases (B = 49.11 (99% CI = 26.61–71.61)) had a higher amount of moderate PA than workers without chronic diseases. Conclusion Workers with chronic diseases adhered less often to the ACSM-guideline, but among workers aged 19–54 years who were physically active for > 0 min/week, those with chronic diseases spent more time in moderate-intensity PA than those without chronic diseases. PMID:26844183

  4. A phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Craig F; Marella, Mathieu; Smerkers, Brian; Barchet, Thomas M; Gershman, Benjamin; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Such a model would show loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia, appearance of Lewy bodies, and the early stages of motor dysfunction. The model was developed by subcutaneously injecting biodegradable microspheres of rotenone, a complex I inhibitor in 8–9 month old, ovariectomized Long–Evans rats. Animals were observed for changes in body weight and motor activity. At the end of 11–12 weeks animals were euthanized and the brains examined for histopathological changes. Rotenone treated animals gain weight and appear normal and healthy as compared to controls but showed modest hypokinesia around 5–6 weeks posttreatment. Animals showed loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and the appearance of putative Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress were evidenced by the appearance of activated microglia, iron precipitates, and 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine a major product of DNA oxidation. The dorsal striatum, the projection site of midbrain DA neurons, showed a significant reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining, together with an increase in reactive astrocytes, an early sign of DA nerve terminal damage. Levels of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were significantly reduced in the dorsal striatum; however, there was an unexpected increase in dopamine transporter (DAT) levels. Old, ovariectomized females treated with rotenone microspheres present with normal weight gain and good health but a modest hypokinesia. Accompanying this behavioral phenotype are a constellation of neuropathologies characteristic of PD that include loss of DA neurons, microglia activation, oxidative damage to nuclear DNA, iron deposition, and appearance of putative Lewy bodies. This phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease could provide insight into early mechanisms of pathogenesis and could aid in

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cells as tools for disease modelling and drug discovery in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Lezanne; Sidhu, Kuldip; Poljak, Anne; Sutherland, Greg; O'Connor, Michael D; Sachdev, Perminder; Münch, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative brain disorder that leads to a progressive decline in a person's memory and ability to communicate and carry out daily activities. The brain pathology in AD is characterized by extensive neuronal loss, particularly of cholinergic neurons, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles composed of the tau protein (NFTs) and extracellular deposition of plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ), a cleavage product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). These two insoluble protein aggregates are accompanied by a chronic inflammatory response and extensive oxidative damage. Whereas dys-regulation of APP expression or processing appears to be important for the familial, early-onset form of AD, controversy exists between the "Baptists" (in favour of Aβ) and the "Tauists" (in favour of tau) as to which of these two protein dysfunctions occur at the earliest stages or are the most important contributors to the disease process in sporadic AD. However, more and more "non-amyloid" and "non-tau" causes have been proposed, including, glycation, inflammation, oxidative stress and dys-regulation of the cell cycle. However, to get an insight into the ultimate cause of AD, and to prove that any drug target is valuable in AD, disease-relevant models giving insight into the pathogenic processes in AD are urgently needed. In the absence of a good animal model for sporadic AD, we propose in this review that induced pluripotent stem cells, derived from dermal fibroblasts of AD patients, and differentiated into cholinergic neurons, might be a promising novel tool for disease modelling and drug discovery for the sporadic form of AD.

  6. Perivascular fat, AMP-activated protein kinase and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Almabrouk, T A M; Ewart, M A; Salt, I P; Kennedy, S

    2014-01-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is an active endocrine and paracrine organ that modulates vascular function, with implications for the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Adipocytes and stromal cells contained within PVAT produce mediators (adipokines, cytokines, reactive oxygen species and gaseous compounds) with a range of paracrine effects modulating vascular smooth muscle cell contraction, proliferation and migration. However, the modulatory effect of PVAT on the vascular system in diseases, such as obesity, hypertension and atherosclerosis, remains poorly characterized. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates adipocyte metabolism, adipose biology and vascular function, and hence may be a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the vascular complications associated with obesity and T2DM. The role of AMPK in PVAT or the actions of PVAT have yet to be established, however. Activation of AMPK by pharmacological agents, such as metformin and thiazolidinediones, may modulate the activity of PVAT surrounding blood vessels and thereby contribute to their beneficial effect in cardiometabolic diseases. This review will provide a current perspective on how PVAT may influence vascular function via AMPK. We will also attempt to demonstrate how modulating AMPK activity using pharmacological agents could be exploited therapeutically to treat cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24490856

  7. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation.

  8. New advances on glial activation in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kim Mai; MacLean, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    In addition to being the support cells of the central nervous system (CNS), astrocytes are now recognized as active players in the regulation of synaptic function, neural repair, and CNS immunity. Astrocytes are among the most structurally complex cells in the brain, and activation of these cells has been shown in a wide spectrum of CNS injuries and diseases. Over the past decade, research has begun to elucidate the role of astrocyte activation and changes in astrocyte morphology in the progression of neural pathologies, which has led to glial-specific interventions for drug development. Future therapies for CNS infection, injury, and neurodegenerative disease are now aimed at targeting astrocyte responses to such insults including astrocyte activation, astrogliosis and other morphological changes, and innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:25964871

  9. Measuring disease activity in Crohn’s disease: what is currently available to the clinician

    PubMed Central

    D’Incà, Renata; Caccaro, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease characterized by a relapsing-remitting clinical behavior and dominated by intestinal inflammation. Being a chronic disorder that with time develops into a disabling disease, it is important to monitor the severity of inflammation to assess the efficacy of medication, rule out complications, and prevent progression. This is particularly true now that the goals of treatment are mucosal healing and deep remission. Endoscopy has always been the gold standard for assessing mucosal activity in CD, but its use is limited by its invasiveness and its inability to examine the small intestine, proximal to the terminal ileum. Enteroscopy and the less invasive small bowel capsule endoscopy enable the small bowel to be thoroughly explored and scores are emerging for classifying small bowel disease activity. Cross-sectional imaging techniques (ultrasound, magnetic resonance, computed tomography) are emerging as valid tools for monitoring CD patients, assessing inflammatory activity in the mucosa and the transmucosal extent of the disease, and for excluding extra-intestinal complications. Neither endoscopy nor imaging are suitable for assessing patients frequently, however. Noninvasive markers such as C-reactive protein, and fecal biomarkers such as calprotectin and lactoferrin, are therefore useful to confirm the inflammatory burden of the disease and to identify patients requiring further investigations. PMID:24876789

  10. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Claudia P.; de Lima Sanches, Priscila; de Abreu-Silva, Erlon Oliveira; Marcadenti, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide and it is associated with other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are not completely established and there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. In the gold standard treatment for NAFLD weight loss, dietary therapy, and physical activity are included. However, little scientific evidence is available on diet and/or physical activity and NAFLD specifically. Many dietary approaches such as Mediterranean and DASH diet are used for treatment of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but on the basis of its components their role in NAFLD has been discussed. In this review, the implications of current dietary and exercise approaches, including Brazilian and other guidelines, are discussed, with a focus on determining the optimal nonpharmacological treatment to prescribe for NAFLD. PMID:26770987

  11. Modeling daily flow patterns individuals to characterize disease spread

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, J.; Hyman, J. M.; Mirchandani, Pitu B.

    2002-11-17

    The effect of an individual's travels throughout a day on the spread of disease is examined using a deterministic SIR model. We determine which spatial and demographic characteristics most contribute to the disease spread and whether the progression of the disease can be slowed by appropriate vaccination of people belonging to a specific location-type.

  12. A model to evaluate quality and effectiveness of disease management.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, K M M; Nieboer, A P; van Schayck, C P; Asin, J D; Huijsman, R

    2008-12-01

    Disease management has emerged as a new strategy to enhance quality of care for patients suffering from chronic conditions, and to control healthcare costs. So far, however, the effects of this strategy remain unclear. Although current models define the concept of disease management, they do not provide a systematic development or an explanatory theory of how disease management affects the outcomes of care. The objective of this paper is to present a framework for valid evaluation of disease-management initiatives. The evaluation model is built on two pillars of disease management: patient-related and professional-directed interventions. The effectiveness of these interventions is thought to be affected by the organisational design of the healthcare system. Disease management requires a multifaceted approach; hence disease-management programme evaluations should focus on the effects of multiple interventions, namely patient-related, professional-directed and organisational interventions. The framework has been built upon the conceptualisation of these disease-management interventions. Analysis of the underlying mechanisms of these interventions revealed that learning and behavioural theories support the core assumptions of disease management. The evaluation model can be used to identify the components of disease-management programmes and the mechanisms behind them, making valid comparison feasible. In addition, this model links the programme interventions to indicators that can be used to evaluate the disease-management programme. Consistent use of this framework will enable comparisons among disease-management programmes and outcomes in evaluation research.

  13. Heart disease and physical activity: looking beyond patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Chris M

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) adherence is a problem that has plagued cardiovascular disease patients for years. Because of this, researchers have advocated for the identification of key theoretical correlates that can be used to guide PA intervention development. The present review will identify key PA correlates for these patients and provide subsequent recommendations to look beyond patient-level correlates.

  14. A Network Approach to Rare Disease Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiassian, Susan; Rabello, Sabrina; Sharma, Amitabh; Wiest, Olaf; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2011-03-01

    Network approaches have been widely used to better understand different areas of natural and social sciences. Network Science had a particularly great impact on the study of biological systems. In this project, using biological networks, candidate drugs as a potential treatment of rare diseases were identified. Developing new drugs for more than 2000 rare diseases (as defined by ORPHANET) is too expensive and beyond expectation. Disease proteins do not function in isolation but in cooperation with other interacting proteins. Research on FDA approved drugs have shown that most of the drugs do not target the disease protein but a protein which is 2 or 3 steps away from the disease protein in the Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) network. We identified the already known drug targets in the disease gene's PPI subnetwork (up to the 3rd neighborhood) and among them those in the same sub cellular compartment and higher coexpression coefficient with the disease gene are expected to be stronger candidates. Out of 2177 rare diseases, 1092 were found not to have any drug target. Using the above method, we have found the strongest candidates among the rest in order to further experimental validations.

  15. Role of Nox4 in murine models of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Babelova, Andrea; Avaniadi, Despina; Jung, Oliver; Fork, Christian; Beckmann, Janet; Kosowski, Judith; Weissmann, Norbert; Anilkumar, Narayana; Shah, Ajay M; Schaefer, Liliana; Schröder, Katrin; Brandes, Ralf P

    2012-08-15

    Nox4 is a hydrogen peroxide-producing NADPH oxidase highly expressed in the kidney which has been linked to epithelial cell injury and diabetic-induced cellular dysfunction in cultured cells. The role of the enzyme for renal pathology in vivo, however, is unclear. To address this, three experimental animal models of renal injury (streptozotocin diabetes I, unilateral ureteral ligation (UUO), and 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx)) were studied in either Nox4-inducible (Nox4(*/*)) or constitutive knockout (Nox4(-/-)) mice. Nox4 contributed more than 80% of diphenylene iodonium-sensitive H(2)O(2) formation of freshly isolated tubules determined by Amplex Red assay. In streptozotocin diabetes, acute deletion of Nox4 by tamoxifen-activated cre-recombinase increased albuminuria, whereas matrix deposition was similar between WT and Nox4(*/*) mice. Interestingly, renal Nox4 expression, mainly localized to tubular cells, decreased in the course of diabetes and this was not associated with a compensatory upregulation of Nox1 or Nox2. In the UUO model, renal expression of ICAM1, connective tissue growth factor, and fibronectin were higher in kidneys of Nox4(*/*) than control mice. Also in this model, levels of Nox4 decreased in the course of the disease. In the 5/6Nx model, which was performed in SV129 and SV129-Nox4(-/-) mice, no difference in the development of hypertension and albuminuria was found between the strains. Collectively, the first in vivo data of the kidney do not support the view that Nox4 is a main driver of renal disease. It rather appears that under specific conditions Nox4 may even slightly limit injury and disease progression.

  16. Stress-Activated Cap’n’collar Transcription Factors in Aging and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Bohmann, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Cap’n’collar (Cnc) transcription factors are conserved in metazoans and have important developmental and homeostatic functions. The vertebrate Nrf1, Nrf2, and Nrf3, the Caenorhabditis elegans SKN-1, and the Drosophila CncC comprise a subgroup of Cnc factors that mediate adaptive responses to cellular stress. The most studied stress-activated Cnc factor is Nrf2, which orchestrates the transcriptional response of cells to oxidative stressors and electrophilic xenobiotics. In rodent models, signaling by Nrf2 defends against oxidative stress and aging-associated disorders, such as neurodegeneration, respiratory diseases, and cancer. In humans, polymorphisms that decrease Nrf2 abundance have been associated with various pathologies of the skin, respiratory system, and digestive tract. In addition to preventing disease in rodents and humans, Cnc factors have lifespan-extending and anti-aging functions in invertebrates. However, despite the pro-longevity and antioxidant roles of stress-activated Cnc factors, their activity paradoxically declines in aging model organisms and in humans suffering from progressing respiratory disease or neurodegeneration. We review the roles and regulation of stress-activated Cnc factors across species, present all reported instances in which their activity is paradoxically decreased in aging and disease, and discuss the possibility that the pharmacological restoration of Nrf2 signaling may be useful in the prevention and treatment of age-related diseases. PMID:20215646

  17. Preclinical models of Graves' disease and associated secondary complications.

    PubMed

    Moshkelgosha, Sajad; So, Po-Wah; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Banga, J Paul

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most common organ-specific autoimmune disorder which consists of two opposing clinical syndromes, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' (hyperthyroidism) disease. Graves' disease is characterized by goiter, hyperthyroidism, and the orbital complication known as Graves' orbitopathy (GO), or thyroid eye disease. The hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of function of thyrotropin hormone receptor (TSHR), resulting from the production of agonist antibodies to the receptor. A variety of induced mouse models of Graves' disease have been developed over the past two decades, with some reproducible models leading to high disease incidence of autoimmune hyperthyroidism. However, none of the models show any signs of the orbital manifestation of GO. We have recently developed an experimental mouse model of GO induced by immunization of the plasmid encoded ligand binding domain of human TSHR cDNA by close field electroporation that recapitulates the orbital pathology in GO. As in human GO patients, immune mice with hyperthyroid or hypothyroid disease induced by anti-TSHR antibodies exhibited orbital pathology and chemosis, characterized by inflammation of orbital muscles and extensive adipogenesis leading to expansion of the orbital retrobulbar space. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head region in immune mice showed a significant expansion of the orbital space, concurrent with proptosis. This review discusses the different strategies for developing mouse models in Graves' disease, with a particular focus on GO. Furthermore, it outlines how this new model will facilitate molecular investigations into pathophysiology of the orbital disease and evaluation of new therapeutic interventions.

