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Sample records for active drug levels

  1. Therapeutic drug levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003430.htm Therapeutic drug levels To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Therapeutic drug levels are lab tests to look for the presence ...

  2. Correlations between immunogenicity, drug levels, and disease activity in an Italian cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with tocilizumab

    PubMed Central

    Benucci, Maurizio; Meacci, Francesca; Grossi, Valentina; Infantino, Maria; Manfredi, Mariangela; Bellio, Emanuele; Bellio, Valerio; Li Gobbi, Francesca; Bazzichi, Laura; Moscato, Paolo; Caputo, Dario; Saviola, Gianantonio; Talotta, Rossella; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the real-life immunogenicity of anti-drug antibodies, drug levels, and disease activity in an Italian cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with tocilizumab (TCZ). We evaluated 126 TCZ-treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (16 males and 110 females; mean age 59±12 years, range 26–83; mean disease duration 11±5 years) with inadequate 12-week response to any synthetic and biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, in a retrospective analysis. One-hundred and seven patients were treated with methotrexate mean dose 12.6±1.3 mg/week in combination with TCZ, 13 received TCZ monotherapy, and six received leflunomide 20 mg/day plus TCZ; all patients were treated with prednisone mean dose 6.4±1.2 mg/day. They had a 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) of >3.2, an erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of >30 mm/hour, and CRP levels of >1.0 mg/dL. We evaluated at baseline and after 6 months of treatment: DAS28; rheumatoid factor (RF) IgM, IgA, and IgG; anti-citrullinated peptide antibody; ESR; CRP; TNF-α; and IL-6. TCZ and anti-TCZ antibodies were detected using LISA-TRACKER Duo TCZ. TCZ levels of <10 µg/mL were considered low and >10 µg/mL high. After 6 months of treatment only one patient was positive for anti-TCZ antibodies. There were correlations between DAS28, ESR, and CRP and IL-6 levels in all patients. Comparison of the 84 patients with TCZ levels of <10 µg/mL and the 42 with TCZ levels of >10 µg/mL showed the following differences: DAS28: 3.09±1.32 vs 2.78±1.32, P=0.0005; ESR: 27±14.8 vs 14±12 mm/hour, P=0.0001; CRP: 1.47±1.05 vs 0.65±0.80 mg/dL, P=0.0086; TNF-α: 10.2±1.2 vs 9.9±1.1 pg/mL, P=0.999; IL-6: 3.65±4.75 vs 3.62±4.41 pg/mL, P=0.97; anti-citrullinated peptide antibody: 85.2±93.7 vs 86.7±90.3 IU/mL, P=0.94; RF IgM: 72.4±62.7 vs 68.3±61.6 IU/mL, P=0.754; RF IgA: 41.7±36.4 vs 47.8±42.1 U/mL, P=0.449; and RF IgG: 46.4±46.1 vs 59.3±58.2 U/mL, P=0.212. These findings show

  3. Prediction of antiarthritic drug efficacies by monitoring active matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) levels in collagen-induced arthritic mice using the MMP-3 probe.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aeju; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Sung-Jae; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Kuiwon; Kwon, Ick Chan; Yoon, Soo-Young; Youn, Inchan

    2014-05-01

    Active matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is a prognostic marker of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We recently developed an MMP-3 probe that can specifically detect the active form of MMP-3. The aim of this study was to investigate whether detection and monitoring of active MMP-3 could be useful to predict therapeutic drug responses in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. During the period of treatment with drugs such as methotrexate (MTX) or infliximab (IFX), MMP-3 mRNA and protein levels were correlated with fluorescence signals in arthritic joint tissues and in the serum of CIA mice. Also, bone volume density and erosion in the knee joints and the paws of CIA mice were measured with microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), X-ray, and histology to confirm drug responses. In joint tissues and serum of CIA mice, strong fluorescence signals induced by the action of active MMP-3 were significantly decreased when drugs were applied. The decrease in RA scores in drug-treated CIA mice led to fluorescence reductions, mainly as a result of down-regulation of MMP-3 mRNA or protein. The micro-CT, X-ray, and histology results clearly showed marked decreases in bone and cartilage destruction, which were consistent with the reduction of fluorescence by down-regulation of active MMP-3 in drug-treated CIA mice. We suggest that the MMP-3 diagnostic kit could be used to detect and monitor the active form of MMP-3 in CIA mice serum during a treatment course and thereby used to predict the drug response or resistance to RA therapies at an earlier stage. We hope that monitoring of active MMP-3 levels in arthritis patients using the MMP-3 diagnostic kit will be a promising tool for drug discovery, drug development, and monitoring of drug responses in RA therapy. PMID:24673659

  4. Relative plasma levels of the cardioprotective drug dexrazoxane and its two active ring-opened metabolites in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hasinoff, B B; Aoyama, R G

    1999-02-01

    A postcolumn derivatization reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography method has been developed to detect and separate the one-ring open intermediates of dexrazoxane (ICRF-187) in blood plasma. Dexrazoxane is clinically used as a doxorubicin cardioprotective agent and may act by preventing iron-based oxygen-free radical damage through the iron-chelating ability of its one-ring open intermediates and its fully rings opened hydrolysis product ADR-925. Little is known of the in vivo metabolism of dexrazoxane to its one-ring open intermediates, which may be two of the active forms of dexrazoxane. The one-ring open intermediates were detected within 5 min of i.v. administration of dexrazoxane to rats, suggesting that dexrazoxane is rapidly metabolized in vivo. The plasma concentrations of the one-ring open intermediates varied from 4 to 9% and 6 to 24% of the dexrazoxane concentrations at 5 and 120 min, respectively. The relatively small changes in the levels of the one-ring open intermediates with time suggest that a dynamic steady state is occurring. The ratio of the concentrations of the two one-ring open intermediates was similar to that previously seen for the in vitro dihydropyrimidine amidohydrolase-catalyzed hydrolysis of dexrazoxane. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that dihydropyrimidine amidohydrolase in the liver and kidney is responsible for the metabolism of dexrazoxane in the rat. PMID:9929514

  5. Inflammatory cytokine levels, disease activity, and function of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with combined conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs or biologics.

    PubMed

    Osiri, Manathip; Wongpiyabovorn, Jongkonnee; Sattayasomboon, Youwanuch; Thammacharoenrach, Niramol

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of treatment by combined conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (cDMARDs) or biologics on cytokines, disease activity, and function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Sera from a cohort of 81 patients with long-standing RA treated with combined cDMARDs or biologics were measured for 12 cytokines. Comparisons of serum cytokine concentrations with treatment types (combination 2, 3 cDMARDs or biologics), serologic status (positivity for RF and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP Ab)), DAS28-ESR, and function were performed. Spearman correlation coefficients between individual cytokines and clinical parameters were explored. Approximately half of the patients were prescribed two cDMARDs. Mean duration of current treatment was 42 months. More than 70 % had moderate disease activity or normal function/slight disability. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17A, IL-23, IL-33, interferon (IFN)-γ, granulocyte monocyte-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and TNF-α in patients taking combined cDMARDs did not significantly differ from those on biologics. Seventy-nine serum samples (97.5 %) had undetectable levels of 1 to 10 cytokines. Concentrations of several cytokines were significantly higher in patients with moderate to high disease activity, seropositive or poor functional status. Weak correlations between cytokine levels and RA disease activity or function were demonstrated. The highest correlation coefficients were observed with IL-33, IL-8, and IL-6. Long-term treatment with cDMARDs did not differ from biologics with respect to cytokine concentrations, disease activity, and function. The cytokine profiles in established RA were mainly those produced from effector cells, especially IL-6, IL-8, and IL-33. Both IL-8 and IL-33 may be potential biomarkers and/or treatment targets in patients with late RA. PMID:27188857

  6. Social Disorganization, Drug Market Activity, and Neighborhood Violent Crime.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ramiro; Rosenfeld, Richard; Mares, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Although illicit drug activity occurs within local communities, past quantitative research on drug markets and violent crime in the United States has been conducted mainly at the city level. The authors use neighborhood-level data from the city of Miami to test hypotheses regarding the effect of drug activity and traditional indicators of social disorganization on rates of aggravated assault and robbery. The results show that drug activity has robust effects on violent crime that are independent of other disorganization indicators. The authors also find that drug activity is concentrated in neighborhoods with low rates of immigration, less linguistic isolation and ethnic heterogeneity, and where nondrug accidental deaths are prevalent. The authors find no independent effect of neighborhood racial composition on drug activity or violent crime. The results suggest that future neighborhood-level research on social disorganization and violent crime should devote explicit attention to the disorganizing and violence-producing effects of illicit drug activity. PMID:19655037

  7. Social Disorganization, Drug Market Activity, and Neighborhood Violent Crime

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Ramiro; Rosenfeld, Richard; Mares, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Although illicit drug activity occurs within local communities, past quantitative research on drug markets and violent crime in the United States has been conducted mainly at the city level. The authors use neighborhood-level data from the city of Miami to test hypotheses regarding the effect of drug activity and traditional indicators of social disorganization on rates of aggravated assault and robbery. The results show that drug activity has robust effects on violent crime that are independent of other disorganization indicators. The authors also find that drug activity is concentrated in neighborhoods with low rates of immigration, less linguistic isolation and ethnic heterogeneity, and where nondrug accidental deaths are prevalent. The authors find no independent effect of neighborhood racial composition on drug activity or violent crime. The results suggest that future neighborhood-level research on social disorganization and violent crime should devote explicit attention to the disorganizing and violence-producing effects of illicit drug activity. PMID:19655037

  8. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  9. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  10. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  11. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  12. 10 CFR 26.133 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.133... § 26.133 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. Subject to the provisions of § 26.31(d)(3)(iii), licensees and other entities may specify more stringent cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites...

  13. 32 CFR 637.7 - Drug enforcement activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Drug enforcement activities. 637.7 Section 637.7... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.7 Drug enforcement activities. Provost marshals and U.S. Army law enforcement supervisors at all levels will ensure that active...

  14. 32 CFR 637.7 - Drug enforcement activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drug enforcement activities. 637.7 Section 637.7... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.7 Drug enforcement activities. Provost marshals and U.S. Army law enforcement supervisors at all levels will ensure that active...

  15. 10 CFR 26.163 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.163... the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.163 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. (a) Initial drug testing. (1) HHS-certified laboratories shall apply the following cutoff levels for...

  16. 10 CFR 26.163 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.163... the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.163 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. (a) Initial drug testing. (1) HHS-certified laboratories shall apply the following cutoff levels for...

  17. 10 CFR 26.163 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.163... the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.163 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. (a) Initial drug testing. (1) HHS-certified laboratories shall apply the following cutoff levels for...

  18. 10 CFR 26.163 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.163... the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.163 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. (a) Initial drug testing. (1) HHS-certified laboratories shall apply the following cutoff levels for...

  19. 10 CFR 26.163 - Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. 26.163... the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.163 Cutoff levels for drugs and drug metabolites. (a) Initial drug testing. (1) HHS-certified laboratories shall apply the following cutoff levels for...

  20. Stress Levels of Recovering Drug Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaMon, Brent C.; Alonzo, Anthony

    It appears that chronic drug use may develop as a means of coping in which individuals use self-medication to produce a more desirable state of being. Because drugs are often used to cope with stress, this study examined stress among recovering male drug addicts (N=23) from an urban substance abuse program by administering a self-report inventory…

  1. Systems Level Neuroplasticity in Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Feltenstein, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder for which research has been dedicated to understand the various factors that contribute to development, loss of control, and persistence of compulsive addictive behaviors. In this review, we provide a broad overview of various theories of addiction, drugs of abuse, and the neurobiology involved across the addiction cycle. Specific focus is devoted to the role of the mesolimbic pathway in acute drug reinforcement and occasional drug use, the mesocortical pathway and associated areas (e.g., the dorsal striatum) in escalation/dependence, and the involvement of these pathways and associated circuits in mediating conditioned responses, drug craving, and loss of behavioral control thought to underlie withdrawal and relapse. With a better understanding of the neurobiological factors that underlie drug addiction, continued preclinical and clinical research will aid in the development of novel therapeutic interventions that can serve as effective long-term treatment strategies for drug-dependent individuals. PMID:23580792

  2. Income Level and Drug Related Harm among People Who Use Injection Drugs in a Canadian Setting

    PubMed Central

    Long, Cathy; DeBeck, Kora; Feng, Cindy; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Higher income is generally associated with better health outcomes; however, among people who inject drugs (IDU) income generation frequently involves activities, such as sex work and drug dealing, which pose significant health risks. Therefore, we sought to examine the relationship between level of income and specific drug use patterns and related health risks. Methods This study involved IDU participating in a prospective cohort study in Vancouver, Canada. Monthly income was categorized based on non-fixed quartiles at each follow-up with the lowest level serving as the reference category in generalized linear mixed-effects regression. Results Among our sample of 1,032 IDU, the median average monthly income over the study follow-up was $1050 [Interquartile range=785–2000]. In multivariate analysis, the highest income category was significantly associated with sex work (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR]=7.65), drug dealing (AOR=5.06), daily heroin injection (AOR=2.97), daily cocaine injection (AOR=1.65), daily crack smoking (AOR=2.48), binge drug use (AOR=1.57) and unstable housing (AOR=1.67). The high income category was negatively associated with being female (AOR=0.61) and accessing addiction treatment (AOR=0.64), (all p < 0.05). In addition, higher income was strongly associated with higher monthly expenditure on drugs (>$400) (OR=97.8). Conclusion Among IDU in Vancouver, average monthly income levels were low and higher total monthly income was linked to high-risk income generation strategies as well as a range of drug use patterns characteristic of higher intensity addiction and HIV risk. These findings underscore the need for interventions that provide economic empowerment and address high intensity addiction, especially for female IDU. PMID:24380808

  3. Taking Risks: Activities and Materials for Teaching About Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Traffic Safety. Book 2, Secondary Level (Grades 7 and 10).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnik, Henry S.; And Others

    This guide is designed to help teachers instruct students in the areas of alcohol, drugs, and traffic safety. It consists of two units, targeted to seventh-grade students and the other to tenth-grade students. Each unit can be used over a two-week period. The lesson plans and related materials focus on helping students gain insight into factors…

  4. Taking Risks: Activities and Materials for Teaching About Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Traffic Safety. Book 1, Elementary Level (Grades 3 and 5).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnik, Henry S.; And Others

    This guide is designed to help teachers instruct students in the areas of alcohol, drugs and traffic safety. It consists of two units targeted to third-grade students and the other to fifth-grade students. Each unit can be used over a two-week period. The lesson plans and related materials focus on helping students gain insight into factors that…

  5. Discovering New Drugs on the Cellular Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    With the Vision for Space Exploration calling for a sustained human presence in space, astronauts will need to grow plants, while in orbit, for nourishment that they will not receive from only consuming dehydrated foods. As a potential source of food for long-duration missions, space-grown plants could also give astronauts an important psychological boost, as fresh vegetables could serve as a welcomed change from monotonous meals consisting of reconstituted foods in plastic bags. Even more, these plants could likely aid in the recycling of air and wastewater on spacecraft. With a helping hand from a company by the name of Biolog, Inc., NASA is studying the impacts of decreased gravity and spaceborne bacteria on the plants being grown for food in space. With a helping hand from NASA, this very same company is creating powerful new cell- and bacteria-analysis tools for use in discovering and developing new drugs on Earth.

  6. [Drugs and athletic activity: do they fit together?].

    PubMed

    Furlanello, Francesco; Serdoz, Laura Vitali; Botrè, Francesco; Accettura, Domenico; Lestuzzi, Chiara; De Ambroggi, Luigi; Cappato, Riccardo

    2010-10-01

    Competitive sports eligibility, mandatory for the Italian law in all age classes, from young to master athletes, involves millions of subjects, who are at risk during their sport career both for prescription and illicit drugs (or banned substances included in the World Anti-Doping Agency list, annually updated). These drugs may interfere with adrenergic hyperactivation related to athletic activity and can bring to unfavorable cardiovascular effects, such as arrhythmias, coronary artery disease, myocarditis, pericarditis, heart failure, ion channel disease. Moreover, numerous compounds may reduce athletic performance. Cardiovascular side effects are more frequently reported when drug co-administration is performed, which occurs frequently. Drug co-administration may have a higher risk when a common metabolic pathway is used (i.e. P450 hepatic cytochrome), and inhibition or induction effects modify plasma drug levels. One of the most important problems remains for combination of drugs that might be torsadogenic. Therefore, it is mandatory to be aware of pharmacokinetic properties, mechanisms of action, side effects and interactions between drugs and competitive sports activities; moreover, possible clinical, instrumental (i.e. ECG) or laboratory markers should be pointed out in order to recognize a possible toxic effect and subsequently interrupt or modify drug administration and/or assumption. PMID:21416840

  7. 32 CFR 637.7 - Drug enforcement activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.7 Drug enforcement activities... initial, interim and final military police reports concerning drug investigations will be provided to...

  8. 32 CFR 637.7 - Drug enforcement activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.7 Drug enforcement activities... initial, interim and final military police reports concerning drug investigations will be provided to...

  9. 32 CFR 637.7 - Drug enforcement activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.7 Drug enforcement activities... initial, interim and final military police reports concerning drug investigations will be provided to...

  10. Real time computation of in vivo drug levels during drug self-administration experiments.

    PubMed

    Tsibulsky, Vladimir L; Norman, Andrew B

    2005-05-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the drug concentration in the effect compartment of the body is the major factor regulating self-administration behavior. A novel computer-based protocol was developed to facilitate studies on mechanisms of drug addiction by determining correlations between drug levels and behavior during multiple drug injections and infusions. The core of the system is a user's program written in Medstate Notation language (Med-Associates, Inc.), which runs the self-administration session (with MED-PC software and hardware, Med-Associates, Inc.) and calculates the levels of infused and/or injected drugs in real time during the session. From the comparison of classical exponential and simple linear models of first-order kinetics, it is concluded that exponential solutions for the appropriate differential equations may be replaced with linear equations if the cycle of computation is much shorter than the shortest half-life for the drug. The choice between particular computation equations depends on assumptions about the pharmacokinetics of the particular drug: (i) one-, two- or three-compartment model, (ii) zero-, first- or second-order process of elimination, (iii) the constants of distribution and elimination half-lives of the drug are known or can be reasonably assumed, (iv) dependence of the constants on the drug level, and (v) temporal stability of all parameters during the session. This method of drug level computation can be employed not only for self-administration but also for other behavioral paradigms to advance pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling. PMID:15878149

  11. Drug-drug interactions between rosuvastatin and oral antidiabetic drugs occurring at the level of OATP1B1.

    PubMed

    van de Steeg, E; Greupink, R; Schreurs, M; Nooijen, I H G; Verhoeckx, K C M; Hanemaaijer, R; Ripken, D; Monshouwer, M; Vlaming, M L H; DeGroot, J; Verwei, M; Russel, F G M; Huisman, M T; Wortelboer, H M

    2013-03-01

    Organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) is an important hepatic uptake transporter, of which the polymorphic variant OATP1B1*15 (Asn130Asp and Val174Ala) has been associated with decreased transport activity. Rosuvastatin is an OATP1B1 substrate and often concomitantly prescribed with oral antidiabetics in the clinic. The aim of this study was to investigate possible drug-drug interactions between these drugs at the level of OATP1B1 and OATP1B1*15. We generated human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells stably overexpressing OATP1B1 or OATP1B1*15 that showed similar protein expression levels of OATP1B1 and OATP1B1*15 at the cell membrane as measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In HEK-OATP1B1*15 cells, the V(max) for OATP1B1-mediated transport of E(2)17β-G (estradiol 17β-d-glucuronide) was decreased >60%, whereas K(m) values (Michaelis constant) were comparable. Uptake of rosuvastatin in HEK-OATP1B1 cells (K(m) 13.1 ± 0.43 μM) was nearly absent in HEK-OATP1B1*15 cells. Interestingly, several oral antidiabetics (glyburide, glimepiride, troglitazone, pioglitazone, glipizide, gliclazide, and tolbutamide), but not metformin, were identified as significant inhibitors of the OATP1B1-mediated transport of rosuvastatin. The IC(50) values for inhibition of E(2)17β-G uptake were similar between OATP1B1 and OATP1B1*15. In conclusion, these studies indicate that several oral antidiabetic drugs affect the OATP1B1-mediated uptake of rosuvastatin in vitro. The next step will be to translate these data to the clinical situation, as it remains to be established whether the studied oral antidiabetics indeed affect the clinical pharmacokinetic profile of rosuvastatin in patients. PMID:23248200

  12. Determinants of US Prescription Drug Utilization using County Level Data.

    PubMed

    Nianogo, Thierry; Okunade, Albert; Fofana, Demba; Chen, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    Prescription drugs are the third largest component of US healthcare expenditures. The 2006 Medicare Part D and the 2010 Affordable Care Act are catalysts for further growths in utilization becuase of insurance expansion effects. This research investigating the determinants of prescription drug utilization is timely, methodologically novel, and policy relevant. Differences in population health status, access to care, socioeconomics, demographics, and variations in per capita number of scripts filled at retail pharmacies across the USA justify fitting separate econometric models to county data of the states partitioned into low, medium, and high prescription drug users. Given the skewed distribution of per capita number of filled prescriptions (response variable), we fit the variance stabilizing Box-Cox power transformation regression models to 2011 county level data for investigating the correlates of prescription drug utilization separately for low, medium, and high utilization states. Maximum likelihood regression parameter estimates, including the optimal Box-Cox λ power transformations, differ across high (λ = 0.214), medium (λ = 0.942), and low (λ = 0.302) prescription drug utilization models. The estimated income elasticities of -0.634, 0.031, and -0.532 in high, medium, and low utilization models suggest that the economic behavior of prescriptions is not invariant across different utilization levels. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25903420

  13. Association between Pregnancy and Active Injection Drug Use and Sex Work among Women Injection Drug Users in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

    PubMed

    Girchenko, P; Ompad, D C; Bikmukhametov, D; Gensburg, L

    2015-06-01

    Widespread use of unsafe sexual practices among women injecting drugs both practicing and not practicing sex work leads to high levels of unplanned pregnancies in this population. The goal of this study was to investigate the association between pregnancy and active drug use and sex work. Data were collected using a convenience sample of 500 women in Saint Petersburg, Russia, in 2013. All women had recent experience of drug use, of which 200 were pregnant at the time of the study. The study consisted of a structured interview followed by a rapid HIV test. Pregnancy was protective against both active drug use and sex work. For HIV-positive women, these associations were stronger than for HIV-negative women: drug use prevalence ratio (PR) was 0.59 vs 0.85; for sex work, the PRs were 0.36 vs 0.64. Higher levels of education were associated with a lower prevalence ratio for active drug use and sex work in all models. Having children was not associated with active drug use or sex work. Pregnancy might be an optimal time for conducting interventions aimed at cessation of drug use and sex work among women injecting drugs. PMID:25835324

  14. Nitroheterocyclic drugs with broad spectrum activity.

    PubMed

    Raether, W; Hänel, H

    2003-06-01

    The group of biologically active nitroheterocyclic compounds includes various 5- and 2-nitroimidazoles and 5-nitrofurans, which can be used as therapeutic agents against a variety of protozoan and bacterial (anaerobic) infections of humans and animals. The current status in the the treatment of giardiasis, trichomoniasis, balantidiasis, histomoniasis, and amebiasis (including infections due to opportunistic amebas) is presented. The most relevant drugs (benznidazole, furazolidone, metronidazole, misonidazole, nifurtimox, nimorazole, nitazoxanide, ornidazole, secnidazole, and tinidazole) are characterized with regard to their chemical, chemotherapeutic, toxicological, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacological properties, including the mechanism of action and resistance in certain parasitic protozoa. PMID:12811546

  15. Using DNA devices to track anticancer drug activity.

    PubMed

    Kahanda, Dimithree; Chakrabarti, Gaurab; Mcwilliams, Marc A; Boothman, David A; Slinker, Jason D

    2016-06-15

    It is beneficial to develop systems that reproduce complex reactions of biological systems while maintaining control over specific factors involved in such processes. We demonstrated a DNA device for following the repair of DNA damage produced by a redox-cycling anticancer drug, beta-lapachone (β-lap). These chips supported ß-lap-induced biological redox cycle and tracked subsequent DNA damage repair activity with redox-modified DNA monolayers on gold. We observed drug-specific changes in square wave voltammetry from these chips at therapeutic ß-lap concentrations of high statistical significance over drug-free control. We also demonstrated a high correlation of this change with the specific ß-lap-induced redox cycle using rational controls. The concentration dependence of ß-lap revealed significant signal changes at levels of high clinical significance as well as sensitivity to sub-lethal levels of ß-lap. Catalase, an enzyme decomposing peroxide, was found to suppress DNA damage at a NQO1/catalase ratio found in healthy cells, but was clearly overcome at a higher NQO1/catalase ratio consistent with cancer cells. We found that it was necessary to reproduce key features of the cellular environment to observe this activity. Thus, this chip-based platform enabled tracking of ß-lap-induced DNA damage repair when biological criteria were met, providing a unique synthetic platform for uncovering activity normally confined to inside cells. PMID:26901461

  16. Pharmacologically active drug metabolites: therapeutic and toxic activities, plasma and urine data in man, accumulation in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Drayer, D E

    1976-01-01

    Drugs that are administered to man may be biotransformed to yield metabolites that are pharmacologically active. The therapeutic and toxic activities of drug metabolites and the species in which this activity was demonstrated are compiled for the metabolites of 58 drugs. The metabolite to parent drug ratio in the plasma of non-uraemic man and the percentage urinary excretion of the metabolite in non-uraemic man are also tabulated. Those active metabolites with significant pharmacological activity and high plasma levels, both relative to that of the parent drug, will probably contribute substantially to the pharmacological effect ascribed to the parent drug. Active metabolites may accumulate in patients with end stage renal disease if renal excretion is a major elimination pathway for the metabolite. This is true even if the active metabolite is a minor metabolite of the parent drug, as long as the minor metabolite is not further biotransformed and is mainly excreted in the urine. Minor metabolite accumulation may also occur if it is further biotransformed by a pathway inhibited in uraemia. Some clinical examples of the accumulation of active drug metabolites in patients with renal failure are: (a) The abolition of premature ventricular contractions and prevention of paroxysmal atrial tachycardia in some cardiac patients with poor renal function treated with procainamide are associated with high levels of N-acetylprocainamide. (b) The severe irritability and twitching seen in a uraemic patient treated with pethidine (meperidine) are associated with high levels of norpethidine. (c) The severe muscle weakness and tenderness seen in patients with renal failure receiving clofibrate are associated with excessive accumulation of the free acid metabolite of clofibrate. (d) Patients with severe renal insufficiency taking allopurinol appear to experience a higher incidence of side reactions, possibly due to the accumulation of oxipurinol. (e) Accumulation of free and

  17. Flavonoids as drugs at the small intestinal level.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    Flavonoids represent a biologically active class of secondary plant compounds. For selected members there is convincing evidence regarding their beneficial effects on human health. Accordingly these compounds are tested as supporting or alternative therapies for a number of diseases such as cancer or type-II diabetes. Subsequent to their ingestion a first site of interference are digestive enzymes and transporters in the small intestine. Through interactions with glucose transporters in the apical membranes of enterocytes flavonoid glycosides and also some aglycones appear to reduce postprandial hyperglycaemia in diabetic patients. Moreover, many flavonoids have been shown to interfere with ATP-dependent drug-efflux transporters which are relevant for the resistance of cancer cells versus various cytostatic drugs and makes them candidates to overcome multidrug-resistance. PMID:24094625

  18. An analysis of risk domains associated with drug transitions of active Latino gang members.

    PubMed

    De La Rosa, Mario; Rugh, Douglas; Rice, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol and illicit drug abuse is a serious problem among male Latino gang members. Research indicates that gang members increase their drug use while they are members, and use more drugs after they leave the gangs. This manuscript reports on data reflecting the influences of individual, familial, peer, and community factors on the number of drug use transitions that Latino gang members undergo during their drug using careers. Data from this study were collected from interviews conducted with seventy-six active Latino gang members. The study's results indicate that age at the time of interview and lower age of drug onset were associated with a greater number of drug use transitions. Positive family attitudes toward deviance, friend drug use, school truancy, conflict with parents, and living in neighborhoods with a high level of crime were also found to be associated with increased drug use transitions. PMID:17088228

  19. Bayesian active learning for drug combinations.

    PubMed

    Park, Mijung; Nassar, Marcel; Vikalo, Haris

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of complex diseases are governed by intricate interactions of myriad factors. Drug combinations, formed by mixing several single-drug treatments at various doses, can enhance the effectiveness of the therapy by targeting multiple contributing factors. The main challenge in designing drug combinations is the highly nonlinear interaction of the constituent drugs. Prior work focused on guided space-exploratory heuristics that require discretization of drug doses. While being more efficient than random sampling, these methods are impractical if the drug space is high dimensional or if the drug sensitivity is unknown. Furthermore, the effectiveness of the obtained combinations may decrease if the resolution of the discretization grid is not sufficiently fine. In this paper, we model the biological system response to a continuous combination of drug doses by a Gaussian process (GP). We perform closed-loop experiments that rely on the expected improvement criterion to efficiently guide the exploration process toward drug combinations with the optimal response. When computing the criterion, we marginalize out the GP hyperparameters in a fully Bayesian manner using a particle filter. Finally, we employ a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm to rapidly explore the high-dimensional continuous search space. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on a fully factorial Drosophila dataset, an antiviral drug dataset for Herpes simplex virus type 1, and simulated human Apoptosis networks. The results show that our approach significantly reduces the number of required trials compared to existing methods. PMID:23846437

  20. Survey of City/County Drug Abuse Activities 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drug Abuse Council, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This monograph is the second of a two-part report delineating state and local government activities and programs in the area of drug abuse. Presented here are the efforts of cities and counties to control drug abuse, accompanied by comparisons with state actions where appropriate. A survey instrument was developed by the Drug Abuse Council, Inc.…

  1. Birth Order and Activity Level in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Warren O.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied 7,018 children between birth and 7 years and 81 children of 5-8 years to test the hypothesis that birth order is negatively related to motor activity level. Activity level declined linearly across birth position, so that early-borns were rated as more active than later-borns. (RJC)

  2. Systematic Protein Level Regulation via Degradation Machinery Induced by Genotoxic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kume, Kohei; Ishida, Kazushige; Ikeda, Miyuki; Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Shimura, Tsutomu; Young, Lynn; Nishizuka, Satoshi S

    2016-01-01

    In this study we monitored protein dynamics in response to cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and irinotecan with different concentrations and administration modes using "reverse-phase" protein arrays (RPPAs) in order to gain comprehensive insight into the protein dynamics induced by genotoxic drugs. Among 666 protein time-courses, 38% exhibited an increasing trend, 32% exhibited a steady decrease, and 30% fluctuated within 24 h after drug exposure. We analyzed almost 12,000 time-course pairs of protein levels based on the geometrical similarity by correlation distance (dCor). Twenty-two percent of the pairs showed dCor > 0.8, which indicates that each protein of the pair had similar dynamics. These trends were disrupted by a proteasome inhibitor, MG132, suggesting that the protein degradation system was activated in response to the drugs. Among the pairs with high dCor, the average dCor of pairs with apoptosis-related protein was significantly higher than those without, indicating that regulation of protein levels was induced by the drugs. These results suggest that the levels of numerous functionally distinct proteins may be regulated by common degradation machinery induced by genotoxic drugs. PMID:26625007

  3. Antiprotozoal Activity Profiling of Approved Drugs: A Starting Point toward Drug Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Marcel; Mäser, Pascal; Tadoori, Leela Pavan; Ioset, Jean-Robert; Brun, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality and are a source of poverty in endemic countries. Only a few drugs are available to treat diseases such as leishmaniasis, Chagas’ disease, human African trypanosomiasis and malaria. Since drug development is lengthy and expensive, a drug repurposing strategy offers an attractive fast-track approach to speed up the process. A set of 100 registered drugs with drug repositioning potential for neglected diseases was assembled and tested in vitro against four protozoan parasites associated with the aforementioned diseases. Several drugs and drug classes showed in vitro activity in those screening assays. The results are critically reviewed and discussed in the perspective of a follow-up drug repositioning strategy where R&D has to be addressed with limited resources. PMID:26270335

  4. Drugs related to monoamine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Zdeněk

    2016-08-01

    Progress in understanding the role of monoamine neurotransmission in pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders was made after the discovery of the mechanisms of action of psychoactive drugs, including monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. The increase in monoamine neurotransmitter availability, decrease in hydrogen peroxide production, and neuroprotective effects evoked by MAO inhibitors represent an important approach in the development of new drugs for the treatment of mental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. New drugs are synthesized by acting as multitarget-directed ligands, with MAO, acetylcholinesterase, and iron chelation as targets. Basic information is summarized in this paper about the drug-induced regulation of monoaminergic systems in the brain, with a focus on MAO inhibition. Desirable effects of MAO inhibition include increased availability of monoamine neurotransmitters, decreased oxidative stress, decreased formation of neurotoxins, induction of pro-survival genes and antiapoptotic factors, and improved mitochondrial functions. PMID:26944656

  5. Chasing the Bean: Prescription Drug Smoking among Socially Active Youth

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Brian C.; Vuolo, Mike; Pawson, Mark; Wells, Brooke E.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alternative consumption practices of prescription drug misuse have been less well monitored than general prevalence. We describe prescription drug smoking among socially active youth and highlight correlates of this practice. We also examine its association with drug problems, drug dependence, and mental health. Methods We surveyed 404 young adults recruited from nightlife venues in New York via time-space sampling. We use linear and logistic regression models to examine the probability of smoking prescription drugs and its association with drug problems, dependence, and mental health. Qualitative findings supplement the survey data. Results Males have higher odds than females (OR=3.4) and heterosexuals have higher odds than sexual minority youth (OR=2.3) of smoking prescription drugs. Those involved in Electronic Dance Music nightlife have higher odds (OR=2.1) compared to those who do not participate in that scene, while those in college bar scenes have lower odds (OR=0.4) of having smoked prescription drugs. Prescription drug smokers report more drug problems (β=0.322) and greater symptoms of dependence (β=0.298) net of the frequency of misuse and other characteristics. Prescription drug smokers do not report greater mental health problems. Qualitative interview data support these survey findings. Conclusions Prescription drug smoking is a significant drug trend among socially active youth. It is associated with drug problems and symptoms of dependence net of frequency of misuse. Prevention and intervention efforts for youth who misuse prescription drugs should address the issue of prescription drug smoking, and this may be an area for clinicians to address with their adolescent patients. PMID:26003578

  6. Engagement in Pleasant Activities and Depression Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewinsohn, Peter M.

    1975-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a low rate of engagement in pleasant activities to be a concomitant of depression. The crucial question addressed by the Hammen and Glass study (1975) is whether an increase in pleasant-activity level will produce a decrease in depression level. (Editor)

  7. Factors Influencing Cypriot Children's Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loucaides, Constantinos A.; Chedzoy, Sue M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present selected findings from a larger study, which set out to examine the physical activity levels of Cypriot primary school children and determinants of their activity. Twenty parents of children who obtained high and low activity scores based on pedometer counts and self-reports scores were interviewed. By…

  8. [Participation of pineal gland in antistressor activity of adaptogenic drugs].

    PubMed

    Arushanian, É B; Beĭer, É V

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress produces some morphological changes in rats, including thymus weight reduction, adrenal hypertrophy, and peptic ulcers in stomach. Repeated administration of phytoadaptogenic drugs (ginseng and bilobil) decreased these stress-induced disorders. The antistressor activity of drugs was attenuated upon by removal of the pineal gland. Histochemical and morphometric investigation of pineal tissues in stressed animals showed that that the pharmacological effect was accompanied by increasing functional activity of the pineal gland. It is suggested that pineal mobilization may participate in antistressor activity of phytoadaptogenic drugs. PMID:25826867

  9. On the biological activity of drug molecules: Busulfan and nabumetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2010-10-01

    The electronic structures of drug molecules busulfan (BSU) and nabumetone (NAB) have been investigated by HeI and HeII UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and virtual docking studies. Their biological activities are discussed in the framework of their electronic and molecular structures, reactivity and drug-enzyme binding.

  10. "Let's Talk about Drugs": Pilot Study of a Community-Level Drug Prevention Intervention Based on Motivational Interviewing Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbery, Natasha; McCambridge, Jim; Strang, John

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility of a community-level drug prevention intervention based upon the principles of motivational interviewing within a further education college was investigated in a pilot study. Design/methodology/approach: The implementation over the course of a single term of "Let's Talk about Drugs" was studied with both action research…

  11. The effect of drugs and stimulants on gastric myoelectrical activity

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecień, Jarosław; Kasicka-Jonderko, Anna; Buschhaus, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Electrogastrography (EGG) is a non-invasive diagnostic method useful for the registration and analysis of gastric myoelectrical activity. Abnormalities within an electrogastrogram were found to correlate with a number of disorders and symptoms, like functional dyspepsia, diabetic gastroparesis and terminal hepatic or renal failure. The EGG is also a valuable diagnostic method enabling the evaluation of the effect of drugs on gastric myoelectrical activity, which can be intentional, as in the case of prokinetics, or can have an adverse character. Our review focuses on drugs with a proven impact on gastric myoelectrical activity and hence on the electrogastrogram. The paper assembles and discusses the results of investigations dealing with changes in the electrogastrograms evoked by various drugs. Moreover, the mechanisms of the influence on the gastric myoelectrical activity of drugs, curative substances and stimulants are presented. PMID:25097708

  12. Induction of P-glycoprotein expression and activity by Aconitum alkaloids: Implication for clinical drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinjun; Lin, Na; Li, Fangyuan; Zhang, Guiyu; He, Shugui; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Ou, Rilan; Li, Na; Liu, Shuqiang; Feng, Lizhi; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhongqiu; Lu, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    The Aconitum species, which mainly contain bioactive Aconitum alkaloids, are frequently administered concomitantly with other herbal medicines or chemical drugs in clinics. The potential risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) arising from co-administration of Aconitum alkaloids and other drugs against specific targets such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) must be evaluated. This study focused on the effects of three representative Aconitum alkaloids: aconitine (AC), benzoylaconine (BAC), and aconine, on the expression and activity of P-gp. We observed that Aconitum alkaloids increased P-gp expression in LS174T and Caco-2 cells in the order AC > BAC > aconine. Nuclear receptors were involved in the induction of P-gp. AC and BAC increased the P-gp transport activity. Strikingly, intracellular ATP levels and mitochondrial mass also increased. Furthermore, exposure to AC decreased the toxicity of vincristine and doxorubicin towards the cells. In vivo, AC significantly up-regulated the P-gp protein levels in the jejunum, ileum, and colon of FVB mice, and protected them against acute AC toxicity. Taken together, the findings of our in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that AC can induce P-gp expression, and that co-administration of AC with P-gp substrate drugs may cause DDIs. Our findings have important implications for Aconitum therapy in clinics. PMID:27139035

  13. Discovery of drugs that possess activity against feline leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Greggs, Willie M.; Clouser, Christine L.; Patterson, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a gammaretrovirus that is a significant cause of neoplastic-related disorders affecting cats worldwide. Treatment options for FeLV are limited, associated with serious side effects, and can be cost-prohibitive. The development of drugs used to treat a related retrovirus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has been rapid, leading to the approval of five drug classes. Although structural differences affect the susceptibility of gammaretroviruses to anti-HIV drugs, the similarities in mechanism of replication suggest that some anti-HIV-1 drugs may also inhibit FeLV. This study demonstrates the anti-FeLV activity of four drugs approved by the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration) at non-toxic concentrations. Of these, tenofovir and raltegravir are anti-HIV-1 drugs, while decitabine and gemcitabine are approved to treat myelodysplastic syndromes and pancreatic cancer, respectively, but also have anti-HIV-1 activity in cell culture. Our results indicate that these drugs may be useful for FeLV treatment and should be investigated for mechanism of action and suitability for veterinary use. PMID:22258856

  14. The Use of Central Nervous System Active Drugs During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Källén, Bengt; Borg, Natalia; Reis, Margareta

    2013-01-01

    CNS-active drugs are used relatively often during pregnancy. Use during early pregnancy may increase the risk of a congenital malformation; use during the later part of pregnancy may be associated with preterm birth, intrauterine growth disturbances and neonatal morbidity. There is also a possibility that drug exposure can affect brain development with long-term neuropsychological harm as a result. This paper summarizes the literature on such drugs used during pregnancy: opioids, anticonvulsants, drugs used for Parkinson’s disease, neuroleptics, sedatives and hypnotics, antidepressants, psychostimulants, and some other CNS-active drugs. In addition to an overview of the literature, data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register (1996–2011) are presented. The exposure data are either based on midwife interviews towards the end of the first trimester or on linkage with a prescribed drug register. An association between malformations and maternal use of anticonvulsants and notably valproic acid is well known from the literature and also demonstrated in the present study. Some other associations between drug exposure and outcome were found. PMID:24275849

  15. 75 FR 74059 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Radioactive Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Radioactive Drug Research Committees AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing an opportunity for...

  16. 76 FR 3910 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Orphan Drugs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Orphan Drugs; Common European Medicines Agency/Food and Drug Administration Application Form for Orphan Medicinal Product Designation (Form FDA 3671) AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  17. 78 FR 35277 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Orphan Drugs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Orphan Drugs; Common European Medicines Agency/Food and Drug Administration Application Form for Orphan Medicinal Product Designation (Form FDA 3671) AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  18. Drug Predictive Cues Activate Aversion-Sensitive Striatal Neurons That Encode Drug Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Daniel S.; Robble, Mykel A.; Hebron, Emily M.; Dupont, Matthew J.; Ebben, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-associated cues have profound effects on an addict's emotional state and drug-seeking behavior. Although this influence must involve the motivational neural system that initiates and encodes the drug-seeking act, surprisingly little is known about the nature of such physiological events and their motivational consequences. Three experiments investigated the effect of a cocaine-predictive stimulus on dopamine signaling, neuronal activity, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking. In all experiments, rats were divided into two groups (paired and unpaired), and trained to self-administer cocaine in the presence of a tone that signaled the immediate availability of the drug. For rats in the paired group, self-administration sessions were preceded by a taste cue that signaled delayed drug availability. Assessments of hedonic responses indicated that this delay cue became aversive during training. Both the self-administration behavior and the immediate cue were subsequently extinguished in the absence of cocaine. After extinction of self-administration behavior, the presentation of the aversive delay cue reinstated drug seeking. In vivo electrophysiology and voltammetry recordings in the nucleus accumbens measured the neural responses to both the delay and immediate drug cues after extinction. Interestingly, the presentation of the delay cue simultaneously decreased dopamine signaling and increased excitatory encoding of the immediate cue. Most importantly, the delay cue selectively enhanced the baseline activity of neurons that would later encode drug seeking. Together these observations reveal how cocaine cues can modulate not only affective state, but also the neurochemical and downstream neurophysiological environment of striatal circuits in a manner that promotes drug seeking. PMID:25948270

  19. Drug predictive cues activate aversion-sensitive striatal neurons that encode drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Robble, Mykel A; Hebron, Emily M; Dupont, Matthew J; Ebben, Amanda L; Wheeler, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    Drug-associated cues have profound effects on an addict's emotional state and drug-seeking behavior. Although this influence must involve the motivational neural system that initiates and encodes the drug-seeking act, surprisingly little is known about the nature of such physiological events and their motivational consequences. Three experiments investigated the effect of a cocaine-predictive stimulus on dopamine signaling, neuronal activity, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking. In all experiments, rats were divided into two groups (paired and unpaired), and trained to self-administer cocaine in the presence of a tone that signaled the immediate availability of the drug. For rats in the paired group, self-administration sessions were preceded by a taste cue that signaled delayed drug availability. Assessments of hedonic responses indicated that this delay cue became aversive during training. Both the self-administration behavior and the immediate cue were subsequently extinguished in the absence of cocaine. After extinction of self-administration behavior, the presentation of the aversive delay cue reinstated drug seeking. In vivo electrophysiology and voltammetry recordings in the nucleus accumbens measured the neural responses to both the delay and immediate drug cues after extinction. Interestingly, the presentation of the delay cue simultaneously decreased dopamine signaling and increased excitatory encoding of the immediate cue. Most importantly, the delay cue selectively enhanced the baseline activity of neurons that would later encode drug seeking. Together these observations reveal how cocaine cues can modulate not only affective state, but also the neurochemical and downstream neurophysiological environment of striatal circuits in a manner that promotes drug seeking. PMID:25948270

  20. Drug Trafficking Organizations and Local Economic Activity in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    González, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between illegal firms and local economic activity. In this paper I study changes in satellite night lights across Mexican municipalities after the arrival of large drug trafficking organizations in the period 2000–2010. After accounting for state trends and differences in political regimes, results indicate no significant change in night lights after the arrival of these illegal firms. Estimated coefficients are precise, robust, and similar across different drug trafficking organizations. PMID:26348041

  1. Drug Trafficking Organizations and Local Economic Activity in Mexico.

    PubMed

    González, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between illegal firms and local economic activity. In this paper I study changes in satellite night lights across Mexican municipalities after the arrival of large drug trafficking organizations in the period 2000-2010. After accounting for state trends and differences in political regimes, results indicate no significant change in night lights after the arrival of these illegal firms. Estimated coefficients are precise, robust, and similar across different drug trafficking organizations. PMID:26348041

  2. Quantification of Low-Level Drug Effects Using Real-Time, in vitro Measurement of Oxygen Consumption Rate.

    PubMed

    Neal, Adam; Rountree, Austin M; Philips, Craig W; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Williams, Dominic P; Newham, Peter; Khalil, Gamal; Cook, Daniel L; Sweet, Ian R

    2015-12-01

    There is a general need to detect toxic effects of drugs during preclinical screening. We propose that increased sensitivity of xenobiotics toxicity combined with improved in vitro physiological recapitulation will more accurately assess potentially toxic perturbations of cellular biochemistry that are near in vivo pharmacological exposure levels. Importantly, measurement of such cytopathologies avoids activating mechanisms mediating toxicity at suprapharmacologic levels not relevant to in vivo effects. We present a sensitive method to measure changes in oxygen consumption rate (OCR), a well-established parameter reflecting a potential hazard, in response to exposure to pharmacologic levels of drugs using a flow culture system and state of the art oxygen sensing system. We tested metformin and acetaminophen on rat liver slices to illustrate the method. The features of the method include continuous and very stable measurement of OCR over the course of 48 h in liver slices in a continuous flow chamber with the ability to resolve changes as small as 0.3%/h. Kinetic modeling of metformin inhibition of OCR over a wide range of concentrations revealed both a slow and fast mechanism, where the fast mechanism activated only at concentrations above 0.6 mM. For both drugs, small amounts of inhibition were reversible, but higher decrements were irreversible. Overall the study highlights the advantages of measuring low-level toxicity so as to avoid the common extrapolations made about drug toxicity based on effects of drugs tested at suprapharmacologic levels. PMID:26396153

  3. 21 CFR 201.316 - Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use... Drug Products § 201.316 Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning. (a) Drugs with thyroid hormone activity have been promoted for, and continue to be dispensed and prescribed...

  4. 21 CFR 201.316 - Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use... Drug Products § 201.316 Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning. (a) Drugs with thyroid hormone activity have been promoted for, and continue to be dispensed and prescribed...

  5. 21 CFR 201.316 - Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use... Drug Products § 201.316 Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning. (a) Drugs with thyroid hormone activity have been promoted for, and continue to be dispensed and prescribed...

  6. 21 CFR 201.316 - Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use... Drug Products § 201.316 Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning. (a) Drugs with thyroid hormone activity have been promoted for, and continue to be dispensed and prescribed...

  7. 21 CFR 201.316 - Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use... Drug Products § 201.316 Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning. (a) Drugs with thyroid hormone activity have been promoted for, and continue to be dispensed and prescribed...

  8. Compatibility between active components of a commercial drug.

    PubMed

    Rodante, Fabrizio; Vecchio, Stefano; Catalani, Giovanni; Tomassetti, Mauro

    2002-10-01

    A thermal and a kinetic analysis on the decomposition processes of a commercial drug named diamplicil (AD), obtained by an antibiotic combination of ampicillin (A) and dicloxacillin (D), have been carried out to find their thermal stability. The DSC/TG curves of this commercial drug were compared with those of its active components and an excipient, the magnesium stearate (M). Kinetic study was carried out using both isothermal and dynamic TG curves. Decomposition mechanisms for both active components and commercial drug tested were not found. The kinetic data obtained by the non-isothermal isoconversional method showed that D component causes a decrease of the kinetic stability of the active A component. Additive magnesium stearate does not decrease the stability of the two components. Moreover, storage time values at room temperature were calculated. PMID:12420879

  9. The drug prescription network: a system-level view of drug co-prescription in community-dwelling elderly people.

    PubMed

    Bazzoni, Gianfranco; Marengoni, Alessandra; Tettamanti, Mauro; Franchi, Carlotta; Pasina, Luca; Djade, Codjo Djignefa; Fortino, Ida; Bortolotti, Angela; Merlino, Luca; Nobili, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Networks are well suited to display and analyze complex systems that consist of numerous and interlinked elements. This study aimed at: (1) generating a series of drug prescription networks (DPNs) displaying co-prescription in community-dwelling elderly people; (2) analyzing DPN structure and organization; and (3) comparing various DPNs to unveil possible differences in drug co-prescription patterns across time and space. Data were extracted from the administrative prescription database of the Lombardy Region in northern Italy in 2000 and 2010. DPNs were generated, in which each node represents a drug chemical subclass, whereas each edge linking two nodes represents the co-prescription of the corresponding drugs to the same patient. At a global level, the DPN was a very dense and highly clustered network, whereas at the local level it was organized into anatomically homogeneous modules. In addition, the DPN was assortative by class, because similar nodes (representing drugs with the same anatomic, therapeutic, and pharmacologic annotation) connected to each other more frequently than expected, indicating that similar drugs are often co-prescribed. Finally, temporal changes in the co-prescription of specific drug sub-groups (for instance, proton pump inhibitors) translated into topological changes of the DPN and its modules. In conclusion, complementing more traditional pharmaco-epidemiology methods, the DPN-based method allows appreciatiation (and representation) of general trends in the co-prescription of a specific drug (e.g., its emergence as a heavily co-prescribed hub) in comparison with other drugs. PMID:25531938

  10. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa; Gamarro, Francisco; Pérez-Victoria, José M

    2015-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. PMID:26195527

  11. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca2+, and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. PMID:26195527

  12. Drug-Drug Interaction Associated with Mold-Active Triazoles among Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Andes, David; Azie, Nkechi; Yang, Hongbo; Harrington, Rachel; Kelley, Caroline; Tan, Ruo-Ding; Wu, Eric Q; Franks, Billy; Kristy, Rita; Lee, Edward; Khandelwal, Nikhil; Spalding, James

    2016-06-01

    The majority of hospitalized patients receiving mold-active triazoles are at risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Efforts are needed to increase awareness of DDIs that pose a serious risk of adverse events. Triazoles remain the most commonly utilized antifungals. Recent developments have included the mold-active triazoles (MATs) itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, which are first-line agents for the treatment of filamentous fungal infections but have the potential for DDIs. This objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of triazole DDIs. Hospitalized U.S. adults with MAT use were identified in the Cerner HealthFacts database, which contained data from over 150 hospitals (2005 to 2013). The severities of DDIs with MATs were categorized, using drug labels and the drug information from the Drugdex system (Thompson Micromedex), into four groups (contraindicated, major, moderate, and minor severity). DDIs of minor severity were not counted. A DDI event was considered to have occurred if the following two conditions were met: (i) the patient used at least one drug with a classification of at least a moderate interaction with the MAT during the hospitalization and (ii) there was a period of overlap between the administration of the MAT and that of the interacting drug of at least 1 day. A total of 6,962 hospitalizations with MAT use were identified. Among them, 88% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use, 86% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 93% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use included the use of a concomitant interacting drug. A total of 68% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 34% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 20% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the use of at least one drug with a DDI of contraindicated severity. A total of 83% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 61% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 82% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the

  13. Chemoprotective activity of boldine: modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, R; Machala, M; Minksová, K; Neca, J; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    Possible chemoprotective effects of the naturally occurring alkaloid boldine, a major alkaloid of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.) leaves and bark, including in vitro modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cell line and mouse hepatic microsomes, were investigated. Boldine manifested inhibition activity on hepatic microsomal CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activities and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In addition to the known antioxidant activity, boldine could decrease the metabolic activation of other xenobiotics including chemical mutagens. PMID:11265593

  14. Minireview: Targeting GPCR Activated ERK Pathways for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Eishingdrelo, Haifeng; Kongsamut, Sathapana

    2013-01-01

    It has become clear in recent years that multiple signal transduction pathways are employed upon GPCR activation. One of the major cellular effectors activated by GPCRs is extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Both G-protein and β-arrestin mediated signaling pathways can lead to ERK activation. However, depending on activation pathway, the subcellular destination of activated ERK1/2 may be different. G-protein -dependent ERK activation results in the translocation of active ERK to the nucleus, whereas ERK activated via an arrestin-dependent mechanism remains largely in the cytoplasm. The subcellular location of activated ERK1/2 determines the downstream signaling cascade. Many substrates of ERK1/2 are found in the nucleus: nuclear transcription factors that participate in gene transcription, cell proliferation and differentiation. ERK1/2 substrates are also found in cytosol and other cellular organelles: they may play roles in translation, mitosis, apoptosis and cross-talk with other signaling pathways. Therefore, determining specific subcellular locations of activated ERK1/2 mediated by GPCR ligands would be important in correlating signaling pathways with cellular physiological functions. While GPCR-stimulated selective ERK pathway activation has been studied in several receptor systems, exploitation of these different signaling cascades for therapeutics has not yet been seriously pursued. Many old drug candidates were identified from screens based on G-protein signaling assays, and their activity on β-arrestin signaling pathways being mostly unknown, especially regarding their subcellular ERK pathways. With today’s knowledge of complicated GPCR signaling pathways, drug discovery can no longer rely on single-pathway approaches. Since ERK activation is an important signaling pathway and associated with many physiological functions, targeting the ERK pathway, especially specific subcellular activation pathways should provide new avenues for GPCR drug

  15. Active Targeted Drug Delivery for Microbes Using Nano-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines and antibiotics could kill or inhibit microbes, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat because of acquired resistance and adverse side effects. Nano-carriers-based technology has made significant progress for a long time and is introducing a new paradigm in drug delivery. However, it still has some challenges like lack of specificity toward targeting the infectious site. Nano-carriers utilized targeting ligands on their surface called ‘active target’ provide the promising way to solve the problems like accelerating drug delivery to infectious areas and preventing toxicity or side-effects. In this mini review, we demonstrate the recent studies using the active targeted strategy to kill or inhibit microbes. The four common nano-carriers (e.g. liposomes, nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) delivering encapsulated drugs are introduced. PMID:25877093

  16. Are Preschool Children Active Enough? Objectively Measured Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardon, Greet M.; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse M. M.

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe accelerometer-based physical activity levels in 4- and 5-year-old children (N = 76) on 2 weekdays and 2 weekend days. The children were sedentary for 9.6 hr (85%) daily, while they engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for 34 min (5%). Only 7% of the children engaged in MVPA for 60 min per…

  17. Phenytoin intoxication with no symptoms correlated with serum drug level: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Avcil, Mucahit; Duman, Ali; Turkdogan, Kenan Ahmet; Kapci, Mucahit; Akoz, Ayhan; Canakci, Selcuk Eren; Ozluer, Yunus Emre

    2015-01-01

    In high-dose intake of phenytoin, which is used frequently to treatepilepsy, nystagmus, diplopia, nausea-vomiting, lethargy, confusion, seizure, and coma can be observed. In recent studies on phenytoin intoxication, in which seizure and coma were observed in drug levels greater than 50 ug/mL. The serum phenytoin level of apatient, who consumed approximately 100 pcs of 100 mg phenytoin tablets in an effort to commit suicide, and who had no pathological finding in her neurologic examination, was 124 ug/mL. High drug level and the absence of toxic effect (or the absence of toxic effect correlated with the drug level) indicates that cytochrome P450 is functioning, but there can be a mutation in the MDR1 gene. In our case study, we report on phenytoin intoxication in a patient having a high level of phenytoin but no symptoms correlated with serum drug level, as supported by the findings in the literature. PMID:26966493

  18. DRUG EFFECTS ON THE LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY OF LARVAL ZEBRAFISH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae and the effects of prototype drugs. Zebrafish larvae (6-7 days post-fertilization) were indiv...

  19. Acute neuroactive drug exposures alter locomotor activity in larval zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA's prioritization of toxic chemicals, we are characterizing the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae after exposure to prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. MPTP (1-methyl-4phenyl- 1 ,2,3,6-...

  20. Acute Neuroactive Drug Exposures alter Locomotor Activity in Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the development of a rapid in vivo screen for prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae by assessing the acute effects of prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. Initially,...

  1. Scanning ion images; analysis of pharmaceutical drugs at organelle levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larras-Regard, E.; Mony, M.-C.

    1995-05-01

    With the ion analyser IMS 4F used in microprobe mode, it is possible to obtain images of fields of 10 × 10 [mu]m2, corresponding to an effective magnification of 7000 with lateral resolution of 250 nm, technical characteristics that are appropriate for the size of cell organelles. It is possible to characterize organelles by their relative CN-, P- and S- intensities when the tissues are prepared by freeze fixation and freeze substitution. The recognition of organelles enables correlation of the tissue distribution of ebselen, a pharmaceutical drug containing selenium. The various metabolites characterized in plasma, bile and urine during biotransformation of ebselen all contain selenium, so the presence of the drug and its metabolites can be followed by images of Se. We were also able to detect the endogenous content of Se in tissue, due to the increased sensitivity of ion analysis in microprobe mode. Our results show a natural occurrence of Se in the border corresponding to the basal lamina of cells of proximal but not distal tubules of the kidney. After treatment of rats with ebselen, an additional site of Se is found in the lysosomes. We suggest that in addition to direct elimination of ebselen and its metabolites by glomerular filtration and urinary elimination, a second process of elimination may occur: Se compounds reaching the epithelial cells via the basal lamina accumulate in lysosomes prior to excretion into the tubular fluid. The technical developments of using the IMS 4F instrument in the microprobe mode and the improvement in preparation of samples by freeze fixation and substitution further extend the limit of ion analysis in biology. Direct imaging of trace elements and molecules marked with a tracer make it possible to determine their targets by comparison with images of subcellular structures. This is a promising advance in the study of pathways of compounds within tissues, cells and the whole organism.

  2. [Activity of NTDs Drug-discovery Research Consortium].

    PubMed

    Namatame, Ichiji

    2016-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are an extremely important issue facing global health care. To improve "access to health" where people are unable to access adequate medical care due to poverty and weak healthcare systems, we have established two consortiums: the NTD drug discovery research consortium, and the pediatric praziquantel consortium. The NTD drug discovery research consortium, which involves six institutions from industry, government, and academia, as well as an international non-profit organization, is committed to developing anti-protozoan active compounds for three NTDs (Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and African sleeping sickness). Each participating institute will contribute their efforts to accomplish the following: selection of drug targets based on information technology, and drug discovery by three different approaches (in silico drug discovery, "fragment evolution" which is a unique drug designing method of Astellas Pharma, and phenotypic screening with Astellas' compound library). The consortium has established a brand new database (Integrated Neglected Tropical Disease Database; iNTRODB), and has selected target proteins for the in silico and fragment evolution drug discovery approaches. Thus far, we have identified a number of promising compounds that inhibit the target protein, and we are currently trying to improve the anti-protozoan activity of these compounds. The pediatric praziquantel consortium was founded in July 2012 to develop and register a new praziquantel pediatric formulation for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Astellas Pharma has been a core member in this consortium since its establishment, and has provided expertise and technology in the area of pediatric formulation development and clinical development. PMID:26831798

  3. Relationship between Dose, Drug Levels, and D2 Receptor Occupancy for the Atypical Antipsychotics Risperidone and Paliperidone

    PubMed Central

    Votaw, J. R.; Ritchie, J.; Howell, L. L.

    2012-01-01

    Blockade of D2 family dopamine receptors (D2Rs) is a fundamental property of antipsychotics, and the degree of striatal D2R occupancy has been related to antipsychotic and motor effects of these drugs. Recent studies suggest the D2R occupancy of antipsychotics may differ in extrastriatal regions compared with the dorsal striatum. We studied this issue in macaque monkeys by using a within-subjects design. [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography scans were obtained on four different doses of risperidone and paliperidone (the 9-OH metabolite of risperidone) and compared with multiple off-drug scans in each animal. The half-life of the two drugs in these monkeys was determined to be between 3 and 4 h, and drug was administered by a constant infusion through an intragastric catheter. The D2R occupancy of antipsychotic was determined in the caudate, putamen, ventral striatum, and four prefrontal and temporal cortical regions and was related to serum and cerebrospinal fluid drug levels. Repeated 2-week treatment with risperidone or paliperidone did not produce lasting changes in D2R binding potential in any region examined. As expected, D2R binding potential was highest in the caudate and putamen and was approximately one-third that level in the ventral striatum and 2% of that level in the cortical regions. We found dose-dependent D2R occupancy for both risperidone and paliperidone in both basal ganglia and cortical regions of interest. We could not find evidence of regional variation in D2R occupancy of either drug. Comparison of D2R occupancy and serum drug levels supports a target of 40 to 80 ng/ml active drug for these two atypical antipsychotics. PMID:22214649

  4. Reversal of efflux of an anticancer drug in human drug-resistant breast cancer cells by inhibition of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan Woo; Asai, Daisuke; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2016-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a 170-kDa transmembrane protein that mediates the efflux of anticancer drugs from cells. Pgp overexpression has a distinct role in cells exhibiting multidrug resistance (MDR). We examined reversal of drug resistance in human MDR breast cancer cells by inhibition of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) activity, which is associated with Pgp-mediated efflux of anticancer drugs. PKCα activity was confirmed by measurement of phosphorylation levels of a PKCα-specific peptide substrate (FKKQGSFAKKK-NH2), showing relatively higher basal activity in drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells (84 %) than that in drug-sensitive MCF-7 cells (63 %). PKCα activity was effectively suppressed by the PKC inhibitor, Ro-31-7549, and reversal of intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin was observed by inhibition of PKCα activity in MCF-7/ADR cells compared with their intrinsic drug resistance. Importantly, increased accumulation of doxorubicin could enhance the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in MDR cells significantly. These results suggest a potential for overcoming MDR via inhibition of PKCα activity with conventional anticancer drugs. PMID:26323260

  5. Finding New Tricks for Old Drugs: Tumoricidal Activity of Non-Traditional Antitumor Drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangrong; Li, Min; Wang, Junling; Liang, Xi; Su, Yujie; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Chemotherapy, a traditional method, plays an important role in tumor therapy. Currently, common clinical antitumor drugs have several defects like poor efficacy, side effects, etc. Furthermore, developing new antitumor drugs takes a long time and requires many resources. Recent studies have found that oldies are newbies for the oncologist, such as flavonoid, metformin, aspirin, etc. These non-traditional antitumor drugs (NTADs) are widely used in management of non-cancer diseases, which gained FDA approval for treatment of patients. Increasingly, studies about antitumor action of NTADs have attracted many researchers' interests. A giant amount of studies showed a decrease in cancer incidence in NTAD-treated patients. Several reports outlined a direct inhibitory effect of NTADs on cancer cell growth and antitumoral actions. This review summarized the research progress on antitumor effects of ten NTADs. Retrospective and meta-analyses of trials also showed that these NTADs had preventive effects against cancer in vitro and in vivo. These drugs represent a promising option for cancer treatment, which have clear benefits including clinical safety, obvious curative effect, and saving medical and health resources. Judged from previous reports, future studies will yield valuable data about the profitable effects of these drugs. With a better understanding of its mechanisms of antitumor activity, NTADs may become available for combination with chemotherapy or targeted therapy in clinic. PMID:27032934

  6. 21 CFR 310.542 - Over-the-counter (OTC) drug products containing active ingredients offered for use in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Over-the-counter (OTC) drug products containing active ingredients offered for use in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia. 310.542 Section 310.542 Food...) Hyperphosphatemia is a condition in which an abnormally high plasma level of phosphate occurs in the blood....

