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Sample records for active dry yeasts

  1. Vitality enhancement of the rehydrated active dry wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Porrata, B; Novo, M; Guillamón, J; Rozès, N; Mas, A; Otero, R Cordero

    2008-08-15

    In winemaking, spontaneous grape must fermentations have been replaced by inoculation of commercial active dry wine yeast (ADWY). Yeast rehydration is the key to avoiding stuck and sluggish fermentations. Despite the importance of this step, not enough is known about what this process implies for winemaking as a whole or about what kind of practices could help to improve it. The main aim of this study is to determine the best yeast rehydration conditions for ensuring good cell viability and vitality before inoculation into the must. The experimental rehydration media in this study can be divided into four groups: carbon and nitrogen compounds, metallic ions, oxidant and antioxidant agents, and membrane fluidity agents. We studied the biochemical and biophysical behaviour of ADWY after rehydration in the various media under oenological conditions, i.e. incubation at 37 degrees C for 30 min. The viability of rehydrated yeast cells was evaluated by plating, and assessed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The vitality of rehydrated cells was estimated by indirect impedance. The rehydrating solution complemented with magnesium provided the best vitality rate because the time taken to reach the activity threshold was cut by two thirds. This improvement was also illustrated by the less time needed to stop the leakage of intracellular compounds during the rehydration process.

  2. Glass transition temperatures and fermentative activity of heat-treated commercial active dry yeasts.

    PubMed

    Schebor, C; Galvagno, M; del Pilar Buera, M; Chirife, J

    2000-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry thermograms of various samples of commercial instant active dry yeasts revealed a clear glass transition typical of amorphous carbohydrates and sugars. The resulting glass transition temperatures were found to decrease with increasing moisture content. The observed glass curve was similar to that of pure trehalose, which is known to accumulate in large amounts in baker's yeast. The effect of heat treatment at various temperatures on the fermentative activity (as measured by the metabolic production of CO(2)) of dry yeast was studied. First-order plots were obtained representing the loss of fermentative activity as a function of heating time at the various temperatures assayed. Significant losses of fermentative activity were observed in vitrified yeast samples. The dependence of rate constants with temperature was found to follow Arrhenius behavior. The relationship between the loss of fermentative activity and glass transition was not verified, and the glass transition was not reflected on the temperature dependence of fermentative activity loss.

  3. Antioxidant defense parameters as predictive biomarkers for fermentative capacity of active dried wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Gamero-Sandemetrio, Esther; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Matallana, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    The production of active dried yeast (ADY) is a common practice in industry for the maintenance of yeast starters and as a means of long term storage. The process, however, causes multiple cell injuries, with oxidative damage being one of the most important stresses. Consequentially, dehydration tolerance is a highly appreciated property in yeast for ADY production. In this study we analyzed the cellular redox environment in three Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains, which show markedly different fermentative capacities after dehydration. To measure/quantify the effect of dehydration on the S. cerevisiae strains, we used: (i) fluorescent probes; (ii) antioxidant enzyme activities; (ii) intracellular damage; (iii) antioxidant metabolites; and (iv) gene expression, to select a minimal set of biochemical parameters capable of predicting desiccation tolerance in wine yeasts. Our results show that naturally enhanced antioxidant defenses prevent oxidative damage after wine yeast biomass dehydration and improve fermentative capacity. Based on these results we chose four easily assayable parameters/biomarkers for the selection of industrial yeast strains of interest for ADY production: trehalose and glutathione levels, and glutathione reductase and catalase enzymatic activities. Yeast strains selected in accordance with this process display high levels of trehalose, low levels of oxidized glutathione, a high induction of glutathione reductase activity, as well as a high basal level and sufficient induction of catalase activity, which are properties inherent in superior ADY strains.

  4. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  5. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  6. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  7. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  8. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida...

  9. Construction of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for bioethanol active dry yeast (ADY) production.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhang, Ke; Gao, Kehui; Liu, Zewei; Zhang, Xing; Li, Ou; Sun, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Du, Fengguang; Sun, Peiyong; Qu, Aimin; Wu, Xuechang

    2013-01-01

    The application of active dry yeast (ADY) in bioethanol production simplifies operation processes and reduces the risk of bacterial contamination. In the present study, we constructed a novel ADY strain with improved stress tolerance and ethanol fermentation performances under stressful conditions. The industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain ZTW1 showed excellent properties and thus subjected to a modified whole-genome shuffling (WGS) process to improve its ethanol titer, proliferation capability, and multiple stress tolerance for ADY production. The best-performing mutant, Z3-86, was obtained after three rounds of WGS, producing 4.4% more ethanol and retaining 2.15-fold higher viability than ZTW1 after drying. Proteomics and physiological analyses indicated that the altered expression patterns of genes involved in protein metabolism, plasma membrane composition, trehalose metabolism, and oxidative responses contribute to the trait improvement of Z3-86. This work not only successfully developed a novel S. cerevisiae mutant for application in commercial bioethanol production, but also enriched the current understanding of how WGS improves the complex traits of microbes.

  10. Oxidative stress responses and lipid peroxidation damage are induced during dehydration in the production of dry active wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Garre, Elena; Raginel, Françoise; Palacios, Antonio; Julien, Anne; Matallana, Emilia

    2010-01-01

    The tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to desiccation is important for the use of this microorganism in the wine industry, since active dry wine yeast is routinely used as starter for must fermentations. Many studies have shown the complexity of the cellular effects caused by water loss, including oxidative injuries on macromolecular components. However the technological interest of yeast drying was not addressed in those studies, and the dehydration conditions were far from the industrial practice. In the present study a molecular approach was used to characterize the relevant injuring conditions during pilot plant dehydration under two different drying temperatures (i.e., 35 and 41 degrees C). We have analyzed expression changes for several stress gene markers and we have determined two biochemical redox indicators (glutathione and lipid peroxidation levels) during pilot plant dehydration to produce active dry biomass, according to the standard practice in industry. The main gene expression response involves the induction of genes TRR1 and GRX5, corresponding to the two main redox balance systems, thioredoxins and glutathione/glutaredoxins. Elevated glutathione content and significant lipid peroxidation damage indicate the physiological impact of the oxidative stress on cellular components. The comparison between commercial stocks and pilot plant samples demonstrate the suitability of the molecular approach at the pilot plant scale to study physiological traits of industrial yeast products.

  11. Field-flow fractionation as analytical technique for the characterization of dry yeast: correlation with wine fermentation activity.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ramsés; Galceran, Ma Teresa; Puignou, Lluís

    2003-01-01

    Important oenological properties of wine depend on the winemaking yeast used in the fermentation process. There is considerable controversy about the quality of yeast, and a simple and cheap analytical methodology for quality control of yeast is needed. Gravitational field flow fractionation (GFFF) was used to characterize several commercial active dry wine yeasts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus and to assess the quality of the raw material before use. Laboratory-scale fermentations were performed using two different S. cerevisiae strains as inocula, and GFFF was used to follow the behavior of yeast cells during alcoholic fermentation. The viable/nonviable cell ratio was obtained by flow cytometry (FC) using propidium iodide as fluorescent dye. In each experiment, the amount of dry wine yeast to be used was calculated in order to provide the same quantity of viable cells. Kinetic studies of the fermentation process were performed controlling the density of the must, from 1.071 to 0.989 (20/20 density), and the total residual sugars, from 170 to 3 g/L. During the wine fermentation process, differences in the peak profiles obtained by GFFF between the two types of commercial yeasts that can be related with the unlike cell growth were observed. Moreover, the strains showed different fermentation kinetic profiles that could be correlated with the corresponding fractograms monitored by GFFF. These results allow optimism that sedimentation FFF techniques could be successfully used for quality assessment of the raw material and to predict yeast behavior during yeast-based bioprocesses such as wine production.

  12. Effects of dietary supplementation of active dried yeast on fecal methanogenic archaea diversity in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dingxing; Kang, Kun; Wang, Hongze; Wang, Zhisheng; Xue, Bai; Wang, Lizhi; Xu, Feng; Peng, Quanhui

    2017-02-07

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of different dosages of active dried yeast (ADY) on the fecal methanogenic archaea community of dairy cattle. Twelve multiparous, healthy, mid-lactating Holstein dairy cows (body weight: 584 ± 23.2 kg, milk produced: 26.3 ± 1.22 kg/d) were randomly assigned to one of three treatments (control, ADY2, and ADY4) according to body weight with four replicates per treatment. Cows in the control group were fed conventional rations without ADY supplementation, while cows in the ADY2 and ADY4 group were fed rations supplemented with ADY at 2 or 4 g/d/head. Real-time PCR analysis showed the populations of total methanogens in the feces were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in the ADY4 group compared with control. High-throughput sequencing technology was applied to examine the differences in methanogenic archaea diversity in the feces of the three treatment groups. A total of 155,609 sequences were recovered (a mean of 12,967 sequences per sample) from the twelve fecal samples, which consisted of a number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) ranging from 1451 to 1,733, were assigned to two phyla, four classes, five orders, five families and six genera. Bioinformatic analyses illustrated that the natural fecal archaeal community of the control group was predominated by Methanobrevibacter (86.9% of the total sequence reads) and Methanocorpusculum (10.4%), while the relative abundance of the remaining four genera were below 1% with Methanosphaera comprising 0.8%, Thermoplasma composing 0.4%, and the relative abundance of Candidatus Nitrososphaera and Halalkalicoccus being close to zero. At the genus level, the relative abundances of Methanocorpusculum and Thermoplasma were increased (P < 0.05) with increasing dosage of ADY. Conversely, the predominant methanogen genus Methanobrevibacter was decreased with ADY dosage (P < 0.05). Dietary supplementation of ADY had no significant effect (P

  13. Differing effects of 2 active dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains on ruminal acidosis and methane production in nonlactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y-H; Walker, N D; McGinn, S M; Beauchemin, K A

    2011-05-01

    Fifteen ruminally cannulated, nonlactating Holstein cows were used to measure the effects of 2 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fed as active dried yeasts, on ruminal pH and fermentation and enteric methane (CH(4)) emissions. Nonlactating cows were blocked by total duration (h) that their ruminal pH was below 5.8 during a 6-d pre-experimental period. Within each block, cows were randomly assigned to control (no yeast), yeast strain 1 (Levucell SC), or yeast strain 2 (a novel strain selected for enhanced in vitro fiber degradation), with both strains (Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Montréal, QC, Canada) providing 1 × 10(10) cfu/head per day. Cows were fed once daily a total mixed ration consisting of a 50:50 forage to concentrate ratio (dry matter basis). The yeast strains were dosed via the rumen cannula daily at the time of feeding. During the 35-d experiment, ruminal pH was measured continuously for 7 d (d 22 to 28) by using an indwelling system, and CH(4) gas was measured for 4 d (d 32 to 35) using the sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas technique (with halters and yokes). Rumen contents were sampled on 2 d (d 22 and 26) at 0, 3, and 6h after feeding. Dry matter intake, body weight, and apparent total-tract digestibility of nutrients were not affected by yeast feeding. Strain 2 decreased the average daily minimum (5.35 vs. 5.65 or 5.66), mean (5.98 vs. 6.24 or 6.34), and maximum ruminal pH (6.71 vs. 6.86 or 6.86), and prolonged the time that ruminal pH was below 5.8 (7.5 vs. 3.3 or 1.0 h/d) compared with the control or strain 1, respectively. The molar percentage of acetate was lower and that of propionate was greater in the ruminal fluid of cows receiving strain 2 compared with cows receiving no yeast or strain 1. Enteric CH(4) production adjusted for intake of dry matter or gross energy, however, did not differ between either yeast strain compared with the control but it tended to be reduced by 10% when strain 2 was compared with strain 1. The study shows that

  14. Food-grade argan oil supplementation in molasses enhances fermentative performance and antioxidant defenses of active dry wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Gamero-Sandemetrio, Esther; Torrellas, Max; Rábena, María Teresa; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Aranda, Agustín; Matallana, Emilia

    2015-12-01

    The tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to desiccation is important for the use of this microorganism in the wine industry, since active dry yeast (ADY) is routinely used as starter for must fermentations. Both biomass propagation and dehydration cause cellular oxidative stress, therefore negatively affecting yeast performance. Protective treatments against oxidative damage, such as natural antioxidants, may have important biotechnological implications. In this study we analysed the antioxidant capacity of pure chemical compounds (quercetin, ascorbic acid, caffeic acid, oleic acid, and glutathione) added to molasses during biomass propagation, and we determine several oxidative damage/response parameters (lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, protective metabolites and enzymatic activities) to assess their molecular effects. Supplementation with ascorbic, caffeic or oleic acids diminished the oxidative damage associated to ADY production. Based on these results, we tested supplementation of molasses with argan oil, a natural food-grade ingredient rich in these three antioxidants, and we showed that it improved both biomass yield and fermentative performance of ADY. Therefore, we propose the use of natural, food-grade antioxidant ingredients, such as argan oil, in industrial processes involving high cellular oxidative stress, such as the biotechnological production of the dry starter.

  15. The effects of active dried and killed dried yeast on subacute ruminal acidosis, ruminal fermentation, and nutrient digestibility in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Vyas, D; Uwizeye, A; Mohammed, R; Yang, W Z; Walker, N D; Beauchemin, K A

    2014-02-01

    The study addressed the importance of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) viability for reducing the incidence of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) and improving total tract nutrient digestibility in beef heifers. Six ruminally cannulated beef heifers (680 ± 50 kg BW) were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design and were fed a diet consisting of 40% barley silage, 10% chopped grass hay, and 50% barley grain-based concentrate (DM basis). Treatments were 1) no yeast (Control), 2) active dried yeast (ADY; 4 g providing 10(10) cfu/g; AB Vista, Marlborough, UK), and 3) killed dried yeast (KDY; 4 g autoclaved ADY). The treatments were directly dosed via the ruminal cannula daily at the time of feeding. The periods consisted of 2 wk of adaptation (d 1 to 14) and 7 d of measurements (d 15 to 21). Ruminal pH was continuously measured (d 15 to 21) using an indwelling system. Ruminal contents were sampled on d 15 and 17 at 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 h after feeding. Total tract nutrient digestibility was measured using an external marker (YbCl3) from d 15 to 19. No treatment difference was observed for DMI (P = 0.86). Yeast supplementation (ADY and KDY) tended to increase total tract digestibility of starch (P = 0.07) whereas no effects were observed on digestibility of other nutrients. Both ADY and KDY elevated minimum (P < 0.01) and mean ruminal pH (P = 0.02) whereas no effects were observed on maximum pH (P = 0.12). Irrespective of its viability, yeast supplementation was effective in reducing time that ruminal pH was below 5.8 (P < 0.01) and 5.6 (P < 0.01). No treatment differences were observed for the ruminal VFA profile and lactate concentration. No treatment differences were observed on the relative population size of Streptococcus bovis, Fibrobacter succinogenes, and Megasphaera elsdenii (P > 0.10); however, the proportion of Ruminococcus flavefaciens in solid fraction of digesta was greater with KDY (P = 0.05). The study demonstrates the positive effects of yeast

  16. Fermentative capacity of dry active wine yeast requires a specific oxidative stress response during industrial biomass growth.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Larsson, Christer; Matallana, Emilia

    2009-01-01

    Induction of the oxidative stress response has been described under many physiological conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including industrial fermentation for wine yeast biomass production where cells are grown through several batch and fed-batch cultures on molasses. Here, we investigate the influence of aeration on the expression changes of different gene markers for oxidative stress and compare the induction profiles to the accumulation of several intracellular metabolites in order to correlate the molecular response to physiological and metabolic changes. We also demonstrate that this specific oxidative response is relevant for wine yeast performance by construction of a genetically engineered wine yeast strain overexpressing the TRX2 gene that codifies a thioredoxin, one of the most important cellular defenses against oxidative damage. This modified strain displays an improved fermentative capacity and lower levels of oxidative cellular damages than its parental strain after dry biomass production.

  17. Yeast strains as potential aroma enhancers in dry fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Flores, Mónica; Corral, Sara; Cano-García, Liliana; Salvador, Ana; Belloch, Carmela

    2015-11-06

    Actual healthy trends produce changes in the sensory characteristics of dry fermented sausages therefore, new strategies are needed to enhance their aroma. In particular, a reduction in the aroma characteristics was observed in reduced fat and salt dry sausages. In terms of aroma enhancing, generally coagulase-negative cocci were selected as the most important group from the endogenous microbiota in the production of flavour compounds. Among the volatile compounds analysed in dry sausages, ester compounds contribute to fruity aroma notes associated with high acceptance of traditional dry sausages. However, the origin of ester compounds in traditional dry sausages can be due to other microorganisms as lactic acid bacteria, yeast and moulds. Yeast contribution in dry fermented sausages was investigated with opposite results attributed to low yeast survival or low activity during processing. Generally, they affect sausage colour and flavour by their oxygen-scavenging and lipolytic activities in addition to, their ability to catabolize fermentation products such as lactate increasing the pH and contributing to less tangy and more aromatic sausages. Recently, the isolation and characterization of yeast from traditional dry fermented sausages made possible the selection of those with ability to produce aroma active compounds. Molecular methods were used for genetic typing of the isolated yeasts whereas their ability to produce aroma compounds was tested in different systems such as in culture media, in model systems and finally on dry fermented sausages. The results revealed that the appropriate selection of yeast strains with aroma potential may be used to improve the sensory characteristics of reformulated fermented sausages.

  18. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity. The food additive Pichia pastoris dried yeast may be used in feed formulations of broiler chickens as a source of protein not...

  19. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity. The food additive Pichia pastoris dried yeast may be used in feed formulations of broiler chickens as a source of protein not...

  20. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity. The food additive Pichia pastoris dried yeast may be used in feed formulations of broiler chickens as a source of protein not...

  1. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity. The food additive Pichia pastoris dried yeast may be used in feed formulations of broiler chickens as a source of protein not...

  2. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity. The food additive Pichia pastoris dried yeast may be used in feed formulations of broiler chickens as a source of protein not...

  3. Thermal destruction of dried vegetative yeast cells and dried bacterial spores in a convective hot air flow: strong influence of initial water activity.

    PubMed

    Fine, Frédéric; Gervais, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Thermal treatment of Bacillus subtilis spores and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells dried on glass beads was performed at various initial water activities (in the range 0.10-0.90). Experiments were carried out at 150 degrees C, 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C for 5-120 s. Significant destruction of up to 10(7) vegetative cells and up to 10(5) spores g(-1) was achieved, depending upon treatment conditions. This study demonstrated that the initial water activity (a(w)) value of a sample is very important in the destruction or survival of microorganisms treated with hot air stresses. As described previously, the heat resistance of spores and vegetative cells was strongly enhanced by low initial a(w) values until an optimal a(w) value between 0.30 and 0.50, with maximal viability at 0.35 for both S. cerevisiae and B. subtilis. However, our results highlighted for the first time that very low initial a(w) values (close to 0.10) greatly improved the destruction of spores and vegetative cells. Factors and possible mechanisms involved in the death of vegetative cells and spores are discussed.

  4. An RT-qPCR approach to study the expression of genes responsible for sugar assimilation during rehydration of active dry yeast.

    PubMed

    Vaudano, Enrico; Costantini, Antonella; Noti, Olta; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2010-09-01

    A short reactivation period in aqueous media is required for active dry yeast (ADY) to be utilised in winemaking. Rehydration restores the active metabolic conditions necessary for good fermentative and competitive abilities. We used a reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) method with relative quantification to investigate the expression of seven hexose transporter genes (HXT1-7) and one invertase-encoding gene (SUC2) during ADY rehydration in water with or without sucrose. For this, seven candidate reference genes were evaluated, and the three most stably expressed genes were selected and used for mRNA normalisation. The results show that, during the rehydration in the presence of sucrose, yeast cells are able to immediately hydrolyse this sugar into glucose and fructose as soon as they are introduced in the medium. Subsequently, differential glucose/fructose uptake occurs, which is mediated by hexose transporters. At the transcriptomic level, there is a strong induction of the high-affinity transporters, HXT2 and HXT4, and the low-affinity transporters, HXT3 and HXT1, when ADY is rehydrated with sucrose, while HXT5 and HXT6/7 are expressed at high levels with a moderate tendency to decrease. In water, the HXT2 gene was the only one of the transporter genes studied that showed significant variations. These results suggest that during rehydration, expression is not simply regulated by the affinity to hexose but is also controlled by other mechanisms that allow the cell to bypass glucose control. Moreover, the expression of SUC2 showed little variation in media with sucrose, suggesting that other invertases and/or posttranscriptional controls exist.

  5. Dry red wine making using yeast immobilized on cork pieces.

    PubMed

    Tsakiris, Argyris; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Bekatorou, Argyro; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2010-11-01

    The commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Uvaferme 299 wine yeast was immobilized on cork pieces to produce a biocatalyst for use in dry red wine making. The immobilized biocatalyst was suitable for clarified and non-clarified grape must fermentation at ambient and low temperatures (0-25 degrees C). Fermentation times were low and very low amounts of residual sugar were detected, showing suitability for dry wine production. The presence of suspended solids in the non-clarified must did not affect the activity of the immobilized cells. Complete fermentation of sugars at 0 degrees C was possible with immobilized Uvaferme 299, although not a cryotolerant strain, indicating a cryoprotective effect of cork. The presence of cork did not affect the composition of major volatiles with methanol and acetaldehyde kept at low levels. Reduction of amyl alcohols on total volatiles was also observed in wines fermented at low temperatures. Differences in the headspace aroma profile in wines produced by immobilized and free cells were found by GC-MS analysis, but no cork taint compounds were detected.

  6. Optimization of air-blast drying process for manufacturing Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeast as industrial wine starters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae-Byuk; Choi, Won-Seok; Jo, Hyun-Jung; Yeo, Soo-Hwan; Park, Heui-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Wine yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae D8) and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts (Hanseniaspora uvarum S6 and Issatchenkia orientalis KMBL5774) were studied using air-blast drying instead of the conventional drying methods (such as freeze and spray drying). Skim milk-a widely used protective agent-was used and in all strains, the highest viabilities following air-blast drying were obtained using 10% skim milk. Four excipients (wheat flour, nuruk, artichoke powder, and lactomil) were evaluated as protective agents for yeast strains during air-blast drying. Our results showed that 7 g lactomil was the best excipient in terms of drying time, powder form, and the survival rate of the yeast in the final product. Finally, 7 types of sugars were investigated to improve the survival rate of air-blast dried yeast cells: 10% trehalose, 10% sucrose, and 10% glucose had the highest survival rate of 97.54, 92.59, and 79.49% for S. cerevisiae D8, H. uvarum S6, and I. orientalis KMBL5774, respectively. After 3 months of storage, S. cerevisiae D8 and H. uvarum S6 demonstrated good survival rates (making them suitable for use as starters), whereas the survival rate of I. orientalis KMBL5774 decreased considerably compared to the other strains. Air-blast dried S. cerevisiae D8 and H. uvarum S6 showed metabolic activities similar to those of non-dried yeast cells, regardless of the storage period. Air-blast dried I. orientalis KMBL5774 showed a noticeable decrease in its ability to decompose malic acid after 3 months of storage at 4 °C.

  7. Inventions on baker's yeast storage and activation at the bakery plant.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Baker's yeast is the gas-forming ingredient in bakery products. Methods have been invented to properly handle baker's yeast and optimize its activity at the bakery plant. Over the years, incentives for inventions on yeast storage and activation have greatly changed depending on trends in the baking industry. For example, retailer's devices for cutting bulk pressed yeast and techniques for activating dry yeast have now lost their importance. Review of patents for invention indicates that activation of baker's yeast activity has been a very important issue for bakers, for example, with baking ingredients called yeast foods. In the recent years and especially for highly automated bakeries, interest has moved to equipments and processes for optimized storage of liquid cream yeast to thoroughly control dough fermentation and bread quality.

  8. [Biosorption of lead ions on dried waste beer yeast and the analysis by FTIR].

    PubMed

    Dai, Qun-Wei; Dong, Fa-Qin; Zhang, Wei

    2009-07-01

    The biosorption of lead ions on dried waste beer yeast was investigated with respect to the adsorption conditions and the biosorption mechanism was analyzed with the instruments of AAS, SEM/EDS and FTIR. The results show that the metal uptake value obtained was 47.6 mg x g(-1) and the adsorptive efficiency was above 90%. Under our experiment conditions, the biosorption of Pb2+ on dried waste beer yeast is a fast process. The biosroption quantity of Pb2+ on beer yeast cells was 47.6 mg x g(-1) and the adsorption efficiency obtained was 91.6% in fisrt 30 min, then the metal uptake value obtained was 48.8 mg x g(-1) and the adsorptive efficiency was above 94% at 90 min. The cells cracking and breaking off were seen after the biosorption of lead ions on beer yeast through SEM analysis, and the cytoplasts from yeast cell should be responsible for the last period biosorption of lead ions. EDS analysis also proved that lead ions were absorbed on the yeast cells. FTIR analysis showed that the infrared spectrograms are different at different pH and biosorption time, especially hydroxyl groups, carboxylate groups and amide groups have obviously changed. Amylase and amide of protein were considered as main components to participate the chemical absorption of lead ions on yeast cells. Consequently, dried waste beer yeast is an inexpensive, readily available adsorbent for metals and especially has a high adsorption capacity for lead ions.

  9. Antioxidant N-acetyltransferase Mpr1/2 of industrial baker's yeast enhances fermentation ability after air-drying stress in bread dough.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Takahashi, Shunsuke; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2010-03-31

    During bread-making processes, yeast cells are exposed to multiple stresses. Air-drying stress is one of the most harmful stresses by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previously, we discovered that the novel N-acetyltransferase Mpr1/2 confers oxidative stress tolerance by reducing intracellular ROS level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sigma1278b strain. In this study, we revealed that Japanese industrial baker's yeast possesses one MPR gene. The nucleotide sequence of the MPR gene in industrial baker's yeast was identical to the MPR2 gene in Sigma1278b strain. Gene disruption analysis showed that the MPR2 gene in industrial baker's yeast is involved in air-drying stress tolerance by reducing the intracellular oxidation levels. We also found that expression of the Lys63Arg and Phe65Leu variants with enhanced enzymatic activity and stability, respectively, increased the fermentation ability of bread dough after exposure to air-drying stress compared with the wild-type Mpr1. In addition, our recent study showed that industrial baker's yeast cells accumulating proline exhibited enhanced freeze tolerance in bread dough. Proline accumulation also enhanced the fermentation ability after air-drying stress treatment in industrial baker's yeast. Hence, the antioxidant enzyme Mpr1/2 could be promising for breeding novel yeast strains that are tolerant to air-drying stress.