  18. Oxidative Stress in Genetic Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Varçin, Mustafa; Bentea, Eduard; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive evidence in Parkinson's disease of a link between oxidative stress and some of the monogenically inherited Parkinson's disease-associated genes. This paper focuses on the importance of this link and potential impact on neuronal function. Basic mechanisms of oxidative stress, the cellular antioxidant machinery, and the main sources of cellular oxidative stress are reviewed. Moreover, attention is given to the complex interaction between oxidative stress and other prominent pathogenic pathways in Parkinson's disease, such as mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, an overview of the existing genetic mouse models of Parkinson's disease is given and the evidence of oxidative stress in these models highlighted. Taken into consideration the importance of ageing and environmental factors as a risk for developing Parkinson's disease, gene-environment interactions in genetically engineered mouse models of Parkinson's disease are also discussed, highlighting the role of oxidative damage in the interplay between genetic makeup, environmental stress, and ageing in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22829959

  19. Zebrafish as a disease model for studying human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Ho, Yi-Jung; Yang, Yi-Ju; Liao, Heng-An; Ciou, Shih-Ci; Lin, Liang-In; Ou, Da-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of the world’s most common cancers and the second leading cause of cancer deaths. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a primary hepatic cancer, accounts for 90%-95% of liver cancer cases. The pathogenesis of HCC consists of a stepwise process of liver damage that extends over decades, due to hepatitis, fatty liver, fibrosis, and cirrhosis before developing fully into HCC. Multiple risk factors are highly correlated with HCC, including infection with the hepatitis B or C viruses, alcohol abuse, aflatoxin exposure, and metabolic diseases. Over the last decade, genetic alterations, which include the regulation of multiple oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes and the activation of tumorigenesis-related pathways, have also been identified as important factors in HCC. Recently, zebrafish have become an important living vertebrate model organism, especially for translational medical research. In studies focusing on the biology of cancer, carcinogen induced tumors in zebrafish were found to have many similarities to human tumors. Several zebrafish models have therefore been developed to provide insight into the pathogenesis of liver cancer and the related drug discovery and toxicology, and to enable the evaluation of novel small-molecule inhibitors. This review will focus on illustrative examples involving the application of zebrafish models to the study of human liver disease and HCC, through transgenesis, genome editing technology, xenografts, drug discovery, and drug-induced toxic liver injury. PMID:26576090

  20. Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Jeffrey B; Bury, David C; Richardson, Sean W

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. One-third of these deaths may be preventable through healthy lifestyle choices including diet and physical activity. The Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality, whereas the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan is associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease. Substituting dietary saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes, although exogenous supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids does not improve cardiovascular outcomes. There is an association between increased sodium intake and cardiovascular risk, but reducing dietary sodium has not consistently shown a reduction in cardiovascular risk. Physical activity recommendations for adults are at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week, 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity per week, or an equivalent combination. Increases in physical activity by any level are associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Introducing muscle-strengthening activities at least twice per week in previously inactive adults is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes. Inactive adults without known CVD can gradually increase activity to a moderate-intensity level without consulting a physician. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends behavioral counseling to promote healthy diet and physical activity in adults at high risk of CVD. Evidence of benefit for counseling patients at average risk is less established.

  1. Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Jeffrey B; Bury, David C; Richardson, Sean W

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. One-third of these deaths may be preventable through healthy lifestyle choices including diet and physical activity. The Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality, whereas the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan is associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease. Substituting dietary saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes, although exogenous supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids does not improve cardiovascular outcomes. There is an association between increased sodium intake and cardiovascular risk, but reducing dietary sodium has not consistently shown a reduction in cardiovascular risk. Physical activity recommendations for adults are at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week, 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity per week, or an equivalent combination. Increases in physical activity by any level are associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Introducing muscle-strengthening activities at least twice per week in previously inactive adults is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes. Inactive adults without known CVD can gradually increase activity to a moderate-intensity level without consulting a physician. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends behavioral counseling to promote healthy diet and physical activity in adults at high risk of CVD. Evidence of benefit for counseling patients at average risk is less established. PMID:27281836

  2. The relationship between infliximab concentrations, antibodies to infliximab and disease activity in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vande Casteele, Niels; Khanna, Reena; Levesque, Barrett G; Stitt, Larry; Zou, G Y; Singh, Sharat; Lockton, Steve; Hauenstein, Scott; Ohrmund, Linda; Greenberg, Gordon R; Rutgeerts, Paul J; Gils, Ann; Sandborn, William J; Vermeire, Séverine; Feagan, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although low infliximab trough concentrations and antibodies to infliximab (ATI) are associated with poor outcomes in patients with Crohn's disease (CD), the clinical relevance of ATI in patients with adequate infliximab concentrations is uncertain. We evaluated this question using an assay sensitive for identification of ATI in the presence of infliximab. Design In an observational study, 1487 trough serum samples from 483 patients with CD who participated in four clinical studies of maintenance infliximab therapy were analysed using a fluid phase mobility shift assay. Infliximab and ATI concentrations most discriminant for remission, defined as a C-reactive protein concentration of ≤5 mg/L, were determined by receiver operating characteristic curves. A multivariable regression model evaluated these factors as independent predictors of remission. Results Based upon analysis of 1487 samples, 77.1% of patients had detectable and 22.9% had undetectable infliximab concentrations, of which 9.5% and 71.8%, respectively, were positive for ATI. An infliximab concentration of >2.79 μg/mL (area under the curve (AUC)=0.681; 95% CI 0.632 to 0.731) and ATI concentration of <3.15 U/mL (AUC=0.632; 95% CI 0.589 to 0.676) were associated with remission. Multivariable analysis showed that concentrations of both infliximab trough (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.3 to 2.5; p<0.001) and ATI (OR 0.57; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.81; p=0.002) were independent predictors of remission. Conclusions The development of ATI increases the probability of active disease even at low concentrations and in the presence of a therapeutic concentration of drug during infliximab maintenance therapy. Evaluation of strategies to prevent ATI formation, including therapeutic drug monitoring with selective infliximab dose intensification, is needed. PMID:25336114

  3. Multiscale modeling for clinical translation in neuropsychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Lytton, William W.; Neymotin, Samuel A.; Kerr, Cliff C.

    2015-01-01

    Multiscale modeling of neuropsychiatric illness bridges scales of clinical importance: from the highest scales (presentation of behavioral signs and symptoms), through intermediate scales (clinical testing and surgical intervention), down to the molecular scale of pharmacotherapy. Modeling of brain disease is difficult compared to modeling of other organs, because dysfunction manifests at scales where measurements are rudimentary due both to inadequate access (memory and cognition) and to complexity (behavior). Nonetheless, we can begin to explore these aspects through the use of information-theoretic measures as stand-ins for meaning at the top scales. We here describe efforts across five disorders: Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, stroke, schizophrenia, and epilepsy. We look at the use of therapeutic brain stimulation to replace lost neural signals, a loss that produces diaschisis, defined as activity changes in other brain areas due to missing inputs. These changes may in some cases be compensatory, hence beneficial, but in many cases a primary pathology, whether itself static or dynamic, sets in motion a series of dynamic consequences that produce further pathology. The simulations presented here suggest how diaschisis can be reversed by using a neuroprosthetic signal. Despite having none of the information content of the lost physiological signal, the simplified neuroprosthetic signal can restore a diaschitic area to near-normal patterns of activity. Computer simulation thus begins to explain the remarkable success of stimulation technologies - deep brain stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, ultrasound stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation - across an extremely broad range of pathologies. Multiscale modeling can help us to optimize and integrate these neuroprosthetic therapies by taking into consideration effects of different stimulation protocols, combinations of stimulation with neuropharmacological therapy, and interplay of these

  4. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Tan, Lan; Jiang, Teng; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2015-08-01

    Although most neurodegenerative diseases have been closely related to aberrant accumulation of aggregation-prone proteins in neurons, understanding their pathogenesis remains incomplete, and there is no treatment to delay the onset or slow the progression of many neurodegenerative diseases. The availability of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in recapitulating the phenotypes of several late-onset neurodegenerative diseases marks the new era in in vitro modeling. The iPSC collection represents a unique and well-characterized resource to elucidate disease mechanisms in these diseases and provides a novel human stem cell platform for screening new candidate therapeutics. Modeling human diseases using iPSCs has created novel opportunities for both mechanistic studies as well as for the discovery of new disease therapies. In this review, we introduce iPSC-based disease modeling in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In addition, we discuss the implementation of iPSCs in drug discovery associated with some new techniques.

  5. Genetic variants associated with neurodegenerative Alzheimer disease in natural models.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Claudia; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Ardiles, Álvaro O; Ewer, John; Palacios, Adrián G

    2016-01-01

    The use of transgenic models for the study of neurodegenerative diseases has made valuable contributions to the field. However, some important limitations, including protein overexpression and general systemic compensation for the missing genes, has caused researchers to seek natural models that show the main biomarkers of neurodegenerative diseases during aging. Here we review some of these models-most of them rodents, focusing especially on the genetic variations in biomarkers for Alzheimer diseases, in order to explain their relationships with variants associated with the occurrence of the disease in humans. PMID:26919851

  6. Distinct features of circulating microparticles and their relationship with disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Voudoukis, Evangelos; Vetsika, Eleni-Kyriaki; Giannakopoulou, Konstantina; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Theodoropoulou, Angeliki; Sfiridaki, Aekaterini; Georgoulias, Vassilis; Paspatis, Gregorios A.; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is evidence that circulating microparticles (MPs) and annexin (+) platelet-derived MPs (PDMPs) are increased in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of our study was to characterize the abundance, origin, and annexin V binding of MPs in patients with IBD and correlate them with the disease characteristics. Methods Case-control study of 46 IBD patients (23 Crohn’s disease, 23 ulcerative colitis) and 40 matched healthy controls (HC). MPs were divided according to annexin V binding, their origin was estimated based on specific cell membrane markers in plasma samples and their number was calculated via flow cytometry. Clinical and laboratory activity indices were also analyzed. Results Annexin (-) PDMPs (P=0.0004), total (P=0.04) and annexin (+) monocyte-derived MPs (P=0.02) were increased and annexin (-) total MPs (P=0.0007) were decreased in IBD patients compared to HC. The annexin (+)/(-) ratio of all MP types were significantly elevated in IBD patients compared to HC (P<0.003). IBD patients with active disease displayed elevated total and annexin (+) total MPs, total, annexin (+) and (-) PDMPs compared with those in remission (P<0.05). Annexin (-) PDMPs were considerably increased in IBD patients with active compared to those with inactive disease (P=0.0013). Total and annexin (-) PDMPs were significantly correlated with most of the disease activity indices (P<0.05). Conclusion The majority of circulating MPs, their counterparts and particularly annexin (-) PDMPs are increased in active IBD patients. Annexin (+)/(-) ratio proved to be the most reliable distinctive MP index between HC and IBD patients. PMID:27065731

  7. Optimizing replacement of dairy cows: modeling the effects of diseases.

    PubMed

    Gröhn, Y T; Rajala-Schultz, P J; Allore, H G; DeLorenzo, M A; Hertl, J A; Galligan, D T

    2003-09-30

    We modified an existing dairy management decision model by including economically important dairy cattle diseases, and illustrated how their inclusion changed culling recommendations. Nine common diseases having treatment and veterinary costs, and affecting milk yield, fertility and survival, were considered important in the culling decision process. A sequence of stages was established during which diseases were considered significant: mastitis and lameness, any time during lactation; dystocia, milk fever and retained placenta, 0-4 days of lactation; displaced abomasum, 5-30 days; ketosis and metritis, 5-60 days; and cystic ovaries, 61-120 days. Some diseases were risk factors for others. Baseline incidences and disease effects were obtained from the literature. The effects of various disease combinations on milk yield, fertility, survival and economics were estimated. Adding diseases into the model did not increase voluntary or total culling rate. However, diseased animals were recommended for culling much more than healthy cows, regardless of parity or production level. Cows in the highest production level were not recommended for culling even if they contracted a disease. The annuity per cow decreased and herdlife increased when diseases were in the model. Higher replacement cost also increased herdlife and decreased when diseases were in the model. Higher replacement cost also increased herdlife and decreased the annuity and voluntary culling rate.

  8. Development and application of chronic disease risk prediction models.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun Min; Stefani, Katherine M; Kim, Hyeon Chang

    2014-07-01

    Currently, non-communicable chronic diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and a large proportion of chronic diseases are preventable through risk factor management. However, the prevention efficacy at the individual level is not yet satisfactory. Chronic disease prediction models have been developed to assist physicians and individuals in clinical decision-making. A chronic disease prediction model assesses multiple risk factors together and estimates an absolute disease risk for the individual. Accurate prediction of an individual's future risk for a certain disease enables the comparison of benefits and risks of treatment, the costs of alternative prevention strategies, and selection of the most efficient strategy for the individual. A large number of chronic disease prediction models, especially targeting cardiovascular diseases and cancers, have been suggested, and some of them have been adopted in the clinical practice guidelines and recommendations of many countries. Although few chronic disease prediction tools have been suggested in the Korean population, their clinical utility is not as high as expected. This article reviews methodologies that are commonly used for developing and evaluating a chronic disease prediction model and discusses the current status of chronic disease prediction in Korea.

  9. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'–based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  10. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils.

    PubMed

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'-based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  11. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils.

    PubMed

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'-based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils.

  12. Concise Review: Cardiac Disease Modeling Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunbo; Al-Aama, Jumana; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Keavney, Bernard; Trafford, Andrew; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle

    2015-09-01

    Genetic cardiac diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Although animal models have been created to provide some useful insights into the pathogenesis of genetic cardiac diseases, the significant species differences and the lack of genetic information for complex genetic diseases markedly attenuate the application values of such data. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient-specific specimens and subsequent derivation of cardiomyocytes offer novel avenues to study the mechanisms underlying cardiac diseases, to identify new causative genes, and to provide insights into the disease aetiology. In recent years, the list of human iPSC-based models for genetic cardiac diseases has been expanding rapidly, although there are still remaining concerns on the level of functionality of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and their ability to be used for modeling complex cardiac diseases in adults. This review focuses on the development of cardiomyocyte induction from pluripotent stem cells, the recent progress in heart disease modeling using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, and the challenges associated with understanding complex genetic diseases. To address these issues, we examine the similarity between iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and their ex vivo counterparts and how this relates to the method used to differentiate the pluripotent stem cells into a cardiomyocyte phenotype. We progress to examine categories of congenital cardiac abnormalities that are suitable for iPSC-based disease modeling.

  13. Generating Transgenic Mouse Models for Studying Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Ju, Josephine M; Marietta, Eric V; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of current animal models for studying celiac disease, with a focus on generating HLA transgenic mouse models. Human Leukocyte Antigen class II molecules have been a particular target for transgenic mice due to their tight association with celiac disease, and a number of murine models have been developed which had the endogenous MHC class II genes replaced with insertions of disease susceptible HLA class II alleles DQ2 or DQ8. Additionally, transgenic mice that overexpress interleukin-15 (IL-15), a key player in the inflammatory cascade that leads to celiac disease, have also been generated to model a state of chronic inflammation. To explore the contribution of specific bacteria in gluten-sensitive enteropathy, the nude mouse and rat models have been studied in germ-free facilities. These reductionist mouse models allow us to address single factors thought to have crucial roles in celiac disease. No single model has incorporated all of the multiple factors that make up celiac disease. Rather, these mouse models can allow the functional interrogation of specific components of the many stages of, and contributions to, the pathogenic mechanisms that will lead to gluten-dependent enteropathy. Overall, the tools for animal studies in celiac disease are many and varied, and provide ample space for further creativity as well as to characterize the complete and complex pathogenesis of celiac disease.