  7. 21 CFR 310.541 - Over-the-counter (OTC) drug products containing active ingredients offered for use in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Over-the-counter (OTC) drug products containing active ingredients offered for use in the treatment of hypophosphatemia. 310.541 Section 310.541 Food and...) Hypophosphatemia is a condition in which an abnormally low plasma level of phosphate occurs in the blood....

  8. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Lis; Sousa, Bruno de; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria Ls; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-06-01

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites. PMID:27276364

  9. Enzyme-activated intracellular drug delivery with tubule clay nanoformulation.

    PubMed

    Dzamukova, Maria R; Naumenko, Ekaterina A; Lvov, Yuri M; Fakhrullin, Rawil F

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of stimuli-triggered drug delivery vehicle s is an important milestone in treating cancer. Here we demonstrate the selective anticancer drug delivery into human cells with biocompatible 50-nm diameter halloysite nanotube carriers. Physically-adsorbed dextrin end stoppers secure the intercellular release of brilliant green. Drug-loaded nanotubes penetrate through the cellular membranes and their uptake efficiency depends on the cells growth rate. Intercellular glycosyl hydrolases-mediated decomposition of the dextrin tube-end stoppers triggers the release of the lumen-loaded brilliant green, which allowed for preferable elimination of human lung carcinoma cells (А549) as compared with hepatoma cells (Hep3b). The enzyme-activated intracellular delivery of brilliant green using dextrin-coated halloysite nanotubes is a promising platform for anticancer treatment. PMID:25976444

  10. Enzyme-activated intracellular drug delivery with tubule clay nanoformulation

    PubMed Central

    Dzamukova, Maria R.; Naumenko, Ekaterina A.; Lvov, Yuri M.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of stimuli-triggered drug delivery vehicle s is an important milestone in treating cancer. Here we demonstrate the selective anticancer drug delivery into human cells with biocompatible 50-nm diameter halloysite nanotube carriers. Physically-adsorbed dextrin end stoppers secure the intercellular release of brilliant green. Drug-loaded nanotubes penetrate through the cellular membranes and their uptake efficiency depends on the cells growth rate. Intercellular glycosyl hydrolases-mediated decomposition of the dextrin tube-end stoppers triggers the release of the lumen-loaded brilliant green, which allowed for preferable elimination of human lung carcinoma cells (А549) as compared with hepatoma cells (Hep3b). The enzyme-activated intracellular delivery of brilliant green using dextrin-coated halloysite nanotubes is a promising platform for anticancer treatment. PMID:25976444

  11. Enhanced Efflux Activity Facilitates Drug Tolerance in Dormant Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Yingying; Zhao, Zhilun; Li, Yingxing; Zou, Jin; Ma, Qi; Zhao, Yanna; Ke, Yuehua; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Huiyi; Baker, Matthew A.B.; Ge, Hao; Sun, Yujie; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Bai, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Natural variations in gene expression provide a mechanism for multiple phenotypes to arise in an isogenic bacterial population. In particular, a sub-group termed persisters show high tolerance to antibiotics. Previously, their formation has been attributed to cell dormancy. Here we demonstrate that bacterial persisters, under β-lactam antibiotic treatment, show less cytoplasmic drug accumulation as a result of enhanced efflux activity. Consistently, a number of multi-drug efflux genes, particularly the central component TolC, show higher expression in persisters. Time-lapse imaging and mutagenesis studies further establish a positive correlation between tolC expression and bacterial persistence. The key role of efflux systems, among multiple biological pathways involved in persister formation, indicates that persisters implement a positive defense against antibiotics prior to a passive defense via dormancy. Finally, efflux inhibitors and antibiotics together effectively attenuate persister formation, suggesting a combination strategy to target drug tolerance. PMID:27105118

  12. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Lis; de Sousa, Bruno; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria LS; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites. PMID:27276364

  13. Alteration of human hepatic drug transporter activity and expression by cigarette smoke condensate.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, Katia; Vee, Marc Le; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Fardel, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Smoking is well-known to impair pharmacokinetics, through inducing expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. In the present study, we demonstrated that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) also alters activity and expression of hepatic drug transporters, which are now recognized as major actors of hepatobiliary elimination of drugs. CSC thus directly inhibited activities of sinusoidal transporters such as OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OCT1 and NTCP as well as those of canalicular transporters like P-glycoprotein, MRP2, BCRP and MATE1, in hepatic transporters-overexpressing cells. CSC similarly counteracted constitutive OATP, NTCP and OCT1 activities in human highly-differentiated hepatic HepaRG cells. In parallel, CSC induced expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in HepaRG cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B1, OATP2B1, OAT2, NTCP, OCT1 and BSEP, and enhanced that of MRP4. Such changes in transporter gene expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway, and were counteracted, for some of them, by siRNA-mediated AhR silencing. This suggests that CSC alters hepatic drug transporter levels via activation of the AhR cascade. Importantly, drug transporter expression regulations as well as some transporter activity inhibitions occurred for a range of CSC concentrations similar to those required for inducing drug metabolizing enzymes and may therefore be hypothesized to be relevant for smokers. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of cigarette smoke, which could contribute to known alteration of pharmacokinetics and some liver adverse effects caused by smoking. PMID:27450509

  14. Examination of antimicrobial activity of selected non-antibiotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kruszewska, Hanna; Zareba, Tomasz; Tyski, Stefan

    2004-12-01

    A variety of pharmaceutical preparations, which are applied in the management of non-infectious diseases, have shown in vitro some antimicrobial activity. These drugs are called "non-antibiotics". The aim of this study was to detect and characterize the antimicrobial activity of non-antibiotic drugs, selected from the preparations analysed during state control performed in the National Institute of Public Health in Poland. Over 180 of pharmaceutical preparations were randomly chosen from different groups of drugs. A surveillance study was performed on standard ATCC microbial strains used for drug control: S. aureus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It was shown that the drugs listed below inhibited growth of at least one of the examined strains: Actonel 5 mg tabl. (risedronate), Aldan 10 mg tabl. (amlodipine), Aleras 10 mg tabl. (cetirisine), Aspicam 15 mg tabl. (meloxicam), Baikadent 6 mg/g gel (flavons of Scutellariae), Debretin 100 mg tabl. (trimebutine), Ferro-Duo 100 mg tabl. (ferrum), Gastrovent 145 mg caps. (bismuth citrate), Ibum 200 mg caps., Upfen 200 mg tabl. (ibuprofen), Lastet 100 mg caps. (etoposide), Legalon 70 mg tabl. (sylimarin), Madopar 125 tabl. (benserazide, levodopa), Moxenil 100 mg tabl. (nimesulide), Neurotin 800 mg tabl. (gabapentin), Propranolol 40 mg tabl. (propranolol), Rexetin 20 mg tabl. (paroxetine), Salipax 20 mg caps. (fluoxetine), Selofen 10 mg caps. (zaleplon) Stenorol 0.6% powder (halofuginone), Stimuloton 50 mg tabl. (sertraline), Superoptim 0.3 mg tabl. (hipericine), Uversan 50 mg tabl. (arbutine from Arctostaphylos uva ursi). S. aureus strain was susceptible to the most of the drugs listed above. The lowest inhibitory concentration was found for sertraline and hipericine (0.16 and 0.075 mg/mL, respectively). PMID:15909927

  15. Activation of Melanin Synthesis in Alternaria infectoria by Antifungal Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Chantal; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Silva, Branca M. A.; Nakouzi-Naranjo, Antonio; Zuzarte, Mónica; Chatterjee, Subhasish; Stark, Ruth E.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    The importance of Alternaria species fungi to human health ranges from their role as etiological agents of serious infections with poor prognoses in immunosuppressed individuals to their association with respiratory allergic diseases. The present work focuses on Alternaria infectoria, which was used as a model organism of the genus, and was designed to unravel melanin production in response to antifungals. After we characterized the pigment produced by A. infectoria, we studied the dynamics of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin production during growth, the degree of melanization in response to antifungals, and how melanization affected susceptibility to several classes of therapeutic drugs. We demonstrate that A. infectoria increased melanin deposition in cell walls in response to nikkomycin Z, caspofungin, and itraconazole but not in response to fluconazole or amphotericin B. These results indicate that A. infectoria activates DHN-melanin synthesis in response to certain antifungal drugs, possibly as a protective mechanism against these drugs. Inhibition of DHN-melanin synthesis by pyroquilon resulted in a lower minimum effective concentration (MEC) of caspofungin and enhanced morphological changes (increased hyphal balloon size), characterized by thinner and less organized A. infectoria cell walls. In summary, A. infectoria synthesizes melanin in response to certain antifungal drugs, and its susceptibility is influenced by melanization, suggesting the therapeutic potential of drug combinations that affect melanin synthesis. PMID:26711773

  16. Activation of Melanin Synthesis in Alternaria infectoria by Antifungal Drugs.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Chantal; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Silva, Branca M A; Nakouzi-Naranjo, Antonio; Zuzarte, Mónica; Chatterjee, Subhasish; Stark, Ruth E; Casadevall, Arturo; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2016-03-01

    The importance of Alternaria species fungi to human health ranges from their role as etiological agents of serious infections with poor prognoses in immunosuppressed individuals to their association with respiratory allergic diseases. The present work focuses on Alternaria infectoria, which was used as a model organism of the genus, and was designed to unravel melanin production in response to antifungals. After we characterized the pigment produced by A. infectoria, we studied the dynamics of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin production during growth, the degree of melanization in response to antifungals, and how melanization affected susceptibility to several classes of therapeutic drugs. We demonstrate that A. infectoria increased melanin deposition in cell walls in response to nikkomycin Z, caspofungin, and itraconazole but not in response to fluconazole or amphotericin B. These results indicate that A. infectoria activates DHN-melanin synthesis in response to certain antifungal drugs, possibly as a protective mechanism against these drugs. Inhibition of DHN-melanin synthesis by pyroquilon resulted in a lower minimum effective concentration (MEC) of caspofungin and enhanced morphological changes (increased hyphal balloon size), characterized by thinner and less organized A. infectoria cell walls. In summary, A. infectoria synthesizes melanin in response to certain antifungal drugs, and its susceptibility is influenced by melanization, suggesting the therapeutic potential of drug combinations that affect melanin synthesis. PMID:26711773

  17. Search of antimicrobial activity of selected non-antibiotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kruszewska, Hanna; Zareba, Tomasz; Tyski, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    A variety of pharmaceutical preparations, which are applied in the management of non-infectious diseases, have shown in vitro some antimicrobial activity. These drugs are called "non-antibiotics". The aim of this study was to detect and characterise the antimicrobial activity of non-antibiotic drugs. selected from the preparations analysed during state control performed at the Drug Institute in Poland. Over 160 pharmaceutical preparations were randomly chosen from different groups of drugs. The surveillance study was performed on standard ATCC microbial strains used for drug control: S aureus, E. coil, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It was shown that the drugs listed below inhibited growth of at least one of the examined strains:acyclovir (Awirol 5%, cream), alendronate (Alenato 5 mg, tabl.), alverine (Meteospasmyl 20 mg, caps.), butorphanole (Butamidor 10 mg/ml, amp.), clodronate (Sindronat 400 mg, caps), diclofenac (Olfen 75 mg, amp.), emadastine (Emadine 0.05%, eye dr.), etodolac (Febret 200 mg, caps.), fluvastatine (Lescol 40 mg, tabl.), ketamine (Ketamidor 10%, amp.), levocabastine (Histimet 0.5 mg/ml, eye dr.), losartan (Lorista 50 mg, tabl.), matipranolol (Betaman 0.3% eye dr.), mesalazine (Pentasa 1%, susp.), naproxen (Nalgesin 550 mg, tabl.), oxaprosine (Reumax 600 mg, tabl.), oxymethazoline (Nasivin 0.025%, nose dr.), proxymetacaine (Alcaine 0.5%, eye dr.), ribavirin (Rebetol 200 mg, caps.), rutoside with ascorbic acid (Cerutin 20+200 mg, tabl.), sulodexide (Vessel due F, 250 LSU, caps.), tegaserole (Zelmac 50 mg, tabl.), telmisartan (Pritor 20 mg, tabl.), temosolomide (Temodal 100 mg, caps.), ticlopidine (Ticlid 250 mg, tabl.), tolfenamic acid (Migea rapid 200 mg, tabl.), tramadole (Tramundin 100 mg, tabl.), tropicamide (Tropicamidum 1%, eye dr.). Staphylococcus aureus was susceptible to most of the drugs listed above. Ticlopidine showed activity against S. aureus, E. coli and C. albicans (MICs equal to: 0.45; 0.45 and 0.65 mg/ml, respectively

  18. Effects of acute doses of prosocial drugs methamphetamine and alcohol on plasma oxytocin levels

    PubMed Central

    Bershad, Anya K.; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Seiden, Jacob A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Many drugs, including alcohol and stimulants, demonstrably increase sociability and verbal interaction and are recreationally consumed in social settings. One drug, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, “ecstasy”), appears to produce its prosocial effects by increasing plasma oxytocin levels, and the oxytocin system has been implicated in responses to several other drugs of abuse. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of two other “social” drugs on plasma oxytocin levels: methamphetamine and alcohol. Based on their shared capacity to enhance sociability, we hypothesized that both methamphetamine and alcohol would increase plasma oxytocin. In Study 1, 11 healthy adult volunteers attended three sessions during which they received methamphetamine (10mg or 20mg) or placebo under double blind conditions. Subjective drug effects, cardiovascular effects, and plasma oxytocin were measured at regular intervals throughout the sessions. In Study 2, 8 healthy adult volunteers attended a single session during which they received one beverage containing placebo, and then a beverage containing alcohol (0.8 g/kg). Subjective effects, breath alcohol levels, and plasma oxytocin were measured at regular intervals. Both methamphetamine and alcohol produced their expected physiological and subjective effects, but neither drug increased plasma oxytocin levels. The neurobiological mechanisms mediating the prosocial effects of drugs such as alcohol and methamphetamine remain to be identified. PMID:25853370

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase is activated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    King, Tanya S; Russe, Otto Quintus; Möser, Christine V; Ferreirós, Nerea; Kynast, Katharina L; Knothe, Claudia; Olbrich, Katrin; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2015-09-01

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor, which is activated in stages of increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decrease of inflammatory processes and inhibition of disease progression of diabetes and obesity. A recent study suggested that salicylate, the active metabolite of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) acetyl-salicylic acid (aspirin), is able to activate AMPK pharmacologically. This observation raised the question whether or not other NSAIDs might also act as AMPK activators and whether this action might contribute to their cyclooxygenase (COX)-independent anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated mouse and human neuronal cells and liver tissue of mice after treatment with various NSAIDs. Our results showed that the non-selective acidic NSAIDs ibuprofen and diclofenac induced AMPK activation similar to aspirin while the COX-2 selective drug etoricoxib and the non-opioid analgesic paracetamol, both drugs have no acidic structure, failed to activate AMPK. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK can be activated by specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as salicylic acid, ibuprofen or diclofenac possibly depending on the acidic structure of the drugs. AMPK might therefore contribute to their antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26049010

  20. 21 CFR 212.20 - What activities must I perform to ensure drug quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What activities must I perform to ensure drug quality? 212.20 Section 212.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION...

  1. Activity of several kinds of drugs against Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Qian, Weifeng; Wang, Hui; Shan, Dan; Li, Bo; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qun

    2015-12-01

    Neosporosis caused by Neospora caninum is a serious disease in cattle and dogs worldwide. It is the major cause of abortion and neonatal mortality in cattle. In this study, we evaluated the anti-N. caninum activity of Chinese medicine extracts (curcumin, artemether), herbicides (atrazine, glyphosate), anticoccidiosis drugs (toltrazuril and ponazuril), cyclophosphamide, diminazene aceturate and praziquantel in vitro using parasite growth, replication and host cell invasion assays in human foreskin fibroblast cultures. Curcumin, artemether, atrazine, toltrazuril and ponazuril exhibited inhibitory activity with 50% growth inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.1±0.4, 1.0±0.05, 11.2±2.7, 30.3±2.0 and 33.3±4.1μg/ml, respectively, in the growth inhibition assay. They were also active against protozoa replication, but only curcumin was effective against host cell invasion. Glyphosate, cyclophosphamide, diminazene aceturate and praziquantel were ineffective. In an in vivo infection model, curcumin showed no activity against N. caninum infection. We showed that curcumin, artemether, atrazine, toltrazuril, and ponazuril exhibited anti-N. caninum activity in vitro, providing important information for further studies on anti-N. caninum drugs. PMID:26264260

  2. Bioprinted 3D Primary Liver Tissues Allow Assessment of Organ-Level Response to Clinical Drug Induced Toxicity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Juergen; Robbins, Justin B.; Crogan-Grundy, Candace; Presnell, Sharon C.; Singer, Thomas; Roth, Adrian B.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling clinically relevant tissue responses using cell models poses a significant challenge for drug development, in particular for drug induced liver injury (DILI). This is mainly because existing liver models lack longevity and tissue-level complexity which limits their utility in predictive toxicology. In this study, we established and characterized novel bioprinted human liver tissue mimetics comprised of patient-derived hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells in a defined architecture. Scaffold-free assembly of different cell types in an in vivo-relevant architecture allowed for histologic analysis that revealed distinct intercellular hepatocyte junctions, CD31+ endothelial networks, and desmin positive, smooth muscle actin negative quiescent stellates. Unlike what was seen in 2D hepatocyte cultures, the tissues maintained levels of ATP, Albumin as well as expression and drug-induced enzyme activity of Cytochrome P450s over 4 weeks in culture. To assess the ability of the 3D liver cultures to model tissue-level DILI, dose responses of Trovafloxacin, a drug whose hepatotoxic potential could not be assessed by standard pre-clinical models, were compared to the structurally related non-toxic drug Levofloxacin. Trovafloxacin induced significant, dose-dependent toxicity at clinically relevant doses (≤ 4uM). Interestingly, Trovafloxacin toxicity was observed without lipopolysaccharide stimulation and in the absence of resident macrophages in contrast to earlier reports. Together, these results demonstrate that 3D bioprinted liver tissues can both effectively model DILI and distinguish between highly related compounds with differential profile. Thus, the combination of patient-derived primary cells with bioprinting technology here for the first time demonstrates superior performance in terms of mimicking human drug response in a known target organ at the tissue level. PMID:27387377

  3. Dose critical in-vivo detection of anti-cancer drug levels in blood

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Holly H.; Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the in vivo and in vitro detection and measurement of dose critical levels of DNA-binding anti-cancer drug levels in biological fluids. The apparatus comprises a laser based fiber optic sensor (optrode) which utilizes the secondary interactions between the drug and an intercalating fluorochrome bound to a probe DNA, which in turn is attached to the fiber tip at one end thereof. The other end of the optical fiber is attached to an illumination source, detector and recorder. The fluorescence intensity is measured as a function of the drug concentration and its binding constant to the probe DNA. Anticancer drugs which lend themselves to analysis by the use of the method and the optrode of the present invention include doxorubicin, daunorubicin, carminomycin, aclacinomycin, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-uracil, arabinosyl cytosine, mitomycin, cis-platinum 11 diamine dichloride procarbazine, vinblastine vincristine and the like. The present method and device are suitable for the continuous monitoring of the levels of these and other anticancer drugs in biological fluids such as blood, serum, urine and the like. The optrode of the instant invention also enables the measurement of the levels of these drugs from a remote location and from multiple samples.

  4. Use of drugs and cost of treatment of diarrhea in secondary level government hospitals in maharashtra.

    PubMed

    Rao, P H; Kabra, S G

    2010-05-01

    A prescription audit was carried out among the outpatient attendees of 31 secondary level hospitals under Maharashtra Health Systems Development Project. Use of drugs and cost of treatment of diarrhoea were studied using the prescriptions for diarrhoea collected for the prescription audit. Average number of drugs prescribed per prescription for treatment of diarrhoea was 3.7. It was higher than average number of drugs per prescription in the Maharashtra Health Systems Development Project hospitals in general. About three fourths of the prescriptions contained oral rehydration salts. Furazolidone and metronidazole were prescribed in about half of the prescriptions. Cotrimoxazole was prescribed in about one fourth of prescriptions. About 60% of the prescriptions contained other drugs. The average cost of prescription for diarrhoea was Rs. 14 and increased with the number of drugs prescribed. Average cost of prescription was the highest for those written by general practitioners. Pathological tests were indicated only in case of 11%. PMID:21188059

  5. Nestling activity levels during begging behaviour predicts activity level and body mass in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Simon C.

    2014-01-01

    Across a range of species including humans, personality traits, or differences in behaviour between individuals that are consistent over time, have been demonstrated. However, few studies have measured whether these consistent differences are evident in very young animals, and whether they persist over an individual’s entire lifespan. Here we investigated the begging behaviour of very young cross-fostered zebra finch nestlings and the relationship between that and adult activity levels. We found a link between the nestling activity behaviour head movements during begging, measured at just five and seven days after hatching, and adult activity levels, measured when individuals were between three and three and a half years old. Moreover, body mass was found to be negatively correlated with both nestling and adult activity levels, suggesting that individuals which carry less body fat as adults are less active both as adults and during begging as nestlings. Our work suggests that the personality traits identified here in both very young nestlings and adults may be linked to physiological factors such as metabolism or environmental sources of variation. Moreover, our work suggests it may be possible to predict an individual’s future adult personality at a very young age, opening up new avenues for future work to explore the relationship between personality and a number of aspects of individual life history and survival. PMID:25279258

  6. Nestling activity levels during begging behaviour predicts activity level and body mass in adulthood.

    PubMed

    McCowan, Luke S C; Griffith, Simon C

    2014-01-01

    Across a range of species including humans, personality traits, or differences in behaviour between individuals that are consistent over time, have been demonstrated. However, few studies have measured whether these consistent differences are evident in very young animals, and whether they persist over an individual's entire lifespan. Here we investigated the begging behaviour of very young cross-fostered zebra finch nestlings and the relationship between that and adult activity levels. We found a link between the nestling activity behaviour head movements during begging, measured at just five and seven days after hatching, and adult activity levels, measured when individuals were between three and three and a half years old. Moreover, body mass was found to be negatively correlated with both nestling and adult activity levels, suggesting that individuals which carry less body fat as adults are less active both as adults and during begging as nestlings. Our work suggests that the personality traits identified here in both very young nestlings and adults may be linked to physiological factors such as metabolism or environmental sources of variation. Moreover, our work suggests it may be possible to predict an individual's future adult personality at a very young age, opening up new avenues for future work to explore the relationship between personality and a number of aspects of individual life history and survival. PMID:25279258

  7. Prescription and consumption of solid oral drugs dispensed as unitary doses in a third level hospital

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Guzmán, David; Juárez-Olguín, Hugo; Hernández-García, Ernestina; Medina-Andrade, Alejandro; Juarez Tapia, Belen

    2015-01-01

    Background: The knowledge about the pattern of prescription and consumption of solid oral drugs dispensed as unitary doses (UD) in Mexico is sparing. Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of prescription and consumption of solid oral drugs dispensed as unitary doses (UD) in a third level private hospital of Mexico. A retrospective study of a 60-month period (from 2007 to 2011) was carried out to know the pattern of drugs dispensed as UD in a third level hospital. Results: Among the principal drugs consumed were analgesic, antihypertensive, antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, antiepileptic, and diuretics. The dispensation of drugs per year was as follows: 181 drugs with 85,167 UD in 2007; 199 with 90,519 UD in 2008; 193 with 101,479 UD in 2009; 195 with 100,798 UD in 2010; and 198 with 103,913 UD in 2011. Conclusion: The findings confirmed that prescription and consumption of unitary doses in the hospitalization service increased, and revealed the extensive use of analgesics as the principal prescribed drug in this kind of hospital. PMID:27013914

  8. Towards integrated drug substance and drug product design for an active pharmaceutical ingredient using particle engineering.

    PubMed

    Kougoulos, Eleftherios; Smales, Ian; Verrier, Hugh M

    2011-03-01

    A novel experimental approach describing the integration of drug substance and drug production design using particle engineering techniques such as sonocrystallization, high shear wet milling (HSWM) and dry impact (hammer) milling were used to manufacture samples of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) with diverse particle size and size distributions. The API instability was addressed using particle engineering and through judicious selection of excipients to reduce degradation reactions. API produced using a conventional batch cooling crystallization process resulted in content uniformity issues. Hammer milling increased fine particle formation resulting in reduced content uniformity and increased degradation compared to sonocrystallized and HSWM API in the formulation. To ensure at least a 2-year shelf life based on predictions using an Accelerated Stability Assessment Program, this API should have a D [v, 0.1] of 55 μm and a D [v, 0.5] of 140 μm. The particle size of the chief excipient in the drug product formulation needed to be close to that of the API to avoid content uniformity and stability issues but large enough to reduce lactam formation. The novel methodology described here has potential for application to other APIs. PMID:21246419

  9. Effect of lipid-lowering and anti-hypertensive drugs on plasma homocysteine levels

    PubMed Central

    Dierkes, Jutta; Luley, Claus; Westphal, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of homocysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, are a risk factor for coronary, cerebral and peripheral artery disease. Next to other factors, drugs used for the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular disease may modulate plasma homocysteine levels. Thus, a drug induced homocysteine increase may counteract the desired cardioprotective effect. The aim is to summarize the current knowledge on the effect of two important classes of drugs, lipid-lowering drugs and anti-hypertensive drugs, on homocysteine metabolism. Among the lipid-lowering drugs, especially the fibric acid derivatives, which are used for treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol, are associated with an increase of homocysteine by 20%–50%. This increase can be reduced, but not totally avoided by the addition of folic acid, vitamin B12 and B6 to fibrates. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) do not influence homocysteine concentrations substantially. The effects of nicotinic acid and n3-fatty acids on the homocysteine concentrations are less clear, more studies are necessary to clarify their influence on homocysteine. Antihypertensive drugs have also been studied with respect to homocysteine metabolism. A homocysteine increase has been shown after treatment with hydrochlorothiazide, a lowering was observed after treatment with ß-blockers, but no effect with ACE-inhibitors. The clinical significance of the homocysteine elevation by fibrates and thiazides is not clear. However, individual patients use these drugs for long time, indicating that even moderate increases may be important. PMID:17583180

  10. Inhibitions of several antineoplastic drugs on serum sialic Acid levels in mice bearing tumors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Da-Yong; Xu, Jing; Lu, Ting-Ren; Wu, Hong-Ying; Xu, Bin

    2013-03-01

    Six murine tumors, including ascetic tumors HepA, EC, P388 leukemia, S180 and solid tumor S180, and Lewis lung carcinoma, were employed in this work. The free sialic acid concentrations in both blood and ascites were measured in tumor-bearing mice. The results showed that the content of sialic acids in blood was increased in tumor growth and certain tumor types. Higher sialic acid content was observed in ascites than that present in blood. The influence of antineoplastic agents (vincristine, thiotepa, adriamycin, probimane, cisplatin, oxalysine, cortisone, nitrogen mustard, lycobetaine, Ara-C, harringtonine, and cyclophosphamide) on the content of sialic acids in mice blood bearing solid tumors of either S180 or Lewis lung carcinoma was observed. Different inhibitions of antineoplastic drugs on both tumor growth and serum sialic acid levels in mice bearing tumors were found. Among these antineoplastic drugs, probimane, cisplatin, nitrogen mustard, and lycobetaine were able to decrease the serum sialic acid levels in mice bearing tumors. Since these four antineoplastic drugs are all DNA chelating agents, it was proposed that the inhibition of tumor sialic acids by these drugs might be through the DNA template via two ways. Since we have found no effect of antineoplastic drugs on serum sialic acid levels in normal mice, this suggests that the inhibition of antineoplastic drugs on sialic acids is by tumor involvement. PMID:23641340

  11. Inhibition of topoisomerase I activity and efflux drug transporters' expression by xanthohumol. from hops.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Jung Sun; Lee, Ik-Soo; Kang, Bok Yun

    2007-11-01

    Xanthohumol (XN) and its related compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against four different human cancer cell lines, A549 (lung), SK-OV-3 (ovarian), SK-MEL-2 (melanoma), and HCT-15 (colon) using a sulforhodamine B assay. XN showed the most active cytotoxicity against the human cancer cell lines. Isoxanthohumol, 8-prenylnaringenin, and xanthohumol 4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside showed comparable cytotoxicity and (2S)-5-methoxy-8-prenylnaringenin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside was the least cytotoxic compound. The anticancer properties of XN, the most active cytotoxic compound, were further investigated. XN showed an inhibitory effect on the activity of DNA topoisomerase I (topo I), which was measured from the relaxation of supercoiled DNA. The inhibition of topo I by XN might explain the cytotoxicity against the human cancer cell lines. Moreover, the expression of the drug efflux genes was investigated to predict the drug resistance. XN clearly decreased the mRNA levels of ABCB1 (MDR1), ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCC2 (MRP2), and ABCC3 (MRP3). These results suggest that XN has anticancer properties by inhibiting the topo I activity and it might be used in conjunction with other anticancer chemotherapeutic agents to reduce the drug resistance inhibiting the efflux drug transporters. PMID:18087812

  12. A Drug Combination Screen Identifies Drugs Active against Amoxicillin-Induced Round Bodies of In Vitro Borrelia burgdorferi Persisters from an FDA Drug Library

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Although currently recommended antibiotics for Lyme disease such as doxycycline or amoxicillin cure the majority of the patients, about 10–20% of patients treated for Lyme disease may experience lingering symptoms including fatigue, pain, or joint and muscle aches. Under experimental stress conditions such as starvation or antibiotic exposure, Borrelia burgdorferi can develop round body forms, which are a type of persister bacteria that appear resistant in vitro to customary first-line antibiotics for Lyme disease. To identify more effective drugs with activity against the round body form of B. burgdorferi, we established a round body persister model induced by exposure to amoxicillin (50 μg/ml) and then screened the Food and Drug Administration drug library consisting of 1581 drug compounds and also 22 drug combinations using the SYBR Green I/propidium iodide viability assay. We identified 23 drug candidates that have higher activity against the round bodies of B. burgdorferi than either amoxicillin or doxycycline. Eleven individual drugs scored better than metronidazole and tinidazole which have been previously described to be active against round bodies. In this amoxicillin-induced round body model, some drug candidates such as daptomycin and clofazimine also displayed enhanced activity which was similar to a previous screen against stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters not exposure to amoxicillin. Additional candidate drugs active against round bodies identified include artemisinin, ciprofloxacin, nifuroxime, fosfomycin, chlortetracycline, sulfacetamide, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfathiozole. Two triple drug combinations had the highest activity against amoxicillin-induced round bodies and stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters: artemisinin/cefoperazone/doxycycline and sulfachlorpyridazine/daptomycin/doxycycline. These findings confirm and extend previous findings that certain drug combinations have superior activity against B. burgdorferi

  13. A Drug Combination Screen Identifies Drugs Active against Amoxicillin-Induced Round Bodies of In Vitro Borrelia burgdorferi Persisters from an FDA Drug Library.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Although currently recommended antibiotics for Lyme disease such as doxycycline or amoxicillin cure the majority of the patients, about 10-20% of patients treated for Lyme disease may experience lingering symptoms including fatigue, pain, or joint and muscle aches. Under experimental stress conditions such as starvation or antibiotic exposure, Borrelia burgdorferi can develop round body forms, which are a type of persister bacteria that appear resistant in vitro to customary first-line antibiotics for Lyme disease. To identify more effective drugs with activity against the round body form of B. burgdorferi, we established a round body persister model induced by exposure to amoxicillin (50 μg/ml) and then screened the Food and Drug Administration drug library consisting of 1581 drug compounds and also 22 drug combinations using the SYBR Green I/propidium iodide viability assay. We identified 23 drug candidates that have higher activity against the round bodies of B. burgdorferi than either amoxicillin or doxycycline. Eleven individual drugs scored better than metronidazole and tinidazole which have been previously described to be active against round bodies. In this amoxicillin-induced round body model, some drug candidates such as daptomycin and clofazimine also displayed enhanced activity which was similar to a previous screen against stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters not exposure to amoxicillin. Additional candidate drugs active against round bodies identified include artemisinin, ciprofloxacin, nifuroxime, fosfomycin, chlortetracycline, sulfacetamide, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfathiozole. Two triple drug combinations had the highest activity against amoxicillin-induced round bodies and stationary phase B. burgdorferi persisters: artemisinin/cefoperazone/doxycycline and sulfachlorpyridazine/daptomycin/doxycycline. These findings confirm and extend previous findings that certain drug combinations have superior activity against B. burgdorferi

  14. Antitubercular activity of disulfiram, an antialcoholism drug, against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Horita, Yasuhiro; Takii, Takemasa; Yagi, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Kenji; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Inagaki, Emi; Kremer, Laurent; Sato, Yasuo; Kuroishi, Ryuji; Lee, Yoosa; Makino, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Hajime; Hasegawa, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2012-08-01

    The antimycobacterial activities of disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) clinical isolates were evaluated in vitro. Both DSF and DDC exhibited potent antitubercular activities against 42 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, including MDR/XDR-TB strains. Moreover, DSF showed remarkable bactericidal activity ex vivo and in vivo. Therefore, DSF might be a drug repurposed for the treatment of MDR/XDR-TB. PMID:22615274

  15. Antitubercular Activity of Disulfiram, an Antialcoholism Drug, against Multidrug- and Extensively Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Kenji; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Inagaki, Emi; Kremer, Laurent; Sato, Yasuo; Kuroishi, Ryuji; Lee, YooSa; Makino, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Hajime; Hasegawa, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2012-01-01

    The antimycobacterial activities of disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) clinical isolates were evaluated in vitro. Both DSF and DDC exhibited potent antitubercular activities against 42 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, including MDR/XDR-TB strains. Moreover, DSF showed remarkable bactericidal activity ex vivo and in vivo. Therefore, DSF might be a drug repurposed for the treatment of MDR/XDR-TB. PMID:22615274

  16. Modification of bursting in a Helix neuron by drugs influencing intracellular regulation of calcium level.

    PubMed

    Salánki, J; Budai, D; Véró, M

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ruthenium red, caffein and EGTA (ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid) influencing intracellular Ca2+ level as well as that of pH-lowering was investigated on identified RPal neuron of Helix pomatia characterized by bimodal pacemaker (bursting) activity. Drugs were applied both extracellularly and intracellularly. Intracellular injection was performed from micropipettes by pressure. It was found that intracellular injection of ruthenium red, caffein, EGTA and pH-lowering caused immediate short hyperpolarization and suspension of bursting. The effect of caffein and lowering of pH was biphasic, hyperpolarization was followed by an increase of spiking. Following EGTA injection the amplitudes of interburst hyperpolarizing waves decreased, and prolongation of spikes occurred. Extracellular application of ruthenium red caused slight depolarization, while caffein produced mainly effects that were similar to those of the intracellular injection. Adding EGTA into the bath resulted in cessation of bursting, and later on also spike generation was blocked. All these effects could be eliminated by washing. It is concluded that Ca-influx during spiking cannot be considered as a single factor in maintaining bursting activity, nevertheless, intracellular binding and liberation of Ca depending on the cell metabolism should also be taken into consideration as a possible mechanism of burst regulation. PMID:6198869

  17. An enzymatic deconjugation method for the analysis of small molecule active drugs on antibody-drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Gu, Christine; Gruenhagen, Jason; Yehl, Peter; Chetwyn, Nik P; Medley, Colin D

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are complex therapeutic agents that use the specific targeting properties of antibodies and the highly potent cytotoxicity of small molecule drugs to selectively eliminate tumor cells while limiting the toxicity to normal healthy tissues. Two critical quality attributes of ADCs are the purity and stability of the active small molecule drug linked to the ADC, but these are difficult to assess once the drug is conjugated to the antibody. In this study, we report a enzyme deconjugation approach to cleave small molecule drugs from ADCs, which allows the drugs to be subsequently characterized by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The model ADC we used in this study utilizes a valine-citrulline linker that is designed to be sensitive to endoproteases after internalization by tumor cells. We screened several proteases to determine the most effective enzyme. Among the 3 cysteine proteases evaluated, papain had the best efficiency in cleaving the small molecule drug from the model ADC. The deconjugation conditions were further optimized to achieve complete cleavage of the small molecule drug. This papain deconjugation approach demonstrated excellent specificity and precision. The purity and stability of the active drug on an ADC drug product was evaluated and the major degradation products of the active drug were identified. The papain deconjugation method was also applied to several other ADCs, with the results suggesting it could be applied generally to ADCs containing a valine-citrulline linker. Our results indicate that the papain deconjugation method is a powerful tool for characterizing the active small molecule drug conjugated to an ADC, and may be useful in ensuring the product quality, efficacy and the safety of ADCs. PMID:26891281

  18. Recent New Drug Approvals, Part 2: Drugs Undergoing Active Clinical Studies in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chhim, Rebecca F.; Shelton, Chasity M.; Christensen, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this 2-part review is to provide information about drugs that have been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Part 1 reviewed recently approved drugs with pediatric indications. Part 2 reviews drugs recently approved only in adults and have published or ongoing studies in children. PMID:23616733

  19. Activation of Latent HIV Using Drug-loaded Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovochich, Michael

    Antiretroviral therapy is currently only capable of controlling human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication, rather than completely eradicating virus from patients. This is due in part to the establishment of a latent virus reservoir in resting CD4+ T-cells, which persists even in the presence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). It is thought that forced activation of latently infected cells could induce virus production, allowing targeting of the cell by the immune response. A variety of molecules are able to stimulate HIV from latency. However, no tested purging strategy has proven capable of eliminating the infection completely or preventing viral rebound if therapy is stopped. Hence, novel latency activation approaches are required. Nanoparticles can offer several advantages over more traditional drug delivery methods, including improved drug solubility, stability, and the ability to simultaneously target multiple different molecules to particular cell or tissue types. Here we describe the development of a novel lipid nanoparticle with the protein kinase C activator bryostatin-2 incorporated (LNP-Bry). These particles can target, activate primary human CD4+ T-cells, and stimulate latent virus production from human T-cell lines in vitro and from latently infected cells in a humanized mouse model ex vivo. This activation was synergistically enhanced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) sodium butyrate. Furthermore, LNP-Bry can also be loaded with the protease inhibitor nelfinavir (LNP-Bry-Nel), producing a particle capable of both activating latent virus and inhibiting viral spread. LNP-Bry was further tested for its in vivo biodistribution in both wild type mice (C57 black 6), as well as humanized mice (SCID-hu Thy/Liv, and bone marrow-liver-thymus [BLT]). LNP-Bry accumulated in the spleen and induced the early activation marker CD69 in wild type mice. Taken together, these data demonstrate the ability of nanotechnological approaches to

  20. Job level risk assessment using task level ACGIH hand activity level TLV scores: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Drinkaus, Phillip; Sesek, Richard; Bloswick, Donald S; Mann, Clay; Bernard, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Existing upper extremity musculoskeletal disorder analytical tools are primarily intended for single or mono-task jobs. However, many jobs contain more than 1 task and some include job rotation. This case/control study investigates methods of modifying an existing tool, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Hand Activity Level (HAL) Threshold Limit Value (TLV), to assess the upper extremity risk of multi-task jobs. Various methods of combining the task differences and ratios into a job level assessment were explored. Two methods returned significant odds ratios, (p < .05) of 18.0 (95% CI 1.8-172) and 12.0 (95% CI 1.2-120). These results indicate that a modified ACGIH HAL TLV may provide insight into the work-related risk of multi-task jobs. Further research is needed to optimize this process. PMID:16219155

  1. Drug Discovery for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy via Utrophin Promoter Activation Screening

    PubMed Central

    Moorwood, Catherine; Lozynska, Olga; Suri, Neha; Napper, Andrew D.; Diamond, Scott L.; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating muscle wasting disease caused by mutations in dystrophin, a muscle cytoskeletal protein. Utrophin is a homologue of dystrophin that can functionally compensate for its absence when expressed at increased levels in the myofibre, as shown by studies in dystrophin-deficient mice. Utrophin upregulation is therefore a promising therapeutic approach for DMD. The use of a small, drug-like molecule to achieve utrophin upregulation offers obvious advantages in terms of delivery and bioavailability. Furthermore, much of the time and expense involved in the development of a new drug can be eliminated by screening molecules that are already approved for clinical use. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed and validated a cell-based, high-throughput screening assay for utrophin promoter activation, and used it to screen the Prestwick Chemical Library of marketed drugs and natural compounds. Initial screening produced 20 hit molecules, 14 of which exhibited dose-dependent activation of the utrophin promoter and were confirmed as hits. Independent validation demonstrated that one of these compounds, nabumetone, is able to upregulate endogenous utrophin mRNA and protein, in C2C12 muscle cells. Conclusions/Significance We have developed a cell-based, high-throughput screening utrophin promoter assay. Using this assay, we identified and validated a utrophin promoter-activating drug, nabumetone, for which pharmacokinetics and safety in humans are already well described, and which represents a lead compound for utrophin upregulation as a therapy for DMD. PMID:22028826

  2. Molecular pathways: mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway mutations and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Antonia L; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2013-05-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases are a diverse family of transmembrane proteins that can activate multiple pathways upon ligation of the receptor, one of which is the series of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades. The MAPK pathways play critical roles in a wide variety of cancer types, from hematologic malignancies to solid tumors. Aberrations include altered expression levels and activation states of pathway components, which can sometimes be attributable to mutations in individual members. The V600E mutation of BRAF was initially described in 2002 and has been found at particularly high frequency in melanoma and certain subtypes of colorectal cancer. In the relatively short time since this discovery, a family of drugs has been developed that specifically target this mutated BRAF isoform, which, after results from phase I/II and III clinical trials, was granted U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval in August 2011. Although these drugs produce clinically meaningful increases in progression-free and overall survival, due to acquired resistance they have not improved mortality rates. New drugs targeting other members of the MAPK pathways are in clinical trials or advanced stages of development. It is hoped that combination therapies of these new drugs in conjunction with BRAF inhibitors will counteract the mechanisms of resistance and provide cures. The clinical implementation of next-generation sequencing is leading to a greater understanding of the genetic architecture of tumors, along with acquired mechanisms of drug resistance, which will guide the development of tumor-specific inhibitors and combination therapies in the future. PMID:23406774

  3. Nanocomplexes of an insulinotropic drug: optimization, microparticle formation, and antidiabetic activity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Elmowafy, Enas; Osman, Rihab; El-Shamy, Abdel Hameed; Awad, Gehanne AS

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to test the ability of two non-diabetogenic carbohydrates to intranasally deliver the insulinotropic drug repaglinide (REP) for controlling blood glucose level. REP was loaded onto chitosan/alginate nanocomplexes (NCs) suitable for mucosal delivery and uptake. Improved stability and delivery characteristics were obtained by spray drying the selected NCs, yielding microparticles. A statistical experimental design was adopted to investigate the effects of the formulations’ variables on two critical responses: NC size and drug entrapment efficiency. Physicochemical characterizations of the network’s structures were done, and in vitro cytotoxicity and histopathological studies were conducted. The potential of the developed system to prolong the drug effect was tested on diabetic rats. The results showed that to attain particles suitable for nasal delivery, alginate should be used at its lowest level used in this study (0.6 mg/mL). A low level of chitosan (0.5 mg/mL) was needed when the drug was cation-loaded, while the high chitosan level (1 mg/mL) was more suitable when REP was anion-loaded. The best entrapment efficiency was achieved at a theoretical drug loading of 0.025 mg/mL. Discrete NCs could be rapidly recovered from the spray-dried microparticles. The cytotoxicity and histopathological studies indicated that such formulations were well tolerated. The antihyperglycemic activity of the nasally administered formulae was gradual but was significantly sustained over 24 hours, suggesting NC mucosal uptake. Nasal delivery of such dry powders achieved better glycemic control compared with the conventional oral tablets. PMID:25258534

  4. Using Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Levels as a Biomarker for Drug-Induced Gingival Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Sukuroglu, Erkan; Güncü, Güliz N.; Kilinc, Kamer; Caglayan, Feriha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Drug-induced gingival overgrowth has a multifactorial nature and the pathogenesis is still uncertain. It has been suggested that Nitric Oxide (NO) might play a role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival overgrowth due to the contribution of NO to immune response and matrix degradation. NO levels in biological fluids have been used as a diagnostic biomarker in many diseases. The aim of this study is to determine whether NO levels in plasma, saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) can serve as a potential biomarker for the evaluation of drug-induced gingival overgrowth risk. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 patients, receiving cyclosporine A (n = 35), phenytoin (n = 25), nifedipine (n = 26), or diltiazem (n = 18) participated in the study. The amount of gingival overgrowth was evaluated with two indices and was given as percentage. Periodontal clinical parameters including plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding time index (GBTI), and probing depth (PD) were also assessed. Saliva, GCF, and plasma samples were obtained from each participants. Nitrite and nitrate levels in saliva, GCF, and plasma were analyzed by Griess reagent. Results: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels in responders were significantly higher than those in non-responders in only phenytoin group (p < 0.05). Nitrite and nitrate levels of gingival crevicular fluid and plasma did not significantly differ between responders and non-responders in all study groups (p > 0.05). Salivary nitrite levels exhibited a significant correlation with PD, GBTI, severity of gingival overgrowth (%GO), and GCF volume (p < 0.05). Additionally, a strong positive correlation was detected between saliva and plasma nitrate levels (p < 0.005). However, both nitrite and nitrate levels in GCF and plasma demonstrated no significant correlation with clinical parameters, GO severity, and GCF volume (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels could be used as periodontal disease

  5. 21 CFR 310.538 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for use for ingrown...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for use for ingrown toenail relief. 310.538 Section 310.538 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs...

  6. Elevated p21-activated kinase 2 activity results in anchorage-independent growth and resistance to anticancer drug-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Jerry W; Eaton, Andrew; Montano, Gerald T; Chang, Yu-Wen E; Jakobi, Rolf

    2009-03-01

    p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK-2) seems to be a regulatory switch between cell survival and cell death signaling. We have shown previously that activation of full-length PAK-2 by Rac or Cdc42 stimulates cell survival, whereas caspase activation of PAK-2 to the proapoptotic PAK-2p34 fragment is involved in the cell death response. In this study, we present a role of elevated activity of full-length PAK-2 in anchorage-independent growth and resistance to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. Hs578T human breast cancer cells that have low levels of PAK-2 activity were more sensitive to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis and showed higher levels of caspase activation of PAK-2 than MDA-MB435 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells that have high levels of PAK-2 activity. To examine the role of elevated PAK-2 activity in breast cancer, we have introduced a conditionally active PAK-2 into Hs578T human breast cells. Conditional activation of PAK-2 causes loss of contact inhibition and anchorage-independent growth of Hs578T cells. Furthermore, conditional activation of PAK-2 suppresses activation of caspase 3, caspase activation of PAK-2, and apoptosis of Hs578T cells in response to the anticancer drug cisplatin. Our data suggest a novel mechanism by which full-length PAK-2 activity controls the apoptotic response by regulating levels of activated caspase 3 and thereby its own cleavage to the proapoptotic PAK-2p34 fragment. As a result, elevated PAK-2 activity interrupts the apoptotic response and thereby causes anchorage-independent survival and growth and resistance to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis. PMID:19242610

  7. Use of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Ascertain Levels of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ted; Zignol, Matteo; Nyakan, Edwin; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L.; Gardner, Adrian; Kamle, Lydia; Injera, Wilfred; Carter, E. Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective To classify the prevalence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in two different geographic settings in western Kenya using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) methodology. Design The prevalence of drug resistance was classified among treatment-naïve smear positive TB patients in two settings, one rural and one urban. These regions were classified as having high or low prevalence of MDR-TB according to a static, two-way LQAS sampling plan selected to classify high resistance regions at greater than 5% resistance and low resistance regions at less than 1% resistance. Results This study classified both the urban and rural settings as having low levels of TB drug resistance. Out of the 105 patients screened in each setting, two patients were diagnosed with MDR-TB in the urban setting and one patient was diagnosed with MDR-TB in the rural setting. An additional 27 patients were diagnosed with a variety of mono- and poly- resistant strains. Conclusion Further drug resistance surveillance using LQAS may help identify the levels and geographical distribution of drug resistance in Kenya and may have applications in other countries in the African Region facing similar resource constraints. PMID:27167381

  8. A computer-based intervention for improving the appropriateness of antiepileptic drug level monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chen, Philip; Tanasijevic, Milenko J; Schoenenberger, Ronald A; Fiskio, Julie; Kuperman, Gilad J; Bates, David W

    2003-03-01

    We designed and implemented 2 automated, computerized screens for use at the time of antiepileptic drug (AED) test order entry to improve appropriateness by reminding physicians when a potentially redundant test was ordered and providing common indications for monitoring and pharmacokinetics of the specific AED. All computerized orders for inpatient serum AED levels during two 3-month periods were included in the study. During the 3-month period after implementation of the automated intervention, 13% of all AED tests ordered were canceled following computerized reminders. For orders appearing redundant, the cancellation rate was 27%. For nonredundant orders, 4% were canceled when information on specific AED monitoring and pharmacokinetics was provided. The cancellation rate was sustained after 4 years. There has been a 19.5% decrease in total AED testing volume since implementation of this intervention, despite a 19.3% increase in overall chemistry test volume. Inappropriateness owing to repeated testing before pharmacologic steady state was reached decreased from 54% of all AED orders to 14.6%. A simple, automated, activity-based intervention targeting a specific test-ordering behavior effectively reduced inappropriate laboratory testing. The sustained benefit supports the idea that computerized interventions may durably affect physician behavior. Computerized delivery of such evidence-based boundary guidelines can help narrow the gap between evidence and practice. PMID:12645347

  9. Entry-Level Activities in System Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylander, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    System-level consultation or organizational development in schools is an area in great need of theoretical models and definitions. The three articles in this special issue provide a unique learning opportunity not only for consultation across borders but also for consultation within the same nation. In my commentary, I limit my remarks to a few…

  10. Hardee County Energy Activities - Middle School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.

    Described are over 70 activities designed to help students develop writing skills by examining energy issues. Intended for middle school students, the lessons were developed by Hardee County, Florida teachers. Learning strategies employed include class discussions, analogies, word puzzles, letter writing, sentence completions, vocabulary building…

  11. Human Development Program: Level VI Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Geraldine

    The curriculum guide presents the activities component of the Human Development Program for grade 6. The Human Development Program (HDP) is an affective curricular approach developed by psychologists to aid teachers in instilling responsibility and self-confidence in children. The nucleus of the Human Development Program is a circle session…

  12. Human Development Program: Level III Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessell, Harold

    The curriculum guide presents the activities component of the Human Development Program for the third grade. The Human Development Program (HDP) is an affective curricular approach developed by psychologists to help teachers instill responsibility and self-confidence in children. Following a brief overview of the HDP and explanation of the Magic…

  13. New active drugs for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaniboni, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Newer active drugs have been recently added to the pharmacological armamentarium for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Aflibercept, a recombinant fusion protein composed of the extracellular domains of human vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1 and 2 and the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), is an attractive second-line option in combination with folfiri for patients who have failed folfox +/- bevacizumab. Ramucirumab, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets VEGFR-2, provided similar results in the same setting. Tas-102, an oral fluoropyrimidine, and regorafenib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, are both able to control the disease in a considerable proportion of patients when all other available treatments have failed. These new therapeutic options along with the emerging concept that previous therapies may also be reitroduced or rechallenged after regorafenib and Tas-102 failure are bringing new hope for thousands of patients and their families. PMID:26730280

  14. New active drugs for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Alberto

    2015-12-27

    Newer active drugs have been recently added to the pharmacological armamentarium for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Aflibercept, a recombinant fusion protein composed of the extracellular domains of human vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1 and 2 and the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), is an attractive second-line option in combination with folfiri for patients who have failed folfox +/- bevacizumab. Ramucirumab, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets VEGFR-2, provided similar results in the same setting. Tas-102, an oral fluoropyrimidine, and regorafenib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, are both able to control the disease in a considerable proportion of patients when all other available treatments have failed. These new therapeutic options along with the emerging concept that previous therapies may also be reitroduced or rechallenged after regorafenib and Tas-102 failure are bringing new hope for thousands of patients and their families. PMID:26730280

  15. 75 FR 49946 - National Drug Intelligence Center: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... National Drug Intelligence Center: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension With Change... Response System. The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), National Drug Intelligence Center (NDIC... Intelligence Center, Fifth Floor, 319 Washington Street, Johnstown, PA 15901. Written comments and...

  16. Serum drug level-related sodium valproate-induced hair loss

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnappa, Suresh K.; Belhekar, Mahesh N.

    2013-01-01

    Sodium valproate is a well-established treatment in epilepsy and mood disorders. Its utility is compromised by its adverse effects such as tremor, weight gain, hair loss, and liver dysfunction. Hair loss may occur when drug is used in higher dose. Drug-induced hair loss is diffused and non-scarring, which is reversible upon withdrawal. But there are no case reports showing relation between serum levels of valproate and occurrence of hair loss. So we took interest in reporting this case report. PMID:23716898

  17. Application of space-time scan statistics to describe geographic and temporal clustering of visible drug activity.

    PubMed

    Linton, Sabriya L; Jennings, Jacky M; Latkin, Carl A; Gomez, Marisela B; Mehta, Shruti H

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge of the geographic and temporal clustering of drug activity can inform where health and social services are needed and can provide insight on the potential impact of local policies on drug activity. This ecologic study assessed the spatial and temporal distribution of drug activity in Baltimore, Maryland, prior to and following the implementation of a large urban redevelopment project in East Baltimore, which began in 2003. Drug activity was measured by narcotic calls for service at the neighborhood level. A space-time scan statistic approach was used to identify statistically significant clusters of narcotic calls for service across space and time, using a discrete Poisson model. After adjusting for economic deprivation and housing vacancy, clusters of narcotic calls for service were identified among neighborhoods located in Southeast, Northeast, Northwest, and West Baltimore from 2001 to 2010. Clusters of narcotic calls for service were identified among neighborhoods located in East Baltimore from 2001 to 2003, indicating a decrease in narcotic calls thereafter. A large proportion of clusters occurred among neighborhoods located in North and Northeast Baltimore after 2003, which indicated a potential spike during this time frame. These findings suggest potential displacement of drug activity coinciding with the initiation of urban redevelopment in East Baltimore. Space-time scan statistics should be used in future research to describe the potential implications of local policies on drug activity. PMID:25078036

  18. Assessment of Disease-Related Therapeutic Protein Drug-Drug Interaction for Etrolizumab in Patients With Moderately to Severely Active Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohui; Kenny, Jane R; Dickmann, Leslie; Maciuca, Romeo; Looney, Caroline; Tang, Meina T

    2016-06-01

    The efficacy and safety of etrolizumab, a humanized IgG1 mAb, were evaluated in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) in a phase 2 study (EUCALYPTUS). The current study assessed the risk of therapeutic protein drug-drug interaction (TP-DDI) of etrolizumab on CYP3A activity in patients with UC. Literature review was performed to compare serum proinflammatory cytokine levels and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of CYP3A substrate drugs between patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and healthy subjects. Treatment effect of etrolizumab on CYP3A activity was evaluated by measuring colonic CYP3A4 mRNA expression and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in EUCALYPTUS patients. Literature data suggested similar levels between IBD patients and healthy subjects for serum proinflammatory cytokines and PK parameters of CYP3A substrate drugs. Additionally, treatment with etrolizumab did not change colonic CYP3A4 mRNA expression or serum CRP levels in UC patients. In conclusion, our results indicate a low TP-DDI risk for etrolizumab in UC patients, particularly on medications metabolized by CYP3A. PMID:26412221

  19. Effect of amantadine on drug-induced parkisonism: relationship between plasma levels and effect.

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, G M; Nardini, M; Ferrari, P; Latini, R; Fieschi, C; Morselli, P L

    1976-01-01

    Amantadine, administered at a dose of 200 mg/day, antagonized the extapyramidal symptomatology induced by neuroleptic drugs in fifteen psychiatric patients. Steady-state levels were reached within 4-7 days of treatment. Individual plasma levels ranged from 200-900 ng/ml. Apparent plasma half-lives varied from 10-28.5 h with an apparent VD of 200-400 litres. A significant relationship was found between the plasma levels of amantadine and the effects on the extrapyramidal symptomatology. The data suggest a direct effect of amantadine on dopaminergic receptors. PMID:788761

  20. Evaluation of pharmacodynamic properties of psychotropic drugs: quanitative EEG, psychometric and blood level investigations in normals and patients.

    PubMed

    Saletu, B; Grünberger, J

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative EEG analyses in combination with certain statistical procedures may be utilized in order to classify psychotropic drugs and to determine their cerebral bioavailability. Psychometric tests including evaluation of attention, concentration, psychomotor activity, critical flicker frequency, reaction time, Archimedean spiral, mood and affectivity, may add valuable information about a drug's psychotropic and pharmacodynamic properties. As was seen in studies involving a new pyridodiazepine, short-term drug effects in the EEG of normals are predictive of EEG and clinical effects in patients. Pharmaco-EEG profiles of lopirazepam were found similar in normals and alcoholic patients with an anxiety syndrom as far as the type of changes was concerned, although some quantitative differences were observed. As previously described, quantitative EEG changes during treatment were correlated with clinical improvement or deterioration. Moreover, there is some evidence that single dose effects in the EEG of patients may eventually be utilized to predict therapeutic outcome with a certain drug. Finally, relationships between blood level, quantitative EEG and psychometric changes after administration of phentermine and oxazepam are described and discussed. PMID:419165

  1. Directly Observed Physical Activity Levels in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell R.; McIver, Kerry; Dowda, Marsha; Brown, William H.; Addy, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Background: Millions of young children attend preschools and other structured child development programs, but little is known about their physical activity levels while in those settings. The purpose of this study was to describe the physical activity levels and demographic and school-related correlates of physical activity in children attending…

  2. Targeted drug delivery systems 6: Intracellular bioreductive activation, uptake and transport of an anticancer drug delivery system across intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gharat, L; Taneja, R; Weerapreeyakul, N; Rege, B; Polli, J; Chikhale, P J

    2001-05-21

    We demonstrate transport across, intracellular accumulation and bioreductive activation of a conformationally constrained, anticancer drug delivery system (the CH(3)-TDDS) using Caco-2 cell monolayers (CCMs) as an in vitro model of the human intestinal mucosa. Reverse-phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) coupled with UV detection was used to detect CH(3)-TDDS, the bioreduction product (lactone) and the released drug (melphalan methyl ester; MME). Upon incubation of the CH(3)-TDDS with the apical (AP) surface of 21-day-old CCM, we observed rapid decrease in the AP concentration of the CH(3)-TDDS (60%/hr) as a result of cellular uptake. Rapid intracellular accumulation of the CH(3)-TDDS was followed by bioreductive activation to deplete the cellular levels of CH(3)-TDDS. The drug part (MME) and lactone, as well as CH(3)-TDDS, were detected in the basolateral (BL) chamber. Intracellular Caco-2 levels of TDDS and lactone were also detectable. Bioreductive activation of the CH(3)-TDDS was additionally confirmed by formation of lactone after incubation of the CH(3)-TDDS in the presence of freshly prepared Caco-2 cell homogenates. During transport studies of melphalan or MME alone (as control), the intact drug was not detected in the intracellular compartment or in the BL chamber. These observations demonstrate that CH(3)-TDDS has potential for improving intestinal delivery of MME. TDDS could be useful in facilitating oral absorption of MME as well as the oral delivery of other agents. PMID:11337161

  3. Drug Metabolism Enzyme Expression and Activity in Primary Cultures of Human Proximal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lash, Lawrence H.; Putt, David A.; Cai, Hongliang

    2008-01-01

    We previously catalogued expression and activity of organic anion and cation, amino acid, and peptide transporters in primary cultures of human proximal tubular (hPT) cells to establish them as a cellular model to study drug transport in the human kidney [Toxicology 228, 200–218 (2006)]. Here, we extend our analysis to drug metabolism enzymes. Expression of 11 cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was determined with specific antibodies. CYP1B1, CYP3A4, and CYP4A11 were the only CYP enzymes readily detected in total cell extracts. These same CYP enzymes, as well as CYP3A5 and possibly CYP2D6, were detected in microsomes from confluent hPT cells, although expression levels varied among kidney samples. In agreement with Western blot data, only activity of CYP3A4/5 was detected among the enzyme activities measured. Expression of all three glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) known to be found in hPT cells, GSTA, GSTP, and GSTT, was readily detected. Variable expression of three sulfotransferases (SULTs), SULT1A3, SULT1E, and SULT2A1, and three UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), UGT1A1, UGT1A6, and UGT2B7, was also detected. When examined over the course of cell growth to confluence, expression of all enzymes was generally maintained at readily measurable levels, although they were often lower than in fresh tissue. These results indicate that primary cultures of hPT cells possess significant capacity to metabolize many classes of drugs, and can be used as an effective model to study drug metabolism. PMID:18055091

  4. Assessing the Essentiality of Leishmania donovani Nitroreductase and Its Role in Nitro Drug Activation

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Stephen; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    The nitroimidazole fexinidazole has potential as a safe and effective oral drug therapy for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis. To date, nitroheterocyclics have not been used in the treatment of leishmaniasis, and relatively little is known about their mechanism of action. In African trypanosomes, nitro drugs are reductively activated by a type I nitroreductase (NTR), absent in mammalian cells. Modulation of nitroreductase levels in Trypanosoma brucei directly affected sensitivity to nitro compounds, with reduced concentrations of the enzyme leading to moderate nitro drug resistance. In view of the progression of fexinidazole into clinical development for visceral leishmaniasis, here we assess the essentiality of the nitroreductase in Leishmania donovani and the effect of modulating nitroreductase levels on susceptibility to fexinidazole. The failure to directly replace both endogenous copies of the NTR gene, except in the presence of an ectopic copy of the gene, suggests that the NTR gene is essential for the growth and survival of L. donovani promastigotes. Loss of a single chromosomal copy of the L. donovani NTR gene resulted in parasites that were mildly resistant (<2-fold) to the predominant in vivo metabolite of fexinidazole, while parasites overexpressing NTR were 18-fold more susceptible. These data confirm that Leishmania NTR plays a pivotal role in fexinidazole activation. Reliance on a single enzyme for prodrug activation may leave fexinidazole vulnerable to the emergence of drug resistance. However, the essentiality of the NTR in L. donovani promastigotes, combined with the limited resistance shown by NTR single knockout cells, suggests that the potential for the spread of NTR-based resistance to fexinidazole may be limited. PMID:23208716

  5. Psychotropic drugs attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia by altering hypothalamic levels of inflammatory mediators in rats.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Ahmad; Sharon-Granit, Yael; Azab, Abed N

    2016-07-28

    Recent evidence suggests that inflammation may contribute to the pathophysiology of mental disorders and that psychotropic drugs exert various effects on brain inflammation. The administration of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) to mammals is associated with robust production of inflammatory mediators and pathological changes in body temperature. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of four different psychotropic drugs on LPS-induced hypothermia and production of prostaglandin (PG) E2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and phosphorylated-p65 (P-p65) levels in hypothalamus of LPS-treated rats. Rats were treated once daily with lithium (100mg/kg), carbamazepine (40mg/kg), haloperidol (2mg/kg), imipramine (20mg/kg) or vehicle (NaCl 0.9%) for 29 days. On day 29, rats were injected with LPS (1mg/kg) or saline. At 1.5h post LPS injection body temperature was measured, rats were sacrificed, blood was collected and their hypothalami were excised, homogenized and centrifuged. PGE2, TNF-α and nuclear P-p65 levels were determined by specific ELISA kits. We found that lithium, carbamazepine, haloperidol and imipramine significantly attenuated LPS-induced hypothermia, resembling the effect of classic anti-inflammatory drugs. Moreover, lithium, carbamazepine, haloperidol and imipramine differently but significantly affected the levels of PGE2, TNF-α and P-p65 in plasma and hypothalamus of LPS-treated rats. The results suggest that psychotropic drugs attenuate LPS-induced hypothermia by reducing hypothalamic production of inflammatory constituents, particularly PGE2. The effects of psychotropic drugs on brain inflammation may contribute to their therapeutic mechanism but also to their toxicological profile. PMID:27181513

  6. Autophagy activation by novel inducers prevents BECN2-mediated drug tolerance to cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Kenta; Wang, Nan; Fan, Yuying; Zhang, Weiran; Schoenen, Frank J; Frankowski, Kevin J; Marugan, Juan; Zhou, Yifa; Huang, Sui; He, Congcong

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoids and related drugs generate profound behavioral effects (such as analgesic effects) through activating CNR1 (cannabinoid receptor 1 [brain]). However, repeated cannabinoid administration triggers lysosomal degradation of the receptor and rapid development of drug tolerance, limiting the medical use of marijuana in chronic diseases. The pathogenic mechanisms of cannabinoid tolerance are not fully understood, and little is known about its prevention. Here we show that a protein involved in macroautophagy/autophagy (a conserved lysosomal degradation pathway), BECN2 (beclin 2), mediates cannabinoid tolerance by preventing CNR1 recycling and resensitization after prolonged agonist exposure, and deletion of Becn2 rescues CNR1 activity in mouse brain and conveys resistance to analgesic tolerance to chronic cannabinoids. To target BECN2 therapeutically, we established a competitive recruitment model of BECN2 and identified novel synthetic, natural or physiological stimuli of autophagy that sequester BECN2 from its binding with GPRASP1, a receptor protein for CNR1 degradation. Co-administration of these autophagy inducers effectively restores the level and signaling of brain CNR1 and protects mice from developing tolerance to repeated cannabinoid usage. Overall, our findings demonstrate the functional link among autophagy, receptor signaling and animal behavior regulated by psychoactive drugs, and develop a new strategy to prevent tolerance and improve medical efficacy of cannabinoids by modulating the BECN2 interactome and autophagy activity. PMID:27305347

  7. Stable Colloidal Drug Aggregates Catch and Release Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Christopher K; Duan, Da; Ganesh, Ahil N; Torosyan, Hayarpi; Shoichet, Brian K; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-04-15

    Small molecule aggregates are considered nuisance compounds in drug discovery, but their unusual properties as colloids could be exploited to form stable vehicles to preserve protein activity. We investigated the coaggregation of seven molecules chosen because they had been previously intensely studied as colloidal aggregators, coformulating them with bis-azo dyes. The coformulation reduced colloid sizes to <100 nm and improved uniformity of the particle size distribution. The new colloid formulations are more stable than previous aggregator particles. Specifically, coaggregation of Congo Red with sorafenib, tetraiodophenolphthalein (TIPT), or vemurafenib produced particles that are stable in solutions of high ionic strength and high protein concentrations. Like traditional, single compound colloidal aggregates, the stabilized colloids adsorbed and inhibited enzymes like β-lactamase, malate dehydrogenase, and trypsin. Unlike traditional aggregates, the coformulated colloid-protein particles could be centrifuged and resuspended multiple times, and from resuspended particles, active trypsin could be released up to 72 h after adsorption. Unexpectedly, the stable colloidal formulations can sequester, stabilize, and isolate enzymes by spin-down, resuspension, and release. PMID:26741163

  8. Conditioned tolerance to drug-induced (poly I:C) natural killer cell activation: effects of drug-dosage and context-specificity parameters.