  10. Post-fermentative production of glutathione by baker's yeast (S. cerevisiae) in compressed and dried forms.

    PubMed

    Musatti, Alida; Manzoni, Matilde; Rollini, Manuela

    2013-01-25

    The study was aimed at investigating the best biotransformation conditions to increase intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels in samples of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) employing either the commercially available compressed and dried forms. Glucose, GSH precursors amino acids, as well as other cofactors, were dissolved in a biotransformation solution and yeast cells were added (5%dcw). Two response surface central composite designs (RSCCDs) were performed in sequence: in the first step the influence of amino acid composition (cysteine, glycine, glutamic acid and serine) on GSH accumulation was investigated; once their formulation was set up, the influence of other components was studied. Initial GSH content was found 0.53 and 0.47%dcw for compressed and dried forms. GSH accumulation ability of baker's yeast in compressed form was higher at the beginning of shelf life, that is, in the first week, and a maximum of 2.04%dcw was obtained. Performance of yeast in dried form was not found satisfactory, as the maximum GSH level was 1.18%dcw. When cysteine lacks from the reaction solution, yeast cells do not accumulate GSH. With dried yeast, the highest GSH yields occurred when cysteine was set at 3 g/L, glycine and glutamic acid at least at 4 g/L, without serine. Employing compressed yeast, the highest GSH yields occurred when cysteine and glutamic acid were set at 2-3 g/L, while glycine and serine higher than 2 g/L. Results allowed to set up an optimal and feasible procedure to obtain GSH-enriched yeast biomass, with up to threefold increase with respect to initial content.

  11. Production of freeze-dried yeast culture for the brewing of traditional sorghum beer, tchapalo.

    PubMed

    N'Guessan, Florent K; Coulibaly, Hermann W; Alloue-Boraud, Mireille W A; Cot, Marlène; Djè, Koffi Marcellin

    2016-01-01

    Freeze-drying is a well-known dehydration method widely used to preserve microorganisms. In order to produce freeze-dried yeast starter culture for the brewing purpose of African sorghum beer, we tested protective agents (sucrose, glucose, glycerol) in combination with support materials (millet, maize, sorghum, and cassava flours) at 1:1 ratio (v/v). The yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae F 12-7 and Candida tropicalis C 0-7 previously isolated from sorghum beer were used in a mixed culture at a ratio of 2:1 (C. tropicalis/S. cerevisiae). After the freeze-drying, the residual water contents were between 0.78 -2.27%, 0.55 -4.09%, and 0.40-2.61%, respectively, with sucrose, glucose and glycerol. The dried yeasts viabilities were between 4.0% and 10.6%. Among the protective agents used, sucrose was found to be the best protectant giving cell viabilities of 8.4-10.6%. Considering the support materials, millet flour was the best support after drying. When the freeze-dried yeast powders were stored at 4°C and room temperature (25-28°C) for up to 3 months, the survival rates were the highest with cassava flour as the support material.

  12. Characterization of technological features of dry yeast (strain I-7-43) preparation, product of electrofusion between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces diastaticus, in industrial application.

    PubMed

    Kotarska, Katarzyna; Kłosowski, Grzegorz; Czupryński, Bogusław

    2011-06-10

    The aim of the study was to verify the technological usability and stability of biotechnological features of active dry distillery yeast preparation (strain I-7-43 with amylolytic abilities) applied to full-scale production of agricultural distillery. Various reduced doses of glucoamylase preparation (San-Extra L) were used for starch saccharification, from 90% to 70% in relation to the full standard dose of preparation. The dry distillery yeast I-7-43 were assessed positively in respect to fermentation activity and yield of ethanol production. Application of the dry yeast I-7-43 preparation in distillery practice lowers the costs of spirit production by saving the glucoamylase preparation (up to 30%) used in the process of mash saccharification. Concentrations of the volatile fermentation by-products in raw spirits obtained from fermentations with application of I-7-43 strain were on the levels guaranteeing good organoleptic properties of distillates.

  13. Role of specific components from commercial inactive dry yeast winemaking preparations on the growth of wine lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Andújar-Ortiz, Inmaculada; Pozo-Bayón, Maria Angeles; García-Ruiz, Almudena; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria

    2010-07-28

    The role of specific components from inactive dry yeast preparations widely used in winemaking on the growth of three representative wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni, Lactobacillus hilgardii and Pediococcus pentosaceus) has been studied. A pressure liquid extraction technique using solvents of different polarity was employed to obtain extracts with different chemical composition from the inactive dry yeast preparations. Each of the extracts was assayed against the three lactic acid bacteria. Important differences in the effect of the extracts on the growth of the bacteria were observed, which depended on the solvent employed during the extraction, on the type of commercial preparations and on the lactic acid bacteria species. The extracts that exhibited the most different activity were chemically characterized in amino acids, free monosaccharides, monosaccharides from polysaccharides, fatty acids and volatile compounds. In general, specific amino acids and monosaccharides were related to a stimulating effect whereas fatty acid composition and likely some volatile compounds seemed to show an inhibitory effect on the growth of the lactic acid bacteria. These results may provide novel and useful information in trying to obtain better and more specific formulations of winemaking inactive dry yeast preparations.

  14. Noninvasive characterization of the fission yeast cell cycle by monitoring dry mass with digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaz, Benjamin; Cano, Elena; Colomb, Tristan; Kühn, Jonas; Depeursinge, Christian; Simanis, Viesturs; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Marquet, Pierre

    2009-05-01

    Digital holography microscopy (DHM) is an optical technique which provides phase images yielding quantitative information about cell structure and cellular dynamics. Furthermore, the quantitative phase images allow the derivation of other parameters, including dry mass production, density, and spatial distribution. We have applied DHM to study the dry mass production rate and the dry mass surface density in wild-type and mutant fission yeast cells. Our study demonstrates the applicability of DHM as a tool for label-free quantitative analysis of the cell cycle and opens the possibility for its use in high-throughput screening.

  15. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic dry valley yeasts and growth in substrate limited habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    The multiple stresses temperature, moisture, and for chemoheterotrophs, sources of carbon and energy of the Dry Valley Antarctica soils allow at best depauperate communities, low in species diversity and population density. The nature of community structure, the operation of biogeochemical cycles, the evolution and mechanisms of adaptation to this habitat are of interest in informing speculations upon life on other planets as well as in modeling the limits of gene life. Yeasts of the Cryptococcus vishniacil complex (Basidiobiastomycetes) are investigated, as the only known indigenes of the most hostile, lichen free, parts of the Dry Valleys. Methods were developed for isolating these yeasts (methods which do not exclude the recovery of other microbiota). The definition of the complex was refined and the importance of nitrogen sources was established as well as substrate competition in fitness to the Dry Valley habitats.

  16. Performance of Clarias gariepinus Fed Dried Brewer's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Slurry in Replacement for Soybean Meal

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Shola Gabriel; Itodo, Gabriel Enemona

    2017-01-01

    Following disparity of earlier results, this study tested the performance of African catfish Clarias gariepinus fed dried brewer's yeast slurry meal (DBYM) based diets. Fingerlings of C. gariepinus with pooled mean initial weight of 1.58 ± 0.01 g were stocked in hapas (1 m × 1 m × 1 m) immersed in an earthen pond at a density of 15 fish per cage. Five diets with increasing substitution of soybean meal with 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of dried brewer's yeast and a control without dried brewer's yeast (0% substitution) were evaluated for 8 weeks. Palatability of diets reduced with increasing levels of DBYM. Growth and utilization parameters such as weight gain, feed conversion ratio, protein efficiency ratio, and specific growth rate differed significantly (p < 0.05) among treated groups. Specific growth rate decreased with increasing substitution while the best feed conversion ratio was obtained in the diet devoid of DBYM. Protein efficiency and utilization decreased with increasing levels of DBYM. Body composition was also affected by inclusion of DBYM with significant differences (p < 0.05) being observed across the diets. The trend in body composition follows the utilization of the diets. We conclude that the optimal range of inclusion and substitution of soybean meal with DBYM in C. gariepinus feed is between 1% and 14% of dry matter. PMID:28239492

  17. Performance of Clarias gariepinus Fed Dried Brewer's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Slurry in Replacement for Soybean Meal.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Shola Gabriel; Ataguba, Gabriel Arome; Itodo, Gabriel Enemona

    2017-01-01

    Following disparity of earlier results, this study tested the performance of African catfish Clarias gariepinus fed dried brewer's yeast slurry meal (DBYM) based diets. Fingerlings of C. gariepinus with pooled mean initial weight of 1.58 ± 0.01 g were stocked in hapas (1 m × 1 m × 1 m) immersed in an earthen pond at a density of 15 fish per cage. Five diets with increasing substitution of soybean meal with 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of dried brewer's yeast and a control without dried brewer's yeast (0% substitution) were evaluated for 8 weeks. Palatability of diets reduced with increasing levels of DBYM. Growth and utilization parameters such as weight gain, feed conversion ratio, protein efficiency ratio, and specific growth rate differed significantly (p < 0.05) among treated groups. Specific growth rate decreased with increasing substitution while the best feed conversion ratio was obtained in the diet devoid of DBYM. Protein efficiency and utilization decreased with increasing levels of DBYM. Body composition was also affected by inclusion of DBYM with significant differences (p < 0.05) being observed across the diets. The trend in body composition follows the utilization of the diets. We conclude that the optimal range of inclusion and substitution of soybean meal with DBYM in C. gariepinus feed is between 1% and 14% of dry matter.

  18. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic dry valley yeasts and growth in substrate-limited habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1982-01-01

    The success of the Antarctic Dry Valley yeasts presumeably results from adaptations to multiple stresses, to low temperatures and substrate-limitation as well as prolonged resting periods enforced by low water availability. Previous investigations have suggested that the crucial stress is substrate limitation. Specific adaptations may be pinpointed by comparing the physiology of the Cryptococcus vishniacii complex, the yeasts of the Tyrol Valley, with their congeners from other habitats. Progress was made in methods of isolation and definition of ecological niches, in the design of experiments in competition for limited substrate, and in establishing the relationships of the Cryptococcus vishniacii complex with other yeasts. In the course of investigating relationships, a new method for 25SrRNA homology was developed. For the first time it appears that 25SrRNA homology may reflect parallel or convergent evolution.

  19. Low-temperature brewing using yeast immobilized on dried figs.

    PubMed

    Bekatorou, A; Sarellas, A; Ternan, N G; Mallouchos, A; Komaitis, M; Koutinas, A A; Kanellaki, M

    2002-12-04

    Dried figs, following exhaustive extraction of their residual sugars with water, were used for immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae AXAZ-1. The immobilized biocatalyst was used in repeated batch fermentations of glucose at 30 degrees C, where significant reduction of the fermentation time was observed, falling from 65 h in the first batch to 7 h after the sixth batch. Repeated fermentations of wort at room and low temperatures resulted in fermentation times that fell from 26 to 20 h and from 27 to 24 days at 18 and 3 degrees C, respectively. Ethanol and beer productivities were high, showing suitability of the biocatalyst for low-temperature brewing. Diacetyl concentrations were low (0.3-0.5 mg/L), and polyphenols were lower than in commercial products and decreased as the fermentation temperature was decreased (126-50 mg/L). Ethyl acetate concentrations increased from 53 to 88 mg/L as the temperature was decreased, while the concentration of amyl alcohols at 3 degrees C (58 mg/L) was lower than half of that at 18 degrees C (125 mg/L). The beers produced at the end of the main fermentation had a fine clarity and a special fruity figlike aroma and taste, distinct from commercial products and more intense than beers produced by cells immobilized on other food-grade supports (gluten pellets or delignified cellulosic materials). GC-MS analysis did not show significant differences in the qualitative composition of the aroma compounds of the beers produced by immobilized and free cells.

  20. DNA typing methods for differentiation of yeasts related to dry-cured meat products.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M J; Rodríguez, M; Sánchez, B; Aranda, E; Córdoba, J J

    2006-03-01

    RFLP analysis of the ITS and 18S rDNA, RAPD-PCR using mini- and microsatellite primers and RFLP analysis of mitochondrial DNA were examined to discriminate yeasts related to dry-cured meat products at species and strain level. Seven species and 35 strains of yeasts usually found in dry-cured meat products were tested. RFLP analysis of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 and 18S rDNA did not allow the separation at species level of all of the species tested. RAPD with a M13 primer was found to be useful for differentiation of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Candida zeylanoides, Yarrowia lipolytica, Debaryomyces hansenii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, no differences were observed between Debaryomyces polymorphus and Pichia carsonii. RAPD analysis with microsatellite primers (GACA)(4), (GTG)(5) and (GAC)(5) enabled discrimination at species and strain level. However, the degree of discrimination by means of RAPD-PCR depends highly on the primers used. Thus, the PCR fingerprinting with primer (GACA)(4) enabled a higher level of discrimination than primers (GAC)(5) and (GTG)(5). The RFLP analysis of mtDNA allowed the discrimination at the species and strain level except for R. mucilaginosa, where no polymorphisms were observed in the strains tested. RAPD analysis with primer (GACA)(4) and the restriction analysis of mtDNA used in the present work are useful for the differentiation at species and strain level of yeasts related to dry-cured meat products.

  1. Antimycotic activity of 4-thioisosteres of flavonoids towards yeast and yeast-like microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Buzzini, Pietro; Menichetti, Stefano; Pagliuca, Chiara; Viglianisi, Caterina; Branda, Eva; Turchetti, Benedetta

    2008-07-01

    Different substituted methoxy- and hydroxy-4-thioisosteres of flavonoids were prepared and their in vitro antimycotic activity towards yeast (Candida spp., Clavispora spp., Cryptococcus spp., Filobasidiella spp., Issatchenkia spp., Pichia spp., Kluyveromyces spp., Saccharomyces spp. and Yarrowia spp.) and yeast-like (Prototheca spp.) microorganisms was tested. Further insights in the biological activities of these antioxidant, oestrogenic and antimicrobial biomimetic derivatives were obtained.

  2. Chromatographic purification of highly active yeast ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Meskauskas, Arturas; Leshin, Jonathan A; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2011-10-24

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are much more labile as compared to their eubacterial and archael counterparts, thus posing a significant challenge to researchers. Particularly troublesome is the fact that lysis of cells releases a large number of proteases and nucleases which can degrade ribosomes. Thus, it is important to separate ribosomes from these enzymes as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, conventional differential ultracentrifugation methods leaves ribosomes exposed to these enzymes for unacceptably long periods of time, impacting their structural integrity and functionality. To address this problem, we utilize a chromatographic method using a cysteine charged Sulfolink resin. This simple and rapid application significantly reduces co-purifying proteolytic and nucleolytic activities, producing high yields of intact, highly biochemically active yeast ribosomes. We suggest that this method should also be applicable to mammalian ribosomes. The simplicity of the method, and the enhanced purity and activity of chromatographically purified ribosome represents a significant technical advancement for the study of eukaryotic ribosomes.

  3. Impact of glutathione-enriched inactive dry yeast preparations on the stability of terpenes during model wine aging.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Bencomo, Juan José; Andújar-Ortiz, Inmaculada; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria; Simó, Carolina; González, Javier; Chana, Antonio; Dávalos, Juan; Pozo-Bayón, M Ángeles

    2014-02-12

    The impact of the addition of glutathione-enriched Inactive dry yeast preparations (g-IDYs) on the stability of some typical wine terpenes (linalool, α-terpineol, β-citronellol, and nerol) stored under accelerated oxidative conditions was evaluated in model wines. Additionally, the effects of a second type of IDY preparation with a different claim (fermentative nutrient) and the sole addition of commercial glutathione into the model wines were also assessed. Model wines were spiked with the low molecular weight fraction (<3 kDa permeate) isolated from the IDYs, avoiding the interaction of aroma compounds with other yeast components. An exhaustive chemical characterization of both IDY permeates was carried out by using targeted and nontargeted metabolomics approaches using CE-MS and FT-ICR-MS analytical platforms. The findings suggest that the addition of <3 kDa permeate isolated from any of the IDYs employed decreases the loss of typical wine terpenes in model wines submitted to accelerated aging conditions. The g-IDY preparation did indeed release reduced GSH into the model wines, although this compound did not seem exclusively related to the protective effect on some aroma compounds determined in both model wines. The presence of other sulfur-containing compounds from yeast origin in g-IDY, and also the presence of small yeast peptides, such as methionine/tryptophan/tyrosine-containing tripeptide in both types of IDYs, seemed to be related to the antioxidant activity determined in the two permeates and to the minor loss of some terpenes in the model wines spiked with them.

  4. Hydrothermal regimes of the dry active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Mamoru; Zhang, Yinsheng; Kadota, Tsutomu; Ohata, Tetsuo

    2006-04-01

    Evaporation and condensation in the soil column clearly influence year-round nonconductive heat transfer dynamics in the dry active layer underlying semiarid permafrost regions. We deduced this from heat flux components quantified using state-of-the-art micrometeorological data sets obtained in dry and moist summers and in winters with various snow cover depths. Vapor moves easily through large pores, some of which connect to the atmosphere, allowing (1) considerable active layer warming driven by pipe-like snowmelt infiltration, and (2) direct vapor linkage between atmosphere and deeper soils. Because of strong adhesive forces, water in the dry active layer evaporates with great difficulty. The fraction of latent heat to total soil heat storage ranged from 26 to 45% in dry and moist summers, respectively. These values are not negligible, despite being smaller than those of arctic wet active layer, in which only freezing and thawing were considered.

  5. Freeze-drying as suitable method to achieve ready-to-use yeast biosensors for androgenic and estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Jarque, Sergio; Bittner, Michal; Hilscherová, Klára

    2016-04-01

    Recombinant yeast assays (RYAs) have been proved to be a suitable tool for the fast screening of compounds with endocrine disrupting activities. However, ready-to-use versions more accessible to less equipped laboratories and field studies are scarce and far from optimal throughputs. Here, we have applied freeze-drying technology to optimize RYA for the fast assessment of environmental compounds with estrogenic and androgenic potencies. The effects of different cryoprotectants, initial optical density and long-term storage were evaluated. The study included detailed characterization of sensitivity, robustness and reproducibility of the new ready-to-use versions, as well as comparison with the standard assays. Freeze-dried RYAs showed similar dose-responses curves to their homolog standard assays, with Lowest Observed Effect Concentration (LOEC) and Median effective Concentration (EC50) of 1 nM and 7.5 nM for testosterone, and 0.05 nM and 0.5 nM for 17β-estradiol, respectively. Freeze-dried cells stored at 4 °C retained maximum sensitivity up to 2 months, while cells stored at -18 °C showed no decrease in sensitivity throughout the study (10 months). This ready-to-use RYA is easily accessible and may be potentially used for on-site applications.

  6. A new specific DNA endonuclease activity in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sargueil, B; Delahodde, A; Hatat, D; Tian, G L; Lazowska, J; Jacq, C

    1991-02-01

    Two group I intron-encoded proteins from the yeast mitochondrial genome have already been shown to have a specific DNA endonuclease activity. This activity mediates intron insertion by cleaving the DNA sequence corresponding to the splice junction of an intronless strain. We have discovered in mitochondrial extracts from the yeast strain 777-3A a new DNA endonuclease activity which cleaves the fused exon A3-exon A4 junction sequence of the CO XI gene.

  7. The Effect of Dry Yeast Fermentation on Chemical Composition and Protein Characteristics of Blue Lupin Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Borowczyk, Paulina; Zaworska, Anita; Nowak, Włodzimierz; Frankiewicz, Andrzej; Gulewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Summary The effect of 24-hour fermentation of lupin seeds by different yeast strains on their chemical composition was determined. After fermentation, the mass fraction of proteins increased and their in vitro digestibility and biological activity significantly improved. The amino acid profile of fermented products was similar to that of raw lupin seeds. The significant reduction in the mass fraction of oligosaccharides and phytate, but not of alkaloids was found. The pH level of fermented products decreased as a consequence of the increase of lactic and propionic acid mass fractions. The most favourable changes in the chemical composition of blue lupin seeds were obtained in fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker’s yeast and Fermivin 7013 strain. PMID:27956868

  8. ENZYMIC ACTIVITY IN FREEZE DRIED FOODS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    and bananas. Factors studied include, polyphenol oxidase , peroxidase, sucrase, alpha and beta amylase, pectinesterase and ascorbase activity as well...storage of freeze-dried and frozen peas at different moisture was studied. Lipase activity and production of free fatty acid was following during long term

  9. Biodiversity of brewery yeast strains and their fermentative activities.

    PubMed

    Berlowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Rajkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the genetic, biochemical, fermentative and physiological characteristics of brewery yeast strains and performed a hierarchical cluster analysis to evaluate their similarity. We used five different ale and lager yeast strains, originating from different European breweries and deposited at the National Collection of Yeast Cultures (UK). Ale and lager strains exhibited different genomic properties, but their assimilation profiles and pyruvate decarboxylase activities corresponded to their species classifications. The activity of another enzyme, succinate dehydrogenase, varied between different brewing strains. Our results confirmed that ATP and glycogen content, and the activity of the key metabolic enzymes succinate dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase, may be good general indicators of cell viability. However, the genetic properties, physiology and fermentation capacity of different brewery yeasts are unique to individual strains.

  10. Mechanisms of Contact-Mediated Killing of Yeast Cells on Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Davide; Krans, Travis; Santo, Christophe Espírito; Elowsky, Christian G.; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Surfaces made of copper or its alloys have strong antimicrobial properties against a wide variety of microorganisms. However, the molecular mode of action responsible for the antimicrobial efficacy of metallic copper is not known. Here, we show that dry copper surfaces inactivate Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae within minutes in a process called contact-mediated killing. Cellular copper ion homeostasis systems influenced the kinetics of contact-mediated killing in both organisms. Deregulated copper ion uptake through a hyperactive S. cerevisiae Ctr1p (ScCtr1p) copper uptake transporter in Saccharomyces resulted in faster inactivation of mutant cells than of wild-type cells. Similarly, lack of the C. albicans Crp1p (CaCrp1p) copper-efflux P-type ATPase or the metallothionein CaCup1p caused more-rapid killing of Candida mutant cells than of wild-type cells. Candida and Saccharomyces took up large quantities of copper ions as soon as they were in contact with copper surfaces, as indicated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis and by the intracellular copper ion-reporting dye coppersensor-1. Exposure to metallic copper did not cause lethality through genotoxicity, deleterious action on a cell's genetic material, as indicated by a mutation assay with Saccharomyces. Instead, toxicity mediated by metallic copper surfaces targeted membranes in both yeast species. With the use of Live/Dead staining, onset of rapid and extensive cytoplasmic membrane damage was observed in cells from copper surfaces. Fluorescence microscopy using the indicator dye DiSBaC2(3) indicated that cell membranes were depolarized. Also, during contact-mediated killing, vacuoles first became enlarged and then disappeared from the cells. Lastly, in metallic copper-stressed yeasts, oxidative stress in the cytoplasm and in mitochondria was elevated. PMID:21097600

  11. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  12. In vitro activity of voriconazole against Mexican oral yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Vargas, Luis Octavio; Eraso, Elena; Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso Javier; Aguirre, José Manuel; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Quindós, Guillermo

    2010-05-01

    Oral candidiasis is the most prevalent complication in HIV-infected and AIDS patients. Topical antifungal treatment is useful for the initial episodes of oral candidiasis, but most patients suffer more than one episode and fluconazole or itraconazole can help in the management, and voriconazole may represent a useful alternative agent for the treatment of recalcitrant oral and oesophageal candidiasis. The aim of this research was to study the in vitro activity of voriconazole and fluconazole against Mexican oral isolates of clinically relevant yeast. The in vitro susceptibility of 187 oral yeast isolates from HIV-infected and healthy Mexicans was determined for fluconazole and voriconazole by the M44-A disc diffusion method. At 24 h, fluconazole was active against 179 of 187 isolates (95.7 %). Moreover, a 100% susceptibility to voriconazole was observed. Voriconazole and fluconazole are highly active in vitro against oral yeast isolates. This study provides baseline data on susceptibilities to both antifungal agents in Mexico.

  13. Superior molasses assimilation, stress tolerance, and trehalose accumulation of baker's yeast isolated from dried sweet potatoes (hoshi-imo).

    PubMed

    Nishida, Osamu; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Suzuki, Chise; Shima, Jun

    2004-07-01

    Yeast strains were isolated from dried sweet potatoes (hoshi-imo), a traditional preserved food in Japan. Dough fermentation ability, freeze tolerance, and growth rates in molasses, which are important characteristics of commercial baker's yeast, were compared between these yeast strains and a commercial yeast derivative that had typical characteristics of commercial strains. Classification tests including pulse-field gel electrophoresis and fermentation/assimilation ability of sugars showed that almost the stains isolated belonged to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One strain, ONY1, accumulated intracellular trehalose at a higher level than commercial strain T128. Correlated with intracellular trehalose contents, the fermentation ability of high-sugar dough containing ONY1 was higher. ONY1 also showed higher freeze tolerance in both low-sugar and high-sugar doughs. The growth rate of ONY1 was significantly higher under batch and fed-batch cultivation conditions using either molasses or synthetic medium than that of strain T128. These results suggest that ONY1 has potential commercial use as baker's yeast for frozen dough and high-sugar dough.

  14. Effects of the usage of dried brewing yeast in the diets on the performance, egg traits and blood parameters in quails.

    PubMed

    Yalçın, S; Erol, H; Ozsoy, B; Onbaşılar, I; Yalçın, S

    2008-12-01

    This experiment was carried out to determine the effects of the usage of dried brewing yeast in quail diets on laying performance, egg traits and blood parameters. A total of 240 Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica) aged 10 weeks were randomly allocated into one control group and three treatment groups. Each group was divided into five replicates as subgroups, comprising 12 quails each. Dried brewing yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was used at the levels of 1.5%, 3.0% and 4.5% in the diets of the first, second and third treatment groups, respectively. Soyabean meal was replaced with dried brewing yeast. The diets were formulated to be isocaloric and isonitrogenous. The experimental period lasted 18 weeks. Dietary treatments did not significantly affect body weight, daily feed intake, daily protein intake, egg production, egg weight, feed efficiency, mortality, egg shell thickness, egg albumen index, egg yolk index, egg Haugh unit, the percentages of egg shell, albumen and yolk, excreta moisture and small intestinal pH. Inclusion of 3% and 4.5% dried brewing yeast in diets reduced egg yolk cholesterol concentration as mg per yolk and mg per g yolk (P < 0.01). Blood serum cholesterol of groups fed diets with dried brewing yeast was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that of the control group. Feeding diets containing 3.0% and 4.5% dried brewing yeast resulted in significant increases (P < 0.01) in blood serum levels of total protein, alanine aminotransferase at the end of the experiment. Blood serum levels of uric acid, triglyceride, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were not affected by dietary dried brewing yeast. It is concluded that dried brewing yeast can be used up to 4.5% in the diets of laying quails without adverse effects on the measured parameters.

  15. Biodiversity of yeast mycobiota in "sucuk," a traditional Turkish fermented dry sausage: phenotypic and genotypic identification, functional and technological properties.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Ismet; Sagdic, Osman

    2014-11-01

    In this study, yeasts from Turkish fermented sucuks were identified and their functional and technological properties were evaluated. Two hundred fifty-five yeast isolates were obtained from 35 different sucuk samples from different regions of Turkey. The yeast isolates were determined as genotypic using 2 different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods (rep-PCR and RAPD-PCR). Functional and technological properties of including proteolytic, lipolytic, and catalase activities, tolerance to NaCl and bile, as well as growing rates at different temperature and pH conditions selected yeast strains were also evaluated. Candida zeylanoides and Debaryomyces hansenii were dominant strains in sucuk samples. All C. zeylanoides and D. hansenii tested could grow at the condition of 15% NaCl and 0.3% bile salt. However, none of the strains were able to grow at 37 °C, even though catalase activity, weak proteolytic and lipolytic activities was still observed. D. hansenii were able to grow only at pH 3, while some of C. zeylanoides could grow at lower pH levels (pH 2). Three and 4 strains of C. zeylanoides showed β-hemolysis activity and nitrate reduction ability to nitrite, respectively. D. hansenii did not have properties, which are β-hemolysis, nitrate reduction, or hydrogen sulfide production. Overall, diverse yeast mycobiota present in Turkish fermented sucuk and their functional and technological properties were revealed with this study.