  14. Myocardin Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Inflammatory Activation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ackers-Johnson, Matthew; Talasila, Amarnath; Sage, Andrew P; Long, Xiaochun; Bot, Ilze; Morrell, Nicholas W; Bennett, Martin R; Miano, Joseph M.; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis, the cause of 50% of deaths in westernised societies, is widely regarded as a chronic vascular inflammatory disease. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) inflammatory activation in response to local pro-inflammatory stimuli contributes to disease progression and is a pervasive feature in developing atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, it is of considerable therapeutic importance to identify mechanisms that regulate the VSMC inflammatory response. Approach and Results We report that myocardin, a powerful myogenic transcriptional coactivator, negatively regulates VSMC inflammatory activation and vascular disease. Myocardin levels are reduced during atherosclerosis, in association with phenotypic switching of smooth muscle cells. Myocardin deficiency accelerates atherogenesis in hypercholesterolemic ApoE−/− mice. Conversely, increased myocardin expression potently abrogates the induction of an array of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules in VSMCs. Expression of myocardin in VSMCs reduces lipid uptake, macrophage interaction, chemotaxis and macrophage-endothelial tethering in vitro, and attenuates monocyte accumulation within developing lesions in vivo. These results demonstrate that endogenous levels of myocardin are a critical regulator of vessel inflammation. Conclusions We propose myocardin as a guardian of the contractile, non-inflammatory VSMC phenotype, with loss of myocardin representing a critical permissive step in the process of phenotypic transition and inflammatory activation, at the onset of vascular disease. PMID:25614278

  15. Blockade of Gap Junction Hemichannel Suppresses Disease Progression in Mouse Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Doi, Yukiko; Jin, Shijie; Noda, Mariko; Liang, Jianfeng; Li, Hua; Zhou, Yan; Mori, Rarami; Yasuoka, Satoko; Li, Endong; Parajuli, Bijay; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Sato, Jun; Yamanaka, Koji; Sobue, Gen; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Suzumura, Akio

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutamate released by activated microglia induces excitotoxic neuronal death, which likely contributes to non-cell autonomous neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Although both blockade of glutamate receptors and inhibition of microglial activation are the therapeutic candidates for these neurodegenerative diseases, glutamate receptor blockers also perturbed physiological and essential glutamate signals, and inhibitors of microglial activation suppressed both neurotoxic/neuroprotective roles of microglia and hardly affected disease progression. We previously demonstrated that activated microglia release a large amount of glutamate specifically through gap junction hemichannel. Hence, blockade of gap junction hemichannel may be potentially beneficial in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Methods and Findings In this study, we generated a novel blood-brain barrier permeable gap junction hemichannel blocker based on glycyrrhetinic acid. We found that pharmacologic blockade of gap junction hemichannel inhibited excessive glutamate release from activated microglia in vitro and in vivo without producing notable toxicity. Blocking gap junction hemichannel significantly suppressed neuronal loss of the spinal cord and extended survival in transgenic mice carrying human superoxide dismutase 1 with G93A or G37R mutation as an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model. Moreover, blockade of gap junction hemichannel also significantly improved memory impairments without altering amyloid β deposition in double transgenic mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein with K595N and M596L mutations and presenilin 1 with A264E mutation as an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Conclusions Our results suggest that gap junction hemichannel blockers may represent a new therapeutic strategy to target neurotoxic microglia specifically and prevent microglia-mediated neuronal death in various

  16. Visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Muller, Alana J; Shine, James M; Halliday, Glenda M; Lewis, Simon J G

    2014-11-01

    One of the most challenging tasks in neuroscience is to be able to meaningfully connect information across the different levels of investigation, from molecular or structural biology to the resulting behavior and cognition. Visual hallucinations are a frequent occurrence in Parkinson's disease and significantly contribute to the burden of the disease. Because of the widespread pathological processes implicated in visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease, a final common mechanism that explains their manifestation will require an integrative approach, in which consideration is taken across all complementary levels of analysis. This review considers the leading hypothetical frameworks for visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease, summarizing the key aspects of each in an attempt to highlight the aspects of the condition that such a unifying hypothesis must explain. These competing hypotheses include implications of dream imagery intrusion, deficits in reality monitoring, and impairments in visual perception and attention.

  17. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yuuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Narita, Ayuko; Takeda, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiromi; Tamura, Masamichi; Kikuchi, Wataru; Komatsu, Akira; Tamura, Hiroaki; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis that affects both small and medium-sized vessels including the coronary arteries in infants and children. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide, a lipid, that functions as a second messenger in the regulation of cell functions. ASM activation has been implicated in numerous cellular stress responses and is associated with cellular ASM secretion, either through alternative trafficking of the ASM precursor protein or by means of an unidentified mechanism. Elevation of serum ASM activity has been described in several human diseases, suggesting that patients with diseases involving vascular endothelial cells may exhibit a preferential elevation of serum ASM activity. As acute KD is characterized by systemic vasculitis that could affect vascular endothelial cells, the elevation of serum ASM activity should be considered in these patients. In the present study, serum ASM activity in the sera of 15 patients with acute KD was determined both before and after treatment with infusion of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a first-line treatment for acute KD. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly elevated in KD patients when compared to the control group (3.85 ± 1.46 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h vs. 1.15 ± 0.10 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h, p < 0.001), suggesting that ASM activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly correlated with levels of C-reactive protein (p < 0.05). These results suggest the involvement of sphingolipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of KD. PMID:26447086

  18. Measurement of Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide as a Marker of Disease Activity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ikonomi, Erkanda; Rothstein, Robin D.; Ehrlich, Adam C.; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Definitive diagnosis of IBD requires endoscopic and pathologic confirmation. These tools are also used to classify disease activity. Our aim was to determine if the fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) could be utilized to screen for IBD and assess for disease activity. Methods We matched weighted IBD cases and controls from the 2009–2010 NHANES dataset. All subjects underwent measurement of FeNO using standardized techniques. We assessed for potential confounders for FeNO measurement including age, height, and asthma. For IBD subjects, we used the presence of diarrhea, fatigue, and weight loss as a proxy for IBD activity. Laboratory parameters examined to estimate disease activity included anemia (≤ 10 g/dl), iron deficiency (ferritin ≤ 20 ng/ml), hypoalbuminemia (≤ 3.2 g/dl), and CRP (≥ 1.1 mg/dl). Results The weighted sample represented 199,414,901 subjects. The weighted prevalence of IBD was 2,084,895 (1.0%). IBD subjects had nearly the same FeNO level as those without IBD (17.0 ± 16.2 vs. 16.7 ± 14.5 ppb). The odds of a FeNO > 25 ppb was half (OR=0.501; 95% CI 0.497–0.504) for subjects with IBD compared to those without IBD after controlling for confounders. The AUROC curve for FeNO was 0.47 (0.35–0.59). FeNO levels were not higher in patients with laboratory values suggestive of active disease. FeNO levels were higher in IBD patients with diarrhea, rectal urgency, and fatigue but were lower in those with unintentional weight loss. Conclusion Measurement of FeNO does not appear to be useful to screen for IBD or assess disease activity. PMID:27398403

  19. Trib3 Is Elevated in Parkinson's Disease and Mediates Death in Parkinson's Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaotian; Zareen, Neela; Rao, Apeksha; Berman, Zachary; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura; Bernd, Paulette; Crary, John F.; Levy, Oren A.; Greene, Lloyd A.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive loss of select neuronal populations, but the prodeath genes mediating the neurodegenerative processes remain to be fully elucidated. Trib3 (tribbles pseudokinase 3) is a stress-induced gene with proapoptotic activity that was previously described as highly activated at the transcriptional level in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) cellular model of PD. Here, we report that Trib3 immunostaining is elevated in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) of human PD patients. Trib3 protein is also upregulated in cellular models of PD, including neuronal PC12 cells and rat dopaminergic ventral midbrain neurons treated with 6-OHDA, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), or α-synuclein fibrils (αSYN). In the toxin models, Trib3 induction is substantially mediated by the transcription factors CHOP and ATF4. Trib3 overexpression is sufficient to promote neuronal death; conversely, Trib3 knockdown protects neuronal PC12 cells as well as ventral midbrain dopaminergic neurons from 6-OHDA, MPP+, or αSYN. Mechanism studies revealed that Trib3 physically interacts with Parkin, a prosurvival protein whose loss of function is associated with PD. Elevated Trib3 reduces Parkin expression in cultured cells; and in the SNpc of PD patients, Parkin levels are reduced in a subset of dopaminergic neurons expressing high levels of Trib3. Loss of Parkin at least partially mediates the prodeath actions of Trib3 in that Parkin knockdown in cellular PD models abolishes the protective effect of Trib3 downregulation. Together, these findings identify Trib3 and its regulatory pathways as potential targets to suppress the progression of neuron death and degeneration in PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. Current treatments ameliorate symptoms, but not the underlying neuronal death. Understanding the core neurodegenerative processes in PD is a

  20. Metformin treatment alters memory function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    DiTacchio, Kacee A; Heinemann, Stephen F; Dziewczapolski, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction exacerbates Alzheimer's disease (AD) incidence and progression. Here we report that activation of the AMPK pathway, a common target in the management of diabetes, results in gender-divergent cognitive effects in a murine model of the disease. Specifically, our results show that activation of AMPK increases memory dysfunction in males but is protective in females, suggesting that gender considerations may constitute an important factor in medical intervention of diabetes as well as AD.

  1. Probability of a disease outbreak in stochastic multipatch epidemic models.

    PubMed

    Lahodny, Glenn E; Allen, Linda J S

    2013-07-01

    Environmental heterogeneity, spatial connectivity, and movement of individuals play important roles in the spread of infectious diseases. To account for environmental differences that impact disease transmission, the spatial region is divided into patches according to risk of infection. A system of ordinary differential equations modeling spatial spread of disease among multiple patches is used to formulate two new stochastic models, a continuous-time Markov chain, and a system of stochastic differential equations. An estimate for the probability of disease extinction is computed by approximating the Markov chain model with a multitype branching process. Numerical examples illustrate some differences between the stochastic models and the deterministic model, important for prevention of disease outbreaks that depend on the location of infectious individuals, the risk of infection, and the movement of individuals. PMID:23666483

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta agonist ameliorated inflammasome activation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Yeon, Jong Eun; Ko, Eun Jung; Yoon, Eileen L; Suh, Sang Jun; Kang, Keunhee; Kim, Hae Rim; Kang, Seoung Hee; Yoo, Yang Jae; Je, Jihye; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inflammasome activation and the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-δ agonist treatment in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) models. METHODS: Male C57BL/6J mice were classified according to control or high fat diet (HFD) with or without PPAR-δ agonist (GW) over period of 12 wk [control, HFD, HFD + lipopolysaccharide (LPS), HFD + LPS + GW group]. HepG2 cells were exposed to palmitic acid (PA) and/or LPS in the absence or presence of GW. RESULTS: HFD caused glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis. In mice fed an HFD with LPS, caspase-1 and interleukin (IL)-1β in the liver were significantly increased. Treatment with GW ameliorated the steatosis and inhibited overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In HepG2 cells, PA and LPS treatment markedly increased mRNA of several nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family members (NLRP3, NLRP6, and NLRP10), caspase-1 and IL-1β. PA and LPS also exaggerated reactive oxygen species production. All of the above effects of PA and LPS were reduced by GW. GW also enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK-α. CONCLUSION: PPAR-δ agonist reduces fatty acid-induced inflammation and steatosis by suppressing inflammasome activation. Targeting the inflammasome by the PPAR-δ agonist may have therapeutic implication for NAFLD. PMID:26668503

  3. Mental health status can reflect disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sokolovic, Sekib; Dervisevic, Vedina; Fisekovic, Saida

    2014-01-01

    Objective A significant number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) link the start of illness with psychological trauma or severe stress. Impaired mental health (IMH), defined as depression and anxiety with psychoneuroimmunological factors, can play a significant role in RA. The main objective of this research was to investigate the mutual correlation of IMH and RA activity, estimated by the laboratory and clinical parameters in RA patients. Material and Methods An open clinical prospective study that lasted for 6 months was designed. There were 72 patients included, 58 women and 14 men, aged 34 to 80 years and screened for mental health status. The study population was randomized following the Brief Symptoms Inventory (BSI) scale, comprised of 53 questions with a range from 0 (no symptoms) to 4 (severe). This mental test was done only once during the study. Following the results from the BSI scale, RA patients were divided into mentally stable and mentally unstable patients to investigate the influence of RA activity on mental health. The following laboratory and clinical parameters were analyzed: sex, age, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), rheumatoid factor (RF), C-reactive protein (CRP), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody, and disease activity score (DAS28). All RA patients did not express extra-articular manifestations or Sjögren’s syndrome. The chi-square test, ANOVA, Pearson’s coefficient, and IBM Statistics - SPSS v19 were used. Results From a total of 72 RA patients, there were 44 mentally stable and 28 mentally unstable patients. All patients had either moderate or severe active disease. The only significant correlation of IMH and activity of RA was found in CRP and DAS28, but no significance was observed in ESR, RF, and anti-CCP. The DAS28 showed high disease activity with an average of 5.3 and CRP of 20.9 mg/L in patients with unstable mental health compared to stable mental health patients, where RA was associated with

  4. Multiple forms of acid phosphatase activity in Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J P; Peters, S P; Glew, R H; Lee, R E; McCafferty, L R; Mercer, D W; Wenger, D A

    1978-07-01

    Although the primary genetic defect in all individuals with Gaucher's disease is a deficiency in glucocerebrosidase activity, the finding of marked elevations in splenic and serum acid phosphatase activity is almost as consistent a finding. Gaucher spleen and serum contain at least two forms of acid phosphatase that can be readily separated by chromatography on columns containing the cation exchange resin Sulphopropyl Sephadex. The major species of acid phosphatase (designated SP-I) contained in Triton X-100 (1% v/v) extracts of Gaucher spleen accounts for 65%--95% of the total activity and has the following properties: (1) it does not bind to the cation exchange column; (2) it exhibitis a pH optimum of 4.5--5.0; (3) it is inhibited by sodium fluoride (15 mM), L(+)-tartaric acid (20 mM), and beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M), and (4) it is resistant to inhibition by sodium dithionite (10 mM). The minor acid phosphatase activity (designated SP-II) present in extracts of Gaucher spleen has properties similar to those of the major species of acid phosphatase activity contained in serum from patients with Gaucher's disease: (1) it binds firmly to cation exchange columns (eluted by 0.5 M sodium chloride); (2) it exhibits a pH optimum of 5.0--6.0; (3) it is inhibited by sodium fluoride and sodium dithionite; and (4) it is resistant to inhibition by beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M) and L(+)-tartaric acid (20 mM). In addition, a second form of acid phosphatase that is tartrate resistant was found to be elevated in Gaucher serum. This form of serum acid phosphatase did not bind to Sulphopropyl Sephadex, was found to be significantly resistant to beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M), and was only partially inhibited by sodium dithionite (10 mM). The findings reported here indicate that at least three distinct forms of acid phosphatase activity are elevated in Gaucher's disease. Furthermore, the minor acid phosphatase activity contained in spleen homogenates has properties very similar to

  5. Evaluating a Model of Youth Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Heitzler, Carrie D.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Erickson, Darin J.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Sirard, John R.; Story, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between social influences, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and barriers and physical activity. Methods Structural equation modeling examined relationships between parent and peer support, parent physical activity, individual perceptions, and objectively measured physical activity using accelerometers among a sample of youth aged 10–17 years (N=720). Results Peer support, parent physical activity, and perceived barriers were directly related to youth activity. The proposed model accounted for 14.7% of the variance in physical activity. Conclusions The results demonstrate a need to further explore additional individual, social, and environmental factors that may influence youth’s regular participation in physical activity. PMID:20524889

  6. Insights into Parkinson's disease models and neurotoxicity using non-invasive imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Pernaute, Rosario; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Isacson, Ole

    2005-09-01

    Loss of dopamine in the nigrostriatal system causes a severe impairment in motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease and in experimental neurotoxic models of the disease. We have used non-invasive imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate in vivo the changes in the dopamine system in neurotoxic models of Parkinson's disease. In addition to classic neurotransmitter studies, in these models, it is also possible to characterize associated and perhaps pathogenic factors, such as the contribution of microglia activation and inflammatory responses to neuronal damage. Functional imaging techniques are instrumental to our understanding and modeling of disease mechanisms, which should in turn lead to development of new therapies for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Serum melatonin in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: correlation with disease activity.