    PubMed

    Dyck, D G; Driedger, S M; Nemeth, R; Osachuk, T A; Greenberg, A H

    1987-09-01

    Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the role of drug-dosage and stimulus-specificity parameters on the tolerance of drug-induced (poly I:C) natural killer (NK) cell activity. In the first experiment a protocol which provided mice with four weekly 20 micrograms/mouse ip injections of the immunostimulatory synthetic polynucleotide (poly I:C) following exposure to either a simple odor cue or a complex cue resulted in tolerance of NK cell activity. The identical protocol with a higher drug dose (50 micrograms/mouse) did not produce tolerance. In a second experiment, the stimulus specificity of tolerance was assessed by giving two groups of mice repeated signaled drug injections. For one of these groups the final poly I:C injection of the series was signaled, while for the other group it was not. Although both groups were tolerant relative to controls not previously exposed to the drug, indirect evidence of conditioning was obtained. Specifically, it was found that tolerance among mice receiving the signal on the test was such that they were not different from undrugged controls, while uncued mice had significantly higher levels of NK cell activity. The third experiment evaluated the role of stimulus specificity within an extinction paradigm. It was found that tolerance was reversed in mice provided with repeated nonreinforced reexposure to drug-signaling cues, while mice exposed to novel cues remained tolerant. These results further support the hypothesis that associative factors contribute to the tolerance of a drug-induced immune response. PMID:3505759

  9. Model of complex chiral drug metabolic systems and numerical simulation of the remaining chirality toward analysis of dynamical pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Yoshiyuki; Asahi, Toru

    2015-05-21

    In this study, systems of complicated pathways involved in chiral drug metabolism were investigated. The development of chiral drugs resulted in significant improvement in the remedies available for the treatment of various severe sicknesses. Enantiopure drugs undergo various biological transformations that involve chiral inversion and thus result in the generation of multiple enantiomeric metabolites. Identification of the specific active substances determining a given drug׳s efficacy among such a mixture of different metabolites remains a challenge. To comprehend this complexity, we constructed a mathematical model representing the complicated metabolic pathways simultaneously involving chiral inversion. Moreover, this model is applied to the metabolism of thalidomide, which has recently been revived as a potentially effective prescription drug for a number of intractable diseases. The numerical simulation results indicate that retained chirality in the metabolites reflects the original chirality of the unmetabolized drug, and a higher level of enantiomeric purity is preserved during spontaneous degradation. In addition, chirality remaining after equilibration is directly related to the rate constant not only for chiral inversion but also for generation and degradation. Furthermore, the retention of chirality is quantitatively predictable using this combination of kinetic parameters. Our simulation results well explain the behavior of thalidomide in the practical biological experimental data. Therefore, this model promises a comprehensive understanding of dynamic metabolic systems involving chiral drugs that express multiple enantiospecific drug efficacies. PMID:25791284

  10. 2-(Quinolin-4-yloxy)acetamides Are Active against Drug-Susceptible and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains.

    PubMed

    Pissinate, Kenia; Villela, Anne Drumond; Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês; Giacobbo, Bruno Couto; Grams, Estêvão Silveira; Abbadi, Bruno Lopes; Trindade, Rogério Valim; Roesler Nery, Laura; Bonan, Carla Denise; Back, Davi Fernando; Campos, Maria Martha; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Machado, Pablo

    2016-03-10

    2-(Quinolin-4-yloxy)acetamides have been described as potent in vitro inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. Herein, additional chemical modifications of lead compounds were carried out, yielding highly potent antitubercular agents with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values as low as 0.05 μM. Further, the synthesized compounds were active against drug-resistant strains and were devoid of apparent toxicity to Vero and HaCat cells (IC50s ≥ 20 μM). In addition, the 2-(quinolin-4-yloxy)acetamides showed intracellular activity against the bacilli in infected macrophages with action similar to rifampin, low risk of drug-drug interactions, and no sign of cardiac toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) at 1 and 5 μM. Therefore, these data indicate that this class of compounds may furnish candidates for future development to, hopefully, provide drug alternatives for tuberculosis treatment. PMID:26985307

  11. Harms and benefits associated with psychoactive drugs: findings of an international survey of active drug users.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Celia J A; Noronha, Louise A; Muetzelfeldt, Mark; Feilding, Amanda; Fielding, Amanda; Curran, H Valerie

    2013-06-01

    There have been several recent efforts in the UK and the Netherlands to describe the harms of psychoactive substances based on ratings of either experts or drug users. This study aimed to assess the perceived benefits as well as harms of widely used recreational drugs, both licit and illicit, in an international sample of drug users. The survey was hosted at https://www.internationaldrugsurvey.org/ and was available in three languages. Residents reported their experience of 15 commonly used drugs or drug classes; regular users then rated their harms and benefits. In all, 5791 individuals from over 40 countries completed the survey, although the majority were from English speaking countries. Rankings of drugs differed across 10 categories of perceived benefits. Skunk and herbal cannabis were ranked consistently beneficial, whilst alcohol and tobacco fell below many classified drugs. There was no correlation at all between users' harm ranking of drugs and their classification in schedules of the USA or ABC system in the UK. Prescription analgesics, alcohol and tobacco were ranked within the top 10 most harmful drugs. These findings suggest that neither the UK nor US classification systems act to inform users of the harms of psychoactive substances. It is hoped the results might inform health professionals and educators of what are considered to be both the harms and benefits of psychoactive substances to young people. PMID:23438502

  12. Harms and benefits associated with psychoactive drugs: findings of an international survey of active drug users

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Celia JA; Noronha, Louise A; Muetzelfeldt, Mark; Fielding, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    There have been several recent efforts in the UK and the Netherlands to describe the harms of psychoactive substances based on ratings of either experts or drug users. This study aimed to assess the perceived benefits as well as harms of widely used recreational drugs, both licit and illicit, in an international sample of drug users. The survey was hosted at https://www.internationaldrugsurvey.org/ and was available in three languages. Residents reported their experience of 15 commonly used drugs or drug classes; regular users then rated their harms and benefits. In all, 5791 individuals from over 40 countries completed the survey, although the majority were from English speaking countries. Rankings of drugs differed across 10 categories of perceived benefits. Skunk and herbal cannabis were ranked consistently beneficial, whilst alcohol and tobacco fell below many classified drugs. There was no correlation at all between users’ harm ranking of drugs and their classification in schedules of the USA or ABC system in the UK. Prescription analgesics, alcohol and tobacco were ranked within the top 10 most harmful drugs. These findings suggest that neither the UK nor US classification systems act to inform users of the harms of psychoactive substances. It is hoped the results might inform health professionals and educators of what are considered to be both the harms and benefits of psychoactive substances to young people. PMID:23438502

  13. Paper-based surfaced enhanced Raman spectroscopy for drug level testing with tear fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kenji; Yokoyama, Moe; Jeong, Hieyong; Kido, Michiko; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to show the effectiveness of therapeutic drug level testing by Paper-based Surfaced Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (PSERS) for artificial lacrimal fluid. We have been used substrates which consist of a common filter paper and gold nano-rods. The targets were Phenobarbital (PB) which dissolved in artificial lacrimal fluid. We measured them using PSERS which the wavelength was 785nm, the power was 30mW. It was found that there were the strong peaks of PB at 997cm-1 and 1026cm-1 which corresponded with solid PB spectral peak for 1mM artificial lacrimal fluid. The results demonstrated the usefulness of this method. It is concluded that our method for therapeutic drug level testing is very efficient.

  14. Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Pharmacogenetic Profile between Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Antiblastic Chemotherapy in Cancer Patients with HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Massimiliano; Caraglia, Michele; Martellotta, Ferdinando; Zappavigna, Silvia; Lombardi, Angela; Fierro, Carla; Atripaldi, Luigi; Muto, Tommaso; Valente, Daniela; De Paoli, Paolo; Tirelli, Umberto; Di Francia, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) into clinical practice has dramatically changed the natural approach of HIV-related cancers. Several studies have shown that intensive antiblastic chemotherapy (AC) is feasible in HIV-infected patients with cancer, and that the outcome is similar to that of HIV-negative patients receiving the same AC regimens. However, the concomitant use of HAART and AC can result in drug accumulation or possible toxicity with consequent decreased efficacy of one or both classes of drugs. In fact, many AC agents are preferentially metabolized by CYP450 and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with HAART are common. Therefore, it is important that HIV patients with cancer in HAART receiving AC treatment at the same time receive an individualized cancer management plan based on their liver and renal functions, their level of bone marrow suppression, their mitochondrial dysfunction, and their genotype profile. The rationale of this review is to summarize the existing data on the impact of HAART on the clinical management of cancer patients with HIV/AIDS and DDIs between antiretrovirals and AC. In addition, in order to maximize the efficacy of antiblastic therapy and minimize the risk of drug-drug interaction, a useful list of pharmacogenomic markers is provided. PMID:27065862

  15. Weekly Active-Learning Activities in a Drug Information and Literature Evaluation Course

    PubMed Central

    Motl, Susannah E.; Eichner, Samantha F.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To incorporate learning activities into the weekly 2-hour Drug Information and Literature Evaluation class sessions to improve student ability and confidence in performing course objectives, as well as to assess student perception of the value of these activities. Methods In-class activities that emphasized content and skills taught within class periods were created and implemented. Three different surveys assessing student ability and confidence in completing drug information and literature retrieval and evaluation tasks were administered prior to and following the appropriate class sessions. At the completion of the course, an additional evaluation was administered to assess the students' impressions of the value of the learning activities. Results Students reported increased ability and confidence in all course objectives. The teaching activities were also stated to be useful in students' learning of the material. Conclusions Incorporation of weekly learning activities resulted in an improvement in student ability and confidence to perform course objectives. Students considered these activities to be beneficial and to contribute to the completion of course objectives. PMID:17136173

  16. 21 CFR 310.532 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) to relieve the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) to relieve the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy. 310.532 Section 310.532 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements...

  17. 21 CFR 310.527 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for external use as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for external use as hair growers or for hair loss prevention. 310.527 Section 310.527 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS...

  18. 21 CFR 310.532 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) to relieve the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) to relieve the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy. 310.532 Section 310.532 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements...

  19. 21 CFR 310.532 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) to relieve the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) to relieve the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy. 310.532 Section 310.532 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements...

  20. 21 CFR 310.541 - Over-the-counter (OTC) drug products containing active ingredients offered for use in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Over-the-counter (OTC) drug products containing active ingredients offered for use in the treatment of hypophosphatemia. 310.541 Section 310.541 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for...

  1. 21 CFR 310.543 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. 310.543 Section 310.543 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements...

  2. 21 CFR 310.542 - Over-the-counter (OTC) drug products containing active ingredients offered for use in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Over-the-counter (OTC) drug products containing active ingredients offered for use in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia. 310.542 Section 310.542 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for...

  3. 21 CFR 310.536 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for use as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for use as a nailbiting or thumbsucking deterrent. 310.536 Section 310.536 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements...

  4. Mechanism of the ultrasonic activation of micellar drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Marin, A; Muniruzzaman, M; Rapoport, N

    2001-07-10

    The mechanism of the ultrasonic enhancement of the uptake of cytotoxic drugs, doxorubicin (DOX) and ruboxyl (Rb) by HL-60 cells from Pluronic micelles was studied. DOX and Rb sorption from either PBS or micellar Pluronic solutions is described by Langmuir-type isotherms characteristic of substrates with limited number of sorption centers. The sorption limits for Rb from PBS and Pluronic were considerably higher than those for DOX, presumably due to much higher Rb partitioning into cell membranes. The overall number of drug sorption centers for both drugs decreased in the presence of Pluronic implying the effect of Pluronic on the DNA conformation, which was confirmed by the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments using Rb as a spin probe. Ultrasound increased drug uptake by the cells from PBS and Pluronic solutions. The fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry experiments using fluorescently-labeled Pluronic showed that ultrasound enhanced both the intracellular uptake of Pluronic micelles and Pluronic trafficking into cell nuclei. A scheme is suggested that describes various equilibria controlling drug/cell interactions and effect of ultrasound on these equilibria. Under the action of ultrasound, the equilibrium between the micellar-encapsulated and free drug is shifted in the direction of free drug due to micelle perturbation; the equilibrium between extracellular and internalized drug is shifted to the intracellular drug due to the ultrasound-induced cellular changes that enhance the accessibility of various cellular structures to drug. An important advantage offered by ultrasound is that the same degree of the intracellular drug uptake may be achieved at a substantially lower drug concentration in the incubation medium. PMID:11451498

  5. Serum time course of naltrexone and 6 beta-naltrexol levels during long-term treatment in drug addicts.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, A; Bertolotti, M; Dell'Utri, A; Avico, U; Sternieri, E

    1998-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics of naltrexone have been scarcely explored in patients during chronic treatment despite the observation that the pharmacological effect of the drug is related to its plasma concentrations. In this study we investigated the time course of serum levels of naltrexone and its active metabolite, 6 beta-naltrexol, in 13 heroin addicts (3 F, 10 M; age 22-32 years) in the 24 h after 100 mg of naltrexone orally. Six patients were studied once, at different times during chronic treatment, whereas in seven patients the study was done at the beginning and after 1 month of naltrexone treatment. Four of these patients also repeated the study after 3 months of naltrexone treatment. Serum naltrexone and 6 beta-naltrexol were assayed by GLC with a nitrogen-phosphorus detector. Our results showed large differences among patients in serum naltrexone and 6 beta-naltrexol levels. On the other hand, there were no differences in serum time course of both substances in the same patient over 3 months. Peak levels and AUCs of naltrexone were lower than those of 6 beta-naltrexol in ten addicts and higher than those of the metabolite in three patients. No significant differences in the apparent half-lives of the two drugs were detected among groups. These data are consistent with the occurrence of a decreased first-pass metabolism of naltrexone in three patients leading to a larger availability of an oral dose. The increased bioavailability of the drug is not very important for opioid receptor antagonist activity but may play a role in naltrexone treatment safety. PMID:9839147

  6. A new activity of N-cholinolytic drug benzohexonium.

    PubMed

    Khnychenko, L K; Okunevich, I V; Losev, N A; Sapronov, N S; Yakovleva, E E

    2012-08-01

    We have found that N-cholinolytic drug benzohexonium produces a hypolipidemic effect: it reduces dyslipoproteinemia, fatty infiltration of the liver, and risk of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:22977852

  7. Hypoxia promotes drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells via activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changfu; Zhang, Qiao; Yu, Tao; Sun, Shudong; Wang, Wenjun; Liu, Guangyao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Drug resistance has been recognized to be a major obstacle to the chemotherapy for osteosarcoma. And the potential importance of hypoxia as a target to reverse drug resistance in osteosarcoma has been indicated, though the mechanism underlining such role is not clarified. The present study aims to investigate the role of hypoxia in the drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells via activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. Experimental design We investigated the promotion of the resistance to doxorubicin of osteosarcoma MG-63 and U2-os cells in vitro, and then determined the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)α and HIF-1β, the activation and regulatory role of AMPK in the osteosarcoma U2-os cells which were treated with doxorubicin under hypoxia. Results It was demonstrated that hypoxia significantly reduced the sensitivity of MG-63 and U2-os cells to doxorubicin, indicating an inhibited viability reduction and a reduced apoptosis promotion. And such reduced sensitivity was not associated with HIF-1α, though it was promoted by hypoxia in U2-os cells. Interestingly, the AMPK signaling was significantly promoted by hypoxia in the doxorubicin-treated U2-os cells, with a marked upregulation of phosphorylated AMPK (Thr 172) and phosphorylated acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) (Ser 79), which were sensitive to the AMPK activator, AICAR and the AMPK inhibitor, Compound C. Moreover, the promoted AMPK activity by AICAR or the downregulated AMPK activity by Compound C significantly reduced or promoted the sensitivity of U2-os cells to doxorubicin. Conclusion The present study confirmed the AMPK signaling activation in the doxorubicin-treated osteosarcoma cells, in response to hypoxia, and the chemical upregulation or downregulation of AMPK signaling reduced or increased the chemo-sensitivity of osteosarcoma U2-os cells in vitro. Our study implies that AMPK inhibition might be a effective strategy to sensitize osteocarcoma cells to chemotherapy. PMID

  8. Activity of clarithromycin compared with those of other drugs against Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and further enhancement of its extracellular and intracellular activities by ethambutol.

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, N; Goh, K S; Labrousse, V

    1992-01-01

    Radiometric MICs of clarithromycin, a new macrolide drug, were determined against five mycobactin-dependent strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (including two Crohn's disease clinical isolates) and compared with those of other drugs which included rifampin, ethambutol, amikacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and sparfloxacin. Among the drugs screened, clarithromycin was the drug for which MICs were lowest against the five strains tested. As MICs were significantly below the reported Cmax levels (about 4 micrograms/ml), the intracellular activity of clarithromycin against the type strain of M. paratuberculosis maintained in cultured macrophages was screened. Clarithromycin was able to kill the initial inoculum by more than 1 log within 7 days, and this activity was further potentiated by ethambutol. Extracellular drug combination screened by using sublethal concentrations of the drugs showed that ethambutol was able to enhance clarithromycin activity in three out of four M. paratuberculosis strains instead of only one out of four strains (or none in the case of ofloxacin) when associated with other drugs. These results suggest that clarithromycin may be fruitful to treat human disease in which M. paratuberculosis may be etiologically involved. Images PMID:1482157

  9. Medroxyprogesterone acetate plasma levels after a single oral administration of two drug formulations.

    PubMed

    Pannuti, F; Strocchi, E; Longhi, A; Comparsi, R; Camaggi, C M

    1986-08-01

    A comparison has been made between the absorption of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in an aqueous suspension preparation and in syrup form. Plasma drug profiles were measured after a single administration of the two formulations in 17 advanced cancer patients. On average the standard form (aqueous suspension) gave peak levels which were lower than the syrup mixture. However, the wide intersubject spread in MPA plasma levels observed in both groups did not allow any statistical significance to be assigned to this difference. PMID:2945648

  10. Transformation of lupus-inducing drugs to cytotoxic products by activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Khursigara, G; Rubin, R L

    1994-11-01

    Drug-induced lupus is a serious side effect of certain medications, but the chemical features that confer this property and the underlying pathogenesis are puzzling. Prototypes of all six therapeutic classes of lupus-inducing drugs were highly cytotoxic only in the presence of activated neutrophils. Removal of extracellular hydrogen peroxide before, but not after, exposure of the drug to activated neutrophils prevented cytotoxicity. Neutrophil-dependent cytotoxicity required the enzymatic action of myeloperoxidase, resulting in the chemical transformation of the drug to a reactive product. The capacity of drugs to serve as myeloperoxidase substrates in vitro was associated with the ability to induce lupus in vivo. PMID:7973636

  11. ToxDB: pathway-level interpretation of drug-treatment data

    PubMed Central

    Hardt, C.; Beber, M.E.; Rasche, A.; Kamburov, A.; Hebels, D.G.; Kleinjans, J.C.; Herwig, R.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Extensive drug treatment gene expression data have been generated in order to identify biomarkers that are predictive for toxicity or to classify compounds. However, such patterns are often highly variable across compounds and lack robustness. We and others have previously shown that supervised expression patterns based on pathway concepts rather than unsupervised patterns are more robust and can be used to assess toxicity for entire classes of drugs more reliably. Results: We have developed a database, ToxDB, for the analysis of the functional consequences of drug treatment at the pathway level. We have collected 2694 pathway concepts and computed numerical response scores of these pathways for 437 drugs and chemicals and 7464 different experimental conditions. ToxDB provides functionalities for exploring these pathway responses by offering tools for visualization and differential analysis allowing for comparisons of different treatment parameters and for linking this data with toxicity annotation and chemical information. Database URL: http://toxdb.molgen.mpg.de PMID:27074805

  12. Identification of novel, in vivo active Chk1 inhibitors utilizing structure guided drug design

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Andrew J.; Stokes, Stephen; Browne, Helen; Foloppe, Nicolas; Fiumana, Andreá; Scrace, Simon; Fallowfield, Mandy; Bedford, Simon; Webb, Paul; Baker, Lisa; Christie, Mark; Drysdale, Martin J.; Wood, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Chk1 kinase is a critical component of the DNA damage response checkpoint especially in cancer cells and targeting Chk1 is a potential therapeutic opportunity for potentiating the anti-tumor activity of DNA damaging chemotherapy drugs. Fragment elaboration by structure guided design was utilized to identify and develop a novel series of Chk1 inhibitors culminating in the identification of V158411, a potent ATP-competitive inhibitor of the Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. V158411 abrogated gemcitabine and camptothecin induced cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in the expected modulation of cell cycle proteins and increased cell death in cancer cells. V158411 potentiated the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine, cisplatin, SN38 and camptothecin in a variety of p53 deficient human tumor cell lines in vitro, p53 proficient cells were unaffected. In nude mice, V158411 showed minimal toxicity as a single agent and in combination with irinotecan. In tumor bearing animals, V158411 was detected at high levels in the tumor with a long elimination half-life; no pharmacologically significant in vivo drug-drug interactions with irinotecan were identified through analysis of the pharmacokinetic profiles. V158411 potentiated the anti-tumor activity of irinotecan in a variety of human colon tumor xenograft models without additional systemic toxicity. These results demonstrate the opportunity for combining V158411 with standard of care chemotherapeutic agents to potentiate the therapeutic efficacy of these agents without increasing their toxicity to normal cells. Thus, V158411 would warrant further clinical evaluation. PMID:26437226

  13. Identification of novel, in vivo active Chk1 inhibitors utilizing structure guided drug design.

    PubMed

    Massey, Andrew J; Stokes, Stephen; Browne, Helen; Foloppe, Nicolas; Fiumana, Andreá; Scrace, Simon; Fallowfield, Mandy; Bedford, Simon; Webb, Paul; Baker, Lisa; Christie, Mark; Drysdale, Martin J; Wood, Mike

    2015-11-01

    Chk1 kinase is a critical component of the DNA damage response checkpoint especially in cancer cells and targeting Chk1 is a potential therapeutic opportunity for potentiating the anti-tumor activity of DNA damaging chemotherapy drugs. Fragment elaboration by structure guided design was utilized to identify and develop a novel series of Chk1 inhibitors culminating in the identification of V158411, a potent ATP-competitive inhibitor of the Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. V158411 abrogated gemcitabine and camptothecin induced cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in the expected modulation of cell cycle proteins and increased cell death in cancer cells. V158411 potentiated the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine, cisplatin, SN38 and camptothecin in a variety of p53 deficient human tumor cell lines in vitro, p53 proficient cells were unaffected. In nude mice, V158411 showed minimal toxicity as a single agent and in combination with irinotecan. In tumor bearing animals, V158411 was detected at high levels in the tumor with a long elimination half-life; no pharmacologically significant in vivo drug-drug interactions with irinotecan were identified through analysis of the pharmacokinetic profiles. V158411 potentiated the anti-tumor activity of irinotecan in a variety of human colon tumor xenograft models without additional systemic toxicity. These results demonstrate the opportunity for combining V158411 with standard of care chemotherapeutic agents to potentiate the therapeutic efficacy of these agents without increasing their toxicity to normal cells. Thus, V158411 would warrant further clinical evaluation. PMID:26437226

  14. Drug-DNA interactions at single molecule level: A view with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Studies of small molecule--DNA interactions are essential for developing new drugs for challenging diseases like cancer and HIV. The main idea behind developing these molecules is to target and inhibit the reproduction of the tumor cells and infected cells. We mechanically manipulate single DNA molecule using optical tweezers to investigate two molecules that have complex and multiple binding modes. Mononuclear ruthenium complexes have been extensively studied as a test for rational drug design. Potential drug candidates should have high affinity to DNA and slow dissociation kinetics. To achieve this, motifs of the ruthenium complexes are altered. Our collaborators designed a dumb-bell shaped binuclear ruthenium complex that can only intercalate DNA by threading through its bases. Studying the binding properties of this complex in bulk studies took hours. By mechanically manipulating a single DNA molecule held with optical tweezers, we lower the barrier to thread and make it fast compared to the bulk experiments. Stretching single DNA molecules with different concentration of drug molecules and holding it at a constant force allows the binding to reach equilibrium. By this we can obtain the equilibrium fractional ligand binding and length of DNA at saturated binding. Fitting these results yields quantitative measurements of the binding thermodynamics and kinetics of this complex process. The second complex discussed in this study is Actinomycin D (ActD), a well studied anti-cancer agent that is used as a prototype for developing new generations of drugs. However, the biophysical basis of its activity is still unclear. Because ActD is known to intercalate double stranded DNA (dsDNA), it was assumed to block replication by stabilizing dsDNA in front of the replication fork. However, recent studies have shown that ActD binds with even higher affinity to imperfect duplexes and some sequences of single stranded DNA (ssDNA). We directly measure the on and off rates by

  15. 34 CFR 300.704 - State-level activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State-level activities. 300.704 Section 300.704... Allotments, Grants, and Use of Funds § 300.704 State-level activities. (a) State administration. (1) For the... may be used for the administration of Part C of the Act, if the SEA is the lead agency for the...

  16. 34 CFR 300.704 - State-level activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true State-level activities. 300.704 Section 300.704... Allotments, Grants, and Use of Funds § 300.704 State-level activities. (a) State administration. (1) For the... may be used for the administration of Part C of the Act, if the SEA is the lead agency for the...

  17. Middle Level Activities To Involve the Invisible Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, Sue; Arico, Jim

    Involvement in student activities has many advantages for the middle level student. Such activities promote achievement, citizenship, and service to the community while developing self-esteem, self-confidence, and social cooperation. This book is intended as a tool for middle level schools to motivate, develop, guide, involve, and provide middle…

  18. Physical Activity Levels during Adventure-Physical Education Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehris, Jeffrey; Myers, Elizabeth; Whitaker, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Adventure-physical education has been proposed to promote adolescents' physical development, but little is known about physical activity levels during such lessons. Using the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time, we observed students' (ages 11-14 years) physical activity levels in co-educational classes during 43 adventure-physical…

  19. [Pharmacological influences on the brain level and transport of GABA. II) Effect of various psychoactive drugs on brain level and uptake of GABA].

    PubMed

    Gabana, M A; Varotto, M; Saladini, M; Zanchin, G; Battistin, L

    1981-04-30

    The effects of some psychoactive drugs on the level and uptake of GABA in the mouse brain was studied using well standardized procedures, mainely the silica-gel cromatography for determining the GABA content and the brain slices for measuring GABA uptake. It was found that levomepromazine, sulpiride, haloperidol and amytryptiline were without effects on the cerebral level of GABA; it was also found that these drugs do not influence the rates of uptake of GABA by mouse brain slices. Such results do indicate that the psychoactive drugs studied are without effects on the level and uptake of GABA in the brain. PMID:7272066

  20. Evaluation of drug-induced neurotoxicity based on metabolomics, proteomics and electrical activity measurements in complementary CNS in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Luise; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Culot, Maxime; da Costa, Anaelle; Landry, Christophe; Bellwon, Patricia; Kristl, Theresa; Hörmann, Katrin; Ruzek, Silke; Aiche, Stephan; Reinert, Knut; Bielow, Chris; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Huber, Christian G; Schroeder, Olaf H-U; Gramowski-Voss, Alexandra; Weiss, Dieter G; Bal-Price, Anna

    2015-12-25

    The present study was performed in an attempt to develop an in vitro integrated testing strategy (ITS) to evaluate drug-induced neurotoxicity. A number of endpoints were analyzed using two complementary brain cell culture models and an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model after single and repeated exposure treatments with selected drugs that covered the major biological, pharmacological and neuro-toxicological responses. Furthermore, four drugs (diazepam, cyclosporine A, chlorpromazine and amiodarone) were tested more in depth as representatives of different classes of neurotoxicants, inducing toxicity through different pathways of toxicity. The developed in vitro BBB model allowed detection of toxic effects at the level of BBB and evaluation of drug transport through the barrier for predicting free brain concentrations of the studied drugs. The measurement of neuronal electrical activity was found to be a sensitive tool to predict the neuroactivity and neurotoxicity of drugs after acute exposure. The histotypic 3D re-aggregating brain cell cultures, containing all brain cell types, were found to be well suited for OMICs analyses after both acute and long term treatment. The obtained data suggest that an in vitro ITS based on the information obtained from BBB studies and combined with metabolomics, proteomics and neuronal electrical activity measurements performed in stable in vitro neuronal cell culture systems, has high potential to improve current in vitro drug-induced neurotoxicity evaluation. PMID:26026931

  1. Activity Levels in Healthy Older Adults: Implications for Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Thorp, Laura E.; Orozco, Diego; Block, Joel A.; Sumner, Dale R.; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2012-01-01

    This work evaluated activity levels in a group of healthy older adults to establish a target activity level for adults of similar age after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). With the decreasing age of TJA patients, it is essential to have a reference for activity level in younger patients as activity level affects quality of life and implant design. 54 asymptomatic, healthy older adults with no clinical evidence of lower extremity OA participated. The main outcome measure, average daily step count, was measured using an accelerometer-based activity monitor. On average the group took 8813 ± 3611 steps per day, approximately 4000 more steps per day than has been previously reported in patients following total joint arthroplasty. The present work provides a reference for activity after joint arthroplasty which is relevant given the projected number of people under the age of 65 who will undergo joint arthroplasty in the coming years. PMID:23577274

  2. Residual activity of anticoccidial drugs in chickens after withdrawal of medicated feeds.

    PubMed

    McDougald, L R; Seibert, B P

    1998-01-31

    Seven anticoccidial drugs commonly used in poultry (diclazuri), monensin, salinomycin, halofuginone, nicarbazin, robenidine, amprolium, and lasalocid) were tested for residual activity after withdrawal. In each test, the products were given at the recommended level to cages of 10 broiler chickens. Oral inoculation with coccidia was given after withdrawal of medication. Birds pretreated with 1 ppm of diclazuril and inoculated with Eimeria tenella after drug withdrawal had normal weight gain and very low lesion scores. Residual activity depleted gradually over several days, as shown by higher lesion scores when medication was withdrawn for up to 3 days before inoculation. Similar results were observed when young birds were inoculated with a mixture of E. tenella, E. maxima and E. acervulina, and also when birds were given diclazuril to market weight (6 weeks of age) and inoculated with a mixture of six species of Eiméria (The above species plus E. brunetti, E. mitis, and E. necatrix) after withdrawal of medication for 2 days. In contrast, there was no evidence of residual anticoccidial activity with nicarbazin, halofuginone, lasalocid, amprolium, salinomycin or monensin. Overall, the residual activity was unique to diclazuril. PMID:9561697

  3. Mechanisms of cell death pathway activation following drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Naoki; Kwang Lee, Kang; Zhang, Carmen; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex I inhibition by drugs and other chemicals has been implicated as a frequent mode of mitochondria-mediated cell injury. However, the exact mechanisms leading to the activation of cell death pathways are incompletely understood. This study was designed to explore the relative contributions to cell injury of three distinct consequences of complex I inhibition, i.e., impairment of ATP biosynthesis, increased formation of superoxide and, hence, peroxynitrite, and inhibition of the mitochondrial protein deacetylase, Sirt3, due to imbalance of the NADH/NAD+ ratio. We used the antiviral drug efavirenz (EFV) to model drug-induced complex I inhibition. Exposure of cultured mouse hepatocytes to EFV resulted in a rapid onset of cell injury, featuring a no-effect level at 30 µM EFV and submaximal effects at 50 µM EFV. EFV caused a concentration-dependent decrease in cellular ATP levels. Furthermore, EFV resulted in increased formation of peroxynitrite and oxidation of mitochondrial protein thiols, including cyclophilin D (CypD). This was prevented by the superoxide scavenger, Fe-TCP, or the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, Fe-TMPyP. Both ferroporphyrins completely protected from EFV-induced cell injury, suggesting that peroxynitrite contributed to the cell injury. Finally, EFV increased the NADH/NAD+ ratio, inhibited Sirt3 activity, and led to hyperacetylated lysine residues, including those in CypD. However, hepatocytes isolated from Sirt3-null mice were protected against 40 µM EFV as compared to their wild-type controls. In conclusion, these data are compatible with the concept that chemical inhibition of complex I activates multiple pathways leading to cell injury; among these, peroxynitrite formation may be the most critical. PMID:25625582

  4. Towards a new paradigm: Activity level balanced sustainability reporting.

    PubMed

    Samudhram, Ananda; Siew, Eu-Gene; Sinnakkannu, Jothee; Yeow, Paul H P

    2016-11-01

    Technoeconomic paradigms based economic growth theories suggest that waves of technological innovations drove the economic growth of advanced economies. Widespread economic degradation and pollution is an unintended consequence of such growth. Tackling environmental and social issues at firm levels would help us to overcome such issues at macro-levels. Consequently, the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) reporting approach promotes firm level economic, environmental and social performances. Incorporating Zink's (2014) 3-pillar presentation model, this paper indicates that economic, social and environmental performances tend to be reported at firm level. All three pillars are not covered evenly at the activity levels. Thus, a loophole is identified whereby excellent environmental performance at activity levels could potentially leave poor social performance undisclosed. A refinement of the TBL paradigm, whereby all three pillars are covered at the activity level, is suggested, to enhance sustainability reporting. PMID:27029522

  5. Individual-level, network-level and city-level factors associated with HIV prevalence among people who inject drugs in eight Russian cities: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Eritsyan, Ksenia; Heimer, Robert; Barbour, Russell; Odinokova, Veronika; White, Edward; Rusakova, Maia M; Smolskaya, Tatiana T; Levina, Olga S

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain HIV prevalence among people who inject drug (injection drug users (IDUs)) in the Russian Federation and identify explanations for the disparity in different cities. Design Cross-sectional survey with serological testing for HIV and hepatitis C virus prevalent infections. Setting 8 Russian cities—Irkutsk, Omsk, Chelyabinsk, Yekaterinburg, Naberezhnye Chelny, Voronezh, Orel and St Petersburg. Participants In 2007–2009 active IDUs were recruited by respondent-driven sampling with a target sample size of 300 or more in each city. Main outcome measures Participants were administered a questionnaire covering sociodemographics, injection risk and protective behaviours, sexual behaviours, HIV knowledge, experiences with drug treatment and harm reduction programmes and social networks. Participants were tested for HIV and hepatitis C by enzyme immunoassay. Data were analysed to identify individual-level, network-level and city-level characteristics significantly associated with HIV prevalence. Factors significant at p≤0.1 were entered into a hierarchical regression model to control for multicollinearity. Results A total of 2596 active IDUs were recruited, interviewed and tested for HIV and hepatitis C virus infection. HIV prevalence ranged from 3% (in Voronezh) to 64% (in Yekaterinburg). Although individual-level and network-level variables explain some of the difference in prevalence across the eight cities, the over-riding variable that seems to account for most of the variance is the emergence of commercial, as opposed to homemade, heroin as the predominant form of opioid injected. Conclusions The expansion of commercial heroin markets to many Russian cities may have served as a trigger for an expanding HIV epidemic among IDUs in that country. PMID:23794559

  6. Radio Frequency-Activated Nanoliposomes for Controlled Combination Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Malekar, Swapnil A; Sarode, Ashish L; Bach, Alvin C; Bose, Arijit; Bothun, Geoffrey; Worthen, David R

    2015-12-01

    This work was conducted in order to design, characterize, and evaluate stable liposomes containing the hydrophobic drug raloxifene HCl (RAL) and hydrophilic doxycycline HCl (DOX), two potentially synergistic agents for treating osteoporosis and other bone lesions, in conjunction with a radio frequency-induced, hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticle-dependent triggering mechanism for drug release. Both drugs were successfully incorporated into liposomes by lipid film hydration, although combination drug loading compromised liposome stability. Liposome stability was improved by reducing the drug load and by including Pluronics® (PL) in the formulations. DOX did not appear to interact with the phospholipid membranes comprising the liposomes, and its release was maximized in the presence of radio frequency (RF) heating. In contrast, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P-NMR) analysis revealed that RAL developed strong interactions with the phospholipid membranes, most notably with lipid phosphate head groups, resulting in significant changes in membrane thermodynamics. Likewise, RAL release from liposomes was minimal, even in the presence of RF heating. These studies may offer useful insights into the design and optimization of multidrug containing liposomes. The effects of RAL on liposome characteristics and drug release performance underscore the importance of appropriate physical-chemical analysis in order to identify and characterize drug-lipid interactions that may profoundly affect liposome properties and performance early in the formulation development process. PMID:25899799

  7. Solar Activity, Different Geomagnetic Activity Levels and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Svetla; Jordanova, Malina; Stoilova, Irina; Taseva, Tatiana; Maslarov, Dimitar

    Results on revealing a possible relationship between solar activity (SA) and geomagnetic activity (GMA) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) morbidity are presented. Studies were based on medical data covering the period from 1.12.1995 to 31.12.2004 and concerned daily distribution of patients with AMI diagnose (in total 1192 cases) from Sofia region on the day of admission at the hospital. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to check the significance of GMA intensity effect and the type of geomagnetic storms, those caused by Magnetic Clouds (MC) and by High Speed Solar Wind Streams (HSSWS), on AMI morbidity. Relevant correlation coefficients were calculated. Results revealed statistically significant positive correlation between considered GMA indices and AMI. ANOVA revealed that AMI number was signifi- cantly increased from the day before (-1st) till the day after (+1st) geomagnetic storms with different intensities. Geomagnetic storms caused by MC were related to significant increase of AMI number in comparison with the storms caused by HSSWS. There was a trend for such different effects even on -1st and +1st day.

  8. [Potential of pharmacological modulation of level and activity incretins on diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Spasov, A A; Chepljaeva, N I

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes data on the main approaches used for the search of biologically active compounds modulating the level and physiological activity of incretins. Currently two groups of drugs are used in clinical practice: they either replenish the deficit of incretins (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists) or inhibit the degradation processes (dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors). In addition, new groups of substances are actively searched. These include non-peptide agonists of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors, agonists/antagonists of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, the hybrid polypeptides based on glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucagon. PMID:26350740

  9. Young Adult Follow-Up of Hyperactive Children: Antisocial Activities and Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.; Fischer, Mariellen; Smallish, Lori; Fletcher, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hyperactive/ADHD children are believed to be a greater risk for adolescent and young adult antisocial activity and drug use/abuse, particularly that subset having comorbid conduct problems/disorder. Method: We report on the lifetime antisocial activities and illegal drug use self-reported at young adult follow-up (mean age 20-21 years;…

  10. Drug Repositioning by Kernel-Based Integration of Molecular Structure, Molecular Activity, and Phenotype Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongcui; Chen, Shilong; Deng, Naiyang; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Computational inference of novel therapeutic values for existing drugs, i.e., drug repositioning, offers the great prospect for faster and low-risk drug development. Previous researches have indicated that chemical structures, target proteins, and side-effects could provide rich information in drug similarity assessment and further disease similarity. However, each single data source is important in its own way and data integration holds the great promise to reposition drug more accurately. Here, we propose a new method for drug repositioning, PreDR (Predict Drug Repositioning), to integrate molecular structure, molecular activity, and phenotype data. Specifically, we characterize drug by profiling in chemical structure, target protein, and side-effects space, and define a kernel function to correlate drugs with diseases. Then we train a support vector machine (SVM) to computationally predict novel drug-disease interactions. PreDR is validated on a well-established drug-disease network with 1,933 interactions among 593 drugs and 313 diseases. By cross-validation, we find that chemical structure, drug target, and side-effects information are all predictive for drug-disease relationships. More experimentally observed drug-disease interactions can be revealed by integrating these three data sources. Comparison with existing methods demonstrates that PreDR is competitive both in accuracy and coverage. Follow-up database search and pathway analysis indicate that our new predictions are worthy of further experimental validation. Particularly several novel predictions are supported by clinical trials databases and this shows the significant prospects of PreDR in future drug treatment. In conclusion, our new method, PreDR, can serve as a useful tool in drug discovery to efficiently identify novel drug-disease interactions. In addition, our heterogeneous data integration framework can be applied to other problems. PMID:24244318

  11. Ferromagnetic interaction model of activity level in workplace communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akitomi, Tomoaki; Ara, Koji; Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Yano, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    The nature of human-human interaction, specifically, how people synchronize with each other in multiple-participant conversations, is described by a ferromagnetic interaction model of people’s activity levels. We found two microscopic human interaction characteristics from a real-environment face-to-face conversation. The first characteristic is that people quite regularly synchronize their activity level with that of the other participants in a conversation. The second characteristic is that the degree of synchronization increases as the number of participants increases. Based on these microscopic ferromagnetic characteristics, a “conversation activity level” was modeled according to the Ising model. The results of a simulation of activity level based on this model well reproduce macroscopic experimental measurements of activity level. This model will give a new insight into how people interact with each other in a conversation.

  12. D1 dopamine receptor activity of anti-parkinsonian drugs.

    PubMed

    Fici, G J; Wu, H; VonVoigtlander, P F; Sethy, V H

    1997-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical investigations suggest that stimulation of D1 dopamine receptors may be responsible for dyskinesias induced by dopamine agonist treatment of Parkinson's Disease (PD), and that these dyskinesias may be decreased by treatment with a D1 antagonist (clozapine). Therefore, the effects of dopamine agonists and antagonists have been investigated in a primary cerebellar granule cell model of cAMP formation that seems to be highly responsive to the D1 receptors. SKF 38393, lisuride, apomorphine, pergolide, dopamine, bromocriptine and 7-OH-DPAT showed concentration-dependent increases in cAMP formation, with EC50s (in microM) of 0.013, 0.053, 0.25, 1.04, 2.18, 50.9 and 54.4, respectively. SKF 38393, apomorphine, dopamine and pergolide had similar intrinsic activity (100%), while the intrinsic activities of 7-OH-DPAT, bromocriptine and lisuride were 28.0%, 20.7% and 17.2%, respectively. SCH 23390, a selective D1 dopamine receptor antagonist, blocked an increase in cAMP formation produced by EC50 concentrations of all of the dopamine agonists investigated in this study. Clozapine concentration-dependently blocked pergolide-induced increases in cAMP and was approximately 1700-fold less potent than SCH 23390 (IC50: 0.97 microM and 0.56 nM, respectively). U-95666A (1-1000 microM), selective for the D2 receptors, showed no significant effect on cAMP, while pramipexole (0.1-100 microM), a D3 preferring agonist, did not elevate cAMP. These data suggest that primary cerebellar granule cell cultures are an excellent model for measuring D1 dopamine receptor-mediated changes in cellular cAMP. The results are discussed with reference to the relationship between the D1 receptor-stimulated increase in cAMP formation and the induction of dyskinesia in humans by these anti-parkinsonian drugs. PMID:9126882

  13. Enhancement of biological activities of nanostructured hydrophobic drug species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qiusen; Yang, Rong; Li, Jingying; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Ying; Dong, Mingdong; Besenbacher, Flemming; Wang, Chen

    2012-03-01

    We report a study of nanoribbons of quercetin, a phase I clinical trial anticancer drug, and their inhibitory effects on cancer cell proliferation. Novel quercetin nanoribbons have been prepared by atmospheric pressure physical vapor deposition (PVD). The nanostructures have been characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, etc. Significantly enhanced solubility in PBS solution and increased drug release rate have been observed for quercetin nanoribbons in comparison to those of quercetin powder. The observed increase of inhibitory effects of quercetin nanoribbons on 4T1 cancel cell growth is correlated with an improvement in their solubility and drug release behavior.We report a study of nanoribbons of quercetin, a phase I clinical trial anticancer drug, and their inhibitory effects on cancer cell proliferation. Novel quercetin nanoribbons have been prepared by atmospheric pressure physical vapor deposition (PVD). The nanostructures have been characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, etc. Significantly enhanced solubility in PBS solution and increased drug release rate have been observed for quercetin nanoribbons in comparison to those of quercetin powder. The observed increase of inhibitory effects of quercetin nanoribbons on 4T1 cancel cell growth is correlated with an improvement in their solubility and drug release behavior. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr12013e

  14. Regulation of Human Hepatic Drug Transporter Activity and Expression by Diesel Exhaust Particle Extract

    PubMed Central

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Lecureur, Valérie; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are common environmental air pollutants primarily affecting the lung. DEPs or chemicals adsorbed on DEPs also exert extra-pulmonary effects, including alteration of hepatic drug detoxifying enzyme expression. The present study was designed to determine whether organic DEP extract (DEPe) may target hepatic drug transporters that contribute in a major way to drug detoxification. Using primary human hepatocytes and transporter-overexpressing cells, DEPe was first shown to strongly inhibit activities of the sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC) uptake transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1, 1B3 and 2B1 and of the canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux pump multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, with IC50 values ranging from approximately 1 to 20 μg/mL and relevant to environmental exposure situations. By contrast, 25 μg/mL DEPe failed to alter activities of the SLC transporter organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and of the ABC efflux pumps P-glycoprotein and bile salt export pump (BSEP), whereas it only moderately inhibited those of sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Treatment by 25 μg/mL DEPe was next demonstrated to induce expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in cultured human hepatic cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B3, OATP2B1, OCT1 and BSEP. Such changes in transporter expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. This suggests that DEPe, which is enriched in known ligands of AhR like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alters drug transporter expression via activation of the AhR cascade. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of organic chemicals containing in DEPs, which may contribute to their

  15. Regulation of human hepatic drug transporter activity and expression by diesel exhaust particle extract.

    PubMed

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Lecureur, Valérie; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are common environmental air pollutants primarily affecting the lung. DEPs or chemicals adsorbed on DEPs also exert extra-pulmonary effects, including alteration of hepatic drug detoxifying enzyme expression. The present study was designed to determine whether organic DEP extract (DEPe) may target hepatic drug transporters that contribute in a major way to drug detoxification. Using primary human hepatocytes and transporter-overexpressing cells, DEPe was first shown to strongly inhibit activities of the sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC) uptake transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1, 1B3 and 2B1 and of the canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux pump multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, with IC50 values ranging from approximately 1 to 20 μg/mL and relevant to environmental exposure situations. By contrast, 25 μg/mL DEPe failed to alter activities of the SLC transporter organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and of the ABC efflux pumps P-glycoprotein and bile salt export pump (BSEP), whereas it only moderately inhibited those of sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Treatment by 25 μg/mL DEPe was next demonstrated to induce expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in cultured human hepatic cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B3, OATP2B1, OCT1 and BSEP. Such changes in transporter expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. This suggests that DEPe, which is enriched in known ligands of AhR like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alters drug transporter expression via activation of the AhR cascade. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of organic chemicals containing in DEPs, which may contribute to their

  16. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model

    PubMed Central

    Vaquer, Sergi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Rabadán, Arnau; González, Albert; Fenollosa, Felip; de la Torre, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay ® (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary) was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG) transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP) during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology opens new and

  17. Taste clusters of music and drugs: evidence from three analytic levels.

    PubMed

    Vuolo, Mike; Uggen, Christopher; Lageson, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    This article examines taste clusters of musical preferences and substance use among adolescents and young adults. Three analytic levels are considered: fixed effects analyses of aggregate listening patterns and substance use in US radio markets, logistic regressions of individual genre preferences and drug use from a nationally representative survey of US youth, and arrest and seizure data from a large American concert venue. A consistent picture emerges from all three levels: rock music is positively associated with substance use, with some substance-specific variability across rock sub-genres. Hip hop music is also associated with higher use, while pop and religious music are associated with lower use. These results are robust to fixed effects models that account for changes over time in radio markets, a comprehensive battery of controls in the individual-level survey, and concert data establishing the co-occurrence of substance use and music listening in the same place and time. The results affirm a rich tradition of qualitative and experimental studies, demonstrating how symbolic boundaries are simultaneously drawn around music and drugs. PMID:24433204

  18. Do Drug Treatment Facilities Increase Clients’ Exposure to Potential Neighborhood-Level Triggers for Relapse? A Small-Area Assessment of a Large, Public Treatment System

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Research on drug treatment facility locations has focused narrowly on the issue of geographic proximity to clients. We argue that neighborhood conditions should also enter into the facility location decision and illustrate a formal assessment of neighborhood conditions at facilities in a large, metropolitan area, taking into account conditions clients already face at home. We discuss choice and construction of small-area measures relevant to the drug treatment context, including drug activity, disadvantage, and violence as well as statistical comparisons of clients’ home and treatment locations with respect to these measures. Analysis of 22,707 clients discharged from 494 community-based outpatient and residential treatment facilities that received public funds during 1998–2000 in Los Angeles County revealed no significant mean differences between home and treatment neighborhoods. However, up to 20% of clients are exposed to markedly higher levels of disadvantage, violence, or drug activity where they attend treatment than where they live, suggesting that it is not uncommon for treatment locations to increase clients’ exposure to potential environmental triggers for relapse. Whereas on average both home and treatment locations exhibit higher levels of these measures than the household locations of the general population, substantial variability in public treatment clients’ home neighborhoods calls into question the notion that they hail exclusively from poor, high drug activity areas. Shortcomings of measures available for neighborhood assessment of treatment locations and implications of the findings for other areas of treatment research are also discussed. PMID:16736365

  19. Metabolic activation and drug-induced liver injury: in vitro approaches for the safety risk assessment of new drugs.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lechón, M José; Tolosa, Laia; Donato, M Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant leading cause of hepatic dysfunction, drug failure during clinical trials and post-market withdrawal of approved drugs. Many cases of DILI are unexpected reactions of an idiosyncratic nature that occur in a small group of susceptible individuals. Intensive research efforts have been made to understand better the idiosyncratic DILI and to identify potential risk factors. Metabolic bioactivation of drugs to form reactive metabolites is considered an initiation mechanism for idiosyncratic DILI. Reactive species may interact irreversibly with cell macromolecules (covalent binding, oxidative damage), and alter their structure and activity. This review focuses on proposed in vitro screening strategies to predict and reduce idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity associated with drug bioactivation. Compound incubation with metabolically competent biological systems (liver-derived cells, subcellular fractions), in combination with methods to reveal the formation of reactive intermediates (e.g., formation of adducts with liver proteins, metabolite trapping or enzyme inhibition assays), are approaches commonly used to screen the reactivity of new molecules in early drug development. Several cell-based assays have also been proposed for the safety risk assessment of bioactivable compounds. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26691983

  20. Activating effect of benzbromarone, a uricosuric drug, on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Kunishima, Chiyoko; Inoue, Ikuo; Oikawa, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Hiromu; Komoda, Tsugikazu; Katayama, Shigehiro

    2007-01-01

    Benzbromarone, a uricosuric drug, reportedly causes hepatic hypertrophy accompanied by proliferation of peroxisomes in rats. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying induction of peroxisome proliferation by benzbromarone, we examined binding affinity for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and gamma (PPARgamma), and effects on the binding activity of PPARs with peroxisome proliferation-responsive element (PPRE) and expression of the PPARs target protein. Binding affinity of benzbromarone for PPARalpha and PPARgamma was examined by reporter gene assay. Binding activity of PPARs with PPRE was determined by electric mobility shift assay, and expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) by Western blot method. Benzbromarone displayed affinity for PPARalpha and PPARgamma, and promoted binding of PPARs to PPRE. Furthermore, cultured cells with benzbromarone added showed upregulated expression of LPL and ACS. These results suggest that benzbromarone induces peroxisome proliferation in hepatocytes by binding to PPARs, and controls expression of proteins related to lipid metabolism. PMID:18274627

  1. Activating Effect of Benzbromarone, a Uricosuric Drug, on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kunishima, Chiyoko; Inoue, Ikuo; Oikawa, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Hiromu; Komoda, Tsugikazu; Katayama, Shigehiro

    2007-01-01

    Benzbromarone, a uricosuric drug, reportedly causes hepatic hypertrophy accompanied by proliferation of peroxisomes in rats. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying induction of peroxisome proliferation by benzbromarone, we examined binding affinity for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and γ (PPARγ), and effects on the binding activity of PPARs with peroxisome proliferation-responsive element (PPRE) and expression of the PPARs target protein. Binding affinity of benzbromarone for PPARα and PPARγ was examined by reporter gene assay. Binding activity of PPARs with PPRE was determined by electric mobility shift assay, and expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) by Western blot method. Benzbromarone displayed affinity for PPARα and PPARγ, and promoted binding of PPARs to PPRE. Furthermore, cultured cells with benzbromarone added showed upregulated expression of LPL and ACS. These results suggest that benzbromarone induces peroxisome proliferation in hepatocytes by binding to PPARs, and controls expression of proteins related to lipid metabolism. PMID:18274627

  2. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  3. Use of three-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict hepatic blood levels of fluvoxamine relevant for drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Iga, Katsumi

    2015-04-01

    Using a three-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and a tube model for hepatic extraction kinetics, equations for calculating blood drug levels (Cb s) and hepatic blood drug levels (Chb s, proportional to actual hepatic drug levels), were derived mathematically. Assuming the actual values for total body clearance (CLtot ), oral bioavailability (F), and steady-state distribution volume (Vdss ), Cb s, and Chb s after intravenous and oral administration of fluvoxamine (strong perpetrator in drug-drug interactions, DDIs), propranolol, imipramine, and tacrine were simulated. Values for Cb s corresponded to the actual values for all tested drugs, and mean Chb and maximal Chb -to-maximal Cb ratio predicted for oral fluvoxamine administration (50 mg twice-a-day administration) were nearly 100 nM and 2.3, respectively, which would be useful for the predictions of the DDIs caused by fluvoxamine. Fluvoxamine and tacrine are known to exhibit relatively large F values despite having CLtot similar to or larger than hepatic blood flow, which may be because of the high liver uptake (almost 0.6) upon intravenous administration. The present method is thus considered to be more predictive of the Chb for perpetrators of DDIs than other methods. PMID:25558834

  4. Centrifugal microfluidic platform for single-cell level cardiomyocyte-based drug profiling and screening.

    PubMed

    Espulgar, W; Aoki, W; Ikeuchi, T; Mita, D; Saito, M; Lee, J-K; Tamiya, E

    2015-09-01

    Drug screening and profiling is an important phase in drug discovery, development, and marketing. However, some profiling tests are not routinely done because of the needed additional technical skills and costly maintenance, which leads to cases of unexpected side effects or adverse drug reactions (ADRs). This study presents the design and operation of a microfluidic chip for single-cell level drug screening and profiling as an alternative platform for this purpose. Centrifugation was utilized to trap isolated single and groups of primary cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes in the same chip. In the off-spin operation of the chip, the cells can be observed under a microscope and movies of the beat motion can be recorded. The beat profiles of the cells were generated by image correlation analysis of the recorded video to study the contractile characteristics (beating rate, beating strength, and inter-beat duration). By utilizing this non-invasive tool, long term continuous monitoring, right after trapping, was made possible and cell growth and dynamics were successfully observed in the chip. Media and liquid replacement does not require further centrifugation but instead utilizes capillary flow only. The effect of carbachol (100 μM) and isoproterenol (4 μg mL(-1)) on single cells and groups of cells was demonstrated and the feature for immunostaining (β-actin) applicability of the chip was revealed. Furthermore, these findings can be helpful for the headway of non-invasive profiling of cardiomyocytes and for future chip design and operation of high-throughput lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:26215661

  5. Relationship between electronic properties and drug activity of seven quinoxaline compounds: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadi, Hadi; Roonasi, Payman; Assle taghipour, Khatoon; van der Spoel, David; Manzetti, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    The quantum chemical calculations at the DFT/B3LYP level of theory were carried out on seven quinoxaline compounds, which have been synthesized as anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis agents. Three conformers were optimized for each compound and the lowest energy structure was found and used in further calculations. The electronic properties including EHOMO, ELUMO and related parameters as well as electron density around oxygen and nitrogen atoms were calculated for each compound. The relationship between the calculated electronic parameters and biological activity of the studied compounds were investigated. Six similar quinoxaline derivatives with possible more drug activity were suggested based on the calculated electronic descriptors. A mechanism was proposed and discussed based on the calculated electronic parameters and bond dissociation energies.