  16. High and dry? Comparing active dry EEG electrodes to active and passive wet electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Kyle E; Harrison, Tyler J L; Kizuk, Sayeed A D

    2017-01-01

    Dry electrodes are becoming popular for both lab-based and consumer-level electrophysiological-recording technologies because they better afford the ability to move traditional lab-based research into the real world. It is unclear, however, how dry electrodes compare in data quality to traditional electrodes. The current study compared three EEG electrode types: (a) passive-wet electrodes with no onboard amplification, (b) actively amplified, wet electrodes with moderate impedance levels, and low impedance levels, and (c) active-dry electrodes with very high impedance. Participants completed a classic P3 auditory oddball task to elicit characteristic EEG signatures and event-related potentials (ERPs). Across the three electrode types, we compared single-trial noise, average ERPs, scalp topographies, ERP noise, and ERP statistical power as a function of number of trials. We extended past work showing active electrodes' insensitivity to moderate levels of interelectrode impedance when compared to passive electrodes in the same amplifier. Importantly, the new dry electrode system could reliably measure EEG spectra and ERP components comparable to traditional electrode types. As expected, however, dry active electrodes with very high interelectrode impedance exhibited marked increases in single-trial and average noise levels, which decreased statistical power, requiring more trials to detect significant effects. This power decrease must be considered as a trade-off with the ease of application and long-term use. The current results help set constraints on experimental design with novel dry electrodes, and provide important evidence needed to measure brain activity in novel settings and situations.

  17. Improved shelf life of dried Beauveria bassiana blastospores using convective drying and active packaging processes.

    PubMed

    Mascarin, Gabriel Moura; Jackson, Mark A; Behle, Robert W; Kobori, Nilce N; Júnior, Ítalo Delalibera

    2016-10-01

    The yeast form (blastospore) of the dimorphic insect-pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana can be rapidly produced using liquid fermentation methods but is generally unable to survive rapid dehydration processes or storage under non-refrigerated conditions. In this study, we evaluated the influence of two convective drying methods, various modified atmosphere packaging systems, and storage temperatures on the desiccation tolerance, storage stability, and virulence of blastospores of B. bassiana ESALQ 1432. All blastospore formulations were dried to <5 % water content equivalent to aw < 0.3. The viability of B. bassiana blastospores after air drying and spray drying was greater than 80 %. Vacuum-packaged blastospores remained viable longer when stored at 4 °C compared with 28 °C with virtually no loss in viability over 9 months regardless the drying method. When both oxygen and moisture scavengers were added to sealed packages of dried blastospore formulations stored at 28 °C, viability was significantly prolonged for both air- and spray-dried blastospores. The addition of ascorbic acid during spray drying did not improve desiccation tolerance but enhanced cell stability (∼twofold higher half-life) when stored at 28 °C. After storage for 4 months at 28 °C, air-dried blastospores produced a lower LC80 and resulted in higher mortality to whitefly nymphs (Bemisia tabaci) when compared with spray-dried blastospores. These studies identified key storage conditions (low aw and oxygen availability) that improved blastospore storage stability at 28 °C and will facilitate the commercial development of blastospores-based bioinsecticides.

  18. Identification and characterization of antimicrobial activity in two yeast genera.

    PubMed Central

    Bilinski, C A; Innamorato, G; Stewart, G G

    1985-01-01

    A general screening test for the expression of antibacterial activity was performed on over 400 cultures belonging to 31 yeast genera. Of these cultures, only two, Kluyveromyces thermotolerans and Kloeckera apiculata, were found to produce zones of inhibition of bacterial growth on Diagnostic Sensitivity Test Agar medium supplemented with 0.002% methylene blue. Of nine bacteria used as test organisms, only Lactobacillus plantarum and Bacillus megaterium were inhibited. No antibacterial activity was evident against four gram-negative bacteria used in this study. Optimal activities were found to be expressed after yeasts were grown at pH 6. A requirement for cultivation in the presence of methylene blue added to culture media for the expression of apparent antibacterial activity was demonstrated. Images PMID:3937494

  19. Efficiency of mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR to characterize yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham at the different geographic areas of ripening.

    PubMed

    Andrade, María J; Rodríguez, Mar; Casado, Eva; Córdoba, Juan J

    2010-03-01

    The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR to characterize yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham was evaluated. Besides, the distribution of the main species and biotypes of yeasts in the different ripening areas of this product was investigated. MtDNA restriction analysis allowed yeast characterization at species and strain level. RAPD-PCR with the primers (GACA)(4) and (GAC)(5) was inappropriate for characterization at species level. Most of the mtDNA restriction patterns detected in dry-cured Iberian ham were consistent with Debaryomyces hansenii. Several yeasts biotypes were associated to specific geographic areas of dry-cured Iberian ham ripening.

  20. Use of Commercial Dry Yeast Products Rich in Mannoproteins for White and Rosé Sparkling Wine Elaboration.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Magariño, Silvia; Martínez-Lapuente, Leticia; Bueno-Herrera, Marta; Ortega-Heras, Miriam; Guadalupe, Zenaida; Ayestarán, Belén

    2015-06-17

    In sparkling wines, mannoproteins released during yeast autolysis largely affect their final quality. This process is very slow and may take several months. The aim of this work was to study the effect of several commercial dry yeast autolysates on the chemical composition, foam, and sensory properties of white and rosé sparkling wines aged on lees for 9 months during two consecutive vintages. The addition of these products in the tirage phase did not affect either the content of phenolic compounds, amino acids, and biogenic amines or the foam properties. The commercial product with the highest mannoprotein content and the highest purity caused significant changes in the volatile composition of the wines and enhanced the fruity aromas in both Verdejo and Godello sparkling wines.

  1. The effect of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on nutrient intake, digestibility and finishing performance of lambs fed a diet based on dried molasses sugar beet-pulp.

    PubMed

    Payandeh, S; Kafilzadeh, F

    2007-12-15

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effect of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SC47) on finishing performance, digestibility, some blood metabolites and carcass characteristics of male lambs fed a diet based on dried Molasses Sugar Beet-Pulp (MSBP). Eighteen Sanjabi male lambs (20.95 +/- 2.7 kg initial body weight and 3 month of age) were used in a completely randomized design. Animals were assigned to one of the two dietary treatments (with or without yeast). Digestibility and nitrogen balance experiment was carried out using six mature rams on finishing diet with and without yeast. Serum metabolites were determined in samples taken from lambs at the end of finishing period. Dry matter digestibility of finishing diet was significantly increased by yeast addition. However, yeast did not have any significant effect on apparent digestibility of OM, NDF, CP and energy. Nitrogen retention was also not affected by yeast addition. Yeast resulted in a significant increase in the average daily gain, dry matter and organic matter intake. However, feed conversion ratio was not significantly affected by addition of yeast. The concentration of the serum metabolites including glucose, urea, cholesterol, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorous and cratinine were not affected significantly by yeast supplementation, but triglyceride concentrations increased significantly when yeast was fed. Addition of yeast to the diet did not have any significant effect on the carcass characteristics. Results of this study suggest that feeding saccharomyces cerevisiae with a diet based on MSBP can improve the performance of fattening lambs without any change in carcass characteristics or cuts.

  2. Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation of dry diluted acid pretreated corn stover at high dry matter loading: Overcoming the inhibitors by non-tolerant yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Qing; Qin, Lei; Li, Wen-Chao; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie; Huang, Yao-Dong; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Dry dilute acid pretreatment (DDAP) is a promising method for lignocellulose bioconversion, although inhibitors generated during the pretreatment impede the fermentation severely. We developed the simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SScF) of DDAP pretreated biomass at high solid loading using xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SyBE005. Effect of temperature on SScF showed that ethanol yield at 34°C was 10.2% higher than that at 38°C. Ethanol concentration reached 29.5 g/L at 15% (w/w) dry matter loading, while SScF almost ceased at the beginning at 25% (w/w) dry matter loading of DDAP pretreated corn stover. According to the effect of the diluted hydrolysate on the fermentation of strain SyBE005, a fed-batch mode was developed for the SScF of DDAP pretreated corn stover with 25% dry matter loading without detoxification, and 40.0 g/L ethanol was achieved. In addition, high yeast inoculation improved xylose utilization and the final ethanol concentration reached 47.2 g/L.

  3. Active yeast ribosome preparation using monolithic anion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Antonio M; Yourik, Paul; Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Nanda, Jagpreet S; Lorsch, Jon R; Walker, Sarah E

    2017-02-01

    In vitro studies of translation provide critical mechanistic details, yet purification of large amounts of highly active eukaryotic ribosomes remains a challenge for biochemists and structural biologists. Here, we present an optimized method for preparation of highly active yeast ribosomes that could easily be adapted for purification of ribosomes from other species. The use of a nitrogen mill for cell lysis coupled with chromatographic purification of the ribosomes results in 10-fold-increased yield and less variability compared with the traditional approach, which relies on sedimentation through sucrose cushions. We demonstrate that these ribosomes are equivalent to those made using the traditional method in a host of in vitro assays, and that utilization of this new method will consistently produce high yields of active yeast ribosomes.

  4. Active yeast ribosome preparation using monolithic anion exchange chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Antonio M.; Yourik, Paul; Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Lorsch, Jon R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vitro studies of translation provide critical mechanistic details, yet purification of large amounts of highly active eukaryotic ribosomes remains a challenge for biochemists and structural biologists. Here, we present an optimized method for preparation of highly active yeast ribosomes that could easily be adapted for purification of ribosomes from other species. The use of a nitrogen mill for cell lysis coupled with chromatographic purification of the ribosomes results in 10-fold-increased yield and less variability compared with the traditional approach, which relies on sedimentation through sucrose cushions. We demonstrate that these ribosomes are equivalent to those made using the traditional method in a host of in vitro assays, and that utilization of this new method will consistently produce high yields of active yeast ribosomes. PMID:27981882

  5. Monitoring the biomass accumulation of recombinant yeast cultures: offline estimations of dry cell mass and cell counts.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Shane M; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2012-01-01

    Biomass is one of the most important parameters for process optimization, scale-up and control in recombinant protein production experiments. However, a standard unit of biomass remains elusive. Methods of biomass monitoring have increasingly been developed towards online, in situ techniques in order to advance process analysis and control. Offline, ex situ methods, such as dry cell mass determination and direct cell counts, remain the reference for determining cell mass and number, respectively, but this type of analysis is time consuming. In this chapter, protocols are presented for determining these offline measures of the biomass yield of recombinant yeast cultures.

  6. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  7. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  8. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  9. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  10. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  11. Extracellular enzymatic activities and physiological profiles of yeasts colonizing fruit trees.

    PubMed

    Molnárová, Jana; Vadkertiová, Renáta; Stratilová, Eva

    2014-07-01

    Yeasts form a significant and diverse part of the phyllosphere microbiota. Some yeasts that inhabit plants have been found to exhibit extracellular enzymatic activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of yeasts isolated from leaves, fruits, and blossoms of fruit trees cultivated in Southwest Slovakia to produce extracellular enzymes, and to discover whether the yeasts originating from these plant organs differ from each other in their physiological properties. In total, 92 strains belonging to 29 different species were tested for: extracellular protease, β-glucosidase, lipase, and polygalacturonase activities; fermentation abilities; the assimilation of xylose, saccharose and alcohols (methanol, ethanol, glycerol); and for growth in a medium with 33% glucose. The black yeast Aureobasidium pullulans showed the largest spectrum of activities of all the species tested. Almost 70% of the strains tested demonstrated some enzymatic activity, and more than 90% utilized one of the carbon compounds tested. Intraspecies variations were found for the species of the genera Cryptococcus and Pseudozyma. Interspecies differences of strains exhibiting some enzymatic activities and utilizing alcohols were also noted. The largest proportion of the yeasts exhibited β-glucosidase activity and assimilated alcohols independently of their origin. The highest number of strains positive for all activities tested was found among the yeasts associated with leaves. Yeasts isolated from blossoms assimilated saccharose and D-xylose the most frequently of all the yeasts tested. The majority of the fruit-inhabiting yeasts grew in the medium with higher osmotic pressure.

  12. [Methods of increasing the activity of extracellular esterase, beta-fructofuranosidase and proteases of wine yeast].

    PubMed

    Abdurazakova, S Kh; Salomov, Kh T

    1975-01-01

    Upon regular fermentation changes in the activity of the enzymes esterase, beta-fructofuranosidase and protease of the yeast Saccharomyces mini of the Parkent I race were examined. The maximum activity of the enzymes occurred in the stationary phase of the yeast growth. An increase in the activity of the above enzymes was shown possible during a prolonged stabilization of the stationary conditions in the process of a continuous chemostat cultivation of wine yeast.

  13. Phytohemagglutination Activity in Extruded Dry Bean Powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry beans are a highly nutritious food. Besides making beans palatable, cooking is required to denature lectin, a protein found in beans. If consumed raw or undercooked, lectin poisoning can occur. Symptoms of lectin poisoning include vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain, and occur within hours of...

  14. Neutron activation analysis for the demonstration of amphibolite rock-weathering activity of a yeast.

    PubMed

    Rades-Rohkohl, E; Hirsch, P; Fränzle, O

    1979-12-01

    Neutron activation analysis was employed in a survey of weathering abilities of rock surface microorganisms. A yeast isolated from an amphibolite of a megalithic grave was found actively to concentrate, in media and in or on cells, iron and other elements when grown in the presence of ground rock. This was demonstrated by comparing a spectrum of neutron-activated amphibolite powder (particle size, 50 to 100 mum) with the spectra of neutron-activated, lyophilized yeast cells which had grown with or without amphibolite powder added to different media. The most active yeast (IFAM 1171) did not only solubilize Fe from the rock powder, but significant amounts of Co, Eu, Yb, Ca, Ba, Sc, Lu, Cr, Th, and U were also mobilized. The latter two elements occurred as natural radioactive isotopes in this amphibolite. When the yeast cells were grown with neutron-activated amphibolite, the cells contained the same elements. Furthermore, the growth medium contained Fe, Co, and Eu which had been solubilized from the amphibolite. This indicates the presence, in this yeast strain, of active rockweathering abilities as well as of uptake mechanisms for solubilized rock components.

  15. Neutron Activation Analysis for the Demonstration of Amphibolite Rock-Weathering Activity of a Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rades-Rohkohl, E.; Hirsch, P.; Fränzle, O.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was employed in a survey of weathering abilities of rock surface microorganisms. A yeast isolated from an amphibolite of a megalithic grave was found actively to concentrate, in media and in or on cells, iron and other elements when grown in the presence of ground rock. This was demonstrated by comparing a spectrum of neutron-activated amphibolite powder (particle size, 50 to 100 μm) with the spectra of neutron-activated, lyophilized yeast cells which had grown with or without amphibolite powder added to different media. The most active yeast (IFAM 1171) did not only solubilize Fe from the rock powder, but significant amounts of Co, Eu, Yb, Ca, Ba, Sc, Lu, Cr, Th, and U were also mobilized. The latter two elements occurred as natural radioactive isotopes in this amphibolite. When the yeast cells were grown with neutron-activated amphibolite, the cells contained the same elements. Furthermore, the growth medium contained Fe, Co, and Eu which had been solubilized from the amphibolite. This indicates the presence, in this yeast strain, of active rockweathering abilities as well as of uptake mechanisms for solubilized rock components. PMID:16345472

  16. Differentiation of yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, RAPD-PCR and their volatile compounds production.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M J; Rodríguez, M; Casado, E M; Bermúdez, E; Córdoba, J J

    2009-09-01

    The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis, RAPD-PCR and volatile compounds analysis to differentiate yeast biotypes involved in flavour development of dry-cured Iberian ham throughout the ripening process is evaluated. For this purpose, 86 yeasts isolated from Iberian hams in the main ripening stages at different industries of the four Protected Designations of Origin of this product, were used. The combination of mtDNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR using the primer (GACA)4 showed a higher variability in the yeast species detected than obtained using only mtDNA restriction analysis. Only two species, Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides, were identified throughout the whole ripening process and a wide diversity of biotypes was found in these two species, with those of D. hansenii predominating. Clear differences between biotypes were detected in the generation of volatile compounds, with the biotype C2-2 of D. hansenii showing the highest concentrations of volatiles. The combined use of mtDNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR distinguishes yeast biotypes with different production of volatile compounds. In addition, analysis of the production profile of volatile compounds is needed to differentiate yeast strains of the same biotype recovered at different stages of ripening. Thus, the combination of these three methods could be very useful to select or monitor yeasts as starter cultures in dry-cured meat products.

  17. Evaluation of grain distillers dried yeast as a fish meal substitute in practical-type diets of juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain distillers dried yeast (GDDY) is a single-cell protein obtained as a co-product during the production of fuel ethanol that may have potential as a protein replacement for rainbow trout. The goal of this study was to examine the suitability of GDDY as a replacement for fishmeal on a digestible ...

  18. Hypoglycemic activity of dried extracts of Bauhinia forficata Link.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, A M; Menon, S; Menon, R; Couto, A G; Bürger, C; Biavatti, M W

    2010-01-01

    Leaves of the pantropical genus Bauhinia (Fabaceae) are known popularly as cow's foot, due to their unique characteristic bilobed aspect. The species Bauhinia forficata (Brazilian Orchid-tree) is widely used in folk medicine as an antidiabetic. The present work investigates the hypoglycemic activity of the dried extracts of Bauhinia forficata leaves in vivo, as well as the influence of the drying and granulation processes on this activity. The fluid extract was dried to generate oven-dried (ODE), spray-dried (SDE) and wet granulation (WGE) extracts, with the aid of colloidal silicon dioxide and/or cellulose:lactose mixture. The dried extracts were characterized by spectrophotometric, chromatographic and photo microscopy image analysis. 200 mg/kg body wt., p.o. of each dried product were administered orally to male Wistar rats over 7 days old, for biomonitoring of the hypoglycemic activity profile. The effect of the extracts was studied in STZ-induced diabetic rats. After 7 days of treatment, fasting glucose was determined, and the livers were removed, dried on tissue paper, weighed, and stored at -20 degrees C to estimate hepatic glycogen. Our results show that spray-drying or oven-drying processes applied to B. forficata extracts did not significantly alter its flavonoid profile or its hypoglycemic activity. Indeed, the dried extracts of B. forficata act differently from glibenclamide. Despite the lower active content in WGE, because of the higher concentration of adjuvants, the use of the granulation process improved the manufacturing properties of the ODE, making this material more appropriate for use in tablets or capsules.

  19. Designing CAF-adjuvanted dry powder vaccines: spray drying preserves the adjuvant activity of CAF01.

    PubMed

    Ingvarsson, Pall Thor; Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Christensen, Dennis; Larsen, Niels Bent; Hinrichs, Wouter Leonardus Joseph; Andersen, Peter; Rantanen, Jukka; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Yang, Mingshi; Foged, Camilla

    2013-05-10

    Dry powder vaccine formulations are highly attractive due to improved storage stability and the possibility for particle engineering, as compared to liquid formulations. However, a prerequisite for formulating vaccines into dry formulations is that their physicochemical and adjuvant properties remain unchanged upon rehydration. Thus, we have identified and optimized the parameters of importance for the design of a spray dried powder formulation of the cationic liposomal adjuvant formulation 01 (CAF01) composed of dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide and trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (TDB) via spray drying. The optimal excipient to stabilize CAF01 during spray drying and for the design of nanocomposite microparticles was identified among mannitol, lactose and trehalose. Trehalose and lactose were promising stabilizers with respect to preserving liposome size, as compared to mannitol. Trehalose and lactose were in the glassy state upon co-spray drying with the liposomes, whereas mannitol appeared crystalline, suggesting that the ability of the stabilizer to form a glassy matrix around the liposomes is one of the prerequisites for stabilization. Systematic studies on the effect of process parameters suggested that a fast drying rate is essential to avoid phase separation and lipid accumulation at the surface of the microparticles during spray drying. Finally, immunization studies in mice with CAF01 in combination with the tuberculosis antigen Ag85B-ESAT6-Rv2660c (H56) demonstrated that spray drying of CAF01 with trehalose under optimal processing conditions resulted in the preservation of the adjuvant activity in vivo. These data demonstrate the importance of liposome stabilization via optimization of formulation and processing conditions in the engineering of dry powder liposome formulations.

  20. Enhanced leavening properties of baker's yeast by reducing sucrase activity in sweet dough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Ying; Lin, Xue; Feng, Bing; Liu, Xiao-Er; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xu, Jia; Pi, Li; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Leavening ability in sweet dough is required for the commercial applications of baker's yeast. This property depends on many factors, such as glycolytic activity, sucrase activity, and osmotolerance. This study explored the importance of sucrase level on the leavening ability of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Furthermore, the baker's yeast strains with varying sucrase activities were constructed by deleting SUC2, which encodes sucrase or replacing the SUC2 promoter with the VPS8/TEF1 promoter. The results verify that the sucrase activity negatively affects the leavening ability of baker's yeast strains under high-sucrose conditions. Based on a certain level of osmotolerance, sucrase level plays a significant role in the fermentation performance of baker's yeast, and appropriate sucrase activity is an important determinant for the leavening property of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Therefore, modification on sucrase activity is an effective method for improving the leavening properties of baker's yeast in sweet dough. This finding provides guidance for the breeding of industrial baker's yeast strains for sweet dough leavening. The transformants BS1 with deleted SUC2 genetic background provided decreased sucrase activity (a decrease of 39.3 %) and exhibited enhanced leavening property (an increase of 12.4 %). Such a strain could be useful for industrial applications.

  1. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: influence of calcium and magnesium ions on yeast resistance to dehydration-rehydration.

    PubMed

    Trofimova, Yuliya; Walker, Graeme; Rapoport, Alexander

    2010-07-01

    The influence of calcium and magnesium ions on resistance to dehydration in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was investigated. Magnesium ion availability directly influenced yeast cells' resistance to dehydration and, when additionally supplemented with calcium ions, this provided further significant increase of yeast resistance to dehydration. Gradual rehydration of dry yeast cells in water vapour indicated that both magnesium and calcium may be important for the stabilization of yeast cell membranes. In particular, calcium ions were shown for the first time to increase the resistance of yeast cells to dehydration in stress-sensitive cultures from exponential growth phases. It is concluded that magnesium and calcium ion supplementations in nutrient media may increase the dehydration stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae cells significantly, and this finding is important for the production of active dry yeast preparations for food and fermentation industries.

  2. The occurrence of killer activity in yeasts isolated from natural habitats.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Monika; Kordowska-Wiater, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Yeast's ability to restrict the growth and kill other yeasts, fungi and bacteria has been known for over 50 years. Killer activity was detected in yeasts deposited in the world collections or isolated from natural habitats. In this study, isolates from the forest environment, leaves of fruit trees, flower petals, cereals and frozen fruit have been screened in terms of their killer activities. Killer activity was tested on strains belonging to six yeast species: Candida, Rhodotorula, Pichia, Pachysolen, Yarrowia, Trichosporon. The reference strains were Kluyveromyces lactis Y-6682 and Kluyveromyces marxinanus Y-8281, well-known to be sensitive to yeast killer toxins. Among one hundred and two tested strains, 24 (23.5% of isolates) showed positive killer action, and 10 (9.8% of the isolates) a weak killer action against at least one sensitive reference strain. The highest killer activity was observed among isolates from forest soil and flowers.

  3. Application of supercritical CO(2) extraction for the elimination of odorant volatile compounds from winemaking inactive dry yeast preparation.

    PubMed

    Pozo-Bayón, María Angeles; Andújar-Ortiz, Inmaculada; Mendiola, Jose A; Ibáñez, Elena; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria

    2010-03-24

    A procedure based on the application of supercritical CO(2) extraction to reduce and/or to remove odorant volatile compounds from a winemaking inactive dry yeast (IDY) preparation has been set up. By applying a factorial design, a screening of different temperatures and pressure conditions was assayed in order to determine the optimal deodorization conditions, and afterward the effect of several sample pretreatments was investigated. The best extraction conditions were achieved at 200 atm and 60 degrees C, applying the cryogenic grinding of the sample and using 40% (w/w) ethanol as cosolvent. By using these conditions, it was possible to reduce to approximately 70% of the volatile compounds present in the samples that may be released into the wines and therefore affecting their sensory characteristics. Odorant volatile compounds such as 2-methylhydroxypyrrole, 2-ethyl-6-methylpyrazine, and 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine completely disappeared from the deodorized sample as verified by GC-O analysis. Additional experiments in model wines confirmed the low release of volatile compounds from the deodorized samples, without provoking any change to their nonvolatile composition (nitrogen compounds and neutral polysaccharides) that is related to the technological properties of these preparations.

  4. Coupling Binding to Catalysis – Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Summary We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  5. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

  6. Study on antioxidant activity of common dry fruits.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Neeraj; Dubey, Akhilesh; Mishra, Rahul; Barik, Nabneeta

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the antioxidant activity of different dry fruits (almonds, walnut, cashew nut, raisins, chironji) through several chemical and biochemical assays: reducing power, lipid peroxidation damage in biomembranes, determination of antioxidant enzymes activity (SOD and CAT). To estimate the total phenolic content, the assay using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent was used. The EC(50) values were calculated for all the methods in order to evaluate the antioxidant efficiency of each dry fruit. The results obtained were quite heterogenous, revealing significant differences among the dry fruits. The methanolic extract of walnut showed the higher value of antioxidant activity based on lipid peroxidation assay. The higher phenolic content was found in walnuts followed by almonds cashew nut, chironji and least phenolic content was found in raisins. Walnut revealed the best antioxidant properties, presenting lower EC(50) values in all assays except in antioxidant enzymatic activity.

  7. Killer activity of yeasts isolated from natural environments against some medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Vadkertiová, Renata; Sláviková, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five yeast cultures, mainly of human origin, belonging to four pathogenic yeast species--Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis were tested for their sensitivity to ten basidiomycetous and eleven ascomycetous yeast species isolated from the water and soil environments and from tree leaves. The best killer activity among basidiomycetous species was exhibited by Rhodotorula glutinis, and R. mucilaginosa. The other carotenoid producing species Cystofilobasidium capitatum, Sporobolomyces salmonicolor, and S. roseus were active only against about 40% of the tested strains and exhibited weak activity. The broadest killer activity among ascomycetous yeasts was shown by the strains Pichia anomala and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. The species Debaryomyces castellii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia membranifaciens, and Williopsis californica did not show any killer activity. The best killer activity exhibited the strains isolated from leafy material. The lowest activity pattern was found among strains originating from soil environment.

  8. Chemically activated manganese dioxide for dry batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, M.; Abbas, H.