    PubMed

    El-Awady, Hanaa Mahmoud; El-Wakkad, Amany Salah El-Dien; Saleh, Maysa Tawheed; Muhammad, Saadia Ibraheem; Ghaniema, Eiman Mahmoud

    2007-05-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the abnormalities in early morning serum melatonin among patients with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) and to outline its relation to disease activity and severity. Twenty one patients with JRA and twenty healthy age and sex matched controls were enrolled in the study. Fifteen patients had polyarticular JRA, 3 had oligoarticular and 3 had systemic onset JRA. Evaluation was carried out clinically, functionally and radiologically by using disease activity score, Juvenile Arthritis Functional Assessment Report for Children (JAFAR-C score) and modified Larsen score, respectively. Laboratory investigations included Complete Blood Picture (CBC), The Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), C-Reactive Protein (CRP), classic IgM Rheumatoid Factor (RF), Anti-nuclear Antibodies (ANA) and melatonin estimation in serum. The serum levels of melatonin were significantly increased in JRA patients (mean +/- SD = 13.9 +/- 8 pg mL(-1)) as compared to healthy controls (mean +/- SD = 8.1 +/- 2.7 pg mL(-1), p < 0.01). A significant positive correlation could link serum melatonin levels to disease activity scores and ESR (r = 0.91, p < 0.001 and r = 0.55, p < 0.01, respectively). No significant correlation was found between melatonin and either Larsen or JAFAR scores (r = 0.19, r = 0.15, respectively). According to melatonin levels, there were 2 groups of patients: Group I with elevated melatonin level (more than 11 pg mL(-1)) (n = 15) and group II with normal melatonin level (less than 11 pg mL(-1)) (n = 6). Patients with elevated melatonin levels had higher ESR (p < 0.05), higher disease activity scores (p < 0.01) and Larsen scores (p < 0.05), than the group of patients with normal serum melatonin. The results of GAFAR scores were comparable between the two groups (p > 0.05). Hence the study conclude that the elevated melatonin levels among JRA patients with active synovitis and its close relation to disease activity rather than disease severity

  8. Bidirectional Relationship between Chronic Kidney Disease and Periodontal Disease: Structural Equation Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Taylor, George W.; West, Brady T.; McCarthy, Ellen T.

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal disease is associated with diabetes, heart disease, and chronic kidney disease (CKD), an effect postulated to be due in part to endovascular inflammation. While a bidirectional relationship between CKD and periodontal disease is plausible, it has not been previously reported in the literature. Over 11 200 adults 18 years or older were identified in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Analyses were conducted in two stages. First, multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to test the hypothesis that periodontal disease was independently associated with CKD. Given the potential that the periodontal disease and CKD relationship may be bidirectional, a two-step analytic approach was used that involved 1) tests for mediation, and 2) structural equation models to examine more complex direct and indirect effects of periodontal disease on CKD, and vice versa. In two separate models periodontal disease (ORAdj =1.62 (95% CI: 1.17-2.26) and edentulism (ORAdj = 1.83 (1.31-2.55) and periodontal disease score (ORAdj = 1.01 (1.01-1.02) were associated with CKD, when simultaneously adjusting for 14 other factors. Three of four structural equation models were most plausible suggesting bidirectional relationships. Collectively, these analyses provide for the first time empirical support for a bidirectional relationship between CKD and periodontal disease, and mediation of that relationship by diabetes duration and hypertension. PMID:20927035

  9. Induced pluripotent stem cells for modelling human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Unternaehrer, Juli J.; Daley, George Q.

    2011-01-01

    Research into the pathophysiological mechanisms of human disease and the development of targeted therapies have been hindered by a lack of predictive disease models that can be experimentally manipulated in vitro. This review describes the current state of modelling human diseases with the use of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines. To date, a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, haematopoietic disorders, metabolic conditions and cardiovascular pathologies have been captured in a Petri dish through reprogramming of patient cells into iPS cells followed by directed differentiation of disease-relevant cells and tissues. However, realizing the true promise of iPS cells for advancing our basic understanding of disease and ultimately providing novel cell-based therapies will require more refined protocols for generating the highly specialized cells affected by disease, coupled with strategies for drug discovery and cell transplantation. PMID:21727133

  10. Use of model organism and disease databases to support matchmaking for human disease gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Mungall, Christopher J; Washington, Nicole L; Nguyen-Xuan, Jeremy; Condit, Christopher; Smedley, Damian; Köhler, Sebastian; Groza, Tudor; Shefchek, Kent; Hochheiser, Harry; Robinson, Peter N; Lewis, Suzanna E; Haendel, Melissa A

    2015-10-01

    The Matchmaker Exchange application programming interface (API) allows searching a patient's genotypic or phenotypic profiles across clinical sites, for the purposes of cohort discovery and variant disease causal validation. This API can be used not only to search for matching patients, but also to match against public disease and model organism data. This public disease data enable matching known diseases and variant-phenotype associations using phenotype semantic similarity algorithms developed by the Monarch Initiative. The model data can provide additional evidence to aid diagnosis, suggest relevant models for disease mechanism and treatment exploration, and identify collaborators across the translational divide. The Monarch Initiative provides an implementation of this API for searching multiple integrated sources of data that contextualize the knowledge about any given patient or patient family into the greater biomedical knowledge landscape. While this corpus of data can aid diagnosis, it is also the beginning of research to improve understanding of rare human diseases.

  11. POSTERIOR PREDICTIVE MODEL CHECKS FOR DISEASE MAPPING MODELS. (R827257)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disease incidence or disease mortality rates for small areas are often displayed on maps. Maps of raw rates, disease counts divided by the total population at risk, have been criticized as unreliable due to non-constant variance associated with heterogeneity in base population si...

  12. Genome editing in nonhuman primates: approach to generating human disease models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Niu, Y; Ji, W

    2016-09-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are superior than rodents to be animal models for the study of human diseases, due to their similarities in terms of genetics, physiology, developmental biology, social behaviour and cognition. Transgenic animals have become a key tool in functional genomics to generate models for human diseases and validate new drugs. However, until now, progress in the field of transgenic NHPs has been slow because of technological limitations. Many human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, are caused by mutations in endogenous genes. Fortunately, recent developments in precision gene editing have led to the generation of NHP models for human diseases. Since 2014, there have been several reports of the generation of monkey models using transcription activator-like endonucleases (TALENs) or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9); some of these NHP models showed symptoms that were much closer to those of human diseases than have been seen previously in mouse models. No off-targeting was observed in the NHP models, and multiple gene knockout and biallelic mutants were feasible with low efficiency. These findings suggest that there are many possibilities to establish NHP models for human diseases that can mimic human diseases more faithfully than rodent models. PMID:27114283

  13. Genome editing in nonhuman primates: approach to generating human disease models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Niu, Y; Ji, W

    2016-09-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are superior than rodents to be animal models for the study of human diseases, due to their similarities in terms of genetics, physiology, developmental biology, social behaviour and cognition. Transgenic animals have become a key tool in functional genomics to generate models for human diseases and validate new drugs. However, until now, progress in the field of transgenic NHPs has been slow because of technological limitations. Many human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, are caused by mutations in endogenous genes. Fortunately, recent developments in precision gene editing have led to the generation of NHP models for human diseases. Since 2014, there have been several reports of the generation of monkey models using transcription activator-like endonucleases (TALENs) or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9); some of these NHP models showed symptoms that were much closer to those of human diseases than have been seen previously in mouse models. No off-targeting was observed in the NHP models, and multiple gene knockout and biallelic mutants were feasible with low efficiency. These findings suggest that there are many possibilities to establish NHP models for human diseases that can mimic human diseases more faithfully than rodent models.

  14. Synaptic activity and Alzheimer's disease: a critical update

    PubMed Central

    Tampellini, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Synapses have been known for many years to be the crucial target of pathology in different forms of dementia, in particular Alzheimer's disease (AD). Synapses and their appropriate activation or inhibition are fundamental for the proper brain function. Alterations in synaptic/neuronal activity and brain metabolism are considered among the earliest symptoms linked to the progression of AD, and lead to a central question in AD research: what is the role played by synaptic activity in AD pathogenesis? Intriguingly, in the last decade, important studies demonstrated that the state of activation of synapses affects the homeostasis of beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau, both of which aggregate and accumulate during AD, and are involved in neuronal dysfunction. In this review we aim to summarize the up-to-date data linking synaptic/neuronal activity with Aβ and tau; moreover, we also intend to provide a critical overview on brain activity alterations in AD, and their role in the disease's pathophysiology. PMID:26582973

  15. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  16. UPS Activation in the Battle Against Aging and Aggregation-Related Diseases: An Extended Review.

    PubMed

    Papaevgeniou, Nikoletta; Chondrogianni, Niki

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a biological process accompanied by gradual increase of damage in all cellular macromolecules, i.e., nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins. When the proteostasis network (chaperones and proteolytic systems) cannot reverse the damage load due to its excess as compared to cellular repair/regeneration capacity, failure of homeostasis is established. This failure is a major hallmark of aging and/or aggregation-related diseases. Dysfunction of the major cellular proteolytic machineries, namely the proteasome and the lysosome, has been reported during the progression of aging and aggregation-prone diseases. Therefore, activation of these pathways is considered as a possible preventive or therapeutic approach against the progression of these processes. This chapter focuses on UPS activation studies in cellular and organismal models and the effects of such activation on aging, longevity and disease prevention or reversal. PMID:27613027

  17. Animal model of human disease: lymphocytic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Rubio, C A; Jarlnäs, M; Johnson, L

    1993-01-01

    Gastric specimens from 102 belonging to 11 different species were reviewed. Of the 11 species, only the gastric mucosa of pigs contained a large number of lymphocytes in the surface and in the foveolar epithelium (mean 82 lymphocytes/1000 epithelial cells, range 62-128 lymphocytes. The gastric specimens of the remaining 10 species revealed none or occasional lymphocytes in the surface or the foveolar epithelium. The occurrence of intraepithelial lymphocytes in the gastric mucosa of pigs mimics the human disease known as "lymphocytic gastritis". Since the etiology of this disease remains unknown, the apparently endemic nature of lymphocytic gastritis in pigs offer an alternative to investigate the possible cause(s), as well as the mechanism of, this disease.

  18. Thermo-kinetic model for Prion diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galdino, M. L.; de Albuquerque, S. S.; Ferreira, A. S.; Cressoni, J. C.; dos Santos, R. J. V.

    2001-06-01

    A mean field theory of the auto catalytic Prions conversion reaction is developed under a conservation law for Prions density. These reactions take place in the brain where a normally folded Prion protein ( Pr P c) is converted into a misfolded, more stable, form ( Pr P Sc). The results reproduce most of the known facts observed in Prion diseases such as: very long incubation time, rapid death after the first symptoms manifestation, dependence of the incubation and death times on the concentration of the initial contamination dose and the existence of a minimum contamination dose for the detection of the disease. Results of computing simulations are also presented.

  19. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Luis E; Craft, Meggan E

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks. PMID:27547199

  20. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Luis E.; Craft, Meggan E.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks. PMID:27547199

  1. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Luis E; Craft, Meggan E

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks.

  2. Cholangiocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells for disease modeling and drug validation

    PubMed Central

    Sampaziotis, Fotios; Bertero, Alessandro; Saeb-Parsy, Kourosh; Soares, Filipa A. C.; Schrumpf, Elisabeth; Melum, Espen; Karlsen, Tom H.; Bradley, J. Andrew; Gelson, William TH; Davies, Susan; Baker, Alastair; Kaser, Arthur; Alexander, Graeme J.

    2016-01-01

    The study of biliary disease has been constrained by a lack of primary human cholangiocytes. Here we present an efficient, serum-free protocol for directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into cholangiocyte-like cells (CLCs). CLCs show functional characteristics of cholangiocytes, including bile acids transfer, alkaline phosphatase activity, gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase activity and physiological responses to secretin, somatostatin and VEGF. We use CLCs to model in vitro key features of Alagille syndrome, polycystic liver disease and cystic fibrosis (CF)-associated cholangiopathy. Furthermore, we use CLCs generated from healthy individuals and patients with polycystic liver disease to reproduce the effects of the drugs verapamil and octreotide, and we show that the experimental CF drug VX809 rescues the disease phenotype of CF cholangiopathy in vitro. Our differentiation protocol will facilitate the study of biological mechanisms controlling biliary development as well as disease modeling and drug screening. PMID:26167629

  3. A Few Bad Apples: A Model of Disease Influenced Agent Behaviour in a Heterogeneous Contact Environment

    PubMed Central

    Enright, Jessica; Kao, Rowland R.

    2015-01-01

    For diseases that infect humans or livestock, transmission dynamics are at least partially dependent on human activity and therefore human behaviour. However, the impact of human behaviour on disease transmission is relatively understudied, especially in the context of heterogeneous contact structures such as described by a social network. Here, we use a strategic game, coupled with a simple disease model, to investigate how strategic agent choices impact the spread of disease over a contact network. Using beliefs that are based on disease status and that build up over time, agents choose actions that stochastically determine disease spread on the network. An agent’s disease status is therefore a function of both his own and his neighbours actions. The effect of disease on agents is modelled by a heterogeneous payoff structure. We find that the combination of network shape and distribution of payoffs has a non-trivial impact on disease prevalence, even if the mean payoff remains the same. An important scenario occurs when a small percentage (called noncooperators) have little incentive to avoid disease. For diseases that are easily acquired when taking a risk, then even when good behavior can lead to disease eradication, a small increase in the percentage of noncooperators (less than 5%) can yield a large (up to 25%) increase in prevalence. PMID:25734661

  4. Mouse models of dominant ACTA1 disease recapitulate human disease and provide insight into therapies.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Jackaman, Connie; Bringans, Scott; Papadimitriou, John M; Griffiths, Lisa M; McNamara, Elyshia; Bakker, Anthony J; Davies, Kay E; Laing, Nigel G; Nowak, Kristen J

    2011-04-01

    Mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1) cause a range of pathologically defined congenital myopathies. Most patients have dominant mutations and experience severe skeletal muscle weakness, dying within one year of birth. To determine mutant ACTA1 pathobiology, transgenic mice expressing ACTA1(D286G) were created. These Tg(ACTA1)(D286G) mice were less active than wild-type individuals. Their skeletal muscles were significantly weaker by in vitro analyses and showed various pathological lesions reminiscent of human patients, however they had a normal lifespan. Mass spectrometry revealed skeletal muscles from Tg(ACTA1)(D286G) mice contained ∼25% ACTA1(D286G) protein. Tg(ACTA1)(D286G) mice were crossed with hemizygous Acta1(+/-) knock-out mice to generate Tg(ACTA1)(D286G)(+/+).Acta1(+/-) offspring that were homozygous for the transgene and hemizygous for the endogenous skeletal muscle α-actin gene. Akin to most human patients, skeletal muscles from these offspring contained approximately equal proportions of ACTA1(D286G) and wild-type actin. Strikingly, the majority of these mice presented with severe immobility between postnatal Days 8 and 17, requiring euthanasia. Their skeletal muscles contained extensive structural abnormalities as identified in severely affected human patients, including nemaline bodies, actin accumulations and widespread sarcomeric disarray. Therefore we have created valuable mouse models, one of mild dominant ACTA1 disease [Tg(ACTA1)(D286G)], and the other of severe disease, with a dramatically shortened lifespan [Tg(ACTA1)(D286G)(+/+).Acta1(+/-)]. The correlation between mutant ACTA1 protein load and disease severity parallels effects in ACTA1 families and suggests altering this ratio in patient muscle may be a therapy for patients with dominant ACTA1 disease. Furthermore, ringbinden fibres were observed in these mouse models. The presence of such features suggests that perhaps patients with ringbinden of unknown genetic

  5. [Physical activity in basic and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata; Kałka, Dariusz; Pilecki, Witold; Adamus, Jerzy

    2009-06-01

    On account of the frequency of appearing and character of atherosclerosis cardiac vascular disease, one of the most crucial elements of effective fight against it is preparation of complex preventive programs including as vast number of population as possible. Consequently, Benjamin and Smitch suggested attaching the notion of basic prevention to the standard division into primary and secondary one. The basic prevention, carrying out in the general population, should concern genetic predisposition, psychosocial factors, keeping up proper body weight, healthy eating and physical activity. Especially high hopes are connected with high efficiency, simplicity and low money-consumption of preventive activities associated with physical activity modification, which has a crucial influence on reducing negative impact of atherosclerosis hazard. The results of numerous scientific research, carried out in many countries and on various, large groups, proved undoubtedly that at the healthy adult people of both sex the systematic physical activity of moderate intensification plays an essential part in preventing CVD and decreasing the death risk because of that reason as well. Moreover, systematic physical exercises show many other health-oriented actions, thanks to which they have an influence on decreasing premature and total death rate. The risk of incidence of civilization-related diseases such as diabetes type II, hypertension, obesity, osteoporosis, tumors (of large intestine, breast, prostatic gland) and depression has decreased significantly. Unequivocally positive influence has been proved at many observations dedicated to health recreational physical activity and physical activity connected with professional work based on aerobe effort. The positive effects have been also observed at children population and senior population which is more and more numerous and the most at risk. The beneficial action of physical activity is connected with direct effect on organism

  6. Metabolic activity of sodium, measured by neutron activation, in the hands of patients suffering from bone diseases: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Spinks, T.J.; Bewley, D.K.; Paolillo, M.; Vlotides, J.; Joplin, G.F.; Ranicar, A.S.O.