  6. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations. PMID:27312339

  7. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Matthew D; Ballinger, Kimberly R; Khetani, Salman R

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations. PMID:27312339

  8. Celastrol and an EGCG pro-drug exhibit potent chemosensitizing activity in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Andrew; Frezza, Michael; Shen, Min; Ge, Yubin; Huo, Congde; Chan, Tak Hang; Dou, Q Ping

    2010-03-01

    Chemotherapy remains the staple of treatment for many types of leukemia. Despite the positive impact on extending overall survival in patients with hematological malignancies, new treatment strategies are needed to reduce the nonspecific toxicity and improve the efficacy of treatment. Celastrol, derived from the 'Thunder God Vine' and Pro-EGCG, a pre-drug version of green tea polyphenol EGCG have shown potent biological activity in vitro and in vivo. Whether these natural products augment the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy in the treatment of leukemia cells has yet to be demonstrated. Here we demonstrate that these natural products could sensitize the effect of chemotherapy in both K-562 and Jurkat T human leukemia cells. Accordingly, this potent biological activity was associated with increased levels of leukemia cell killing, caspase 3 activation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Furthermore, the higher levels of apoptotic indices were associated with decreased levels of Bcr-Abl oncoprotein in K-562 cells. Taken together, our findings present a compelling rationale for the development of combination strategies using natural products in the treatment of hematological malignancies. PMID:20127053

  9. Effect of Anti-Epileptic Drugs on Serum Level of IgG Subclasses

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Mahmoud-Reza; Hosseini, Seyed-Ahmad; Biglari, Mohammad; Abolmaali, Sarah; Azizi Malamiri, Reza; Mombeini, Hoda; Pourpak, Zahra; Saladjegheh, Narges; Rezaei, Nima; Samadian, Azam; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2010-01-01

    Objective There are some controversial studies on effects of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) on serum IgG subclasses; however, the role of these medications is still unclear. The aim of this study was evaluation the effects of anti-epileptic drugs on serum concentration of IgG and its subclasses Methods Serum IgG and IgG subclasses of 61 newly diagnosed epileptic patients were measured at the beginning of monotherapy with carbamazepine, sodium valproate, and phenobarbital, and 6 months later. Measurement of IgG and its subclasses was performed using nephlometry and ELISA techniques, respectively. Findings Reduction of at least one IgG subclass was found in 6 patients 6 months after treatment with AEDs. Among 27 patients receiving carbamazepine, decrease in at least one serum IgG subclass level was found in 5 patients. Among 20 patients using sodium valproate, only one patient showed decrease in IgG2 subclass. None of the 14 patients using phenobarbital revealed significant decrease in IgG subclasses. No infection was seen in the patients with reduction of subclasses. Conclusion Although in our study, children with selective IgG subclass deficiency were asymptomatic, assessment of serum immunoglobulin levels could be recommended at starting the administration of AEDs and in serial intervals afterward in epileptic patients. PMID:23056716

  10. Impact of approach used to determine removal levels of drugs of abuse during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Rodayan, Angela; Majewsky, Marius; Yargeau, Viviane

    2014-07-15

    In this study the levels of 19 drugs of abuse were estimated throughout a wastewater treatment plant using polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS), 24h composite samples and grab samples. Overall removal efficiencies and removals in between each treatment unit were calculated using load data for each sampling technique as well as removals that take into account the hydraulic residence time distribution of the treatment plant (time-shifted mass balancing approach). Amphetamine-type stimulants, cocaine and its major metabolite, benzoylecgonine and opioid levels determined with 24h composite samples were generally comparable to those obtained with POCIS and grab samples. Negative mass balances resulting from the estimation of overall removal efficiencies by POCIS, day-to-day mass balancing of 24h composite and grab sample data did not occur when the hydraulic retention time (HRT) distributions of the plant were taken into account for calculation. Among the compounds investigated, cocaine exhibited the highest overall removal (90%) while codeine had the lowest with 13%, respectively. Sampling between the treatment units revealed that highest removal occurs during biological treatment as compared to primary or secondary clarification. Methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), fentanyl, dihydrocodeine and heroin were not detected in wastewater at any of the sampling locations at the treatment plant regardless of the sampling technique. The study demonstrates the benefits of applying the time-shifted mass balancing approach to the calculation of removals of drugs of abuse during wastewater treatment. PMID:24726517

  11. Movement Activity Levels on Traditional and Contemporary Playground Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabbard, Carl P.; LeBlanc, Elizabeth

    This study investigated playground activity levels of children in grades K-4 and compared levels of use of traditional and creative playground apparatus. The traditional playground area consisted of climbing bars, slides, ladders, chin bars, swings, see saws, and a merry-go-round. The creative playground contained tire hurdles, tire walk, tire…

  12. Physical Activity Levels in Portuguese High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmeleira, Jose Francisco Filipe; Aldeias, Nuno Micael Carrasqueira; da Graca, Pedro Miguel dos Santos Medeira

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the physical activity (PA) levels of high school Portuguese students during physical education (PE) and investigate the association of PA levels with students' goal orientation and intrinsic motivation. Forty-six students from three high schools participated. Heart rate telemetry and pedometry were used…

  13. Active Ageing Level of Older Persons: Regional Comparison in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Md. Nuruzzaman

    2016-01-01

    Active ageing level and its discrepancy in different regions (Bangkok, Central, North, Northeast, and South) of Thailand have been examined for prioritizing the policy agenda to be implemented. Attempt has been made to test preliminary active ageing models for Thai older persons and hence active ageing index (AAI, ranges from 0 to 1) has been estimated. Using nationally representative data and confirmatory factor analysis approach, this study justified active ageing models for female and male older persons in Thailand. Results revealed that active ageing level of Thai older persons is not high (mean AAIs for female and male older persons are 0.64 and 0.61, resp., and those are significantly different (p < 0.001)). Mean AAI in Central region is lower than North, Northeast, and South regions but there is no significant difference in the latter three regions of Thailand. Special emphasis should be given to Central region and policy should be undertaken for increasing active ageing level. Implementation of an Integrated Active Ageing Package (IAAP), containing policies for older persons to improve their health and economic security, to promote participation in social groups and longer working lives, and to arrange learning programs, would be helpful for increasing older persons' active ageing level in Thailand. PMID:27375903

  14. Seasonality in Children's Pedometer-Measured Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beighle, Aaron; Alderman, Brandon; Morgan, Charles F.; Le Masurier, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Seasonality appears to have an impact on children's physical activity levels, but equivocal findings demand more study in this area. With the increased use of pedometers in both research and practice, collecting descriptive data in various seasons to examine the impact of seasonality on pedometer-measured physical activity among children is…

  15. African American Preschool Children's Physical Activity Levels in Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Bo; Reinhart-Lee, Tamara; Janisse, Heather; Brogan, Kathryn; Danford, Cynthia; Jen, K-L. C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the physical activity levels of urban inner city preschoolers while attending Head Start, the federally funded preschool program for children from low-income families. Participants were 158 African American children. Their physical activity during Head Start days was measured using programmed RT-3…

  16. The Role of Various Curriculum Models on Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culpepper, Dean O.; Tarr, Susan J.; Killion, Lorraine E.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that physical education curricula can be highly effective in increasing physical activity levels at school (Sallis & Owen, 1999). The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of various curriculum models on physical activity. Total steps were measured on 1,111 subjects and three curriculum models were studied…

  17. Cutting-edge mass spectrometry methods for the multi-level structural characterization of antibody-drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Beck, Alain; Terral, Guillaume; Debaene, François; Wagner-Rousset, Elsa; Marcoux, Julien; Janin-Bussat, Marie-Claire; Colas, Olivier; Dorsselaer, Alain Van; Cianférani, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) are highly cytotoxic drugs covalently attached via conditionally stable linkers to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and are among the most promising next-generation empowered biologics for cancer treatment. ADCs are more complex than naked mAbs, as the heterogeneity of the conjugates adds to the inherent microvariability of the biomolecules. The development and optimization of ADCs rely on improving their analytical and bioanalytical characterization by assessing several critical quality attributes, namely the distribution and position of the drug, the amount of naked antibody, the average drug to antibody ratio, and the residual drug-linker and related product proportions. Here brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®) and trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla®), the first and gold-standard hinge-cysteine and lysine drug conjugates, respectively, were chosen to develop new mass spectrometry (MS) methods and to improve multiple-level structural assessment protocols. PMID:26653789

  18. Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Literature Review and Activities and Findings of the ICEMR Network.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liwang; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Ndiaye, Daouda; Rathod, Pradipsinh K; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    Antimalarial drugs are key tools for the control and elimination of malaria. Recent decreases in the global malaria burden are likely due, in part, to the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the emergence and potential spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites in southeast Asia and changes in sensitivities to artemisinin partner drugs have raised concerns. In recognition of this urgent threat, the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) are closely monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy and studying the mechanisms underlying drug resistance. At multiple sentinel sites of the global ICEMR network, research activities include clinical studies to track the efficacies of antimalarial drugs, ex vivo/in vitro assays to measure drug susceptibilities of parasite isolates, and characterization of resistance-mediating parasite polymorphisms. Taken together, these efforts offer an increasingly comprehensive assessment of the efficacies of antimalarial therapies, and enable us to predict the emergence of drug resistance and to guide local antimalarial drug policies. Here we briefly review worldwide antimalarial drug resistance concerns, summarize research activities of the ICEMRs related to drug resistance, and assess the global impacts of the ICEMR programs. PMID:26259943

  19. Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Literature Review and Activities and Findings of the ICEMR Network

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liwang; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Ndiaye, Daouda; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs are key tools for the control and elimination of malaria. Recent decreases in the global malaria burden are likely due, in part, to the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the emergence and potential spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites in southeast Asia and changes in sensitivities to artemisinin partner drugs have raised concerns. In recognition of this urgent threat, the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) are closely monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy and studying the mechanisms underlying drug resistance. At multiple sentinel sites of the global ICEMR network, research activities include clinical studies to track the efficacies of antimalarial drugs, ex vivo/in vitro assays to measure drug susceptibilities of parasite isolates, and characterization of resistance-mediating parasite polymorphisms. Taken together, these efforts offer an increasingly comprehensive assessment of the efficacies of antimalarial therapies, and enable us to predict the emergence of drug resistance and to guide local antimalarial drug policies. Here we briefly review worldwide antimalarial drug resistance concerns, summarize research activities of the ICEMRs related to drug resistance, and assess the global impacts of the ICEMR programs. PMID:26259943

  20. Prevalence and Correlates of Prescription Drug Misuse among Socially Active Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Brian C.; Wells, Brooke E.; LeClair, Amy; Tracy, Daniel; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Golub, Sarit A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Prescription drug misuse represents an emerging global drug trend. Data indicate that young adults are misusing prescription drugs at high rates. As such, continued surveillance of the patterns of prescription drug misuse among young adults is critical, particularly for those engaged in social scenes known to accommodate drug use. Methods Prevalence and correlates of lifetime and recent prescription drug misuse among urban young adults recruited at nightlife venues using time-space sampling are assessed via prevalence estimates and logistic regression analyses. Results In a diverse sample of 1,207 young adults, 44.1% reported lifetime prescription drug misuse, and 20.3% reported misuse during the past three months. Stimulants were the most common class of drug respondents misused within the past six months (16.7%), followed by pain killers (16.5%) and sedatives (14.5%). While no gender or sexual orientation differences in misuse prevalence existed, Black youth reported the lowest prevalence of misuse. In multivariate analyses, increased age was associated with lower odds of recent misuse, females report lower odds of recent use, and Black, Asian, and Latino individuals had lower odds of recent misuse than Whites. These odds varied by prescription drug type. Negative binomial regression analyses indicate that, among prescription drug misusers, women misuse prescription drugs less frequently. Younger individuals more frequently misuse stimulants and older individuals more frequently misuse sedatives. Racial variation existed with frequency of use across classes. Conclusions This study illustrates the need for health promotion efforts targeting prescription drug misuse among young adults who are highly socially active. Future research should focus on motivations for and factors associated with prescription drug misuse within youth cultures. Further research may provide a fuller sense of how to reduce the impact of prescription drug misuse for nations whose

  1. Prophylactic activity of mefloquine hydrochloride (WR 142 490) in drug-resistant malaria*

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, K. H.; Trenholme, G. M.; Williams, R. L.; Carson, P. E.; Frischer, H.; Desjardins, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    In preliminary studies with mefloquine (WR 142 490) a single dose exerted prolonged suppressive activity against a drug-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Development of patent parasitaemia was prevented when nonimmune persons were exposed to infected mosquitos 2 weeks after medication, and it was delayed when exposure occurred 3 weeks after drug administration. PMID:4619059

  2. Effects of dietary pantethine levels on drug-metabolizing system in the liver of rats orally administered varying amounts of autoxidized linoleate.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, N; Kishida, T; Natake, M

    1989-08-01

    The effects of dietary pantethine levels on the drug-metabolizing system were investigated under administration of varying amounts of autoxidized linoleate (AL) with rat liver microsomes and S-9 fractions. AL having 800 meq/kg of peroxide value and 1,700 meq/kg of carbonyl value was dosed to the rats of each group given drinking water containing 0 mg% (deficient), 6.25 mg% (normal), and 125 mg% pantethine (sufficient). The contents and activities of the enzymes in the drug-metabolizing system in the rat liver of each pantethine-level group changed essentially in a similar manner, that is, they were induced at an AL daily dose of 0.2 ml/100 g body weight (i.e., small dose) for 5 successive days and lowered at a daily dose of 0.4 ml/100 g body weight (i.e., large dose) by the same administration period, compared with respective non-AL groups in each of the three pantethine levels. In both non-AL and the small-dose AL, enzyme activities of the electron transfer system in rat liver microsomes, aminopyrine-N-demethylase activity, and metabolic activation of 2-acetylaminofluorene in S-9 fractions were significantly higher in the pantethine-deficient group than in the pantethine-normal and -sufficient groups. In the large-dose AL, the enzyme activities in the drug-metabolizing system decreased significantly in any pantethine levels, though the survival rate of the rats was higher in the pantethine-sufficient group than in the pantethine-normal groups. The results suggest that the pantethine relieves the effect of dosed AL on the drug-metabolizing system in rat liver. PMID:2585150

  3. Interaction of nitroimidazole drugs with DNA in vitro: structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, R. J.; Knight, R. C.; Edwards, D. I.

    1981-01-01

    An electrolytic reduction system has been developed to model the cytotoxic action of a range of nitroimidazole drugs against DNA hypoxic cells or anaerobic microorganisms. THe degree of damage induced by these drugs (measured as the release of [14C]-dT from DNA) and their relative rates of reduction have been correlated with their redox potentials. The results show that the correlation of drug-induced damage and electron affinity is related to the amount of drug reduced, and supports the hypothesis that at the molecular level the cytotoxic mechanism of reduced nitroimidazoles is identical in hypoxic mammalian cells, bacteria and protozoa. PMID:7032569

  4. EGFR inhibition evokes innate drug resistance in lung cancer cells by preventing Akt activity and thus inactivating Ets-1 function

    PubMed Central

    Phuchareon, Janyaporn; McCormick, Frank; Eisele, David W.; Tetsu, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. About 14% of NSCLCs harbor mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Despite remarkable progress in treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), only 5% of patients achieve tumor reduction >90%. The limited primary responses are attributed partly to drug resistance inherent in the tumor cells before therapy begins. Recent reports showed that activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is an important determinant of this innate drug resistance. In contrast, we demonstrate that EGFR inhibition promotes innate drug resistance despite blockade of RTK activity in NSCLC cells. EGFR TKIs decrease both the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt protein kinase pathways for a short time, after which the Ras/MAPK pathway becomes reactivated. Akt inhibition selectively blocks the transcriptional activation of Ets-1, which inhibits its target gene, dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6), a negative regulator specific for ERK1/2. As a result, ERK1/2 is activated. Furthermore, elevated c-Src stimulates Ras GTP-loading and activates Raf and MEK kinases. These observations suggest that not only ERK1/2 but also Akt activity is essential to maintain Ets-1 in an active state. Therefore, despite high levels of ERK1/2, Ets-1 target genes including DUSP6 and cyclins D1, D3, and E2 remain suppressed by Akt inhibition. Reduction of DUSP6 in combination with elevated c-Src renews activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway, which enhances cell survival by accelerating Bim protein turnover. Thus, EGFR TKIs evoke innate drug resistance by preventing Akt activity and inactivating Ets-1 function in NSCLC cells. PMID:26150526

  5. EGFR inhibition evokes innate drug resistance in lung cancer cells by preventing Akt activity and thus inactivating Ets-1 function.

    PubMed

    Phuchareon, Janyaporn; McCormick, Frank; Eisele, David W; Tetsu, Osamu

    2015-07-21

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. About 14% of NSCLCs harbor mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Despite remarkable progress in treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), only 5% of patients achieve tumor reduction >90%. The limited primary responses are attributed partly to drug resistance inherent in the tumor cells before therapy begins. Recent reports showed that activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is an important determinant of this innate drug resistance. In contrast, we demonstrate that EGFR inhibition promotes innate drug resistance despite blockade of RTK activity in NSCLC cells. EGFR TKIs decrease both the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt protein kinase pathways for a short time, after which the Ras/MAPK pathway becomes reactivated. Akt inhibition selectively blocks the transcriptional activation of Ets-1, which inhibits its target gene, dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6), a negative regulator specific for ERK1/2. As a result, ERK1/2 is activated. Furthermore, elevated c-Src stimulates Ras GTP-loading and activates Raf and MEK kinases. These observations suggest that not only ERK1/2 but also Akt activity is essential to maintain Ets-1 in an active state. Therefore, despite high levels of ERK1/2, Ets-1 target genes including DUSP6 and cyclins D1, D3, and E2 remain suppressed by Akt inhibition. Reduction of DUSP6 in combination with elevated c-Src renews activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway, which enhances cell survival by accelerating Bim protein turnover. Thus, EGFR TKIs evoke innate drug resistance by preventing Akt activity and inactivating Ets-1 function in NSCLC cells. PMID:26150526

  6. Drug treatment of malaria infections can reduce levels of protection transferred to offspring via maternal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Staszewski, Vincent; Reece, Sarah E.; O'Donnell, Aidan J.; Cunningham, Emma J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Maternally transferred immunity can have a fundamental effect on the ability of offspring to deal with infection. However, levels of antibodies in adults can vary both quantitatively and qualitatively between individuals and during the course of infection. How infection dynamics and their modification by drug treatment might affect the protection transferred to offspring remains poorly understood. Using the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi, we demonstrate that curing dams part way through infection prior to pregnancy can alter their immune response, with major consequences for offspring health and survival. In untreated maternal infections, maternally transferred protection suppressed parasitaemia and reduced pup mortality by 75 per cent compared with pups from naïve dams. However, when dams were treated with anti-malarial drugs, pups received fewer maternal antibodies, parasitaemia was only marginally suppressed, and mortality risk was 25 per cent higher than for pups from dams with full infections. We observed the same qualitative patterns across three different host strains and two parasite genotypes. This study reveals the role that within-host infection dynamics play in the fitness consequences of maternally transferred immunity. Furthermore, it highlights a potential trade-off between the health of mothers and offspring suggesting that anti-parasite treatment may significantly affect the outcome of infection in newborns. PMID:22357264

  7. Medicinal herb extract and a single-compound drug confer similar complex pharmacogenomic activities in mcf-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ning-Sun; Shyur, Lie-Fen; Chen, Chih-Huai; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Tzeng, Chi-Meng

    2004-01-01

    Metabolite profiling and DNA microarray analysis of global gene expression profiles were employed to characterize the bioactivities of the herbal extract of Anoectochilus formosanus (AF), a popular folk medicine with anticancer activity, in MCF-7 cancer cells. The pharmacogenomic activities of this plant extract as a crude phytocompound mixture were compared to those conferred by the single-compound drug, plumbagin. A similar level of complexity in transcriptional regulation at the genomic level was observed for both AF extract- and plumbagin-treated MCF-7 cells, as revealed by the number of up- or downregulated genes as well as by the specific but distinct patterns found in the gene-clustering analysis. This finding offers evidence to support the search for fractionated medicinal herb extracts or phytocompound mixtures, in addition to single-compound drugs, as defined therapeutic agents. PMID:15067226

  8. Randomized Controlled Evaluation of the "Too Good for Drugs" Prevention Program: Impact on Adolescents at Different Risk Levels for Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Bruce W.; Bacon, Tina P.; Ferron, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Sixth graders participating in the "Too Good for Drugs" (TGFD) prevention program in comparison to 6th graders not participating show different results by student risk level. Sixth graders from 20 middle schools were randomly assigned to receive the intervention and those from 20 paired middle schools assigned to serve as controls (N =…

  9. Iran’s Activities on Prevention, Treatment and Harm Reduction of Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Saberi Zafarghandi, Mohammad Bagher; Jadidi, Mohsen; Khalili, Narjes

    2015-01-01

    Context: In the present review study, authors investigated Iran’s activities regarding prevention, abuse and harm reduction of drugs nationwide. The issue appears to be important in order to show the trend of activities in the country. Evidence Acquisition: In this report, authors gathered data from different Farsi/English peer review journals issued both in printed and online versions. These journals have been indexed in PubMed, ISI, ISC, SID, Magiran, UN, etc. These are among the most referred and cited databases. Results: Summarizing the data led to three distinguished sections: 1) drug supply reduction activities; 2) drug demand reduction activities; 3) harm reduction activities. Conclusions: As the results showed, the trend of activities was encouraging and some additional activities could be included to future programs relying on early-onset preventions. PMID:26870709

  10. Magnetospheric impulse response for many levels of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bargatze, L. F.; Baker, D. N.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The temporal relationship between the solar wind and magnetospheric activity has been studied using 34 intervals of high time resolution IMP 8 solar wind data and the corresponding AL auroral activity index. The median values of the AL index for each interval were utilized to rank the intervals according to geomagnetic activity level. The linear prediction filtering technique was then applied to model magnetospheric response as measured by the AL index to the solar wind input function VB(s). The linear prediction filtering routine produces a filter of time-lagged response coefficients which estimates the most general linear relationship between the chosen input and output parameters of the magnetospheric system. It is found that the filters are composed of two response pulses speaking at time lags of 20 and 60 min. The amplitude of the 60-min pulse is the larger for moderate activity levels, while the 20-min pulse is the larger for strong activity levels. A possible interpretation is that the 20-min pulse represents magnetospheric activity driven directly by solar wind coupling and that the 60-min pulse represents magnetospheric activity driven by the release of energy previously stored in the magnetotail. If this interpretation is correct, the linear filtering results suggest that both the driven and the unloading models of magnetospheric response are important facets of a more comprehensive response model.

  11. Neighborhood-level LGBT hate crimes and current illicit drug use among sexual minority youth

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Dustin T.; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Johnson, Renee M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether past-30 day illicit drug use among sexual minority youth was more common in neighborhoods with a greater prevalence of hate crimes targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT, or sexual minority) individuals. Methods We used a population-based survey of public school youth in Boston, Massachusetts, consisting of 1292 9th–12th grade students from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey Geospatial Dataset (sexual minority n = 108). Data on LGBT hate crimes involving assaults or assaults and battery between 2005 and 2008 were obtained from the Boston Police Department and linked to youths’ residential address. Youth reported past-30 day use of marijuana and other illicit drugs. Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney tests and corresponding p-values were computed to assess differences in substance use by neighborhood-level LGBT assault hate crime rate among sexual minority youth (n = 103). Results The LGBT assault hate crime rate in the neighborhoods of sexual minority youth who reported current marijuana use was 23.7 per 100,000, compared to 12.9 per 100,000 for sexual minority youth who reported no marijuana use (p = 0.04). No associations between LGBT assault hate crimes and marijuana use among heterosexual youth (p > 0.05) or between sexual minority marijuana use and overall neighborhood-level violent and property crimes (p > 0.05) were detected, providing evidence for result specificity. Conclusions We found a significantly greater prevalence of marijuana use among sexual minority youth in neighborhoods with a higher prevalence of LGBT assault hate crimes. These results suggest that neighborhood context (i.e., LGBT hate crimes) may contribute to sexual orientation disparities in marijuana use. PMID:24326203

  12. Extraction of Children's Friendship Relation from Activity Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Aki; Shintani, Kimio; Katsuki, Takuya; Kihara, Shin'ya; Ueda, Mari; Kaneda, Shigeo; Haga, Hirohide

    Children learn to fit into society through living in a group, and it's greatly influenced by their friend relations. Although preschool teachers need to observe them to assist in the growth of children's social progress and support the development each child's personality, only experienced teachers can watch over children while providing high-quality guidance. To resolve the problem, this paper proposes a mathematical and objective method that assists teachers with observation. It uses numerical data of activity level recorded by pedometers, and we make tree diagram called dendrogram based on hierarchical clustering with recorded activity level. Also, we calculate children's ``breadth'' and ``depth'' of friend relations by using more than one dendrogram. When we record children's activity level in a certain kindergarten for two months and evaluated the proposed method, the results usually coincide with remarks of teachers about the children.

  13. mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of the NCI-60 integrated with drug activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongfang; D’Andrade, Petula; Fulmer-Smentek, Stephanie; Lorenzi, Philip; Kohn, Kurt W.; Weinstein, John N.; Pommier, Yves; Reinhold, William C.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Spotlight on Molecular Profiling series, we present here new profiling studies of mRNA and microRNA expression for the 60 cell lines of the NCI DTP drug screen (NCI-60) using the 41,000-probe Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray and the 15,000-feature Agilent Human microRNA Microarray V2. The expression levels of ~21,000 genes and 723 human microRNAs were measured. These profiling studies include quadruplicate technical replicates for six and eight cell lines for mRNA and microRNA, respectively, and duplicates for the remaining cell lines. The resulting data sets are freely available and searchable online in our CellMiner database. The result indicates high reproducibility for both platforms and an essential biological similarity across the various cell types. The mRNA and microRNA expression levels were integrated with our previously published 1,429-compound database of anticancer activity obtained from the NCI DTP drug screen. Large blocks of both mRNAs and microRNAs were identified with predominately unidirectional correlations to ~1,300 drugs including 121 drugs with known mechanisms of action. The data sets presented here will facilitate the identification of groups of mRNAs, microRNAs and drugs that potentially affect and interact with one another. PMID:20442302

  14. Evaluation of surface contamination with cyclophosphamide following simulated hazardous drug preparation activities using two closed-system products

    PubMed Central

    Zock, Matthew D; Soefje, Scott; Rickabaugh, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. A preliminary investigation was conducted to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of two closed-system products in preventing contamination of typical pharmacy workplace surfaces with cyclophosphamide during simulated hazardous drug preparation activities in a controlled laboratory setting. Methods. Two separate trials simulating hazardous drug compounding using cyclophosphamide were performed with two different closed-system products. Prior to each trial, work area surfaces of the biological safety cabinet (BSC) workbench, the BSC airfoil and front grill, and the floor below the BSC were cleaned, and wipe samples were collected and analyzed to determine, if present, levels of cyclophosphamide. Following each trial, wipe samples were collected from the work area surfaces to determine the hazardous drug containment effectiveness of each closed-system product. Results. Cyclophosphamide was not detected on work area surfaces prior to each trial. Low levels were detected on the BSC workbench surface following both trials. Discussion. Based on the limited number of samples obtained during this preliminary study and the determination of the presence of the chemical of interest on the drug vials, no statistical evaluation was performed to compare the relative effectiveness of the two systems tested. Work practices and procedures regarding product operation may affect hazardous drug containment and worker safety. Further study and statistical analyses are needed. PMID:20584743

  15. Enhancing cancer targeting and anticancer activity by a stimulus-sensitive multifunctional polymer-drug conjugate.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ying; Zhu, Lin

    2015-08-28

    Undesirable physicochemical properties, low tumor targeting, insufficient cell internalization, acquired drug resistance, and severe side effects significantly limit the applications of anticancer drugs. In this study, to improve the tumor targeting and drug efficacy of the poorly water-soluble drug, doxorubicin (DOX), a novel drug delivery platform (PEG-ppTAT-DOX) was developed, which contained a polyethylene glycol (PEG), a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-sensitive peptide linker (pp), a cell penetrating peptide (TAT), and a model drug (doxorubicin). The prepared drug platform possessed several key features, including: (i) the nanoparticle formation via the self-assembly; (ii) prevention of the non-specific interaction via the PEGylation; (iii) tumor targeting via the MMP2-mediated PEG deshielding and exposure of the TAT; (iv) the TAT-mediated cell internalization; (v) the TAT-induced endosomal escape; (vi) the inhibition of P-glycoprotein mediated drug efflux; and (vii) the TAT-medicated nuclear translocation. These cooperative functions ensured the improved tumor targetability, enhanced tumor cell internalization, improved intracellular distribution, and potentiated anticancer activity. Compared to the multi-component nanocarriers, the proposed simple but multifunctional polymer-drug conjugate might have greater potential for tumor-targeted drug delivery and enhanced chemotherapy. PMID:26113423

  16. 24 CFR 960.204 - Denial of admission for criminal activity or drug abuse by household members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... activity or drug abuse by household members. 960.204 Section 960.204 Housing and Urban Development... HOUSING Admission § 960.204 Denial of admission for criminal activity or drug abuse by household members. (a) Required denial of admission—(1) Persons evicted for drug-related criminal activity. The...

  17. Activity level and risk of overweight in male health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Ching, P L; Willett, W C; Rimm, E B; Colditz, G A; Gortmaker, S L; Stampfer, M J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study undertook to examine relationships between nonsedentary activity level, time spent watching television (TV)/videocassette recorder (VCR), and risk of overweight among men. METHODS. Men participating in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study were mailed surveys. Cross-sectional analyses examined the prevalence and odds of being overweight, prospective analyses determined cumulative incidence rates and relative risks of becoming overweight over 2 years of follow-up. RESULTS. Cross-sectionally, odds of being overweight were 50% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 45%; 55%) lower for men in the highest quintile of nonsedentary activity level when compared with men in the lowest quintile. Among men watching 41 or more hours of TV/VCR per week, the odds of being overweight were 406 (95% CI = 2.67, 6.17) times greater than those for men watching no more than 1 hour per week. Prospectively, higher levels is of nonsedentary activity and lower levels of TV/VCR viewing were independently associated with lower relative risks for becoming overweight between survey years. CONCLUSIONS. Both a lack of nonsedentary activity and time spent watching TV/VCR contribute to the development of overweight in men. Sedentary and nonsedentary activities represent separate domains, each with independent risks for overweight. PMID:8561237

  18. CHIP buffers heterogeneous Bcl-2 expression levels to prevent augmentation of anticancer drug-resistant cell population.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, M; Nakajima, Y; Waku, T; Hiyoshi, H; Morishita, T; Furumai, R; Hayashi, Y; Kishimoto, H; Kimura, K; Yanagisawa, J

    2015-08-27

    Many types of cancer display heterogeneity in various features, including gene expression and malignant potential. This heterogeneity is associated with drug resistance and cancer progression. Recent studies have shown that the expression of a major protein quality control ubiquitin ligase, carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), is negatively correlated with breast cancer clinicopathological stages and poor overall survival. Here we show that CHIP acts as a capacitor of heterogeneous Bcl-2 expression levels and prevents an increase in the anticancer drug-resistant population in breast cancer cells. CHIP knockdown in breast cancer cells increased variation in Bcl-2 expression levels, an antiapoptotic protein, among the cells. Our results also showed that CHIP knockdown increased the proportion of anticancer drug-resistant cells. These findings suggest that CHIP buffers variation in gene expression levels, affecting resistance to anticancer drugs. In single-cell clones derived from breast cancer cell lines, CHIP knockdown did not alter the variation in Bcl-2 expression levels and the proportion of anticancer drug-resistant cells. In contrast, when clonal cells were treated with a mutagen, the variation in Bcl-2 expression levels and proportion of anticancer drug-resistant cells were altered by CHIP knockdown. These results suggest that CHIP masks genetic variations to suppress heterogeneous Bcl-2 expression levels and prevents augmentation of the anticancer drug-resistant population of breast cancer cells. Because genetic variation is a major driver of heterogeneity, our results suggest that the degree of heterogeneity in expression levels is decided by a balance between genetic variation and the buffering capacity of CHIP. PMID:25435366

  19. Cadmium effect on microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity in rat livers with respect to differences in age and sex

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, M.

    1982-04-01

    The effect of cadmium on the hepatic microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme system was investigated. Cadmium chloride caused the conversion of cytochrome P-450 to P-420 in rat liver microsomes. The destruction of cytochrome P-450 by cadmium caused the reduction of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity and prolonged the pentobarbital sleeping time. There is a sex-related difference in the ability of cadmium to inhibit the hepatic drug metabolism in rats: male rats are more sensitive to cadmium than females. The effective period when cadmium prolonged their sleep depended upon the age of rats; older rats were more sensitive to cadmium than younger ones. The maximum increase of sleeping time depended upon the dose level of cadium, and the rate constant of the equations seems to depend upon the age of the animals.

  20. Importance of P450 reductase activity in determining sensitivity of breast tumour cells to the bioreductive drug, tirapazamine (SR 4233).

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, A. V.; Barham, H. M.; Chinje, E. C.; Adams, G. E.; Harris, A. L.; Stratford, I. J.

    1995-01-01

    P450 reductase (NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase, EC 1.6.2.4) is known to be important in the reductive activation of the benzotriazene-di-N-oxide tirapazamine (SR 4233). Using a panel of six human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines we have examined the relationship between P450 reductase activity and sensitivity to tirapazamine. The toxicity of tirapazamine was found to correlate strongly with P450 reductase activity following an acute (3 h) exposure under hypoxic conditions, the drug being most toxic in the cell lines with the highest P450 reductase activity. A similar correlation was also observed following a chronic (96 h) exposure to the drug in air but not following acute (3 h) exposure in air. We have also determined the ability of lysates prepared from the cell lines to metabolise tirapazamine to its two-electron reduced product, SR 4317, under hypoxic conditions using NADPH as an electron donor. The rate of SR 4317 formation was found to correlate both with P450 reductase activity and with sensitivity to tirapazamine, the highest rates of SR 4317 formation being associated with the highest levels of P450 reductase activity and the greatest sensitivity to the drug. These findings indicate a major role for P450 reductase in determining the hypoxic toxicity of tirapazamine in breast tumour cell lines. Images Figure 4 PMID:7577460

  1. Induction of P-glycoprotein expression and activity by Aconitum alkaloids: Implication for clinical drug–drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinjun; Lin, Na; Li, Fangyuan; Zhang, Guiyu; He, Shugui; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Ou, Rilan; Li, Na; Liu, Shuqiang; Feng, Lizhi; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhongqiu; Lu, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    The Aconitum species, which mainly contain bioactive Aconitum alkaloids, are frequently administered concomitantly with other herbal medicines or chemical drugs in clinics. The potential risk of drug–drug interactions (DDIs) arising from co-administration of Aconitum alkaloids and other drugs against specific targets such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) must be evaluated. This study focused on the effects of three representative Aconitum alkaloids: aconitine (AC), benzoylaconine (BAC), and aconine, on the expression and activity of P-gp. We observed that Aconitum alkaloids increased P-gp expression in LS174T and Caco-2 cells in the order AC > BAC > aconine. Nuclear receptors were involved in the induction of P-gp. AC and BAC increased the P-gp transport activity. Strikingly, intracellular ATP levels and mitochondrial mass also increased. Furthermore, exposure to AC decreased the toxicity of vincristine and doxorubicin towards the cells. In vivo, AC significantly up-regulated the P-gp protein levels in the jejunum, ileum, and colon of FVB mice, and protected them against acute AC toxicity. Taken together, the findings of our in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that AC can induce P-gp expression, and that co-administration of AC with P-gp substrate drugs may cause DDIs. Our findings have important implications for Aconitum therapy in clinics. PMID:27139035

  2. Increased Interleukin-17 and decreased BAFF serum levels in drug-free acute schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    El Kissi, Yousri; Samoud, Samar; Mtiraoui, Ahlem; Letaief, Leila; Hannachi, Neila; Ayachi, Mouna; Ali, Bechir Ben Hadj; Boukadida, Jalel

    2015-01-30

    Hypotheses regarding an immune-cytokine basis of schizophrenia have been postulated with controversial findings and a lack of data related to many cytokines. The aim of this study was to assess serum levels of Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), Interleukin-4 (IL-4), Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β), Interleukin-17 (IL-17) and B-cell Activating Factor (BAFF) in schizophrenic patients and to determine correlations between cytokine levels and clinical parameters. Serum cytokine levels were measured with ELISA techniques in 60 neuroleptic-free patients on acute phase of the disease (BPRS≥40) and 28 healthy controls matched for age and sex. Current symptoms were assessed with Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS) and Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS). No significant difference was found between patients and controls regarding IFN-γ serum levels. IL-4 was not detected in both groups. Patients exhibited significantly higher IL-17 and lower BAFF serum levels. IL-17 and BAFF levels were negatively correlated in schizophrenic patients. SANS global score was negatively correlated with IL-17 and positively correlated with IFN-γ serum levels. These results argue against the involvement of Th1 or Th2 population cells in schizophrenia. IL-17 and BAFF could be valuable markers for schizophrenia. PMID:25453636

  3. Individual-level socioeconomic status and community-level inequality as determinants of stigma towards persons living with HIV who inject drugs in Thai Nguyen, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Travis; Zelaya, Carla; Latkin, Carl; Quan, Vu Minh; Frangakis, Constantine; Ha, Tran Viet; Minh, Nguyen Le; Go, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection may be affected by multiple complex socioeconomic status (SES) factors, especially individual socioeconomic disadvantage and community-level inequality. At the same time, stigma towards HIV and marginalized groups has exacerbated persistent concentrated epidemics among key populations, such as persons who inject drugs (PWID) in Vietnam. Stigma researchers argue that stigma fundamentally depends on the existence of economic power differences in a community. In rapidly growing economies like Vietnam, the increasing gap in income and education levels, as well as an individual's absolute income and education, may create social conditions that facilitate stigma related to injecting drug use and HIV. Methods A cross-sectional baseline survey assessing different types of stigma and key socioeconomic characteristics was administered to 1674 PWID and 1349 community members living in physical proximity throughout the 32 communes in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam. We created four stigma scales, including HIV-related and drug-related stigma reported by both PWID and community members. We then used ecologic Spearman's correlation, ordinary least-squares regression and multi-level generalized estimating equations to examine community-level inequality associations, individual-level SES associations and multi-level SES associations with different types of stigma, respectively. Results There was little urban–rural difference in stigma among communes. Higher income inequality was marginally associated with drug-related stigma reported by community members (p=0.087), and higher education inequality was significantly associated with higher HIV-related stigma reported by both PWID and community members (p<0.05). For individuals, higher education was significantly associated with lower stigma (HIV and drug related) reported by both PWID and community members. Part-time employed PWID reported more experiences and perceptions of drug-related stigma, while

  4. KCNN Genes that Encode Small-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Influence Alcohol and Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Padula, Audrey E; Griffin, William C; Lopez, Marcelo F; Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Cannady, Reginald; McGuier, Natalie S; Chesler, Elissa J; Miles, Michael F; Williams, Robert W; Randall, Patrick K; Woodward, John J; Becker, Howard C; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2015-07-01

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (KCa2) channels control neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and have been implicated in substance abuse. However, it is unknown if genes that encode KCa2 channels (KCNN1-3) influence alcohol and drug addiction. In the present study, an integrative functional genomics approach shows that genetic datasets for alcohol, nicotine, and illicit drugs contain the family of KCNN genes. Alcohol preference and dependence QTLs contain KCNN2 and KCNN3, and Kcnn3 transcript levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of genetically diverse BXD strains of mice predicted voluntary alcohol consumption. Transcript levels of Kcnn3 in the NAc negatively correlated with alcohol intake levels in BXD strains, and alcohol dependence enhanced the strength of this association. Microinjections of the KCa2 channel inhibitor apamin into the NAc increased alcohol intake in control C57BL/6J mice, while spontaneous seizures developed in alcohol-dependent mice following apamin injection. Consistent with this finding, alcohol dependence enhanced the intrinsic excitability of medium spiny neurons in the NAc core and reduced the function and protein expression of KCa2 channels in the NAc. Altogether, these data implicate the family of KCNN genes in alcohol, nicotine, and drug addiction, and identify KCNN3 as a mediator of voluntary and excessive alcohol consumption. KCa2.3 channels represent a promising novel target in the pharmacogenetic treatment of alcohol and drug addiction. PMID:25662840

  5. KCNN Genes that Encode Small-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Influence Alcohol and Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Padula, Audrey E; Griffin, William C; Lopez, Marcelo F; Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Cannady, Reginald; McGuier, Natalie S; Chesler, Elissa J; Miles, Michael F; Williams, Robert W; Randall, Patrick K; Woodward, John J; Becker, Howard C; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa2) channels control neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and have been implicated in substance abuse. However, it is unknown if genes that encode KCa2 channels (KCNN1-3) influence alcohol and drug addiction. In the present study, an integrative functional genomics approach shows that genetic datasets for alcohol, nicotine, and illicit drugs contain the family of KCNN genes. Alcohol preference and dependence QTLs contain KCNN2 and KCNN3, and Kcnn3 transcript levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of genetically diverse BXD strains of mice predicted voluntary alcohol consumption. Transcript levels of Kcnn3 in the NAc negatively correlated with alcohol intake levels in BXD strains, and alcohol dependence enhanced the strength of this association. Microinjections of the KCa2 channel inhibitor apamin into the NAc increased alcohol intake in control C57BL/6J mice, while spontaneous seizures developed in alcohol-dependent mice following apamin injection. Consistent with this finding, alcohol dependence enhanced the intrinsic excitability of medium spiny neurons in the NAc core and reduced the function and protein expression of KCa2 channels in the NAc. Altogether, these data implicate the family of KCNN genes in alcohol, nicotine, and drug addiction, and identify KCNN3 as a mediator of voluntary and excessive alcohol consumption. KCa2.3 channels represent a promising novel target in the pharmacogenetic treatment of alcohol and drug addiction. PMID:25662840

  6. Enhanced Histone Deacetylase Activity in Malignant Melanoma Provokes RAD51 and FANCD2-Triggered Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Krumm, Andrea; Barckhausen, Christina; Kücük, Pelin; Tomaszowski, Karl-Heinz; Loquai, Carmen; Fahrer, Jörg; Krämer, Oliver Holger; Kaina, Bernd; Roos, Wynand Paul

    2016-05-15

    DNA-damaging anticancer drugs remain a part of metastatic melanoma therapy. Epigenetic reprogramming caused by increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity arising during tumor formation may contribute to resistance of melanomas to the alkylating drugs temozolomide, dacarbazine, and fotemustine. Here, we report on the impact of class I HDACs on the response of malignant melanoma cells treated with alkylating agents. The data show that malignant melanomas in situ contain a high level of HDAC1/2 and malignant melanoma cells overexpress HDAC1/2/3 compared with noncancer cells. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of class I HDACs sensitizes malignant melanoma cells to apoptosis following exposure to alkylating agents, while not affecting primary melanocytes. Inhibition of HDAC1/2/3 caused sensitization of melanoma cells to temozolomide in vitro and in melanoma xenografts in vivo HDAC1/2/3 inhibition resulted in suppression of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination because of downregulation of RAD51 and FANCD2. This sensitized cells to the cytotoxic DNA lesion O(6)-methylguanine and caused a synthetic lethal interaction with the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib. Furthermore, knockdown experiments identified HDAC2 as being responsible for the regulation of RAD51. The influence of class I HDACs on DSB repair by homologous recombination and the possible clinical implication on malignant melanoma therapy with temozolomide and other alkylating drugs suggests a combination approach where class I HDAC inhibitors such as valproic acid or MS-275 (entinostat) appear to counteract HDAC- and RAD51/FANCD2-mediated melanoma cell resistance. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3067-77. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26980768

  7. Pharmacokinetics of oral 6-mercaptopurine: relationship between plasma levels and urine excretion of parent drug.

    PubMed

    Endresen, L; Lie, S O; Storm-Mathisen, I; Rugstad, H E; Stokke, O

    1990-05-01

    Plasma levels and cumulative urine excretion of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) were measured using a specific and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic assay in seven children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as well as in one healthy volunteer. The dose of 6-MP varied in the range of 25-75 mg/m2 of body surface area and was administered with a standard breakfast. A 4- to 11-fold variation between individuals was found in the pharmacokinetic parameters: peak concentration, time to reach peak, area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), and fraction of dose excreted in the urine. Three repeated determinations in one individual revealed that AUC also varied more than sixfold following an overnight fast. In three individuals, the reducing agents glutathione (10 mg/kg) and ascorbic acid (15 mg/kg) were coadministered with 6-MP to evaluate their possible role in the protection of 6-MP from oxidation and degradation in the intestinal lumen. No consistent effect was observed, however, on the AUCs of either of these agents. A clear relationship was found between AUCs and the 24-h urinary excretion of unchanged drug (r = 0.9381), indicating that determinations of 6-MP in the urine may replace the painful procedure of repeated blood sampling. Further studies are necessary to determine the factors contributing to the unpredictable plasma levels following oral doses of 6-MP and to determine the value of pharmacokinetic monitoring in ALL patients. PMID:2349605

  8. Cascading Activation across Levels of Representation in Children's Lexical Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yi Ting; Snedeker, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    Recent work in adult psycholinguistics has demonstrated that activation of semantic representations begins long before phonological processing is complete. This incremental propagation of information across multiple levels of analysis is a hallmark of adult language processing but how does this ability develop? In two experiments, we elicit…

  9. Education Finance Legislative Activity and Trends at the State Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crampton, Faith E.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews 1997 school finance legislation, comparing legislative activity levels from 1994 to 1997. In 1997, 32 states passed legislation pertaining to capital-outlay funding, tax bases, and taxation for education funding. Half passed legislation for state aid, technology, special-purpose education, budgeting/fiscal management, and school personnel…

  10. 34 CFR 300.704 - State-level activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-level activities. 300.704 Section 300.704 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Authorization,...

  11. 34 CFR 300.814 - Other State-level activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Other State-level activities. 300.814 Section 300.814 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  12. Pedometer-Assessed Physical Activity Levels of Rural Appalachian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Hyun-Ju; Rana, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this investigation were to examine whether pedometer-assessed physical activity (PA) in Appalachian Ohio students differed by body mass index (BMI), school level (middle school vs. high school), and gender during school days and nonschool days and whether students met the recommended PA guidelines. Participants (N = 149) were…

  13. Cardiovascular effects of variations in habitual levels of physical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, C. G.; Mitchell, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in human cardiovascular adaption to stress, particularly adaption to different levels of physical activity are determined along with quantitative noninvasive methods for evaluation of cardiovascular function during stess in normal subjects and in individuals with latent or manifest cardiovascular disease. Results are summarized.

  14. N-acetyltransferase 2 activity and folate levels

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wen; Strnatka, Diana; McQueen, Charlene A.; Hunter, Robert J.; Erickson, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Aims To determine whether increased N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity might have a toxic effect during development and an influence on folate levels since previous work has shown that only low levels of exogenous NAT can be achieved in constitutionally transgenic mice (Cao, et al, 2005) Main Methods A human NAT1 tet-inducible construct was used that would not be expressed until the inducer was delivered. Human NAT1 cDNA was cloned into pTRE2 and injected into mouse oocytes. Two transgenic lines were crossed to mouse line TgN(rtTahCMV)4Uh containing the CMV promoted “teton.”Measurements of red blood cell folate levels in inbred strains of mice were performed. Key findings Only low levels of human NAT1 could be achieved in kidney (highly responsive in other studies) whether the inducer, doxycycline, was given by gavage or in drinking water.An inverse correlation of folate levels with Nat2 enzyme activity was found. Significance Since increasing NAT1 activity decrease folate in at least one tissue, the detrimental effect of expression of human NAT1 in combination with endogenous mouse Nat2 may be a consequence of increased catabolism of folate. PMID:19932120

  15. HER2 confers drug resistance of human breast cancer cells through activation of NRF2 by direct interaction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyo Jin; Yi, Yong Weon; Hong, Young Bin; Kim, Hee Jeong; Jang, Young-Joo; Seong, Yeon-Sun; Bae, Insoo

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression and/or activation of HER2 confers resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. NRF2 also gives drug resistance of cancer cells through induction of detoxification and/or drug efflux proteins. Although several upstream effectors of NRF2 overlapped with the downstream molecules of HER2 pathway, no direct link between HER2 and NRF2 has ever been established. Here, we identified that co-expression of a constitutively active HER2 (HER2CA) and NRF2 increased the levels of NRF2 target proteins, HO-1 and MRP5. We also identified HER2CA activated the DNA-binding of NRF2 and the antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated transcription in an NRF2-dependent manner. In addition, NRF2 and HER2CA cooperatively up-regulated the mRNA expression of various drug-resistant and detoxifying enzymes including GSTA2, GSTP1, CYP3A4, HO-1, MRP1, and MRP5. We also demonstrated that NRF2 binds to HER2 not only in transiently transfected HEK293T cells but also in HER2-amplified breast cancer cells. Functionally, overexpression of HER2CA gave resistance of MCF7 breast cancer cells to either paraquat or doxorubicin. Overexpression of dominant negative NRF2 (DN-NRF2) reduced the HER2CA-induced resistance of MCF7 cells to these agents. Taken together, these results suggest that active HER2 binds and regulates the NRF2-dependent transcriptional activation and induces drug resistance of cancer cells. PMID:25467193

  16. Comparison of activated charcoal and ipecac syrup in prevention of drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, P J; Vartiainen, M; Tokola, O

    1983-01-01

    The efficacy of activated charcoal and ipecac syrup in the prevention of drug absorption was studied in 6 healthy adult volunteers, using a randomized, cross-over design. Paracetamol 1000 mg, tetracycline 500 mg and aminophylline 350 mg were ingested on an empty stomach with 100 ml water. Then, after 5 or 30 min, the subjects ingested, either activated charcoal suspension (50 g charcoal), syrup of ipecac, or, only after 5 min, water 300 ml. Activated charcoal, given either after 5 or 30 min, significantly (p less than 0.01 or less 0.05) reduced the absorption of these 3 drugs measured, for example as AUC0-24 h. Syrup of ipecac caused emesis on each occasion, with a mean delay of 15 min. When ipecac was given 5 min after the drugs, its effect on absorption was significant, but when it was given after 30 min only the absorption of tetracycline was reduced. Activated charcoal was significantly (p less than 0.05) more effective than ipecac in reducing drug absorption when given at the same time points. In cases of acute intoxication, depending on the quality and quantity of the drugs ingested, the relative efficacy of charcoal and ipecac may be somewhat different from that observed in the present study. Despite its emetic action, however, ipecac syrup is not very effective in preventing drug absorption and, in general, activated charcoal should also be given after induced emesis or gastric lavage. PMID:6134626

  17. Interleukin 35 Synovial Fluid Levels Are Associated with Disease Activity of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Šenolt, Ladislav; Šumová, Barbora; Jandová, Romana; Hulejová, Hana; Mann, Heřman; Pavelka, Karel; Vencovský, Jiří; Filková, Mária

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study the association of systemic and local interleukin-35 (IL-35) levels in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods 37 patients with treatment naïve early RA, 49 with established RA and 29 control patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were studied. Serum and paired synovial fluid samples were analysed for IL-35. Disease activity of RA patients was assessed according to the 28-Joint Count Disease Activity Score (DAS28). Results The levels of serum IL-35 were significantly higher in patients with treatment naïve early RA compared to those with established disease and control OA subjects. In addition, serum levels of IL-35 significantly decreased 12 weeks after initiation of glucocorticoids and conventional synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with treatment naïve early RA. Synovial fluid IL-35 levels were significantly higher in RA compared to OA patients, were significantly elevated compared to serum counterparts and correlated with synovial fluid leukocyte count (r=0.412; p<0.01), serum CRP levels (r=0.362; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r=0.430, p<0.01). Conclusion This is the first study showing elevated circulating levels of IL-35 in treatment naïve early RA, its significant decrease after treatment initiation and positive association between increased synovial fluid IL-35 and disease activity in patients with long-lasting RA. PMID:26204444

  18. Can nursing students' confidence levels increase with repeated simulation activities?

    PubMed

    Cummings, Cynthia L; Connelly, Linda K

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, nursing faculty conducted a study with undergraduate nursing students on their satisfaction, confidence, and educational practice levels, as it related to simulation activities throughout the curriculum. The study was a voluntary survey conducted on junior and senior year nursing students. It consisted of 30 items based on the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning and the Educational Practices Questionnaire (Jeffries, 2012). Mean averages were obtained for each of the 30 items from both groups and were compared using T scores for unpaired means. The results showed that 8 of the items had a 95% confidence level and when combined the items were significant for p <.001. The items identified were those related to self-confidence and active learning. Based on these findings, it can be assumed that repeated simulation experiences can lead to an increase in student confidence and active learning. PMID:26599594

  19. Effect of venotropic drugs on the respiratory activity of isolated mitochondria and in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Dominique; Delaive, Edouard; Houbion, Andrée; Eliaers, François; Remacle, José; Michiels, Carine

    2000-01-01

    Several drugs used in the treatment of chronic peripheral ischaemic and venous diseases, i.e. aescine, Cyclo 3, Ginkor Fort, hydroxyethylrutosides, naftidrofuryl, naphthoquinone and procyanidolic oligomers, were tested on the mitochondrial respiratory activity. The results show that all these drugs protected human endothelial cells against the hypoxia-induced decrease in ATP content. In addition, they all induced a concentration-dependent increase in respiratory control ratio (RCR) of liver mitochondria pre-incubated with the drugs for 60 min. The drugs were divided into two groups according to their effects. The first group (A), comprising aescine, Ginkor Fort, naftidrofuryl and naphthoquinone, increased RCR by decreasing state 4 respiration rate. The second group of drugs (B), comprising hydroxyethylrutosides, procyanidolic oligomers and Cyclo 3, increased RCR by increasing state 3 respiration rate. The drugs of group A were able to prevent the inhibition of complexes I and III respectively by amytal and antimycin A while the first two drugs of group B increased adenine nucleotide translocase activity. Cyclo 3 inhibited the carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (mCCP)-induced uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration. None of these seven drugs could protect complexes IV and V, respectively, from inhibition by cyanide and oligomycin. When tested on endothelial cells the drugs of group A, in contrast to group B, prevented the decrease in ATP content induced by amytal or antimycin A. The present results suggest that the protective effects on mitochondrial respiration activity by these venotropic drugs may explain their protective effect on the cellular ATP content in ischaemic conditions and some of their beneficial therapeutic effect in chronic vascular diseases. PMID:10928952

  20. Evaluation of surrogate tissues as indicators of drug activity in a melanoma skin model.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Palak R; Choudhuri, Rohini; Weyemi, Urbain; Martin, Olga A; Bonner, William M; Redon, Christophe E

    2016-08-01

    The development of novel cancer treatments is a challenging task, partly because results from model systems often fail to predict drug efficacy in humans, and also tumors are often inaccessible for biochemical analysis, preventing effective monitoring of drug activity in vivo. Utilizing a model system, we evaluated the use of drug-induced DNA damage in surrogate tissues as indicators of drug efficacy. Samples of a commercially available melanoma skin model (Mattek MLNM-FT-A375) containing keratinocyte and fibroblast layers with melanoma nodules were subjected to various chemotherapeutic regimens for one, four, or eight days. At these times they were analyzed for DNA double-stranded breaks (γH2AX foci) and apoptosis (TUNEL). A wide range of drug responses in both tumor and normal tissues were observed and cataloged. For the melanoma, the most common drug response was apoptosis. The basal keratinocyte layer, which was the most reliable indicator of drug response in the melanoma skin model, responded with γH2AX foci formation that was abrupt and transient. The relationships between tumor and surrogate tissue drug responses are complex, indicating that while surrogate tissue drug responses may be useful clinical tools, careful control of variables such as the timing of sampling may be important in interpreting the results. PMID:27339860

  1. Effects of Curricular Activity on Students' Situational Motivation and Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zan; Hannon, James C.; Newton, Maria; Huang, Chaoqun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine (a) the effects of three curricular activities on students' situational motivation (intrinsic motivation [IM], identified regulation [IR], external regulation, and amotivation [AM]) and physical activity (PA) levels, and (b) the predictive strength of situational motivation to PA levels. Four hundred twelve…

  2. EthA, a Common Activator of Thiocarbamide-Containing Drugs Acting on Different Mycobacterial Targets▿

    PubMed Central

    Dover, Lynn G.; Alahari, Anuradha; Gratraud, Paul; Gomes, Jessica M.; Bhowruth, Veemal; Reynolds, Robert C.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Kremer, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Many of the current antimycobacterial agents require some form of cellular activation unmasking reactive groups, which in turn will bind to their specific targets. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of activation of current antimycobacterials not only helps to decipher mechanisms of drug resistance but may also facilitate the development of alternative activation strategies or of analogues that do not require such processes. Herein, through the use of genetically defined strains of Mycobacterium bovis BCG we provide evidence that EthA, previously shown to activate ethionamide, also converts isoxyl (ISO) and thiacetazone (TAC) into reactive species. These results were further supported by the development of an in vitro assay using purified recombinant EthA, which allowed direct assessment of the metabolism of ISO. Interestingly, biochemical analysis of [14C]acetate-labeled cultures suggested that all of these EthA-activated drugs inhibit mycolic acid biosynthesis via different mechanisms through binding to specific targets. This report is also the first description of the molecular mechanism of action of TAC, a thiosemicarbazone antimicrobial agent that is still used in the treatment of tuberculosis as a second-line drug in many developing countries. Altogether, the results suggest that EthA is a common activator of thiocarbamide-containing drugs. The broad specificity of EthA can now be used to improve the activation process of these drugs, which may help overcome the toxicity problems associated with clinical thiocarbamide use. PMID:17220416

  3. Physical Activity Levels in American-Indian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Storti, Kristi L.; Arena, Vincent C.; Barmada, M. Michael; Bunker, Clareann H.; Hanson, Robert L.; Laston, Sandra L.; Yeh, Jeun-Liang; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Howard, Barbara V.; Kriska, Andrea M.

    2009-01-01

    Background A limited body of evidence, mostly based on self-report, is available regarding physical activity levels among American-Indian adults. Purpose This study aims to examine physical activity levels objectively by pedometer among a large cohort of American Indian adult participants in the Strong Heart Family Study. Methods Physical activity levels in 2604 American-Indian adults, aged 18–91 years, from 13 American-Indian communities were assessed using an Accusplit AE120 pedometer over a period of 7 days during 2001–2003. Anthropometric measurements were also assessed. All data analyses were conducted in 2008. Age-adjusted Pearson correlations were used to examine the relationship between average steps per day and age and anthropometric variables. Subjects were placed in age and BMI categories (according to NHLBI cutpoints) to examine trends in PA with increasing age and BMI. Results Daily pedometer steps ranged from 1001 to 38,755. Mean step counts by age group for men were: 5384 (18–29 years), 5120 (30–39 years), 5040 (40–49 years), 4561(50–59 years),4321 (60–69 years), and 3768 (≥70 years) and for women: 5038 (18–29 years), 5112 (30– 39 years), 5054 (40–49 years), 4582 (50–59 years), 3653 (60–69 years), and 3770 (>70 years). A significant linear trend in physical activity was noted with increasing age (P= 0.002 for men, P<0.0001 for women) and with increasing BMI (P = 0.05 for men, P = 0.04 for women). Conclusions Objectively measured data suggest that inactivity is a problem among American Indian adults and that a majority of American Indian adults in the SHFS may not be meeting the minimum physical activity public health recommendations. Efforts to increase physical activity levels in this population are warranted. PMID:19944912

  4. Down-regulation of telomerase activity by anticancer drugs in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kunifuji, Yasumasa; Gotoh, Sadao; Abe, Tetsuya; Miura, Masayoshi; Karasaki, Yuji

    2002-07-01

    Maintenance of telomere length is crucial for survival of cells. Telomerase, an enzyme that is responsible for elongation of shortened telomeres, is active in human germ cells as well as most tumor tissues and experimentally immortalized cells. In contrast, most mature somatic cells in human tissues express undetectable or low telomerase activity, implying the existence of a stringent and negative regulatory mechanism. In this study we report the effects of anticancer drugs on telomerase activity in human cancer cells. In assaying for telomerase activity, we basically followed the original TRAP assay system, but with some modifications. A down-regulation of telomerase activity was found when cells of a human ovarian cancer cell line, A2780, were treated with;cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP; cisplatin). However, down-regulation of telomerase activity was not found in cells of a cisplatin-resistant cell line, A2780CP, treated with cisplatin. On the other hand, telomerase activity in both the cell lines A2780 and A2780CP was reduced when A2780 or A2780CP was treated with adriamycin, an anthracycline antibiotic having a broad spectrum of antineoplastic activity. The different effects on the telomerase activity of the two types of anticancer drugs may be due the distinct chemical functions of these drugs. The present results may indicate a positive relationship between anticancer effects and down-regulation of telomerase activity by anticancer drugs. PMID:12172504

  5. Inhibition of Microglia Activation as a Phenotypic Assay in Early Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Figuera-Losada, Mariana; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Complex biological processes such as inflammation, cell death, migration, proliferation, and the release of biologically active molecules can be used as outcomes in phenotypic assays during early stages of drug discovery. Although target-based approaches have been widely used over the past decades, a disproportionate number of first-in-class drugs have been identified using phenotypic screening. This review details phenotypic assays based on inhibition of microglial activation and their utility in primary and secondary screening, target validation, and pathway elucidation. The role of microglia, both in normal as well as in pathological conditions such as chronic neurodegenerative diseases, is reviewed. Methodologies to assess microglia activation in vitro are discussed in detail, and classes of therapeutic drugs known to decrease the proinflammatory and cytotoxic responses of activated microglia are appraised, including inhibitors of glutaminase, cystine/glutamate antiporter, nuclear factor κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. PMID:23945875

  6. Nucleus accumbens core acetylcholine is preferentially activated during acquisition of drug- vs food-reinforced behavior.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Jose A; Stöckl, Petra; Zorn, Katja; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2008-12-01

    Acquisition of drug-reinforced behavior is accompanied by a systematic increase of release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) rather than dopamine, the expected prime reward neurotransmitter candidate, in the nucleus accumbens core (AcbC), with activation of both muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptors in the AcbC by ACh volume transmission being necessary for the drug conditioning. The present findings suggest that the AcbC ACh system is preferentially activated by drug reinforcers, because (1) acquisition of food-reinforced behavior was not paralleled by activation of ACh release in the AcbC whereas acquisition of morphine-reinforced behavior, like that of cocaine or remifentanil (tested previously), was, and because (2) local intra-AcbC administration of muscarinic or nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists (atropine or mecamylamine, respectively) did not block the acquisition of food-reinforced behavior whereas acquisition of drug-reinforced behavior had been blocked. Interestingly, the speed with which a drug of abuse distributed into the AcbC and was eliminated from the AcbC determined the size of the AcbC ACh signal, with the temporally more sharply delineated drug stimulus producing a more pronounced AcbC ACh signal. The present findings suggest that muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptors in the AcbC are preferentially involved during reward conditioning for drugs of abuse vs sweetened condensed milk as a food reinforcer. PMID:18418362

  7. Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Levels in Patients with Acute Paraquat Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Su-Jin; Kim, Su-Ji; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) plasma levels, and their possible implications on clinical outcome, we measured tPA and PAI-1 levels in 101 patients with acute paraquat (PQ) intoxication. The control group consisted of patients who ingested non-PQ pesticides during the same period. tPA and PAI-1 levels were higher in the PQ group than in the controls. PQ levels were significantly correlated with ingested amount, timelag to hospital, tPA level, and hospitalization duration. tPA levels were correlated with PAI-1, fibrin degradation product (FDP), and D-dimer. D-dimer levels were lower in the PQ group than in the controls. Univariate analysis indicated the following significant determinants of death: age, ingested amount, PQ level, timelag to hospital, serum creatinine, lipase, pH, pCO2, HCO3-, WBC, FDP, PAI-1, and tPA. However, multivariate analysis indicated that only PQ level was significant independent factor predicting death. In conclusion, tPA and PAI-1 levels were higher, while D-dimer levels were lower in the PQ group than in the controls, implying that ROS stimulate tPA and PAI-1, but PAI-1 activity overrides tPA activity in this setting. Decreased fibrinolytic activity appears to be one of the clinical characteristics of acute PQ intoxication. PMID:21468253

  8. The Relationship between Housing Status and HIV Risk among Active Drug Users: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Hilario, Helena; Convey, Mark; Corbett, A. Michelle; Weeks, Margaret; Martinez, Maria

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between housing status and HIV risk using longitudinal, qualitative data collected in 2004-2005, from a purposeful sample of 65 active drug users in a variety of housed and homeless situations in Hartford, Connecticut. These data were supplemented with observations and in-depth interviews regarding drug use behavior collected in 2001-2005 to evaluate a peer-led HIV prevention intervention. Data reveal differences in social context within and among different housing statuses that affect HIV risky or protective behaviors including the ability to carry drug paraphernalia and HIV prevention materials, the amount of drugs in the immediate environment, access to subsidized and supportive housing, and relationships with others with whom drug users live. Policy implications of the findings, limitations to the data and future research are discussed. PMID:19142817

  9. Propolis: anti-Staphylococcus aureus activity and synergism with antimicrobial drugs.

    PubMed

    Fernandes Júnior, Ary; Balestrin, Elaine Cristina; Betoni, Joyce Elaine Cristina; Orsi, Ricardo de Oliveira; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza; Montelli, Augusto Cezar

    2005-08-01

    Propolis is a natural resinous substance collected by bees from tree exudates and secretions. Its antimicrobial activity has been investigated and inhibitory action on Staphylococcus aureus growth was evaluated. The in vitro synergism between ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) and antimicrobial drugs by two susceptibility tests (Kirby and Bauer and E-Test) on 25 S. aureus strains was evaluated. Petri dishes with sub-inhibitory concentrations of EEP were incubated with 13 drugs using Kirby and Bauer method and synergism between EEP and five drugs [choramphenicol (CLO), gentamicin (GEN), netilmicin (NET), tetracycline (TET), and vancomycin (VAN)] was observed. Nine drugs were assayed by the E-test method and five of them exhibited a synergism [CLO, GEN, NET, TET, and clindamycin (CLI)]. The results demonstrated the synergism between EEP and antimicrobial drugs, especially those agents that interfere on bacterial protein synthesis. PMID:16184236

  10. The NIfETy Method for Environmental Assessment of Neighborhood-level Indicators of Violence, Alcohol, and Other Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Furr-Holden, C. D. M.; Smart, M. J.; Pokorni, J. L.; Ialongo, N. S.; Leaf, P. J.; Holder, H. D.; Anthony, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    There are limited validated quantitative assessment methods to measure features of the built and social environment that might form the basis for environmental preventive interventions. This study describes a model approach for epidemiologic assessment of suspected environmental determinants of violence, alcohol and other drug (VAOD) exposure and fills this gap in current research. The investigation sought to test the feasibility of a systematic and longitudinal assessment of residential block characteristics related to physical and social disorder and indicators of VAOD exposure. Planometric data were used to establish a stratified random sample of street segments within defined neighborhoods of an urban metropolitan area. Field rater assessments of these neighborhood street segments were conducted using the Neighborhood Inventory for Environmental Typology (NIfETy). This report provides a detailed description of the NIfETy Method, including metric properties of the NIfETy Instrument and outcomes of training procedures and quality control measures. Also presented are block-level characteristics and estimates of observable signs of VAOD activity. This work is a first step toward developing future community-level environmental preventive interventions geared to reduce community VAOD exposure among youthful urban populations and may prove to be useful to other public health research groups as well. PMID:18931911

  11. Determinants affecting physical activity levels in animal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tou, Janet C L.; Wade, Charles E.

    2002-01-01

    Weight control is dependent on energy balance. Reduced energy expenditure (EE) associated with decreased physical activity is suggested to be a major underlying cause in the increasing prevalence of weight gain and obesity. Therefore, a better understanding of the biological determinants involved in the regulation of physical activity is essential. To facilitate interpretation in humans, it is helpful to consider the evidence from animal studies. This review focuses on animal studies examining the biological determinants influencing activity and potential implications to human. It appears that physical activity is influenced by a number of parameters. However, regardless of the parameter involved, body weight appears to play an underlying role in the regulation of activity. Furthermore, the regulation of activity associated with body weight appears to occur only after the animal achieves a critical weight. This suggests that activity levels are a consequence rather than a contributor to weight control. However, the existence of an inverse weight-activity relationship remains inconclusive. Confounding the results are the multifactorial nature of physical activity and the lack of appropriate measuring devices. Furthermore, many determinants of body weight are closely interlocked, making it difficult to determine whether a single, combination, or interaction of factors is important for the regulation of activity. For example, diet-induced obesity, aging, lesions to the ventral medial hypothalamus, and genetics all produce hypoactivity. Providing a better understanding of the biological determinants involved in the regulation of activity has important implications for the development of strategies for the prevention of weight gain leading to obesity and subsequent morbidity and mortality in the human population.