    1994-10-01

    The present investigation has enabled us to convert inactive beta-manganese dioxide to high electrochemically active types by chemical processes. Natural and chemically prepared beta-manganese dioxides were roasted at 1050 C to form Mn3O4. This compound was subjected to activation treatment using hydrochloric and sulfuric acid under various reaction conditions. The manganese dioxide so obtained was examined by x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric, differential thermal, and chemical analyses. The structure of the dioxide obtained was found to be greatly dependent on the origin of MnO2 and type of acid used. Treatment with hydrochloric acid yielded the so-called gamma-variety while sulfuric acid tended to produce gamma- or alpha-MnO2. In addition, waste manganese sulfate obtained as by-product from sulfuric acid digestion treatment was recycled and electrolytically oxidized to gamma-MnO2. The discharge performance of the above-mentioned MnO2 samples as battery cathodic active material was evaluated and compared with the ordinary battery grade.

  9. Anti-yeast activity of a food-grade dilution-stable microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Xu, Yaoqi; Wu, Lijiang; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zhu, Songming; Feng, Fengqin; Shen, Lirong

    2010-07-01

    The anti-yeast activities of a food-grade dilution-stable microemulsion against Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied. The weight ratio of the formulated microemulsion is glycerol monolaurate (GML)/propionic acid/Tween 80/sodium benzoate (SB)/water = 3:9:14:14:24. Results of anti-yeast activity on solid medium by agar diffusion method showed that the anti-yeast activity of the microemulsion at 4.8 mg/ml was comparable to that of natamycin at 0.1 mg/ml as positive control. Results of anti-yeast activity in liquid medium by broth dilution method showed that the growth of both C. albicans and S. cerevisiae was completely inhibited when the liquid medium containing 10(6) cfu/ml was treated with 1.2 mg/ml microemulsion, which was determined as minimum fungicidal concentration. The kinetics of killing results showed that the microemulsion killed over 90% yeast cells rapidly within 15 min and caused a complete loss of viability in 120 min. Among the components, SB and GML had a similar anti-yeast activity, followed by propionic acid, while Tween 80 exhibited no activity and could not enhance the anti-yeast activities of these components, and it was revealed that the anti-yeast activity of the microemulsion was attributed to a combination of propionic acid, GML, and SB. The anti-yeast activity of the microemulsion was in good agreement with the leakage of 260-nm absorbing materials and the observation of transmission electron microscopy, indicating that the microemulsion induced the disruption and dysfunction of the cell membrane.

  10. Repeated batch production of theanine by coupled fermentation with energy transfer using membrane-enclosed gamma-glutamylmethylamide synthetase and dried yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Sachiko; Morihara, Yosuke; Wakayama, Mamoru; Tachiki, Takashi

    2009-12-01

    Gamma-glutamylmethylamide synthetase and dried baker's yeast cells were enclosed together in a dialysis membrane tube to produce theanine repeatedly by coupled fermentation with energy transfer. The membrane-enclosed enzyme preparation (M-EEP) formed approximately 600 mM theanine from glutamic acid and ethylamine at a 100% conversion rate. M-EEP maintained its productivity of theanine during six consecutive reactions in a mixture containing NAD(+).

  11. Changes in composition and amino acid profile during dry grind ethanol processing from corn and estimation of yeast contribution toward DDGS proteins.

    PubMed

    Han, Jianchun; Liu, Keshun

    2010-03-24

    Three sets of samples, consisting of ground corn, yeast, intermediate products, and DDGS, were provided by three commercial dry grind ethanol plants in Iowa and freeze dried before chemical analysis. On average, ground corn contained 70.23% starch, 7.65% protein, 3.26% oil, 1.29% ash, 87.79% total carbohydrate (CHO), and 17.57% total nonstarch CHO, dry matter basis. Results from Plant 1 samples showed that compared to ground corn, there was a slight but significant increase in the contents of protein, amino acids (AA), oil, and ash before fermentation, although starch/dextrin decreased sharply upon saccharification. After fermentation, starch content further decreased to about 6.0%, while protein, oil, and ash contents increased over 3-fold. AA increased 2.0-3.5-fold. Total CHO content decreased by 40%, and the content of total nonstarch CHO increased over 2.5-fold. Concentrations of these attributes fluctuated slightly in the remaining downstream products, but oil and ash were concentrated in thin stillage, while protein was concentrated in distiller grains upon centrifugation. When AA composition is expressed in relative % (protein basis), its changes did not follow that of protein concentration, but the influence of yeast AA profiles on those of downstream products became apparent. Accordingly, a multiple linear regression model for the AA profile of a downstream product as a function of AA profiles of ground corn and yeast was proposed. Regression results indicated that, with an r(2) = 0.95, yeast contributed about 20% toward DDGS proteins, and the rest came from corn. Data from Plants 2 and 3 confirmed those found with Plant 1 samples.

  12. Evaluation of a novel dry sheet culture method (Sanita-kun(R)) for rapid enumeration of yeasts and molds in foods.

    PubMed

    Teramura, Hajime; Ushiyama, Masashi; Ogihara, Hirokazu

    2015-02-01

    Sanita-kun(R) Yeasts and Molds (SkYM), a novel dry sheet culture method for rapid enumeration of fungi, has been developed. This re-hydrated plate consists of a unique adhesive sheet, non-woven fabric coated with nutrients, antibiotic, water absorption polymer and uniquely synthesized 2-(2-methoxyphenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl-tetrazolium chloride for rapid enumeration of yeasts and molds. When SkYM was assessed using 37 microbes including 33 fungal strains, 29 fungal strains (87.9%) were formed red colored colonies within 48h whereas all yeasts and molds tested formed colonies within 72 h. All tested bacteria failed to grow. The SkYM method, with both 48 and 72 h of incubation, was compared with Dichloran Rose-Bengal Chloramphenicol Agar (DRBC; 5 days) according to ISO 21527-1, and with 3M Petrifilm YM (PYM; 5 days) and Nissui Compact Dry YM (CDYM; 5 days) commercially available dry culture methods using 100 naturally contaminated foods. The linear correlation coefficients of SkYM (48h) with DRBC, PYM and CDYM were 0.921, 0.929 and 0.947, respectively, whereas the linear correlation coefficients between SkYM (72 h) and DRBC, SkYM (72h) and PYM, SkYM (72h) and CDYM were 0.948, 0.877 and 0.911, respectively. These results demonstrated that SkYM was a useful alternative for rapid enumeration of yeasts and molds in foods.

  13. Partial purification of histone H3 proteolytic activity from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Tomar, Raghuvir Singh

    2016-06-01

    The proteolytic clipping of histone tails has recently emerged as a novel form of irreversible post-translational modification (PTM) of histones. Histone clipping has been implicated as a regulatory process leading to the permanent removal of PTMs from histone proteins. However, there is scarcity of literature that describes the identification and characterization of histone-specific proteases. Here, we employed various biochemical methods to report histone H3-specific proteolytic activity from budding yeast. Our results demonstrate that H3 proteolytic activity was associated with sepharose bead matrices and activity was not affected by a variety of stress conditions. We have also identified the existence of an unknown protein that acts as a physiological inhibitor of the H3-clipping activity of yeast H3 protease. Moreover, through protease inhibition assays, we have also characterized yeast H3 protease as a serine protease. Interestingly, unlike glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), yeast H3 proteolytic activity was not inhibited by Stefin B. Together, our findings suggest the existence of a novel H3 protease in yeast that is different from other reported histone H3 proteases. The presence of histone H3 proteolytic activity, along with the physiological inhibitor in yeast, suggests an interesting molecular mechanism that regulates the activity of histone proteases. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Fractionation of Phenolic Compounds Extracted from Propolis and Their Activity in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Petelinc, Tanja; Polak, Tomaž; Demšar, Lea; Jamnik, Polona

    2013-01-01

    We have here investigated the activities of Slovenian propolis extracts in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified the phenolic compounds that appear to contribute to these activities. We correlated changes in intracellular oxidation and cellular metabolic energy in these yeasts with the individual fractions of the propolis extracts obtained following solid-phase extraction. The most effective fraction was further investigated according to its phenolic compounds. PMID:23409133

  15. Differential Expression of Extracellular Lipase and Protease Activities of Mycelial and Yeast Forms in Malassezia furfur.

    PubMed

    Juntachai, Weerapong; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    Malassezia furfur is a dimorphic yeast that is part of the human skin microflora. This fungus is a pathogen of a certain skin diseases, such as pityriasis versicolor, and in rare cases causes systemic infection in neonates. However, the role of dimorphism in the pathogenicity remains unclear. A modified induction medium (IM) was successfully able to induce mycelial growth of M. furfur under both solid and liquid condition. Filamentous elements with branching hyphae were observed when cultured in the IM. Furthermore, addition of bovine fetus serum into the liquid IM did not promote hyphal formation; on the contrary, it retrograded hyphae to the yeast form. Plate-washing assay showed that M. furfur hyphae did not possess the ability of invasive growth. Secretory proteins from both yeast and hyphal forms were isolated, and lipase and protease activities were analyzed. Intriguingly, the hyphal form showed higher activities than those of the yeast form, particularly the protease activity.

  16. Validation and application of a robust yeast estrogen bioassay for the screening of estrogenic activity in animal feed.

    PubMed

    Bovee, Toine F H; Bor, Gerrit; Heskamp, Henri H; Hoogenboom, Ron L A P; Nielen, Michel W F

    2006-06-01

    Previously we described the construction and properties of a rapid yeast bioassay stably expressing human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha) and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP), the latter in response to estrogens. In the present study this yeast estrogen assay was validated as a qualitative screening method for the determination of estrogenic activity in animal feed. This validation was performed according to EC Decision 2002/657. Twenty blank animal feed samples, including milk replacers and wet and dry feed samples, were spiked with 17beta-estradiol (E2beta) at 5 ng g(-1), 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2) at 5 ng g(-1), diethylstilbestrol (DES) at 10 ng g(-1), zearalenone at 1.25 microg g(-1) or equal at 200 microg g(-1). All of these blank and low estrogen spiked feed samples fulfilled the CCalpha and CCbeta criterions, meaning that all 20 blank feed samples gave a signal below the determined decision limit CCalpha and were thus classified as compliant, and at least 19 out of the 20 spiked samples gave a signal above this CCalpha (beta = 5%) and were thus classified as suspect. The method was specific and estrogens in feed were stable for up to 98 days. In this study we also present long-term performance data and several examples of estrogens found in the routine screening of animal feed. This is the first successful example of a developed, validated and applied bioassay for the screening of hormonal substances in feed.

  17. Distribution of the trehalase activation response and the regulatory trehalase gene among yeast species.

    PubMed

    Soto, T; Fernández, J; Cansado, J; Vicente, J; Gacto, M

    1997-12-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeasts the activity of regulatory trehalases increases in response to the addition of glucose and to thermal changes in the extracellular medium. We have performed an screening on the extent of this response among different representative yeast species and the results show that this ability is displayed only by a few members of the Saccharomycetaceae family. However, all yeasts examined contain a gene related to that coding for regulatory trehalase in S. cerevisiae. This finding reveals that the operational distinction between regulatory and nonregulatory trehalase in yeasts is not a property of the enzyme by itself but relays on the expression of accompanying mechanisms able to modulate trehalase activity.

  18. [Detection of viable metabolically active yeast cells using a colorimetric assay].

    PubMed

    Růzicka, F; Holá, V

    2008-02-01

    The increasing concern of yeasts able to form biofilm brings about the need for susceptibility testing of both planktonic and biofilm cells. Detection of viability or metabolic activity of yeast cells after exposure to antimicrobials plays a key role in the assessment of susceptibility testing results. Colorimetric assays based on the color change of the medium in the presence of metabolically active cells proved suitable for this purpose. In this study, the usability of a colorimetric assay with the resazurin redox indicator for monitoring the effect of yeast inoculum density on the reduction rate was tested. As correlation between the color change rate and inoculum density was observed, approximate quantification of viable cells was possible. The assay would be of relevance to antifungal susceptibility testing in both planktonic and biofilm yeasts.

  19. Comparison of the compact dry YM with the FDA BAM method for enumeration of yeasts and molds in fruit-based products. Performance-Tested Method 100401.

    PubMed

    Kodaka, Hidemasa; Mizuochi, Shingo; Teramura, Hajime; Nirazuka, Tadanobu

    2006-01-01

    Compact Dry YM is a ready-to-use test method for the enumeration of yeasts and molds in fruit-based products. The plates are presterilized and contain nonwoven incorporated nutrients supplemented with antibiotics and a chromogenic enzyme substrate, 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indoxyl phosphate, p-toluidine salt (X-phos), to facilitate counting dyes, and a cold water-soluble gelling agent. The medium should be rehydrated with 1 mL of diluted sample inoculated onto the center of the self-diffusible medium, allowing the solution to diffuse immediately by capillary action. The plate can be incubated at 25 degrees C for 7 days. The Compact Dry YM medium plates were validated as an analysis tool determining colony forming units of yeasts and molds from a variety of fruit-based products using 5 different fruit products. The performance tests were conducted at 25 degrees C. In all studies performed, no apparent differences were observed between the Compact Dry YM method and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA BAM) method results (P > 0.05). For the accuracy claim (n = 75), a correlation factor of r2 = 0.99 could be assigned, as stated in the application for Performance-Tested Method.

  20. Fructanase and fructosyltransferase activity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from fermenting musts of Mezcal.

    PubMed

    Arrizon, Javier; Morel, Sandrine; Gschaedler, Anne; Monsan, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    Fructanase and fructosyltransferase are interesting for the tequila process and prebiotics production (functional food industry). In this study, one hundred thirty non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from "Mezcal de Oaxaca" were screened for fructanase and fructosyltransferase activity. On solid medium, fifty isolates grew on Agave tequilana fructans (ATF), inulin or levan. In liquid media, inulin and ATF induced fructanase activities of between 0.02 and 0.27U/ml depending of yeast isolate. High fructanase activity on sucrose was observed for Kluyveromyces marxianus and Torulaspora delbrueckii, while the highest fructanase activity on inulin and ATF was observed for Issatchenkia orientalis, Cryptococcus albidus, and Candida apicola. Zygosaccharomyces bisporus and Candida boidinii had a high hydrolytic activity on levan. Sixteen yeasts belonging to K. marxianus, T. delbrueckii and C. apicola species were positive for fructosyltransferase activity. Mezcal microbiota proved to showed to be a source for new fructanase and fructosyltransferases with potential application in the tequila and food industry.

  1. Characterization of pectinase activity for enology from yeasts occurring in Argentine Bonarda grape

    PubMed Central

    Merín, María Gabriela; Martín, María Carolina; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Cocolin, Luca; de Ambrosini, Vilma Inés Morata

    2015-01-01

    Pectinolytic enzymes are greatly important in winemaking due to their ability to degrade pectic polymers from grape, contributing to enhance process efficiency and wine quality. This study aimed to analyze the occurrence of pectinolytic yeasts during spontaneous fermentation of Argentine Bonarda grape, to select yeasts that produce extracellular pectinases and to characterize their pectinolytic activity under wine-like conditions. Isolated yeasts were grouped using PCR-DGGE and identified by partial sequencing of 26S rRNA gene. Isolates comprised 7 genera, with Aureobasidium pullulans as the most predominant pectinolytic species, followed by Rhodotorula dairenensis and Cryptococcus saitoi. No pectinolytic activity was detected among ascomycetous yeasts isolated on grapes and during fermentation, suggesting a low occurrence of pectinolytic yeast species in wine fermentation ecosystem. This is the first study reporting R. dairenensis and Cr. saitoi species with pectinolytic activity. R. dairenensis GM-15 produced pectinases that proved to be highly active at grape pH, at 12 °C, and under ethanol and SO2 concentrations usually found in vinifications (pectinase activity around 1.1 U/mL). This strain also produced cellulase activity at 12 °C and pH 3.5, but did not produce β-glucosidase activity under these conditions. The strain showed encouraging enological properties for its potential use in low-temperature winemaking. PMID:26413065

  2. Characterization of pectinase activity for enology from yeasts occurring in Argentine Bonarda grape.

    PubMed

    Merín, María Gabriela; Martín, María Carolina; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Cocolin, Luca; de Ambrosini, Vilma Inés Morata

    2015-01-01

    Pectinolytic enzymes are greatly important in winemaking due to their ability to degrade pectic polymers from grape, contributing to enhance process efficiency and wine quality. This study aimed to analyze the occurrence of pectinolytic yeasts during spontaneous fermentation of Argentine Bonarda grape, to select yeasts that produce extracellular pectinases and to characterize their pectinolytic activity under wine-like conditions. Isolated yeasts were grouped using PCR-DGGE and identified by partial sequencing of 26S rRNA gene. Isolates comprised 7 genera, with Aureobasidium pullulans as the most predominant pectinolytic species, followed by Rhodotorula dairenensis and Cryptococcus saitoi. No pectinolytic activity was detected among ascomycetous yeasts isolated on grapes and during fermentation, suggesting a low occurrence of pectinolytic yeast species in wine fermentation ecosystem. This is the first study reporting R. dairenensis and Cr. saitoi species with pectinolytic activity. R. dairenensis GM-15 produced pectinases that proved to be highly active at grape pH, at 12 °C, and under ethanol and SO2 concentrations usually found in vinifications (pectinase activity around 1.1 U/mL). This strain also produced cellulase activity at 12 °C and pH 3.5, but did not produce β-glucosidase activity under these conditions. The strain showed encouraging enological properties for its potential use in low-temperature winemaking.

  3. Hypotonic shocks activate rat TRPV4 in Yeast in the Absence of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Loukin, Stephen H.; Su, Zhenwei; Kung, Ching

    2010-01-01

    Transient-receptor-potential channels (TRPs) underlie the sensing of chemicals, heat, and mechanical force. We expressed the rat TRPV1 and TRPV4 subtypes in yeast and monitored their activities in vivo as Ca2+ rise using transgenic aequorin. Heat and capsaicin activate TRPV1 but not TRPV4 in yeast. Hypotonic shocks activate TRPV4 but not TRPV1. Osmotic swelling is modeled to activate enzyme(s), producing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to open TRPV4 in mammalian cells. This model relegates mechanosensitivity to the enzyme and not the channel. Yeast has only a single Δ9 fatty-acid monodesaturase and cannot make PUFAs suggesting an alternative mechanism for TRPV4 activation. We discuss possible explanations of this difference. PMID:19174160

  4. Application of anhydrobiosis and dehydration of yeasts for non-conventional biotechnological goals.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Alexander; Turchetti, Benedetta; Buzzini, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    Dehydration of yeast cells causes them to enter a state of anhydrobiosis in which their metabolism is temporarily and reversibly suspended. This unique state among organisms is currently used in the production of active dry yeasts, mainly used in baking and winemaking. In recent decades non-conventional applications of yeast dehydration have been proposed for various modern biotechnologies. This mini-review briefly summarises current information on the application of dry yeasts in traditional and innovative fields. It has been shown that dry yeast preparations can be used for the efficient protection, purification and bioremediation of the environment from heavy metals. The high sorption activity of dehydrated yeasts can be used as an interesting tool in winemaking due to their effects on quality and taste. Dry yeasts are also used in agricultural animal feed. Another interesting application of yeast dehydration is as an additional stage in new methods for the stable immobilisation of microorganisms, especially in cases when biotechnologically important strains have no affinity with the carrier. Such immobilisation methods also provide a new approach for the successful conservation of yeast strains that are very sensitive to dehydration. In addition, the application of dehydration procedures opens up new possibilities for the use of yeast as a model system. Separate sections of this review also discuss possible uses of dry yeasts in biocontrol, bioprotection and biotransformations, in analytical methods as well as in some other areas.

  5. The transfer of aflatoxin M1 in milk of ewes fed diet naturally contaminated by aflatoxins and effect of inclusion of dried yeast culture in the diet.

    PubMed

    Battacone, G; Nudda, A; Palomba, M; Mazzette, A; Pulina, G

    2009-10-01

    An experiment was carried out to investigate 1) the transfer of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) into the milk of dairy ewes fed diets naturally contaminated with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1); 2) the effect of the addition of dried yeast culture in the diet on this transfer; and 3) the alteration of enzymatic activities in the liver of ewes fed diets contaminated with AFB1. Twenty-four Sarda dairy ewes were divided in 4 groups and fed a concentrate mix containing 4 amounts of wheat meal naturally contaminated with aflatoxins. The diet of the control group had no wheat meal, whereas that of treated groups had low, medium, or high amounts of contaminated wheat, which corresponded to 1.13, 2.30, and 5.03 microg of AFB1/kg of feed, respectively. The experiment lasted 14 d. On d 8 to 14 from the beginning of the trial, 12 g/d of a commercial dried yeast product (DYP) of Kluyveromyces lactis was added to the diet of each ewe. The AFM1 concentration in individual milk samples and the blood serum metabolites were measured periodically. The presence of AFM1 was first detected in milk on d 1 of administration, and then its concentration increased and approached a steady-state condition on d 3 simultaneously in all treated groups. The AFM1 in milk at the steady-state condition, which was linearly related to the AFB1 intake, was 39.72, 50.38, and 79.29 ng/L in the low-aflatoxin, medium-aflatoxin, and high-aflatoxin groups, respectively. The AFM1 concentration in milk of the high-aflatoxin group was approximately 1.5-fold greater than the European Commission maximum tolerance level (50 ng/kg). The addition of DYP to the diet did not affect the AFM1 concentration in milk. After the withdrawal of the contaminated concentrate mix, the AFM1 mean concentrations decreased quickly and were no longer detected after 3 d in all treated groups. Daily milk yield and composition did not differ because of aflatoxin treatment. Blood serum parameters (creatinine, glutamic oxalacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic

  6. Characterization of commercial inactive dry yeast preparations for enological use based on their ability to release soluble compounds and their behavior toward aroma compounds in model wines.

    PubMed

    Pozo-Bayón, Maria Angeles; Andujar-Ortiz, Inmaculada; Alcaide-Hidalgo, Juan María; Martín-Alvarez, Pedro J; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria

    2009-11-25

    The characterization of commercial enological inactive dry yeast (IDY) with different applications in wine production has been carried out. This study was based on the yeast's ability to release soluble compounds (high molecular weight nitrogen, free amino nitrogen, peptidic nitrogen, free amino acids, and polysaccharides) into model wines and on its behavior toward the volatility of seven wine aroma compounds. Important differences in soluble compounds released into the model wines supplemented with commercial IDY were found, with the free amino acids being among the most released. The volatility of most of the aroma compounds was affected by the addition of IDY preparations at a concentration usually employed during winemaking. The extent of this effect was dependent on the physicochemical characteristics of the aroma compound and on the length of time the IDY preparations remained in contact with the model wines. Whereas shorter contact times (2, 4, and 6 days) mainly promoted a "salting-out" effect, longer exposure (9 and 13 days) provoked a retention effect, with the consequent reduction of aroma compounds in the headspace. The use of different commercial preparations also promoted different effects toward the aroma compounds that may be at least in part due to differences in their ability to release soluble compounds of yeast origin into the wines.

  7. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  8. Growth model and metabolic activity of brewing yeast biofilm on the surface of spent grains: a biocatalyst for continuous beer fermentation.

    PubMed

    Brányik, Tomás; Vicente, António A; Kuncová, Gabriela; Podrazký, Ondrej; Dostálek, Pavel; Teixeira, José A

    2004-01-01

    In the continuous systems, such as continuous beer fermentation, immobilized cells are kept inside the bioreactor for long periods of time. Thus an important factor in the design and performance of the immobilized yeast reactor is immobilized cell viability and physiology. Both the decreasing specific glucose consumption rate (q(im)) and intracellular redox potential of the cells immobilized to spent grains during continuous cultivation in bubble-column reactor implied alterations in cell physiology. It was hypothesized that the changes of the physiological state of the immobilized brewing yeast were due to the aging process to which the immobilized yeast are exposed in the continuous reactor. The amount of an actively growing fraction (X(im)act) of the total immobilized biomass (X(im)) was subsequently estimated at approximately X(im)act = 0.12 g(IB) g(C)(-1) (IB = dry immobilized biomass, C = dry carrier). A mathematical model of the immobilized yeast biofilm growth on the surface of spent grain particles based on cell deposition (cell-to-carrier adhesion and cell-to-cell attachment), immobilized cell growth, and immobilized biomass detachment (cell outgrowth, biofilm abrasion) was formulated. The concept of the active fraction of immobilized biomass (X(im)act) and the maximum attainable biomass load (X(im)max) was included into the model. Since the average biofilm thickness was estimated at ca. 10 microm, the limitation of the diffusion of substrates inside the yeast biofilm could be neglected. The model successfully predicted the dynamics of the immobilized cell growth, maximum biomass load, free cell growth, and glucose consumption under constant hydrodynamic conditions in a bubble-column reactor. Good agreement between model simulations and experimental data was achieved.

  9. The diversity, extracellular enzymatic activities and photoprotective compounds of yeasts isolated in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Aline B. M.; Rosa, Luiz H.; Vieira, Mariana L. A.; de Garcia, Virginia; Brandão, Luciana R.; Teixeira, Lia C. R. S.; Moliné, Martin; Libkind, Diego; van Broock, Maria; Rosa, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    The diversity of yeasts collected from different sites in Antarctica (Admiralty Bay, King George Island and Port Foster Bay and Deception Island) and their ability to produce extracellular enzymes and mycosporines were studied. Samples were collected during the austral summer season, between November 2006 and January 2007, from the rhizosphere of Deschampsia antarctica, ornithogenic (penguin guano) soil, soil, marine and lake sediments, marine water and freshwater from lakes. A total of 89 isolates belonging to the following genera were recovered: Bensingtonia, Candida, Cryptococcus, Debaryomyces, Dioszegia, Exophiala, Filobasidium, Issatchenkia (Pichia), Kodamaea, Leucosporidium, Leucosporidiella, Metschnikowia, Nadsonia, Pichia, Rhodotorula, and Sporidiobolus, and the yeast-like fungi Aureobasidium, Leuconeurospora and Microglossum. Cryptococcus victoriae was the most frequently identified species. Several species isolated in our study have been previously reported to be Antarctic psychophilic yeasts, including Cr. antarcticus, Cr. victoriae, Dioszegia hungarica and Leucosporidium scottii. The cosmopolitan yeast species A. pullulans, C. zeylanoides, D. hansenii, I. orientalis, K. ohmeri, P. guilliermondii, Rh. mucilaginosa, and S. salmonicolor were also isolated. Five possible new species were identified. Sixty percent of the yeasts had at least one detectable extracellular enzymatic activity. Cryptococcus antarcticus, D. aurantiaca, D. crocea, D. hungarica, Dioszegia sp., E. xenobiotica, Rh. glaciales, Rh. laryngis, Microglossum sp. 1 and Microglossum sp. 2 produced mycosporines. Of the yeast isolates, 41.7% produced pigments and/or mycosporines and could be considered adapted to survive in Antarctica. Most of the yeasts had extracellular enzymatic activities at 4°C and 20°C, indicating that they could be metabolically active in the sampled substrates. PMID:24031709

  10. Quality and Antioxidant Activity of Buckwheat-Based Cookies Designed for a Raw Food Vegan Diet as Affected by Moderate Drying Temperature.