    1980-01-01

    Turnover of sodium in the human hand was studied by neutron activation. Patients suffering from various metabolic abnormalities affecting the skeleton, who were undergoing routine neutron activation for the measurement of calcium, were investigated along with a group of healthy volunteers. Neutron activation labels the sodium atoms simultaneously and with equal probability regardless of the turnover time of individual body compartments. The loss of sodium can be described either by a sum of two exponentials or by a single power function. Distinctions between patients and normal subjects were not apparent from the exponential model but were brought out by the power function. The exponent of time in the latter is a measure of clearance rate. The mean values of this parameter in (a) a group of patients suffering from acromegaly; (b) a group including Paget's disease, osteoporosis, Cushing's disease, and hyperparathyroidism; and (c) a group of healthy subjects, were found to be significantly different from each other.

  7. Modeling seasonal behavior changes and disease transmission with application to chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Oraby, Tamer; Vasilyeva, Olga; Krewski, Daniel; Lutscher, Frithjof

    2014-01-01

    Behavior and habitat of wildlife animals change seasonally according to environmental conditions. Mathematical models need to represent this seasonality to be able to make realistic predictions about the future of a population and the effectiveness of human interventions. Managing and modeling disease in wild animal populations requires particular care in that disease transmission dynamics is a critical consideration in the etiology of both human and animal diseases, with different transmission paradigms requiring different disease risk management strategies. Since transmission of infectious diseases among wildlife depends strongly on social behavior, mechanisms of disease transmission could also change seasonally. A specific consideration in this regard confronted by modellers is whether the contact rate between individuals is density-dependent or frequency-dependent. We argue that seasonal behavior changes could lead to a seasonal shift between density and frequency dependence. This hypothesis is explored in the case of chronic wasting disease (CWD), a fatal disease that affects deer, elk and moose in many areas of North America. Specifically, we introduce a strategic CWD risk model based on direct disease transmission that accounts for the seasonal change in the transmission dynamics and habitats occupied, guided by information derived from cervid ecology. The model is composed of summer and winter susceptible-infected (SI) equations, with frequency-dependent and density-dependent transmission dynamics, respectively. The model includes impulsive birth events with density-dependent birth rate. We determine the basic reproduction number as a weighted average of two seasonal reproduction numbers. We parameterize the model from data derived from the scientific literature on CWD and deer ecology, and conduct global and local sensitivity analyses of the basic reproduction number. We explore the effectiveness of different culling strategies for the management of CWD

  8. Modeling seasonal behavior changes and disease transmission with application to chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Oraby, Tamer; Vasilyeva, Olga; Krewski, Daniel; Lutscher, Frithjof

    2014-01-01

    Behavior and habitat of wildlife animals change seasonally according to environmental conditions. Mathematical models need to represent this seasonality to be able to make realistic predictions about the future of a population and the effectiveness of human interventions. Managing and modeling disease in wild animal populations requires particular care in that disease transmission dynamics is a critical consideration in the etiology of both human and animal diseases, with different transmission paradigms requiring different disease risk management strategies. Since transmission of infectious diseases among wildlife depends strongly on social behavior, mechanisms of disease transmission could also change seasonally. A specific consideration in this regard confronted by modellers is whether the contact rate between individuals is density-dependent or frequency-dependent. We argue that seasonal behavior changes could lead to a seasonal shift between density and frequency dependence. This hypothesis is explored in the case of chronic wasting disease (CWD), a fatal disease that affects deer, elk and moose in many areas of North America. Specifically, we introduce a strategic CWD risk model based on direct disease transmission that accounts for the seasonal change in the transmission dynamics and habitats occupied, guided by information derived from cervid ecology. The model is composed of summer and winter susceptible-infected (SI) equations, with frequency-dependent and density-dependent transmission dynamics, respectively. The model includes impulsive birth events with density-dependent birth rate. We determine the basic reproduction number as a weighted average of two seasonal reproduction numbers. We parameterize the model from data derived from the scientific literature on CWD and deer ecology, and conduct global and local sensitivity analyses of the basic reproduction number. We explore the effectiveness of different culling strategies for the management of CWD

  9. Lymphocyte activation gene 3 and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Diana; Kolmakova, Antonina; Sura, Sunitha; Vella, Anthony T.; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Rich, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The lipoprotein scavenger receptor BI (SCARB1) rs10846744 noncoding variant is significantly associated with atherosclerotic disease independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. We identified a potentially novel connection between rs10846744, the immune checkpoint inhibitor lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG3), and atherosclerosis. METHODS: In vitro approaches included flow cytometry, lipid raft isolation, phosphosignaling, cytokine measurements, and overexpressing and silencing LAG3 protein. Fasting plasma LAG3 protein was measured in hyperalphalipoproteinemic (HALP) and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants. RESULTS: In comparison with rs10846744 reference (GG homozygous) cells, LAG3 protein levels by flow cytometry (P < 0.001), in lipid rafts stimulated and unstimulated (P = 0.03), and phosphosignaling downstream of B cell receptor engagement of CD79A (P = 0.04), CD19 (P = 0.04), and LYN (P = 0.001) were lower in rs10846744 risk (CC homozygous) cells. Overexpressing LAG3 protein in risk cells and silencing LAG3 in reference cells confirmed its importance in phosphosignaling. Secretion of TNF-α was higher (P = 0.04) and IL-10 was lower (P = 0.04) in risk cells. Plasma LAG3 levels were lower in HALP carriers of the CC allele (P < 0.0001) and by race (P = 0.004). In MESA, race (P = 0.0005), age (P = 0.003), lipid medications (P = 0.03), smoking history (P < 0.0001), and rs10846744 genotype (P = 0.002) were independent predictors of plasma LAG3. In multivariable regression models, plasma LAG3 was significantly associated with HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) (P = 0.007), plasma IL-10 (P < 0.0001), and provided additional predictive value above the Framingham risk score (P = 0.04). In MESA, when stratified by high HDL-C, plasma LAG3 was associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) (odds ratio 1.45, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Plasma LAG3 is a potentially novel independent predictor of HDL-C levels and CHD risk. FUNDING: This work was

  10. [Somatoform pruritus: a psychosomatic disease model].

    PubMed

    Niemeier, V; Höring, C M

    2013-06-01

    Pruritus is an interdisciplinary symptom that is difficult to diagnose and treat. When there is no evidence of an organic cause, it is challenge for both the patient and the doctor. Itching affecting non-inflamed and otherwise normal skin is often classified as somatoform pruritus. When treated in an interdisciplinary manner with psychosomatic specialists, the patient increasingly becomes aware of still-unrecognized inner-emotional conflicts. At the same time, however, it must be taken into account that the pruritus may precede an underlying disease by a long time and that the diagnosis must be checked regularly. Basic psychosomatic competence and experience in the administration of psychopharmaceuticals is recommended for dermatologists. Taking a psychosomatic concept of disease into account may improve patient satisfaction and compliance, and help to avoid doctor-hopping. PMID:23677539

  11. An immuno-epidemiological model for Johne's disease in cattle.

    PubMed

    Martcheva, Maia; Lenhart, Suzanne; Eda, Shigetoshi; Klinkenberg, Don; Momotani, Eiichi; Stabel, Judy

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms involved in the dynamics of Johne's disease in dairy cattle, this paper illustrates a novel way to link a within-host model for Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis with an epidemiological model. The underlying variable in the within-host model is the time since infection. Two compartments, infected macrophages and T cells, of the within-host model feed into the epidemiological model through the direct transmission rate, disease-induced mortality rate, the vertical transmission rate, and the shedding of MAP into the environment. The epidemiological reproduction number depends on the within-host bacteria load in a complex way, exhibiting multiple peaks. A possible mechanism to account for the switch in shedding patterns of the bacteria in this disease is included in the within-host model, and its effect can be seen in the epidemiological reproduction model. PMID:26091672

  12. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  13. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-08-14

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  14. The influence of age at disease onset on disease activity and disability: results from the Ontario Best Practices Research Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ruban, T N; Jacob, B; Pope, J E; Keystone, E C; Bombardier, C; Kuriya, B

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to compare characteristics between late-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and young-onset RA and determine the association between age at disease onset and disease severity. We cross-sectionally studied 971 patients at the time of entry into the Ontario Best Practices Research Initiative, a registry of RA patients followed up in routine care. We restricted patients to ≤5 years of disease duration. Late-onset RA was defined as an onset ≥60 years of age and young-onset RA <60 years. Group differences were compared, and multivariate linear regression models were used to test the influence of age at onset on Disease Activity Score in 28 Joints with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR), Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI), and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores. The swollen joint count (6.2 vs. 5.3), acute phase reactants (C-reactive protein (CRP) 17.4 vs. 11.8 mg/L, ESR 30.6 vs. 21.5 mm/h), and comorbidity burden were higher in late-onset RA compared to young-onset RA (p < 0.01). Mean DAS28-ESR (4.6 vs. 4.3) and HAQ (1.2 vs. 1.1) scores were higher in late-onset RA patients (p < 0.05). Late-onset RA patients received more initial disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) monotherapy and corticosteroids in comparison to greater DMARD/biologic combination therapy in young-onset RA patients (p < 0.05). Adjusted multivariate analyses showed that late-onset RA was independently associated with higher mean DAS28-ESR and HAQ scores, but not CDAI. Late-onset RA patients have greater disease activity that may contribute to disability early in the disease course. Despite this, initial treatment consists of less combination DMARD and biologic use in late-onset RA patients. This may have implications for future response to therapy and development of joint damage, disability, and comorbidities in this group.

  15. Engineering Large Animal Species to Model Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S

    2016-07-01

    Animal models are an important resource for studying human diseases. Genetically engineered mice are the most commonly used species and have made significant contributions to our understanding of basic biology, disease mechanisms, and drug development. However, they often fail to recreate important aspects of human diseases and thus can have limited utility as translational research tools. Developing disease models in species more similar to humans may provide a better setting in which to study disease pathogenesis and test new treatments. This unit provides an overview of the history of genetically engineered large animals and the techniques that have made their development possible. Factors to consider when planning a large animal model, including choice of species, type of modification and methodology, characterization, production methods, and regulatory compliance, are also covered. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Engineering Large Animal Species to Model Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Animal models are an important resource for studying human diseases. Genetically engineered mice are the most commonly used species and have made significant contributions to our understanding of basic biology, disease mechanisms, and drug development. However, they often fail to recreate important aspects of human diseases and thus can have limited utility as translational research tools. Developing disease models in species more similar to humans may provide a better setting in which to study disease pathogenesis and test new treatments. This unit provides an overview of the history of genetically engineered large animals and the techniques that have made their development possible. Factors to consider when planning a large animal model, including choice of species, type of modification and methodology, characterization, production methods, and regulatory compliance, are also covered. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367161

  17. Discursive Positionings and Emotions in Modelling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daher, Wajeeh

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling is suggested as an activity through which students engage in meaningful mathematics. In the current research, the modelling activity of a group of four seventh-grade students was analysed using the discursive analysis framework. The research findings show that the positionings and emotions of the group members during their…

  18. Genetic risk and longitudinal disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus using targeted maximum likelihood estimation.

    PubMed

    Gianfrancesco, M A; Balzer, L; Taylor, K E; Trupin, L; Nititham, J; Seldin, M F; Singer, A W; Criswell, L A; Barcellos, L F

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease associated with genetic and environmental risk factors. However, the extent to which genetic risk is causally associated with disease activity is unknown. We utilized longitudinal-targeted maximum likelihood estimation to estimate the causal association between a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising 41 established SLE variants and clinically important disease activity as measured by the validated Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ) in a multiethnic cohort of 942 individuals with SLE. We did not find evidence of a clinically important SLAQ score difference (>4.0) for individuals with a high GRS compared with those with a low GRS across nine time points after controlling for sex, ancestry, renal status, dialysis, disease duration, treatment, depression, smoking and education, as well as time-dependent confounding of missing visits. Individual single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses revealed that 12 of the 41 variants were significantly associated with clinically relevant changes in SLAQ scores across time points eight and nine after controlling for multiple testing. Results based on sophisticated causal modeling of longitudinal data in a large patient cohort suggest that individual SLE risk variants may influence disease activity over time. Our findings also emphasize a role for other biological or environmental factors. PMID:27467283

  19. Schwann cells expressing dismutase active mutant SOD1 unexpectedly slow disease progression in ALS mice

    PubMed Central

    Lobsiger, Christian S.; Boillee, Severine; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Khan, Amir M.; Feltri, M. Laura; Yamanaka, Koji; Cleveland, Don W.

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegeneration in an inherited form of ALS is non-cell-autonomous, with ALS-causing mutant SOD1 damage developed within multiple cell types. Selective inactivation within motor neurons of an ubiquitously expressed mutant SOD1 gene has demonstrated that mutant damage within motor neurons is a determinant of disease initiation, whereas mutant synthesis within neighboring astrocytes or microglia accelerates disease progression. We now report the surprising finding that diminished synthesis (by 70%) within Schwann cells of a fully dismutase active ALS-linked mutant (SOD1G37R) significantly accelerates disease progression, accompanied by reduction of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in nerves. Coupled with shorter disease duration in mouse models caused by dismutase inactive versus dismutase active SOD1 mutants, our findings implicate an oxidative cascade during disease progression that is triggered within axon ensheathing Schwann cells and that can be ameliorated by elevated dismutase activity. Thus, therapeutic down-regulation of dismutase active mutant SOD1 in familial forms of ALS should be targeted away from Schwann cells. PMID:19251638

  20. Deterministic Modelling of BAK Activation Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grills, C.; Chacko, A.; Crawford, N.; Johnston, P. G.; Fennell, D. A.; O'Rourke, S. F. C.

    2009-08-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying mitochondrial BAK activation during apoptosis remains highly controversial. Two seemingly conflicting models have been proposed. In the activation model, BAK requires so-called activating BH3 only proteins (aBH3) to initiate its conformation change. In the other, displacement from inhibitory pro-survival BCL-2 proteins (PBPs) and monomerization of BAK by PBP restricted dissociator BH3-only proteins (dBH3) is sufficient. To better understand the kinetic implications of these models and reconcile these conflicting but highly evidence-based models, we have employed dynamical systems analysis to explore the kinetics underlying BAK activation as a non-linear reaction system. Our findings accommodate both pure agonism and dissociation as mutually exclusive mechanisms capable of initiating BAK activation. In addition we find our work supports a modelling based approach for predicting resistance to therapeutically relevant small molecules BH3 mimetics.

  1. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 in Liver Diseases: A Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Lafdil, Fouad; Kong, Xiaoni; Gao, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a transcription factor that is activated by many cytokines and growth factors and plays a key role in cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. STAT3 activation is detected virtually in all rodent models of liver injury and in human liver diseases. In this review, we highlight recent advances of STAT3 signaling in liver injury, steatosis, inflammation, regeneration, fibrosis, and hepatocarcinogenesis. The cytokines and small molecules that activate STAT3 in hepatocytes may have therapeutic benefits to treat acute liver injury, fatty liver disease, and alcoholic hepatitis, while blockage of STAT3 may have a therapeutic potential to prevent and treat liver cancer. PMID:21552420

  2. Gene Therapy Models of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias.

    PubMed

    Combs, Benjamin; Kneynsberg, Andrew; Kanaan, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Dementias are among the most common neurological disorders, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. AD remains a looming health crisis despite great efforts to learn the mechanisms surrounding the neuron dysfunction and neurodegeneration that accompanies AD primarily in the medial temporal lobe. In addition to AD, a group of diseases known as frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) are degenerative diseases involving atrophy and degeneration in the frontal and temporal lobe regions. Importantly, AD and a number of FTDs are collectively known as tauopathies due to the abundant accumulation of pathological tau inclusions in the brain. The precise role tau plays in disease pathogenesis remains an area of strong research focus. A critical component to effectively study any human disease is the availability of models that recapitulate key features of the disease. Accordingly, a number of animal models are currently being pursued to fill the current gaps in our knowledge of the causes of dementias and to develop effective therapeutics. Recent developments in gene therapy-based approaches, particularly in recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs), have provided new tools to study AD and other related neurodegenerative disorders. Additionally, gene therapy approaches have emerged as an intriguing possibility for treating these diseases in humans. This chapter explores the current state of rAAV models of AD and other dementias, discuss recent efforts to improve these models, and describe current and future possibilities in the use of rAAVs and other viruses in treatments of disease.