  12. Determinants Affecting Physical Activity Levels In Animal Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tou, Janet C. L.; Wade, Charles E.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Weight control is dependent on energy balance. Reduced energy expenditure (EE) associated with decreased physical activity is suggested to be a major underlying cause in the increasing prevalence of weight gain and obesity. Therefore, a better understanding of the biological determinants involved in the regulation of physical activity is essential. To facilitate interpretation in humans, it is helpful to consider the evidence from animal studies. This review focuses on animal studies examining the biological determinants influencing activity and potential implications to human. It appears that physical activity is influenced by a number of parameters. However, regardless of the parameter involved, body weight appears to play all underlying role in the regulation of activity. Furthermore, the regulation of activity associated with body weight appears to occur only after the animal achieves a critical weight. This suggests that activity levels are a consequence rather than a contributor to weight control. However, the existence of an inverse weight-activity relationship remains inconclusive. Confounding the results are the multi-factorial nature of physical activity and the lack of appropriate measuring devices. Furthermore, many determinants of body weight are closely interlocked making it difficult to determine whether a single, combination or interaction of factors is important for the regulation of activity. For example, diet-induced obesity, aging, lesions to tile ventral medial hypothalamus and genetics all produce hypoactivity. Providing a better understanding of the biological determinants involved in the regulation of activity has important implications for the development of strategies for the prevention of weight gain leading to obesity and subsequent morbidity and mortality in the human population.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Antiseizure Drug Activity at GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, L. John

    2013-01-01

    The GABAA receptor (GABAAR) is a major target of antiseizure drugs (ASDs). A variety of agents that act at GABAARs s are used to terminate or prevent seizures. Many act at distinct receptor sites determined by the subunit composition of the holoreceptor. For the benzodiazepines, barbiturates, and loreclezole, actions at the GABAAR are the primary or only known mechanism of antiseizure action. For topiramate, felbamate, retigabine, losigamone and stiripentol, GABAAR modulation is one of several possible antiseizure mechanisms. Allopregnanolone, a progesterone metabolite that enhances GABAAR function, led to the development of ganaxolone. Other agents modulate GABAergic “tone” by regulating the synthesis, transport or breakdown of GABA. GABAAR efficacy is also affected by the transmembrane chloride gradient, which changes during development and in chronic epilepsy. This may provide an additional target for “GABAergic” ASDs. GABAAR subunit changes occur both acutely during status epilepticus and in chronic epilepsy, which alter both intrinsic GABAAR function and the response to GABAAR-acting ASDs. Manipulation of subunit expression patterns or novel ASDs targeting the altered receptors may provide a novel approach for seizure prevention. PMID:23683707

  14. [Classification models of structure - P-glycoprotein activity of drugs].

    PubMed

    Grigorev, V Yu; Solodova, S L; Polianczyk, D E; Raevsky, O A

    2016-01-01

    Thirty three classification models of substrate specificity of 177 drugs to P-glycoprotein have been created using of the linear discriminant analysis, random forest and support vector machine methods. QSAR modeling was carried out using 2 strategies. The first strategy consisted in search of all possible combinations from 1÷5 descriptors on the basis of 7 most significant molecular descriptors with clear physico-chemical interpretation. In the second case forward selection procedure up to 5 descriptors, starting from the best single descriptor was used. This strategy was applied to a set of 387 DRAGON descriptors. It was found that only one of 33 models has necessary statistical parameters. This model was designed by means of the linear discriminant analysis on the basis of a single descriptor of H-bond (ΣC(ad)). The model has good statistical characteristics as evidenced by results to both internal cross-validation, and external validation with application of 44 new chemicals. This confirms an important role of hydrogen bond in the processes connected with penetration of chemical compounds through a blood-brain barrier. PMID:27143376

  15. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  16. Effect of Learning Activity on Students' Motivation, Physical Activity Levels and Effort/Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zan; Lee, Amelia M.; Xiang, Ping; Kosma, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The type of learning activity offered in physical education may influence students' motivational beliefs, physical activity participation and effort/persistence in class. However, most empirical studies have focused on the individual level rather than on the learner-content interactions. Accordingly, the potential effects of learning activities on…

  17. Tight Chk1 Levels Control Replication Cluster Activation in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Jennifer M.; Barbosa, Pedro; Libeau, Pierre; Priam, Pierre; Narassimprakash, Hemalatha; Grodzenski, Xenia; Marheineke, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication in higher eukaryotes initiates at thousands of origins according to a spatio-temporal program. The ATR/Chk1 dependent replication checkpoint inhibits the activation of later firing origins. In the Xenopus in vitro system initiations are not sequence dependent and 2-5 origins are grouped in clusters that fire at different times despite a very short S phase. We have shown that the temporal program is stochastic at the level of single origins and replication clusters. It is unclear how the replication checkpoint inhibits late origins but permits origin activation in early clusters. Here, we analyze the role of Chk1 in the replication program in sperm nuclei replicating in Xenopus egg extracts by a combination of experimental and modelling approaches. After Chk1 inhibition or immunodepletion, we observed an increase of the replication extent and fork density in the presence or absence of external stress. However, overexpression of Chk1 in the absence of external replication stress inhibited DNA replication by decreasing fork densities due to lower Cdk2 kinase activity. Thus, Chk1 levels need to be tightly controlled in order to properly regulate the replication program even during normal S phase. DNA combing experiments showed that Chk1 inhibits origins outside, but not inside, already active clusters. Numerical simulations of initiation frequencies in the absence and presence of Chk1 activity are consistent with a global inhibition of origins by Chk1 at the level of clusters but need to be combined with a local repression of Chk1 action close to activated origins to fit our data. PMID:26046346

  18. Psychoactive-drug response is affected by acute low-level microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of various psychoactive drugs were studied in rats exposed for 45 min in a circularly polarized, pulsed microwave field (2450 MHz; SAR 0.6 W/kg; 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps). Apomorphine-induced hypothermia and stereotypy were enhanced by irradiation. Amphetamine-induced hyperthermia was attenuated while stereotypy was unaffected. Morphine-induced catalepsy and lethality were enhanced by irradiation at certain dosages of the drug. Since these drugs have different modes of action on central neural mechanisms and the effects of microwaves depend on the particular drug studied, these results show the complex nature of the effect of microwave irradiation on brain functions.

  19. Microgravity: a Teacher's Guide with Activities, Secondary Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogt, Gregory L. (Editor); Wargo, Michael J. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This NASA Educational Publication is a teacher's guide that focuses on microgravity for the secondary level student. The introduction answers the question 'What is microgravity?', as well as describing gravity and creating microgravity. Following the introduction is a microgravity primer which covers such topics as the fluid state, combustion science, materials science, biotechnology, as well as microgravity and space flight. Seven different activities are described in the activities section and are written by authors prominent in the field. The concluding sections of the book include a glossary, microgravity references, and NASA educational resources.

  20. Identification of Anti-Persister Activity against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli from a Clinical Drug Library.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongxia; Cui, Peng; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Jie; Wang, Yong; Sullivan, David; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhu, Bingdong; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli is a major cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs), but current antibiotics do not always effectively clear the persistent infection. To identify drugs that eliminate uropathogenic E. coli persisters, we screened a clinical drug library consisting of 1524 compounds using high throughput drug exposure assay in 96-well plates. Bacterial survival was assessed by growth on LB plates. We identified 14 drug candidates (tosufloxacin, colistin, sparfloxacin, moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin, enrofloxacin and sarafloxacin, octodrine, clofoctol, dibekacin, cephalosporin C, pazufloxacin, streptomycin and neomycin), which had high anti-persister activity. Among them, tosufloxacin and colistin had the highest anti-persister activity and could completely eradicate E. coli persisters in 3 days in vitro while the current UTI antibiotics failed to do so. Our findings may have implications for the development of a more effective treatment for UTIs. PMID:27025620

  1. Cytotoxic Activity of Anticancer Drugs on Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells in Hypoxic-Hyponutritional Culture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Zhu, Lin-Zhong; Yang, Ren-Jie; Zhu, Xu

    2014-01-01

    To investigate which anticancer drugs and combination of dual drugs could further promote the inhibition of cell growth in vitro against HCC cell line (HepG2) in the hypoxic and hyponutritional culture medium (HHCM) mimicked the different scenarios of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). The cells of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated by TACE suffered various hypoxia and hyponutrition. The cells were treated for 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours, respectively, using 10 drugs including epirubicin (EPI), cisplatin (DDP), mitomycin-C (MMC), oxaliplatin (OXA), hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), gemcitabine (GEM), docetaxel (DTX), thiotepa (TSPA), and pemetrexed disodium (PEM) in 4 concentrations of HHCM (5%, 10%, 25%, and 50%, respectively) mimicking the scenario of TACE and were assessed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The cells treated with combinations of dual drugs for 24 hours were also tested. The sensitive drugs with inhibition rates more than 30% were EPI, MMC, HCPT, OXA, and PEM in 4 types of HHCMs. The sensitivity of the cells to treatment with drugs for 24 hours was significantly higher than the sensitivity of the cells to treatment with drugs for 2 hours in 5%, 10%, and 25% HHCM. The sensitivity of the combination of dual drugs was no more than the sensitivity of the single drug with higher sensitivity in 4 concentrations of HHCM. EPI, MMC, HCPT, OXA, and PEM exhibited cytotoxic activity against HepG2 cells in various hypoxia and hyponutrition states. Prolonging the time of exposure could increase the sensitivity of drug, and the combination of dual drugs cannot enhance the cytotoxic effect. PMID:25437582

  2. Cytotoxic activity of anticancer drugs on hepatocellular carcinoma cells in hypoxic-hyponutritional culture.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Zhu, Lin-Zhong; Yang, Ren-Jie; Zhu, Xu

    2014-01-01

    To investigate which anticancer drugs and combination of dual drugs could further promote the inhibition of cell growth in vitro against HCC cell line (HepG2) in the hypoxic and hyponutritional culture medium (HHCM) mimicked the different scenarios of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). The cells of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated by TACE suffered various hypoxia and hyponutrition. The cells were treated for 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours, respectively, using 10 drugs including epirubicin (EPI), cisplatin (DDP), mitomycin-C (MMC), oxaliplatin (OXA), hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), gemcitabine (GEM), docetaxel (DTX), thiotepa (TSPA), and pemetrexed disodium (PEM) in 4 concentrations of HHCM (5%, 10%, 25%, and 50%, respectively) mimicking the scenario of TACE and were assessed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The cells treated with combinations of dual drugs for 24 hours were also tested. The sensitive drugs with inhibition rates more than 30% were EPI, MMC, HCPT, OXA, and PEM in 4 types of HHCMs. The sensitivity of the cells to treatment with drugs for 24 hours was significantly higher than the sensitivity of the cells to treatment with drugs for 2 hours in 5%, 10%, and 25% HHCM. The sensitivity of the combination of dual drugs was no more than the sensitivity of the single drug with higher sensitivity in 4 concentrations of HHCM. EPI, MMC, HCPT, OXA, and PEM exhibited cytotoxic activity against HepG2 cells in various hypoxia and hyponutrition states. Prolonging the time of exposure could increase the sensitivity of drug, and the combination of dual drugs cannot enhance the cytotoxic effect. PMID:25437582

  3. System-level effects of integrating a promising treatment into juvenile drug courts.

    PubMed

    McCart, Michael R; Henggeler, Scott W; Chapman, Jason E; Cunningham, Phillippe B

    2012-09-01

    This study examined the system-level effects of implementing a promising treatment for adolescent substance abuse in juvenile drug courts (JDCs). Six JDCs were randomized to receive training in the experimental intervention (contingency management-family engagement [CM-FAM]) or to continue their usual services (US). Participants were 104 families served by the courts, 51 therapists, and 74 JDC stakeholders (e.g., judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys). Assessments included repeated measurements of CM-FAM implementation by therapists and therapist and stakeholder perceptions of incentive-based interventions and organizational characteristics. Results revealed greater use of CM and family engagement techniques among CM-FAM relative to US therapists. In addition, therapists and stakeholders in the CM-FAM condition reported more favorable attitudes toward the use of incentives and greater improvement on several domains of organizational functioning relative to US counterparts. Taken together, these findings suggest that JDC professionals are amenable to the adoption and implementation of a treatment model that holds promise for improving youth outcomes. PMID:22154039

  4. Guanfacine effects on stress, drug craving and prefrontal activation in cocaine dependent individuals: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Fox, Helen C; Seo, Dongju; Tuit, Keri; Hansen, Julie; Kimmerling, Anne; Morgan, Peter T; Sinha, Rajita

    2012-07-01

    Cocaine dependence is associated with increased stress and drug cue-induced craving and physiological arousal but decreased prefrontal activity to emotional and cognitive challenge. As these changes are associated with relapse risk, we investigated the effects of α2 receptor agonist guanfacine on these processes. Twenty-nine early abstinent treatment-seeking cocaine dependent individuals were randomly assigned to either daily placebo or guanfacine (up to 3 mg) for four weeks. In a laboratory experiment, all patients were exposed to three 10-min guided imagery conditions (stress/stress, drug cue/drug cue, stress/drug cue), one per day, consecutively in a random, counterbalanced order. Subjective craving, anxiety and arousal as well as cardiovascular output were assessed repeatedly. Brain response to stress, drug cue and relaxing imagery was also assessed during a functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging session. In the current study, guanfacine was found to be safe and well-tolerated. Lower basal heart rate and blood pressure was observed in the guanfacine versus placebo group. Guanfacine lowered stress and cue-induced nicotine craving and cue-induced cocaine craving, anxiety and arousal. The guanfacine group also showed increased medial and lateral prefrontal activity following stress and drug cue exposure compared with placebo. Data suggest further exploration of guanfacine is warranted in terms of its potential for reducing stress-induced and cue-induced drug craving and arousal. PMID:22234929

  5. An Optimization Model for Expired Drug Recycling Logistics Networks and Government Subsidy Policy Design Based on Tri-level Programming

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui; Li, Yuyu; Huang, Bo; Pi, Xing

    2015-01-01

    In order to recycle and dispose of all people’s expired drugs, the government should design a subsidy policy to stimulate users to return their expired drugs, and drug-stores should take the responsibility of recycling expired drugs, in other words, to be recycling stations. For this purpose it is necessary for the government to select the right recycling stations and treatment stations to optimize the expired drug recycling logistics network and minimize the total costs of recycling and disposal. This paper establishes a tri-level programming model to study how the government can optimize an expired drug recycling logistics network and the appropriate subsidy policies. Furthermore, a Hybrid Genetic Simulated Annealing Algorithm (HGSAA) is proposed to search for the optimal solution of the model. An experiment is discussed to illustrate the good quality of the recycling logistics network and government subsides obtained by the HGSAA. The HGSAA is proven to have the ability to converge on the global optimal solution, and to act as an effective algorithm for solving the optimization problem of expired drug recycling logistics network and government subsidies. PMID:26184252

  6. An Optimization Model for Expired Drug Recycling Logistics Networks and Government Subsidy Policy Design Based on Tri-level Programming.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Li, Yuyu; Huang, Bo; Pi, Xing

    2015-07-01

    In order to recycle and dispose of all people's expired drugs, the government should design a subsidy policy to stimulate users to return their expired drugs, and drug-stores should take the responsibility of recycling expired drugs, in other words, to be recycling stations. For this purpose it is necessary for the government to select the right recycling stations and treatment stations to optimize the expired drug recycling logistics network and minimize the total costs of recycling and disposal. This paper establishes a tri-level programming model to study how the government can optimize an expired drug recycling logistics network and the appropriate subsidy policies. Furthermore, a Hybrid Genetic Simulated Annealing Algorithm (HGSAA) is proposed to search for the optimal solution of the model. An experiment is discussed to illustrate the good quality of the recycling logistics network and government subsides obtained by the HGSAA. The HGSAA is proven to have the ability to converge on the global optimal solution, and to act as an effective algorithm for solving the optimization problem of expired drug recycling logistics network and government subsidies. PMID:26184252

  7. Nicotine Related Brain Activity: The Influence Of Smoking History and Blood Nicotine Levels, an Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Rinah T.; Rohan, Michael L.; Goletiani, Nathalie; Olson, David; Peltier, MacKenzie; Renshaw, Perry F.; Mello, Nancy K.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In this study, we sought to explore brain activity in nicotine-dependent men in response to acute intravenous nicotine using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI). METHODS phMRI was used to evaluate brain activity in response to 1.5 mg/70 kg intravenous nicotine or saline. The nicotine and saline were administered on different visits. The time courses of individual subjects’ nicotine levels were used as regressors to assess neural activity relating to the infusions. The influence of Smoking history and physiological measures on the response to nicotine were also investigated. RESULTS Greater lifetime exposure to cigarette smoking was significantly correlated with higher peak serum nicotine levels. PhMRI analysis of the differential response of nicotine compared to the saline condition showed distinctive activation patterns when analyzed with a) the nicotine time course, b) nicotine time course controlling for smoking history (pack years), and c) pack years controlling for nicotine. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that smoking exposure history influences serum nicotine levels and the brain’s response to nicotine. Alterations in brain activity may be a result of vascular and neuro-adaptations involved in drug exposure and addiction. PMID:23117126

  8. Guardians to Counter Adolescent Drug Use?: Limitations of a Routine Activities Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Based on suggestions made by routine activities theory and data from two surveys, the present study discusses the use of adult guardians as a means to counter drug use among adolescents who seek out unsupervised routine activities with peers. Two surveys with 13- to 15-year-olds were conducted 4 years apart in a Norwegian town (Ns = 1,455 and…

  9. 78 FR 3900 - Generic Drug User Fee-Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient and Finished Dosage Form Facility Fee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the rate for the generic drug active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and finished dosage form (FDF) facilities user fees for fiscal year (FY) 2013. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012 (GDUFA), enacted the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, as......

  10. Identification of levothyroxine antichagasic activity through computer-aided drug repurposing.

    PubMed

    Bellera, Carolina L; Balcazar, Darío E; Alberca, Lucas; Labriola, Carlos A; Talevi, Alan; Carrillo, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Cruzipain (Cz) is the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas disease. A conformation-independent classifier capable of identifying Cz inhibitors was derived from a 163-compound dataset and later applied in a virtual screening campaign on the DrugBank database, which compiles FDA-approved and investigational drugs. 54 approved drugs were selected as candidates, 3 of which were acquired and tested on Cz and T. cruzi epimastigotes proliferation. Among them, levothyroxine, traditionally used in hormone replacement therapy in patients with hypothyroidism, showed dose-dependent inhibition of Cz and antiproliferative activity on the parasite. PMID:24592161

  11. Identification of Levothyroxine Antichagasic Activity through Computer-Aided Drug Repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Bellera, Carolina L.; Balcazar, Darío E.; Alberca, Lucas; Labriola, Carlos A.; Carrillo, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Cruzipain (Cz) is the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas disease. A conformation-independent classifier capable of identifying Cz inhibitors was derived from a 163-compound dataset and later applied in a virtual screening campaign on the DrugBank database, which compiles FDA-approved and investigational drugs. 54 approved drugs were selected as candidates, 3 of which were acquired and tested on Cz and T. cruzi epimastigotes proliferation. Among them, levothyroxine, traditionally used in hormone replacement therapy in patients with hypothyroidism, showed dose-dependent inhibition of Cz and antiproliferative activity on the parasite. PMID:24592161

  12. Laser-activated nano-biomaterials for tissue repair and controlled drug release

    SciTech Connect

    Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Rossi, F; Pini, R

    2014-07-31

    We present recent achievements of minimally invasive welding of biological tissue and controlled drug release based on laser-activated nano-biomaterials. In particular, we consider new advancements in the biomedical application of near-IR absorbing gold nano-chromophores as an original solution for the photothermal repair of surgical incisions and as nanotriggers of controlled drug release from hybrid biopolymer scaffolds. (laser biophotonics)

  13. Nested Event-Level Case-Control Study of Drug Use and Sexual Outcomes in Multipartner Encounters Reported by Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Melendez-Torres, G J; Hickson, Ford; Reid, David; Weatherburn, Peter; Bonell, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Previous event-level analyses have often, but not always, found significant associations between drug use and sexual risk behaviour in men who have sex with men (MSM), but these analyses have rarely considered either multipartner encounters specifically, or other sexual outcomes such as pleasure and control. Using data from an internet-based longitudinal survey of MSM, we tested the association between drug use by respondent and by partners and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), pleasure and control over sexual activity. Overall respondent substance use was significantly associated with increased odds of UAI, though not with pleasure or control. Respondent use of crystal methamphetamine was significantly associated with both increased odds of UAI and decreased odds of control over sexual activity. This analysis agrees with previous studies of dyadic encounters, and specifically suggests that the association between crystal methamphetamine and sexual risk behaviour may be mediated by loss of control. PMID:26139422

  14. [Plasma levels of anti-epileptic drugs. Evaluation of determinations carried out in the years 1978-1979].

    PubMed

    Zagnoni, P; Cognazzo, A; Gerbino Promis, P C; Grasso, E

    1981-11-10

    The results of 701 determinations of antiepileptic drug plasma concentrations administered to 190 patients are described. It has been possible to reduce the number of prescribed drugs to 1.55 per patient, so that only 8.1% of subjects takes three or more drugs while 53% is on monotherapy. The use of the measurement of AEDs plasma concentrations resulted very useful: a) when Phenytoin (PHT) is prescribed; b) in epileptic children; c) when the patient takes two or more drugs; d) to evaluate the compliance. A significant increase (p less than 0.01) of the level/dose ratio of Phenobarbital (PB) when PHT is in, or over, the therapeutic range was observed, while at plasma concentrations of PHT below 10 micrograms/ml it does not influence the metabolism of PB. PMID:7301176

  15. Acetylcholinesterase modulates presenilin-1 levels and γ-secretase activity.

    PubMed

    Campanari, Maria-Letizia; García-Ayllón, María-Salud; Belbin, Olivia; Galcerán, Joan; Lleó, Alberto; Sáez-Valero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The cholinergic enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the catalytic component of the γ-secretase complex, presenilin-1 (PS1), are known to interact. In this study, we investigate the consequences of AChE-PS1 interactions, particularly the influence of AChE in PS1 levels and γ-secretase activity. PS1 is able to co-immunoprecipitate all AChE variants (AChE-R and AChE-T) and molecular forms (tetramers and light subunits) present in the human brain. Overexpression of AChE-R or AChE-T, or their respective inactive mutants, all trigger an increase in PS1 protein levels. The AChE species capable of triggering the biggest increase in PS1 levels is a complex of AChE with the membrane anchoring subunit proline-rich membrane anchor (PRiMA), which restricts the localization of the resulting AChE tetramer to the outer plasma membrane. Incubation of cultured cells with soluble AChE demonstrates that AChE is able to increase PS1 at both the protein and transcript levels. However, the increase of PS1 caused by soluble AChE is accompanied by a decrease in γ-secretase activity as shown by the reduction of the processing of the amyloid-β protein precursor. This inhibitory effect of AChE on γ-secretase activity was also demonstrated by directly assessing accumulation of CTF-AβPP in cell-free membrane preparations incubated with AChE. Our data suggest that AChE may function as an inhibitor of γ-secretase activity. PMID:24699279

  16. Anti-viral drug treatment along with immune activator IL-2: a control-based mathematical approach for HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath Chatterjee, Amar; Roy, Priti Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Recent development in antiretroviral treatment against HIV can help AIDS patients to fight against HIV. But the question that whether the disease is to be partially or totally eradicated from HIV infected individuals still remains unsolved. Usually, the most effective treatment for the disease is HAART which can only control the disease progression. But as the immune system becomes weak, the patients can not fight against other diseases. Immune cells are activated and proliferated by IL-2 after the identification of antigen. IL-2 production is impaired in HIV positive patients and intermitted administration of immune activator IL-2 together with HAART which is a more effective treatment to fight against the disease. Thus, its expediency is essential and is yet to be explored. In this article we anticipated a mathematical model of the effect of IL-2 together with RTIs therapy in HIV positive patients. Our analytical as well as numerical study shows that the optimal schedule of treatment for best result is to be obtained by systematic drug therapy. But at the last stage of treatment, the infection level raises again due to minimisation of drug dosage. Thus we study the perfect adherence of the drugs and found out if RTIs are taken with sufficient interval then for fixed interval of IL-2 therapy, certain amount of drug dosages may be able to sustain the immune system at pre-infection stage and the infected CD4+T cells are going towards extinction.

  17. Low density lipoprotein for cytotoxic drug targeting: improved activity of elliptinium derivative against B16 melanoma in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Samadi-Baboli, M.; Favre, G.; Canal, P.; Soula, G.

    1993-01-01

    Significant low density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake by tumour cells led to the use of LDL as a discriminatory vehicle for the delivery of cytotoxic drugs. In the current study, the lipophilic elliptinium derivative, elliptinium-oleate (OL-NME), was incorporated into LDL to reach an incorporation level of 400 molecules per LDL particle. The OL-NME-LDL complex showed cytotoxic effects on normal human fibroblasts while the cytotoxicity was not observed on receptor-defective human fibroblasts, indicating the ability of the complex to be preferentially metabolised by the LDL receptor. In vivo metabolism of the complex was related to the LDL receptor pathway. The metabolic clearance was the same for native LDL (17.1 ml h-1) and OL-NME-LDL complex (16.2 ml h-1). LDL incorporated OL-NME enhanced the anti-tumour activity against murine B16 melanoma model; this resulted from increased efficacy for OL-NME-LDL at doses equal to free 9-OH-NME (157 vs 76 of Increase Life Span (ILS) (%) values after intraperitoneal (i.p.) drug injection on i.p. implanted tumour model and 45 vs -2 ILS (%) values after intravenous drug injection on subcutaneous implanted tumour model). These data suggest that LDL improves the potency of lipophilic cytotoxic drugs against tumours that express LDL receptor activity. PMID:8347487

  18. Semiautomated assessment of in vitro activity of potential antileishmanial drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, J D; Gallalee, J V

    1985-01-01

    We have compared the in vitro activity of six agents against macrophage-contained Leishmania tropica amastigotes determined by the conventional Giemsa staining procedure, with the activity determined by the semiautomated assessment of incorporation of radiolabeled uracil into the nucleic acid of the organisms. Although the mean 50% effective dose of Pentostam by Giemsa staining (4.1 micrograms/ml) was somewhat higher than that by uracil incorporation (2.8 micrograms/ml), the ED50S for the other two clinical agents (pentamidine, 0.035 versus 0.037 micrograms/ml; amphotericin B, 0.67 versus 0.70 micrograms/ml) and for three promising experimental agents (ketoconazole, 11.3 versus 11.3 micrograms/ml; the 8-aminoquinoline WR 6026, 1.6 versus 1.5 micrograms/ml formycin B, 0.018 versus 0.017 micrograms/ml) were virtually identical. The radiolabeling technique has several advantages over the Giemsa staining procedure. These include the need for relatively few macrophages, rapid and objective data generation, and viability of the test organism being measured. The successful application of the radiolabeling technique to at least six different chemical classes of compounds suggests that it would be useful for the routine assessment of antileishmanial activity in vitro. PMID:3002244

  19. Interleukin-1β biosynthesis inhibition reduces acute seizures and drug resistant chronic epileptic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Maroso, Mattia; Balosso, Silvia; Ravizza, Teresa; Iori, Valentina; Wright, Christopher Ian; French, Jacqueline; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2011-04-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical observations indicate that brain inflammation is an important factor in epilepsy. In particular, induction of interleukin-converting enzyme (ICE)/caspase-1 and activation of interleukin (IL)-1β/IL-1 receptor type 1 axis both occur in human epilepsy, and contribute to experimentally induced acute seizures. In this study, the anticonvulsant activity of VX-765 (a selective ICE/caspase-1 inhibitor) was examined in a mouse model of chronic epilepsy with spontaneous recurrent epileptic activity refractory to some common anticonvulsant drugs. Moreover, the effects of this drug were studied in one acute model of seizures in mice, previously shown to involve activation of ICE/caspase-1. Quantitative analysis of electroencephalogram activity was done in mice exposed to acute seizures or those developing chronic epileptic activity after status epilepticus to assess the anticonvulsant effects of systemic administration of VX-765. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue was carried out at the end of pharmacological experiments in epileptic mice to evaluate neuropathology, glia activation and IL-1β expression, and the effect of treatment. Repeated systemic administration of VX-765 significantly reduced chronic epileptic activity in mice in a dose-dependent fashion (12.5-200 mg/kg). This effect was observed at doses ≥ 50 mg/kg, and was reversible with discontinuation of the drug. Maximal drug effect was associated with inhibition of IL-1β synthesis in activated astrocytes. The same dose regimen of VX-765 also reduced acute seizures in mice and delayed their onset time. These results support a new target system for anticonvulsant pharmacological intervention to control epileptic activity that does not respond to some common anticonvulsant drugs. PMID:21431948

  20. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Ana-Maria; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs) and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects. PMID:24212665

  1. Identification of novel activity against Borrelia burgdorferi persisters using an FDA approved drug library.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Wang, Ting; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Auwaerter, Paul G; Zhang, Ying

    2014-07-01

    Although antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease is effective in the majority of cases, especially during the early phase of the disease, a minority of patients suffer from post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). It is unclear what mechanisms drive this problem, and although slow or ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi has been suggested as an explanation, there is a lack of evidence that viable organisms are present in PTLDS. Although not a clinical surrogate, insight may be gained by examining stationary-phase in vitro Borrelia burgdorferi persisters that survive treatment with the antibiotics doxycycline and amoxicillin. To identify drug candidates that can eliminate B. burgdorferi persisters more effectively, we screened an Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug library consisting of 1524 compounds against stationary-phase B. burgdorferi by using a newly developed high throughput SYBR Green I/propidium iodide (PI) assay. We identified 165 agents approved for use in other disease conditions that had more activity than doxycycline and amoxicillin against B. burgdorferi persisters. The top 27 drug candidates from the 165 hits were confirmed to have higher anti-persister activity than the current frontline antibiotics. Among the top 27 confirmed drug candidates from the 165 hits, daptomycin, clofazimine, carbomycin, sulfa drugs (e.g., sulfamethoxazole), and certain cephalosporins (e.g. cefoperazone) had the highest anti-persister activity. In addition, some drug candidates, such as daptomycin and clofazimine (which had the highest activity against non-growing persisters), had relatively poor activity or a high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against growing B. burgdorferi. Our findings may have implications for the development of a more effective treatment for Lyme disease and for the relief of long-term symptoms that afflict some Lyme disease patients. PMID:26038747

  2. A quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR assay for the assessment of drug activities against intracellular Theileria annulata schizonts.

    PubMed

    Hostettler, Isabel; Müller, Joachim; Stephens, Chad E; Haynes, Richard; Hemphill, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    Intracellular schizonts of the apicomplexans Theileria annulata and Theileria parva immortalize bovine leucocytes thereby causing fatal immunoproliferative diseases. Buparvaquone, a hydroxynaphthoquinone related to parvaquone, is the only drug available against Theileria. The drug is only effective at the onset of infection and emerging resistance underlines the need for identifying alternative compounds. Current drug assays employ monitoring of proliferation of infected cells, with apoptosis of the infected host cell as a read-out, but it is often unclear whether active compounds directly impair the viability of the parasite or primarily induce host cell death. We here report on the development of a quantitative reverse transcriptase real time PCR method based on two Theileria genes, tasp and tap104, which are both expressed in schizonts. Upon in vitro treatment of T. annulata infected bovine monocytes with buparvaquone, TaSP and Tap104 mRNA expression levels significantly decreased in relation to host cell actin already within 4 h of drug exposure, while significant differences in host cell proliferation were detectable only after 48-72 h. TEM revealed marked alterations of the schizont ultrastructure already after 2 h of buparvaquone treatment, while the host cell remained unaffected. Expression of TaSP and Tap104 proteins showed a marked decrease only after 24 h. Therefore, the analysis of expression levels of mRNA coding for TaSP and Tap104 allows to directly measuring impairment of parasite viability. We subsequently applied this method using a series of compounds affecting different targets in other apicomplexan parasites, and show that monitoring of TaSP- and Tap104 mRNA levels constitutes a suitable tool for anti-theilerial drug development. PMID:25516828

  3. A quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR assay for the assessment of drug activities against intracellular Theileria annulata schizonts

    PubMed Central

    Hostettler, Isabel; Müller, Joachim; Stephens, Chad E.; Haynes, Richard; Hemphill, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular schizonts of the apicomplexans Theileria annulata and Theileria parva immortalize bovine leucocytes thereby causing fatal immunoproliferative diseases. Buparvaquone, a hydroxynaphthoquinone related to parvaquone, is the only drug available against Theileria. The drug is only effective at the onset of infection and emerging resistance underlines the need for identifying alternative compounds. Current drug assays employ monitoring of proliferation of infected cells, with apoptosis of the infected host cell as a read-out, but it is often unclear whether active compounds directly impair the viability of the parasite or primarily induce host cell death. We here report on the development of a quantitative reverse transcriptase real time PCR method based on two Theileria genes, tasp and tap104, which are both expressed in schizonts. Upon in vitro treatment of T. annulata infected bovine monocytes with buparvaquone, TaSP and Tap104 mRNA expression levels significantly decreased in relation to host cell actin already within 4 h of drug exposure, while significant differences in host cell proliferation were detectable only after 48–72 h. TEM revealed marked alterations of the schizont ultrastructure already after 2 h of buparvaquone treatment, while the host cell remained unaffected. Expression of TaSP and Tap104 proteins showed a marked decrease only after 24 h. Therefore, the analysis of expression levels of mRNA coding for TaSP and Tap104 allows to directly measuring impairment of parasite viability. We subsequently applied this method using a series of compounds affecting different targets in other apicomplexan parasites, and show that monitoring of TaSP- and Tap104 mRNA levels constitutes a suitable tool for anti-theilerial drug development. PMID:25516828

  4. Solubility Enhancement of a Poorly Water Soluble Drug by Forming Solid Dispersions using Mechanochemical Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Oviedo, I.; Retchkiman-Corona, B.; Quirino-Barreda, C. T.; Cárdenas, J.; Schabes-Retchkiman, P. S.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanochemical activation is a practical cogrinding operation used to obtain a solid dispersion of a poorly water soluble drug through changes in the solid state molecular aggregation of drug-carrier mixtures and the formation of noncovalent interactions (hydrogen bonds) between two crystalline solids such as a soluble carrier, lactose, and a poorly soluble drug, indomethacin, in order to improve its solubility and dissolution rate. Samples of indomethacin and a physical mixture with a weight ratio of 1:1 of indomethacin and lactose were ground using a high speed vibrating ball mill. Particle size was determined by electron microscopy, the reduction of crystallinity was determined by calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy was used to find evidence of any interactions between the drug and the carrier and the determination of apparent solubility allowed for the corroboration of changes in solubility. Before grinding, scanning electron microscopy showed the drug and lactose to have an average particle size of around 50 and 30 μm, respectively. After high speed grinding, indomethacin and the mixture had a reduced average particle size of around 5 and 2 μm, respectively, showing a morphological change. The ground mixture produced a solid dispersion that had a loss of crystallinity that reached 81% after 30 min of grinding while the drug solubility of indomethacin within the solid dispersion increased by 2.76 fold as compared to the pure drug. Drug activation due to hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic group of the drug and the hydroxyl group of lactose as well as the decrease in crystallinity of the solid dispersion and the reduction of the particle size led to a better water solubility of indomethacin. PMID:23798775

  5. Feedback Activation of STAT3 as a Cancer Drug-Resistance Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengguang; Li, Huameng; Lin, Huey-Jen; Yang, Shulin; Lin, Jiayuh; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays crucial roles in several cellular processes such as cell proliferation and survival, and has been found to be aberrantly activated in many cancers. Much research has explored the leading mechanisms for regulating the STAT3 pathway and its role in promoting tumorigenesis. We focus here on recent evidence suggesting that feedback activation of STAT3 plays a prominent role in mediating drug resistance to a broad spectrum of targeted cancer therapies and chemotherapies. We highlight the potential of co-targeting STAT3 and its primary target to overcome drug resistance, and provide perspective on repurposing clinically approved drugs as STAT3 pathway inhibitors, in combination with the FDA-approved receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors, to improve clinical outcome of cancer treatment. PMID:26576830

  6. Effects of wind-dispelling drugs and deficiency-nourishing drugs of Houshiheisan compound prescription on astrocyte activation and inflammatory factor expression in the corpus striatum of cerebral ischemia rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiuxia; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Haizheng

    2012-01-01

    This study explored protective effects of Houshiheisan and its compound prescription of wind-dispelling drugs and deficiency-nourishing drugs on cerebral ischemia in terms of astrocyte activation and inflammatory factor expression. Results suggested that Houshiheisan lessened neuronal degeneration in the corpus striatum on the ischemic side of rats following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, contributed to astrocyte activation and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in the corpus striatum and decreased the levels of interleukin-2, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. Factor analysis results demonstrated that deficiency-nourishing drugs were more beneficial in protecting neurons and upregulating glial fibrillary acidic protein expression than wind-dispelling drugs. However, wind-dispelling drugs were more effective in increasing the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells and reducing inflammatory factor expression than deficiency-nourishing drugs. These indicate that different ingredients of Houshiheisan suppress cerebral ischemic injury by promoting astrocyte activation and diminishing inflammatory factor expression. PMID:25624810

  7. Neuron-specific enolase levels in drug-naïve young adults with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Carolina David; Molina, Mariane Lopez; Passos, Miguel; Moreira, Fernanda Pedrotti; Bittencourt, Guilherme; de Mattos Souza, Luciano Dias; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; Jansen, Karen; Oses, Jean Pierre

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to assess neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels and clinical features in subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). This is a cross-sectional study with drug-naïve young adults with MDD (aged 18-29 years). Serum levels of NSE were assessed using the electrochemiluminescence method. MDD diagnosis, suicidal ideation, and time of disease were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) were used to assess depressive and anxiety symptoms. No relationship was observed between NSE levels and severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms, time of disease, and suicidal ideation. These results suggest that NSE serum levels were not associated with clinical features of MDD among drug-naïve young adults. PMID:27026487

  8. Fitting Transporter Activities to Cellular Drug Concentrations and Fluxes: Why the Bumblebee Can Fly

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Pedro; Oliver, Stephen G.; Kell, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal argued that reported expression levels, kcat and Km for drug transporters could be used to estimate the likelihood that drug fluxes through Caco-2 cells could be accounted for solely by protein transporters. It was in fact concluded that if five such transporters contributed ‘randomly’ they could account for the flux of the most permeable drug tested (verapamil) 35% of the time. However, the values of permeability cited for verapamil were unusually high; this and other drugs have much lower permeabilities. Even for the claimed permeabilities, we found that a single ‘random’ transporter could account for the flux 42% of the time, and that two transporters can achieve 10 · 10−6 cm·s−1 90% of the time. Parameter optimisation methods show that even a single transporter can account for Caco-2 drug uptake of the most permeable drug. Overall, the proposal that ‘phospholipid bilayer diffusion (of drugs) is negligible’ is not disproved by the calculations of ‘likely’ transporter-based fluxes. PMID:26538313

  9. [The Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity and Hypouricemic Effects of Crude Drugs Obtained from the Silkworm in Mice].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryuichirou; Miyata, Yuuma; Minakuchi, Naoki; Murakami, Ayako; Sakazaki, Fumitoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of crude drugs obtained from the silkworm in mice with oxonic acid-induced hyperuricemia using xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity and plasma uric acid levels. The plasma uric acid level was analyzed using an improved HPLC with UV detection (HPLC-UV) method, which enabled high-sensitivity analysis of a microliter of plasma. Using this method, we evaluated natural products administered orally to the hypouricemic mice. The plasma uric acid level of mice administered a water-soluble extract from silkworm larvae with botrytis (used in traditional Chinese medicine to reduce wind, lower blood pressure, and change platelet coagulation) was significantly lower than in the control group 1, 2, and 3 h after treatment. In addition, water soluble extracts from a fungus (NBRC 31161) metabolite and silkworm pupae and larvae reduced the plasma uric acid levels in mice compared with the control group. PMID:26423873

  10. Cell membranes… and how long drugs may exert beneficial pharmacological activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vauquelin, Georges

    2016-09-01

    The time course of the beneficial pharmacological effect of a drug has long been considered to depend merely on the temporal fluctuation of its free concentration. Only in the last decade has it become widely accepted that target-binding kinetics can also affect in vivo pharmacological activity. Although current reviews still essentially focus on genuine dissociation rates, evidence is accumulating that additional micro-pharmacokinetic (PK) and -pharmacodynamic (PD) mechanisms, in which the cell membrane plays a central role, may also increase the residence time of a drug on its target. The present review provides a compilation of otherwise widely dispersed information on this topic. The cell membrane can intervene in drug binding via the following three major mechanisms: (i) by acting as a sink/repository for the drug; (ii) by modulating the conformation of the drug and even by participating in the binding process; and (iii) by facilitating the approach (and rebinding) of the drug to the target. To highlight these mechanisms, we focus on drugs that are currently used in clinical therapy, such as the antihypertensive angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist candesartan, the atypical antipsychotic agent clozapine and the bronchodilator salmeterol. Although the role of cell membranes in PK-PD modelling is gaining increasing interest, many issues remain unresolved. It is likely that novel biophysical and computational approaches will provide improved insights in the near future. PMID:27135195

  11. Acoustically active liposome-nanobubble complexes for enhanced ultrasonic imaging and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, An T; Wrenn, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is well known as a safe, reliable imaging modality. A historical limitation of ultrasound, however, was its inability to resolve structures at length scales less than nominally 20 µm, which meant that classical ultrasound could not be used in applications such as echocardiography and angiogenesis where one requires the ability to image small blood vessels. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents, or microbubbles, removed this limitation and ushered in a new wave of enhanced ultrasound applications. In recent years, the microbubbles have been designed to achieve yet another application, namely ultrasound-triggered drug delivery. Ultrasound contrast agents are thus tantamount to 'theranostic' vehicles, meaning they can do both therapy (drug delivery) and imaging (diagnostics). The use of ultrasound contrast agents as drug delivery vehicles, however, is perhaps less than ideal when compared to traditional drug delivery vehicles (e.g., polymeric microcapsules and liposomes) which have greater drug carrying capacities. The drawback of the traditional drug delivery vehicles is that they are not naturally acoustically active and cannot be used for imaging. The notion of a theranostic vehicle is sufficiently intriguing that many attempts have been made in recent years to achieve a vehicle that combines the echogenicity of microbubbles with the drug carrying capacity of liposomes. The attempts can be classified into three categories, namely entrapping, tethering, and nesting. Of these, nesting is the newest-and perhaps the most promising. PMID:24459007

  12. Activity-dependent regulation of astrocyte GAT levels during synaptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumar, Allie K.; Stork, Tobias; Freeman, Marc R.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic uptake of GABA through GABA transporters (GATs) is an important mechanism regulating excitatory/inhibitory balance in the nervous system, however mechanisms by which astrocytes regulate GAT levels are undefined. Here we show at mid-pupal stages the Drosophila CNS neuropil is devoid of astrocyte membranes and synapses. Astrocyte membranes subsequently infiltrate the neuropil coordinate with synaptogenesis and a strocyte ablation reduces synapse numbers by half, indicating that Drosophila astrocytes are pro-synaptogenic. Shortly after synapses form in earnest, the GABA transporter, GAT, is up-regulated in astrocytes. Ablation or silencing of GABAergic neurons or disruption of metabotropic GABA receptor (GABABR1/2) signaling in astrocytes leads to decreased astrocytic GAT levels. Interestingly, developmental depletion of astrocytic GABABR1/2 signaling suppresses mechanosensory-induced seizure activity in mutants with hyperexcitable neurons. These data reveal astrocytes actively modulate GAT expression via metabotropic GABA receptor signaling, and highlight the importance of precise regulation of astrocytic GAT in modulation of seizure activity. PMID:25151265

  13. Identification of Additional Anti-Persister Activity against Borrelia burgdorferi from an FDA Drug Library.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Weitner, Megan; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is a leading vector-borne disease in the United States. Although the majority of Lyme patients can be cured with standard 2-4 week antibiotic treatment, 10%-20% of patients continue to suffer from prolonged post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). While the cause for this is unclear, persisting organisms not killed by current Lyme antibiotics may be involved. In our previous study, we screened an FDA drug library and reported 27 top hits that showed high activity against Borrelia persisters. In this study, we present the results of an additional 113 active hits that have higher activity against the stationary phase B. burgdorferi than the currently used Lyme antibiotics. Many antimicrobial agents (antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals, anthelmintics or antiparasitics) used for treating other infections were found to have better activity than the current Lyme antibiotics. These include antibacterials such as rifamycins (3-formal-rifamycin, rifaximin, rifamycin SV), thiostrepton, quinolone drugs (sarafloxacin, clinafloxacin, tosufloxacin), and cell wall inhibitors carbenicillin, tazobactam, aztreonam; antifungal agents such as fluconazole, mepartricin, bifonazole, climbazole, oxiconazole, nystatin; antiviral agents zanamivir, nevirapine, tilorone; antimalarial agents artemisinin, methylene blue, and quidaldine blue; antihelmintic and antiparasitic agents toltrazuril, tartar emetic, potassium antimonyl tartrate trihydrate, oxantel, closantel, hycanthone, pyrimethamine, and tetramisole. Interestingly, drugs used for treating other non-infectious conditions including verteporfin, oltipraz, pyroglutamic acid, pidolic acid, and dextrorphan tartrate, that act on the glutathione/γ-glutamyl pathway involved in protection against free radical damage, and also the antidepressant drug indatraline, were found to have high activity against stationary phase B. burgdorferi. Among the active hits, agents that affect cell membranes, energy production, and reactive

  14. Identification of Additional Anti-Persister Activity against Borrelia burgdorferi from an FDA Drug Library

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Weitner, Megan; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is a leading vector-borne disease in the United States. Although the majority of Lyme patients can be cured with standard 2–4 week antibiotic treatment, 10%–20% of patients continue to suffer from prolonged post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). While the cause for this is unclear, persisting organisms not killed by current Lyme antibiotics may be involved. In our previous study, we screened an FDA drug library and reported 27 top hits that showed high activity against Borrelia persisters. In this study, we present the results of an additional 113 active hits that have higher activity against the stationary phase B. burgdorferi than the currently used Lyme antibiotics. Many antimicrobial agents (antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals, anthelmintics or antiparasitics) used for treating other infections were found to have better activity than the current Lyme antibiotics. These include antibacterials such as rifamycins (3-formal-rifamycin, rifaximin, rifamycin SV), thiostrepton, quinolone drugs (sarafloxacin, clinafloxacin, tosufloxacin), and cell wall inhibitors carbenicillin, tazobactam, aztreonam; antifungal agents such as fluconazole, mepartricin, bifonazole, climbazole, oxiconazole, nystatin; antiviral agents zanamivir, nevirapine, tilorone; antimalarial agents artemisinin, methylene blue, and quidaldine blue; antihelmintic and antiparasitic agents toltrazuril, tartar emetic, potassium antimonyl tartrate trihydrate, oxantel, closantel, hycanthone, pyrimethamine, and tetramisole. Interestingly, drugs used for treating other non-infectious conditions including verteporfin, oltipraz, pyroglutamic acid, pidolic acid, and dextrorphan tartrate, that act on the glutathione/γ-glutamyl pathway involved in protection against free radical damage, and also the antidepressant drug indatraline, were found to have high activity against stationary phase B. burgdorferi. Among the active hits, agents that affect cell membranes, energy production, and

  15. Caffeine enhances the antidepressant-like activity of common antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Szopa, Aleksandra; Poleszak, Ewa; Wyska, Elżbieta; Serefko, Anna; Wośko, Sylwia; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Pieróg, Mateusz; Wróbel, Andrzej; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used behaviorally active drug in the world which exerts its activity on central nervous system through adenosine receptors. Worrying data indicate that excessive caffeine intake applies to patients suffering from mental disorders, including depression. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the influence of caffeine on animals' behavior in forced swim test (FST) as well as the effect of caffeine (5 mg/kg) on the activity of six typical antidepressants, such as imipramine (15 mg/kg), desipramine (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg), paroxetine (0.5 mg/kg), escitalopram (2 mg/kg), and reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg). Locomotor activity was estimated to verify and exclude false-positive/negative results. In order to assess the influence of caffeine on the levels of antidepressant drugs studied, their concentrations were determined in murine serum and brains using high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that caffeine at a dose of 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg exhibited antidepressant activity in the FST, and it was not related to changes in locomotor activity in the animals. Caffeine at a dose of 5 mg/kg potentiated the activity of all antidepressants, and the observed effects were not due to the increase in locomotor activity in the animals. The interactions between caffeine and desipramine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and reboxetine were exclusively of pharmacodynamic character, because caffeine did not cause any changes in the concentrations of these drugs neither in blood serum nor in brain tissue. As a result of joint administration of caffeine and paroxetine, an increase in the antidepressant drug concentrations in serum was observed. No such change was noticed in the brain tissue. A decrease in the antidepressant drug concentrations in brain was observed in the case of imipramine administered together with caffeine. Therefore, it can be assumed that the interactions caffeine-paroxetine and caffeine-imipramine occur at least in

  16. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-02

    Here, the most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigatemore » the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. In conclusion, from these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.« less

  17. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells. PMID:26932808

  18. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.

  19. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Murillo L; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J; Bordallo, Heloisa N

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells. PMID:26932808

  20. Infrared spectroscopic studies to understand the effect of drugs at molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhawana; Gautam, Rekha; Chandrasekar, Bhagawat; Rakshit, Srabanti; Kumar B. N., Vinay; Boopathy, Sivaraman; Nandi, Dipankar; Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Umapathy, Siva

    2012-06-01

    In the recent past, there have been enormous efforts to understand effect of drugs on human body. Prior to understand the effect of drugs on human body most of the experiments are carried out on cells or model organisms. Here we present our study on the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs on cancer cells and the acetaminophen (APAP) induced hepatotoxicity in mouse model. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) have attracted attention as potential drug molecules for the treatment of cancer. These are the chemotherapeutic drugs which have indirect mechanistic action against cancer cells via acting against histone deacetylases (HDAC). It has been known that different HDAC enzymes are over-expressed in various types of cancers for example; HDAC1 is over expressed in prostate, gastric and breast carcinomas. Therefore, in order to optimise chemotherapy, it is important to determine the efficacy of various classes of HDAC inhibitor drugs against variety of over-expressed HDAC enzymes. In the present study, FTIR microspectroscopy has been employed to predict the acetylation and propionylation brought in by HDIs. The liver plays an important role in cellular metabolism and is highly susceptible to drug toxicity. APAP which is an analgesic and antipyretic drug is extensively used for therapeutic purposes and has become the most common cause of acute liver failure (ALF). In the current study, we have focused to understand APAP induced hepatotoxicity using FTIR microspectroscopy. In the IR spectrum the bands corresponding to glycogen, ester group and were found to be suitable markers to predict liver injury at early time point (0.5hr) due to APAP both in tissue and serum in comparison to standard biochemical assays. Our studies show the potential of FTIR spectroscopy as a rapid, sensitive and non invasive detection technique for future clinical diagnosis.

  1. Müller glia activation by VEGF-antagonizing drugs: An in vitro study on rat primary retinal cultures.

    PubMed

    Gaddini, Lucia; Varano, Monica; Matteucci, Andrea; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Villa, Marika; Pricci, Flavia; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella

    2016-04-01

    The effects of the anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) drugs ranibizumab and aflibercept were studied in Müller glia in primary mixed cultures from rat neonatal retina. Treatment with both agents induced activation of Müller glia, demonstrated by increased levels of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein. In addition, phosphorylated Extracellular-Regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) showed enhanced immunoreactivity in activated Müller glia. Treatment with aflibercept induced an increase in K(+) channel (Kir) 4.1 levels and both drugs upregulated Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) in activated Müller glia. The results show that VEGF-antagonizing drugs influence the homeostasis of Müller cells in primary retinal cultures, inducing an activated phenotype. Upregulation of Kir4.1 and AQP4 suggests that Müller glia activation following anti-VEGF drugs may not depict a detrimental gliotic reaction. Indeed, it could represent one of the mechanisms able to contribute to the therapeutic effects of these drugs, particularly in the presence of macular edema. PMID:26607807

  2. Spatiotemporally synchronized cancer combination therapy using photo-activated nanoparticle drug delivery systems (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    This talk will introduce a new nanotechnology platform for cancer combination therapy that utilizes near infrared light activation not only for photodynamic damage but also as an extrinsic mechanism to initiate release of complimentary drugs to suppress dynamic bursts in molecular signaling networks that promote tumor cell survival and treatment escape. The goal is to achieve co-delivery with concomitant activity of photodynamic, molecular inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents, selectively within the tumor. This approach overcomes challenges in achieving synergistic interactions using sequential drug delivery. Conventional drug delivery is compromised by the differential pharmacokinetics of individual agents and potentially antagonistic effects—such as vascular shutdown by one agent that limits delivery of the second. Here, photodynamic damage—which efficiently kills drug-resistant cells via damage of common proteins involved in drug-resistance (such as anti-apoptosis factors and drug-efflux transporters)—is synchronized spatially and temporally with the photo-initiated release of complimentary agents—to enable full interaction amongst the individual therapies. This spatiotemporal synchronization offers new prospects for exploiting time-sensitive synergistic interactions. Specific implementations of these concepts will be presented in preclinical models of cancer. Strategies to enable molecular-targeting of cancer cells via site-specific attachment of targeting moieties to the outer lipid shell of these nanovehicles will also be discussed. If successful in humans, this new paradigm for synchronized, tumor-focused combination therapy will ultimately supersede the present use of chronic drug injection by increasing efficacy per cycle whilst reducing systemic exposure to toxic drugs.

  3. Fluorescent TEM-1 β-lactamase with wild-type activity as a rapid drug sensor for in vitro drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Wing-Lam; Tsang, Ming-San; So, Pui-Kin; Chung, Wai-Hong; Leung, Yun-Chung; Chan, Pak-Ho

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a novel fluorescent drug sensor from the bacterial drug target TEM-1 β-lactamase through the combined strategy of Val216→Cys216 mutation and fluorophore labelling for in vitro drug screening. The Val216 residue in TEM-1 is replaced with a cysteine residue, and the environment-sensitive fluorophore fluorescein-5-maleimide is specifically attached to the Cys216 residue in the V216C mutant for sensing drug binding at the active site. The labelled V216C mutant has wild-type catalytic activity and gives stronger fluorescence when β-lactam antibiotics bind to the active site. The labelled V216C mutant can differentiate between potent and impotent β-lactam antibiotics and can distinguish active-site binders from non-binders (including aggregates formed by small molecules in aqueous solution) by giving characteristic time-course fluorescence profiles. Mass spectrometric, molecular modelling and trypsin digestion results indicate that drug binding at the active site is likely to cause the fluorescein label to stay away from the active site and experience weaker fluorescence quenching by the residues around the active site, thus making the labelled V216C mutant to give stronger fluorescence in the drug-bound state. Given the ancestor's role of TEM-1 in the TEM family, the fluorescent TEM-1 drug sensor represents a good model to demonstrate the general combined strategy of Val216→Cys216 mutation and fluorophore labelling for fabricating tailor-made fluorescent drug sensors from other clinically significant TEM-type β-lactamase variants for in vitro drug screening. PMID:25074398

  4. Drug Use, Personality and Partner Violence: A Model of Separate, Additive, Contributions in an Active Drug User Sample

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Adi; Pedersen, William C.; Fisher, Dennis G.; Reynolds, Grace L.; Hershberger, Scott L.; Reise, Steve; Bentler, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Drug use is considered a main contributing factor to crime and violence. This research examined the evidence regarding the relationship between drug abuse and the occurrence of intimate partner violence. Current drug using men were assessed on aggression related personality variables, their drug use, and the occurrence of violence in their close relationships. A latent aggression factor and recent amphetamine use were the only variables found to be significantly associated with violence. No other drug use variables were found to be associated with violence by the participant and the overall drug use factor was not found to be associated with violence or aggressive personality. The widely accepted notion that increased substance use directly leads to increases in violent behavior was only partially supported, at least within this drug using population. The assessment of aggressive personality, rather than of drug use, is suggested for correctional as well as clinical settings in which drug users are prevalent when determining susceptibility to violence. PMID:21165162

  5. Protein Folding Activity of Ribosomal RNA Is a Selective Target of Two Unrelated Antiprion Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tribouillard-Tanvier, Déborah; Dos Reis, Suzana; Gug, Fabienne; Voisset, Cécile; Béringue, Vincent; Sabate, Raimon; Kikovska, Ema; Talarek, Nicolas; Bach, Stéphane; Huang, Chenhui; Desban, Nathalie; Saupe, Sven J.; Supattapone, Surachai; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Chédin, Stéphane; Vilette, Didier; Galons, Hervé; Sanyal, Suparna; Blondel, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background 6-Aminophenanthridine (6AP) and Guanabenz (GA, a drug currently in use for the treatment of hypertension) were isolated as antiprion drugs using a yeast-based assay. These structurally unrelated molecules are also active against mammalian prion in several cell-based assays and in vivo in a mouse model for prion-based diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the identification of cellular targets of these drugs. Using affinity chromatography matrices for both drugs, we demonstrate an RNA-dependent interaction of 6AP and GA with the ribosome. These specific interactions have no effect on the peptidyl transferase activity of the ribosome or on global translation. In contrast, 6AP and GA specifically inhibit the ribosomal RNA-mediated protein folding activity of the ribosome. Conclusion/Significance 6AP and GA are therefore the first compounds to selectively inhibit the protein folding activity of the ribosome. They thus constitute precious tools to study the yet largely unexplored biological role of this protein folding activity. PMID:18478094

  6. Phosphorothioate backbone modifications of nucleotide-based drugs are potent platelet activators

    PubMed Central

    Flierl, Ulrike; Nero, Tracy L.; Lim, Bock; Arthur, Jane F.; Yao, Yu; Jung, Stephanie M.; Gitz, Eelo; Pollitt, Alice Y.; Zaldivia, Maria T.K.; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Schäfer, Andreas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Andrews, Robert K.; Parker, Michael W.; Gardiner, Elizabeth E.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-based drug candidates such as antisense oligonucleotides, aptamers, immunoreceptor-activating nucleotides, or (anti)microRNAs hold great therapeutic promise for many human diseases. Phosphorothioate (PS) backbone modification of nucleotide-based drugs is common practice to protect these promising drug candidates from rapid degradation by plasma and intracellular nucleases. Effects of the changes in physicochemical properties associated with PS modification on platelets have not been elucidated so far. Here we report the unexpected binding of PS-modified oligonucleotides to platelets eliciting strong platelet activation, signaling, reactive oxygen species generation, adhesion, spreading, aggregation, and thrombus formation in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, the platelet-specific receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI) mediates these platelet-activating effects. Notably, platelets from GPVI function–deficient patients do not exhibit binding of PS-modified oligonucleotides, and platelet activation is fully abolished. Our data demonstrate a novel, unexpected, PS backbone–dependent, platelet-activating effect of nucleotide-based drug candidates mediated by GPVI. This unforeseen effect should be considered in the ongoing development programs for the broad range of upcoming and promising DNA/RNA therapeutics. PMID:25646267

  7. Phosphorothioate backbone modifications of nucleotide-based drugs are potent platelet activators.

    PubMed

    Flierl, Ulrike; Nero, Tracy L; Lim, Bock; Arthur, Jane F; Yao, Yu; Jung, Stephanie M; Gitz, Eelo; Pollitt, Alice Y; Zaldivia, Maria T K; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Schäfer, Andreas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Andrews, Robert K; Parker, Michael W; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Peter, Karlheinz

    2015-02-01

    Nucleotide-based drug candidates such as antisense oligonucleotides, aptamers, immunoreceptor-activating nucleotides, or (anti)microRNAs hold great therapeutic promise for many human diseases. Phosphorothioate (PS) backbone modification of nucleotide-based drugs is common practice to protect these promising drug candidates from rapid degradation by plasma and intracellular nucleases. Effects of the changes in physicochemical properties associated with PS modification on platelets have not been elucidated so far. Here we report the unexpected binding of PS-modified oligonucleotides to platelets eliciting strong platelet activation, signaling, reactive oxygen species generation, adhesion, spreading, aggregation, and thrombus formation in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, the platelet-specific receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI) mediates these platelet-activating effects. Notably, platelets from GPVI function-deficient patients do not exhibit binding of PS-modified oligonucleotides, and platelet activation is fully abolished. Our data demonstrate a novel, unexpected, PS backbone-dependent, platelet-activating effect of nucleotide-based drug candidates mediated by GPVI. This unforeseen effect should be considered in the ongoing development programs for the broad range of upcoming and promising DNA/RNA therapeutics. PMID:25646267

  8. Exploring human epileptic activity at the single-neuron level.

    PubMed

    Tankus, Ariel

    2016-05-01

    Today, localization of the seizure focus heavily relies on EEG monitoring (scalp or intracranial). However, current technology enables much finer resolutions. The activity of hundreds of single neurons in the human brain can now be simultaneously explored before, during, and after a seizure or in association with an interictal discharge. This technology opens up new horizons to understanding epilepsy at a completely new level. This review therefore begins with a brief description of the basis of the technology, the microelectrodes, and the setup for their implantation in patients with epilepsy. Using these electrodes, recent studies provide novel insights into both the time domain and firing patterns of epileptic activity of single neurons. In the time domain, seizure-related activity may occur even minutes before seizure onset (in its current, EEG-based definition). Seizure-related neuronal interactions exhibit complex heterogeneous dynamics. In the seizure-onset zone, changes in firing patterns correlate with cell loss; in the penumbra, neurons maintain their spike stereotypy during a seizure. Hence, investigation of the extracellular electrical activity is expected to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the disease; it may, in the future, serve for a more accurate localization of the seizure focus; and it may also be employed to predict the occurrence of seizures prior to their behavioral manifestation in order to administer automatic therapeutic interventions. PMID:26994366

  9. Relationship between immunoglobulin levels and extremes of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoupel, Elijahu G.; Abramson, Eugene; Gabbay, Uri; Pick, Albert I.

    1995-06-01

    The possible relationship between epidemics and extremes of solar activity has been discussed previously. The purpose of the present study was to verify whether differences in the levels of immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM) could be noted at the highest (July 1989) and lowest (September 1986) points of the last (21st) and present (22nd) 11-year solar cycle. The work was divided into a 1-month study (covering the month of minimal or maximal solar activity), a 3-month study (1 month before and after the month of minimal or maximal solar activity) and a 5-month study (2 months before and after the month of minimal or maximal solar activity). A trend of a drop-off for all three immunoglobulins was seen on the far side of the maximal point of the solar cycle. Statistical significance was achieved in the 5-month study for IgM ( P=0.04), and a strong trend was shown for IgG ( P=0.07). Differences between the sexes were also noted.

  10. Evaluation of trypanocidal activity of combinations of anti-sleeping sickness drugs with cysteine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Steverding, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is unsatisfactory because only a few drugs, with serious side effects and poor efficacy, are available. As drug combination regimes often achieve greater therapeutic efficacy than monotherapies, here the trypanocidal activity of the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 in combination with current anti-HAT drugs using bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated. Isobolographic analysis was used to determine the interaction between cysteine protease inhibitors (K11777, CA-074Me and CAA0225) and anti-HAT drugs (suramin, pentamidine, melarsoprol and eflornithine). Bloodstream forms of T. brucei were incubated in culture medium containing cysteine protease inhibitors or anti-HAT drugs alone or in combination at a 1:1 fixed-dose ratio. After 48 h incubation, live cells were counted, the 50% growth inhibition values determined and combination indices calculated. The general cytotoxicity of drug combinations was evaluated with human leukaemia HL-60 cells. Combinations of K11777 with suramin, pentamidine and melarsoprol showed antagonistic effects while with eflornithine a synergistic effect was observed. Whereas eflornithine antagonises with CA-074Me, an inhibitor inactivating the targeted TbCATL only under reducing conditions, it synergises with CAA0255, an inhibitor structurally related to CA-074Me which inactivates TbCATL independently of thiols. These findings indicate an essential role of thiols for the synergistic interaction between K11777 and eflornithine. Encouragingly, the K11777/eflornithine combination displayed higher trypanocidal than cytotoxic activity. The results of this study suggest that the combination of the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 and eflornithine display promising synergistic trypanocidal activity that warrants further investigation of the drug combination as possible alternative treatment of HAT. PMID:25662707

  11. Protection of low density lipoprotein oxidation at chemical and cellular level by the antioxidant drug dipyridamole.

    PubMed Central

    Iuliano, L.; Colavita, A. R.; Camastra, C.; Bello, V.; Quintarelli, C.; Alessandroni, M.; Piovella, F.; Violi, F.