    PubMed

    Brožková, Iveta; Dvořáková, Veronika; Michálková, Kateřina; Červenka, Libor; Velichová, Helena

    2016-12-01

    Buckwheat cookies with various ingredients for raw food vegan diet are usually prepared by soaking them in water at ambient temperature followed by drying at moderate temperature. The aim of this study was to examine the temperature effect on the microbiological quality, antioxidant properties and oxidative stability of lipids of final dried samples. The mixture of ingredients was soaked for 20 h in distilled water, and then cookies were formed and dried in air-forced oven at constant temperature in the range from 40 to 60 °C. Total viable counts, fungi, yeasts, coliform and aerobic spore-forming bacteria counts were evaluated in dried samples and were found to decrease during drying at 50 and 60 °C. Antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH and ABTS assays, and the former showed the highest value at 40 °C. Superoxide dismutase activity was also higher at 40 °C in comparison with that at 60 °C. The percentage of lipid peroxidation inhibition increased with the increase in drying temperature until 4th day of incubation. While peroxide value was significantly higher in samples dried at 40 °C, TBARS values did not show significant changes during the drying process. The results of this study suggest that drying buckwheat-based cookies at 40 °C retained their good antioxidant properties but represent a potentially serious microbial hazard.

  11. Mold-inhibitory activity of different yeast species during airtight storage of wheat grain.

    PubMed

    Adel Druvefors, Ulrika; Schnürer, Johan

    2005-02-01

    The yeast Pichia anomala J121 inhibits spoilage by Penicillium roqueforti in laboratory and pilot studies with high-moisture wheat in malfunctioning airtight storage. We tested the biocontrol ability of an additional 57 yeast species in a grain mini silo system. Most yeast species grew to CFU levels comparable to that of P. anomala J121 after 14 days of incubation (>10(6) CFU g(-1)). Of the 58 species, 38 (63 strains) had no mold-inhibitory effects (Pen. roqueforti levels >10(5) CFU g(-1)). Among these were 11 species (18 strains) that did not grow on the wheat grain. Several of the non-inhibiting yeast species have previously been reported as biocontrol agents in other postharvest environments. Weak inhibitory activity, reducing Pen. roqueforti levels to between 10(4) and 10(5) CFU g(-1), was observed with 11 species (12 strains). Candida silvicola and Pichia guillermondii reduced Pen. roqueforti to <10(4) CFU g(-1). Candida fennica, Candida pelliculosa, Candida silvicultrix, P. anomala (29 strains), Pichia burtonii, Pichia farinosa and Pichia membranifaciens strongly inhibited Pen. roqueforti (<10(3) CFU g(-1)) in the mini silos, but none had higher biocontrol activity than P. anomala strain J121. This report is the first of biocontrol activity of C. fennica and C. silvicultrix. The ability of 27 yeast species to grow to high CFU values without inhibiting mold growth suggests that nutrient competition may not be the main mode of action of P. anomala J121.

  12. The diversity and antimicrobial activity of Preussia sp. endophytes isolated from Australian dry rainforests.

    PubMed

    Mapperson, Rachel R; Kotiw, Michael; Davis, Rohan A; Dearnaley, John D W

    2014-01-01

    Limited knowledge currently exists regarding species diversity and antimicrobial activity of endophytic isolates of Preussia within Australia. This report describes endophytic Preussia species that were identified through molecular analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region. Screening for antimicrobial secondary metabolites was determined by testing crude ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extracts derived from fungal mycelia against a panel of ATCC type strains which included Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the opportunist yeast pathogen Candida albicans. Subsequently, high-performance liquid chromatography generated fractions of bioactive EtOAc extracts which were subject to confirmatory testing using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute reference microdilution antimicrobial activity assay. A total of 18 Preussia were isolated from nine host plants with 6/18 having a <97 % sequence similarity to other known species in Genbank, suggesting that they are new species. In preliminary screening, 13/18 Preussia isolates revealed antimicrobial activity against at least one of the microbes tested, whilst 6/18 isolates, including 4/6 putative new species showed specific antimicrobial activity against MRSA and C. albicans. These results highlight the antimicrobial potential of Australian Preussia spp. and also the importance of Australian dry rainforests as an untapped repository of potentially significant bioactive compounds.

  13. The euryhaline yeast Debaryomyces hansenii has two catalase genes encoding enzymes with differential activity profile.

    PubMed

    Segal-Kischinevzky, Claudia; Rodarte-Murguía, Beatriz; Valdés-López, Victor; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González, Alicia; Alba-Lois, Luisa

    2011-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a spoilage yeast able to grow in a variety of ecological niches, from seawater to dairy products. Results presented in this article show that (i) D. hansenii has an inherent resistance to H2O2 which could be attributed to the fact that this yeast has a basal catalase activity which is several-fold higher than that observed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the same culture conditions, (ii) D. hansenii has two genes (DhCTA1 and DhCTT1) encoding two catalase isozymes with a differential enzymatic activity profile which is not strictly correlated with a differential expression profile of the encoding genes.

  14. Proteinase and phospholipase activities and development at different temperatures of yeasts isolated from bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Melville, Priscilla A; Benites, Nilson R; Ruz-Peres, Monica; Yokoya, Eugenio

    2011-11-01

    The presence of yeasts in milk may cause physical and chemical changes limiting the durability and compromising the quality of the product. Moreover, milk and dairy products contaminated by yeasts may be a potential means of transmission of these microorganisms to man and animals causing several kinds of infections. This study aimed to determine whether different species of yeasts isolated from bovine raw milk had the ability to develop at 37°C and/or under refrigeration temperature. Proteinase and phospholipase activities resulting from these yeasts were also monitored at different temperatures. Five genera of yeasts (Aureobasidium sp., Candida spp., Geotrichum spp., Trichosporon spp. and Rhodotorula spp.) isolated from bovine raw milk samples were evaluated. All strains showed one or a combination of characteristics: growth at 37°C (99·09% of the strains), psychrotrophic behaviour (50·9%), proteinase production (16·81% of the strains at 37°C and 4·09% under refrigeration) and phospholipase production (36·36% of the isolates at 37°C and 10·9% under refrigeration), and all these factors may compromise the quality of the product. Proteinase production was similar for strains incubated at 37°C (16·81% of the isolates) and room temperature (17·27%) but there was less amount of phospholipase-producing strains at room temperature (15·45% of the isolates were positive) when compared with incubation at 37°C (36·36%). Enzymes production at 37°C by yeasts isolated from milk confirmed their pathogenic potential. The refrigeration temperature was found to be most efficient to inhibit enzymes production and consequently ensure better quality of milk. The viability of yeasts and the activity of their enzymes at different temperatures are worrying because this can compromise the quality of dairy products at all stages of production and/or storage, and represent a risk to the consumer.

  15. Optimised quantification of the antiyeast activity of different barley malts towards a lager brewing yeast strain.

    PubMed

    van Nierop, Sandra N E; Axcell, Barry C; Cantrell, Ian C; Rautenbach, Marina

    2008-10-01

    The brewing of beer involves two major biological systems, namely malted barley (malt) and yeast. Both malt and yeast show natural variation and assessing the impact of differing malts on yeast performance is important in the optimisation of the brewing process. Currently, the brewing industry uses well-established tests to assess malt quality, but these frequently fail to predict malt-associated problem fermentations, such as incomplete fermentations, premature yeast flocculation (PYF) and gushing of the final beer product. Antimicrobial compounds, and in particular antiyeast compounds in malt, may be one of the unknown and unmeasured malt factors leading to problem fermentations. In this study, the adaptation of antimicrobial assays for the determination of antiyeast activity in malt is described. Our adapted assay was able to detect differing antiyeast activities in nine malt samples. For this sample set, malts associated with PYF during fermentation and gushing activity in beer showed high antiyeast activity. Both PYF and gushing are malt quality issues associated with fungal infection of barley in the field which may result in elevated antimicrobial activity in the barley grain. Also, two more malts that passed the normal quality control tests were also observed to have high antiyeast activity and such malts must be considered as suspect. Based on our results, this assay is a useful measure of malt quality as it quantifies the antiyeast activity in malt which may adversely impact on brewery fermentation.

  16. Improved shelf life of dried Beauveria bassiana blastospores using convective drying and active packaging processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yeast form (blastospore) of the dimorphic insect-pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana can be rapidly produced using liquid fermentation methods but is generally unable to survive rapid dehydration processes or storage under non-refrigerated conditions. In this study, we evaluated the influence o...

  17. Activation of polyomavirus DNA replication by yeast GAL4 is dependent on its transcriptional activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett-Cook, E R; Hassell, J A

    1991-01-01

    The polyomavirus replication origin contains transcriptional regulatory sequences. To determine how these elements function in DNA replication, and to learn whether a common mechanism underlies the activation of transcription and DNA replication, we tested whether a well-characterized transcriptional activator, yeast GAL4, was capable of stimulating DNA replication and transcription in the same mammalian cell line. We observed that GAL4 activated polyomavirus DNA replication in mouse cells when its binding site was juxtaposed to the late border of the polyomavirus origin core. Synergistic activation of DNA replication was achieved by multimerization of the GAL4 binding site. Analysis of GAL4 mutant proteins, GAL4 hybrid proteins and mutants of the latter revealed that the activation domains of these transcriptional activators were required to stimulate DNA replication. In agreement with previously published data, the activation domains of GAL4 were also required to enhance transcription in the same mouse cell line. These observations implicate transcriptional activators in Py DNA replication and suggest that similar mechanisms govern the activation of transcription and DNA replication. Images PMID:1849079

  18. Inventions on baker's yeast strains and specialty ingredients.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    Baker's yeast is one of the oldest food microbial starters. Between 1927 and 2008, 165 inventions on more than 337 baker's yeast strains were patented. The first generation of patented yeast strains claimed improved biomass yield at the yeast plant, higher gassing power in dough or better survival to drying to prepare active dry baker's yeast. Especially between 1980 and 1995, a major interest was given to strains for multiple bakery applications such as dough with variable sugar content and stored at refrigeration (cold) or freezing temperatures. During the same period, genetically engineered yeast strains became very popular but did not find applications in the baking industry. Since year 2000, patented baker's yeast strains claimed aroma, anti-moulding or nutritive properties to better meet the needs of the baking industry. In addition to patents on yeast strains, 47 patents were issued on baker's yeast specialty ingredients for niche markets. This review shows that patents on baker's yeast with improved characteristics such as aromatic or nutritive properties have regularly been issued since the 1920's. Overall, it also confirms recent interest for a very wide range of tailored-made yeast-based ingredients for bakery applications.

  19. “In vitro” antifungal activity of ozonized sunflower oil on yeasts from onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Guerrer, L.V.; Cunha, K. C.; Nogueira, M. C. L.; Cardoso, C. C.; Soares, M. M. C. N.; Almeida, M. T. G.

    2012-01-01

    The “in vitro” antifungal activity of ozonized sunflower oil (Bioperoxoil®) was tested on 101 samples of yeasts originating from onychomycosis using the disk diffusion method. The oil was efficacious against several clinical fungal strains: Candida parapsilosis, Candida albicans, Trichosporon asahii, Candida tropicalis and Candida guilliermondii. PMID:24031958

  20. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome is involved in Yeast Prion Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Marc; Soubigou, Flavie; Evrard, Justine; Nguyen, Phu hai; Hasin, Naushaba; Chédin, Stéphane; Gillet, Reynald; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Stahl, Guillaume; Jones, Gary W.; Voisset, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    6AP and GA are potent inhibitors of yeast and mammalian prions and also specific inhibitors of PFAR, the protein-folding activity borne by domain V of the large rRNA of the large subunit of the ribosome. We therefore explored the link between PFAR and yeast prion [PSI+] using both PFAR-enriched mutants and site-directed methylation. We demonstrate that PFAR is involved in propagation and de novo formation of [PSI+]. PFAR and the yeast heat-shock protein Hsp104 partially compensate each other for [PSI+] propagation. Our data also provide insight into new functions for the ribosome in basal thermotolerance and heat-shocked protein refolding. PFAR is thus an evolutionarily conserved cell component implicated in the prion life cycle, and we propose that it could be a potential therapeutic target for human protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27633137

  1. Effect of air-blast drying and the presence of protectants on the viability of yeast entrapped in calcium alginate beads with an aim to improve the survival rate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hwan; Lee, Sae-Byuk; Park, Heui-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Five yeast strains, Saccharomyces cerevisiae D8, M12, and S13; Hanseniaspora uvarum S6; and Issatchenkia orientalis KMBL5774, isolated from Korean grapes, were entrapped in Ca-alginate beads, which are non-toxic, simple to use, and economical. Ca-alginate beads containing yeast cells were soaked in protective solutions, such as skim milk, saccharides, polyols, and nitrogen compounds, before air-blast drying to improve the yeast survival rate and storage ability. The results showed that both entrapment in Ca-alginate beads and soaking in protective agents favorably affected the survival of all strains. The microenvironment formed by the beads and protective agents can protect the yeast cells from harsh environmental conditions, such as low water (below 10 %). All the yeast strains entrapped in Ca-alginate beads showed greater than 80 % survival and less than 11 % water content after air-blast drying at 37 °C for 5 h. In addition, air-blast dried cells of S. cerevisiae D8, M12, S13; H. uvarum S6; and I. orientalis KMBL5774 entrapped in 2 % Ca-alginate beads and soaked in protective agents (10 % skim milk containing 10 % sucrose, 10 % raffinose, 10 % trehalose, 10 % trehalose, and 10 % glucose, respectively) after air-blast drying at 37 °C for 5 h showed 90, 87, 92, 90, and 87 % viability, respectively. All dried entrapped yeast cells showed survival rates of at least 51 % after storage at 4 °C for 3 months.

  2. [Expression of Chinese sturgeon cystatin in yeast Pichia pastoris and its proteinase inhibitory activity analysis].

    PubMed

    Ma, Dong-Mei; Bai, Jun-Jie; Jian, Qing; Lao, Hai-Hua; Ye, Xing; Luo, Jian-Ren

    2003-09-01

    Cystatin, which widely distributed in both tissues and body fluids of animal and plant, was a superfamily of cysteine proteinase inhibitors. It could form activity-inhibitor complexes with cysteine proteinases to inhibit the hydrolytic activity of proteinases. Cystatin played important roles not only in the inhibition of the proteolytic degradation of fish muscle, but also in biological defense systems against invaders. To explore the functions of fish cystatin and the potential values in fish disease prevention and cure, as well as seafood processing, the recombinant yeast strains which could express Chinese sturgeon cystatin were constructed. First, the cystatin cDNA of Chinese sturgeon, which had been PCR modified, was subcloned into yeast integrated vector pPICZaA. After extracted and purified, the recombinant plasmids were linearized by Sac I. The yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 strain was transformed by use of the Lithium Chloride transformation method, and the recombinant cystatin yeast strains got. After 0.5% methanol induction, SDS-PAGE analysis of the culture supernatant indicated that the yield of recombinant cystatin was about 215mg x L(-1) with the percentage about 73.6%. The recombinant cystatin was purified through Q-Sepharose anion-exchange chromatography, and the purity reached about 94.2%. The inhibitory activity of recombinant cystatin was measured by inhibiting the proteinase activity of papain. The results showed that about 1 microg recombinant cystatin could inhibit the activity of 15 microg papain. Heat stability assay results showed that there was a decrease in inhibitory activity of cystatin with the increasing of temperature. When solution of recombinant cystatin was kept at 70 degrees C for 5min, the inhibitory activity reduced fast. While the recombinant cystatin was heated to 90 degrees C for 5min, the inhibitory activity of recombinant cystatin was undetected. The inhibitory activity for recombinant Chinese sturgeon cystatin was higher

  3. Effect of balanced low pressure drying of curcuma longa leaf on skin immune activation activities.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wooseok; Lim, Hye Won; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2014-01-01

    The effect of balanced low pressure drying pretreatment associated with ultrasonication extraction (BU) on the enhancement of skin immune modulatory activities of Curcuma longa leaf was studied by comparing with conventional hot air drying (HE), freeze drying (FE) and balanced low pressure drying (BE) pretreatment processes. In considering skin immune activation activities such as the inhibition of hyaluronidase activity, the BU extract showed ca. 10% higher than those of HE, and even higher than that of the FE extract. Nitric oxide production from macrophage of the BU extract in adding 1.0 mg/mL was increased up to 16.5 μM. When measuring inhibition of IL-6 and TNF-a production from the human T lymphocytes (T cell), the BU extract also showed 53% and 78% of inhibition effect, respectively. It is found that the BU extract could effectively suppress the expression levels of skin inflammation related genes such as Cox-2 and iNOS, down to 80% and 85% compared to the control, respectively. Balanced low pressure drying process was especially active on dehydration of the leaves with minimizing the destruction and making easier elution of the bioactive substances, which resulted in higher extraction yield and better biological activities.

  4. Active Trans-Plasma Membrane Water Cycling in Yeast Is Revealed by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yajie; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Springer, Charles S.; Balschi, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma membrane water transport is a crucial cellular phenomenon. Net water movement in response to an osmotic gradient changes cell volume. Steady-state exchange of water molecules, with no net flux or volume change, occurs by passive diffusion through the phospholipid bilayer and passage through membrane proteins. The hypothesis is tested that plasma membrane water exchange also correlates with ATP-driven membrane transport activity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Longitudinal 1H2O NMR relaxation time constant (T1) values were measured in yeast suspensions containing extracellular relaxation reagent. Two-site-exchange analysis quantified the reversible exchange kinetics as the mean intracellular water lifetime (τi), where τi−1 is the pseudo-first-order rate constant for water efflux. To modulate cellular ATP, yeast suspensions were bubbled with 95%O2/5%CO2 (O2) or 95%N2/5%CO2 (N2). ATP was high during O2, and τi−1 was 3.1 s−1 at 25°C. After changing to N2, ATP decreased and τi−1 was 1.8 s−1. The principal active yeast ion transport protein is the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. Studies using the H+-ATPase inhibitor ebselen or a yeast genetic strain with reduced H+-ATPase found reduced τi−1, notwithstanding high ATP. Steady-state water exchange correlates with H+-ATPase activity. At volume steady state, water is cycling across the plasma membrane in response to metabolic transport activity. PMID:22261073

  5. UBA 1: an essential yeast gene encoding ubiquitin-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, J P; Jentsch, S; Varshavsky, A

    1991-01-01

    All known functions of ubiquitin are mediated through its covalent attachment to other proteins. The post-translational formation of ubiquitin--protein conjugates is preceded by an ATP-requiring step in which the carboxyl terminus of ubiquitin is adenylated and subsequently joined, through a thiolester bond, to a cysteine residue in the ubiquitin-activating enzyme, also known as E1. We report the isolation and functional analysis of the gene (UBA1) for the ubiquitin-activating enzyme of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. UBA1 encodes a 114 kd protein whose amino acid sequence contains motifs characteristic of nucleotide-binding sites. Expression of catalytically active UBA1 protein in E. coli, which lacks the ubiquitin system, confirmed that the yeast UBA1 gene encodes a ubiquitin-activating enzyme. Deletion of the UBA1 gene is lethal, demonstrating that the formation of ubiquitin--protein conjugates is essential for cell viability. Images PMID:1989885

  6. In vitro antifungal activity of fluconazole and voriconazole against non-Candida yeasts and yeast-like fungi clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Mandras, Narcisa; Roana, Janira; Scalas, Daniela; Fucale, Giacomo; Allizond, Valeria; Banche, Giuliana; Barbui, Anna; Li Vigni, Nicolò; Newell, Vance A; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Tullio, Vivian

    2015-10-01

    The risk of opportunistic infections caused by non-Candida yeasts and yeast-like fungi is increasingly common, mainly in immunocompromised patients. Appropriate first-line therapy has not been defined and standardized, mainly due to the low number of cases reported. To improve empirical treatment guidelines, we describe the susceptibility profile to fluconazole and voriconazole of 176 non-Candida yeasts and yeast-like fungi collected from hospitals in Piedmont, North West Italy from January 2009 to December 2013. The results showed that most isolates are susceptible to voriconazole (94%), but less susceptible to fluconazole (78%), suggesting that voriconazole could be used as first-line therapy in infections caused by these fungi.

  7. Antifungal Activity of Brazilian Propolis Microparticles against Yeasts Isolated from Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Dota, Kelen Fátima Dalben; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; Bruschi, Marcos Luciano

    2011-01-01

    Propolis, a resinous compound produced by Apis mellifera L. bees, is known to possess a variety of biological activities and is applied in the therapy of various infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity of propolis ethanol extract (PE) and propolis microparticles (PMs) obtained from a sample of Brazilian propolis against clinical yeast isolates of importance in the vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). PE was used to prepare the microparticles. Yeast isolates (n = 89), obtained from vaginal exudates of patients with VVC, were exposed to the PE and the PMs. Moreover, the main antifungal drugs used in the treatment of VVC (Fluconazole, Voriconazole, Itraconazole, Ketoconazole, Miconazole and Amphotericin B) were also tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined according to the standard broth microdilution method. Some Candida albicans isolates showed resistance or dose-dependent susceptibility for the azolic drugs and Amphotericin B. Non-C. albicans isolates showed more resistance and dose-dependent susceptibility for the azolic drugs than C. albicans. However, all of them were sensitive or dose-dependent susceptible for Amphotericin B. All yeasts were inhibited by PE and PMs, with small variation, independent of the species of yeast. The overall results provided important information for the potential application of PMs in the therapy of VVC and the possible prevention of the occurrence of new symptomatic episodes. PMID:21607012

  8. Caspase Inhibitors of the P35 Family Are More Active When Purified from Yeast than Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Ingo L.; Civciristov, Srgjan; Taylor, Nicole L.; Talbo, Gert H.; Pantaki-Eimany, Delara; Levina, Vita; Clem, Rollie J.; Perugini, Matthew A.; Kvansakul, Marc; Hawkins, Christine J.

    2012-01-01

    Many insect viruses express caspase inhibitors of the P35 superfamily, which prevent defensive host apoptosis to enable viral propagation. The prototypical P35 family member, AcP35 from Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, has been extensively studied. Bacterially purified AcP35 has been previously shown to inhibit caspases from insect, mammalian and nematode species. This inhibition occurs via a pseudosubstrate mechanism involving caspase-mediated cleavage of a “reactive site loop” within the P35 protein, which ultimately leaves cleaved P35 covalently bound to the caspase's active site. We observed that AcP35 purifed from Saccharomyces cerevisae inhibited caspase activity more efficiently than AcP35 purified from Escherichia coli. This differential potency was more dramatic for another P35 family member, MaviP35, which inhibited human caspase 3 almost 300-fold more potently when purified from yeast than bacteria. Biophysical assays revealed that MaviP35 proteins produced in bacteria and yeast had similar primary and secondary structures. However, bacterially produced MaviP35 possessed greater thermal stability and propensity to form higher order oligomers than its counterpart purified from yeast. Caspase 3 could process yeast-purified MaviP35, but failed to detectably cleave bacterially purified MaviP35. These data suggest that bacterially produced P35 proteins adopt subtly different conformations from their yeast-expressed counterparts, which hinder caspase access to the reactive site loop to reduce the potency of caspase inhibition, and promote aggregation. These data highlight the differential caspase inhibition by recombinant P35 proteins purified from different sources, and caution that analyses of bacterially produced P35 family members (and perhaps other types of proteins) may underestimate their activity. PMID:22720082

  9. Potential for a mycotoxin deactivator to improve growth and performance of rainbow trout fed high levels of an ethanol industry co-Product, grain distiller’s dried yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Co-products from the production of fuel ethanol may have the potential to be used as protein sources for Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss if dietary supplementation strategies that can maintain fish performance can be identified. A random sample of one such co-product, grain distiller’s dried yeast...

  10. Evaluation of commercially available enzymes, probiotics, or yeast on apparent total-tract nutrient digestion and growth in nursery and finishing pigs fed diets containing corn dried distillers grains with solubles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of enzymes, direct fed microbials, or yeast to enhance nutrient utilization or growth performance in nursery or finishing pigs fed diets containing increased levels of corn fiber from dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) is largely unknown. Ten commercially available feed additiv...

  11. The diversity and extracellular enzymatic activities of yeasts isolated from water tanks of Vriesea minarum, an endangered bromeliad species in Brazil, and the description of Occultifur brasiliensis f.a., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Fátima C O; Safar, Silvana V B; Marques, Andrea R; Medeiros, Adriana O; Santos, Ana Raquel O; Carvalho, Cláudia; Lachance, Marc-André; Sampaio, José Paulo; Rosa, Carlos A

    2015-02-01

    The diversity of yeast species collected from the bromeliad tanks of Vriesea minarum, an endangered bromeliad species, and their ability to produce extracellular enzymes were studied. Water samples were collected from 30 tanks of bromeliads living in a rupestrian field site located at Serrada Piedade, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, during both the dry and rainy seasons. Thirty-six species were isolated, representing 22 basidiomycetous and 14 ascomycetous species. Occultifur sp., Cryptococcus podzolicus and Cryptococcus sp. 1 were the prevalent basidiomycetous species. The yeast-like fungus from the order Myriangiales, Candida silvae and Aureobasidium pullulans were the most frequent ascomycetous species. The diversity of the yeast communities obtained between seasons was not significantly different, but the yeast composition per bromeliad was different between seasons. These results suggest that there is significant spatial heterogeneity in the composition of populations of the yeast communities within bromeliad tanks, independent of the season. Among the 352 yeast isolates tested, 282 showed at least one enzymatic activity. Protease activity was the most widely expressed extracellular enzymatic activity, followed by xylanase, amylase, pectinase and cellulase activities. These enzymes may increase the carbon and nitrogen availability for the microbial food web in the bromeliad tank of V. minarum. Sequence analyses revealed the existence of 10 new species, indicating that bromeliad tanks are important sources of new yeasts. The novel species Occultifur brasiliensis, f.a., sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate the most frequently isolated yeast associated with V. minarum. The type strain of O. brasiliensis, f.a., sp. nov. is UFMG-CM-Y375(T) (= CBS 12687(T)). The Mycobank number is MB 809816.

  12. Phosphorylation is the major mechanism regulating isocitrate lyase activity in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Aline H da Silva; Brock, Matthias; Zambuzzi-Carvalho, Patrícia F; Santos-Silva, Ludier K; Troian, Rogério F; Góes, Alfredo M; Soares, Célia M de Almeida; Pereira, Maristela

    2011-07-01

    The glyoxylate cycle plays an essential role for anaplerosis of oxaloacetate during growth of microorganisms on carbon sources such as acetate or fatty acids and has been shown to contribute to virulence of several pathogens. Here, we investigated the transcriptional and post-translational regulation of the glyoxylate cycle key enzyme isocitrate lyase (PbICL) in the human pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Although sequence analyses on fungal isocitrate lyases revealed a high phylogenetic conservation, their regulation seems to differ significantly. Closely related Aspergillus species regulate the glyoxylate cycle at the transcriptional level, whereas Pbicl was constitutively expressed in yeast cells. However, only low PbICL activity was detected when cells were grown in the presence of glucose. Two-dimensional gel analyses with subsequent antibody hybridization revealed constitutive production of PbICL, but low PbICL activity on glucose coincided with extensive protein phosphorylation. Since an in vitro dephosphorylation of PbICL from glucose grown cells strongly increased ICL activity and resembled the phosphorylation pattern of highly active acetate grown cells, post-translational modification seems the main mechanism regulating PbICL activity in yeast cells. In agreement, a transfer of yeast cells from glucose to acetate medium increased PbICL activity without requirement of de novo protein synthesis. Thus, inactivation of PbICL by phosphorylation is reversible, denoting a new strategy for the rapid adaptation to changing environmental conditions.