  3. Subcortical evoked activity and motor enhancement in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Anzak, Anam; Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Khan, Sadaquate; Javed, Shazia; Gill, Steven S; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Akram, Harith; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Brown, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Enhancements in motor performance have been demonstrated in response to intense stimuli both in healthy subjects and in the form of 'paradoxical kinesis' in patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we identify a mid-latency evoked potential in local field potential recordings from the region of the subthalamic nucleus, which scales in amplitude with both the intensity of the stimulus delivered and corresponding enhancements in biomechanical measures of maximal handgrips, independent of the dopaminergic state of our subjects with Parkinson's disease. Recordings of a similar evoked potential in the related pedunculopontine nucleus - a key component of the reticular activating system - provide support for this neural signature in the subthalmic nucleus being a novel correlate of ascending arousal, propagated from the reticular activating system to exert an 'energizing' influence on motor circuitry. Future manipulation of this system linking arousal and motor performance may provide a novel approach for the non-dopaminergic enhancement of motor performance in patients with hypokinetic disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

  4. Mechanisms of physical activity limitation in chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Zakynthinos, George; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios

    2012-01-01

    In chronic lung diseases physical activity limitation is multifactorial involving respiratory, hemodynamic, and peripheral muscle abnormalities. The mechanisms of limitation discussed in this paper relate to (i) the imbalance between ventilatory capacity and demand, (ii) the imbalance between energy demand and supply to working respiratory and peripheral muscles, and (iii) the factors that induce peripheral muscle dysfunction. In practice, intolerable exertional symptoms (i.e., dyspnea) and/or leg discomfort are the main symptoms that limit physical performance in patients with chronic lung diseases. Furthermore, the reduced capacity for physical work and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle, in an attempt to avoid breathlessness upon physical exertion, cause profound muscle deconditioning which in turn leads to disability and loss of functional independence. Accordingly, physical inactivity is an important component of worsening the patients' quality of life and contributes importantly to poor prognosis. Identifying the factors which prevent a patient with lung disease to easily carry out activities of daily living provides a unique as well as important perspective for the choice of the appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  5. Subcortical evoked activity and motor enhancement in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Anzak, Anam; Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Khan, Sadaquate; Javed, Shazia; Gill, Steven S.; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Akram, Harith; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Green, Alexander L.; Aziz, Tipu; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Enhancements in motor performance have been demonstrated in response to intense stimuli both in healthy subjects and in the form of ‘paradoxical kinesis’ in patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we identify a mid-latency evoked potential in local field potential recordings from the region of the subthalamic nucleus, which scales in amplitude with both the intensity of the stimulus delivered and corresponding enhancements in biomechanical measures of maximal handgrips, independent of the dopaminergic state of our subjects with Parkinson's disease. Recordings of a similar evoked potential in the related pedunculopontine nucleus – a key component of the reticular activating system – provide support for this neural signature in the subthalmic nucleus being a novel correlate of ascending arousal, propagated from the reticular activating system to exert an ‘energizing’ influence on motor circuitry. Future manipulation of this system linking arousal and motor performance may provide a novel approach for the non-dopaminergic enhancement of motor performance in patients with hypokinetic disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:26687971

  6. Evaluating a Model of Youth Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzler, Carrie D.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Erickson, Darin J.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Sirard, John R.; Story, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between social influences, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and barriers and physical activity. Methods: Structural equation modeling examined relationships between parent and peer support, parent physical activity, individual perceptions, and objectively measured physical activity using accelerometers among a…

  7. An Immuno-epidemiological model for Johne's disease in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the mechanisms involved in the dynamics of Johne’s Disease in dairy cattle, this paper illustrates a novel way to link a within-host model for Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis with an epidemiological model. The underlying variable in the within-host model is the time s...

  8. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels: Potential Target for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, De-Li; Bai, Yun-Long; Cai, Ben-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCa) are classified into three subtypes: big conductance (BKCa), intermediate conductance (IKCa), and small conductance (SKCa) KCa channels. The three types of KCa channels have distinct physiological or pathological functions in cardiovascular system. BKCa channels are mainly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and inner mitochondrial membrane of cardiomyocytes, activation of BKCa channels in these locations results in vasodilation and cardioprotection against cardiac ischemia. IKCa channels are expressed in VSMCs, endothelial cells, and cardiac fibroblasts and involved in vascular smooth muscle proliferation, migration, vessel dilation, and cardiac fibrosis. SKCa channels are widely expressed in nervous and cardiovascular system, and activation of SKCa channels mainly contributes membrane hyperpolarization. In this chapter, we summarize the physiological and pathological roles of the three types of KCa channels in cardiovascular system and put forward the possibility of KCa channels as potential target for cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Latest In vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Stoven, Samantha; Murray, Joseph A.; Marietta, Eric V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease is a gluten free diet, and there is an increased desire for alternative therapies. In vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease have been generated in order to better understand the pathogenesis of celiac disease, and this review will discuss these models as well as the testing of alternative therapies using these models. Areas Covered The research discussed describes the different in vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease that currently exist and how they have contributed to our understanding of how gluten can stimulate both innate and adaptive immune responses in celiac patients. We also provide a summary on the alternative therapies that have been tested with these models and discuss whether subsequent clinical trials were done based on these tests done with these models of celiac disease. Expert Opinion Only a few of the alternative therapies that have been tested with animal models have gone on to clinical trials; however, those that did go on to clinical trial have provided promising results from a safety standpoint. Further trials are required to determine if some of these therapies may serve as an effective adjunct to a gluten free diet to alleviate the adverse affects associated with accidental gluten exposure. A “magic-bullet” approach may not be the answer to celiac disease, but possibly a future cocktail of these different therapeutics may allow celiac patients to consume an unrestricted diet. PMID:23293929

  10. Impact of Network Activity on the Spread of Infectious Diseases through the German Pig Trade Network

    PubMed Central

    Lebl, Karin; Lentz, Hartmut H. K.; Pinior, Beate; Selhorst, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The trade of livestock is an important and growing economic sector, but it is also a major factor in the spread of diseases. The spreading of diseases in a trade network is likely to be influenced by how often existing trade connections are active. The activity α is defined as the mean frequency of occurrences of existing trade links, thus 0 < α ≤ 1. The observed German pig trade network had an activity of α = 0.11, thus each existing trade connection between two farms was, on average, active at about 10% of the time during the observation period 2008–2009. The aim of this study is to analyze how changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network influence the probability of disease outbreaks, size, and duration of epidemics for different disease transmission probabilities. Thus, we want to investigate the question, whether it makes a difference for a hypothetical spread of an animal disease to transport many animals at the same time or few animals at many times. A SIR model was used to simulate the spread of a disease within the German pig trade network. Our results show that for transmission probabilities <1, the outbreak probability increases in the case of a decreased frequency of animal transports, peaking range of α from 0.05 to 0.1. However, for the final outbreak size, we find that a threshold exists such that finite outbreaks occur only above a critical value of α, which is ~0.1, and therefore in proximity of the observed activity level. Thus, although the outbreak probability increased when decreasing α, these outbreaks affect only a small number of farms. The duration of the epidemic peaks at an activity level in the range of α = 0.2–0.3. Additionally, the results of our simulations show that even small changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network would have dramatic effects on outbreak probability, outbreak size, and epidemic duration. Thus, we can conclude and recommend that the network activity

  11. Animal models of human granulocyte diseases.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, Alejandro A; Klein, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    In vivo animal models have proven very useful to the understanding of basic biologic pathways of the immune system, a prerequisite for the development of innovate therapies. This article addresses currently available models for defined human monogenetic defects of neutrophil granulocytes, including murine, zebrafish, and larger mammalian species. Strengths and weaknesses of each system are summarized, and clinical investigators may thus be inspired to develop further lines of research to improve diagnosis and therapy by use of the appropriate animal model system. PMID:23351993

  12. Lyme disease: a unique human model for an infectious etiology of rheumatic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Malawista, S. E.; Steere, A. C.; Hardin, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Lyme disease is a complex immune-mediated multi-system disorder that is infectious in origin and inflammatory or "rheumatic" in expression. Through its epidemiologic characteristics, large numbers of a seasonally synchronized patient population are readily available for prospective study. Lyme disease has a known clinical onset ("zero time"), marked by the characteristic expanding skin lesion, erythema chronicum migrans, and a clearly defined pre-articular phase. At least some manifestations of the disorder are responsive to antibiotics, and the causative agent--a spirochete--is now known. These advantages make Lyme disease unique as a human model for an infectious etiology of rheumatic disease. PMID:6516449

  13. IMMUNE ACTIVATION AND PAEDIATRIC HIV-1 DISEASE OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Roider, J; Muenchhoff, M; Goulder, PJR

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The paediatric HIV epidemic is changing. Over the past decade, new infections have substantially reduced whilst access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased. Overall this success means that numbers of children living with HIV are climbing. In addition, the problems in adults of chronic inflammation resulting from persistent immune activation even following ART-mediated suppression of viral replication are magnified in children infected from birth. Recent findings Features of immune ontogeny favor low immune activation in early life, whilst specific aspects of paediatric HIV infection tend to increase it. A subset of ART-naïve non-progressing children exists in whom normal CD4 counts are maintained in the setting of persistent high viremia and yet in the context of low immune activation. This sooty mangabey-like phenotype contrasts with non-progressing adult infection characterized by the expression of protective HLA class I molecules and low viral load. The particular factors contributing to raised or lowered immune activation in paediatric infection, and that ultimately influence disease outcome, are discussed. Summary Novel strategies to circumvent the unwanted long-term consequences of HIV infection may be possible in children in whom natural immune ontogeny in early life militates against immune activation. Defining the mechanisms underlying low immune activation in natural HIV infection would have applications beyond paediatric HIV. PMID:26679413

  14. Early microglia activation in a mouse model of chronic glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Alejandra; Steele, Michael R.; Vetter, Monica L.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in microglial cell activation and distribution are associated with neuronal decline in the CNS, particularly under pathological conditions. Activated microglia converge on the initial site of axonal degeneration in human glaucoma, yet, their part in its pathophysiology remains unresolved. To begin with, it is unknown whether microglia activation precedes or is a late consequence of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) neurodegeneration. Here, we address this critical element in DBA/2J (D2) mice, an established model of chronic inherited glaucoma, using as a control the congenic substrain DBA/2J Gpnmb+/SjJ (D2G), which is not affected by glaucoma. We analyzed the spatial distribution and timecourse of microglial changes in the retina, as well as within the proximal optic nerve prior to and throughout ages when neurodegeneration has been reported. Exclusively in D2 mice, we detected early microglia clustering in the inner central retina and unmyelinated optic nerve regions, with microglia activation peaking by 3 months of age. Between 5 and 8 months of age, activated microglia persisted and concentrated in the optic disc, but also localized to the retinal periphery. Collectively, our findings suggest microglia activation is an early alteration in the retina and optic nerve in D2 glaucoma, potentially contributing to disease onset or progression. Ultimately, detection of microglial activation may have value in early disease diagnosis, while modulation of microglial responses may alter disease progression. PMID:21246546

  15. Modeling infectious diseases dissemination through online role-playing games.

    PubMed

    Balicer, Ran D

    2007-03-01

    As mathematical modeling of infectious diseases becomes increasingly important for developing public health policies, a novel platform for such studies might be considered. Millions of people worldwide play interactive online role-playing games, forming complex and rich networks among their virtual characters. An unexpected outbreak of an infective communicable disease (unplanned by the game creators) recently occurred in this virtual world. This outbreak holds surprising similarities to real-world epidemics. It is possible that these virtual environments could serve as a platform for studying the dissemination of infectious diseases, and as a testing ground for novel interventions to control emerging communicable diseases.

  16. Cholestasis: human disease and experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Garay, Emilio Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Cholestasis may result from a failure in bile secretion in hepatocytes or ductular cells, or from a blockade to the free bile flow. Human cholestasis may be induced by many drugs, being antibiotics the more common. Other types of cholestasis seen in humans are a group of familial cholestatic disorders, obstructive cholestasis, primary biliary cirrhosis, extrahepatic biliary atresia, primary sclerosing cholangitis, cholestasis of pregnancy, oral contraceptive-induced cholestasis, and sepsis-induced cholestasis. Experimental animal models allow the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms involved and their clinical correlates. The most common experimental models of intrahepatic cholestasis are estrogen-induced, endotoxin-induced and drug-induced cholestasis. A well known model of extrahepatic biliary obstruction is common bile duct ligation. Drug-induced cholestasis were described using different drugs. On this regard, alpha naphthylisothiocyanate treatment has been extensively used, permitting to describe not only cholestatic alterations but also compensatory mechanisms. Congenital defficiency of transport proteins also were studied in natural rat models of cholestasis. The experimental animal models allow to define down-regulated alterations of hepatocyte transport proteins, and up-regulated ones acting as compensatory mechanisms. In conclusion, animal model and transport protein studies are necessary for the progressive understanding of congenital and acquired human cholestasis, and regulatory mechanisms that operate on liver cells.

  17. The experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS: utility for understanding disease pathophysiology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    ROBINSON, ANDREW P.; HARP, CHRISTOPHER T.; NORONHA, AVERTANO; MILLER, STEPHEN D.