    1996-01-01

    1. The oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is thought to be an important factor in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Natural and synthetic antioxidants have been shown to protect LDL from oxidation and to inhibit atherosclerosis development in animals. Synthetic antioxidants are currently being tested, by they are not necessarily safe for human use. 2. We have previously reported that dipyridamole, currently used in clinical practice, is a potent scavenger of free radicals. Thus, we tested whether dipyridamole could affect LDL oxidation at chemical and cellular level. 3. Chemically induced LDL oxidation was made by Cu(II), Cu(II) plus hydrogen peroxide or peroxyl radicals generated by thermolysis of 2,2'-azo-bis(2-amidino propane). Dipyridamole, (1-10 microM), inhibited LDL oxidation as monitored by diene formation, evolution of hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, apoprotein modification and by the fluorescence of cis-parinaric acid. 4. The physiological relevance of the antioxidant activity was validated by experiments at the cellular level where dipyridamole inhibited endothelial cell-mediated LDL oxidation, their degradation by monocytes, and cytotoxicity. 5. In comparison with ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol and probucol, dipyridamole was the more efficient antioxidant with the following order of activity: dipyridamole > probucol > ascorbic acid > alpha-tocopherol. The present study shows that dipyridamole inhibits oxidation of LDL at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. The inhibition of LDL oxidation is unequivocally confirmed by use of three different methods of chemical oxidation, by several methods of oxidation monitoring, and the pharmacological relevance is demonstrated by the superiority of dipyridamole over the naturally occurring antioxidants, ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol and the synthetic antioxidant probucol. Images Figure 6 PMID:8968553

  12. Metabolism-Activated Multitargeting (MAMUT): An Innovative Multitargeting Approach to Drug Design and Development.

    PubMed

    Mátyus, Péter; Chai, Christina L L

    2016-06-20

    Multitargeting is a valuable concept in drug design for the development of effective drugs for the treatment of multifactorial diseases. This concept has most frequently been realized by incorporating two or more pharmacophores into a single hybrid molecule. Many such hybrids, due to the increased molecular size, exhibit unfavorable physicochemical properties leading to adverse effects and/or an inappropriate ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) profile. To avoid this limitation and achieve additional therapeutic benefits, here we describe a novel multitargeting strategy based on the synergistic effects of a parent drug and its active metabolite(s). The concept of metabolism-activated multitargeting (MAMUT) is illustrated using a number of examples. PMID:26497424

  13. [The original nootropic and neuroprotective drug noopept potentiates the anticonvulsant activity of valproate in mice].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, E V; Ponteleeva, I V; Trofimov, S S; Lapa, V I; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the original dipeptide drug noopept, known to possess nootrope, neuroprotector, and anxiolytic properties, on the anticonvulsant activity of the antiepileptic drug valproate has been studied on the model of corazole-induced convulsions in mice. Neither a single administration of noopept (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) nor its repeated introduction in 10 or 35 days enhanced the convulsant effect of corazole, which is evidence that noopept alone does not possess anticonvulsant properties. Prolonged (five weeks) preliminary administration of noopept enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of valproate. This result justifies the joint chronic administration of noopept in combination with valproate in order to potentiate the anticonvulsant effect of the latter drug. In addition, the administration of noopept favorably influences the cognitive functions and suppresses the development of neurodegenerative processes. PMID:20095393

  14. Application of activated nucleoside analogs for the treatment of drug-resistant tumors by oral delivery of nanogel-drug conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Senanayake, Thulani H.; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin; Vinogradov, Serguei V.

    2013-01-01

    A majority of nanoencapsulated drugs that have shown promise in cancer chemotherapy are administered intravenously. Development of effective oral nanoformulations presents a very challenging medical goal. Here, we describe successful applications of innovative polymeric nanogels in the form of conjugates with activated nucleoside analogs for oral administration in cancer chemotherapy. Previously, we reported the synthesis of amphiphilic polyvinyl alcohol and dextrin-based nanogel conjugates with the phosphorylated 5-FU nucleoside Floxuridine and demonstrated their enhanced activity against regular and drug-resistant cancers[1]. In this study, we synthesized and evaluated oral applications of nanogel conjugates of a protected Gemcitabine, the drug never used in oral therapies. These conjugates were able to quickly release an active form of the drug (Gemcitabine 5′-mono-, di- and triphosphates) by specific enzymatic activities, or slowly during hydrolysis. Gemcitabine conjugates demonstrated up to 127 times higher in vitro efficacy than the free drug against various cancer cells, including the lines resistant to nucleoside analogs. Surprisingly, these nanogel-drug conjugates were relatively stable in gastric conditions and able to actively penetrate through the gastrointestinal barrier based on permeability studies in Caco-2 cell model. In tumor xenograft models of several drug-resistant human cancers, we observed an efficient inhibition of tumor growth and extended the life-span of the animals by 4 times that of the control with orally treated Gemcitabine- or Floxuridine-nanogel conjugates. Thus, we have demonstrated a potential of therapeutic nanogel conjugates with the activated and stabilized Gemcitabine as a successful oral drug form against Gemcitabine-resistant and other drug-resistant tumors. PMID:23385032

  15. 21 CFR 310.534 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral wound healing agents. 310.534 Section 310.534 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific...

  16. Alarming Levels of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Patients in Metropolitan Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Isaakidis, Petros; Das, Mrinalini; Kumar, Ajay M V; Peskett, Christopher; Khetarpal, Minni; Bamne, Arun; Adsul, Balkrishna; Manglani, Mamta; Sachdeva, Kuldeep Singh; Parmar, Malik; Kanchar, Avinash; Rewari, B.B.; Deshpande, Alaka; Rodrigues, Camilla; Shetty, Anjali; Rebello, Lorraine; Saranchuk, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a looming threat to tuberculosis control in India. However, no countrywide prevalence data are available. The burden of DR-TB in HIV-co-infected patients is likewise unknown. Undiagnosed and untreated DR-TB among HIV-infected patients is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We aimed to assess the prevalence of DR-TB (defined as resistance to any anti-TB drug) in patients attending public antiretroviral treatment (ART) centers in greater metropolitan Mumbai, India. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among adults and children ART-center attendees. Smear microscopy, culture and drug-susceptibility-testing (DST) against all first and second-line TB-drugs using phenotypic liquid culture (MGIT) were conducted on all presumptive tuberculosis patients. Analyses were performed to determine DR-TB prevalence and resistance patterns separately for new and previously treated, culture-positive TB-cases. Results Between March 2013 and January 2014, ART-center attendees were screened during 14135 visits, of whom 1724 had presumptive TB. Of 1724 attendees, 72 (4%) were smear-positive and 202 (12%) had a positive culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Overall DR-TB was diagnosed in 68 (34%, 95% CI: 27%–40%) TB-patients. The proportions of DR-TB were 25% (29/114) and 44% (39/88) among new and previously treated cases respectively. The patterns of DR-TB were: 21% mono-resistant, 12% poly-resistant, 38% multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB), 21% pre-extensively-drug-resistant (MDR-TB plus resistance to either a fluoroquinolone or second-line injectable), 6% extensively drug-resistant (XDR-TB) and 2% extremely drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB plus resistance to any group-IV/V drug). Only previous history of TB was significantly associated with the diagnosis of DR-TB in multivariate models. Conclusion The burden of DR-TB among HIV-infected patients attending public ART-centers in Mumbai was alarmingly high, likely representing ongoing

  17. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  18. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Diana; Pires, David; Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  19. Activity profile of high-level Australian lacrosse players.

    PubMed

    Polley, Chris S; Cormack, Stuart J; Gabbett, Tim J; Polglaze, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Despite lacrosse being one of the fastest growing team sports in the world, there is a paucity of information detailing the activity profile of high-level players. Microtechnology systems (global positioning systems and accelerometers) provide the opportunity to obtain detailed information on the activity profile in lacrosse. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the activity profile of lacrosse match-play using microtechnology. Activity profile variables assessed relative to minutes of playing time included relative distance (meter per minute), distance spent standing (0-0.1 m·min), walking (0.2-1.7 m·min), jogging (1.8-3.2 m·min), running (3.3-5.6 m·min), sprinting (≥5.7 m·min), number of high, moderate, low accelerations and decelerations, and player load (PL per minute), calculated as the square root of the sum of the squared instantaneous rate of change in acceleration in 3 vectors (medio-lateral, anterior-posterior, and vertical). Activity was recorded from 14 lacrosse players over 4 matches during a national tournament. Players were separated into positions of attack, midfield, or defense. Differences (effect size [ES] ± 90% confidence interval) between positions and periods of play were considered likely positive when there was ≥75% likelihood of the difference exceeding an ES threshold of 0.2. Midfielders had likely covered higher (mean ± SD) meters per minute (100 ± 11) compared with attackers (87 ± 14; ES = 0.89 ± 1.04) and defenders (79 ± 14; ES = 1.54 ± 0.94) and more moderate and high accelerations and decelerations. Almost all variables across positions were reduced in quarter 4 compared with quarter 1. Coaches should accommodate for positional differences when preparing lacrosse players for competition. PMID:25264672

  20. The Effects of Acute Exposure to Neuroactive Drugs on the Locomotor Activity of Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae using prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. Initially, we chose to define the beh...

  1. Drugs that Target Dopamine Receptors: Changes in Locomotor Activity in Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort at the US Environmental Protection Agency to develop a rapid in vivo screen for prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. This includes assessing the acute effects of drugs known...

  2. [The comparative study of bioelectronic brain activity at the drug and Internet-addiction].

    PubMed

    Rabadanova, A I; Abacharova, Z S

    2014-01-01

    The comparative estimation of the bioelectric brain activities at different drug (heroin, opium, toxic organic join, home chemistry) and internet addiction are studied. These data can be interest for problem of general and specific mechanism of the influence of different factors, causing the addiction, on neirofisiological and neirochemical processes. PMID:25702456

  3. Tumor cell-specific bioluminescence platform to identify stroma-induced changes to anticancer drug activity.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Douglas W; Delmore, Jake; Weisberg, Ellen; Negri, Joseph M; Geer, D Corey; Klippel, Steffen; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Schlossman, Robert L; Munshi, Nikhil C; Kung, Andrew L; Griffin, James D; Richardson, Paul G; Anderson, Kenneth C; Mitsiades, Constantine S

    2010-04-01

    Conventional anticancer drug screening is typically performed in the absence of accessory cells of the tumor microenvironment, which can profoundly alter antitumor drug activity. To address this limitation, we developed the tumor cell-specific in vitro bioluminescence imaging (CS-BLI) assay. Tumor cells (for example, myeloma, leukemia and solid tumors) stably expressing luciferase are cultured with nonmalignant accessory cells (for example, stromal cells) for selective quantification of tumor cell viability, in presence versus absence of stromal cells or drug treatment. CS-BLI is high-throughput scalable and identifies stroma-induced chemoresistance in diverse malignancies, including imatinib resistance in leukemic cells. A stroma-induced signature in tumor cells correlates with adverse clinical prognosis and includes signatures for activated Akt, Ras, NF-kappaB, HIF-1alpha, myc, hTERT and IRF4; for biological aggressiveness; and for self-renewal. Unlike conventional screening, CS-BLI can also identify agents with increased activity against tumor cells interacting with stroma. One such compound, reversine, shows more potent activity in an orthotopic model of diffuse myeloma bone lesions than in conventional subcutaneous xenografts. Use of CS-BLI, therefore, enables refined screening of candidate anticancer agents to enrich preclinical pipelines with potential therapeutics that overcome stroma-mediated drug resistance and can act in a synthetic lethal manner in the context of tumor-stroma interactions. PMID:20228816

  4. MALDI-MS Patterning of Caspase Activities and Its Application in the Assessment of Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junjie; Liu, Fei; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-06-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been widely used for enzyme activity assays. Herein, we propose a MALDI-MS patterning strategy for the convenient visual presentation of multiple enzyme activities with an easy-to-prepare chip. The array-based caspase-activity patterned chip (Casp-PC) is fabricated by hydrophobically assembling different phospholipid-tagged peptide substrates on a modified ITO slide. The advantages of amphipathic phospholipids lead to high-quality mass spectra for imaging analysis. Upon the respective cleavage of these substrates by different caspases, such as caspase-1, -2, -3, and -8, to produce a mass shift, the enzyme activities can be directly evaluated by MALDI-MS patterning by m/z-dependent imaging of the cleavage products. The ability to identify drug-sensitive/resistant cancer cells and assess the curative effects of anticancer drugs is demonstrated, indicating the applicability of the method and the designed chip. PMID:27101158

  5. Evaluation of drug-induced tissue injury by measuring alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity in silkworm hemolymph

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Our previous studies suggest silkworms can be used as model animals instead of mammals in pharmacologic studies to develop novel therapeutic medicines. We examined the usefulness of the silkworm larvae Bombyx mori as an animal model for evaluating tissue injury induced by various cytotoxic drugs. Drugs that induce hepatotoxic effects in mammals were injected into the silkworm hemocoel, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity was measured in the hemolymph 1 day later. Results Injection of CCl4 into the hemocoel led to an increase in ALT activity. The increase in ALT activity was attenuated by pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Injection of benzoic acid derivatives, ferric sulfate, sodium valproate, tetracycline, amiodarone hydrochloride, methyldopa, ketoconazole, pemoline (Betanamin), N-nitroso-fenfluramine, and D-galactosamine also increased ALT activity. Conclusions These findings indicate that silkworms are useful for evaluating the effects of chemicals that induce tissue injury in mammals. PMID:23137391

  6. Potentiation of antiproliferative drug activity by lonidamine in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, L; Tesei, A; De Paola, F; Milandri, C; Amadori, D; Frassineti, G L; Ulivi, P; Zoli, W

    2003-10-01

    The ability of lonidamine (LND), a derivative of indazole-carboxylic acid, to modulate the cytotoxic activity of anticancer drugs was investigated in two human hepatocarcinoma (HCC) cell lines. The cytotoxicity of drugs used singly, in association or in sequence was evaluated using the Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. LND did not appreciably potentiate the effect of antitumor drugs when given before or simultaneously, in either cell line. Conversely, a synergistic interaction was observed in both cell lines when LND was given after conventional drugs. LND produced a moderate decrease in S-phase cell fraction and did not induce apoptosis. Conversely, paclitaxel (TAX) induced an important block in G2 and an increase in apoptosis. Following a 48-h TAX wash out, a progressive passage of cells from G2 to M phase was observed with a corresponding increase in apoptotic cells. Post-treatment with LND increased the cytotoxicity of some antitumor drugs, especially TAX, in hepatocarcinoma cells, possibly by preventing, as an energolytic drug, cell damage repair or by producing an additional effect on microtubule stabilization. PMID:14598941

  7. Development of Long-Circulating Zwitterionic Cross-Linked Micelles for Active-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weifeng; Ma, Guanglong; Kampf, Nir; Yuan, Zhefan; Chen, Shengfu

    2016-06-13

    Blood stability, active targeting, and controlled drug release are the most important features to design desirable drug carriers. Here, we demonstrate a zwitterionic biodegradable cross-linked micelle based on a penta-block copolymer, which utilizes poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) as hydrophilic segment, poly(ε-caprolactone) as biodegradable hydrophobic segment, poly(S-2-hydroxyethyl-O-ethyl dithiocarbonate methacrylate) (PSODMA) block as thiol protecting segment for cross-linking, and cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp-d-Tyr-Lys [c(RGDyK)] as targeting ligand. As a result, this micelle possessed excellent colloidal stability at high dilution and in 50% fetal bovine serum. In vitro drug release experiment showed no burst release under physiological conditions but accelerated drug release in mimicking tumor tissue environment. In vivo tests showed that the drug-loaded micelles had prolonged half-life in bloodstream, enhanced therapeutic efficiency, and reduced cardiac toxicity and biotoxicity compared with free drug formulation. Taken together, the reported c(RGDyK)-modified zwitterionic interfacially cross-linked micelle has emerged as an appealing platform for cancer therapy. PMID:27050797

  8. Acoustically-Active Microbubbles Conjugated to Liposomes: Characterization of a Proposed Drug Delivery Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Dayton, Paul A.; Lum, Aaron F. H.; Little, Erika; Paoli, Eric E.; Zheng, Hairong; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2009-01-01

    A new acoustically-active delivery vehicle was developed by conjugating liposomes and microbubbles, using the high affinity interaction between avidin and biotin. Binding between microbubbles and liposomes each containing 5% DSPE-PEG2kBiotin was highly dependent on avidin concentration and observed above an avidin concentration of 10 nM. With an optimized avidin and liposome concentration, we measured and calculated as high as 1000 to 10,000 liposomes with average diameters of 200 and 100 nm, respectively, attached to each microbubble. Replacing avidin with neutravidin resulted in 3-fold higher binding, approaching the calculated saturation level. High-speed photography of this new drug delivery vehicle demonstrated that the liposome-bearing microbubbles oscillate in response to an acoustic pulse similar to microbubble contrast agents. Additionally, microbubbles carrying liposomes could be spatially concentrated on a monolayer of PC-3 cells at the focal point of ultrasound beam. As a result of cell-vehicle contact, the liposomes fused with the cells and internalization of NBD-cholesterol occurred shortly after incubation at 37°C, with internalization of NBD-cholesterol substantially enhanced in the acoustic focus. PMID:17300849

  9. Computer-guided drug repurposing: identification of trypanocidal activity of clofazimine, benidipine and saquinavir.

    PubMed

    Bellera, Carolina L; Balcazar, Darío E; Vanrell, M Cristina; Casassa, A Florencia; Palestro, Pablo H; Gavernet, Luciana; Labriola, Carlos A; Gálvez, Jorge; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E; Romano, Patricia S; Carrillo, Carolina; Talevi, Alan

    2015-03-26

    In spite of remarkable advances in the knowledge on Trypanosoma cruzi biology, no medications to treat Chagas disease have been approved in the last 40 years and almost 8 million people remain infected. Since the public sector and non-profit organizations play a significant role in the research efforts on Chagas disease, it is important to implement research strategies that promote translation of basic research into the clinical practice. Recent international public-private initiatives address the potential of drug repositioning (i.e. finding second or further medical uses for known-medications) which can substantially improve the success at clinical trials and the innovation in the pharmaceutical field. In this work, we present the computer-aided identification of approved drugs clofazimine, benidipine and saquinavir as potential trypanocidal compounds and test their effects at biochemical as much as cellular level on different parasite stages. According to the obtained results, we discuss biopharmaceutical, toxicological and physiopathological criteria applied to decide to move clofazimine and benidipine into preclinical phase, in an acute model of infection. The article illustrates the potential of computer-guided drug repositioning to integrate and optimize drug discovery and preclinical development; it also proposes rational rules to select which among repositioned candidates should advance to investigational drug status and offers a new insight on clofazimine and benidipine as candidate treatments for Chagas disease. One Sentence Summary: We present the computer-guided drug repositioning of three approved drugs as potential new treatments for Chagas disease, integrating computer-aided drug screening and biochemical, cellular and preclinical tests. PMID:25707014

  10. Physical Activity Levels in College Students With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Turner, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Context Ankle sprains are the most common orthopaedic pathologic condition, and more concerning is the high percentage of persons who develop chronic ankle instability (CAI). Researchers have reported that patients with CAI are restricted occupationally, have more functional limitations, and have a poorer health-related quality of life. We do not know if these limitations decrease physical activity levels. Objective To assess total weekly steps taken between persons with CAI and persons with healthy ankles. Design Case-control study. Setting University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 20 participants with unilateral CAI (9 men, 11 women; age = 21.2 ± 1.9 years, height = 174.3 ± 6.9 cm, mass = 71.9 ± 11.7 kg) and 20 healthy participants (9 men, 11 women; age = 20.4 ± 2.1 years, height = 172.1 ± 5.5 cm, mass = 73.1 ± 13.4 kg) volunteered. Main Outcome Measure(s) We provided all participants with a pedometer and instructed them to wear it every day for 7 days and to complete a daily step log. They also completed the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), the FAAM Sport version, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. A 2-way analysis of variance (group × sex) was used to determine if differences existed in the total number of weekly steps, ankle laxity, and answers on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire between groups and between sexes. Results We found no group × sex interaction for step count (F range = 0.439–2.108, P = .08). A main effect for group was observed (F1,38 = 10.45, P = .04). The CAI group took fewer steps than the healthy group (P = .04). The average daily step count was 6694.47 ± 1603.35 for the CAI group and 8831.01 ± 1290.01 for the healthy group. The CAI group also scored lower on the FAAM (P = .01) and the FAAM Sport version (P = .01). Conclusions The decreased step count that the participants with CAI demonstrated is concerning. This decreased physical activity may be secondary

  11. "New drug" designations for new therapeutic entities: new active substance, new chemical entity, new biological entity, new molecular entity.

    PubMed

    Branch, Sarah K; Agranat, Israel

    2014-11-13

    This Perspective addresses ambiguities in designations of "new drugs" intended as new therapeutic entities (NTEs). Designation of an NTE as a new drug is significant, as it may confer regulatory exclusivity, an important incentive for development of novel compounds. Such designations differ between jurisdictions according to their drug laws and drug regulations. Chemical, biological, and innovative drugs are addressed in turn. The terms new chemical entity (NCE), new molecular entity (NME), new active substance (NAS), and new biological entity (NBE) as applied in worldwide jurisdictions are clarified. Differences between them are explored through case studies showing why new drugs have different periods of exclusivity in different jurisdictions or none at all. Finally, this Perspective recommends that in future, for the purpose of new drug compilations, NME is used for a new chemical drug, NBE for a new biological drug, and the combined designation NTE should refer to either an NME or an NBE. PMID:25188028

  12. The Effect of Gender and Level of Vision on the Physical Activity Level of Children and Adolescents with Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslan, Ummuhan Bas; Calik, Bilge Basakci; Kitis, Ali

    2012-01-01

    This study was planned in order to determine physical activity levels of visually impaired children and adolescents and to investigate the effect of gender and level of vision on physical activity level in visually impaired children and adolescents. A total of 30 visually impaired children and adolescents (16 low vision and 14 blind) aged between…

  13. Structure-Based Tetravalent Zanamivir with Potent Inhibitory Activity against Drug-Resistant Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lifeng; Bi, Yuhai; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Shanshan; Qi, Jianxun; Li, Yan; Lu, Xuancheng; Zhang, Zhenning; Lv, Xun; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F; Li, Xuebing

    2016-07-14

    Zanamivir and oseltamivir are principal influenza antiviral drugs that target viral neuraminidase (NA), but resistant viruses containing mutant NAs with diminished drug affinity are increasingly emerging. Using the structural knowledge of both drug-binding sites and their spatial arrangement on the homotetrameric NA, we have developed a tetravalent zanamivir (TZ) molecule that exhibited marked increases in NA binding affinity, inhibition of NA enzyme activity, and in vitro plus in vivo antiviral efficacy over zanamivir. TZ functioned against both human seasonal H3N2 and avian H7N9 viruses, including drug-resistant mutants. Crystal structure of a resistant N9 NA in complex with TZ explained the function, which showed that four zanamivir residues simultaneously bound to all four monomers of NA. The design method of TZ described in this study may be useful to develop drugs or ligands that target proteins with multiple binding sites. The potent anti-influenza activity of TZ makes it attractive for further development. PMID:27341624

  14. Dual Drug Loaded Biodegradable Nanofibrous Microsphere for Improving Anti-Colon Cancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rangrang; Li, Xiaoling; Deng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Liangxue; Zheng, Yu; Tong, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoning; You, Chao; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    One of the approaches being explored to increase antitumor activity of chemotherapeutics is to inject drug-loaded microspheres locally to specific anatomic sites, providing for a slow, long term release of a chemotherapeutic while minimizing systemic exposure. However, the used clinically drug carriers available at present have limitations, such as their low stability, renal clearance and residual surfactant. Here, we report docetaxel (DOC) and curcumin (CUR) loaded nanofibrous microspheres (DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres), self-assembled from biodegradable PLA-PEO-PPO-PEO-PLA polymers as an injectable drug carrier without adding surfactant during the emulsification process. The obtained nanofibrous microspheres are composed entirely of nanofibers and have an open hole on the shell without the assistance of a template. It was shown that these DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres could release curcumin and docetaxel slowly in vitro. The slow, sustained release of curcumin and docetaxel in vivo may help maintain local concentrations of active drug. The mechanism by which DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres inhibit colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis might involve increased induction of apoptosis in tumor cells and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. In vitro and in vivo evaluations demonstrated efficacious synergistic antitumor effects against CT26 of curcumin and docetaxel combined nanofibrous microspheres. In conclusion, the dual drug loaded nanofibrous microspheres were considered potentially useful for treating abdominal metastases of colorectal cancer. PMID:27324595

  15. Dual Drug Loaded Biodegradable Nanofibrous Microsphere for Improving Anti-Colon Cancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rangrang; Li, Xiaoling; Deng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Liangxue; Zheng, Yu; Tong, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoning; You, Chao; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    One of the approaches being explored to increase antitumor activity of chemotherapeutics is to inject drug-loaded microspheres locally to specific anatomic sites, providing for a slow, long term release of a chemotherapeutic while minimizing systemic exposure. However, the used clinically drug carriers available at present have limitations, such as their low stability, renal clearance and residual surfactant. Here, we report docetaxel (DOC) and curcumin (CUR) loaded nanofibrous microspheres (DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres), self-assembled from biodegradable PLA-PEO-PPO-PEO-PLA polymers as an injectable drug carrier without adding surfactant during the emulsification process. The obtained nanofibrous microspheres are composed entirely of nanofibers and have an open hole on the shell without the assistance of a template. It was shown that these DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres could release curcumin and docetaxel slowly in vitro. The slow, sustained release of curcumin and docetaxel in vivo may help maintain local concentrations of active drug. The mechanism by which DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres inhibit colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis might involve increased induction of apoptosis in tumor cells and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. In vitro and in vivo evaluations demonstrated efficacious synergistic antitumor effects against CT26 of curcumin and docetaxel combined nanofibrous microspheres. In conclusion, the dual drug loaded nanofibrous microspheres were considered potentially useful for treating abdominal metastases of colorectal cancer. PMID:27324595

  16. Dual Drug Loaded Biodegradable Nanofibrous Microsphere for Improving Anti-Colon Cancer Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rangrang; Li, Xiaoling; Deng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Liangxue; Zheng, Yu; Tong, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoning; You, Chao; Guo, Gang

    2016-06-01

    One of the approaches being explored to increase antitumor activity of chemotherapeutics is to inject drug-loaded microspheres locally to specific anatomic sites, providing for a slow, long term release of a chemotherapeutic while minimizing systemic exposure. However, the used clinically drug carriers available at present have limitations, such as their low stability, renal clearance and residual surfactant. Here, we report docetaxel (DOC) and curcumin (CUR) loaded nanofibrous microspheres (DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres), self-assembled from biodegradable PLA-PEO-PPO-PEO-PLA polymers as an injectable drug carrier without adding surfactant during the emulsification process. The obtained nanofibrous microspheres are composed entirely of nanofibers and have an open hole on the shell without the assistance of a template. It was shown that these DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres could release curcumin and docetaxel slowly in vitro. The slow, sustained release of curcumin and docetaxel in vivo may help maintain local concentrations of active drug. The mechanism by which DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres inhibit colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis might involve increased induction of apoptosis in tumor cells and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. In vitro and in vivo evaluations demonstrated efficacious synergistic antitumor effects against CT26 of curcumin and docetaxel combined nanofibrous microspheres. In conclusion, the dual drug loaded nanofibrous microspheres were considered potentially useful for treating abdominal metastases of colorectal cancer.

  17. The Basophil Activation Test Is Safe and Useful for Confirming Drug-Induced Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Yeon; Kim, Joo Hee; Jang, Young Sook; Choi, Jeong Hee; Park, Sunghoon; Hwang, Yong Il; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki Suck

    2016-11-01

    The basophil activation test (BAT) has been suggested as a complementary method for diagnosing drug allergies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of this test in patients with drug-induced anaphylaxis. In total, 19 patients, all of whom had a history of moderate to severe anaphylaxis, were enrolled. None of the causative drugs had available in vitro tests or reliable skin tests; these drugs included, among others, first and second-generation cephalosporins, H2 blockers, and muscle relaxants. The BAT yielded positive results in 57.9% of the cases, which was similar those results of skin prick and intradermal tests (42.1% and 57.9%, respectively). When basophils were double labelled with CD63 and CD203c, both of which are basophil activation markers, the positive rate was increased from 57.9% to 73.7%. Therefore, the results of this study confirm that the BAT is a quick, reliable, and safe diagnostic tool for patients with drug-induced anaphylaxis. PMID:27582406

  18. The Impact of Engagement in Street-based Income Generation Activities on Stimulant Drug Use Cessation among People who Inject Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ti, Lianping; Richardson, Lindsey; DeBeck, Kora; Nguyen, Paul; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the growing prevalence of illicit stimulant drug use internationally, and the widespread involvement of people who inject drugs (IDU) within street-based drug markets, little is known about the impact of different types of street-based income generation activities on the cessation of stimulant use among IDU. Methods Data were derived from an open prospective cohort of IDU in Vancouver, Canada. We used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression to examine the effect of different types of street-based income generation activities (e.g., sex work, drug dealing, and scavenging) on time to cessation of stimulant use. Results Between December, 2005 and November, 2012, 887 IDU who use stimulant drugs (cocaine, crack cocaine, or crystal methamphetamine) were prospectively followed-up for a median duration of 47 months. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, compared to those who did not engage in street-based income generation activities, participants who reported sex work, drug dealing, scavenging, or more than one of these activities were significantly less likely to report stimulant drug use cessation (all p<0.001). When considered as time-updated variables and adjusted for potential confounders in a multivariable model, each type of street-based income generation activity remained significantly associated with a slower time to stimulant drug cessation (all p<0.005). Conclusions Our findings highlight the urgent need for strategies to address stimulant dependence, including novel pharmacotherapies. Also important, structural interventions, such as low-threshold employment opportunities, availability of supportive housing, legal reforms regarding drug use, and evidence-based approaches that reduce harm among IDU are urgently required. PMID:24909853

  19. Light-activated endosomal escape using upconversion nanoparticles for enhanced delivery of drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasammandhan, Muthu Kumara; Bansal, Akshaya; Zhang, Yong

    2013-02-01

    Nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs has gained a lot of prominence recently but the main problem hampering efficient delivery of payload is the clearing or degradation of nanoparticles by endosomes. Various strategies have been used to overcome this issue and one such effective solution is Photochemical Internalization (PCI). This technique involves the activation of certain photosensitizing compounds by light, which accumulate specifically in the membranes of endocytic vesicles. The activated photosensitizers induce the formation of reactive oxygen species which in turn induces localized disruption of endosomal membranes. But the drawback of this technique is that it needs blue light for activation and hence confined to be used only in in-vitro systems due to the poor tissue penetration of blue light. Here, we report the use of Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNs) as a transducer for activation of the photosensitizer, TPPS 2a. NIR light has good tissue penetrating ability and thus enables PCI in greater depths. Highly monodisperse, uniformly-sized, sub-100 nm, biocompatible upconversion nanoparticles were synthesized with a mesoporous silica coating. These UCNs activated TPPS 2a efficiently in solution and in cells. Paclitaxel, an anti-cancer drug was used as a model drug and was loaded into the mesoporous silica coating. B16F0 cells transfected with drug-loaded UCNs and irradiated with NIR showed significantly higher nanoparticle uptake and in turn higher cell death caused by the delivered drug. This technique can be used to enhance the delivery of any therapeutic molecule and thus increase the therapeutic efficiency considerably.

  20. Convergence of dopamine and glutamate signaling onto striatal ERK activation in response to drugs of abuse

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Emma; Salery, Marine; Vanhoutte, Peter; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2014-01-01

    Despite their distinct targets, all addictive drugs commonly abused by humans evoke increases in dopamine (DA) concentration within the striatum. The main DA Guanine nucleotide binding protein couple receptors (GPCRs) expressed by medium-sized spiny neurons of the striatum are the D1R and D2R, which are positively and negatively coupled to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, respectively. These two DA GPCRs are largely segregated into distinct neuronal populations, where they are co-expressed with glutamate receptors in dendritic spines. Direct and indirect interactions between DA GPCRs and glutamate receptors are the molecular basis by which DA modulates glutamate transmission and controls striatal plasticity and behavior induced by drugs of abuse. A major downstream target of striatal D1R is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase pathway. ERK activation by drugs of abuse behaves as a key integrator of D1R and glutamate NMDAR signaling. Once activated, ERK can trigger chromatin remodeling and induce gene expression that permits long-term cellular alterations and drug-induced morphological and behavioral changes. Besides the classical cAMP/PKA pathway, downstream of D1R, recent evidence implicates a cAMP-independent crosstalk mechanism by which the D1R potentiates NMDAR-mediated calcium influx and ERK activation. The mounting evidence of reciprocal modulation of DA and glutamate receptors adds further intricacy to striatal synaptic signaling and is liable to prove relevant for addictive drug-induced signaling, plasticity, and behavior. Herein, we review the evidence that built our understanding of the consequences of this synergistic signaling for the actions of drugs of abuse. PMID:24409148

  1. Assertive/Leveling Communication and Empathy in Adolescent Drug Abuse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englander-Golden, Paula; And Others

    This paper reports feedback from 349 fifth through eighth graders who participated in Say It Straight (SIS), a school-based drug abuse prevention program which combines assertiveness training with role playing and guided imagery. The feedback presented concerns students' feelings about sending and receiving messages using the following…

  2. Party Education 101: A Multi-Level Early Drug Intervention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigman, S. Leellen; Austin, Donna G.

    During the fall of 1987 Arizona State University received a grant to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using student professionals to teach assertive and decision making skills to their peers. These skills were taught as an early intervention strategy to address the dynamics of peer pressure in drug use among high risk college age…

  3. Idaho Senior Center Activities, Activity Participation Level, and Managers' Perceptions of Activity Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girvan, James T.; Harris, Frances

    A survey completed by managers of 77 senior centers in Idaho revealed that meals, blood pressure screening, and games and trips were the most successful activities offered. Alzheimer's support groups, library books for loan, and exercise classes were the least successful. Possible reasons for the success or failure of these activities were…

  4. Fixed-Dose Combination Drug Approvals, Patents and Market Exclusivities Compared to Single Active Ingredient Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jing; Rodriguez-Monguio, Rosa; Seoane-Vazquez, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fixed-dose combinations (FDC) contain two or more active ingredients. The effective patent and exclusivity life of FDC compared to single active ingredient has not been assessed. Objectives Trends in FDA approved FDC in the period 1980–2012 and time lag between approval of FDC and single active ingredients in the combination were assessed, and the effective patent and exclusivity life of FDC was compared with their single active ingredients. Materials and Methods New molecular entities (NMEs), new therapeutic biologics license applications (BLAs) and FDC data were collected from the FDA Orange Book and Drugs@FDA. Analysis included FDC containing one or more NMEs or BLAs at first FDA approval (NMEs-FDC) and only already marketed drugs (Non-NMEs-FDC). Descriptive, Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Rank Sum analyses were performed. Results During the study period, the FDA approved 28 NMEs-FDC (3.5% of NMEs) and 117 non-NMEs-FDC. FDC approvals increased from 12 in the 1980s to 59 in the 2000s. Non-NMEs-FDC entered the market at a median of 5.43 years (interquartile range 1.74, 10.31) after first FDA approval of single active ingredients in the combination. The Non-NMEs-FDC entered the market at a median of 2.33 years (-7.55, 2.39) before approval of generic single active ingredient. Non-NME-FDC added a median of 9.70 (2.75, 16.24) years to the patent and exclusivity life of the single active ingredients in the combination. Conclusion FDC approvals significantly increased over the last twenty years. Pharmaceutical companies market FDC drugs shortly before the generic versions of the single ingredients enter the market extending the patent and exclusivity life of drugs included in the combination. PMID:26469277

  5. U.S. Food and Drug Administration perspective of the inclusion of effects of low-level exposures in safety and risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Gaylor, D W; Bolger, P M; Schwetz, B A

    1998-01-01

    A brief overview is provided of some of the general safety and risk assessment procedures used by the different centers of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA) to evaluate low-level exposures. The U.S. FDA protects public health by regulating a wide variety of consumer products including foods, human and animal drugs, biologics, and medical devices under the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The diverse legal and regulatory standards in the act allow for the consideration of benefits for some products (e.g., drugs) but preclude them from others (e.g., food additives). When not precluded by statutory mandates (e.g., Delaney prohibition), the U.S. FDA considers both physiologic adaptive responses and beneficial effects. For the basic safety assessment paradigm as presently used, for example in the premarket approval of food additives, the emphasis is on the identification of adverse effects and no observed adverse effect level(s) (NOAEL). Generally, the NOAEL is divided by safety factors to establish an acceptable exposure level. This safety assessment paradigm does not preclude the consideration of effects whether they are biologically adaptive or beneficial at lower dose levels. The flexibility to consider issues such as mechanisms of action and adaptive and beneficial responses depends on the product under consideration. For carcinogenic contaminants and radiation from medical devices, the U.S. FDA considers the potential cancer risk at low exposure levels. This generally involves downward extrapolation from the observed dose-response range. The consideration of adverse effects of other toxicologic end points (e.g., reproductive, immunologic, neurologic, developmental) associated with low exposure levels is also becoming more of a reality (e.g., endocrine disrupters). The evaluation of the biologic effects of low-level exposures to toxic substances must include whether the effect is adverse or a normal physiologic adaptive response and also

  6. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase in rainbow trout: effects of fasting and statin drugs on activities and mRNA transcripts.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie; Chen, Xi; Moon, Thomas W

    2008-04-01

    Human pharmaceuticals including statin drugs are found in effluents post-waste water treatment plant. In order to establish whether statin drugs could affect an aquatic species, we initially characterized in the rainbow trout the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase or HMGCoAR which is the mammalian target of statin drugs. Two HMGCoAR transcripts (-1 and -2) were isolated to trout tissues and given their prevalence in liver and brain, these two tissues were used in activity assays. HMGCoAR activities were 87.2 and 66.0 pmol/min/mg protein for liver microsomes and whole brain homogenates. Liver activities were affected by conditions promoting phosphorylation but not by a 14 day fast; brain activities were differentially altered by fasting and re-feeding. Even though activities were altered by fasting, HMGCoAR-1 (but not -2) mRNA was reduced by fasting in both the liver and hypothalamus/pituitary. Both statin drugs (cerivastatin and atorvastatin) significantly decreased HMGCoAR activities in vitro and cerivastatin when injected significantly decreased hepatic but not brain activities; some changes in mRNA levels were noted. These studies demonstrate that at the concentrations of statins used in this study, effects on HMGCoAR activities and transcripts occur. Such changes could affect cholesterol content and may alter cholesterol dynamics in this species. PMID:18280795

  7. Cytostatic and immunomobilizing activities of polymer-bound drugs: experimental and first clinical data.

    PubMed

    Ríhová, Blanka; Strohalm, Jirí; Prausová, Jana; Kubácková, Katerina; Jelínková, Markéta; Rozprimová, Lad'ka; Sírová, Milada; Plocová, Dana; Etrych, Tomás; Subr, Vladimír; Mrkvan, Tomás; Kovár, Marek; Ulbrich, Karel

    2003-08-28

    An N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer carrier containing doxorubicin and human immunoglobulin as an actively/passively targeting moiety was used in four patients with generalized breast cancer resistant to standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. The dose and time schedule were deduced from a Phase I clinical trial in which doxorubicin bound to HPMA copolymer carrier (PK1) was tested. It was confirmed that the Dox-HPMA-HuIg conjugate is stable and doxorubicin remains in the peripheral blood with a small amount also in the urine, mostly in its polymer-bound form. More than 116 biochemical, immunological and hematological parameters were determined for blood samples taken from patients 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 1 to 11 weeks after treatment. Depending on the patient, some parameters decreased permanently or temporarily to the normal level (CRP, C3, CA 72-4, beta(2)-microglobulin, ferritin, CEA, CA 125, CD4, CD8, CE19, CD16(+)56(+), leu, ery) and some moved markedly towards physiological values (AST, ALT, ALP, GMT, CA 15-3, NSE, AFP). While the number of peripheral blood reticulocytes was significantly decreased after treatment with the classical free drug, their number was not affected or was even elevated after treatment with Dox-HPMA-HuIg. Increased absolute numbers of CD16(+)56(+) and CD4(+) cells in the peripheral blood and activation of NK and LAK cells in all patients support data obtained in experimental animals, pointing to a dual, i.e. cytostatic and immunomobilizing character of Dox-HPMA conjugates containing a targeting immunoglobulin moiety. PMID:12932633

  8. Therapeutic [Activities]: Letting Go, Moving On; The System; Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs-12-Bits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannister, Willie; Gass, Mike; McMillan, Kelly

    1998-01-01

    Describes three therapeutic group activities used with adolescents, adults, or families in adventure- and experiential-education settings. Includes target group, group size, time and space requirements, activity level, props needed, instructions, and ideas for post-activity group processing and reflection. Activities involve moving beyond…

  9. Repeated in vivo electrochemical activation and the biological effects of microelectromechanical systems drug delivery device.

    PubMed

    Shawgo, Rebecca S; Voskerician, Gabriela; Duc, Hong Linh Ho; Li, Yawen; Lynn, Aaron; MacEwan, Matthew; Langer, Robert; Anderson, James M; Cima, Michael J

    2004-12-15

    The repeated activation of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) drug delivery device was studied in vivo in rats to examine the effect of implantation on the device operation and the effect of electrochemical activation on the inflammatory and wound-healing response. The MEMS devices were fabricated from a silicon wafer into which reservoirs were etched and covered with gold membranes. The membranes were electrochemically removed when an anodic voltage was applied. Devices were implanted subcutaneously both with and without stainless steel mesh cages for 4, 7, 14, 21, or 28 days before activation. Devices were activated every other day for five activations. Leukocyte concentrations indicated that both the application of voltage and the gold corrosion products elevated the inflammatory response which was resolved within 48 h after each activation. The efficiency of gold membrane removal was not impaired throughout the implantation, although a bimodal distribution of background current densities was observed after long implantation times. The thickness of the fibrous capsule surrounding the MEMS devices was similar between activated and control devices explanted at each time point. It was concluded that the repeated activation of MEMS drug delivery devices was successful and the activation produced an acceptable biological response that resolved promptly. PMID:15508122

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy: evolution of disease activity and pathophysiological considerations for drug use

    PubMed Central

    Hazes, Johanna M.W.; Coulie, Pierre G.; Geenen, Vincent; Vermeire, Séverine; Carbonnel, Franck; Louis, Edouard; Masson, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that pregnancy and childbirth have a profound effect on the disease activity of rheumatic diseases. For clinicians, the management of patients with RA wishing to become pregnant involves the challenge of keeping disease activity under control and adequately adapting drug therapy during pregnancy and post-partum. This article aims to summarize the current evidence on the evolution of RA disease activity during and after pregnancy and the use of anti-rheumatic drugs around this period. Of recent interest is the potential use of anti-TNF compounds in the preconception period and during pregnancy. Accumulating experience with anti-TNF therapy in other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as Crohn’s disease, provides useful insights for the use of TNF blockade in pregnant women with RA, or RA patients wishing to become pregnant. PMID:21890617

  11. The activation of phosphoramide mustard anticancer drugs from ab initio simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allesch, Markus; Schwegler, Eric; Colvin, Mike; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2007-03-01

    The nitrogen mustard based DNA alkylating agents were the first nonhormonal drugs to be used effectively in the treatment of cancer and remain one of the most important drugs for the chemotherapeutic management of many common malignancies today. An understanding of the activation of these compounds is, in itself, of scientific interest, but also critical in designing improved analogs of greater selectivity and efficacy. We have investigated the activation pathways of one of the most active metabolites, phosphoramide mustard (PM), and its methylated ester (PMME). In particular, we have examined the activation barrier and reaction free energy for the intramolecular cyclization reaction using first principles molecular dynamics simulations with explicit and continuum solvation models. Structural, dynamical and electronic properties along the reaction path have been computed mainly to address the question why de-esterification is required to activate these drugs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy at the University of California/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48.

  12. Measurement of caspase-2 activation during different anti-tumor drugs induced apoptosis by FRET technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Juqiang; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Rong, Chen; Zhang, Zhihong

    2007-11-01

    Caspase-2 is important for the engagement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, in the presence of DNA-damaging agents, such as cisplatin; however, the mechanism by which caspase-2 executes apoptosis remains obscure. In this study, we carried out the measurements of the dynamics of caspase-2 activation in a single living cell by a FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) probe. A FRET probe was constructed that encoded a CRS (caspase-2 recognition site) fused with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and a red fluorescent protein (DsRed) (CFP-CRS-DsRed). Using this probe, we found that during TRAIL-induced apoptosis, caspase-2 was not activated, and caspase-2 activation occurred in etoposide and cisplatin treated cells. However, during cisplatin-induced apoptosis caspase-2 activation was initiated much earlier than that of etoposide. Cisplatin and etoposide is one of the most broadly used drugs in the Clinical applications of cancer chemotherapy, and TRAIL, which belongs to the TNF family proteins, can selectively induce apoptosis in many transformed cells but not in normal cells. Most of anticancer drugs can induce apoptosis mediated by the activation of caspase pathway. Thus, the perfect synergistic effect group of multi-drug can be selected by using our FRET probe.

  13. Promoters maintain their relative activity levels under different growth conditions

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Leeat; Zackay, Ora; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Barenholz, Uri; Dekel, Erez; Sasson, Vered; Aidelberg, Guy; Bren, Anat; Zeevi, Danny; Weinberger, Adina; Alon, Uri; Milo, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Most genes change expression levels across conditions, but it is unclear which of these changes represents specific regulation and what determines their quantitative degree. Here, we accurately measured activities of ∼900 S. cerevisiae and ∼1800 E. coli promoters using fluorescent reporters. We show that in both organisms 60–90% of promoters change their expression between conditions by a constant global scaling factor that depends only on the conditions and not on the promoter's identity. Quantifying such global effects allows precise characterization of specific regulation—promoters deviating from the global scale line. These are organized into few functionally related groups that also adhere to scale lines and preserve their relative activities across conditions. Thus, only several scaling factors suffice to accurately describe genome-wide expression profiles across conditions. We present a parameter-free passive resource allocation model that quantitatively accounts for the global scaling factors. It suggests that many changes in expression across conditions result from global effects and not specific regulation, and provides means for quantitative interpretation of expression profiles. PMID:24169404

  14. Promoters maintain their relative activity levels under different growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Keren, Leeat; Zackay, Ora; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Barenholz, Uri; Dekel, Erez; Sasson, Vered; Aidelberg, Guy; Bren, Anat; Zeevi, Danny; Weinberger, Adina; Alon, Uri; Milo, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Most genes change expression levels across conditions, but it is unclear which of these changes represents specific regulation and what determines their quantitative degree. Here, we accurately measured activities of ~900 S. cerevisiae and ~1800 E. coli promoters using fluorescent reporters. We show that in both organisms 60-90% of promoters change their expression between conditions by a constant global scaling factor that depends only on the conditions and not on the promoter's identity. Quantifying such global effects allows precise characterization of specific regulation-promoters deviating from the global scale line. These are organized into few functionally related groups that also adhere to scale lines and preserve their relative activities across conditions. Thus, only several scaling factors suffice to accurately describe genome-wide expression profiles across conditions. We present a parameter-free passive resource allocation model that quantitatively accounts for the global scaling factors. It suggests that many changes in expression across conditions result from global effects and not specific regulation, and provides means for quantitative interpretation of expression profiles. PMID:24169404

  15. Closure Plan for Active Low Level Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    2000-11-16

    This plan has been prepared in response to direction from the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of the plan is to define approaches that will be implemented to ensure protection of the public and the environment when active Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBGs) at the Hanford Site are closed. Performance assessments for active burial grounds in the 200 East and West 200 Areas provide current estimates of potential environmental contamination and doses to the ''maximum exposed individual'' from burial ground operation and closure and compare dose estimates to performance objective dose limits for the facilities. This is an Operational Closure Plan. The intent of the guidance in DOE Order 435.1 is that this plan will be a living document, like the facility performance assessments, and will be revised periodically through the operational life of the LLBGs to reflect updated information on waste inventory. management practices, facility transition planning, schedule dates, assessments of post-closure performance, and environmental consequences. Out year dates identified in this plan are tentative. A Final Closure Plan will be prepared in the future when the timing and extent of closure-related activities for LLBGs can be established with greater certainty. After current operations at the LLBGs are concluded, this plan proposes transitioning of these facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program. This action will enable the Environmental Restoration Program to design and implement consistent and coordinated final remedial actions for active and inactive LLBGs. Active and inactive burial grounds in the 200 West and 200 East Areas are commingled. This plan describes approaches that will be implemented during Interim Closure, Final Closure, and Institutional Control Periods to prepare LLBGs for surface barriers, and the construction of barriers, as well as the scope of inspection, monitoring and maintenance practices that will be performed during and after closure

  16. Hypoxia Alters Ocular Drug Transporter Expression and Activity in Rat and Calf Models: Implications for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Rajendra S.; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; LaFlamme, Daniel J.; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chronic hypoxia, a key stimulus for neovascularization, has been implicated in the pathology of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and wet age related macular degeneration. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of chronic hypoxia on drug transporter mRNA expression and activity in ocular barriers. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (PB = 380 mm Hg) for 6 weeks and neonatal calves were maintained under hypobaric hypoxia (PB = 445 mm Hg) for 2 weeks. Age matched controls for rats and calves were maintained at ambient altitude and normoxia. The effect of hypoxia on transporter expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR analysis of transporter mRNA expression in hypoxic and control rat choroid-retina. Effect of hypoxia on the activity of PEPT, OCT, ATB0+, and MCT transporters was evaluated using in vitro transport studies of model transporter substrates across calf cornea and sclera-choroid-RPE (SCRPE). Results Quantitative gene expression analysis of 84 transporters in rat choroid-retina showed that 29 transporter genes were up regulated or down regulated by ≥1.5-fold in hypoxia. Nine ATP binding cassette (ABC) families of efflux transporters including MRP3, MRP4, MRP5, MRP6, MRP7, Abca17, Abc2, Abc3, and RGD1562128 were up regulated. For solute carrier family transporters, 11 transporters including SLC10a1, SLC16a3, SLC22a7, SLC22a8, SLC29a1, SLC29a2, SLC2a1, SLC3a2, SLC5a4, SLC7a11, and SLC7a4 were up regulated, while 4 transporters including SLC22a2, SLC22a9, SLC28a1, and SLC7a9 were down regulated in hypoxia. Of the 3 aquaporin (Aqp) water channels, Aqp-9 was down regulated and Aqp-1 was up regulated during hypoxia. Gene expression analysis showed down regulation of OCT-1, OCT-2, and ATB0+ and up regulation of MCT-3 in hypoxic rat choroid-retina, without any effect on the expression of PEPT-1 and PEPT-2 expression. Functional activity assays of PEPT, OCT, ATB0+, and MCT transporters in

  17. A review of antiviral drugs and other compounds with activity against feline herpesvirus type 1.

    PubMed

    Thomasy, Sara M; Maggs, David J

    2016-07-01

    Feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) is a common and important cause of ocular surface disease, dermatitis, respiratory disease, and potentially intraocular disease in cats. Many antiviral drugs developed for the treatment of humans infected with herpesviruses have been used to treat cats infected with FHV-1. Translational use of drugs in this manner ideally requires methodical investigation of their in vitro efficacy against FHV-1 followed by pharmacokinetic and safety trials in normal cats. Subsequently, placebo-controlled efficacy studies in experimentally inoculated animals should be performed followed, finally, by carefully designed and monitored clinical trials in client-owned animals. This review is intended to provide a concise overview of the available literature regarding the efficacy of antiviral drugs and other compounds with proven or putative activity against FHV-1, as well as a discussion of their safety in cats. PMID:27091747

  18. PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR (PPAR) AGONISTS AS PROMISING NEW MEDICATIONS FOR DRUG ADDICTION: PRECLINICAL EVIDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Foll, Bernard Le; Ciano, Patricia Di; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Goldberg, Steven R.; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This review examines the growing literature on the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in addiction. There are two subtypes of PPAR receptors that have been studied in addiction: PPAR-α and PPAR-γ. The role of each PPAR subtype in common models of addictive behavior, mainly pre-clinical models, is summarized. In particular, studies are reviewed that investigated the effects of PPAR-α agonists on relapse, sensitization, conditioned place preference, withdrawal and drug intake, and effects of PPAR-γ agonists on relapse, withdrawal and drug intake. Finally, studies that investigated the effects of PPAR agonists on neural pathways of addiction are reviewed. Taken together this preclinical data indicates that PPAR agonists are promising new medications for drug addiction treatment. PMID:23614675

  19. Induction of multiple pleiotropic drug resistance genes in yeast engineered to produce an increased level of anti-malarial drug precursor, artemisinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Ouellet, Mario; Paradise, Eric M; Burd, Helcio; Eng, Diana; Paddon, Chris J; Newman, Jack D; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-01-01

    yeast microarray further demonstrated that the induction of drug-resistant genes such as ABC transporters and major facilitator superfamily (MSF) genes is the primary cellular stress-response; in addition, oxidative and osmotic stress responses were observed in the engineered yeast. Conclusion The data presented here suggest that the engineered yeast producing artemisinic acid suffers oxidative and drug-associated stresses. The use of plant-derived transporters and optimizing AMO activity may improve the yield of artemisinic acid production in the engineered yeast. PMID:18983675

  20. Levels of physical activity and predictors of mortality in COPD*

    PubMed Central

    Nyssen, Samantha Maria; dos Santos, Júlia Gianjoppe; Barusso, Marina Sallum; de Oliveira, Antônio Delfino; Lorenzo, Valéria Amorim Pires Di; Jamami, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the Body mass index, airway Obstruction, Dyspnea, and Exercise capacity (BODE) index scores and its individual components between COPD patients with and without severe physical inactivity, as well as to correlate the number of steps/day with scores of physical activity questionnaires, age, and the BODE index (including its components). METHODS: We included 30 patients, who were evaluated for body composition, pulmonary function (FEV1), perception of dyspnea (modified Medical Research Council scale), and exercise capacity (six-minute walk distance [6MWD]). The patients also completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), short version, and the modified Baecke questionnaire (mBQ). The level of physical activity was assessed by the number of steps/day (as determined by pedometer), using the cut-off of 4,580 steps/day to form two groups: no severe physical inactivity (SPI−) and severe physical inactivity (SPI+). We used the Mann-Whitney test or t-test, as well as Pearson's or Spearman's correlation tests, in the statistical analysis. RESULTS: In comparison with the SPI− group, the SPI+ group showed more advanced age, higher mBQ scores (leisure domain), lower 6MWD (in m and % of predicted), and lower IPAQ scores (metabolic equivalent-walk/week domain and total). The IPAQ scores showed weak correlations with steps/day (r = 0.399), age (r = −0.459), and 6MWD-in m (r = 0.446) and in % of predicted (r = 0.422). CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, the cut-off of 4,580 steps/day was not sensitive enough to identify differences between the groups when compared with the predictors of mortality. The IPAQ, short version score correlated with steps/day. PMID:24473759

  1. Evidence of drug metabolism by macrophages: possible role of macrophages in the pathogenesis of drug-induced tissue damage and in the activation of environmental procarcinogens.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, S N

    1987-01-01

    After interaction with human macrophages derived from blood, bone marrow or spleen, solutions of sodium phenobarbitone, phenytoin sodium and chlorpromazine hydrochloride showed reduced cytotoxicity towards K562 cells. The reduction in cytotoxicity was partially suppressed in the presence of tetrahydrofurane, an inhibitor of cytochrome P450. These data suggest that macrophages are capable of metabolizing certain drugs, probably via a cytochrome P450-dependent mechanism. The present findings raise the possibility that some drug-induced blood dyscrasias are caused by metabolism of the drug by bone marrow macrophages and the consequent release of relatively short-lived molecules which are toxic to adjacent haemopoietic cells. The generation of cytotoxic molecules during drug metabolism by macrophages may also be responsible for drug-induced damage to other macrophage-rich tissues. In addition, since cytochrome P450-dependent reactions seem to occur within macrophages, these cells may activate environmental procarcinogens and thus plays a role in carcinogenesis and leukaemogenesis. PMID:3652639

  2. Photothermally activated drug release from liposomes coupled to hollow gold nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Natalie; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2011-03-01

    Liposomes show great promise as intravenous drug delivery vehicles, but it is difficult to combine stability in the circulation, extended drug retention and rapid, targeted release at the site of interest. Accessorizing conventional and multicompartment liposomes with photo-activated hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) provides a convenient method to initiate drug release with spatial and temporal control. HGN efficiently absorb near infrared (NIR) light and rapidly convert the absorbed optical energy into heat. Femto- to nano-second NIR light pulses cause the HGNs to rapidly heat, creating large temperature gradients between the HGNs and surrounding fluid. The formation and collapse of unstable vapor bubbles transiently rupture liposome and other bilayer membranes to trigger contents release. Near-complete contents release occurs when the nanoshells are encapsulated within the liposome or tethered to the outer surface of the liposome, with no chemical damage to the contents. Release is achieved by focusing the laser beam at the target, eliminating the need for highly specific targeting ligands or antibodies. Although HGN heating can be intense, the overall energy input is small causing minimal heating of the surroundings. To ensure that drugs are retained within the liposomes until delivery in a physiological environment, we have made novel multicompartment carriers called vesosomes, which consist of an outer lipid bilayer shell that encloses and protects the drug-carrying liposomes. The second bilayer increases the serum half-life of ciprofloxacin from <10 minutes in liposomes to 6 hours in vesosomes and alters the release kinetics. The enhanced drug retention is due to the outer membrane preventing enzymes and proteins in the blood from breaking down the drug-carrying interior compartments.

  3. The bitter pill: clinical drugs that activate the human bitter taste receptor TAS2R14.

    PubMed

    Levit, Anat; Nowak, Stefanie; Peters, Maximilian; Wiener, Ayana; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Behrens, Maik; Niv, Masha Y

    2014-03-01

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) mediate aversive response to toxic food, which is often bitter. These G-protein-coupled receptors are also expressed in extraoral tissues, and emerge as novel targets for therapeutic indications such as asthma and infection. Our goal was to identify ligands of the broadly tuned TAS2R14 among clinical drugs. Molecular properties of known human bitter taste receptor TAS2R14 agonists were incorporated into pharmacophore- and shape-based models and used to computationally predict additional ligands. Predictions were tested by calcium imaging of TAS2R14-transfected HEK293 cells. In vitro testing of the virtual screening predictions resulted in 30-80% success rates, and 15 clinical drugs were found to activate the TAS2R14. hERG potassium channel, which is predominantly expressed in the heart, emerged as a common off-target of bitter drugs. Despite immense chemical diversity of known TAS2R14 ligands, novel ligands and previously unknown polypharmacology of drugs were unraveled by in vitro screening of computational predictions. This enables rational repurposing of traditional and standard drugs for bitter taste signaling modulation for therapeutic indications. PMID:24285091

  4. Activators of G-protein Signaling 3: A drug addiction molecular gateway

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, M. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Drug addiction is marked by continued drug-seeking behavior despite deleterious consequences and a heightened propensity to relapse notwithstanding long, drug-free periods. The enduring nature of addiction has been hypothesized to arise from perturbations in intracellular signaling, gene expression, and brain circuitry induced by substance abuse. Ameliorating some of these aberrations should abate behavioral and neurochemical markers associated with an “addiction phenotype”. This review summarizes data showing that protein expression and signaling through the non-receptor Activator of heterotrimeric G-protein Signaling 3 (AGS3) is altered by commonly abused substances in rat and in vitro addiction models. AGS3 structure and function are unrelated to the more broadly studied Regulator of G-protein Signaling (RGS) family. Thus, the unique role of AGS3 is the focus of this review. Intriguingly, AGS3 protein changes persist into drug abstinence. Accordingly, studies probing the role of AGS3 in the neurochemistry of drug-seeking behavior and relapse are reviewed in detail. To illuminate this work, AGS3 structure, cellular localization, and function are covered so that an idealized AGS3-targeted pharmacotherapy can be proposed. PMID:20700046

  5. The association between sterilizing activity and drug distribution into tuberculosis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Prideaux, Brendan; Via, Laura E.; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Eum, Seokyong; Sarathy, Jansy; O’Brien, Paul; Chen, Chao; Kaya, Firat; Weiner, Danielle M.; Chen, Pei-Yu; Song, Taeksun; Lee, Myungsun; Shim, TaeSun; Cho, Jeong Su; Kim, Wooshik; Cho, Sang Nae; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Barry, Clifton E.; Dartois, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Finding new treatment-shortening antibiotics to improve cure rates and curb the alarming emergence of drug resistance is the major objective of tuberculosis (TB) drug development. Using a MALDI mass spectrometry imaging suite in a biosafety containment facility, we show that the key sterilizing drugs rifampicin and pyrazinamide efficiently penetrate the sites of TB infection in lung lesions. Rifampicin even accumulates in necrotic caseum, a critical lesion site where persisting tubercle bacilli reside1. In contrast, moxifloxacin which is active in vitro against persisters, a sub-population of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that persists in specific niches under drug pressure, and achieved treatment shortening in mice2, does not diffuse well in caseum, concordant with its failure to shorten therapy in recent clinical trials. We also suggest that such differential spatial distribution and kinetics of accumulation in lesions may create temporal and spatial windows of monotherapy in specific niches, allowing the gradual development of multidrug resistant TB. We propose an alternative working model to prioritize new antibiotic regimens based on quantitative and spatial distribution of TB drugs in the major lesion types found in human lungs. The finding that lesion penetration contributes to treatment outcome has wide implications for TB. PMID:26343800

  6. Comparison of In Vitro Activities of 17 Antifungal Drugs against a Panel of 20 Dermatophytes by Using a Microdilution Assay

    PubMed Central

    Favre, Bertrand; Hofbauer, Bettina; Hildering, Kwang-Soo; Ryder, Neil S.