  13. Changes in free amino acid content and activities of amination and transamination enzymes in yeasts grown on different inorganic nitrogen sources, including hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Norkrans, B; Tunblad-Johansson, I

    1981-01-01

    This study concerns inter- and intraspecific differences between yeasts at assimilation of different nitrogen sources. Alterations in the content of free amino acids in cells and media as well as in the related enzyme activities during growth were studied. The hydroxylamine (HA)-tolerant Endomycopsis lipolytica was examined and compared with the nitrate-reducing Cryptococcus albidus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, requiring fully reduced nitrogen for growth. Special attention was paid to alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, the amino acids closely related to the Krebs cycle keto acids. The amino acids were analyzed as their n-propyl N-acetyl esters by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). The composition of the amino acid pool was similar for the three yeasts. Glutamic acid was predominant; in early log-phase cells of E. lipolytica contents of 200-234 micromol . g(-1) dry weight were found. A positive correlation between the specific growth rate and the size of the amino acid pool was observed. The assimilation of ammonia was mediated by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). The NADP-GDH was the dominating enzyme in all three yeasts showing the highest specific activity in Cr. albidus grown on nitrate (6980 nmol . (min(-1)).(mg protein(-1)). Glutamine synthetase (GS) displayed a high specific activity in S. cerevisiae, which also had a high amount of glutamine. The assimilation of HA did not differ greatly from the assimilation of ammonium in E. lipolytica. The existing differences could rather be explained as provoked by the concentration of available nitrogen.

  14. Inhibition of Yap2 activity by MAPKAP kinase Rck1 affects yeast tolerance to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Daiane; Pimentel, Catarina; Caetano, Soraia; Amaral, Catarina; Menezes, Regina; Santos, Claudia N; Eleutherio, Elis; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2015-09-14

    Yap2 is a cadmium responsive transcription factor that interacts with MAPK-activated protein (MAPKAP) kinase Rck1. We show that Rck1 deletion confers protection against cadmium toxicity and that the mechanism underlying this observation relies on Yap2. Rck1 removal from the yeast genome potentiates Yap2 activity by increasing protein half-life and delaying its nuclear export. As a consequence, several Yap2 antioxidant targets are over-activated by a mechanism that also requires Yap1. Several genes of the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway are upregulated under cadmium stress in a Yap2 dependent way. We showed that deletion of CWI genes renders yeast cells more sensitive to cadmium. These findings led us to suggest that in response to cadmium stress Yap2 may serve a dual purpose: oxidative stress attenuation and cell wall maintenance.

  15. Synchronous activation of cell division by light or temperature stimuli in the dimorphic yeast Schizosaccharomyces japonicus.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Sho; Furuya, Kanji; Nozaki, Shingo; Aoki, Keita; Niki, Hironori

    2013-09-01

    Many fungi respond to light and regulate fungal development and behavior. A blue light-activated complex has been identified in Neurospora crassa as the product of the wc-1 and wc-2 genes. Orthologs of WC-1 and WC-2 have hitherto been found only in filamentous fungi and not in yeast, with the exception of the basidiomycete pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus. Here, we report that the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces japonicus responds to blue light depending on Wcs1 and Wcs2, orthologs of components of the WC complex. Surprisingly, those of ascomycete S. japonicus are more closely related to those of the basidiomycete. S. japonicus reversibly changes from yeast to hyphae in response to environmental stresses. After incubation at 30°C, a colony of yeast was formed, and then hyphal cells extended from the periphery of the colony. When light cycles were applied, distinct dark- and bright-colored hyphal cell stripes were formed because the growing hyphal cells had synchronously activated cytokinesis. In addition, temperature cycles of 30°C for 12 h and 35°C for 12 h or of 25°C for 12 h and 30°C for 12 h during incubation in the dark induced a response in the hyphal cells similar to that of light. The stripe formation of the temperature cycles was independent of the wcs genes. Both light and temperature, which are daily external cues, have the same effect on growing hyphal cells. A dual sensing mechanism of external cues allows organisms to adapt to daily changes of environmental alteration.

  16. Effect of increased yeast alcohol acetyltransferase activity on flavor profiles of wine and distillates.

    PubMed

    Lilly, M; Lambrechts, M G; Pretorius, I S

    2000-02-01

    The distinctive flavor of wine, brandy, and other grape-derived alcoholic beverages is affected by many compounds, including esters produced during alcoholic fermentation. The characteristic fruity odors of the fermentation bouquet are primarily due to a mixture of hexyl acetate, ethyl caproate (apple-like aroma), iso-amyl acetate (banana-like aroma), ethyl caprylate (apple-like aroma), and 2-phenylethyl acetate (fruity, flowery flavor with a honey note). The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of improving the aroma of wine and distillates by overexpressing one of the endogenous yeast genes that controls acetate ester production during fermentation. The synthesis of acetate esters by the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation is ascribed to at least three acetyltransferase activities, namely, alcohol acetyltransferase (AAT), ethanol acetyltransferase, and iso-amyl AAT. To investigate the effect of increased AAT activity on the sensory quality of Chenin blanc wines and distillates from Colombar base wines, we have overexpressed the alcohol acetyltransferase gene (ATF1) of S. cerevisiae. The ATF1 gene, located on chromosome XV, was cloned from a widely used commercial wine yeast strain of S. cerevisiae, VIN13, and placed under the control of the constitutive yeast phosphoglycerate kinase gene (PGK1) promoter and terminator. Chromoblot analysis confirmed the integration of the modified copy of ATF1 into the genome of three commercial wine yeast strains (VIN7, VIN13, and WE228). Northern blot analysis indicated constitutive expression of ATF1 at high levels in these yeast transformants. The levels of ethyl acetate, iso-amyl acetate, and 2-phenylethyl acetate increased 3- to 10-fold, 3.8- to 12-fold, and 2- to 10-fold, respectively, depending on the fermentation temperature, cultivar, and yeast strain used. The concentrations of ethyl caprate, ethyl caprylate, and hexyl acetate only showed minor changes, whereas the acetic acid

  17. Antioxidant activity of phytochemicals from dried distillers grain oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A distillate was obtained by molecular distillation of oil extracted from distiller’s dried grains (DDG). The dried distiller’s grains distillate (DDGD) contained phytosterols, steryl ferulates, tocopherols, tocotrienols, and carotenoids. DDGD was tested for its impact on the oxidative stability in...

  18. Antioxidant Activity of Phytochemicals from Dried Distillers Grain Oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A distillate was obtained by molecular distillation of oil extracted from distiller’s dried grains (DDG). The dried distiller’s grains distillate (DDGD) contained phytosterols, steryl ferulates, tocopherols, tocotrienols, and carotenoids. DDGD was tested for its impact on the oxidative stability i...

  19. Modulating the potency of an activator in a yeast in vitro transcription system.

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Y; Brickman, J M; Furman, E; Middleton, B; Carey, M

    1994-01-01

    The intrinsic stimulatory potential or potency of a eukaryotic gene activator is controlled by the interaction between the activation domain and the transcriptional machinery. To further understand this interaction, we undertook a biochemical study to identify parameters that could be used to modulate activator potency. We considered how varying the number of activation domains, their flexibility, and the number of promoter sites affects potency in a yeast nuclear extract. The effects of GAL4 derivatives bearing either one, two, or four herpes simplex virus VP16 activation domains (amino acids 413 to 454) were measured on DNA templates containing one or two GAL4 sites in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear extract. We found that multimerized VP16 activation domains acted synergistically to increase the potency of the activators. The spacing between the activation domains was critical, such that the increased flexibility imparted by a protein linker contributed to increased activator potency. With highly potent activators, the levels of transcription stimulated on a single site were saturating, whereas the stimulatory effect of weaker activators increased with the number of sites. We discuss how these biochemical studies relate to the mechanism of gene activation and synergy in a yeast in vitro system. Images PMID:8139572

  20. Measurements of Myosin-II Motor Activity During Cytokinesis in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing; Pollard, Luther W; Lord, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeast myosin-II (Myo2p) represents the critical actin-based motor protein that drives actomyosin ring assembly and constriction during cytokinesis. We detail three different methods to measure Myo2p motor function. Actin-activated ATPases provide a readout of actomyosin ATPase motor activity in a bulk assay; actin filament motility assays reveal the speed and efficiency of myosin-driven actin filament gliding (when motors are anchored); myosin-bead motility assays reveal the speed and efficiency of myosin ensembles traveling along actin filaments (when actin is anchored). Collectively, these methods allow us to combine the standard in vivo approaches common to fission yeast with in vitro biochemical methods to learn more about the mechanistic action of myosin-II during cytokinesis.

  1. Influence of fermentation conditions on specific activity of the enzymes alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase from yeasts.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, J C; Ortega, J M

    1993-01-01

    The effects of anaerobic, semi-aerobic and short aeration fermentation conditions and the addition of ergosterol and oleic acid to musts on the specific activity of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH and ALDH) from two yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii, were studied. ADH I biosynthesis only occurred during the first few hours of fermentation. ADH II from S. cerevisiae and ALDH-NADP+ from the two yeast species behaved as constitutive enzymes under all fermentation conditions. ADH II from T. delbrueckii was only synthesized in small amounts, and its activity was always lower than in S. cerevisiae, where it was responsible for the termination of alcoholic fermentation during the steady growth phase.

  2. Aroma-active components of nonfat dry milk.

    PubMed

    Karagül-Yüceer, Y; Drake, M A; Cadwallader, K R

    2001-06-01

    Application of aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) on the volatile components of low-, medium-, and high-heat-treated nonfat dry milks (NDM) revealed aroma-active compounds in the log(3) flavor dilution (log(3) FD) factor range of 1 to 6. The following compounds contributed the highest log(3) FD factors to overall NDM flavor: 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone [(Furaneol), burnt sugar-like]; butanoic acid (rancid); 3-(methylthio)propanal [(methional), boiled potato-like]; o-aminoacetophenone (grape-like); delta-decalactone (sweet); (E)-4,5-epoxy-(E)-2-decenal (metallic); pentanoic acid (sweaty); 4,5-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone [(sotolon), curry]; 3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde [(vanillin), vanilla]; 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline and 2-acetyl-2-thiazoline (popcorn-like); hexanoic acid (vinegar-like); phenylacetic acid (rose-like); octanoic acid (waxy); nonanal (fatty); and 1-octen-3-one (mushroom-like). The odor intensities of Furaneol, butanoic acid, methional, o-aminoacetophenone, sotolon, vanillin, (E)-4,5-epoxy-(E)-2-decenal, and phenylacetic acid were higher in high-heat-treated samples than others. However, the odor intensities of lactones, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, and 2-acetyl-2-thiazoline were not affected by heat treatment. Sensory evaluation results also revealed that heat-generated flavors have a major impact on the flavor profile of NDM.

  3. Nitrogen-dependent calcineurin activation in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Celia; Galindo, Luis R; Siverio, José M

    2013-04-01

    Non-preferred nitrogen sources, unlike preferred ones, raised total cell Ca(2+) content and expression of ENA1, a very well-known calcineurin-regulated gene. This indicates calcineurin activation is regulated by nitrogen source. Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) and nitrate induction mechanisms, both regulating nitrate assimilation in Hansenula polymorpha, are controlled by calcineurin. Concerning NCR, lack of calcineurin (cnb1 mutant) decreased nitrate-assimilation gene expression, levels of the transcription factor Gat1 and growth in several nitrogen sources. We found that the role of calcineurin in NCR was mediated by Crz1 via Gat1. Regarding nitrate induction, calcineurin also affects the levels of transcription factors Gat2 and Yna2 involved in this process. We conclude that Ca(2+) and calcineurin play a central role in nitrogen signalling and assimilation. Thus, the nitrogen source modulates Ca(2+) content and calcineurin activation. Calcineurin in turn regulates nitrogen assimilation genes.

  4. Diversity and extracellular enzymatic activities of yeasts isolated from King George Island, the sub-Antarctic region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antarctica has been successfully colonized by microorganisms despite presenting adverse conditions for life such as low temperatures, high solar radiation, low nutrient availability and dryness. Although these “cold-loving” microorganisms are recognized as primarily responsible for nutrient and organic matter recycling/mineralization, the yeasts, in particular, remain poorly characterized and understood. The aim of this work was to study the yeast microbiota in soil and water samples collected on King George Island. Results A high number of yeast isolates was obtained from 34 soil and 14 water samples. Molecular analyses based on rDNA sequences revealed 22 yeast species belonging to 12 genera, with Mrakia and Cryptococcus genera containing the highest species diversity. The species Sporidiobolus salmonicolor was by far the most ubiquitous, being identified in 24 isolates from 13 different samples. Most of the yeasts were psychrotolerant and ranged widely in their ability to assimilate carbon sources (consuming from 1 to 27 of the 29 carbon sources tested). All species displayed at least 1 of the 8 extracellular enzyme activities tested. Lipase, amylase and esterase activity dominated, while chitinase and xylanase were less common. Two yeasts identified as Leuconeurospora sp. and Dioszegia fristingensis displayed 6 enzyme activities. Conclusions A high diversity of yeasts was isolated in this work including undescribed species and species not previously isolated from the Antarctic region, including Wickerhamomyces anomalus, which has not been isolated from cold regions in general. The diversity of extracellular enzyme activities, and hence the variety of compounds that the yeasts may degrade or transform, suggests an important nutrient recycling role of microorganisms in this region. These yeasts are of potential use in industrial applications requiring high enzyme activities at low temperatures. PMID:23131126

  5. Expanding the yeast prion world: Active prion conversion of non-glutamine/asparagine-rich Mod5 for cell survival.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Genjiro; Tanaka, Motomasa

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian and fungal prion proteins form self-perpetuating β-sheet-rich fibrillar aggregates called amyloid. Prion inheritance is based on propagation of the regularly oriented amyloid structures of the prion proteins. All yeast prion proteins identified thus far contain aggregation-prone glutamine/asparagine (Gln/Asn)-rich domains, although the mammalian prion protein and fungal prion protein HET-s do not contain such sequences. In order to fill this gap, we searched for novel yeast prion proteins lacking Gln/Asn-rich domains via a genome-wide screen based on cross-seeding between two heterologous proteins and identified Mod5, a yeast tRNA isopentenyltransferase, as a novel non-Gln/Asn-rich yeast prion protein. Mod5 formed self-propagating amyloid fibers in vitro and the introduction of Mod5 amyloids into non-prion yeast induced dominantly and cytoplasmically heritable prion state [MOD (+) ], which harbors aggregates of endogenous Mod5. [MOD (+) ] yeast showed an increased level of membrane lipid ergosterol and acquired resistance to antifungal agents. Importantly, enhanced de novo formation of [MOD (+) ] was observed when non-prion yeast was grown under selective pressures from antifungal drugs. Our findings expand the family of yeast prions to non-Gln/Asn-rich proteins and reveal the acquisition of a fitness advantage for cell survival through active prion conversion.

  6. Peroxide Sensors for the Fission Yeast Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Vicky; Quinn, Janet; Pino, Teresa Soto; Martin, Humberto; Saldanha, Jose; Makino, Kozo; Morgan, Brian A.; Millar, Jonathan B.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe stress-activated Sty1p/Spc1p mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase regulates gene expression through the Atf1p and Pap1p transcription factors, homologs of human ATF2 and c-Jun, respectively. Mcs4p, a response regulator protein, acts upstream of Sty1p by binding the Wak1p/Wis4p MAP kinase kinase kinase. We show that phosphorylation of Mcs4p on a conserved aspartic acid residue is required for activation of Sty1p only in response to peroxide stress. Mcs4p acts in a conserved phospho-relay system initiated by two PAS/PAC domain-containing histidine kinases, Mak2p and Mak3p. In the absence of Mak2p or Mak3p, Sty1p fails to phosphorylate the Atf1p transcription factor or induce Atf1p-dependent gene expression. As a consequence, cells lacking Mak2p and Mak3p are sensitive to peroxide attack in the absence of Prr1p, a distinct response regulator protein that functions in association with Pap1p. The Mak1p histidine kinase, which also contains PAS/PAC repeats, does not regulate Sty1p or Atf1p but is partially required for Pap1p- and Prr1p-dependent transcription. We conclude that the transcriptional response to free radical attack is initiated by at least two distinct phospho-relay pathways in fission yeast. PMID:11179424

  7. Yeast Recombination Enhancer Is Stimulated by Transcription Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Sevinc; Reese, Joseph C.; Workman, Jerry L.; Simpson, Robert T.

    2005-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating type switching is a gene conversion event that exhibits donor preference. MATa cells choose HMLα for recombination, and MATα cells choose HMRa. Donor preference is controlled by the recombination enhancer (RE), located between HMLα and MATa on the left arm of chromosome III. A number of a-cell specific noncoding RNAs are transcribed from the RE locus. Mcm1 and Fkh1 regulate RE activity in a cells. Here we show that Mcm1 binding is required for both the transcription of the noncoding RNAs and Fkh1 binding. This requirement can be bypassed by inserting another promoter into the RE. Moreover, the insertion of this promoter increases donor preference and opens the chromatin structure around the conserved domains of RE. Additionally, we determined that the level of Fkh1 binding positively correlates with the level of donor preference. We conclude that the role of Mcm1 in RE is to open chromatin around the conserved domains and activate transcription; this facilitates Fkh1 binding and the level of this binding determines the level of donor preference. PMID:16135790

  8. Enzyme activities of D-glucose metabolism in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C S; Shi, J L; Beehler, B W; Beck, B

    1992-12-01

    The activities of key enzymes that are members of D-glucose metabolic pathways in Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoing respirative, respirofermentative, and fermentative metabolisms are monitored. The steady-state activities of glycolytic enzymes, except phosphofructokinase, decrease with a reduced efficiency in D-glucose utilization by yeast continuous culture. On the other hand, the enzymic activities of pentose monophosphate pathway reach the maximum when the cell mass production of the cultures is optimum. Enzymes of tricarboxylate cycle exhibit the maximum activities at approximately the washout rate. The steady-state activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex increases rapidly when D-glucose is efficiently utilized. By comparison, the activity of pyruvate decarboxylase begins to increase only when ethanol production occurs. Depletion of dissolved oxygen suppresses the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex but facilitates that of pyruvate decarboxylase. Acetate greatly enhances the acetyl CoA synthetase activity. Similarly, ethanol stimulates alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities. Evidence for the existence of alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes in the fission yeast is presented.

  9. Estrogenic activity of phenolic additives determined by an in vitro yeast bioassay.

    PubMed

    Miller, D; Wheals, B B; Beresford, N; Sumpter, J P

    2001-02-01

    We used a recombinant yeast estrogen assay to assess the activity of 73 phenolic additives that are used as sunscreens, preservatives, disinfectants, antioxidants, flavorings, or for perfumery. Thirty-two of these compounds displayed activity: 22 with potencies relative to 17beta-estradiol, ranging from 1/3,000 to < 1/3,000,000, and 10 compounds with an impaired response that could not be directly compared with 17beta-estradiol. Forty-one compounds were inactive. The major criteria for activity appear to be the presence of an unhindered phenolic OH group in a para position and a molecular weight of 140-250 Da.

  10. Process engineering for bioflavour production with metabolically active yeasts - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Carlquist, Magnus; Gibson, Brian; Karagul Yuceer, Yonca; Paraskevopoulou, Adamantini; Sandell, Mari; Angelov, Angel I; Gotcheva, Velitchka; Angelov, Angel D; Etschmann, Marlene; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Lidén, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Flavours are biologically active molecules of large commercial interest in the food, cosmetics, detergent and pharmaceutical industries. The production of flavours can take place by either extraction from plant materials, chemical synthesis, biological conversion of precursor molecules or de novo biosynthesis. The latter alternatives are gaining importance through the rapidly growing fields of systems biology and metabolic engineering, giving efficient production hosts for the so-called 'bioflavours', which are natural flavour and/or fragrance compounds obtained with cell factories or enzymatic systems. Yeasts are potential production hosts for bioflavours. In this mini-review, we give an overview of bioflavour production in yeasts from the process-engineering perspective. Two specific examples, production of 2-phenylethanol and vanillin, are used to illustrate the process challenges and strategies used.

  11. Oral application of freeze-dried yeast particles expressing the PCV2b Cap protein on their surface induce protection to subsequent PCV2b challenge in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Robert; Eley, Thomas; Browne, Christopher; Martineau, Henny M.; Werling, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is now endemic in every major pig producing country, causing PCV-associated disease (PCVAD), linked with large scale economic losses. Current vaccination strategies are based on the capsid protein of the virus and are reasonably successful in preventing PCVAD but fail to induce sterile immunity. Additionally, vaccinating whole herds is expensive and time consuming. In the present study a “proof of concept” vaccine trial was employed to test the effectiveness of powdered freeze-dried recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast stably expressing the capsid protein of PCV2b on its surface as an orally applied vaccine. PCV2-free pigs were given 3 doses of vaccine or left un-vaccinated before challenge with a defined PCV2b strain. Rectal temperatures were measured and serum and faeces samples were collected weekly. At the end of the study, pigs were euthanized, tissue samples taken and tested for PCV2b load by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. The peak of viraemia in sera and faeces of unvaccinated pigs was higher than that of vaccinated pigs. Additionally more sIgA was found in faeces of vaccinated pigs than unvaccinated. Vaccination was associated with lower serum concentrations of TNFα and IL-1β but higher concentrations of IFNα and IFNγ in comparison to the unvaccinated animals. At the end of the trial, a higher viral load was found in several lymphatic tissues and the ileum of unvaccinated pigs in comparison to vaccinated pigs. The difference between groups was especially apparent in the ileum. The results presented here demonstrate a possible use for recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing viral proteins as an oral vaccine against PCV2. A powdered freeze-dried recombinant S. cerevisiae used as an oral vaccine could be mixed with feed and may offer a cheap and less labour intensive alternative to inoculation with the additional advantage that no cooling chain would be required for vaccine transport and storage. PMID:26476879

  12. Oral application of freeze-dried yeast particles expressing the PCV2b Cap protein on their surface induce protection to subsequent PCV2b challenge in vivo.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Robert; Eley, Thomas; Browne, Christopher; Martineau, Henny M; Werling, Dirk

    2015-11-17

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is now endemic in every major pig producing country, causing PCV-associated disease (PCVAD), linked with large scale economic losses. Current vaccination strategies are based on the capsid protein of the virus and are reasonably successful in preventing PCVAD but fail to induce sterile immunity. Additionally, vaccinating whole herds is expensive and time consuming. In the present study a "proof of concept" vaccine trial was employed to test the effectiveness of powdered freeze-dried recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast stably expressing the capsid protein of PCV2b on its surface as an orally applied vaccine. PCV2-free pigs were given 3 doses of vaccine or left un-vaccinated before challenge with a defined PCV2b strain. Rectal temperatures were measured and serum and faeces samples were collected weekly. At the end of the study, pigs were euthanized, tissue samples taken and tested for PCV2b load by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. The peak of viraemia in sera and faeces of unvaccinated pigs was higher than that of vaccinated pigs. Additionally more sIgA was found in faeces of vaccinated pigs than unvaccinated. Vaccination was associated with lower serum concentrations of TNFα and IL-1β but higher concentrations of IFNα and IFNγ in comparison to the unvaccinated animals. At the end of the trial, a higher viral load was found in several lymphatic tissues and the ileum of unvaccinated pigs in comparison to vaccinated pigs. The difference between groups was especially apparent in the ileum. The results presented here demonstrate a possible use for recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing viral proteins as an oral vaccine against PCV2. A powdered freeze-dried recombinant S. cerevisiae used as an oral vaccine could be mixed with feed and may offer a cheap and less labour intensive alternative to inoculation with the additional advantage that no cooling chain would be required for vaccine transport and storage.

  13. Effect of process conditions on recovery of protein activity after freezing and freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Nail, S L

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this research was to gain a better understanding of the degree to which recovery of activity of model proteins after freeze-drying can be maximized by manipulation of freeze-dry process conditions in the absence of protective solutes. Catalase, beta-galactosidase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were used as model proteins. All of the three proteins exhibited a concentration-dependent loss of activity after freezing, with significantly higher recovery at higher concentration. The freezing method and the type of buffer were also important, with sodium phosphate buffer and freezing by immersion of vials in liquid nitrogen associated with the lowest recovery of activity. Differential scanning calorimetry was predictive of the onset of collapse during freeze-drying only for beta-galactosidase. For the other proteins, either no Tg' transition was observed, or the apparent glass transition did not correlate with the microscopically-observed collapse temperature. The time course of activity loss for beta-galactosidase and LDH was compared during freeze-drying under conditions which produced collapse of the dried matrix and conditions which produced retention of microstructure in the dried solid. Recovery of activity decreased continuously during primary drying, with no sharp drop in recovery of activity associated with the onset of collapse. The most important drying process variable affecting recovery of activity was residual moisture level, with a dramatic drop in activity recovery associated with residual moisture levels less than about 10%.

  14. Effect of source-separated urine storage on estrogenic activity detected using bioluminescent yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jaatinen, Sanna; Kivistö, Anniina; Palmroth, Marja R T; Karp, Matti

    2016-09-01

    The objective was to demonstrate that a microbial whole cell biosensor, bioluminescent yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (BMAEREluc/ERα) can be applied to detect overall estrogenic activity from fresh and stored human urine. The use of source-separated urine in agriculture removes a human originated estrogen source from wastewater influents, subsequently enabling nutrient recycling. Estrogenic activity in urine should be diminished prior to urine usage in agriculture in order to prevent its migration to soil. A storage period of 6 months is required for hygienic reasons; therefore, estrogenic activity monitoring is of interest. The method measured cumulative female hormone-like activity. Calibration curves were prepared for estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α- ethinylestradiol and estriol. Estrogen concentrations of 0.29-29,640 μg L(-1) were detectable while limit of detection corresponded to 0.28-35 μg L(-1) of estrogens. The yeast sensor responded well to fresh and stored urine and gave high signals corresponding to 0.38-3,804 μg L(-1) of estrogens in different urine samples. Estrogenic activity decreased during storage, but was still higher than in fresh urine implying insufficient storage length. The biosensor was suitable for monitoring hormonal activity in urine and can be used in screening anthropogenic estrogen-like compounds interacting with the receptor.

  15. TpBGL2 codes for a Tetrapisispora phaffii killer toxin active against wine spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Oro, Lucia; Zara, Severino; Fancellu, Francesca; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Budroni, Marilena; Ciani, Maurizio; Comitini, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Tetrapisispora phaffii produces a killer toxin known as Kpkt that has extensive anti-Hanseniaspora/Kloeckera activity under winemaking conditions. Kpkt has a β-glucanase activity and induces ultrastructural modifications in the cell wall of sensitive strains, with a higher specific cytocidal activity and a selective action towards target yeast cells. In this study, a two-step PCR-based approach was used to isolate the gene coding β-glucanase of T. phaffii. Initially, a fragment of the open reading frame was isolated by degenerate PCR, with primers designed on the NH2 -terminal sequence of the protein and on conserved motifs of Bgl2p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. Subsequently, the entire sequence of the gene was obtained by inverse PCR. blast analyses of TpBGL2 highlight high identity with homologous genes in other yeast species, in which TpBGL2p shows no killer activity. However, gene disruption resulted in complete loss of the glucanase activity and the killer phenotype, thus confirming that TpBgl2p has a killer activity.