    2014-01-01

    While no single model can exactly recapitulate all aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS), animal models are essential in understanding the induction and pathogenesis of the disease and to develop therapeutic strategies that limit disease progression and eventually lead to effective treatments for the human disease. Several different models of MS exist, but by far the best understood and most commonly used is the rodent model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This model is typically induced by either active immunization with myelin-derived proteins or peptides in adjuvant or by passive transfer of activated myelin-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes. Mouse models are most frequently used because of the inbred genotype of laboratory mice, their rapid breeding capacity, the ease of genetic manipulation, and availability of transgenic and knockout mice to facilitate mechanistic studies. Although not all therapeutic strategies for MS have been developed in EAE, all of the current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved immunomodulatory drugs are effective to some degree in treating EAE, a strong indicator that EAE is an extremely useful model to study potential treatments for MS. Several therapies, such as glatiramer acetate (GA: Copaxone), and natalizumab (Tysabri), were tested first in the mouse model of EAE and then went on to clinical trials. Here we discuss the usefulness of the EAE model in understanding basic disease pathophysiology and developing treatments for MS as well as the potential drawbacks of this model. PMID:24507518

  18. Sulforaphane Protects against Cardiovascular Disease via Nrf2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yang; Wang, Xiaolu; Zhao, Song; Ma, Chunye; Cui, Jiuwei; Zheng, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) causes an unparalleled proportion of the global burden of disease and will remain the main cause of mortality for the near future. Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiac disorders. Several studies have highlighted the cardinal role played by the overproduction of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species in the pathogenesis of ischemic myocardial damage and consequent cardiac dysfunction. Isothiocyanates (ITC) are sulfur-containing compounds that are broadly distributed among cruciferous vegetables. Sulforaphane (SFN) is an ITC shown to possess anticancer activities by both in vivo and epidemiological studies. Recent data have indicated that the beneficial effects of SFN in CVD are due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. SFN activates NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that serves as a defense mechanism against oxidative stress and electrophilic toxicants by inducing more than a hundred cytoprotective proteins, including antioxidants and phase II detoxifying enzymes. This review will summarize the evidence from clinical studies and animal experiments relating to the potential mechanisms by which SFN modulates Nrf2 activation and protects against CVD. PMID:26583056

  19. iPSC technology-Powerful hand for disease modeling and therapeutic screen

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changsung

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases are major health threats in many developed countries. Recently, target tissues derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), such as cardiomyocytes (CMs) or neurons, have been actively mobilized for drug screening. Knowledge of drug toxicity and efficacy obtained using stem cell-derived tissues could parallel that obtained from human trials. Furthermore, iPSC disease models could be advantageous in the development of personalized medicine in various parts of disease sectors. To obtain the maximum benefit from iPSCs in disease modeling, researchers are now focusing on aging, maturation, and metabolism to recapitulate the pathological features seen in patients. Compared to pediatric disease modeling, adult-onset disease modeling with iPSCs requires proper maturation for full manifestation of pathological features. Herein, the success of iPSC technology, focusing on patient-specific drug treatment, maturation-based disease modeling, and alternative approaches to compensate for the current limitations of patient iPSC modeling, will be further discussed. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(5): 256-265] PMID:25104399

  20. Mammalian target of rapamycin activation underlies HSC defects in autoimmune disease and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Liu, Yu; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Pan

    2010-11-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a signaling molecule that senses environmental cues, such as nutrient status and oxygen supply, to regulate cell growth, proliferation, and other functions. Unchecked, sustained mTOR activity results in defects in HSC function. Inflammatory conditions, such as autoimmune disease, are often associated with defective hematopoiesis. Here, we investigated whether hyperactivation of mTOR in HSCs contributes to hematopoietic defects in autoimmunity and inflammation. We found that in mice deficient in Foxp3 (scurfy mice), a model of autoimmunity, the development of autoimmune disease correlated with progressive bone marrow loss and impaired regenerative capacity of HSCs in competitive bone marrow transplantation. Similarly, LPS-mediated inflammation in C57BL/6 mice led to massive bone marrow cell death and impaired HSC function. Importantly, treatment with rapamycin in both models corrected bone marrow hypocellularity and partially restored hematopoietic activity. In cultured mouse bone marrow cells, treatment with either of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 or TNF-α was sufficient to activate mTOR, while preventing mTOR activation in vivo required simultaneous inhibition of CCL2, IL-6, and TNF-α. These data strongly suggest that mTOR activation in HSCs by inflammatory cytokines underlies defective hematopoiesis in autoimmune disease and inflammation.

  1. Parkinson's disease and CYP1A2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, J T; Grünewald, R A; Rostami-Hodjegan, A; Lennard, M S; Sagar, H J; Tucker, G T

    2000-01-01

    Aims MPTP, a neurotoxin which induces parkinsonism is partially metabolized by the enzyme CYP1A2. Smoking appears to protect against Parkinson's disease (PD) and cigarette smoke induces CYP1A2 activity. Thus, we investigated the hypothesis that idiopathic PD is associated with lower CYP1A2 activity using caffeine as a probe compound. Methods CYP1A2 activity was assessed using saliva paraxanthine (PX) to caffeine (CA) ratios. Caffeine half-life was also estimated from salivary concentrations of caffeine at 2 and 5 h post dose. 117 treated and 40 untreated patients with PD and 105 healthy control subjects were studied. Results PX/CA ratios were 0.57, 0.93 and 0.77 in treated patients, untreated patients and healthy control subjects, respectively, with no significant differences between study groups (95% CI: treated patients vs controls −0.24, 0.57; untreated patients vs controls −0.75, 0.35). However, patients with PD (treated or untreated) had caffeine half-lives shorter than that in controls (treated patients: 262 min, untreated patients: 244 min, controls: 345 min; 95% CI: controls vs treated patients 23, 143 (P = 0.003); controls vs untreated patients 19, 184 (P = 0.011)). Amongst the patients with PD, caffeine half-life was also inversely related to the age of onset of disease (P = 0.012); gender and concomitant drugs did not influence this significantly. Conclusions Based on PX/CA ratio, there was no evidence of decreased CYP1A2 activity in patients compared with control subjects. The observed decrease in the elimination half-life of caffeine in PD may be caused by increased CYP2E1 activity, an enzyme that also contributes to the metabolism of caffeine. The latter warrants further investigation. PMID:11012552

  2. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Models in Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Southerland, Janet H; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Bednarsh, Helene; Mouton, Charles P

    2016-10-01

    Interprofessional collaboration in health has become essential to providing high-quality care, decreased costs, and improved outcomes. Patient-centered care requires synthesis of all the components of primary and specialty medicine to address patient needs. For individuals living with chronic diseases, this model is even more critical to obtain better health outcomes. Studies have shown shown that oral health and systemic disease are correlated as it relates to disease development and progression. Thus, inclusion of oral health in many of the existing and new collaborative models could result in better management of chronic illnesses and improve overall health outcomes. PMID:27671954

  3. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Models in Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Southerland, Janet H; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Bednarsh, Helene; Mouton, Charles P

    2016-10-01

    Interprofessional collaboration in health has become essential to providing high-quality care, decreased costs, and improved outcomes. Patient-centered care requires synthesis of all the components of primary and specialty medicine to address patient needs. For individuals living with chronic diseases, this model is even more critical to obtain better health outcomes. Studies have shown shown that oral health and systemic disease are correlated as it relates to disease development and progression. Thus, inclusion of oral health in many of the existing and new collaborative models could result in better management of chronic illnesses and improve overall health outcomes.

  4. A Rhesus Macaque Model of Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Winthrop, Kevin; Rivera, Andrea; Engelmann, Flora; Rose, Sasha; Lewis, Anne; Ku, Jennifer; Bermudez, Luiz; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we sought to develop a nonhuman primate model of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected from three female rhesus macaques infected intrabronchially with escalating doses of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Immunity was determined by measuring cytokine levels, lymphocyte proliferation, and antigen-specific responses. Disease progression was monitored clinically and microbiologically with serial thoracic radiographs, computed tomography scans, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures. The animal subjected to the highest inoculum showed evidence of chronic pulmonary MAC disease. Therefore, rhesus macaques could provide a robust model in which to investigate host-pathogen interactions during MAC infection.

  5. Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Model Skeletal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Barruet, Emilie; Hsiao, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders affecting the bones and joints are major health problems among children and adults. Major challenges such as the genetic origins or poor diagnostics of severe skeletal disease hinder our understanding of human skeletal diseases. The recent advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (human iPS cells) provides an unparalleled opportunity to create human-specific models of human skeletal diseases. iPS cells have the ability to self-renew, allowing us to obtain large amounts of starting material, and have the potential to differentiate into any cell types in the body. In addition, they can carry one or more mutations responsible for the disease of interest or be genetically corrected to create isogenic controls. Our work has focused on modeling rare musculoskeletal disorders including fibrodysplasia ossificans progressive (FOP), a congenital disease of increased heterotopic ossification. In this review, we will discuss our experiences and protocols differentiating human iPS cells toward the osteogenic lineage and their application to model skeletal diseases. A number of critical challenges and exciting new approaches are also discussed, which will allow the skeletal biology field to harness the potential of human iPS cells as a critical model system for understanding diseases of abnormal skeletal formation and bone regeneration.

  6. Fluctuations in epidemic modeling - disease extinction and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Ira

    2009-03-01

    The analysis of infectious disease fluctuations has recently seen an increasing rise in the use of new tools and models from stochastic dynamics and statistical physics. Examples arise in modeling fluctuations of multi-strain diseases, in modeling adaptive social behavior and its impact on disease fluctuations, and in the analysis of disease extinction in finite population models. Proper stochastic model reduction [1] allows one to predict unobserved fluctuations from observed data in multi-strain models [2]. Degree alteration and power law behavior is predicted in adaptive network epidemic models [3,4]. And extinction rates derived from large fluctuation theory exhibit scaling with respect to distance to the bifurcation point of disease onset with an unusual exponent [5]. In addition to outbreak prediction, another main goal of epidemic modeling is one of eliminating the disease to extinction through various control mechanisms, such as vaccine implementation or quarantine. In this talk, a description will be presented of the fluctuational behavior of several epidemic models and their extinction rates. A general framework and analysis of the effect of non-Gaussian control actuations which enhance the rate to disease extinction will be described. In particular, in it is shown that even in the presence of a small Poisson distributed vaccination program, there is an exponentially enhanced rate to disease extinction. These ideas may lead to improved methods of controlling disease where random vaccinations are prevalent. [4pt] Recent papers:[0pt] [1] E. Forgoston and I. B. Schwartz, ``Escape Rates in a Stochastic Environment with Multiple Scales,'' arXiv:0809.1345 2008.[0pt] [2] L. B. Shaw, L. Billings, I. B. Schwartz, ``Using dimension reduction to improve outbreak predictability of multi-strain diseases,'' J. Math. Bio. 55, 1 2007.[0pt] [3] L. B. Shaw and I. B. Schwartz, ``Fluctuating epidemics on adaptive networks,'' Physical Review E 77, 066101 2008.[0pt] [4] L. B

  7. Animal models of human respiratory syncytial virus disease

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human pneumovirus pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), causes a wide spectrum of respiratory disease, notably among infants and the elderly. Laboratory animal studies permit detailed experimental modeling of hRSV disease and are therefore indispensable in the search for novel therapies and preventative strategies. Present animal models include several target species for hRSV, including chimpanzees, cattle, sheep, cotton rats, and mice, as well as alternative animal pneumovirus models, such as bovine RSV and pneumonia virus of mice. These diverse animal models reproduce different features of hRSV disease, and their utilization should therefore be based on the scientific hypothesis under investigation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the strengths and limitations of each of these animal models. Our intent is to provide a resource for investigators and an impetus for future research. PMID:21571908

  8. Rodent models for Alzheimer’s disease drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Puzzo, Daniela; Gulisano, Walter; Palmeri, Agostino; Arancio, Ottavio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by memory loss and personality changes, leading to dementia. Histophatological hallmarks are represented by aggregates of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in senile plaques and deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau protein in neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Rare forms of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease are due to gene mutations. This has prompted researchers to develop genetically modified animals that could recapitulate the main features of the disease. The use of these models is complemented by non-genetically modified animals. Area covered This review summarizes the characteristics of the most used transgenic (Tg) and non-Tg models of AD. The authors have focused on models mainly used in their laboratories including: APP Tg2576, APP/PS1, 3xAD, single h-Tau, non-Tg mice treated with acute injections of Aβ or tau, and models of physiological aging. Expert opinion Animal models of disease might be very useful for studying the pathophysiology of the disease and for testing new therapeutics in preclinical studies but they do not reproduce the entire clinical features of human AD. When selecting a model, researchers should consider the various factors that might influence the phenotype. They should also consider the timing of testing/treating animals since the age at which each model develops certain aspects of the AD pathology varies. PMID:25927677

  9. Modelling the propagation of social response during a disease outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Fast, Shannon M.; González, Marta C.; Wilson, James M.; Markuzon, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Epidemic trajectories and associated social responses vary widely between populations, with severe reactions sometimes observed. When confronted with fatal or novel pathogens, people exhibit a variety of behaviours from anxiety to hoarding of medical supplies, overwhelming medical infrastructure and rioting. We developed a coupled network approach to understanding and predicting social response. We couple the disease spread and panic spread processes and model them through local interactions between agents. The social contagion process depends on the prevalence of the disease, its perceived risk and a global media signal. We verify the model by analysing the spread of disease and social response during the 2009 H1N1 outbreak in Mexico City and 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome and 2009 H1N1 outbreaks in Hong Kong, accurately predicting population-level behaviour. This kind of empirically validated model is critical to exploring strategies for public health intervention, increasing our ability to anticipate the response to infectious disease outbreaks. PMID:25589575

  10. Behavioral and locomotor measurements using an open field activity monitoring system for skeletal muscle diseases.

    PubMed

    Tatem, Kathleen S; Quinn, James L; Phadke, Aditi; Yu, Qing; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-09-29

    The open field activity monitoring system comprehensively assesses locomotor and behavioral activity levels of mice. It is a useful tool for assessing locomotive impairment in animal models of neuromuscular disease and efficacy of therapeutic drugs that may improve locomotion and/or muscle function. The open field activity measurement provides a different measure than muscle strength, which is commonly assessed by grip strength measurements. It can also show how drugs may affect other body systems as well when used with additional outcome measures. In addition, measures such as total distance traveled mirror the 6 min walk test, a clinical trial outcome measure. However, open field activity monitoring is also associated with significant challenges: Open field activity measurements vary according to animal strain, age, sex, and circadian rhythm. In addition, room temperature, humidity, lighting, noise, and even odor can affect assessment outcomes. Overall, this manuscript provides a well-tested and standardized open field activity SOP for preclinical trials in animal models of neuromuscular diseases. We provide a discussion of important considerations, typical results, data analysis, and detail the strengths and weaknesses of open field testing. In addition, we provide recommendations for optimal study design when using open field activity in a preclinical trial.

  11. Behavioral and locomotor measurements using an open field activity monitoring system for skeletal muscle diseases.

    PubMed

    Tatem, Kathleen S; Quinn, James L; Phadke, Aditi; Yu, Qing; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    The open field activity monitoring system comprehensively assesses locomotor and behavioral activity levels of mice. It is a useful tool for assessing locomotive impairment in animal models of neuromuscular disease and efficacy of therapeutic drugs that may improve locomotion and/or muscle function. The open field activity measurement provides a different measure than muscle strength, which is commonly assessed by grip strength measurements. It can also show how drugs may affect other body systems as well when used with additional outcome measures. In addition, measures such as total distance traveled mirror the 6 min walk test, a clinical trial outcome measure. However, open field activity monitoring is also associated with significant challenges: Open field activity measurements vary according to animal strain, age, sex, and circadian rhythm. In addition, room temperature, humidity, lighting, noise, and even odor can affect assessment outcomes. Overall, this manuscript provides a well-tested and standardized open field activity SOP for preclinical trials in animal models of neuromuscular diseases. We provide a discussion of important considerations, typical results, data analysis, and detail the strengths and weaknesses of open field testing. In addition, we provide recommendations for optimal study design when using open field activity in a preclinical trial. PMID:25286313

  12. Network Modeling of Crohn’s Disease Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Jean-Marc; Debret, Gaëlle; Lesne, Annick; Pascoe, Leigh; Carrivain, Pascal; Wainrib, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous genetic and environmental risk factors play a role in human complex genetic disorders (CGD). However, their complex interplay remains to be modelled and explained in terms of disease mechanisms. Methods and findings Crohn's Disease (CD) was modeled as a modular network of patho-physiological functions, each summarizing multiple gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. The disease resulted from one or few specific combinations of module functional states. Network aging dynamics was able to reproduce age-specific CD incidence curves as well as their variations over the past century in Western countries. Within the model, we translated the odds ratios (OR) associated to at-risk alleles in terms of disease propensities of the functional modules. Finally, the model was successfully applied to other CGD including ulcerative colitis, ankylosing spondylitis, multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia. Conclusion Modeling disease incidence may help to understand disease causative chains, to delineate the potential of personalized medicine, and to monitor epidemiological changes in CGD. PMID:27309539

  13. Beyond the zebrafish: diverse fish species for modeling human disease

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, zebrafish, and to a lesser extent medaka, have become widely used small animal models for human diseases. These organisms have convincingly demonstrated the usefulness of fish for improving our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to pathological conditions, and for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Despite the usefulness of zebrafish and medaka in the investigation of a wide spectrum of traits, there is evidence to suggest that other fish species could be better suited for more targeted questions. With the emergence of new, improved sequencing technologies that enable genomic resources to be generated with increasing efficiency and speed, the potential of non-mainstream fish species as disease models can now be explored. A key feature of these fish species is that the pathological condition that they model is often related to specific evolutionary adaptations. By exploring these adaptations, new disease-causing and disease-modifier genes might be identified; thus, diverse fish species could be exploited to better understand the complexity of disease processes. In addition, non-mainstream fish models could allow us to study the impact of environmental factors, as well as genetic variation, on complex disease phenotypes. This Review will discuss the opportunities that such fish models offer for current and future biomedical research. PMID:24271780

  14. p21-activated Kinase-aberrant Activation and Translocation in Alzheimer Disease Pathogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiu-Lan; Yang, Fusheng; Calon, Frédéric; Ubeda, Oliver J.; Hansen, James E.; Weisbart, Richard H.; Beech, Walter; Frautschy, Sally A.; Cole, Greg M.