    2003-01-01

    The in vitro activities of 17 antifungal drugs against a panel of 20 dermatophytes comprising 6 different species were determined using a microdilution assay according to the NCCLS M38-P method with some modifications. Terbinafine was the most potent systemic drug while tolnaftate and amorolfine were the most active topical agents. PMID:14532230

  7. In vitro model systems to investigate bile salt export pump (BSEP) activity and drug interactions: A review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yaofeng; Woolf, Thomas F; Gan, Jinping; He, Kan

    2016-08-01

    The bile salt export pump protein (BSEP), expressed on the canalicular membranes of hepatocytes, is primarily responsible for the biliary excretion of bile salts. The inhibition of BSEP transport activity can lead to an increase in intracellular bile salt levels and liver injury. This review discusses the various in vitro assays currently available for assessing the effect of drugs or other chemical entities to modulate BSEP transport activity. BSEP transporter assays use one of the following platforms: Xenopus laevis oocytes; canalicular membrane vesicles (CMV); BSEP-expressed membrane vesicles; cell lines expressing BSEP; sandwich cultured hepatocytes (SCH); and hepatocytes in suspension. Two of these, BSEP-expressed insect membrane vesicles and sandwich cultured hepatocytes, are the most commonly used assays. BSEP membrane vesicles prepared from transfected insect cells are useful for assessing BSEP inhibition or substrate specificity and exploring mechanisms of BSEP-associated genetic diseases. This model can be applied in a high-throughput format for discovery-drug screening. However, experimental results from use of membrane vesicles may lack physiological relevance and the model does not allow for investigation of in situ metabolism in modulation of BSEP activity. Hepatocyte-based assays that use the SCH format provide results that are generally more physiologically relevant than membrane assays. The SCH model is useful in detailed studies of the biliary excretion of drugs and BSEP inhibition, but due to the complexity of SCH preparation, this model is used primarily for determining biliary clearance and BSEP inhibition in a limited number of compounds. The newly developed hepatocyte in suspension assay avoids many of the complexities of the SCH method. The use of pooled cryopreserved hepatocytes in suspension minimizes genetic variance and individual differences in BSEP activity and also provides the opportunity for higher throughput screening and cross

  8. Associations between Socio-Motivational Factors, Physical Education Activity Levels and Physical Activity Behavior among Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ning, Weihong; Gao, Zan; Lodewyk, Ken

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between established socio-motivational factors and children's physical activity levels daily and during physical education classes. A total of 307 middle school students (149 boys, 158 girls) from a suburban public school in the Southern United States participated in this study. Participants completed…

  9. Adolescent physical activity and perceived competence: does change in activity level impact self-perception?

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Cynthia J.; Fisher, Laurie; Berkey, Catherine; Colditz, Graham A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether change in physical activity level impacts adolescents' self-perceptions. Methods Using questionnaire responses from the Growing Up Today Study (GUTS) in 1997 and 1999, we evaluated data from 5,260 girls and 3,410 boys. Physical activity changes were compared to changes in perceived competence in 3 domains (social, athletic, and scholastic) as well as in global self-worth. Analyses controlled for sibling clustering as well as for potential confounders, including body mass index, cigarette smoking, baseline activity levels, and baseline self-perception scores. Results For girls and boys, increase in physical activity was positively associated with change in social and athletic (p<0.0001), but not scholastic or global. self-perception. Compared to those with little or no change in activity, those who increased physical activity were more likely to have increased self-perception measures. Girls who increased physical activity by 5 or more hours/week were at least 33% more likely to have increased social self-perception, and at least 44% more likely to have increased athletic self-perception. In boys, those who increased activity by 10 or more hours/week were 45% more likely to have increased social self-perception. The reverse was also true; for both girls and boys, those with decreased physical activity were more likely to have decreased self-perception scores. Conclusions This research indicates that increased physical activity has a positive impact on athletic and social self-perception in girls and boys. PMID:17448405

  10. Detection of metabolic activation leading to drug-induced phospholipidosis in rat hepatocyte spheroids.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Masashi; Sanoh, Seigo; Santoh, Masataka; Ejiri, Yoko; Kotake, Yaichiro; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-02-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (PLD) is one of the adverse reactions to treatment with cationic amphiphilic drugs. Recently, simple and reliable evaluation methods for PLD have been reported. However, the predictive power of these methods for in vivo PLD induction is insufficient in some cases. To accurately predict PLD, we focused on drug metabolism and used three-dimensional cultures of hepatocytes known as spheroids. Here we used the fluorescent phospholipid dye N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (NBD-PE) to detect PLD induction. After 48 hr exposure to 20 µM amiodarone and amitriptyline, PLD inducers, NBD-PE fluorescence in the spheroids was significantly higher than that in the control. In contrast, 1 mM acetaminophen, as a negative control, did not increase fluorescence. Furthermore, the combination of NBD-PE fluorescence and LysoTracker Red fluorescence and the accumulation of intrinsic phospholipids reflected PLD induction in spheroids. To evaluate metabolic activation, we assessed PLD induction by loratadine. NBD-PE fluorescence intensity was significantly increased by 50 µM loratadine treatment. However, the fluorescence was markedly decreased by co-treatment with 500 µM 1-aminobenzotriazole, a broad cytochrome P450 inhibitor. The formation of desloratadine, a metabolite of loratadine, was observed in spheroids after treatment with loratadine alone. These results showed that metabolic activation is the key factor in PLD induction by treatment with loratadine. We demonstrated that rat primary hepatocyte spheroid culture is a useful model for evaluating drug-induced PLD induction mediated by metabolic activation of the drug using the fluorescence probe technique. PMID:26763403

  11. Peroxide bond strength of antimalarial drugs containing an endoperoxide cycle. Relation with biological activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Israel; Robert, Anne

    2011-06-01

    Several endoperoxide compounds are very efficient antimalarial analogues of the natural drug artemisinin. Quantum chemical calculations have been used to correlate the computed free energies of the O-O bond with respect to the total number of oxygen atoms contained in the cycle, and with the size/strain of the cycle (5- or 6-membered cycles). The gas-phase homolysis of the O-O bond has been studied for five- and six-membered oxygenated cycles which are models of the "real" drugs. Our results indicate that, in 6-membered cycles, the stability order is the following: 1,2-dioxane > 1,2,4-trioxane > 1,2,4,5-tetraoxane. In cycles containing 3 oxygen atoms, the 5-membered cycle 1,2,4-trioxolane was found much less stable than its 6-membered counterpart 1,2,4-trioxane. This feature indicates the possible role of the cycle strain for the O-O bond stability, and may also explain the high antimalarial activity of some trioxolane derivatives. Similar trends in the O-O bond strength have been found for the real antimalarial drugs. However, the O-O bond stability is not in itself a decisive argument to anticipate the antimalarial activity of drugs. PMID:21487624

  12. High Affinity Inha Inhibitors with Activity Against Drug-Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan,T.; Truglio, J.; Boyne, M.; Novichenok, P.; Zhang, X.; Stratton, C.; Li, H.; Kaur, T.; Amin, A.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Novel chemotherapeutics for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are required to combat the spread of tuberculosis, a disease that kills more than 2 million people annually. Using structure-based drug design, we have developed a series of alkyl diphenyl ethers that are uncompetitive inhibitors of InhA, the enoyl reductase enzyme in the MTB fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. The most potent compound has a Ki{prime} value of 1 nM for InhA and MIC{sub 99} values of 2-3 {micro}g mL{sup -1} (6-10 {micro}M) for both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of MTB. Overexpression of InhA in MTB results in a 9-12-fold increase in MIC{sub 99}, consistent with the belief that these compounds target InhA within the cell. In addition, transcriptional response studies reveal that the alkyl diphenyl ethers fail to upregulate a putative efflux pump and aromatic dioxygenase, detoxification mechanisms that are triggered by the lead compound triclosan. These diphenyl ether-based InhA inhibitors do not require activation by the mycobacterial KatG enzyme, thereby circumventing the normal mechanism of resistance to the front line drug isoniazid (INH) and thus accounting for their activity against INH-resistant strains of MTB.

  13. Shape regulated anticancer activities and systematic toxicities of drug nanocrystals in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiujuan; Yu, Caitong; Nan, Xueyan; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, shape regulated anticancer activities as well as systematic toxicities of hydroxycamptothecin nanorods and nanoparticles (HCPT NRs and NPs) were systematically studied. In vitro and in vivo therapeutic efficacies were evaluated in cancer cells and tumor-bearing mice, indicating that NRs possessed superior antitumor efficacy over NPs at the equivalent dose, while systematic toxicity of the differently shaped nanodrugs assessed in healthy mice, including the maximum tolerated dose, blood analysis and histology examinations and so on, suggested that the NRs also caused higher toxicities than NPs, and also had a long-term toxicity. These results imply that the balance between anticancer efficiency and systematic toxicity of drug nanocrystals should be fully considered in practice, which will provide new concept in the future design of drug nanocrystals for cancer therapy. From the Clinical Editor: Advances in nanotechnology have enabled the design of novel nanosized drugs for the treatment of cancer. One of the interesting findings thus far is the different biological effects seen with different shaped nanoparticles. In this article, the authors investigated and compared the anticancer activities of hydroxycamptothecin nanorods and nanoparticles. The experimental data would provide a better understanding for future drug design. PMID:26427356

  14. Integration of active pharmaceutical ingredient solid form selection and particle engineering into drug product design.

    PubMed

    Ticehurst, Martyn David; Marziano, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    This review seeks to offer a broad perspective that encompasses an understanding of the drug product attributes affected by active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) physical properties, their link to solid form selection and the role of particle engineering. While the crucial role of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) solid form selection is universally acknowledged in the pharmaceutical industry, the value of increasing effort to understanding the link between solid form, API physical properties and drug product formulation and manufacture is now also being recognised. A truly holistic strategy for drug product development should focus on connecting solid form selection, particle engineering and formulation design to both exploit opportunities to access simpler manufacturing operations and prevent failures. Modelling and predictive tools that assist in establishing these links early in product development are discussed. In addition, the potential for differences between the ingoing API physical properties and those in the final product caused by drug product processing is considered. The focus of this review is on oral solid dosage forms and dry powder inhaler products for lung delivery. PMID:25677227

  15. Immune activation of the host cell induces drug tolerance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yancheng; Tan, Shumin; Huang, Lu; Abramovitch, Robert B; Rohde, Kyle H; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Chen, Chao; Dartois, Véronique; VanderVen, Brian C; Russell, David G

    2016-05-01

    Successful chemotherapy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) must eradicate the bacterium within the context of its host cell. However, our understanding of the impact of this environment on antimycobacterial drug action remains incomplete. Intriguingly, we find that Mtb in myeloid cells isolated from the lungs of experimentally infected mice exhibit tolerance to both isoniazid and rifampin to a degree proportional to the activation status of the host cells. These data are confirmed by in vitro infections of resting versus activated macrophages where cytokine-mediated activation renders Mtb tolerant to four frontline drugs. Transcriptional analysis of intracellular Mtb exposed to drugs identified a set of genes common to all four drugs. The data imply a causal linkage between a loss of fitness caused by drug action and Mtb's sensitivity to host-derived stresses. Interestingly, the environmental context exerts a more dominant impact on Mtb gene expression than the pressure on the drugs' primary targets. Mtb's stress responses to drugs resemble those mobilized after cytokine activation of the host cell. Although host-derived stresses are antimicrobial in nature, they negatively affect drug efficacy. Together, our findings demonstrate that the macrophage environment dominates Mtb's response to drug pressure and suggest novel routes for future drug discovery programs. PMID:27114608

  16. Aspects of activity behavior as a determinant of the physical activity level.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, A G; Plasqui, G; Goris, A H C; Westerterp, K R

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated which aspects of the individuals' activity behavior determine the physical activity level (PAL). Habitual physical activity of 20 Dutch adults (age: 26-60 years, body mass index: 24.5 ± 2.7 kg/m(2)) was measured using a tri-axial accelerometer. Accelerometer output was used to identify the engagement in different types of daily activities with a classification tree algorithm. Activity behavior was described by the daily duration of sleeping, sedentary behavior (lying, sitting, and standing), walking, running, bicycling, and generic standing activities. Simultaneously, the total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured using doubly labeled water. PAL was calculated as TEE divided by sleeping metabolic rate. PAL was significantly associated (P<0.05) with sedentary time (R=-0.72), and the duration of walking (R=0.49), bicycling (R=0.77), and active standing (R=0.62). A negative association was observed between sedentary time and the duration of active standing (R=-0.87; P<0.001). A multiple-linear regression analysis showed that 75% of the variance in PAL could be predicted by the duration of bicycling (Partial R(2) =59%; P<0.01), walking (Partial R(2) =9%; P<0.05) and being sedentary (Partial R(2) =7%; P<0.05). In conclusion, there is objective evidence that sedentary time and activities related to transportation and commuting, such as walking and bicycling, contribute significantly to the average PAL. PMID:20536909

  17. Transcytosis, Antitumor Activity and Toxicity of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin C2 as an Oral Administration Protein Drug

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenbin; Li, Yangyang; Liu, Wenhui; Ding, Ding; Xu, Yingchun; Pan, Liqiang; Chen, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) is a classical superantigen (SAg), which can tremendously activate T lymphocytes at very low dosage, thus exerting its powerful antitumor activity. As an intravenous protein drug and a bacterial toxin, SEC2 has some limitations including poor patient compliance and toxic side effects. In this research, we devoted our attention to studying the antitumor activity and toxicity of SEC2 as a potential oral administration protein drug. We proved that His-tagged SEC2 (SEC2-His) could undergo facilitated transcytosis on human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and SEC2-His was detected in the blood of rats after oral administration. Furthermore, oral SEC2-His caused massive cytokine release and immune cell enrichment around tumor tissue, leading to inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, although SEC2-His was dosed up to 32 mg/kg in mice, no significant toxicity was observed. These data showed that SEC2 can cross the intestinal epithelium in an immunologically integral form, maintaining antitumor activity but with reduced systemic toxicity. Therefore, these results may have implications for developing SEC2 as an oral administration protein drug. PMID:27322320

  18. Transcytosis, Antitumor Activity and Toxicity of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin C2 as an Oral Administration Protein Drug.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenbin; Li, Yangyang; Liu, Wenhui; Ding, Ding; Xu, Yingchun; Pan, Liqiang; Chen, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) is a classical superantigen (SAg), which can tremendously activate T lymphocytes at very low dosage, thus exerting its powerful antitumor activity. As an intravenous protein drug and a bacterial toxin, SEC2 has some limitations including poor patient compliance and toxic side effects. In this research, we devoted our attention to studying the antitumor activity and toxicity of SEC2 as a potential oral administration protein drug. We proved that His-tagged SEC2 (SEC2-His) could undergo facilitated transcytosis on human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and SEC2-His was detected in the blood of rats after oral administration. Furthermore, oral SEC2-His caused massive cytokine release and immune cell enrichment around tumor tissue, leading to inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, although SEC2-His was dosed up to 32 mg/kg in mice, no significant toxicity was observed. These data showed that SEC2 can cross the intestinal epithelium in an immunologically integral form, maintaining antitumor activity but with reduced systemic toxicity. Therefore, these results may have implications for developing SEC2 as an oral administration protein drug. PMID:27322320

  19. Antibacterial Activities and Antibacterial Mechanism of Polygonum cuspidatum Extracts against Nosocomial Drug-Resistant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Su, Pai-Wei; Yang, Cheng-Hong; Yang, Jyh-Ferng; Su, Pei-Yu; Chuang, Li-Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Recently, drug resistance due to the extensive abuse and over-use of antibiotics has become an increasingly serious problem, making the development of alternative antibiotics a very urgent issue. In this study, the Chinese herbal medicine, Polygonum cuspidatum, was extracted with 95% ethanol and the crude extracts were further purified by partition based on solvent polarity. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts and fractions were determined by the disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods. The results showed that the ethyl ether fraction (EE) of the ethanol extracts possesses a broader antimicrobial spectrum and greater antimicrobial activity against all of the tested clinical drug-resistant isolates, with a range of MIC values between 0.1-3.5 mg/mL. The active extract showed complete inhibition of pathogen growth and did not induce resistance to the active components. In addition, according to scanning electron microscope observations, EE resulted in greater cell morphological changes by degrading and disrupting the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, whereby ultimately this cell membrane integrity damage led to cell death. In conclusion, the EE extracts from Polygonum cuspidatum may provide a promising antimicrobial agent for therapeutic applications against nosocomial drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:26087259

  20. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity and bronchodialator effect of a polyherbal drug-Shrishadi

    PubMed Central

    Kajaria, Divya Kumari; Gangwar, Mayank; Kumar, Dharmendra; Kumar Sharma, Amit; Tilak, Ragini; Nath, Gopal; Tripathi, Yamini Bhusan; Tripathi, JS; Tiwari, SK

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate antimicrobial and bronchodialator effect of hydroalcholic extract of polyherbal drug Shirishadi containing Shirisha (Albezzia lebbeck), Nagarmotha (Cyprus rotandus) & Kantakari (Solanum xanthocarpum). Methods Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion method and MIC, MBC, MFC were calculated by micro dilution method. Hydroalcholic extract of this preparation was investigated for its phytochemical analysis, phenol and flavonoid were determined by spectrophotometric method and in vivo bronchodilator effect was analysed by convulsion time. Results The phytochemical tests revealed presence of alkaloids, anthraquinones, carbohydrates, flavonoids, saponins and tannins. The antimicrobial result showed the MIC of 6.25 mg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus and 12.5 mg/mL for Escherichia coli and 12.5 mg/mL against remaining bacteria tested, with strong antifungal activity. The maximum inhibition zone is found against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MIC 16 mg/mL. Drug showed significant bronchodilator effect with 27.86% & 36.13% increase in preconvulsion time of guinea pigs pretreated with 100 & 200 mg/kg body weight of extract. Conclusions The study reveals that the extracts possess antibacterial activity and antifungal activity in a dose dependent manner. This antimicrobial property may be due to presence of several saponins, further studies are highly needed for the drug development. PMID:23569869

  1. Drug release from Kollicoat SR 30D-coated nonpareil beads: evaluation of coating level, plasticizer type, and curing condition.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zezhi J; Moralesi, Luis; Diaz, Steven; Muhammadi, Nouman A

    2002-01-01

    A newly available polyvinylacetate aqueous dispersion, Kollicoat SR 30D, was evaluated with respect to its ability to modulate the in vitro release of a highly water-soluble model compound (diphenhydramine hydrochloride) from nonpareil-based systems. Kollicoat SR 30D premixed with a selected plasticizer (10% wt/wt propylene glycol, 2.5% triethyl citrate, or 2.5% dibutyl sebacate), talc, and red #30 lake dye was coated onto the drug beads in an Aeromatic Strea I fluid-bed drier with a Wurster insert using bottom spray. With propylene glycol as the plasticizer, increases in polymer coating level retarded drug release from beads in a stepwise fashion along with apparent permeability, indicating a consistent release mechanism. Stability studies at 40 degrees C/75% RH revealed gradual decreases in dissolution rate, and additional curing studies further confirmed the dependence of release kinetics on curing condition. Furthermore, the type of plasticizer was found to play a key role. Unplasticized formulations exhibited the fastest dissolution, followed by formulations plasticized with triethyl citrate, propylene glycol, and dibutyl sebacate. All 4 formulations (unplasticized and plasticized), nevertheless, revealed a marked difference between uncured and cured dissolution profiles. Kollicoat SR 30D has, thereby, been demonstrated to effectively retard drug release from nonpareil-based systems. However, selected plasticizer type and subsequent curing condition play important roles in controlling drug release from such a system. PMID:12916952

  2. Ketoconazole increases fingolimod blood levels in a drug interaction via CYP4F2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, John M; Dole, Kiran; Riviere, Gilles-Jacques; Pommier, Francoise; Maton, Steve; Jin, Yi; Lasseter, Kenneth C; Schmouder, Robert L

    2009-02-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor modulator fingolimod is predominantly hydroxylated by cytochrome CYP4F2. In vitro experiments showed that ketoconazole significantly inhibited the oxidative metabolism of fingolimod by human liver microsomes and by recombinant CYP4F2. The authors used ketoconazole as a putative CYP4F2 inhibitor to quantify its influence on fingolimod pharmacokinetics in healthy subjects. In a 2-period, single-sequence, crossover study, 22 healthy subjects received a single 5-mg dose of fingolimod in period 1. In period 2, subjects received ketoconazole 200 mg twice daily for 9 days and a single 5-mg dose of fingolimod coadministered on the 4th day of ketoconazole treatment. Ketoconazole did not affect fingolimod t(max) or half-life, but there was a weak average increase in C(max) of 1.22-fold (90% confidence interval, 1.15-1.30). The AUC over the 5 days of ketoconazole coadministration increased 1.40-fold (1.31-1.50), and the full AUC to infinity increased 1.71-fold (1.53-1.91). The AUC of the active metabolite fingolimod-phosphate was increased to a similar extent by 1.67-fold (1.50-1.85). Ketoconazole predose plasma levels were not altered by fingolimod. The magnitude of this interaction suggests that a proactive dose reduction of fingolimod is not necessary when adding ketoconazole to a fingolimod regimen. The clinician, however, should be aware of this interaction and bear in mind the possibility of a fingolimod dose reduction based on clinical monitoring. PMID:19118083

  3. Hot melt extrusion for amorphous solid dispersions: temperature and moisture activated drug-polymer interactions for enhanced stability.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Ashish L; Sandhu, Harpreet; Shah, Navnit; Malick, Waseem; Zia, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Hot melt extrudates (HMEs) of indomethacin (IND) with Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64 and those of itraconazole (ITZ) with HPMCAS-LF and Kollidon VA 64 were manufactured using a Leistritz twin screw extruder. The milled HMEs were stored at controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were collected after specified time periods for 3 months. The stability of amorphous HMEs was assessed using moisture analysis, thermal evaluation, powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, HPLC, and dissolution study. In general, the moisture content increased with time, temperature, and humidity levels. Amorphous ITZ was physically unstable at very high temperature and humidity levels, and its recrystallization was detected in the HMEs manufactured using Kollidon VA 64. Although physical stability of IND was better sustained by both Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64, chemical degradation of the drug was identified in the stability samples of HMEs with Eudragit EPO stored at 50 °C. The dissolution rates and the supersaturation levels were significantly decreased for the stability samples in which crystallization was detected. Interestingly, the supersaturation was improved for the stability samples of IND:Eudragit EPO and ITZ:HPMCAS-LF, in which no physical or chemical instability was observed. This enhancement in supersaturation was attributed to the temperature and moisture activated electrostatic interactions between the drugs and their counterionic polymers. PMID:23961978

  4. Differential effects of chronic lead intoxication on circadian rhythm of ambulatory activity and on regional brain norepinephrine levels in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shafiq-ur-Rehman; Khushnood-ur-Rehman; Kabir-ud-Din; Chandra, O.

    1986-01-01

    Changes in biochemical mechanisms and amine concentrations in the brain have been manifested in the form of varying disorders and abnormalities in behavior, including motor-activity, which has been proved with a number of psychoactive drugs. It has been reported that increased level of cerebral norepinephrine (NE) has been shown to be associated with motor hyper-activity, and in lead exposed rats. No study is available which could account for the pattern of changes in spontaneous ambulatory responses in an open field situation together with the steady state regional levels of NE in the brain of chronically lead exposed rats. Therefore, it seemed to be worthwhile to study the circadian rhythm of ambulatory activity and its association with NE levels in various brain regions of rats exposed to lead.

  5. Hepatoprotective activity of Moringa oleifera on antitubercular drug-induced liver damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Pari, L; Kumar, N Ashok

    2002-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam (Moringaceae), commonly known as "Drumstick," is used in Indian folk medicine for the treatment of various illness. We have evaluated the hepatoprotective effect of an ethanolic extract of M. oleifera leaves on liver damage induced by antitubercular drugs such as isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP), and pyrazinamide (PZA) in rats. Oral administration of the extract showed a significant protective action made evident by its effect on the levels of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (aspartate aminotransferase), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (alanine aminotransferase), alkaline phosphatase, and bilirubin in the serum; lipids, and lipid peroxidation levels in liver. This observation was supplemented by histopathological examination of liver sections. The results of this study showed that treatment with M. oleifera extracts or silymarin (as a reference) appears to enhance the recovery from hepatic damage induced by antitubercular drugs. PMID:12495589

  6. NOTE: Dielectrophoretic analysis of changes in cytoplasmic ion levels due to ion channel blocker action reveals underlying differences between drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant leukaemic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, L.; Shelmerdine, H.; Hughes, M. P.; Coley, H. M.; Hübner, Y.; Labeed, F. H.

    2008-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP)—the motion of particles in non-uniform AC fields—has been used in the investigation of cell electrophysiology. The technique offers the advantages of rapid determination of the conductance and capacitance of membrane and cytoplasm. However, it is unable to directly determine the ionic strengths of individual cytoplasmic ions, which has potentially limited its application in assessing cell composition. In this paper, we demonstrate how dielectrophoresis can be used to investigate the cytoplasmic ion composition by using ion channel blocking agents. By blocking key ion transporters individually, it is possible to determine their overall contribution to the free ions in the cytoplasm. We use this technique to evaluate the relative contributions of chloride, potassium and calcium ions to the cytoplasmic conductivities of drug sensitive and resistant myelogenous leukaemic (K562) cells in order to determine the contributions of individual ion channel activity in mediating multi-drug resistance in cancer. Results indicate that whilst K+ and Ca2+ levels were extremely similar between sensitive and resistant lines, levels of Cl- were elevated by three times to that in the resistant line, implying increased chloride channel activity. This result is in line with current theories of MDR, and validates the use of ion channel blockers with DEP to investigate ion channel function.

  7. Antimycobacterial spectrum of sparfloxacin and its activities alone and in association with other drugs against Mycobacterium avium complex growing extracellularly and intracellularly in murine and human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, N; Labrousse, V; Goh, K S; De Sousa, J P

    1991-01-01

    The MICs and MBCs of the new difluorinated quinolone drug sparfloxacin against type strains belonging to 21 species of mycobacteria were screened. The MICs and MBCs were within the range of 0.1 to 2.0 and 0.1 to 4.0 micrograms/ml, respectively (with an MBC/MIC ratio of 1 to 2), and against 18 of the 21 species tested, the drug showed significant bactericidal activity (at least 99% killing or more of the initial inoculum added) at concentrations well within the reported peak concentrations in serum (Cmax) in humans. MICs of sparfloxacin for 7 of 10 Mycobacterium avium complex strains were below the Cmax, with MBC/MIC ratios within the range of 2 to 4. Enhancement of its activity by ethambutol, rifampin, amikacin, and clarithromycin (which were used at sublethal concentrations) assessed by using BACTEC radiometry revealed that its activity was further enhanced in 2 of 10 strains by rifampin and in 7 of 10 strains by ethambutol. The bactericidal effects of various drugs used alone as well as two-drug combinations used at Cmax levels were also screened against four strains of M. avium complex growing intracellularly in two different macrophage systems, namely, mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages and peripheral blood monocyte-derived human macrophages. Our results showed a satisfactory correlation between the extracellular and intracellular drug activity data. PMID:1667250

  8. Psychosomatic or allergic symptoms? High levels for somatization in patients with drug intolerance.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Jessica C; Danner, Daniel; Hassel, Alexander J

    2011-10-01

    Patients with dermatological diseases often have associated psychological problems. For patients with allergic diseases, only a few publications have focused on psychological aspects. The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric profile, including somatization, depression, anxiety and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), of patients suffering from drug intolerance or hymenoptera venom allergies. In a prospective cohort study design, patients who were admitted to hospital for a challenge test for an alternative drug (n = 49, 24.5% men) or for induction of desensitization therapy with hymenoptera venom (n = 58, 37.9% men) were included. Psychometric screening questionnaires focusing on somatization (Symptom Check List), depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale), and also on HRQoL (Short Form questionnaire) were assessed. The scores were compared with population scores and between the two groups. Both groups had significantly higher somatization scores (P ≤ 0.003) than the normal population, and the challenge-test group had lower HRQoL than the normal population. Between-group analysis revealed significantly higher somatization scores in the challenge-test group (P = 0.011) and more impaired HRQoL (physical health domain P < 0.001). Anxiety/depression scores were not significantly different from those of the normal population, or between groups, although abnormally high scores for anxiety were frequent (18% and 12% for the challenge-test and allergy groups, respectively). Somatization, reduced HRQoL and anxiety seem to be part of the symptoms of patients with allergic diseases, especially for patients with drug intolerance. Standardized questionnaires could help to discover patients who may need psychological support. This may help to improve the patients' symptoms and quality of life. PMID:21767296

  9. The effect of orlistat on plasma levels of psychotropic drugs in patients with long-term psychopharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hilger, E; Quiner, S; Ginzel, I; Walter, H; Saria, L; Barnas, C

    2002-02-01

    Weight gain induced by long-term psychopharmacotherapy has emerged as a relevant clinical issue because it is a major problem affecting compliance and long-term outcome. The novel antiobesity drug orlistat inhibits gastrointestinal lipases, thus lowering the absorption of dietary fat and raising the possibility of decreased absorption of fat-soluble vitamins and certain concomitantly administered drugs in some individuals. We monitored plasma levels of several psychotropic agents in eight psychiatric patients receiving orlistat to determine the potential influence of orlistat on the bioavailability of these drugs. We found no clinically relevant changes in plasma concentrations of haloperidol, clozapine, clomipramine, desipramine, or carbamazepine over an 8-week period in orlistat recipients. We therefore consider orlistat to be compatible with use during long-term pharmacotherapy. Our preliminary findings suggest that orlistat may offer a pharmacological treatment option to support dietary efforts in obese and overweight psychiatric patients. However, so far no data about the potential influence of orlistat on pharmacokinetics of psychotropics have been published; therefore, plasma level monitoring is recommended. PMID:11799345

  10. Using activation status of signaling pathways as mechanism-based biomarkers to predict drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Amadoz, Alicia; Sebastian-Leon, Patricia; Vidal, Enrique; Salavert, Francisco; Dopazo, Joaquin

    2015-01-01

    Many complex traits, as drug response, are associated with changes in biological pathways rather than being caused by single gene alterations. Here, a predictive framework is presented in which gene expression data are recoded into activity statuses of signal transduction circuits (sub-pathways within signaling pathways that connect receptor proteins to final effector proteins that trigger cell actions). Such activity values are used as features by a prediction algorithm which can efficiently predict a continuous variable such as the IC50 value. The main advantage of this prediction method is that the features selected by the predictor, the signaling circuits, are themselves rich-informative, mechanism-based biomarkers which provide insight into or drug molecular mechanisms of action (MoA). PMID:26678097

  11. In Vitro Activities of a Wide Panel of Antifungal Drugs against Various Scopulariopsis and Microascus Species

    PubMed Central

    Bulanda, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro activities of 11 antifungal drugs against 68 Scopulariopsis and Microascus strains were investigated. Amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, and ciclopirox showed no or poor antifungal effect. The best activities were exhibited by terbinafine and caspofungin, where the MIC and MEC (minimal effective concentration) ranges were 0.0313 to >16 μg/ml and 0.125 to 16 μg/ml, respectively. The MIC and MEC modes were both 1 µg/ml for terbinafine and caspofungin; the MIC50 and MEC50 were 1 µg/ml for both drugs, whereas the MIC90 and MEC90 were 4 µg/ml and 16 µg/ml, respectively. PMID:26100698

  12. Two preclinical tests to evaluate anticancer activity and to help validate drug candidates for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to assessing preclinical anticancer activity do not reliably predict drug efficacy in cancer patients. Most of the compounds that show remarkable anticancer effects in preclinical models actually fail when tested in clinical trials. We blame these failures on the complexity of the disease and on the limitations of the preclinical tools we require for our research. This manuscript argues that this lack of clinical response may also be caused by poor in vitro and in vivo preclinical designs, in which cancer patients' needs are not fully considered. Then, it proposes two patient-oriented tests to assess in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity and to help validate drug candidates for clinical evaluation. PMID:25859551

  13. Paired galaxies with different activity levels and their supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaryan, T. A.; Petrosian, A. R.; Hakobyan, A. A.; Adibekyan, V. Z.; Kunth, D.; Mamon, G. A.; Turatto, M.; Aramyan, L. S.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the influence of close neighbor galaxies on the properties of supernovae (SNe) and their host galaxies using 56 SNe located in pairs of galaxies with different levels of star formation (SF) and nuclear activity. The statistical study of SN hosts shows that there is no significant difference between morphologies of hosts in our sample and the larger general sample of SN hosts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). The mean distance of type II SNe from nuclei of hosts is greater by about a factor of 2 than that of type Ibc SNe. The distributions and mean distances of SNe are consistent with previous results compiled with the larger sample. For the first time it is shown that SNe Ibc are located in pairs with significantly smaller difference of radial velocities between components than pairs containing SNe Ia and II. We consider this as a result of higher star formation rate (SFR) of these closer systems of galaxies. SN types are not correlated with the luminosity ratio of host and neighbor galaxies in pairs. The orientation of SNe with respect to the preferred direction toward neighbor galaxy is found to be isotropic and independent of kinematical properties of the galaxy pair.

  14. Plasma lipid levels in active and sedentary premenopausal females.

    PubMed

    Perry, A C; Shaw, M H; Hsia, L; Nash, M S; Kaplan, T; Signorile, J F; Appleyate, B

    1992-04-01

    Cross-sectional data on 19 long-distance runners (LD), 17 aerobic dancers (AD), 19 recreational joggers (RJ), and 15 inactive controls (IC) were examined for cardiovascular endurance and determination of plasma lipoproteins. Subjects included premenopausal eumenorrheic females who were non-smokers and presently not using oral contraceptives. Results indicated that all groups were similar in age, height and weight. Only the AD group had a significantly lower percent body fat (p less than .001) than the other groups. The LD, AD and RJ groups had a significantly higher VO2max than the IC group (p less than .05), and the LD and AD groups had a significantly higher VO2max than the RJ group (p less than .05). Analysis of a one-day food log indicated that the only difference in diet among the groups was a significantly lower intake of total and monounsaturated fat in the AD group (p less than .05) and a significantly lower intake of carbohydrates in the IC group than the AD group (p less than .05). Analysis of plasma lipids revealed no significant differences in any lipid variables among the groups. These findings indicate that healthy premenopausal eumenorrheic females with similar physical characteristics also have similar plasma lipid profiles regardless of their physical activity level. PMID:1601555

  15. The role of degradant profiling in active pharmaceutical ingredients and drug products.

    PubMed

    Alsante, Karen M; Ando, Akemi; Brown, Roland; Ensing, Janice; Hatajik, Todd D; Kong, Wei; Tsuda, Yoshiko

    2007-01-10

    Forced degradation studies are used to facilitate the development of analytical methodology, to gain a better understanding of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and drug product (DP) stability, and to provide information about degradation pathways and degradation products. In order to fulfill development and regulatory needs, this publication provides a roadmap for when and how to perform studies, helpful tools in designing rugged scientific studies, and guidance on how to record and communicate results. PMID:17187892

  16. Imaging the urokinase plasminongen activator receptor in preclinical breast cancer models of acquired drug resistance.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, Aaron M; Sevillano, Natalia; King, Mandy L; Duriseti, Sai; Murphy, Stephanie T; Craik, Charles S; Murphy, Laura L; VanBrocklin, Henry F

    2014-01-01

    Subtype-targeted therapies can have a dramatic impact on improving the quality and quantity of life for women suffering from breast cancer. Despite an initial therapeutic response, cancer recurrence and acquired drug-resistance are commonplace. Non-invasive imaging probes that identify drug-resistant lesions are urgently needed to aid in the development of novel drugs and the effective utilization of established therapies for breast cancer. The protease receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a target that can be exploited for non-invasive imaging. The expression of uPAR has been associated with phenotypically aggressive breast cancer and acquired drug-resistance. Acquired drug-resistance was modeled in cell lines from two different breast cancer subtypes, the uPAR negative luminal A subtype and the uPAR positive triple negative subtype cell line MDA-MB-231. MCF-7 cells, cultured to be resistant to tamoxifen (MCF-7 TamR), were found to significantly over-express uPAR compared to the parental cell line. uPAR expression was maintained when resistance was modeled in triple-negative breast cancer by generating doxorubicin and paclitaxel resistant MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-MB-231 DoxR and MDA-MB-231 TaxR). Using the antagonistic uPAR antibody 2G10, uPAR was imaged in vivo by near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging and (111)In-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Tumor uptake of the (111)In-SPECT probe was high in the three drug-resistant xenografts (> 46 %ID/g) and minimal in uPAR negative xenografts at 72 hours post-injection. This preclinical study demonstrates that uPAR can be targeted for imaging breast cancer models of acquired resistance leading to potential clinical applications. PMID:24505235

  17. Effect of smooth muscle relaxant drugs on proximal human ureteric activity in vivo: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Kim; Timoney, Anthony G; Keeley, Francis X

    2007-08-01

    Drugs are increasingly being used to promote stone passage in renal colic. Diclofenac, nifedipine and tamsulosin cause ureteric smooth muscle relaxation in vitro; however, in clinical trials nifedipine and tamsulosin promote stone passage whereas diclofenac has no apparent benefit. We adapted a ureteric pressure transducer catheter in an attempt to compare the human ureteric response to these drugs in vivo. The catheter was inserted into the contralateral ureter following ureteroscopy for stone disease. Contraction frequency, pressure and velocity measurements were recorded at 24 h. Each patient was randomly allocated to receive oral diclofenac, nifedipine or tamsulosin. Measurements were taken following drug administration. Eighteen patients (mean age 50 years) were recruited. Two patients were excluded intraoperatively and three required early removal of the catheter. Prior to drug administration, the mean number of contractions recorded was 0-4.1/min and the peak contraction pressure ranged from 11 to 35 mmHg. Conduction velocity ranged from 1.5 to 2.6 cm/s. Ureteric peristalsis persisted in all patients despite these drugs. Diclofenac and nifedipine produced inconsistent ureteric pressure responses but had little effect on contraction frequency. Tamsulosin significantly reduced ureteric pressure but had no effect on contraction frequency. There are many limitations associated with the use of ureteric catheters, however, they may provide some useful information when used to record the response to an intervention in the same patient. These preliminary results suggest a reduction in pressure generation may be the essential factor in the promotion of stone passage. More work is required but these drugs may work by preventing the increased, uncoordinated muscular activity seen in renal colic whilst maintaining peristalsis, thereby promoting stone passage. PMID:17530238

  18. In silico repositioning-chemogenomics strategy identifies new drugs with potential activity against multiple life stages of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Neves, Bruno J; Braga, Rodolpho C; Bezerra, José C B; Cravo, Pedro V L; Andrade, Carolina H

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality caused by schistosomiasis are serious public health problems in developing countries. Because praziquantel is the only drug in therapeutic use, the risk of drug resistance is a concern. In the search for new schistosomicidal drugs, we performed a target-based chemogenomics screen of a dataset of 2,114 proteins to identify drugs that are approved for clinical use in humans that may be active against multiple life stages of Schistosoma mansoni. Each of these proteins was treated as a potential drug target, and its amino acid sequence was used to interrogate three databases: Therapeutic Target Database (TTD), DrugBank and STITCH. Predicted drug-target interactions were refined using a combination of approaches, including pairwise alignment, conservation state of functional regions and chemical space analysis. To validate our strategy, several drugs previously shown to be active against Schistosoma species were correctly predicted, such as clonazepam, auranofin, nifedipine, and artesunate. We were also able to identify 115 drugs that have not yet been experimentally tested against schistosomes and that require further assessment. Some examples are aprindine, gentamicin, clotrimazole, tetrabenazine, griseofulvin, and cinnarizine. In conclusion, we have developed a systematic and focused computer-aided approach to propose approved drugs that may warrant testing and/or serve as lead compounds for the design of new drugs against schistosomes. PMID:25569258

  19. In Silico Repositioning-Chemogenomics Strategy Identifies New Drugs with Potential Activity against Multiple Life Stages of Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Bruno J.; Braga, Rodolpho C.; Bezerra, José C. B.; Cravo, Pedro V. L.; Andrade, Carolina H.

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality caused by schistosomiasis are serious public health problems in developing countries. Because praziquantel is the only drug in therapeutic use, the risk of drug resistance is a concern. In the search for new schistosomicidal drugs, we performed a target-based chemogenomics screen of a dataset of 2,114 proteins to identify drugs that are approved for clinical use in humans that may be active against multiple life stages of Schistosoma mansoni. Each of these proteins was treated as a potential drug target, and its amino acid sequence was used to interrogate three databases: Therapeutic Target Database (TTD), DrugBank and STITCH. Predicted drug-target interactions were refined using a combination of approaches, including pairwise alignment, conservation state of functional regions and chemical space analysis. To validate our strategy, several drugs previously shown to be active against Schistosoma species were correctly predicted, such as clonazepam, auranofin, nifedipine, and artesunate. We were also able to identify 115 drugs that have not yet been experimentally tested against schistosomes and that require further assessment. Some examples are aprindine, gentamicin, clotrimazole, tetrabenazine, griseofulvin, and cinnarizine. In conclusion, we have developed a systematic and focused computer-aided approach to propose approved drugs that may warrant testing and/or serve as lead compounds for the design of new drugs against schistosomes. PMID:25569258

  20. A method for predicting target drug efficiency in cancer based on the analysis of signaling pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Artemov, Artem; Aliper, Alexander; Korzinkin, Michael; Lezhnina, Ksenia; Jellen, Leslie; Zhukov, Nikolay; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Gaifullin, Nurshat; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Borisov, Nicolas; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of anticancer therapeutics called target drugs has quickly developed in the 21st century. These drugs are tailored to inhibit cancer cell growth, proliferation, and viability by specific interactions with one or a few target proteins. However, despite formally known molecular targets for every “target” drug, patient response to treatment remains largely individual and unpredictable. Choosing the most effective personalized treatment remains a major challenge in oncology and is still largely trial and error. Here we present a novel approach for predicting target drug efficacy based on the gene expression signature of the individual tumor sample(s). The enclosed bioinformatic algorithm detects activation of intracellular regulatory pathways in the tumor in comparison to the corresponding normal tissues. According to the nature of the molecular targets of a drug, it predicts whether the drug can prevent cancer growth and survival in each individual case by blocking the abnormally activated tumor-promoting pathways or by reinforcing internal tumor suppressor cascades. To validate the method, we compared the distribution of predicted drug efficacy scores for five drugs (Sorafenib, Bevacizumab, Cetuximab, Sorafenib, Imatinib, Sunitinib) and seven cancer types (Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma, Colon cancer, Lung adenocarcinoma, non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Thyroid cancer and Sarcoma) with the available clinical trials data for the respective cancer types and drugs. The percent of responders to a drug treatment correlated significantly (Pearson's correlation 0.77 p = 0.023) with the percent of tumors showing high drug scores calculated with the current algorithm. PMID:26320181

  1. Effect of the mechanical activation on size reduction of crystalline acetaminophen drug particles.

    PubMed

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Beitollahi, Ali; Rezayat, S Mehdi; Forati, Tahmineh; Asefnejad, Azadeh; Rahimi, Mehdi; Zeinali, Reza; Ardeshir, Mahmoud; Hatamjafari, Farhad; Sahebalzamani, Ali; Heidari, Majid

    2009-01-01

    The decrease in particle size may offer new properties to drugs. In this study, we investigated the size reduction influence of the acetaminophen (C(8)H(9)O(2)N) particles by mechanical activation using a dry ball mill. The activated samples with the average size of 1 microm were then investigated in different time periods with the infrared (IR), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The results of the IR and XRD images showed no change in the drug structure after the mechanical activation of all samples. With the peak height at full width at half maximum from XRD and the Scherrer equation, the size of the activated crystallite samples illustrated that the AFM images were in sound agreement with the Scherrer equation. According to the peaks of the AFM images, the average size of the particles in 30 hours of activation was 24 nm with a normal particle distribution. The ICP analysis demonstrated the presence of tungsten carbide particle impurities after activation from the powder sample impacting with the ball and jar. The greatest reduction in size was after milling for 30 hours. PMID:20054432

  2. Cannabis cue-induced brain activation correlates with drug craving in limbic and visual salience regions: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Charboneau, Evonne J; Dietrich, Mary S; Park, Sohee; Cao, Aize; Watkins, Tristan J; Blackford, Jennifer U; Benningfield, Margaret M; Martin, Peter R; Buchowski, Maciej S; Cowan, Ronald L

    2013-11-30

    Craving is a major motivator underlying drug use and relapse but the neural correlates of cannabis craving are not well understood. This study sought to determine whether visual cannabis cues increase cannabis craving and whether cue-induced craving is associated with regional brain activation in cannabis-dependent individuals. Cannabis craving was assessed in 16 cannabis-dependent adult volunteers while they viewed cannabis cues during a functional MRI (fMRI) scan. The Marijuana Craving Questionnaire was administered immediately before and after each of three cannabis cue-exposure fMRI runs. FMRI blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity was determined in regions activated by cannabis cues to examine the relationship of regional brain activation to cannabis craving. Craving scores increased significantly following exposure to visual cannabis cues. Visual cues activated multiple brain regions, including inferior orbital frontal cortex, posterior cingulate gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, hippocampus, amygdala, superior temporal pole, and occipital cortex. Craving scores at baseline and at the end of all three runs were significantly correlated with brain activation during the first fMRI run only, in the limbic system (including amygdala and hippocampus) and paralimbic system (superior temporal pole), and visual regions (occipital cortex). Cannabis cues increased craving in cannabis-dependent individuals and this increase was associated with activation in the limbic, paralimbic, and visual systems during the first fMRI run, but not subsequent fMRI runs. These results suggest that these regions may mediate visually cued aspects of drug craving. This study provides preliminary evidence for the neural basis of cue-induced cannabis craving and suggests possible neural targets for interventions targeted at treating cannabis dependence. PMID:24035535

  3. Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Mechanism for the Radical Scavenging Activity of Cardiovascular Drug Dipyridamole

    PubMed Central

    Barzegar, Abolfazl

    2012-01-01

    Dipyridamole (DIP) is a well-known pharmaceutical drug used as a coronary vasodilator and anti-platelet agent in clinics for treating several cardiovascular diseases. Primarily, the therapeutic effects of the drug are attributed to its antioxidant potency. In this research, we aim to declare the unknown antioxidant mechanism of DIP as well as its potent chain-breaking antioxidant activity in polar aqueous medium inside the cells, using different experimental methods and theoretical quantum calculations. Data demonstrated the higher antioxidant capacity of DIP against ROS and free radicals in polar cell's interior. DIP is capable of generating long living and noninvasive DIP• radicals in oxidant condition that leads to an effective “chain-breaking antioxidant” activity. Quantum computational data indicated that DIP antioxidant has more favorable ionization potential than trolox which means DIP has higher antioxidant activity. Also, data showed that the direct hydrogen-transfer is not a favorable process to construct DIP• because of high barrier energy, though electron-transfer process can more easily to produce DIP•+ with the lowest barrier energy. Altogether, the electron donating potency of DIP to reduce ferric ion, having the low anodic oxidation peak potential, producing long lived stable DIP• radicals and protecting myoblast cells from oxidation, proposed the excellent “chain-breaking antioxidant” potency via electron-transfer mechanism of this vasodilator DIP drug in polar aqueous medium. PMID:22745807

  4. [Hospital pharmacist has a rule for best practice use and French hospital activity tariffs. Example of a pharmaceutical quality control for drugs reimbursed in addition of DRGs].

    PubMed

    Hedoux, S; Dode, X; Pivot, C; Couray-Targe, S; Aulagner, G

    2012-07-01

    The best practice contract has given a new objective to the hospital pharmacists for the reimbursement in addition to Diagnosis Related Groups' (DRGs) tariffs. We built our pharmaceutical quality control for the administration traceability follow-up regarding the DRGs and the cost of care, for two reasons: the nominal drugs dispensation in link with the prescription made by pharmacist and the important expenditure of these drugs. Our organization depends on the development level of the informatized drugs circuit and minimizes the risk of financial shortfalls or wrong benefits, possible causes of economic penalties for our hospital. On the basis of this follow-up, we highlighted our activity and identified problems of management and drugs circuit organization. The quality of the administration traceability impacts directly on the quality of the medical records and the reimbursements of the expensive drugs. A better knowledge of prescription software is also required for a better quality and security of the medical data used in the medical informatic systems. The drugs management and the personal treatment in and between the care units need to be improved too. We have to continue and improve our organization with the future financial model for ATU drugs and the FIDES project. The health personnel awareness and the development of best informatic tools are also required. PMID:22818260

  5. Serotonergic drugs and spinal cord transections indicate that different spinal circuits are involved in external urethral sphincter activity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui-Yi; Cheng, Chen-Li; Chen, Jia-Jin J.; de Groat, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Lower urinary tract function is regulated by spinal and supraspinal reflexes that coordinate the activity of the urinary bladder and external urethral sphincter (EUS). Two types of EUS activity (tonic and bursting) have been identified in rats. This study in urethane-anesthetized female rats used cystometry, EUS electromyography, spinal cord transection (SCT) at different segmental levels, and analysis of the effects of 5-HT1A receptor agonist (8-OH-DPAT) and antagonist (WAY100635) drugs to examine the origin of tonic and bursting EUS activity. EUS activity was elicited by bladder distension or electrical stimulation of afferent axons in the pelvic nerve (pelvic-EUS reflex). Tonic activity evoked by bladder distension was detected in spinal cord-intact rats and after acute and chronic T8–9 or L3–4 SCT but was abolished after L6–S1 SCT. Bursting activity was abolished by all types of SCT except chronic T8–9 transection. 8-OH-DPAT enhanced tonic activity, and WAY100635 reversed the effect of 8-OH-DPAT. The pelvic-EUS reflex consisted of an early response (ER) and late response (LR) when the bladder was distended in spinal cord-intact rats. ER remained after acute or chronic T8–9 and L3–4 SCT, but was absent after L6–S1 SCT. LR occurred only in chronic T8–9 SCT rats where it was enhanced or unmasked by 8-OH-DPAT. The results indicate that spinal serotonergic mechanisms facilitate tonic and bursting EUS activity. The circuitry for generating different patterns of EUS activity appears to be located in different segments of the spinal cord: tonic activity at L6–S1 and bursting activity between T8–9 and L3–4. PMID:17047164

  6. Millimeter-Wave Measurements of High Level and Low Level Activity Glass Melts

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, Paul P.; Sundaram, S.K.; Daniel, William E., Jr.

    2006-06-01

    The primary objectives of the current research is to develop on-line sensors for characterizing molten glass in high-level and low-activity waste glass melters using millimeter-wave (MMW) technology and to use this technology to do novel research of melt dynamics. Existing and planned waste glass melters lack sophisticated diagnostics due to the hot, corrosive, and radioactive melter environments. Without process control diagnostics, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at Hanford operate by a feed forward process control scheme that relies on predictive models with large uncertainties. This scheme severely limits production throughput and waste loading. Also operations at DWPF have shown susceptibility to anomalies such as pouring, foaming, and combustion gas build up, which can seriously disrupt operations. Future waste chemistries will be even more challenging. The scientific goals of this project are to develop new reliable on-line monitoring capability for important glass process parameters such as temperature profiles, emissivity, density, viscosity, and other characteristics using the unique advantages of millimeter wave electromagnetic radiation that can be eventually implemented in the operating melters. Once successfully developed and implemented, significant cost savings would be realized in melter operations by increasing production through put, reduced storage volumes (through higher waste loading), and reduced risks (prevention or mitigation of anomalies).

  7. Magnetic field activated drug release system based on magnetic PLGA microspheres for chemo-thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kun; Song, Lina; Gu, Zhuxiao; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated for cancer therapy in order to obtain better specific targeting and therapeutic efficiency. Herein, we developed doxorubicin-loaded magnetic PLGA microspheres (DOX-MMS), in which DOX was encapsulated in the core and high contents (28.3 wt%) of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (IOs) were electrostatically assembled on the surface of microsphere to ensure the high sensitivity to response of an external alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The IOs in PLGA shell can both induce the heat effect and trigger shell permeability enhancement to release drugs when DOX-MMs was activated by ACMF. Results show that the cumulative drug release from DOX-MMs exposed to ACMF for 30 min (21.6%) was significantly higher (approximately 7 times higher) than that not exposed to ACMF (2.8%). The combination of hyperthermia and enhanced DOX release from DOX-MMS is beneficial for in vitro 4T1 breast cancer cell apoptosis as well as effective inhibition of tumor growth in 4T1 tumor xenografts. Therefore, the DOX-MMS can be optimized as powerful delivery system for efficient magnetic responsive drug release and chemo-thermal therapy. PMID:26513754

  8. Patients treated with antitumor drugs displaying neurological deficits are characterized by a low circulating level of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    De Santis, S; Pace, A; Bove, L; Cognetti, F; Properzi, F; Fiore, M; Triaca, V; Savarese, A; Simone, M D; Jandolo, B; Manzione, L; Aloe, L

    2000-01-01

    The aim of our study was to explore whether nerve growth factor (NGF) plays any role in the development of peripheral neuropathy induced by anticancer treatment. We measured the circulating NGF levels in 23 cancer patients before and after chemotherapy. We evaluated whether the development of peripheral neurotoxicity was associated with changes in basal NGF concentrations in patients studied with a comprehensive neurological and neurophysiological examination. The results of these studies showed that the circulating levels of NGF, which are about 20 pg/ml in plasma of controls, decrease during chemotherapy and in some cases completely disappeared after prolonged treatment with antitumor agents. The decrease in NGF levels seems to be correlated with the severity of neurotoxicity. These results clearly suggest that NGF might become a useful agent to prevent neuropathies induced by antineoplastic drugs and restore peripheral nerve dysfunction induced by these pharmacological compounds. PMID:10656436

  9. Oxaliplatin immuno hybrid nanoparticles for active targeting: an approach for enhanced apoptotic activity and drug delivery to colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Shashank; Gowthamarajan, K; Satish Kumar, M N; Wadhwani, Ashish

    2016-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) proved to be a promising new target for colorectal cancer treatment. Elevated expression of TRAIL protein in tumor cells distinguishes it from healthy cells, thereby delivering the drug at the specific site. Here, we formulated oxaliplatin immunohybrid nanoparticles (OIHNPs) to deliver oxaliplatin and anti-TRAIL for colorectal cancer treatment in xenograft tumor models. The polymeric chitosan layer binds to the lipid film with the mixture of phospholipids by an ultra sound method followed by conjugating with thiolated antibody using DSPE-PEG-mal3400, resulting in the formation of OIHNPs. The polymer layer helps in more encapsulation of the drug (71 ± 0.09%) with appreciable particle size (95 ± 0.01 nm), and lipid layer prevents degradation of the drug in serum by preventing nanoparticle aggregation. OIHNPs have shown a 4-fold decrease in the IC50 value compared to oxaliplatin in HT-29 cells by the MTT assay. These immuno-nanoparticles represent the successful uptake and internalization of oxaliplatin in HT-29 cells rather than in MCF-7 cells determined by triple fluorescence method. Apoptotic activity in vitro of OIHNPs was determined by the change in the mitochondria membrane potential that further elevates its anti-tumor property. Furthermore, the conjugated nanoparticles can effectively deliver the drug to the tumor sites, which can be attributed to its ability in reducing tumor mass and tumor volume in xenograft tumor models in vivo along with sustaining its release in vitro. These findings indicated that the oxaliplatin immuno-hybrid nanoparticles would be a promising nano-sized active targeted formulation for colorectal-tumor targeted therapy. PMID:26377238

  10. High-level iron mitigates fusaricidin-induced membrane damage and reduces membrane fluidity leading to enhanced drug resistance in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Bang; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2016-05-01

    Fusaricidins are a class of cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics that have strong antifungal activities against plant pathogenic fungi and excellent bactericidal activities against Gram-positive bacteria. The mechanism through which fusaricidin exerts its action is not yet entirely clear. To investigate the mode of action of fusaricidin, we determined the physiological and transcriptional responses of Bacillus subtilis to fusaricidin treatment by using a systems-level approach. Our data show that fusaricidin rapidly induced the expression of σ(W) regulon and caused membrane damage in B. subtilis. We further demonstrated that ferric ions play multiple roles in the action of fusaricidin on B. subtilis. Iron deprivation blocked the formation of hydroxyl radical in the cells and significantly inhibited the bactericidal activity of fusaricidin. Conversely, high levels of iron (>2 mM) repressed the expression of BkdR regulon, resulting in a smaller cellular pool of branched-chain precursors for iso- and anteiso-branched fatty acids, which in turn led to a decrease in the proportion of branched-chain fatty acids in the membrane of B. subtilis. This change in membrane composition reduced its bilayer fluidity and increased its resistance to antimicrobial agents. In conclusion, our experiments uncovered some novel interactions and a synergism between cellular iron levels and drug resistance in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26467177

  11. A population-based study of active and drug-resistant epilepsies in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Giussani, Giorgia; Canelli, Valentina; Bianchi, Elisa; Franchi, Carlotta; Nobili, Alessandro; Erba, Giuseppe; Beghi, Ettore

    2016-02-01

    Drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) is defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as a failure of adequate trials of two tolerated, appropriately chosen, and used antiepileptic drugs to achieve sustained seizure freedom. Our aim was to calculate the following: (1) the prevalence of active epilepsy and DRE in a well-defined population of Northern Italy and (2) the proportion of incident cases developing DRE. The study population (146,506; year 2008) resided in the province of Lecco, Northern Italy. The medical records of 123 general practitioners were reviewed to identify patients with epilepsy, diagnosed by a neurologist during the period 2000-2008. The point prevalence of active epilepsy and DRE was calculated on December 31, 2008. A total of 747 prevalent patients with epilepsy, 684 patients with active epilepsy, and 342 incident cases were identified. The frequency of DRE was 15.6% (107/684) of all active epilepsies and 10.5% (36/342) of incident cases. The point prevalence was 0.73 per 1000. The standardized prevalence of DRE was 0.7 per 1000 (Italian population) and 0.8 per 1000 (world population). Our data indicate that 1/6 patients with active epilepsy in the general population has DRE, and 1/10 patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy will develop DRE within nine years from the diagnosis. PMID:26731716

  12. Predictors of Active Injection Drug Use in a Cohort of Patients Infected With Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Carrie; Bliss, Caleb; Heeren, Timothy; Tumilty, Sheila; Horsburgh, C. Robert; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Cotton, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated potential risk factors for active injection drug use (IDU) in an inner-city cohort of patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Methods. We used log-binomial regression to identify factors independently associated with active IDU during the first 3 years of follow-up for the 289 participants who reported ever having injected drugs at baseline. Results. Overall, 142 (49.1%) of the 289 participants reported active IDU at some point during the follow-up period. In a multivariate model, being unemployed (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.93; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.24, 3.03) and hazardous alcohol drinking (PR = 1.67; 95% CI = 1.34, 2.08) were associated with active IDU. Smoking was associated with IDU but this association was not statistically significant. Patients with all 3 of those factors were 3 times as likely to report IDU during follow-up as those with 0 or 1 factor (PR = 3.3; 95% CI = 2.2, 4.9). Neither HIV coinfection nor history of psychiatric disease was independently associated with active IDU. Conclusions. Optimal treatment of persons with HCV infection will require attention to unemployment, alcohol use, and smoking in conjunction with IDU treatment and prevention. PMID:23153145

  13. Derived Intervention Levels for Tritium Based on Food and Drug Administration Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    1998-12-21

    In 1998, the FDA released it recommendations for age-dependent derived intervention levels for several radionuclides involved in nuclear accidents. One radionuclide that is not included in that document is tritium.

  14. Hypoglycemic activity of Ficus racemosa bark in combination with oral hypoglycemic drug in diabetic human.

    PubMed

    Gul-e-Rana; Karim, Sabiha; Khurhsid, Rukhshan; Saeed-ul-Hassan, Syed; Tariq, Imran; Sultana, Misbah; Rashid, Ahmad Junaid; Shah, Syed Haider; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal herbs, used in indigenous medicines in crude forms for the management of diabetes mellitus, contain both the organic and inorganic constituents. The aim of the study was to find out the hypoglycemic effect of Ficus racemosa in a group of diabetic subjects taking oral hypoglycemic drug. Twenty five of each, male and female, diabetic patients, selected from Fatima Jinnah Medical College, Lahore, Pakistan, taking oral hypoglycemic drug were included in this study and were given orally the extract (5 mL) of bark of Ficus racemosa (about 100 mg) two times for 15 days. Blood samples for estimation of blood glucose and parameters of liver and renal functions were estimated. It was observed that after taking the herb in combination with drug, blood glucose level (fasting and after breakfast) was markedly decreased in both male and female but significant difference was only observed in sugar level of males after 1.5 h after breakfast. To rule out herb toxicity, liver and renal functions tests of patients was also performed which were observed to be in normal range. Present investigation established a pharmacological evidence to support the folklore claim that Ficus racemosa is good anti-diabetic agent. PMID:24383328

  15. [Sporting activities and psychoactive substance use. Data abstracted from the French part of the European School Survey on Alcohol and other Drugs (ESPAD 99)].

    PubMed

    Arvers, Philippe; Choquet, Marie

    2003-06-01

    Few studies have analyzed in the general population psychoactive substance use among athletes, especially among females. In fact, sporting activity is often promoted in prevention actions, as an alternative to addiction or alcohol, tobacco or other substance misuse. So, we propose an analysis of the ESPAD 1999 sample among students (16-18 years old), focused on the relationship between sporting activities and substance use. Boys play sport more frequently than girls (71.5% versus 49.5%) and report 8 hours and more a week 4 more times than girls (14% versus 3.5%). Sixty-eight percent of boys and 36% of girls have already participated in sport competitions, more often at a local, departmental or regional level; a minority of them (26% of boys and 20% of girls) have already participated in sport competitions at a national or international level. Sporting activity is decreasing with age among girls, students from general lycée play sport more frequently than others do (vocational lycée); the higher the father's education level, the more frequently the students play sport. Moderate sporting activity (1-8 hours a week) is a protective factor against regular smoking (OR=0.54 in boys and OR=0.60 in girls) and against regular cannabis use among boys (OR=0.64). Intensive sporting activity (>8 hours a week) is a risk factor for illicit drugs (except cannabis) use (OR=2.74) and sleeping drugs/tranquillizers (OR=1.82) only among girls. Competition level is the most important risk factor for substance misuse as well in boys (except sleeping drugs/tranquillizers) as in girls. Practical implications are: adjusting health policy concerning the beneficial effects of sporting activity, raising sports associations abilities and avoiding doping and addiction in high-level sporting activities. PMID:12910031

  16. Addictive and non-addictive drugs induce distinct and specific patterns of ERK activation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Valjent, Emmanuel; Pagès, Christiane; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2004-04-01

    A major goal of research on addiction is to identify the molecular mechanisms of long-lasting behavioural alterations induced by drugs of abuse. Cocaine and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the striatum and blockade of the ERK pathway prevents establishment of conditioned place preference to these drugs. However, it is not known whether activation of ERK in the striatum is specific for these two drugs and/or this brain region. We studied the appearance of phospho-ERK immunoreactive neurons in CD-1 mouse brain following acute administration of drugs commonly abused by humans, cocaine, morphine, nicotine and THC, or of other psychoactive compounds including caffeine, scopolamine, antidepressants and antipsychotics. Each drug generated a distinct regional pattern of ERK activation. All drugs of abuse increased ERK phosphorylation in nucleus accumbens, lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central amygdala and deep layers of prefrontal cortex, through a dopamine D1 receptor-dependent mechanism. Although some non-addictive drugs moderately activated ERK in a few of these areas, they never induced this combined pattern of strong activation. Antidepressants and caffeine activated ERK in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Typical antipsychotics mildly activated ERK in dorsal striatum and superficial prefrontal cortex, whereas clozapine had no effect in the striatum, but more widespread effects in cortex and amygdala. Our results outline a subset of structures in which ERK activation might specifically contribute to the long-term effects of drugs of abuse, and suggest mapping ERK activation in brain as a way to identify potential sites of action of psychoactive drugs. PMID:15078556

  17. Chemical proteomic probes for profiling cytochrome P450 activities and drug interactions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Aaron T.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2007-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (P450) superfamily metabolizes many endogenous signaling molecules and drugs. P450 enzymes are regulated by post-translational mechanisms in vivo, which hinders their functional characterization by conventional genomic or proteomic methods. Here, we describe a chemical proteomic strategy to profile P450 activities directly in living systems. Derivatization of a mechanism-based inhibitor with a “clickable” handle provided an activity-based probe that labels multiple P450s both in proteomic extracts and in vivo. This probe was used to record alterations in liver P450 activities triggered by chemical agents, including inducers of P450 expression and direct P450 inhibitors. The chemical proteomic strategy described herein thus offers a versatile method to monitor P450 activities and small molecule interactions in any biological system and, through doing so, should facilitate the functional characterization of this large and diverse enzyme class. PMID:17884636

  18. In vitro Antiproliferative Activity of Benzopyranone Derivatives in Comparison with Standard Chemotherapeutic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Musiliyu A.; Cooperwood, John S.; Khan, M. Omar F.; Rahman, Taufiq

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The cytotoxic activities of five new benzopyranone derivatives containing basic amino side chain are described. Their cytotoxicities against ER (+) MCF-7 and ER (−) MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, and Ishikawa human endometrial cell line were determined after 72 h drug exposure employing CellTiter-Glo assay at concentrations ranging from 0.01 – 1.0 × 105 nM. The antiproliferative activities of these compounds were compared to tamoxifen (TAM), 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT, active metabolite of tamoxifen) and raloxifene (RAL). In vitro results indicated that compounds 9, 10, 12 and 13 were more potent than TAM against the human breast cancer cell lines with IC50 < 20 µM. The in silico structure-activity relationships of these compounds and their binding mode within the estrogen receptor (ER) binding site using AutoDock vina are discussed. PMID:21290426

  19. Quantitative analysis of drug effects at the whole-body level: a case study for glucose metabolism in malaria patients.