  16. Diversity and activities of yeasts from different parts of a Stilton cheese.

    PubMed

    Gkatzionis, Konstantinos; Yunita, Dewi; Linforth, Robert S T; Dickinson, Matthew; Dodd, Christine E R

    2014-05-02

    Blue cheeses are very complex food matrices presenting significant spatial differentiation between sections and the Stilton variety also has a hard brown crust making its matrix even more complex. The mycobiota communities in the three sections (blue veins, white core and outer crust) of a Stilton blue cheese were studied by employing culture-independent (TRFLP, DGGE) and culture-dependent analyses. Yeasts isolated from the cheese were studied for aroma production in a dairy model system with and without the starter Lactococcus lactis and filamentous fungus Penicillium roqueforti using SPME GC-MS. Significant qualitative and quantitative differences were observed in the yeast communities between the cheese sections with all the techniques. Yarrowia lipolytica presented strong synergistic activity with P. roqueforti enhancing the production of ketone aroma compounds, characteristic of blue cheeses. Culture techniques allowed the observation of the presence and uneven distribution of two different morphological groups of Debaryomyces hansenii in the different sections and of Trichosporon ovoides but failed to isolate Candida catenulata which dominated some parts of the cheese in the culture-independent analysis. This suggests that this species may be an important early coloniser but fails to survive into the final cheese. The study indicated that the yeast flora in the cheese sections differ including isolates that could affect their aroma profiles.

  17. A new method for monitoring the extracellular proteolytic activity of wine yeasts during alcoholic fermentation of grape must.

    PubMed

    Chasseriaud, Laura; Miot-Sertier, Cécile; Coulon, Joana; Iturmendi, Nerea; Moine, Virginie; Albertin, Warren; Bely, Marina

    2015-12-01

    The existing methods for testing proteolytic activity are time consuming, quite difficult to perform, and do not allow real-time monitoring. Proteases have attracted considerable interest in winemaking and some yeast species naturally present in grape must, such as Metschnikowia pulcherrima, are capable of expressing this activity. In this study, a new test is proposed for measuring proteolytic activity directly in fermenting grape must, using azocasein, a chromogenic substrate. Several yeast strains were tested and differences in proteolytic activity were observed. Moreover, analysis of grape must proteins in wines revealed that protease secreted by Metschnikowia strains may be active against wine proteins.

  18. Fenton peroxidation improves the drying performance of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Dewil, Raf; Baeyens, Jan; Neyens, Elisabeth

    2005-01-31

    Advanced sludge treatment processes (AST) reduce the amount of sludge produced and improve the dewaterability, thus probably also affecting the heat transfer properties and the drying characteristics of the sludge. This paper studies the influence of the Fenton peroxidation on the thermal conductivity of the sludge. Results demonstrate that the Fenton's peroxidation positively influences the sludge cake consistency and hence enhances the mechanical dewaterability and the drying characteristics of the dewatered sludge. For the two sludges used in this study, i.e. obtained from the wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) of Tienen and Sint-Niklaas--the dry solids content of the mechanically dewatered sludge increased from 22.5% to 40.3% and from 18.7% to 35.2%, respectively. The effective thermal conductivity k(e) of the untreated and the peroxidized sludges is measured and used to determine the heat transfer coefficient h(s). An average improvement for k(e) of 16.7% (Tienen) and 5.8% (Sint-Niklaas) was observed. Consequently the value of h(s) increased with 15.6% (Tienen) and 5.0% (Sint-Niklaas). This increased heat transfer coefficient in combination with the increased dewaterability has direct implications on the design of sludge dryers. A plate-to-plate calculation of a multiple hearth dryer illustrates that the number of plates required to dry the peroxidized sludge to 90% DS is less than half the number of plates needed to dry untreated sludge. This results in reduced dryer dimensions or a higher capacity for an existing dryer of given dimensions.

  19. Ethanol Effects Involve Non-canonical Unfolded Protein Response Activation in Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Tapia, Elisabet; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Querol, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved intracellular signaling pathway that controls transcription of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis related genes. Ethanol stress has been recently described as an activator of the UPR response in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but very little is known about the causes of this activation. Although some authors ensure that the UPR is triggered by the unfolded proteins generated by ethanol in the cell, there are studies which demonstrate that protein denaturation occurs at higher ethanol concentrations than those used to trigger the UPR. Here, we studied UPR after ethanol stress by three different approaches and we concluded that unfolded proteins do not accumulate in the ER under. We also ruled out inositol depletion as an alternative mechanism to activate the UPR under ethanol stress discarding that ethanol effects on the cell decreased inositol levels by different methods. All these data suggest that ethanol, at relatively low concentrations, does not cause unfolded proteins in the yeasts and UPR activation is likely due to other unknown mechanism related with a restructuring of ER membrane due to the effect of ethanol. PMID:28326077

  20. Yeast-Based High-Throughput Screens to Identify Novel Compounds Active against Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Bilsland, Elizabeth; Bean, Daniel M.; Devaney, Eileen; Oliver, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis is caused by the parasitic worms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi or B. timori, which are transmitted via the bites from infected mosquitoes. Once in the human body, the parasites develop into adult worms in the lymphatic vessels, causing severe damage and swelling of the affected tissues. According to the World Health Organization, over 1.2 billion people in 58 countries are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis. Very few drugs are available to treat patients infected with these parasites, and these have low efficacy against the adult stages of the worms, which can live for 7–15 years in the human body. The requirement for annual treatment increases the risk of drug-resistant worms emerging, making it imperative to develop new drugs against these devastating diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed a yeast-based, high-throughput screening system whereby essential yeast genes are replaced with their filarial or human counterparts. These strains are labeled with different fluorescent proteins to allow the simultaneous monitoring of strains with parasite or human genes in competition, and hence the identification of compounds that inhibit the parasite target without affecting its human ortholog. We constructed yeast strains expressing eight different Brugia malayi drug targets (as well as seven of their human counterparts), and performed medium-throughput drug screens for compounds that specifically inhibit the parasite enzymes. Using the Malaria Box collection (400 compounds), we identified nine filarial specific inhibitors and confirmed the antifilarial activity of five of these using in vitro assays against Brugia pahangi. Conclusions/Significance We were able to functionally complement yeast deletions with eight different Brugia malayi enzymes that represent potential drug targets. We demonstrated that our yeast-based screening platform is efficient in identifying compounds that can discriminate between

  1. Crystal Structures of the Adenylate Sensor from Fission Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Townley,R.; Shapiro, L.

    2007-01-01

    The 5'-AMP (adenosine monophosphate)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) coordinates metabolic function with energy availability by responding to changes in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and AMP levels. Here we report crystal structures at 2.6 and 2.9 Angstrom resolution for ATP- and AMP-bound forms of a core {alpha}{beta}{gamma} adenylate-binding domain from the fission yeast AMPK homologue. ATP and AMP bind competitively to a single site in the {gamma} subunit, with their respective phosphate groups positioned near function-impairing mutants. Surprisingly, ATP binds without counter ions, amplifying its electrostatic effects on a critical regulatory region where all three subunits converge.

  2. Detecting estrogenic activity in water samples withestrogen-sensitive yeast cells using spectrophotometry and fluorescencemicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wozei, E.; Holman, H-Y.N.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Borglin S.

    2006-03-15

    Environmental estrogens are environmental contaminants that can mimic the biological activities of the female hormone estrogen in the endocrine system, i.e. they act as endocrine disrupters. Several substances are reported to have estrogen-like activity or estrogenic activity. These include steroid hormones, synthetic estrogens (xenoestrogens), environmental pollutants and phytoestrogens (plant estrogens). Using the chromogenic substrate ortho-nitrophenyl-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) we show that an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE, with human estrogen receptor (hER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes the enzyme {beta}-galactosidase, is able to detect estrogenic activity in water samples over a wide range of spiked concentrations of the hormonal estrogen 17{beta}-estradiol (E2). Ortho-nitrophenol (ONP), the yellow product of this assay can be detected using spectrophotometry but requires cell lysis to release the enzyme and allow product formation. We improved this aspect in a fluorogenic assay by using fluorescein di-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (FDG) as a substrate. The product was visualized using fluorescence microscopy without the need to kill, fix or lyse the cells. We show that in live yeast cells, the uptake of E2 and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximum enzyme-catalyzed fluorescent product formation evident after about 30 minutes of exposure to E2. The fluorogenic assay was applied to a selection of estrogenic compounds and the Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectra of the cells obtained to better understand the yeast whole cell response to the compounds. The fluorogenic assay is most sensitive to E2, but the SR-FTIR spectra suggest that the cells respond to all the estrogenic compounds tested even when no fluorescent response was detected. These findings are promising and may shorten the duration of environmental water screening and monitoring regimes using

  3. Influence of temperature, pH and water activity on "in vitro" inhibition of Penicillium glabrum (Wehmer) Westling by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Sinigaglia, M; Corbo, M R; Ciccarone, C

    1998-08-01

    Four different yeast species (Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Saccharomycopsis vini, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Cryptococcus albidus), isolated from surface of grapes, were evaluated for biocontrol potential against Penicillium glabrum. In order to investigate the influence of temperature, pH, water activity and yeast cell concentration on Penicillium glabrum inhibition, the individual effects and the interaction of these factors were analyzed by means of a Central Composite Design (CCD). All yeast species tested showed antagonistic effects which were more pronounced at high cell concentrations. The other variables affected the antagonistic effect differentially depending on the yeast species. Results of the experimental design showed that the selective success of a competitive microflora is under environmental control; moreover, when microbial cells are subjected to multiple factors, the effects and the reciprocal interactions of the individual variables cannot be independently evaluated.

  4. The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase complex mediates glucose regulation of gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tian; Bendrioua, Loubna; Carmena, David; García-Salcedo, Raúl; Dahl, Peter; Carling, David; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-06-05

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here we expressed hetero-trimeric mammalian AMPK complexes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking all five genes encoding yeast AMPK/SNF1 components. Certain mammalian complexes complemented the growth defect of the yeast mutant on non-fermentable carbon sources. Phosphorylation of the AMPK α1-subunit was glucose-regulated, albeit not by the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase, which performs this function on yeast AMPK/SNF1. AMPK could take over SNF1 function in glucose derepression. While indirectly acting anti-diabetic drugs had no effect on AMPK in yeast, compound 991 stimulated α1-subunit phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a remarkable functional conservation of AMPK and that glucose regulation of AMPK may not be mediated by regulatory features of a specific phosphatase.

  5. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosen, Barry P; Tamás, Markus J

    2015-12-28

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation.

  6. Optimization of permeabilization process of yeast cells for catalase activity using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Trawczyńska, Ilona; Wójcik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Biotransformation processes accompanied by whole yeast cells as biocatalyst are a promising area of food industry. Among the chemical sanitizers currently used in food technology, hydrogen peroxide is a very effective microbicidal and bleaching agent. In this paper, permeabilization has been applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells aiming at increased intracellular catalase activity for decomposed H2O2. Ethanol, which is non-toxic, biodegradable and easily available, has been used as permeabilization factor. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been applied in determining the influence of different parameters on permeabilization process. The aim of the study was to find such values of the process parameters that would yield maximum activity of catalase during decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The optimum operating conditions for permeabilization process obtained by RSM were as follows: 53% (v/v) of ethanol concentration, temperature of 14.8 °C and treatment time of 40 min. After permeabilization, the activity of catalase increased ca. 40 times and its maximum value equalled to 4711 U/g. PMID:26019618

  7. SALSA, a variant of yeast SAGA, contains truncated Spt7, which correlates with activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Sterner, David E; Belotserkovskaya, Rimma; Berger, Shelley L

    2002-09-03

    Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) is a previously described histone acetyltransferase/transcriptional coactivator complex in yeast. At promoters of certain genes (HIS3 and TRP3), SAGA has an inhibitory function involving a nonproductive TATA-binding protein interaction mediated by the Spt3 and Spt8 subunits. Related to this, Spt8-less SAGA is a major form of the complex under activating conditions for these genes. In the present study, we purify this activation-specific complex, called SALSA (SAGA altered, Spt8 absent). Besides lacking Spt8, SALSA contains Spt7 subunit that is truncated. Examining the role of this subunit, we find that C-terminally truncated SPT7 resulted in derepressed HIS3 transcription. Furthermore, when grown in rich media (repressing conditions), wild-type cells yielded predominantly SAGA, but Spt7 C-terminal truncations resulted primarily in a form of complex similar to SALSA. Thus, SALSA-like structure and activating function can be partially recapitulated in yeast by truncating the C terminus of Spt7. Overall, these results lead to a model that for a subset of promoters SAGA is inhibitory through Spt3, Spt8, and an Spt8-interacting subdomain of Spt7, whereas SALSA is a form of complex for positive transcriptional regulation. These data clarify a mechanism by which a transcriptional regulatory complex can switch between positive and negative modulation.

  8. SUMO functions in constitutive transcription and during activation of inducible genes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Rosonina, Emanuel; Duncan, Sarah M; Manley, James L

    2010-06-15

    Transcription factors represent one of the largest groups of proteins regulated by SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification, and their sumoylation is usually associated with transcriptional repression. To investigate whether sumoylation plays a general role in regulating transcription in yeast, we determined the occupancy of sumoylated proteins at a variety of genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody that recognizes the yeast SUMO peptide. Surprisingly, we detected sumoylated proteins at all constitutively transcribed genes tested but not at repressed genes. Ubc9, the SUMO conjugation enzyme, was not present on these genes, but its inactivation reduced SUMO at the constitutive promoters and modestly decreased RNA polymerase II levels. In contrast, activation of the inducible GAL1, STL1, and ARG1 genes caused not only a striking accumulation of SUMO at all three promoter regions, but also recruitment of Ubc9, indicating that gene activation involves sumoylation of promoter-bound factors. However, Ubc9 inactivation, while reducing sumoylation at the induced promoters, paradoxically resulted in increased transcription. Providing an explanation for this, the reduced sumoylation impaired the cell's ability to appropriately shut off transcription of the induced ARG1 gene, indicating that SUMO can facilitate transcriptional silencing. Our findings thus establish unexpected roles for sumoylation in both constitutive and activated transcription, and provide a novel mechanism for regulating gene expression.

  9. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation. PMID:26711267

  10. Estrogenic and mutagenic activities of Crotalaria pallida measured by recombinant yeast assay and Ames test

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Crotalaria pallida Ailton is a plant belonging to the Fabaceae family, popularly known as “rattle or rattlesnake” and used in traditional medicine to treat swelling of the joints and as a vermifuge. Previous pharmacological studies have also reported anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antifungal activities. Nevertheless, scientific information regarding this species is scarce, and there are no reports related to its possible estrogenic and mutagenic effects. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the estrogenic potential of C. pallida leaves by means of the Recombinant Yeast Assay (RYA), seeking an alternative for estrogen replacement therapy during menopause; and to reflect on the safe use of natural products to assess the mutagenic activity of the crude extract from C. pallida leaves, the dichloromethane fraction and stigmasterol by means of the Ames test. Methods The recombinant yeast assay with the strain BY4741 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was performed with the ethanolic extract, dichloromethane fraction and stigmasterol isolated from the leaves of C. pallida. Mutagenic activity was evaluated by the Salmonella/microsome assay (Ames test), using the Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA100, TA98, TA97 and TA102, with (+S9) and without (-S9) metabolization, by the preincubation method. Results All samples showed estrogenic activity, mainly stigmasterol. The ethanolic extract from C. pallida leaves showed mutagenic activity in the TA98 strain (-S9), whereas dichloromethane fraction and stigmasterol were found devoid of activity. Conclusion Considering the excellent estrogenic activity performed by stigmasterol in the RYA associated with the absence of mutagenic activity when evaluated by the Ames test, stigmasterol becomes a strong candidate to be used in hormone replacement therapy during menopause. PMID:24134316

  11. Detection of hormone active chemicals using genetically engineered yeast cells and microfluidic devices with interdigitated array electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ino, Kosuke; Kitagawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Shiku, Hitoshi; Koide, Masahiro; Itayama, Tomoaki; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2009-10-01

    Endocrine disruptors that act like hormones in the endocrine system might have toxic effects. Therefore, it is important to develop a portable device that can detect hormone active chemicals in samples rapidly and easily. In this study, a microfluidic device was developed for the detection of hormone active chemicals using genetically engineered yeast cells. The yeast cells were used as biosensors since they were genetically engineered to respond to the presence of hormone active chemicals by synthesizing beta-galactosidase (beta-gal). For achieving further sensitivity, we incorporated interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes (width, 1.2 microm; gap, 0.8 microm) with 40 electrode fingers into the analytical chamber of the microfluidic device. The yeast cells precultured with a hormone active chemical, 17beta-estradiol (E2), were trapped from the main channel of the device to the analytical camber by electrophoresis. After trapping in the analytical chamber, we performed electrochemical detection of beta-gal induced in the yeast cells with the IDA electrodes. Actually, electrochemical detection was performed on p-aminophenol that was converted from p-aminophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside with beta-gal. The electrochemical signals from the yeast cells precultured with 17beta-estradiol were successfully detected with the device. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of antagonists such as tamoxifen were also detected electrochemically by using the device. Thus, the present microfluidic device can be used for highly sensitive detection of hormone active chemicals.

  12. Feasibility of measuring ferricyanide reduction by yeasts to estimate their activity during alcoholic fermentation in wine-making conditions.

    PubMed

    Roustan, Jean-Louis; Sablayrolles, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    We assessed the feasibility of measuring the extracellular reduction of ferricyanide in the presence of an intermediate carrier (menadione) as a means of estimating the activity of yeasts during alcoholic fermentation. A spectrophotometric and a potentiometric approach were used. Comparison of specific reductase activity and gas production rate during the stationary phase indicated that measuring the menadione-catalyzed reduction of ferricyanide provides a good estimate of the total activity of the yeast cells in a fermenting must. The response observed following the addition of an electron acceptor (acetaldehyde) confirmed that the reductase activity of menadione is dependent on the availability of NADH. The stability of menadione in the fermentation medium, as assessed by the potentiometric method, suggested that electrochemical reoxidation of the ferrocyanide can act as a substitute for the addition of an electron acceptor when studying the redox regulation of fermenting yeasts.

  13. Neuro-fuzzy modeling to predict physicochemical and microbiological parameters of partially dried cherry tomato during storage: effects on water activity, temperature and storage time.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yang; Li, Yong; Zhou, Ruiyun; Chu, Dinh-Toi; Su, Lijuan; Han, Yongbin; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2016-10-01

    In the study, osmotically dehydrated cherry tomatoes were partially dried to water activity between 0.746 and 0.868, vacuum-packed and stored at 4-30 °C for 60 days. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was utilized to predict the physicochemical and microbiological parameters of these partially dried cherry tomatoes during storage. Satisfactory accuracies were obtained when ANFIS was used to predict the lycopene and total phenolic contents, color and microbial contamination. The coefficients of determination for all the ANFIS models were higher than 0.86 and showed better performance for prediction compared with models developed by response surface methodology. Through ANFIS modeling, the effects of storage conditions on the properties of partially dried cherry tomatoes were visualized. Generally, contents of lycopene and total phenolics decreased with the increase in water activity, temperature and storage time, while aerobic plate count and number of yeasts and molds increased at high water activities and temperatures. Overall, ANFIS approach can be used as an effective tool to study the quality decrease and microbial pollution of partially dried cherry tomatoes during storage, as well as identify the suitable preservation conditions.

  14. Baker's yeast assay procedure for testing heavy metal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bitton, G.; Koopman, B.; Wang, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is microorganism which is commercially available and sold as packaged dry pellets in any food store at low cost. Studies have been undertaken on the effects of organic xenobiotics as well as heavy metals on yeast metabolism. This type of study has been generally useful in examining the mechanism(s) of chemical toxicity. However, a rapid and quantitative toxicity test using S. cerevisiae as the test organism has not been developed. The purpose of this study was to develop a toxicity assay for heavy metals, using commercial dry yeast as the test microorganism. This rapid and simple procedure is based on the reduction of 2-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyltetrazolium chloride (INT) to INT-formazan by the yeast electron transport system. The scoring of active cells following exposure to heavy metals was undertaken according to the MINT (malachite green-INT) method developed by Bitton and Koopman.

  15. Antifungal activity of mango peel and seed extracts against clinically pathogenic and food spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Dorta, E; González, M; Lobo, M G; Laich, F

    2015-11-26

    The antioxidant and antifungal (antiyeast) properties of mango (Mangifera indica) peel and seed by-products were investigated. Nine extracts were obtained using three cultivars and two extraction methods. Significant differences between cultivars and extraction methods were detected in their bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity. The antifungal property was determined using agar diffusion and broth micro-dilution assays against 18 yeast species of the genera Candida, Dekkera, Hanseniaspora, Lodderomyces, Metschnikowia, Pichia, Schizosaccharomyces, Saccharomycodes and Zygosaccharomyces. All mango extracts showed antifungal activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) values were lower for seed than for peel extracts. MICs and MFCs ranged from values <0.1 to 5 and 5 to >30 mgGAE/mL, respectively. The multivariate analysis showed a relationship between antifungal activity, the capacity to inhibit lipid peroxidation and total phenol content. These properties were associated with high levels of proanthocyanidins, gallates and gallotannins in the extracts.

  16. Enhanced purity, activity and structural integrity of yeast ribosomes purified using a general chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Leshin, Jonathan A; Rakauskaitė, Rasa; Dinman, Jonathan D; Meskauskas, Arturas

    2010-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing researchers working with eukaryotic ribosomes lies in their lability relative to their eubacterial and archael counterparts. In particular, lysis of cells and purification of eukaryotic ribosomes by conventional differential ultracentrifugation methods exposes them for long periods of time to a wide range of co-purifying proteases and nucleases, negatively impacting their structural integrity and functionality. A chromatographic method using a cysteine charged Sulfolink resin was adapted to address these problems. This fast and simple method significantly reduces co-purifying proteolytic and nucleolytic activities, producing good yields of highly biochemically active yeast ribosomes with fewer nicks in their rRNAs. In particular, the chromatographic purification protocol significantly improved the quality of ribosomes isolated from mutant cells. This method is likely applicable to mammalian ribosomes as well. The simplicity of the method, and the enhanced purity and activity of chromatographically purified ribosome represents a significant technical advancement for the study of eukaryotic ribosomes.

  17. Fission yeast Ryh1 GTPase activates TOR Complex 2 in response to glucose.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Tomoyuki; Morigasaki, Susumu; Tatebe, Hisashi; Ikeda, Kyoko; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Target Of Rapamycin (TOR) is an evolutionarily conserved protein kinase that forms 2 distinct protein complexes referred to as TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and 2 (TORC2). Recent extensive studies have demonstrated that TORC1 is under the control of the small GTPases Rheb and Rag that funnel multiple input signals including those derived from nutritional sources; however, information is scarce as to the regulation of TORC2. A previous study using the model system provided by the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe identified Ryh1, a Rab-family GTPase, as an activator of TORC2. Here, we show that the nucleotide-binding state of Ryh1 is regulated in response to glucose, mediating this major nutrient signal to TORC2. In glucose-rich growth media, the GTP-bound form of Ryh1 induces TORC2-dependent phosphorylation of Gad8, a downstream target of TORC2 in fission yeast. Upon glucose deprivation, Ryh1 becomes inactive, which turns off the TORC2-Gad8 pathway. During glucose starvation, however, Gad8 phosphorylation by TORC2 gradually recovers independently of Ryh1, implying an additional TORC2 activator that is regulated negatively by glucose. The paired positive and negative regulatory mechanisms may allow fine-tuning of the TORC2-Gad8 pathway, which is essential for growth under glucose-limited environment.

  18. Comparative in vitro activity of antimycotic agents against pathogenic vaginal yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Lynch, M E; Sobel, J D

    1994-01-01

    Although numerous antimycotic agents are available for the treatment of yeast vaginitis there is little comparative data on the in vitro activity of these drugs. In the present two-part study, in vitro macro-broth dilution sensitivity tests were performed on a total of 377 clinical vaginal yeast isolates of nine different species. Antimycotics surveyed included amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine and eight azole derivatives. Results show that all vaginal Candida albicans isolates were uniformly sensitive at low concentration to all 10 antimycotics tested. However, non-albicans species, especially Candida glabrata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, manifested several-fold increases in minimal inhibitory concentrations to all azoles tested except butoconazole. In particular, the in vitro potency of fluconazole and terconazole against species other than C. albicans was relatively poor, whereas the drugs demonstrating the best activity were itraconazole, butoconazole and saperconazole. Susceptibility testing of vaginal C. albicans isolates is not routinely indicated, even in patients with recurrent vaginitis and should be reserved for selected organisms, especially non-albicans species, in patients with clinical failure only.

  19. Arrhenius activation energy of damage to catalase during spray-drying.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Joachim; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation of catalase during spray-drying over a range of outlet gas temperatures could be closely represented by the Arrhenius equation. From this an activation energy for damage to the catalase could be calculated. The close fit to Arrhenius suggests that the thermally-induced part of inactivation of the catalase during the complex drying and particle-formation processes takes place at constant temperature. These processes are rapid compared with the residence time of the powder in the collecting vessel of the cyclone where dried catalase is exposed to a constant temperature equal to approximately the drying gas outlet temperature. A lower activation energy after spray drying with the ultrasonic nozzle was found than with the 2-fluid nozzle under otherwise identical spray drying conditions. It is feasible that the ultrasonic nozzle when mounted in the lid of the spray dryer heats up toward the drying gas inlet temperature much more that the air-cooled 2-fluid nozzle. Calculation of the Arrhenius activation energy also showed how the stabilizing efficacy of trehalose and mannitol on the catalase varies in strength across the range of drying gas inlet and outlet temperatures examined.

  20. Glutathione depletion activates the yeast vacuolar transient receptor potential channel, Yvc1p, by reversible glutathionylation of specific cysteines

    PubMed Central

    Chandel, Avinash; Das, Krishna K.; Bachhawat, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione depletion and calcium influx into the cytoplasm are two hallmarks of apoptosis. We have been investigating how glutathione depletion leads to apoptosis in yeast. We show here that glutathione depletion in yeast leads to the activation of two cytoplasmically inward-facing channels: the plasma membrane, Cch1p, and the vacuolar calcium channel, Yvc1p. Deletion of these channels partially rescues cells from glutathione depletion–induced cell death. Subsequent investigations on the Yvc1p channel, a homologue of the mammalian TRP channels, revealed that the channel is activated by glutathionylation. Yvc1p has nine cysteine residues, of which eight are located in the cytoplasmic regions and one on the transmembrane domain. We show that three of these cysteines, Cys-17, Cys-79, and Cys-191, are specifically glutathionylated. Mutation of these cysteines to alanine leads to a loss in glutathionylation and a concomitant loss in calcium channel activity. We further investigated the mechanism of glutathionylation and demonstrate a role for the yeast glutathione S-transferase Gtt1p in glutathionylation. Yvc1p is also deglutathionylated, and this was found to be mediated by the yeast thioredoxin, Trx2p. A model for redox activation and deactivation of the yeast Yvc1p channel is presented. PMID:27708136

  1. Assessment of xylanase activity in dry storage as a potential method of reducing feedstock cost.

    PubMed

    Smith, William A; Thompson, David N; Thompson, Vicki S; Radtke, Corey W; Carter, Brady

    2009-05-01

    Enzymatic preprocessing of lignocellulosic biomass in dry storage systems has the potential to improve feedstock characteristics and lower ethanol production costs. To assess the potential for endoxylanase activity at low water contents, endoxylanase activity was tested using a refined wheat arabinoxylan substrate and three commercial endoxylanases over the water activity range 0.21-1.0, corresponding to water contents of 5% to >60% (dry basis). Homogeneously mixed dry samples were prepared at a fixed enzyme to substrate ratio and incubated in chambers at a variety of fixed water activities. Replicates were sacrificed periodically, and endoxylanase activity was quantified as an increase in reducing sugar relative to desiccant-stored controls. Endoxylanase activity was observed at water activities over 0.91 in all enzyme preparations in less than 4 days and at a water activity of 0.59 in less than 1 week in two preparations. Endoxylanase activity after storage was confirmed for selected desiccant-stored controls by incubation at 100% relative humidity. Water content to water activity relationships were determined for three lignocellulosic substrates, and results indicate that two endoxylanase preparations retained limited activity as low as 7% to 13% water content (dry basis), which is well within the range of water contents representative of dry biomass storage. Future work will examine the effects of endoxylanase activity toward substrates such as corn stover, wheat straw, and switchgrass in low water content environments.