    2008-01-01

    Defects in dendritic spines and synapses contribute to cognitive deficits in mental retardation syndromes and, potentially, Alzheimer disease. p21-activated kinases (PAKs) regulate actin filaments and morphogenesis of dendritic spines regulated by the Rho family GTPases Rac and Cdc42. We previously reported that active PAK was markedly reduced in Alzheimer disease cytosol, accompanied by downstream loss of the spine actin-regulatory protein Drebrin. β-Amyloid (Aβ) oligomer was implicated in PAK defects. Here we demonstrate that PAK is aberrantly activated and translocated from cytosol to membrane in Alzheimer disease brain and in 22-month-old Tg2576 transgenic mice with Alzheimer disease. This active PAK coimmunoprecipitated with the small GTPase Rac and both translocated to granules. Aβ42 oligomer treatment of cultured hippocampal neurons induced similar effects, accompanied by reduction of dendrites that were protected by kinase-active but not kinase-dead PAK. Aβ42 oligomer treatment also significantly reduced N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor subunit NR2B phosphotyrosine labeling. The Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2 significantly blocked the PAK/Rac translocation but not the loss of p-NR2B in Aβ42 oligomer-treated neurons. Src family kinases are known to phosphorylate the Rac activator Tiam1, which has recently been shown to be Aβ-responsive. In addition, anti-oligomer curcumin comparatively suppressed PAK translocation in aged Tg2576 transgenic mice with Alzheimer amyloid pathology and in Aβ42 oligomer-treated cultured hippocampal neurons. Our results implicate aberrant PAK in Aβ oligomer-induced signaling and synaptic deficits in Alzheimer disease. PMID:18347024

  15. Complement depletion with humanised cobra venom factor: efficacy in preclinical models of vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Fritzinger, David C; Gorsuch, W Brian; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-03-01

    The complement system is an intrinsic part of the immune system and has important functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, inadvertent or misdirected complement activation is also involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, contributing solely or significantly to tissue injury and disease development. Multiple approaches to develop pharmacological agents to inhibit complement are currently being pursued. We have developed a conceptually different approach of not inhibiting but depleting complement, based on the complement-depleting activities of cobra venom factor (CVF), a non-toxic cobra venom component with structural and functional homology to complement component C3. We developed a humanised version of CVF by creating human complement component C3 derivatives with complement-depleting activities of CVF (humanised CVF) as a promising therapeutic agent for diseases with complement pathogenesis. Here we review the beneficial therapeutic effect of humanised CVF in several murine models of vascular diseases such as reperfusion injury.

  16. Intra-Individual Variability of Physical Activity in Older Adults With and Without Mild Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Watts, Amber; Walters, Ryan W; Hoffman, Lesa; Templin, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity shows promise for protection against cognitive decline in older adults with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD). To better understand barriers to adoption of physical activity in this population, a clear understanding of daily and weekly activity patterns is needed. Most accelerometry studies report average physical activity over an entire wear period without considering the potential importance of the variability of physical activity. This study evaluated individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity and determined whether these differences could be predicted by AD status, day of wear, age, gender, education, and cardiorespiratory capacity. Physical activity was measured via accelerometry (Actigraph GT3X+) over one week in 86 older adults with and without AD (n = 33 and n = 53, respectively). Mixed-effects location-scale models were estimated to evaluate and predict individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity. Results indicated that compared to controls, participants with AD averaged 21% less activity, but averaged non-significantly greater intra-individual variability. Women and men averaged similar amounts of physical activity, but women were significantly less variable. The amount of physical activity differed significantly across days of wear. Increased cardiorespiratory capacity was associated with greater average amounts of physical activity. Investigation of individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity provided insight into differences by AD status, days of monitor wear, gender, and cardiovascular capacity. All individuals regardless of AD status were equally consistent in their physical activity, which may have been due to a highly sedentary sample and/or the early disease stage of those participants with AD. These results highlight the value of considering individual differences in both the amount and

  17. Intra-Individual Variability of Physical Activity in Older Adults With and Without Mild Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Watts, Amber; Walters, Ryan W; Hoffman, Lesa; Templin, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity shows promise for protection against cognitive decline in older adults with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD). To better understand barriers to adoption of physical activity in this population, a clear understanding of daily and weekly activity patterns is needed. Most accelerometry studies report average physical activity over an entire wear period without considering the potential importance of the variability of physical activity. This study evaluated individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity and determined whether these differences could be predicted by AD status, day of wear, age, gender, education, and cardiorespiratory capacity. Physical activity was measured via accelerometry (Actigraph GT3X+) over one week in 86 older adults with and without AD (n = 33 and n = 53, respectively). Mixed-effects location-scale models were estimated to evaluate and predict individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity. Results indicated that compared to controls, participants with AD averaged 21% less activity, but averaged non-significantly greater intra-individual variability. Women and men averaged similar amounts of physical activity, but women were significantly less variable. The amount of physical activity differed significantly across days of wear. Increased cardiorespiratory capacity was associated with greater average amounts of physical activity. Investigation of individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity provided insight into differences by AD status, days of monitor wear, gender, and cardiovascular capacity. All individuals regardless of AD status were equally consistent in their physical activity, which may have been due to a highly sedentary sample and/or the early disease stage of those participants with AD. These results highlight the value of considering individual differences in both the amount and

  18. Remote sensing and geographic information systems in the spatial temporal dynamics modeling of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Gong, Peng; Xu, Bing; Liang, Song

    2006-12-01

    Similar to species immigration or exotic species invasion, infectious disease transmission is strengthened due to the globalization of human activities. Using schistosomiasis as an example, we propose a conceptual model simulating the spatio-temporal dynamics of infectious diseases. We base the model on the knowledge of the interrelationship among the source, media, and the hosts of the disease. With the endemics data of schistosomiasis in Xichang, China, we demonstrate that the conceptual model is feasible; we introduce how remote sensing and geographic information systems techniques can be used in support of spatio-temporal modeling; we compare the different effects caused to the entire population when selecting different groups of people for schistosomiasis control. Our work illustrates the importance of such a modeling tool in supporting spatial decisions. Our modeling method can be directly applied to such infectious diseases as the plague, lyme disease, and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. The application of remote sensing and geographic information systems can shed light on the modeling of other infectious disease and invasive species studies.

  19. Imaging Microglial Activation with TSPO PET: Lighting Up Neurologic Diseases?

    PubMed

    Vivash, Lucy; O'Brien, Terence J

    2016-02-01

    Neuroinflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide range of neurologic and neuropsychiatric diseases. For over 20 years, (11)C-PK11195 PET, which aims to image expression of the translocator protein (TSPO) on activated microglia in the brain, has been used in preclinical and clinical research to investigate neuroinflammation in vivo in patients with brain diseases. However, (11)C-PK11195 suffers from two major limitations: its low brain permeability and high nonspecific and plasma binding results in a low signal-to-noise ratio, and the use of (11)C restricts its use to PET research centers and hospitals with an on-site cyclotron. In recent years, there has been a great deal of work into the development of new TSPO-specific PET radiotracers. This work has focused on fluorinated radiotracers, which would enable wider use and improved signal-to-noise ratios. These radiotracers have been utilized in preclinical and clinical studies of several neurologic diseases with varying degrees of success. Unfortunately, the application of these second-generation TSPO radiotracers has revealed additional problems, including a polymorphism that affects TSPO binding. In this review, the developments in TSPO imaging are discussed, and current limitations and suggestions for future directions are explored.

  20. Hippocampal novelty activations in schizophrenia: disease and medication effects.

    PubMed

    Tamminga, Carol A; Thomas, Binu P; Chin, Ronald; Mihalakos, Perry; Youens, Kenneth; Wagner, Anthony D; Preston, Alison R

    2012-07-01

    We examined hippocampal activation in schizophrenia (SZ) with fMRI BOLD in response to the presentation of novel and familiar scenes. Voxel-wise analysis showed no group differences. However, anatomical region-of-interest analyses contrasting normal (NL), SZ-on-medication (SZ-ON), SZ-off-medication (SZ-OFF) showed substantial differences in MTL-based novelty responding, accounted for by the reduction in novelty responses in the SZ-OFF predominantly in the anterior hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex. These differences in novelty-based activation in the SZ-OFF group represent disease characteristics of schizophrenia without confounding effects of antipsychotic medication and illustrate the tendency of antipsychotic drug treatment to improve memory functions in schizophrenia.

  1. Discursive positionings and emotions in modelling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daher, Wajeeh

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical modelling is suggested as an activity through which students engage in meaningful mathematics. In the current research, the modelling activity of a group of four seventh-grade students was analysed using the discursive analysis framework. The research findings show that the positionings and emotions of the group members during their participation in the modelling activity changed as the activity proceeded. Overall, it can be said that three of the four group members acted as insiders, while the fourth acted as an outsider, and only, towards the end of the group's work on the activity, he acted as an insider. Moreover, the research findings point at four factors that affected the group members' positionings and emotions during the modelling activity: the member's characteristics, the member's history of learning experiences, the activity characteristics and the modelling phases. Furthermore, the different positionings of the group members in the different modelling phases were accompanied by different emotions experienced by them, where being an insider and a collaborator resulted in positive emotions, while being an outsider resulted in negative emotions.

  2. Cholesterol-dependent increases in glucosylceramide synthase activity in Niemann-Pick disease type C model cells: Abnormal trafficking of endogenously formed ceramide metabolites by inhibition of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Ikiru; Takahashi, Hiromasa; Ashikawa, Hitomi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Toshihiko

    2016-11-01

    Sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and glycosphingolipids (GSLs) derived from glucosylceramide (GlcCer), in addition to cholesterol, accumulate in cells/neurons in Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). The activities of acid sphingomyelinase and lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GCase), which degrade sphingomyelin and GlcCer, respectively, are down-regulated in NPC cells, however, changes in GlcCer synthase activity have not yet been elucidated. We herein demonstrated for the first time that GlcCer synthase activity for the fluorescent ceramide, 4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole-labeled C6-ceramide (NBD-ceramide) increased in intact NPC1((-/-)) cells and cell lysates without affecting the protein levels. In NBD-ceramide-labeled NPC1((-/-)) cells, NBD-fluorescence preferentially accumulated in the Golgi complex and vesicular specks in the cytoplasm 40 and 150 min, respectively, after labeling, while a treatment for 48 h with the GlcCer synthase inhibitors, N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) and 1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol, accelerated the appearance of vesicular specks emitting NBD-fluorescence within 40 min. The treatment of NPC1((-/-)) cells with NB-DNJ for 48 h additionally increased the levels of cholesterol, but not those of sphingomyelin. Increases in the activity of GlcCer synthase and formation of vesicular specks emitting NBD-fluorescence in NPC1((-/-)) cells were dependent on cholesterol. LacCer taken up by endocytosis, which accumulated in the Golgi complex in normal cells, accumulated in vesicular specks after 10 and 40 min in NPC1((-/-)) cells, and this response was not accelerated by the NB-DNJ treatment, but was restored by the depletion of cholesterol. The cellular roles for enhanced GlcCer synthesis and increased levels of cholesterol in the trafficking of NBD-ceramide metabolites in NPC1((-/-)) cells have been discussed.

  3. Oxygen saturation during daily activities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Soguel Schenkel, N; Burdet, L; de Muralt, B; Fitting, J W

    1996-12-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) frequently develop nocturnal oxygen desturation because of alveolar hypoventilation, worsening of ventilation-perfusion mismatch, and sometimes obstructive sleep apnoeas. In contrast, little is known about their oxygen status during the various activities of daily life. The aim of this study was to compare the oxygen saturation profile during day and night, and to assess the influence of different daily activities in COPD. During a rehabilitation programme, we studied 30 patients with moderate-to-severe COPD (median forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 37% of predicted), without marked hypoxaemia (median arterial oxygen tension (Pa,O2) 9.1 kPa). Arterial oxygen saturation (Sa,O2) was assessed by pulse oximetry during night (8 h) and day (10.5 h). The mean and minimal Sa,O2 were calculated, and desaturations were defined as Sa,O2 falls > 4%.h-1. Daily activities were identified by the patients as resting, eating, washing, nebulization therapy and walking. Mean Sa,O2 was lower during the night (88%) than during the day (89%). In contrast, minimal Sa,O2 was lower during the day (69%) than during the night (72%), and the number of desaturations was higher during the day (8.6 desaturations.h-1) than during the night (6.8 desaturations.h-1). Mean Sa,O2 was 88% during walking, which was lower than during resting (90%), nebulization (90%), and meals (89%). The number of desaturations was higher during walking (13.1 desaturations.h-1), washing (12.6 desaturations.h-1), and eating (9.2 desaturations.h-1) than during resting (5.3 desaturations.h-1). We conclude that daily activities, such as walking, washing and eating, are associated with transient oxygen desaturation in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, even without marked resting hypoxaemia.

  4. Impact of physical activity during pregnancy and postpartum on chronic disease risk.

    PubMed

    2006-05-01

    Research over the past 20 years has focused on the safety of physical activity during pregnancy. Guidelines for health care providers and pregnant/postpartum women have been developed from the results of these studies. The overwhelming results of most studies have shown few negative effects on the pregnancy of a healthy gravida, but rather, be beneficial to the maternal-fetal unit. Recently, researchers have begun to consider the role of maternal physical activity in a more traditional chronic disease prevention model, for both mother and offspring. To address the key issues related to the role of physical activity during pregnancy and postpartum on chronic disease risk, the American College of Sports Medicine convened a Scientific Roundtable at Michigan State University in East Lansing, MI. Topics included preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, breastfeeding and weight loss, musculoskeletal disorders, mental health, and offspring health and development.

  5. Analysis of a dengue disease transmission model.

    PubMed

    Esteva, L; Vargas, C

    1998-06-15

    A model for the transmission of dengue fever in a constant human population and variable vector population is discussed. A complete global analysis is given, which uses the results of the theory of competitive systems and stability of periodic orbits, to establish the global stability of the endemic equilibrium. The control measures of the vector population are discussed in terms of the threshold condition, which governs the existence and stability of the endemic equilibrium.

  6. The role of activated astrocytes and of the neurotrophic cytokine S100B in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mrak, R E; Griffinbc, W S

    2001-01-01

    Activated astrocytes, overexpressing the neurotrophic signaling molecule S100beta, are invariant components of the Abeta plaques of Alzheimer's disease. Even early, nonfibrillar amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease contain such astrocytes, and the numbers and degree of activation of these wax and wane with the subsequent neuritic pathology of plaque evolution. Astrocytic overexpression of S100B in the neuritic plaques of Alzheimer's disease correlates with the degree of neuritic pathology in Abeta plaques in this disease, suggesting a pathogenic role for S100B's neurotrophic properties in the evolution of these lesions. Astrocytic overexpression of S100B, in turn, is promoted by high levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1), originating from activated microglia that are also constant components of Abeta plaques in Alzheimer's disease. Similar patterns of astrocyte activation, S100B overexpression, microglial activation, and IL-1 overexpression are seen in conditions that confer risk for Alzheimer's disease (aging, head trauma, Down's syndrome), in conditions that predispose to accelerated appearance of Alzheimer-like neuropathologic changes (chronic epilepsy, HIV infection), and in animal models of Alzheimer's disease. These cells and molecules are an important components of a cytokine cycle of molecular and cellular cascades that may drive disease progression in Alzheimer's disease<