    PubMed

    Snoep, Jacky L; Green, Kathleen; Eicher, Johann; Palm, Daniel C; Penkler, Gerald; du Toit, Francois; Walters, Nicolas; Burger, Robert; Westerhoff, Hans V; van Niekerk, David D

    2015-12-01

    We propose a hierarchical modelling approach to construct models for disease states at the whole-body level. Such models can simulate effects of drug-induced inhibition of reaction steps on the whole-body physiology. We illustrate the approach for glucose metabolism in malaria patients, by merging two detailed kinetic models for glucose metabolism in the parasite Plasmodium falciparum and the human red blood cell with a coarse-grained model for whole-body glucose metabolism. In addition we use a genome-scale metabolic model for the parasite to predict amino acid production profiles by the malaria parasite that can be used as a complex biomarker. PMID:26614654

  20. Unequal prognostic potentials of p53 gain-of-function mutations in human cancers associate with drug-metabolizing activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Wang, J; Hu, Y; Qian, J; Xu, B; Chen, H; Zou, W; Fang, J-Y

    2014-01-01

    Mutation of p53 is the most common genetic change in human cancer, causing complex effects including not only loss of wild-type function but also gain of novel oncogenic functions (GOF). It is increasingly likely that p53-hotspot mutations may confer different types and magnitudes of GOF, but the evidences are mainly supported by cellular and transgenic animal models. Here we combine large-scale cancer genomic data to characterize the prognostic significance of different p53 mutations in human cancers. Unexpectedly, only mutations on the Arg248 and Arg282 positions displayed significant association with shorter patient survival, but such association was not evident for other hotspot GOF mutations. Gene set enrichment analysis on these mutations revealed higher activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes, including the CYP3A4 cytochrome P450. Ectopic expression of p53 mutant R282W in H1299 and SaOS2 cells significantly upregulated CYP3A4 mRNA and protein levels, and cancer cell lines bearing mortality-associated p53 mutations display higher CYP3A4 expression and resistance to several CYP3A4-metabolized chemotherapeutic drugs. Our results suggest that p53 mutations have unequal GOF activities in human cancers, and future evaluation of p53 as a cancer biomarker should consider which mutation is present in the tumor, rather than having comparison between wild-type and mutant genotypes. PMID:24603336

  1. In vitro Models to Evaluate Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity: Potential Test Based on Activation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Corsini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated (“allergic”) and non-immune-mediated (“pseudo allergic”) reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon. We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells. PMID:27462271

  2. In vitro Models to Evaluate Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity: Potential Test Based on Activation of Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Corsini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated ("allergic") and non-immune-mediated ("pseudo allergic") reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon. We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells. PMID:27462271

  3. Haloperidol and Risperidone at high concentrations activate an in vitro inflammatory response of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells by induction of apoptosis and modification of cytokine levels.

    PubMed

    da Cruz Jung, Ivo Emílio; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; Barbisan, Fernanda; Azzolin, Verônica Farina; Duarte, Thiago; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; do Prado-Lima, Pedro Antônio Schmidt; Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Scola, Gustavo; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2016-05-01

    Antipsychotic drugs, such as haloperidol and risperidone, are used in long-term treatment of psychiatric patients and thus increase the risk of obesity and other metabolic dysfunctions. Available evidence suggests that these drugs have pro-inflammatory effect, which contributes to the establishment of endocrine disturbances. However, results yielded by extant studies are inconsistent. Therefore, in this work, we tested the in vitro effects of different high concentrations of haloperidol and risperidone on the activation of isolated macrophages (RAW 264.7 cell line). The results indicated that macrophages were activated by both drugs. In addition, the activation involved an increase in nitric oxide levels and apoptosis events by modulation of caspases 8 and 3 levels and a decrease of the Bcl-2/BAX gene expression ratio. Cells treated with haloperidol and risperidone also presented higher concentrations of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα) and low levels of IL-6 anti-inflammatory cytokine in a dose-dependent manner. Despite the limitation of cell line studies based solely on macrophages cells, we suggest that antipsychotic drugs could potentially exacerbate inflammatory processes in peripheral tissues (blood and fat). The continued activation of macrophages could contribute to the development of obesity and other endocrine disturbances caused by the use of antipsychotic drugs. PMID:26391290

  4. Characterization of the activities of actin-affecting drugs on tumor cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hayot, Caroline; Debeir, Olivier; Ham, Philippe van; Damme, Marc van; Kiss, Robert; Decaestecker, Christine . E-mail: cdecaes@ulb.ac.be

    2006-02-15

    recolonization (possibly acting on the cell growth features). In conclusion, the use of multi-assays with different levels of sophistication and biological relevance is recommended in the screening of new actin-affecting drugs with potentially anti-migratory effects.

  5. Evaluation of anti-GERD activity of gastro retentive drug delivery system of itopride hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Satapathy, Trilochan; Panda, Prasana K; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2010-08-01

    The present work describes the formulation and evaluation of the gastroretentive system of Itopride hydrochloride. In this research, we have formulated floating hydrogel-based microspheres employing calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) as a gas forming agent dispersed in alginate matrix. In vitro characterizations such as drug content, particle size, and drug release were carried out. GI motility was determined by administration of charcoal meal to rats. Results demonstrated that prepared microspheres were spherical in shape with smooth surface, good loading efficiency, and excellent buoyancy. The gastro retentive dosage form of itiopride demonstrated significant antacid, anti-ulcer, and anti-GERD activity after 12 hours in comparison with the conventional dosage form. PMID:20515421

  6. Effects of the lipid regulating drug clofibric acid on PPARα-regulated gene transcript levels in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) at pharmacological and environmental exposure levels

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Jenna; Winter, Matthew J.; Lange, Anke; Cumming, Rob; Owen, Stewart F.; Tyler, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) plays a key role in regulating various genes involved in lipid metabolism, bile acid synthesis and cholesterol homeostasis, and is activated by a diverse group of compounds collectively termed peroxisome proliferators (PPs). Specific PPs have been detected in the aquatic environment; however little is known on their pharmacological activity in fish. We investigated the bioavailability and persistence of the human PPARα ligand clofibric acid (CFA) in carp, together with various relevant endpoints, at a concentration similar to therapeutic levels in humans (20 mg/L) and for an environmentally relevant concentration (4 μg/L). Exposure to pharmacologically-relevant concentrations of CFA resulted in increased transcript levels of a number of known PPARα target genes together with increased acyl-coA oxidase (Acox1) activity, supporting stimulation of lipid metabolism pathways in carp which are known to be similarly activated in mammals. Although Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) activity was not affected, mRNA levels of several biotransformation genes were also increased, paralleling previous reports in mammals and indicating a potential role in hepatic detoxification for PPARα in carp. Importantly, transcription of some of these genes (and Acox1 activity) were affected at exposure concentrations comparable with those reported in effluent discharges. Collectively, these data suggest that CFA is pharmacologically active in carp and has the potential to invoke PPARα-related responses in fish exposed in the environment, particularly considering that CFA may represent just one of a number of PPAR-active compounds present to which wild fish may be exposed. PMID:25749508

  7. Correlation between Serum Level of Antiepileptic Drugs and their Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Abbashar; Abdulgalil, Amira; Omer, Faroug; Eltoum, Hassan; Hamad, Ahmed; El-Adil, Omer; Mubarak, Bedraldin; Malkaldar, Mohmad; Idris, Iway; Alwidaa, Yasin; Mahmoud, Esam

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study is to investigate the relation between serum levels of anticonvulsants and their side effects. Methods This is a prospective cross sectional hospital based study conducted at Al Shaab Teaching Hospital. 120 patients were included in the study. The AEDs used were phenytoin, phenobarbitone, carbamazibine, and sodium valproate. Results The results showed that the side effects among the studied group were not uncommon. Conclusion There was no relationship between serum levels of AEDs and their side effects. PMID:22125692

  8. Biotransformation of anthelmintics and the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the tapeworm Moniezia expansa.

    PubMed

    Prchal, Lukáš; Bártíková, Hana; Bečanová, Aneta; Jirásko, Robert; Vokřál, Ivan; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Skálová, Lenka; Kubíček, Vladimír; Lamka, Jiří; Trejtnar, František; Szotáková, Barbora

    2015-04-01

    The sheep tapeworm Moniezia expansa is very common parasite, which affects ruminants such as sheep, goats as well as other species. The benzimidazole anthelmintics albendazole (ABZ), flubendazole (FLU) and mebendazole (MBZ) are often used to treat the infection. The drug-metabolizing enzymes of helminths may alter the potency of anthelmintic treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the activity of the main drug-metabolizing enzymes and evaluate the metabolism of selected anthelmintics (ABZ, MBZ and FLU) in M. expansa. Activities of biotransformation enzymes were determined in subcellular fractions. Metabolites of the anthelmintics were detected and identified using high performance liquid chromatography/ultra-violet/VIS/fluorescence or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Reduction of MBZ, FLU and oxidation of ABZ were proved as well as activities of various metabolizing enzymes. Despite the fact that the conjugation enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase and UDP-glucosyl transferase were active in vitro, no conjugated metabolites of anthelmintics were identified either ex vivo or in vitro. The obtained results indicate that sheep tapeworm is able to deactivate the administered anthelmintics, and thus protects itself against their action. PMID:25373326

  9. Hernandezine, a novel AMPK activator induces autophagic cell death in drug-resistant cancers

    PubMed Central

    Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Mok, Simon Wing Fai; Chan, Wai Kit; Xu, Su Wei; Wu, An Guo; Yao, Xiao Jun; Wang, Jing Rong; Liu, Liang; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance hinder most cancer chemotherapies and leads to disease recurrence and poor survival of patients. Resistance of cancer cells towards apoptosis is the major cause of these symptomatic behaviours. Here, we showed that isoquinoline alkaloids, including liensinine, isoliensinine, dauricine, cepharanthine and hernandezine, putatively induce cytotoxicity against a repertoire of cancer cell lines (HeLa, A549, MCF-7, PC3, HepG2, Hep3B and H1299). Proven by the use of apoptosis-resistant cellular models and autophagic assays, such isoquinoline alkaloid-induced cytotoxic effect involves energy- and autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7)-dependent autophagy that resulted from direct activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). Hernandezine possess the highest efficacy in provoking such cell death when compared with other examined compounds. We confirmed that isoquinoline alkaloid is structurally varied from the existing direct AMPK activators. In conclusion, isoquinoline alkaloid is a new class of compound that induce autophagic cell death in drug-resistant fibroblasts or cancers by exhibiting its direct activation on AMPK. PMID:26811496

  10. Effects of Teratogenic Drugs on CYP1A1 Activity in Differentiating Rat Embryo Cells.

    PubMed

    Tayeboon, Gh S; Ostad, S N; Nasri, S; Nili-Ahmadabadi, A; Tavakoli, F; Sabzevari, O

    2015-05-01

    CYP1A1, a P450 isoenzyme, is involved in the phase I xenobiotic metabolism including teratogen drugs. In the present study, the ability of teratogens to elevate the embryonic expression of CYP1A1 was examined. Micromass cell cultures prepared from day 13 rat embryo limb buds (LB). LB cells were cultivated and exposed for 5 days to retinoic acid (RA), hydrocortisone (HC), caffeine (CA) and quinine (QN). CYP1A1 protein expression and activity were measured using immunofluorescence staining and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD) assay, respectively. The EROD activity increased significantly following LB cells exposure to RA and HC (p<0.05) but the expression of CYP1A1 protein was reduced by these drugs, whereas the expression of CYP1A1 protein and EROD activity decreased significantly following the addition of CA and QN (p<0.05, p<0.01). Our findings show that studied teratogens have potency to increase CYP1A1 activity. PMID:24668578

  11. In vitro antifungal activity of topical and systemic antifungal drugs against Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso Javier; Rojas, Florencia; Tur-Tur, Cristina; de Los Ángeles Sosa, María; Diez, Gustavo Ortiz; Espada, Carmen Martín; Payá, María Jesús; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2013-09-01

    The strict nutritional requirements of Malassezia species make it difficult to test the antifungal susceptibility. Treatments of the chronic and recurrent infections associated with Malassezia spp. are usually ineffective. The objective of this study was to obtain in vitro susceptibility profile of 76 clinical isolates of Malassezia species against 16 antifungal drugs used for topical or systemic treatment. Isolates were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were obtained by a modified microdilution method based on the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute reference document M27-A3. The modifications allowed a good growth of all tested species. High in vitro antifungal activity of most tested drugs was observed, especially triazole derivatives, except for fluconazole which presented the highest MICs and widest range of concentrations. Ketoconazole and itraconazole demonstrated a great activity. Higher MICs values were obtained with Malassezia furfur indicating a low susceptibility to most of the antifungal agents tested. Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia pachydermatis were found to be more-susceptible species than M. furfur, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia slooffiae and Malassezia restricta. Topical substances were also active but provide higher MICs than the compounds for systemic use. The differences observed in the antifungals activity and interspecies variability demonstrated the importance to studying the susceptibility profile of each species to obtain reliable information for defining an effective treatment regimen. PMID:23496653

  12. Infant Temperament and Genetics: An Objective Twin Study of Motor Activity Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saudino, Kimberly J.; Eaton, Warren O.

    1991-01-01

    The activity level of 60 pairs of infant twins was measured for 2 days. Differences in activity level for monozygotic and dizygotic twins, as indicated by motion recorders and parent ratings, showed evidence of genetic influences. (BC)

  13. Buserelin acetate microparticle dispersion effects drug release and plasma E(1) levels.

    PubMed

    Usami, Makiko; Misawa, Kazumasa; Yagi, Naomi; Sekikawa, Hitoshi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2007-07-18

    We investigated the effect of different dispersion methods on release behavior and efficacy onset following microparticle administration of buserelin acetate (BA) sustained-release injection. In this in vitro release study, the initial dispersion of BA increased with increased stirring speed (p<0.01). Stability of BA was studied over 7 days after BA release. The initial BA release rate was higher (p<0.01) after a 1-min vibration dispersion method (VDM) using a test tube mixer (2000 rpm) compared with the standard dispersion method (SDM) by hand. Without shaking, powder aggregation was observed, and BA release was lower than in either the SDM or VDM methods. In this study using 4-week-old Sprague-Dawley female rats, the initial plasma estrone (E(1)) concentrations were lower (p<0.05) in the VDM method than in the SDM method. Observations by optical microscope and scanning microscope showed no change in microparticle shape or distribution of size induced by SDM, VDM or the ultrasonication dispersion method. These results suggest that different dispersion methods do not change the shape and distribution of microparticle size, but clearly change the BA release rate and the transition in plasma E(1) concentrations that can affect drug efficacy. PMID:17398044

  14. Nipping cue reactivity in the bud: baclofen prevents limbic activation elicited by subliminal drug cues.

    PubMed

    Young, Kimberly A; Franklin, Teresa R; Roberts, David C S; Jagannathan, Kanchana; Suh, Jesse J; Wetherill, Reagan R; Wang, Ze; Kampman, Kyle M; O'Brien, Charles P; Childress, Anna Rose

    2014-04-01

    Relapse is a widely recognized and difficult to treat feature of the addictions. Substantial evidence implicates cue-triggered activation of the mesolimbic dopamine system as an important contributing factor. Even drug cues presented outside of conscious awareness (i.e., subliminally) produce robust activation within this circuitry, indicating the sensitivity and vulnerability of the brain to potentially problematic reward signals. Because pharmacological agents that prevent these early cue-induced responses could play an important role in relapse prevention, we examined whether baclofen-a GABAB receptor agonist that reduces mesolimbic dopamine release and conditioned drug responses in laboratory animals-could inhibit mesolimbic activation elicited by subliminal cocaine cues in cocaine-dependent individuals. Twenty cocaine-dependent participants were randomized to receive baclofen (60 mg/d; 20 mg t.i.d.) or placebo. Event-related BOLD fMRI and a backward-masking paradigm were used to examine the effects of baclofen on subliminal cocaine (vs neutral) cues. Sexual and aversive cues were included to examine specificity. We observed that baclofen-treated participants displayed significantly less activation in response to subliminal cocaine (vs neutral) cues, but not sexual or aversive (vs neutral) cues, than placebo-treated participants in a large interconnected bilateral cluster spanning the ventral striatum, ventral pallidum, amygdala, midbrain, and orbitofrontal cortex (voxel threshold p < 0.005; cluster corrected at p < 0.05). These results suggest that baclofen may inhibit the earliest type of drug cue-induced motivational processing-that which occurs outside of awareness-before it evolves into a less manageable state. PMID:24695721

  15. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    SciTech Connect

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C.; Sudano, Isabella; Luescher, Thomas F.; Camici, Giovanni G.

    2010-01-22

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 {+-} 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% {+-} 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 {+-} 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  16. Salinomycin and Other Ionophores as a New Class of Antimalarial Drugs with Transmission-Blocking Activity

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, Sarah; Corbett, Yolanda; Ilboudo, Denise P.; Misiano, Paola; Dahiya, Nisha; Abay, Solomon M.; Habluetzel, Annette; Grande, Romualdo; Gismondo, Maria R.; Dechering, Koen J.; Koolen, Karin M. J.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Taramelli, Donatella; Parapini, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The drug target profile proposed by the Medicines for Malaria Venture for a malaria elimination/eradication policy focuses on molecules active on both asexual and sexual stages of Plasmodium, thus with both curative and transmission-blocking activities. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether the class of monovalent ionophores, which includes drugs used in veterinary medicine and that were recently proposed as human anticancer agents, meets these requirements. The activity of salinomycin, monensin, and nigericin on Plasmodium falciparum asexual and sexual erythrocytic stages and on the development of the Plasmodium berghei and P. falciparum mosquito stages is reported here. Gametocytogenesis of the P. falciparum strain 3D7 was induced in vitro, and gametocytes at stage II and III or stage IV and V of development were treated for different lengths of time with the ionophores and their viability measured with the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. The monovalent ionophores efficiently killed both asexual parasites and gametocytes with a nanomolar 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). Salinomycin showed a fast speed of kill compared to that of standard drugs, and the potency was higher on stage IV and V than on stage II and III gametocytes. The ionophores inhibited ookinete development and subsequent oocyst formation in the mosquito midgut, confirming their transmission-blocking activity. Potential toxicity due to hemolysis was excluded, since only infected and not normal erythrocytes were damaged by ionophores. Our data strongly support the downstream exploration of monovalent ionophores for repositioning as new antimalarial and transmission-blocking leads. PMID:26055362

  17. Postgraduation Activities: All Degree Levels in Pennsylvania, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehman, George E., Jr.

    The employment of 1981 graduates at all degree levels in Pennsylvania's colleges and universities was surveyed, based on data for 47,996 graduates of 147 institutions, or 65.9 percent of all graduates. It was found that the 1981 full-time employment rate for all graduates, regardless of degree level, decreased from the 1980 value of 72.3 percent…

  18. Sex hormones, sexual activity and plasma anticonvulsant levels in male epileptics.

    PubMed Central

    Toone, B K; Wheeler, M; Nanjee, M; Fenwick, P; Grant, R

    1983-01-01

    Testosterone, LH, FSH, PRL, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured in 72 male epileptic patients on chronic anticonvulsant drug regimes. Sexual activity was estimated and plasma anticonvulsants measured. Total testosterone (TT), LH, FSH, PRL, and SHBG were increased; free testosterone (FT) was decreased. Sexual activity appeared diminished particularly in relation to reduced FT. PMID:6413659

  19. Functionalized chalcones with basic functionalities have antibacterial activity against drug sensitive Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Liu, X L; Xu, Y J; Go, M L

    2008-08-01

    A library of chalcones with basic functionalities were evaluated for antibacterial activity against drug sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The most active compounds were 2-52 and 2-57 (MIC 6.3 microM S. aureus). These compounds had no activity against E. coli (MIC>100 microM). Both compounds were characterized by a ring A that was substituted with 2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxy-3-(1-methylpiperidin-4-yl) groups. The phenolic OH and 1-methylpiperidinyl groups were required for activity but the phenolic OH may play a more critical role. While the compounds were comparable to licochalcone A in terms of antibacterial activity, they caused less hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes at high concentrations (100 microM). It was noted that the structural requirements for limiting hemolytic activity were less stringent than those required for antibacterial activity. The present findings suggest that the chalcone framework is an attractive template for optimization to achieve better potency, lower toxicity and a wider spectrum of antibacterial activity. PMID:18031869

  20. Drug use in relation to clinical activities as an instrument for prospective drug budgeting. The Belgian experience.

    PubMed

    Closon, M C; Crott, R; Even-Adin, D

    1996-03-01

    In an effort to control escalating health expenditures, especially in hospitals, many countries are planning or experimenting with prospective budgeting systems. Belgium is no exception and has recently introduced, with some success, limited fixed charges per hospital admission and/or per hospitalisation day for laboratory tests and radiographic investigations. More recently, the focus has shifted to hospital drug expenditures, which have shown high growth rates over the past few years. Until now, such expenditures have been reimbursed on a fee-for-service system, often with limited out-of-pocket charges for hospitalised patients. In order to curb the growth of drug expenditures, it is appropriate to investigate whether the financing of hospital drugs through a prospective budgeting system could be a feasible solution. Therefore, we constructed a database of over 270 000 admissions from a sample of 23 Belgian general and teaching (university) hospitals for the year 1991. Data were obtained from the official Minimum Basic Data Set or Résumé Clinique Minimum, which contains summarised clinical and administrative information, plus detailed expenditures (including medications) for each hospital stay. This information allowed us to categorize each stay into an appropriate diagnosis-related group (DRG). Our first descriptive analysis identified a number of major variables that influenced patients' drug expenditures: all-patient DRG (APDRG), age, disease severity, length of stay in an intensive care unit, emergency admission, death during hospitalisation, and hospital type (teaching or general). A covariance analysis was then performed on all hospital stays combined, and separately on surgical and medical stays. The results indicated that these variables taken together account for between 56.5 and 76.3% of drug expenditures in medical and surgical stays, respectively, with the major variance explained by differences in APDRG category. However, when the data were

  1. Distant Interactions and Their Effects on Children's Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Debra L.; van der Mars, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Background: It has been observed that physical activity patterns of health-related behavior are established in childhood and may continue into adulthood. Recent findings showing a relationship between the onset of chronic diseases and sedentary lifestyles support the importance of examining Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA). One…

  2. Human Development Program: Level IV Activity Guide, Revised 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessell, Harold; Ball, Geraldine

    The curriculum guide presents the activities component of the Human Development Program for grade four. The Human Development Program (HDP) is an affective curricular approach developed by psychologists to help teachers instill responsibility and self-confidence in children. The activity guide presents topics and directions for 180 sequential…

  3. Application and assessment of a regular environmental monitoring of the antineoplastic drug contamination level in pharmacies - the MEWIP project.

    PubMed

    Kiffmeyer, Thekla K; Tuerk, Jochen; Hahn, Moritz; Stuetzer, Hartmut; Hadtstein, Claudia; Heinemann, André; Eickmann, Udo

    2013-05-01

    A large-scale study was carried out in order to determine the contamination level of antineoplastic drugs in pharmacies and to investigate the suitability and effects of wipe sample monitoring at regular intervals. A specific study design was developed. The 130 participating pharmacies were divided into a study and a control group, carrying out five and two wipe sampling cycles, respectively. The work practice was analyzed using questionnaires to identify factors that influence the contamination level. From 1269 wipe samples, 774 (61%) were contaminated with at least one of the analyzed cytotoxic drugs: cyclophosphamide, docetaxel, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine, ifosfamide, methotrexate, and paclitaxel. A significant decrease of the contamination with cyclophosphamide and 5-fluorouracil was observed in the study group. The Monitoring-Effect Study of Wipe Sampling in Pharmacies method has proven to be a reliable and affordable tool for contamination control. Based on the 90th percentile of the contamination values, a substance-independent performance-based guidance value of 0.1ng cm(-2) has been derived. PMID:23125441

  4. Playground Designs to Increase Physical Activity Levels during School Recess: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escalante, Yolanda; García-Hermoso, Antonio; Backx, Karianne; Saavedra, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    School recess provides a major opportunity to increase children's physical activity levels. Various studies have described strategies to increase levels of physical activity. The purpose of this systematic review is therefore to examine the interventions proposed as forms of increasing children's physical activity levels during recess. A…

  5. Comparative in vitro activities of linezolid, telithromycin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and four conventional antimycobacterial drugs against Mycobacterium kansasii.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Fernando; Calatayud, Laura; Santín, Miguel; Martín, Rogelio

    2004-12-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is one of the most pathogenic and frequent nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from humans. Patients with adverse drug reactions, resistant isolates, or suboptimal response require alternative treatment regimens. One hundred forty-eight consecutive clinical isolates of M. kansasii were tested for antimicrobial susceptibilities by the BACTEC 460 system (NCCLS) with two different inoculation protocols, one conventional and one alternative. In the alternative protocol, the inoculum 12B vial was incubated until the growth index was between 250 and 500. Four conventional antimycobacterial drugs (isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, and ethambutol) were studied with standard critical concentrations. The in vitro activities of linezolid, telithromycin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin were determined by measuring radiometric MICs. All isolates tested were identified as M. kansasii genotype I and were resistant to isoniazid at a concentration of 0.4 mug/ml. One hundred twenty isolates (81.1%) were inhibited by 1 microg of isoniazid per ml. A high level of resistance to isoniazid (>10 microg/ml) was observed in six isolates (4.1%). Only five strains (3.4%) were resistant to rifampin (>1 microg/ml). All isolates studied were susceptible to streptomycin and ethambutol. The MICs at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited (in micrograms per milliliter) were as follows: linezolid, 1 (range, < or =0.25 to 2); telithromycin, >16 (range, 4 to >16); clarithromycin, 0.5 (range, < or =0.03 to 1); levofloxacin, 0.12 (range, 0.12 to 0.25); and moxifloxacin, 0.06 (range, < or =0.06 to 0.12). The susceptibility testing results with both inoculation protocols showed perfect correlation. In conclusion, all M. kansasii isolates showed decreased susceptibility to isoniazid, but resistance to rifampin was infrequent. Quinolones, especially moxifloxacin, were the most active antimicrobial agents tested, followed by clarithromycin. Linezolid also showed good

  6. CFL1 expression levels as a prognostic and drug resistance marker in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alves Castro, Mauro Antônio; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Zdanov, Stéphanie; Soares, Márcio; Müller, Carolina Beatriz; Lopes, Fernanda Martins; Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Fernandes, Marilda da Cruz; Fonseca Moreira, José Cláudio; Shacter, Emily; Klamt, Fábio

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the major determinant of overall cancer mortality worldwide. Despite progress in molecular research current treatments offer limited benefits. Since NSCLC generates early metastasis and this behavior requires great cell motility, herein we assessed the potential value of CFL1 gene (main member of the invasion/metastasis pathway) as a prognostic and predictive NSCLC biomarker. METHODS Meta-data analysis of tumor tissue microarray was applied to examine expression of CFL1 in archival lung cancer samples from 111 patients and investigated its clinicopathologic significance. The robustness of our finding was validated using another independent data set. Finally, we assayed in vitro the role of CFL1 levels in tumor invasiveness and drug resistance using six human NSCLC cell lines with different basal degree of CFL1 gene expression. RESULTS CFL1 levels in biopsies discriminate between good and bad prognosis within early tumor stage (IA, IB and IIA/B), where high CFL1 levels are correlated with lower overall survival rate (P<0.0001). Biomarker performance was further analyzed by immunohistochemistry, hazard ratio (P<0.001) and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (area=0.787; P<0.001). High CFL1 mRNA levels and protein content are positive correlated with cellular invasiveness (determined by Matrigel Invasion Chamber System) and resistance (two-fold increase in drug GI50 value) against a list of 22 alkylating agents. Hierarchical clustering analysis of CFL1 gene network had the same robustness to stratified NSCLC patients. CONCLUSIONS Our study indicates that CFL1 gene and its functional gene network can be used as prognostic biomarker for NSCLC and could also guide chemotherapeutic interventions. PMID:20564088

  7. Can Antidepressant Drug Impact on Blood Pressure Level in Patients with Psychiatric Disorder and Hypertension? A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Razavi Ratki, Seyed Kazem; Seyedhosseini, Seyedmostafa; Valizadeh, Alieh; Rastgoo, Tahere; Tavakkoli, Rozita; Golabchi, Allahyar; Ghashghaei, Fatemeh Esteki; Nemayandeh, Seyede Mahdieh; Boroomand, Amirreza; Shirinzade, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: High blood pressure (BP) has been known as a major risk factor for many chronic diseases. It should be noted, a psychiatric disorder which is common in the people living modern lifestyle may be one of the leading causes of hypertension, and many people are prescribed antidepressant each year. Hence, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and alprazolam which defined as antidepressant on the BP levels, and to compare the BP levels between the group of users and nonusers. Methods: This randomized clinical trial study was conducted at the Nohom Dey Hospital in the Torbat-e Heydarieh, Iran between December 2011 and March 2012. Participants comprised 101 psychiatric patients with hypertension that randomly separated into users and nonusers of antidepressant. The period of intervention lasted for 3 months. The mean of BP calculated by this formula (systolic BP [SBP] +2 diastolic BP [DBP])/3 which was the main outcome of the study. Results: Users of antidepressant drugs did not have any significant changes in BP levels, except in patients who received SSRIs alone, significant improvement was observed in DBP (P = 0.04) and mean of BP (P = 0.03). While, in nonusers of antidepressant, significant development was observed in DBP, and mean of BP. Comparing the users and nonusers did not show any significant differences in SBP, DBP, and Mean of BP; even, when outcomes were adjusted for risk factors and antihypertensive drugs. Conclusions: Three months treatment with SSRIs and alprazolam did not have any effect on lowering BP level in patients with the psychiatric disorder. PMID:26941927

  8. Recent insights into the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuee; Zhang, Wenji; Chen, Zirong; Shi, Zhi; He, Chengwei; Chen, Meiwan

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinones, the major lipid-soluble pharmacological constituents of the Chinese medicinal herb Tanshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza), have attracted growing scientific attention because of the prospective biomedical applications of these compounds. Numerous pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardio-cerebrovascular protection activities, are exhibited by the three primary bioactive constituents among the tanshinones, ie, tanshinone I (TNI), tanshinone IIA (TNIIA), and cryptotanshinone (CPT). However, due to their poor solubility and low dissolution rate, the clinical applications of TNI, TNIIA, and CPT are limited. To solve these problems, many studies have focused on loading tanshinones into liposomes, nanoparticles, microemulsions, cyclodextrin inclusions, solid dispersions, and so on. In this review, we aim to offer an updated summary of the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones to provide a reference for these constituents in clinical applications. PMID:26792989

  9. Recent insights into the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yuee; Zhang, Wenji; Chen, Zirong; Shi, Zhi; He, Chengwei; Chen, Meiwan

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinones, the major lipid-soluble pharmacological constituents of the Chinese medicinal herb Tanshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza), have attracted growing scientific attention because of the prospective biomedical applications of these compounds. Numerous pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardio-cerebrovascular protection activities, are exhibited by the three primary bioactive constituents among the tanshinones, ie, tanshinone I (TNI), tanshinone IIA (TNIIA), and cryptotanshinone (CPT). However, due to their poor solubility and low dissolution rate, the clinical applications of TNI, TNIIA, and CPT are limited. To solve these problems, many studies have focused on loading tanshinones into liposomes, nanoparticles, microemulsions, cyclodextrin inclusions, solid dispersions, and so on. In this review, we aim to offer an updated summary of the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones to provide a reference for these constituents in clinical applications. PMID:26792989

  10. Cancer Chemoprevention Effects of Ginger and its Active Constituents: Potential for New Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Qi, Lian-Wen; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is a commonly used spice and herbal medicine worldwide. Besides its extensive use as a condiment, ginger has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the management of various medical conditions. In recent years, ginger has received wide attention due to its observed antiemetic and anticancer activities. This paper reviews the potential role of ginger and its active constituents in cancer chemoprevention. The phytochemistry, bioactivity, and molecular targets of ginger constituents, especially 6-shogaol, are discussed. The content of 6-shogaol is very low in fresh ginger, but significantly higher after steaming. With reported anti-cancer activities, 6-shogaol can be served as a lead compound for new drug discovery. The lead compound derivative synthesis, bioactivity evaluation, and computational docking provide a promising opportunity to identify novel anticancer compounds originating from ginger. PMID:26477795

  11. Selective activation of human heat shock gene transcription by nitrosourea antitumor drugs mediated by isocyanate-induced damage and activation of heat shock transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Kroes, R.A. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL ); Abravaya, K.; Morimoto, R.I. ); Seidenfeld, J. )

    1991-06-01

    Treatment of cultured human tumor cells with the chloroethylnitrosourea antitumor drug 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) selectively induces transcription and protein synthesis of a subset of the human heat shock or stress-induced genes (HSP90 and HSP70) with little effect on other stress genes or on expression of the c-fos, c-myc, or {beta}-actin genes. The active component of BCNU and related compounds appears to be the isocyanate moiety that causes carbamoylation of proteins and nucleic acids. Transcriptional activation of the human HSP70 gene by BCNU is dependent on the heat shock element and correlates with the level of heat shock transcription factor and its binding to the heat shock element in vivo. Unlike activation by heat or heavy metals, BCNU-mediated activation is strongly dependent upon new protein synthesis. This suggests that BCNU-induced, isocyanate-mediated damage to newly synthesized protein(s) may be responsible for activation of the heat shock transcription factor and increased transcription of the HSP90 and HSP70 genes.

  12. Prelude to Passion: Limbic Activation by “Unseen” Drug and Sexual Cues

    PubMed Central

    Childress, Anna Rose; Ehrman, Ronald N.; Wang, Ze; Li, Yin; Sciortino, Nathan; Hakun, Jonathan; Jens, William; Suh, Jesse; Listerud, John; Marquez, Kathleen; Franklin, Teresa; Langleben, Daniel; Detre, John; O'Brien, Charles P.

    2008-01-01

    Background The human brain responds to recognizable signals for sex and for rewarding drugs of abuse by activation of limbic reward circuitry. Does the brain respond in similar way to such reward signals even when they are “unseen”, i.e., presented in a way that prevents their conscious recognition? Can the brain response to “unseen” reward cues predict the future affective response to recognizable versions of such cues, revealing a link between affective/motivational processes inside and outside awareness? Methodology/Principal Findings We exploited the fast temporal resolution of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test the brain response to “unseen” (backward-masked) cocaine, sexual, aversive and neutral cues of 33 milliseconds duration in male cocaine patients (n = 22). Two days after scanning, the affective valence for visible versions of each cue type was determined using an affective bias (priming) task. We demonstrate, for the first time, limbic brain activation by “unseen” drug and sexual cues of only 33 msec duration. Importantly, increased activity in an large interconnected ventral pallidum/amygdala cluster to the “unseen” cocaine cues strongly predicted future positive affect to visible versions of the same cues in subsequent off-magnet testing, pointing both to the functional significance of the rapid brain response, and to shared brain substrates for appetitive motivation within and outside awareness. Conclusions/Significance These findings represent the first evidence that brain reward circuitry responds to drug and sexual cues presented outside awareness. The results underscore the sensitivity of the brain to “unseen” reward signals and may represent the brain's primordial signature for desire. The limbic brain response to reward cues outside awareness may represent a potential vulnerability in disorders (e.g., the addictions) for whom poorly-controlled appetitive motivation is a central feature

  13. The In vitro anti-acne activity of two unani drugs

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shahid Shah; Tariq, Mohd.; Zaman, Roohi; Imtiyaz, Shaikh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acne is the most common disorder treated by dermatologists. As many as 80-90% of all adolescents have some type of acne and 30% of them require medical treatment. It is an inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit characterized by the formation of open and closed comedones, papules, pustules, nodules, and cysts. Aims: The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro anti-acne activity of two Unani single drugs Darchini (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Bl.) and Tukhm Khashkhash (Papaver somniferum L. seeds). Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activity of aqueous, ethanolic and hydroalcoholic extracts of both drugs were investigated against two acne causing bacteria, i.e., Propionibacterium acne and Staphylococcus epidermidis using well diffusion method. Results: The result showed that both drugs were active against the two bacteria. Against P. acne aqueous and ethanolic extract of Darchini and Tukhm Khashkhash showed the zone of inhibition of 18 ± 1.02 mm and 18 ± 1.6 mm and 13 ± 1.04 mm and 14 ± 1.8 mm, respectively. Against S. epidermidis aqueous, hydroalcoholic and ethanolic extracts of Darchini showed 22 ± 1.7 mm, 22 ± 1.2 mm and 15 ± 1.8 mm zone of inhibition respectively. Hydroalcoholic and ethanolic extracts of Tukhm Khashkhash showed 15 ± 1.09 mm and 13 ± 1.6 mm zone of inhibition respectively. Conclusion: This suggests that C. zeylanicum and P. somniferum have potential against acne causing bacteria and hence they can be used in topical anti-acne preparations and may address the antibiotic resistance of the bacteria. PMID:25161328

  14. Comparing the Effects of Light- or Sonic-Activated Drug Delivery: Photochemical/Sonochemical Internalization.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Steen J; Gonzales, Jonathan; Zamora, Genesis; Berg, Kristian; Nair, Rohit Kumar; Hirschberg, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a technique that uses the photochemical properties of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the enhanced delivery of endolysosomal-trapped macromolecules into the cell cytoplasm. The released agent can therefore exert its full biological activity, in contrast to being degraded by lysosomal hydrolases. Activation of photosensitizers via ultrasound (US), called sonodynamic therapy (SDT), has been proposed as an alternative to light-activated PDT for the treatment of cancerous tumors. The use of focused US (FUS) to activate photosensitizers allows treatment at tumor sites buried deep within tissues, overcoming one of the main limitations of PDT/PCI. We have examined ultrasonic activation of photosensitizers together with the anticancer agent bleomycin (BLM) using sonochemical internalization (SCI), as an alternative to light-activated PCI. Our results indicate that, compared to drug or US treatment alone, US activation of the photosensitizer AlPcS2a together with BLM significantly inhibits the ability of treated glioma cells to form clonogenic colonies. PMID:27279586

  15. Effect of cationic surfactant on transport of surface-active and non-surface-active model drugs and emulsion stability in triphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Chidambaram, N; Burgess, D J

    2000-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the effect of excess surfactant on transport kinetics in emulsions, using surface-active (phenobarbital, barbital) and non-surface-active (phenylazoaniline, benzocaine) model drugs (pH 7.0). Mineral oil was chosen as the oil phase, and the ionic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was chosen as the emulsifier. The effect of nonionic surfactant Brij 97 on transport kinetics of these model drugs were determined by authors elsewhere. Model drug transport in the triphasic systems was investigated using side-by-side diffusion cells mounted with hydrophilic dialysis membranes (molecular weight cutoffs 1 kD and 50 kD) and a novel bulk equilibrium reverse dialysis bag technique. Emulsion stability was determined by droplet size analysis as a function of time, temperature, and the presence of model drugs using photon correlation spectroscopy. Mineral oil/water partition coefficients and aqueous solubilities were determined in the presence of surfactant. The droplet size of the CTAB-stabilized emulsion system is bigger than that of the Brij 97-stabilized system because of the relatively less dense interfacial packing of the cationic surfactant. CTAB forms a complex with the model drugs because of ionic interaction between CTAB and the aromatic and azo groups of the model drugs. This complexation is expected to increase emulsion stability and affect model drug transport kinetics. The transport rates of model drugs in emulsions increased with increases in CTAB micellar concentrations up to 0.5% w/v and then decreased at higher surfactant concentrations. Total transport rates of phenobarbital and barbital were faster than those of phenylazoaniline and benzocaine. Excess surfactant affected the transport rates of the model drugs in the emulsions depending on drug surface activity and lipophilicity. The transport profiles of the model drugs appeared to be governed by model drug oil/water partition coefficient values and by

  16. Polycomb repressive complex 2 structure with inhibitor reveals a mechanism of activation and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brooun, Alexei; Gajiwala, Ketan S.; Deng, Ya-Li; Liu, Wei; Bolaños, Ben; Bingham, Patrick; He, You-Ai; Diehl, Wade; Grable, Nicole; Kung, Pei-Pei; Sutton, Scott; Maegley, Karen A.; Yu, Xiu; Stewart, Al E.

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) mediates gene silencing through chromatin reorganization by methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27). Overexpression of the complex and point mutations in the individual subunits of PRC2 have been shown to contribute to tumorigenesis. Several inhibitors of the PRC2 activity have shown efficacy in EZH2-mutated lymphomas and are currently in clinical development, although the molecular basis of inhibitor recognition remains unknown. Here we report the crystal structures of the inhibitor-bound wild-type and Y641N PRC2. The structures illuminate an important role played by a stretch of 17 residues in the N-terminal region of EZH2, we call the activation loop, in the stimulation of the enzyme activity, inhibitor recognition and the potential development of the mutation-mediated drug resistance. The work presented here provides new avenues for the design and development of next-generation PRC2 inhibitors through establishment of a structure-based drug design platform. PMID:27122193

  17. Tumor-selective peptide-carrier delivery of Paclitaxel increases in vivo activity of the drug

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Pillozzi, Serena; Falciani, Chiara; Depau, Lorenzo; Tenori, Eleonora; Scali, Silvia; Lozzi, Luisa; Pini, Alessandro; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Menichetti, Stefano; Bracci, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Taxanes are highly effective chemotherapeutic drugs against proliferating cancer and an established option in the standard treatment of ovarian and breast cancer. However, treatment with paclitaxel is associated with severe side effects, including sensory axonal neuropathy, and its poor solubility in water complicates its formulation. In this paper we report the in vitro and in vivo activity of a new form of paclitaxel, modified for conjugation with a tumor-selective tetrabranched peptide carrier (NT4). NT4 selectively targets tumor cells by binding to membrane sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and to endocytic receptors, like LRP1 and LRP6, which are established tumor markers. Biological activity of NT4-paclitaxel was tested in vitro on MDA-MB 231 and SKOV-3 cell lines, representing breast and ovarian cancer, respectively, and in vivo in an orthotopic mouse model of human breast cancer. Using in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we found that conjugation of paclitaxel with the NT4 peptide led to increased therapeutic activity of the drug in vivo. NT4-paclitaxel induced tumor regression, whereas treatment with unconjugated paclitaxel only produced a reduction in tumor growth. Moreover, unlike paclitaxel, NT4-paclitaxel is very hydrophilic, which may improve its pharmacokinetic profile and allow the use of less toxic dilution buffers, further decreasing its general chemotherapic toxicity. PMID:26626158

  18. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of action of auranofin against multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F N; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Hedrick, Victoria E; Paul, Lake N; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods employed to discover new antibiotics are both a time-consuming and financially-taxing venture. This has led researchers to mine existing libraries of clinical molecules in order to repurpose old drugs for new applications (as antimicrobials). Such an effort led to the discovery of auranofin, a drug initially approved as an anti-rheumatic agent, which also possesses potent antibacterial activity in a clinically achievable range. The present study demonstrates auranofin's antibacterial activity is a complex process that involves inhibition of multiple biosynthetic pathways including cell wall, DNA, and bacterial protein synthesis. We also confirmed that the lack of activity of auranofin observed against Gram-negative bacteria is due to the permeability barrier conferred by the outer membrane. Auranofin's ability to suppress bacterial protein synthesis leads to significant reduction in the production of key methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) toxins. Additionally, auranofin is capable of eradicating intracellular MRSA present inside infected macrophage cells. Furthermore, auranofin is efficacious in a mouse model of MRSA systemic infection and significantly reduces the bacterial load in murine organs including the spleen and liver. Collectively, this study provides valuable evidence that auranofin has significant promise to be repurposed as a novel antibacterial for treatment of invasive bacterial infections. PMID:26936660

  19. Urinary glucaric acid excretion in rheumatoid arthritis: influence of disease activity and disease modifying drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Addyman, R; Beyeler, C; Astbury, C; Bird, H A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if a correlation exists between cytochrome P-450 enzyme induction and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), measuring urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid (GA) as an index of phase II drug metabolism. METHODS: Patients with RA were treated with sulphasalazine, sodium aurothiomalate, or D-penicillamine in standard dose regimens, for 24 weeks. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or non-inflammatory arthritis (NIA) acted as controls. The urinary GA:creatinine ratio was measured at 0, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment. RESULTS: Patients with RA had a slightly greater urinary GA:creatinine ratio than patients with AS or NIA at baseline; this increased during treatment with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Sulphasalazine treatment had a greater effect on GA excretion than sodium aurothiomalate or D-penicillamine; this difference was statistically significant between weeks 0 and 12 (p = 0.01). Gamma glutamyltranspeptidase concentration showed a weak correlation with GA excretion between weeks 0 and 12 (p = 0.03), but all other measurements of changes in disease activity (plasma viscosity, C reactive protein, platelets, and articular index) were found not to correlate with GA excretion between weeks 0-12 or 0-24. CONCLUSION: The increased excretion of GA in patients with RA receiving DMARD treatment is probably the result of an indirect effect on hepatic metabolism bearing no relationship to disease activity. PMID:8774168

  20. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of action of auranofin against multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods employed to discover new antibiotics are both a time-consuming and financially-taxing venture. This has led researchers to mine existing libraries of clinical molecules in order to repurpose old drugs for new applications (as antimicrobials). Such an effort led to the discovery of auranofin, a drug initially approved as an anti-rheumatic agent, which also possesses potent antibacterial activity in a clinically achievable range. The present study demonstrates auranofin’s antibacterial activity is a complex process that involves inhibition of multiple biosynthetic pathways including cell wall, DNA, and bacterial protein synthesis. We also confirmed that the lack of activity of auranofin observed against Gram-negative bacteria is due to the permeability barrier conferred by the outer membrane. Auranofin’s ability to suppress bacterial protein synthesis leads to significant reduction in the production of key methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) toxins. Additionally, auranofin is capable of eradicating intracellular MRSA present inside infected macrophage cells. Furthermore, auranofin is efficacious in a mouse model of MRSA systemic infection and significantly reduces the bacterial load in murine organs including the spleen and liver. Collectively, this study provides valuable evidence that auranofin has significant promise to be repurposed as a novel antibacterial for treatment of invasive bacterial infections. PMID:26936660

  1. Transformable Peptide Nanocarriers for Expeditious Drug Release and Effective Cancer Therapy via Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Activation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Tianjiao; Zhao, Ying; Ding, Yanping; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Ruifang; Lang, Jiayan; Qin, Hao; Liu, Xiaoman; Shi, Jian; Tao, Ning; Qin, Zhihai; Nie, Guangjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2016-01-18

    A novel cleavable amphiphilic peptide (CAP) was designed to be specifically responsive to fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α), a protease specifically expressed on the surface of cancer-associated fibroblasts. The CAP self-assembled into fiber-like nanostructures in solution, while the presence of hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drugs readily transformed the assemblies into drug-loaded spherical nanoparticles. The disassembly of these nanoparticles (CAP-NPs) upon FAP-α cleavage resulted in rapid and efficient release of the encapsulated drugs specifically at tumor sites. This Transformers-like drug delivery strategy could allow them to disrupt the stromal barrier and enhance local drug accumulation. Therapeutic results suggested that drug-loaded CAP-NPs hold promising tumor specificity and therapeutic efficacy for various solid tumor models, confirming its potential utility and versatility in antitumor therapy. PMID:26283097

  2. Raman optical activity spectra and conformational elucidation of chiral drugs. The case of the antiangiogenic aeroplysinin-1.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Casado, Juan; Blanch, Ewan W; López Navarrete, Juan T; Quesada, Ana R; Ramírez, Francisco J

    2011-04-01

    We present the determination of the conformational properties of aeroplysinin-1 in aqueous solution by means of a combined experimental and theoretical Raman optical activity (ROA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) study. Aeroplysinin-1 is an antiangiogenic drug extracted from the sponge Aplysina cavernicola which has been proved to be a valuable candidate for the treatment of cancer and other antiangiogenic diseases. Our study shows that this molecule possesses the 1S,6R absolute configuration in aqueous solution, where only two conformers are present to a significant level. We discuss in detail the relationships between the chiro-optical ROA and VCD features, and the structural properties of various energy accessible conformers are described. The present work is one of the first studies in which both ROA and VCD have been used as complementary tools for the determination of absolute configuration and dominant solution-state conformations of an unknown therapeutically significant molecule. PMID:21401047

  3. Silicon nanowire based biosensing platform for electrochemical sensing of Mebendazole drug activity on breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shashaani, Hani; Faramarzpour, Mahsa; Hassanpour, Morteza; Namdar, Nasser; Alikhani, Alireza; Abdolahad, Mohammad

    2016-11-15

    Electrochemical approaches have played crucial roles in bio sensing because of their Potential in achieving sensitive, specific and low-cost detection of biomolecules and other bio evidences. Engineering the electrochemical sensing interface with nanomaterials tends to new generations of label-free biosensors with improved performances in terms of sensitive area and response signals. Here we applied Silicon Nanowire (SiNW) array electrodes (in an integrated architecture of working, counter and reference electrodes) grown by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system with VLS procedure to electrochemically diagnose the presence of breast cancer cells as well as their response to anticancer drugs. Mebendazole (MBZ), has been used as antitubulin drug. It perturbs the anodic/cathodic response of the cell covered biosensor by releasing Cytochrome C in cytoplasm. Reduction of cytochrome C would change the ionic state of the cells monitored by SiNW biosensor. By applying well direct bioelectrical contacts with cancer cells, SiNWs can detect minor signal transduction and bio recognition events, resulting in precise biosensing. Our device detected the trace of MBZ drugs (with the concentration of 2nM) on electrochemical activity MCF-7 cells. Also, experimented biological analysis such as confocal and Flowcytometry assays confirmed the electrochemical results. PMID:27196254

  4. Extracellularly activated nanocarriers: A new paradigm of tumor targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gullotti, Emily; Yeo, Yoon

    2009-01-01

    One of the main goals of nanomedicine is to develop a nanocarrier that can selectively deliver anti-cancer drugs to the targeted tumors. Extensive efforts have resulted in several tumor-targeted nanocarriers, some of which are approved for clinical use. Most nanocarriers achieve tumor-selective accumulation through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Targeting molecules such as antibodies, peptides, ligands, or nucleic acids attached to the nanocarriers further enhance their recognition and internalization by the target tissues. While both the stealth and targeting features are important for effective and selective drug delivery to the tumors, achieving both features simultaneously is often found to be difficult. Some of the recent targeting strategies have the potential to overcome this challenge. These strategies utilize the unique extracellular environment of tumors to change the long-circulating nanocarriers to release the drug or interact with cells in a tumor-specific manner. This review discusses the new targeting strategies with recent examples, which utilize the environmental stimuli to activate the nanocarriers. Traditional strategies for tumor-targeted nanocarriers are briefly discussed with an emphasis on their achievements and challenges. PMID:19366234

  5. Paclitaxel loading in PLGA nanospheres affected the in vitro drug cell accumulation and antiproliferative activity

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Luisa; Musumeci, Teresa; Giannone, Ignazio; Adamo, Luana; Conticello, Concetta; De Maria, Ruggero; Pignatello, Rosario; Puglisi, Giovanni; Gulisano, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Background PTX is one of the most widely used drug in oncology due to its high efficacy against solid tumors and several hematological cancers. PTX is administered in a formulation containing 1:1 Cremophor® EL (polyethoxylated castor oil) and ethanol, often responsible for toxic effects. Its encapsulation in colloidal delivery systems would gain an improved targeting to cancer cells, reducing the dose and frequency of administration. Methods In this paper PTX was loaded in PLGA NS. The activity of PTX-NS was assessed in vitro against thyroid, breast and bladder cancer cell lines in cultures. Cell growth was evaluated by MTS assay, intracellular NS uptake was performed using coumarin-6 labelled NS and the amount of intracellular PTX was measured by HPLC. Results NS loaded with 3% PTX (w/w) had a mean size < 250 nm and a polydispersity index of 0.4 after freeze-drying with 0.5% HP-Cyd as cryoprotector. PTX encapsulation efficiency was 30% and NS showed a prolonged drug release in vitro. An increase of the cytotoxic effect of PTX-NS was observed with respect to free PTX in all cell lines tested. Conclusion These findings suggest that the greater biological effect of PTX-NS could be due to higher uptake of the drug inside the cells as shown by intracellular NS uptake and cell accumulation studies. PMID:18657273

  6. Evaluation of photodynamic activity, photostability and in vitro drug release of zinc phthalocyanine-loaded nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Thiane Deprá; Ziembowicz, Francieli Isa; Müller, Debora Friedrich; Lauermann, Sâmera Cristina; Kloster, Carmen Luisa; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Machado, Giovanna; Villetti, Marcos Antonio

    2016-02-15

    Nanocapsule formulations containing zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) were investigated as drug delivery systems for use in photodynamic therapy (PDT). ZnPc loaded chitosan, PCL, and PCL coated with chitosan nanocapsules were prepared and characterized by means of their physicochemical properties, photodynamic activity, photostability and drug release profile. All formulations presented nanometric hydrodynamic radius, around 100 nm, low polydispersity index (0.08-0.24), slightly negative zeta potential for PCL nanoparticles and positive zeta potential for suspension containing chitosan. Encapsulation efficiencies were higher than 99%. The capacity of ZnPc loaded nanocapsules to produce cytotoxic singlet oxygen ((1)O2) by irradiation with red laser was monitored using 1.3-diphenylisobenzofuran as a probe. The singlet oxygen quantum yields (ΦΔ) for ZnPc loaded chitosan nanocapsules were high and similar to that of the standard (ZnPc in DMSO), displaying excellent ability to generate (1)O2. The photosensitizer loaded nanocapsules are photostable in the timescale usually utilized in PDT and only a small photobleaching event was observed when a light dose of 610J/cm(2) was applied. The in vitro drug release studies of ZnPc from all nanocapsules demonstrated a sustained release profile controlled by diffusion, without burst effect. The nature of the polymer and the core type of the nanocapsules regulated ZnPc release. Thus, the nanocapsules developed in this work are a promising strategy to be employed in PDT. PMID:26678154

  7. Applicator for in-vitro ultrasound-activated targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerold, B.; Gourevich, D.; Volovick, A.; Xu, D.; Arditti, F.; Prentice, P.; Cochran, S.; Gnaim, J.; Medan, Y.; Wang, L.; Melzer, A.

    2012-10-01

    Reducing toxicity and improving uptake of cancer drugs in tumors are important goals of targeted drug delivery (TDD). Ultrasonic drug release from various encapsulants has been a focus of many research groups. However, a single standard ultrasonic device, viable for use by biologists, is not currently present in the market. The device reported here is designed to allow investigation of the impact of ultrasound on cellular uptake and cell viability in-vitro. In it, single-element transducers with different operating frequencies are mounted below a standard 96-well plate. The plate is moved above the transducers, such that each line of wells can be sonicated at a different frequency. To assess the device, 96-well plates were seeded with cells and sonicated using different ultrasonic parameters, with and without doxorubicin. Cell viability was measured by colorimetric MTT assay and the uptake of doxorubicin by cells was also determined. The device proved to be highly viable in preliminary tests; it demonstrated that change in ultrasonic parameters produces different effect on cells. For example, increase in uptake of doxorubicin was demonstrated following ultrasound application. The growing interest in ultrasound-activated TDD emphasizes the need for standardization of the ultrasound device and the one reported here may offer some indications of how that may be achieved. It is planned to further improve the prototype by increasing the number of ultrasonic frequencies and degrees of freedom for each transducer.

  8. The anti-obesity drug orlistat reveals anti-viral activity.

    PubMed

    Ammer, Elisabeth; Nietzsche, Sandor; Rien, Christian; Kühnl, Alexander; Mader, Theresa; Heller, Regine; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Henke, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The administration of drugs to inhibit metabolic pathways not only reduces the risk of obesity-induced diseases in humans but may also hamper the replication of different viral pathogens. In order to investigate the value of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-obesity drug orlistat in view of its anti-viral activity against different human-pathogenic viruses, several anti-viral studies, electron microscopy analyses as well as fatty acid uptake experiments were performed. The results indicate that administrations of non-cytotoxic concentrations of orlistat reduced the replication of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) in different cell types significantly. Moreover, orlistat revealed cell protective effects and modified the formation of multi-layered structures in CVB3-infected cells, which are necessary for viral replication. Lowering fatty acid uptake from the extracellular environment by phloretin administrations had only marginal impact on CVB3 replication. Finally, orlistat reduced also the replication of varicella-zoster virus moderately but had no significant influence on the replication of influenza A viruses. The data support further experiments into the value of orlistat as an inhibitor of the fatty acid synthase to develop new anti-viral compounds, which are based on the modulation of cellular metabolic pathways. PMID:25680890

  9. Novel antimicrobial peptides that exhibit activity against select agents and other drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Divakaramenon; Klapper, David; Srouji, Antoine H; Bhonsle, Jayendra B; Borschel, Richard; Mueller, Allen; Russell, Amanda L; Williams, Brittany C; Hicks, Rickey P

    2010-07-15

    One of the greatest challenges facing modern medicine is the evolution of drug resistant strains of bacteria. In addition to traditional methods of exposure to traditional bacterial organisms there is a growing concerned of the use of bacteria as bio-terrorism agents. To counter the evolution of drug resistant and potential bio-terrorism bacterial agents new antibiotic drugs must be developed. One potential source of new therapeutic agents that act via a novel mechanism of action are natural and synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In our laboratories we have developed a series of AMPs incorporating the un-natural amino acids Tic-Oic to impart organism selectivity and potency while increasing metabolic stability. Herein the in vitro activity of these peptides, including ten new compounds, against eight potential bio-terrorism bacterial agents and three other bacterial strains is presented and discussed. These peptides exhibit a wide range of organism potency and selectivity. Calcein fluorescence leakage and circular dichroism studies were conducted to confirm that these peptides interact with zwitterionic and anionic liposomes. PMID:20558071

  10. ERα propelled aberrant global DNA hypermethylation by activating the DNMT1 gene to enhance anticancer drug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jinghuan; Ding, Haijian; Zhang, Xin A.; Shao, Lipei; Yang, Nan; Cheng, He; Sun, Luan; Zhu, Dongliang; Yang, Yin; Li, Andi; Han, Xiao; Sun, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced aberrant DNA methylation is the first identified epigenetic marker involved in chemotherapy resistance. Understanding how the aberrant DNA methylation is acquired would impact cancer treatment in theory and practice. In this study we systematically investigated whether and how ERα propelled aberrant global DNA hypermethylation in the context of breast cancer drug resistance. Our data demonstrated that anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) augmented ERα binding to the DNMT1 and DNMT3b promoters to activate DNMT1 and DNMT3b genes, enhancing the PTX resistance of breast cancer cells. In support of these observations, estrogen enhanced multi-drug resistance of breast cancer cells by up-regulation of DNMT1 and DNMT3b genes. Nevertheless, the aberrant global DNA hypermethylation was dominantly induced by ERα-activated-DNMT1, since DNMT1 over-expression significantly increased global DNA methylation and DNMT1 knockdown reversed the ERα-induced global DNA methylation. Altering DNMT3b expression had no detectable effect on global DNA methylation. Consistently, the expression level of DNMT1 was positively correlated with ERα in 78 breast cancer tissue samples shown by our immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis and negatively correlated with relapse-free survival (RFS) and distance metastasis-free survival (DMFS) of ERα-positive breast cancer patients. This study provides a new perspective for understanding the mechanism underlying drug-resistance-facilitating aberrant DNA methylation in breast cancer and other estrogen dependent tumors. PMID:26980709

  11. In Vitro Activities of Eight Antifungal Drugs against 106 Waterborne and Cutaneous Exophiala Species

    PubMed Central

    Najafzadeh, M. J.; Saradeghi Keisari, M.; Vicente, V. A.; Feng, P.; Shamsian, S. A. A.; Rezaei-Matehkolaei, A.; de Hoog, G. S.; Curfs-Breuker, I.

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro activities of eight antifungal drugs against 106 clinical and environmental isolates of waterborne and cutaneous Exophiala species were tested. The MICs and minimum effective concentrations for 90% of the strains tested (n = 106) were, in increasing order, as follows: posaconazole, 0.063 μg/ml; itraconazole, 0.25 μg/ml; micafungin, 1 μg/ml; voriconazole, 2 μg/ml; isavuconazole, 4 μg/ml; caspofungin, 8 μg/ml; amphotericin B, 16 μg/ml; fluconazole, 64 μg/ml. PMID:24100491

  12. Parasite Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases as Drug Discovery Targets to Treat Human Protozoan Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Brumlik, Michael J.; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Ludwig, Sara M.; Murthy, Kruthi; Curiel, Tyler J.

    2011-01-01

    Protozoan pathogens are a highly diverse group of unicellular organisms, several of which are significant human pathogens. One group of protozoan pathogens includes obligate intracellular parasites such as agents of malaria, leishmaniasis, babesiosis, and toxoplasmosis. The other group includes extracellular pathogens such as agents of giardiasis and amebiasis. An unfortunate unifying theme for most human protozoan pathogens is that highly effective treatments for them are generally lacking. We will review targeting protozoan mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) as a novel drug discovery approach towards developing better therapies, focusing on Plasmodia, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma, about which the most is known. PMID:21637385

  13. [Studies of the active constituents of the Chinese drug "duhuo" Angelica pubescents].

    PubMed

    Li, R Z; He, Y Q; Chiao, M; Xu, Y; Zhang, Q B; Meng, J R; Gu, Y; Ge, L P

    1989-01-01

    Eight coumarins isolated from the alcohol extract of the Chinese drug "Duhuo", the root of Angelica pubescents Maxim. f. biserrata Shan et Yuan (Umbelliferae) were elucidated to be columbianetin (I), columbianetin acetate (II), columbiadin (III), osthol (IV), isoimperatorin (V), bergapten (VI), xanthotoxin (VII), and columbianetin-beta-D-glucopyranoside (VIII), by chemical and spectral analysis, compound VIII was isolated from plant for the first time. All these coumarins were tested on platelet aggregation induced by 2 microns ADP. I, II, III, IV and VIII showed strong inhibiting activity against platelet aggregation. PMID:2618698

  14. Enhancing Activity of Anticancer Drugs in Multidrug Resistant Tumors by Modulating P-Glycoprotein through Dietary Nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad; Maryam, Amara; Mehmood, Tahir; Zhang, Yaofang; Ma, Tonghui

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a principal mechanism by which tumors become resistant to structurally and functionally unrelated anticancer drugs. Resistance to chemotherapy has been correlated with overexpression of p-glycoprotein (p-gp), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of membrane transporters. P-gp mediates resistance to a broad-spectrum of anticancer drugs including doxorubicin, taxol, and vinca alkaloids by actively expelling the drugs from cells. Use of specific inhibitors/blocker of p-gp in combination with clinically important anticancer drugs has emerged as a new paradigm for overcoming multidrug resistance. The aim of this paper is to review p-gp regulation by dietary nutraceuticals and to correlate this dietary nutraceutical induced-modulation of p-gp with activity of anticancer drugs. PMID:26514453

  15. Improved drug targeting of cancer cells by utilizing actively targetable folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheyu; Li, Yan; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oneill, Brian; Bi, Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres (FA-AN) have been developed to provide an actively targetable drug delivery system for improved drug targeting of cancer cells with reduced side effects. The nanospheres were prepared by conjugating folic acid onto the surface of albumin nanospheres using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a catalyst. To test the efficacy of these nanospheres as a potential delivery platform, doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanospheres (DOX-AN) and doxorubicin-loaded FA-AN (FA-DOX-AN) were prepared by entrapping DOX (an anthracycline, antibiotic drug widely used in cancer chemotherapy that works by intercalating DNA) into AN and FA-AN nanoparticles. Cell uptake of the DOX was then measured. The results show that FA-AN was incorporated into HeLa cells (tumor cells) only after 2.0h incubation, whereas HeLa cells failed to incorporate albumin nanospheres without conjugated folic acid after 4.0h incubation. When HeLa cells were treated with the DOX-AN, FA-DOX-AN nanoparticles or free DOX, cell viability decreased with increasing culture time (i.e. cell death increases with time) over a 70h period. Cell viability was always the lowest for free DOX followed by FA-DOX-AN4 and then DOX-AN. In a second set of experiments, HeLa cells washed to remove excess DOX after an initial incubation for 2h were incubated for 70h. The corresponding cell viability was slightly higher when the cells were treated with FA-DOX-AN or free DOX whilst cells treated with DOX-AN nanoparticles remained viable. The above experiments were repeated for non-cancerous, aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). As expected, cell viability of the HeLa cells (with FA receptor alpha, FRα) and AoSMC cells (without FRα) decreased rapidly with time in the presence of free DOX, but treatment with FA-DOX-AN resulted in selective killing of the tumor