  2. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  3. Plant growth-promoting and antifungal activity of yeasts from dark chestnut soil.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Lyudmila V; Brazhnikova, Yelena V; Berzhanova, Ramza Z; Mukasheva, Togzhan D

    2015-06-01

    538 yeast strains were isolated from dark chestnut soil collected from under the plants of the legume family (Fabaceae). The greatest number of microorganisms is found at soil depth 10-20 cm. Among the 538 strains of yeast 77 (14.3%) strains demonstrated the ability to synthesize IAA. 15 strains were attributed to high IAA-producing yeasts (above 10 μg/ml). The most active strains were YA05 with 51.7 ± 2.1 μg/ml of IAA and YR07 with 45.3 ± 1.5 μg/ml. In the study of effect of incubation time on IAA production the maximum accumulation of IAA coincided with maximum rates of biomass: at 120 h for YR07 and at 144 h for strain YA05. IAA production increased when medium was supplemented with the L-tryptophan. 400 μg/ml of L-tryptophan showed maximum IAA production. 10 strains demonstrated the ability to inhibit the growth and development of phytopathogenic fungi. YA05 and YR07 strains formed the largest zones of inhibition compared to the other strains--from 21.6 ± 0.3 to 30.6 ± 0.5 mm. Maximum zone of inhibition was observed for YA05 against Phytophtora infestans and YR07 strains against Fusarium graminearum. YA05 and YR07 strains were identified as Aureobasidium pullulans YA05 (GenBank accession No JF160955) and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa YR07 (GenBank accession No JF160956).

  4. Species-specific activation of Cu/Zn SOD by its CCS copper chaperone in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Julie E.; Li, Cissy X; Odeh, Hana M.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic yeast of important public health relevance. Virulence of C. albicans requires a copper and zinc containing superoxide dismutase (SOD1), but the biology of C. albicans SOD1 is poorly understood. To this end, C. albicans SOD1 activation was examined in baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), a eukaryotic expression system proven fruitful for the study of Cu/Zn SODs from invertebrates, plants and mammals. In spite of the 80% similarity between S. cerevisiae and C. albicans SOD1 molecules, C. albicans SOD1 is not active in S. cerevisiae. The SOD1 appears incapable of productive interactions with the copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS1) of baker’s yeast. C. albicans SOD1 contains a proline at position 144 predicted to dictate dependence on CCS1. By mutating this proline, C. albicans SOD1 gained activity in baker’s yeast and this activity was independent of CCS1. We identified a putative CCS1 gene in C. albicans and created heterozygous and homozygous gene deletions at this locus. Loss of CCS1 resulted in loss of SOD1 activity, consistent with its role as a copper chaperone. C. albicans CCS1 also restored activity to C. albicans SOD1 expressed in baker’s yeast. C. albicans CCS1 is well adapted for activating its partner SOD1 from C. albicans, but not SOD1 from S. cerevisiae. In spite of the high degree of homology between the SOD1 and CCS1 molecules in these two fungal species, there exists a specie-specific barrier in CCS-SOD interactions which may reflect the vastly different lifestyles of the pathogenic versus non-infectious yeast. PMID:24043471

  5. Effect of microwave drying and oven drying on the water activity, color, phenolic compounds content and antioxidant activity of coconut husk (Cocos nucifera L.).

    PubMed

    Valadez-Carmona, Lourdes; Cortez-García, Rosa María; Plazola-Jacinto, Carla Patricia; Necoechea-Mondragón, Hugo; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia

    2016-09-01

    The coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) husk is basically composed by fiber and pith material and remained under-utilized. This is an important source of phenolic compounds that could be used as functional ingredients. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of: oven-drying (OD) and microwave drying (MD), on the water activity, color, phenolic compound content and antioxidant activity of coconut husk. The OD was performed at 60 °C for 12 h and MD was performed at 900 W for 10 min. The total phenolic content (TPC) in fresh coconut husk was 64.2 mg GAE/g dry wt and significant higher than observed after OD and MD of 35.8 and 45.5 mg GAE/g dry wt, respectively. Ten phenols were identified in fresh and dehydrated coconut husks. The husk MD showed an increase in the content of gallic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, ferulic and syringic acids and epicatechin compared with the fresh; while coconut husk OD and MD, showed a decrease in the content of vanillic acid, vanillin, catequin and kaempferol. The antioxidant activity decreased after both OD and MD. However, MD resulted in a better antioxidant activity in husk than OD. MD of husk resulted into better retention of preserved color, TPC and TFC than OD.

  6. Protein aggregation activates erratic stress response in dietary restricted yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Ankan Kumar; Das, Eshita; Roy, Ipsita

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress and prolonged activation of defence pathways have deleterious consequences for the cell. Dietary restriction is believed to be beneficial as it induces the cellular stress response machinery. We report here that although the phenomenon is beneficial in a wild-type cell, dietary restriction leads to an inconsistent response in a cell that is already under proteotoxicity-induced stress. Using a yeast model of Huntington’s disease, we show that contrary to expectation, aggregation of mutant huntingtin is exacerbated and activation of the unfolded protein response pathway is dampened under dietary restriction. Global proteomic analysis shows that when exposed to a single stress, either protein aggregation or dietary restriction, the expression of foldases like peptidyl-prolyl isomerase, is strongly upregulated. However, under combinatorial stress, this lead is lost, which results in enhanced protein aggregation and reduced cell survival. Successful designing of aggregation-targeted therapeutics will need to take additional stressors into account. PMID:27633120

  7. Activation of the yeast Hippo pathway by phosphorylation-dependent assembly of signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jeremy M; Lim, Daniel; Stach, Lasse; Ogrodowicz, Roksana W; Keck, Jamie M; Jones, Michele H; Wong, Catherine C L; Yates, John R; Winey, Mark; Smerdon, Stephen J; Yaffe, Michael B; Amon, Angelika

    2013-05-17

    Scaffold-assisted signaling cascades guide cellular decision-making. In budding yeast, one such signal transduction pathway called the mitotic exit network (MEN) governs the transition from mitosis to the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The MEN is conserved and in metazoans is known as the Hippo tumor-suppressor pathway. We found that signaling through the MEN kinase cascade was mediated by an unusual two-step process. The MEN kinase Cdc15 first phosphorylated the scaffold Nud1. This created a phospho-docking site on Nud1, to which the effector kinase complex Dbf2-Mob1 bound through a phosphoserine-threonine binding domain, in order to be activated by Cdc15. This mechanism of pathway activation has implications for signal transmission through other kinase cascades and might represent a general principle in scaffold-assisted signaling.

  8. Change in activity of serine palmitoyltransferase affects sensitivity to syringomycin E in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Toume, Moeko; Tani, Motohiro

    2014-09-01

    Syringomycin E is a cyclic lipodepsipeptide produced by strains of the plant bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. Genetic studies involving the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have revealed that complex sphingolipids play important roles in the action of syringomycin E. Here, we found a novel mutation that confers resistance to syringomycin E on yeast; that is, a deletion mutant of ORM1 and ORM2, which encode negative regulators of serine palmitoyltransferase catalyzing the initial step of sphingolipid biosynthesis, exhibited resistance to syringomycin E. On the contrary, overexpression of Orm2 resulted in high sensitivity to the toxin. Moreover, overexpression of Lcb1 and Lcb2, catalytic subunits of serine palmitoyltransferase, causes resistance to the toxin, whereas partial repression of expression of Lcb1 had the opposite effect. Partial reduction of complex sphingolipids by repression of expression of Aur1, an inositol phosphorylceramide synthase, also resulted in high sensitivity to the toxin. These results suggested that an increase in sphingolipid biosynthesis caused by a change in the activity of serine palmitoyltransferase causes resistance to syringomycin E.

  9. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Cold-Active Lipase from the Yeast Candida zeylanoides.

    PubMed

    Čanak, Iva; Berkics, Adrienn; Bajcsi, Nikolett; Kovacs, Monika; Belak, Agnes; Teparić, Renata; Maraz, Anna; Mrša, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Cold-active lipases have attracted attention in recent years due to their potential applications in reactions requiring lower temperatures. Both bacterial and fungal lipases have been investigated, each having distinct advantages for particular applications. Among yeasts, cold-active lipases from the genera Candida, Yarrowia, Rhodotorula, and Pichia have been reported. In this paper, biosynthesis and properties of a novel cold-active lipase from Candida zeylanoides isolated from refrigerated poultry meat are described. Heat-sterilized olive oil was found to be the best lipase biosynthesis inducer, while nonionic detergents were not effective. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using hydrophobic chromatography and its enzymatic properties were tested. Pure enzyme activity at 7 °C was about 60% of the maximal activity at 27 °C. The enzyme had rather good activity at higher temperatures, as well. Optimal pH of pure lipase was between 7.3 and 8.2, while the enzyme from the crude extract had an optimum pH of about 9.0. The enzyme was sensitive to high ionic strength and lost most of its activity at high salt concentrations. Due to the described properties, cold-active C. zeylanoides lipase has comparative advantages to most similar enzymes with technological applications and may have potential to become an industrially important enzyme.

  10. In vitro activities of amphotericin B deoxycholate and liposomal amphotericin B against 604 clinical yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Maria Teresa; Lovero, Grazia; Coretti, Caterina; De Giglio, Osvalda; Martinelli, Domenico; Bedini, Andrea; Delia, Mario; Rosato, Antonio; Codeluppi, Mauro; Caggiano, Giuseppina

    2014-12-01

    We determined the in vitro antifungal activity of liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) against 604 clinical yeast isolates. Amphotericin B deoxycholate (D-AmB) was tested in parallel against all the isolates. Susceptibility testing was performed according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M27-A3 method. Overall, L-AmB was highly active against the isolates (mean MIC, 0.42 µg ml(-1); MIC90, 1 µg ml(-1); 97.2 % of MICs were ≤1 µg ml(-1)) and comparable to D-AmB (mean MIC, 0.48 µg ml(-1); MIC90, 1 µg ml(-1); 97.3 % of MICs were ≤1 µg ml(-1)). The in vitro activity of D-AmB and L-AmB was correlated (R(2) = 0.61; exp(b), 2.3; 95 % CI, 2.19-2.44, P<0.001). Candida albicans (mean MICs of D-AmB and L-AmB, 0.39 µg ml(-1) and 0.31 µg ml(-1), respectively) and Candida parapsilosis (mean MICs of D-AmB and L-AmB, 0.38 µg ml(-1) and 0.35 µg ml(-1), respectively) were the species most susceptible to the agents tested, while Candida krusei (currently named Issatchenkia orientalis) (mean MICs of D-AmB and L-AmB, 1.27 µg ml(-1) and 1.13 µg ml(-1), respectively) was the least susceptible. The excellent in vitro activity of L-AmB may have important implications for empirical treatment approaches and support its role in treatment of a wide range of invasive infections due to yeasts.

  11. Obtaining a Dry Extract from the Mikania laevigata Leaves with Potential for Antiulcer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Mariana Viana; Oliveira, Ezequiane Machado; Martins, Jose Luiz Rodrigues; de Paula, Jose Realino; Costa, Elson Alves; da Conceição, Edemilson Cardoso; Bara, Maria Teresa Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mikania laevigata leaves are commonly used in Brazil as a medicinal plant. Objective: To obtain hydroalcoholic dried extract by nebulization and evaluate its antiulcerogenic potential. Materials and Methods: Plant material and hydroalcoholic extract were processed and analyzed for their physicochemical characteristics. A method using HPLC was validated to quantify coumarin and o-coumaric acid. Hydroalcoholic extract was spray dried and the powder obtained was characterized in terms of its physicochemical parameters and potential for antiulcerogenic activity. Results: The analytical method proved to be selective, linear, precise, accurate, sensitive, and robust. M. laevigata spray dried extract was obtained using colloidal silicon dioxide as adjuvant and was shown to possess 1.83 ± 0.004% coumarin and 0.80 ± 0.012% o-coumaric acid. It showed significant antiulcer activity in a model of an indomethacin-induced gastric lesion in mice and also produced a gastroprotective effect. Conclusion: This dried extract from M. laevigata could be a promising intermediate phytopharmaceutical product. SUMMARY Research and development of standardized dried extract of Mikania laevigata leaves obtained through spray drying and the production process was monitored by the chemical profile, physicochemical properties and potential for anti-ulcerogenic activity. Abbreviations used: DE: M. laevigata spray dried extract, HE: hydroalcoholic extract. PMID:28216886

  12. Esterase Active in Polar Organic Solvents from the Yeast Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165

    PubMed Central

    Shainu, Anju; Pandey, Ashok; Sukumaran, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Esterases/lipases active in water miscible solvents are highly desired in biocatalysis where substrate solubility is limited and also when the solvent is desired as an acyl acceptor in transesterification reactions, as with the case of biodiesel production. We have isolated an esterase from the glycolipid producing yeast-Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 which in its crude form was alkali active, thermo stable, halo tolerant and also capable of acting in presence of high methanol concentration. The crude enzyme which maintained 90% of its original activity after being treated at 70°C was purified and the properties were characterized. The partially purified esterase preparation had temperature and pH optima of 60°C and 8.0 respectively. The enzyme retained almost complete activity in presence of 25% methanol and 80% activity in the same strength of ethanol. Conditions of enzyme production were optimized, which lead to 9 fold increase in the esterase yield. One of the isoforms of the enzyme LIP1 was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Purified LIP1 had a Km and Vmax of 0.01 and 1.12, respectively. The purified esterase lost its thermo and halo tolerance but interestingly, retained 97% activity in methanol. PMID:24800063

  13. Comparison of the Petrifilm dry rehydratable film and conventional culture methods for enumeration of yeasts and molds in foods: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Knight, M T; Newman, M C; Benzinger, M J; Neufang, K L; Agin, J R; McAllister, J S; Ramos, M

    1997-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed involving 18 laboratories and 6 food types to compare 3M Petrifilm yeast and mold count plates with the method described in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual. Four species of mold and 2 species of yeast were used to inoculate the following foods: hot dogs, corn meal, ketchup, orange juice, yogurt, and cake mix. Each collaborator received 15 samples of each food type: 5 low-level inoculations, 5 high-level inoculations, and 5 uninoculated samples. There was no significant difference between the means of the 2 methods for any product or inoculation level. The Petrifilm yeast and mold count plate method for enumeration of yeasts and molds in foods has been adopted first action by AOAC INTERNATIONAL.

  14. Degradation of Biochemical Activity in Soil Sterilized by Dry Heat and Gamma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, K. L.; Souza, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of soil sterilization by dry heat (0.08% relative humidity), gamma radiation, or both on soil phosphatase, urease, and decarboxylase activity was studied. Soil sterilized by a long exposure to dry heat at relatively low temperatures (eight weeks at 100.5 C) retained higher activities than did soil exposed to a higher temperature (two weeks at 124.5 C), while all activity was destroyed by four days at 148.5 C. Sterilization with 7.5 Mrads destroyed less activity than did heat sterilization. The effect of several individually nonsterizing doses of heat radiation is described.

  15. Decrease of aged beer aroma by the reducing activity of brewing yeast.

    PubMed

    Saison, Daan; De Schutter, David P; Vanbeneden, Nele; Daenen, Luk; Delvaux, Filip; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2010-03-10

    The flavor profile of beer is subject to changes during storage. Since, possibly, yeast has an influence on flavor stability, the aim of this study was to examine if there is a direct impact of brewing yeast on aged aroma. This was achieved by refermentation of aged beers. It was shown that several aged aroma notes, such as cardboard, ribes, Maillard and Madeira, were removed almost entirely by brewing yeast, independently of the yeast or the beer type. This was explained by the reduction of aldehydes, mainly (E)-2-nonenal, Strecker aldehydes, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and diacetyl, to their corresponding alcohols. Furthermore, it became evident that the reducing capacity of brewing yeast is high, but that yeast strain and compound specific residual concentrations remained in the refermented beer independently of the initial concentration. Finally, it appeared that aldehydes were not only reduced but also formed during refermentation.

  16. Yeast Breads. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.15a. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with yeast breads and their ingredients. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these areas: yeast breads and their ingredients,…

  17. Allosteric regulation of catalytic activity: Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase versus yeast chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedt, K; Krappmann, S; Braus, G H

    2001-09-01

    Allosteric regulation of key metabolic enzymes is a fascinating field to study the structure-function relationship of induced conformational changes of proteins. In this review we compare the principles of allosteric transitions of the complex classical model aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from Escherichia coli, consisting of 12 polypeptides, and the less complicated chorismate mutase derived from baker's yeast, which functions as a homodimer. Chorismate mutase presumably represents the minimal oligomerization state of a cooperative enzyme which still can be either activated or inhibited by different heterotropic effectors. Detailed knowledge of the number of possible quaternary states and a description of molecular triggers for conformational changes of model enzymes such as ATCase and chorismate mutase shed more and more light on allostery as an important regulatory mechanism of any living cell. The comparison of wild-type and engineered mutant enzymes reveals that current textbook models for regulation do not cover the entire picture needed to describe the function of these enzymes in detail.

  18. Photocatalytic activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles synthesized using yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kaushik; Sarkar, C. K.; Ghosh, C. K.

    2015-11-01

    Synthesis of metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles through physical and chemical route is quiet common but biological synthesis procedures are gaining momentum due to their simplicity, cost-effectivity and eco-friendliness. Here, we report green synthesis of silver nanoparticles from aqueous solution of silver salts using yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) extract. The nanoparticles formation was gradually investigated by UV-Vis spectrometer. X-ray diffraction analysis was done to identify different phases of biosynthesized Ag nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to study the particle size and morphology of silver nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the nanoparticles was performed to study the role of biomolecules capped on the surface of Ag nanoparticles during interaction. Photocatalytic activity of these biosynthesized nanoparticles was studied using an organic dye, methylene blue under solar irradiation and these nanoparticles showed efficacy in degrading the dye within a few hours of exposure.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Protein Kinase Domain of Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Snf1

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph,M.; Amodeo, G.; Bai, Y.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master metabolic regulator, and is an important target for drug development against diabetes, obesity, and other diseases. AMPK is a hetero-trimeric enzyme, with a catalytic ({alpha}) subunit, and two regulatory ({beta} and {gamma}) subunits. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.2 Angstrom resolution of the protein kinase domain (KD) of the catalytic subunit of yeast AMPK (commonly known as SNF1). The Snf1-KD structure shares strong similarity to other protein kinases, with a small N-terminal lobe and a large C-terminal lobe. Two negative surface patches in the structure may be important for the recognition of the substrates of this kinase.

  20. Effects of drying on nitrification activity in zeoponic medium used for long-term space missions.

    PubMed

    McGilloway, R L; Weaver, R W

    2004-01-01

    One component of a proposed life support system is the use of zeoponic substrates, which slowly release NH4+ into "soil" solution, for the production of plants. Nitrifying bacteria that convert NH4+ to NO3- are among the important microbial components of these systems. Survival of nitrifying bacteria in dry zeoponic substrates is needed, because the substrate would likely be stored in an air-dry state between croppings. Substrate was enriched for nitrifying bacteria and allowed to air-dry in a laminar flow hood. Stored substrate was analyzed for nitrifier survivability by measuring nitrifier activity at the beginning, 3 days, 1, 2, and 3 weeks. After rewetting, activity was approximately 9 micrograms N g-1 h-1 regardless of storage time. Nitrification rates did not decrease during storage. It seems unlikely that drying between plantings would result in practical reductions in nitrification, and reinoculation with nitrifying bacteria would not be necessary.

  1. Effects of drying on nitrification activity in zeoponic medium used for long-term space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    One component of a proposed life support system is the use of zeoponic substrates, which slowly release NH4+ into "soil" solution, for the production of plants. Nitrifying bacteria that convert NH4+ to NO3- are among the important microbial components of these systems. Survival of nitrifying bacteria in dry zeoponic substrates is needed, because the substrate would likely be stored in an air-dry state between croppings. Substrate was enriched for nitrifying bacteria and allowed to air-dry in a laminar flow hood. Stored substrate was analyzed for nitrifier survivability by measuring nitrifier activity at the beginning, 3 days, 1, 2, and 3 weeks. After rewetting, activity was approximately 9 micrograms N g-1 h-1 regardless of storage time. Nitrification rates did not decrease during storage. It seems unlikely that drying between plantings would result in practical reductions in nitrification, and reinoculation with nitrifying bacteria would not be necessary.

  2. CDC37 is required for p60v-src activity in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Dey, B; Lightbody, J J; Boschelli, F

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the molecular chaperones Hsp90 and Ydj1p suppress the toxicity of the protein tyrosine kinase p60v-src in yeast by reducing its levels or its kinase activity. We describe isolation and characterization of novel p60v-src-resistant, temperature-sensitive cdc37 mutants, cdc37-34 and cdc37-17, which produce less p60v-src than the parental wild-type strain at 23 degrees C. However, p60v-src levels are not low enough to account for the resistance of these strains. Asynchronously growing cdc37-34 and cdc37-17 mutants arrest in G1 and G2/M when shifted from permissive temperatures (23 degrees C) to the restrictive temperature (37 degrees C), but hydroxyurea-synchronized cdc37-34 and cdc37-17 mutants arrest in G2/M when released from the hydroxyurea block and shifted from 23 to 37 degrees C. The previously described temperature-sensitive cdc37-1 mutant is p60v-src-sensitive and produces wild-type amounts of p60v-src at permissive temperatures but becomes p60v-src-resistant at its restrictive temperature, 38 degrees C. In all three cdc37 mutants, inactivation of Cdc37p by incubation at 38 degrees C reduces p60v-src-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of yeast proteins to low or undetectable levels. Also, p60v-src levels are enriched in urea-solubilized extracts and depleted in detergent-solubilized extracts of all three cdc37 mutants prepared from cells incubated at the restrictive temperature. These results suggest that Cdc37p is required for maintenance of p60v-src in a soluble, biologically active form. Images PMID:8885235

  3. Biological significance of nuclear localization of mitogen-activated protein kinase Pmk1 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-07-27

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level.

  4. In situ photoexcitation of silver-doped titania nanopowders for activity against bacteria and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Katarzyna; Wysocka-Król, Katarzyna; Kopaczyńska, Marta; Dworniczek, Ewa; Franiczek, Roman; Wawrzyńska, Magdalena; Vargová, Melinda; Zahoran, Miroslav; Rakovský, Erik; Kuš, Peter; Plesch, Gustav; Plecenik, Andrej; Laffir, Fathima; Tofail, Syed A M; Podbielska, Halina

    2011-10-01

    Photocatalytic and in situ microbial activity of the amorphous and annealed states of Ag-doped and un-doped titania were examined. Studies on their structure, morphology, composition, and the photo-absorption characteristics of these materials were performed. These results were correlated with the photocatalytic and microbial activity against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus K324 (MRSA), methicillin susceptible S. aureus ATCC 25923 (MSSA), Escherichia coli PA 170, and yeasts Candida albicans ATCC 90028. The annealed powders containing anatase form of titania exhibited relatively higher photocatalytic activity,corresponding to activity against MRSA,when exposed to UV-A radiation. In comparison, amorphous powders exhibited low photoactivity and showed poor antibacterial performance against MRSA under UV-A exposure. Doping of amorphous titania with Ag resulted in an anti-MRSA effect without exposure to UV radiation. In the Ag-doped crystalline anatase samples, the size of Ag primary nanocrystallites increased, which led to the decrease in the surface concentration of Ag and detriment anti-MRSA activity.

  5. Biological Significance of Nuclear Localization of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pmk1 in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M. Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level. PMID:22685296

  6. Survey of estrogenic activity in fish feed by yeast estrogen-screen assay.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takeru; Kobayashi, Makito; Moriwaki, Toshihisa; Kawai, Shin'ichiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2004-10-01

    Fishes have been used as laboratory animal for research of estrogenic endocrine disrupters by many researchers. However, much less attention was paid to the possibility that compounds with estrogenic activity are present in fish diets. In order to examine this possibility, we measured the estrogenic activity in commercial fish feed by in vitro yeast estrogen-screen (YES) assay based on the binding ability of tested compounds to estrogen receptors. Estrogenic activity was detected in all the commercial fish feed examined (0.2-6.2 ng estradiol equivalent/g fish feed), some phytoestrogens (genistein, formononetin, equol and coumestrol; relative activity to estradiol, 8.6 x 10(-6)-1.1 x 10(-4) by giving a value of 1.0 to estradiol) and some androgens (testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone; relative activity to estradiol, 3.0 x 10(-6)-1.2 x 10(-4)). Therefore, it is possible that these compounds could affect the results of in vivo estrogen assay, such as vitellogenin production in male fish, especially when fish are fed commercial feed.

  7. Activation of the cell integrity pathway is channelled through diverse signalling elements in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Barba, Gregorio; Soto, Teresa; Madrid, Marisa; Núñez, Andrés; Vicente, Jeronima; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2008-04-01

    MAPK Pmk1p is the central element of a cascade involved in the maintenance of cell integrity and other functions in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Pmk1p becomes activated by multiple stressing situations and also during cell separation. GTPase Rho2p acts upstream of the protein kinase C homolog Pck2p to activate the Pmk1 signalling pathway through direct interaction with MAPKKK Mkh1p. In this work we analyzed the functional significance of both Rho2p and Pck2p in the transduction of various stress signals by the cell integrity pathway. The results indicate that basal Pmk1p activity can be positively regulated by alternative mechanisms which are independent on the control by Rho2p and/or Pck2p. Unexpectedly, Pck1p, another protein kinase C homolog, negatively modulates Pmk1p basal activity by an unknown mechanism. Moreover, different elements appear to regulate the stress-induced activation of Pmk1p depending on the nature of the triggering stimuli. Whereas Pmk1p activation induced by hyper- or hypotonic stresses is channeled through Rho2p-Pck2p, other stressors, like glucose deprivation or cell wall disturbance, are transduced via other pathways in addition to that of Rho2p-Pck2p. On the contrary, Pmk1p activation observed during cell separation or after treatment with hydrogen peroxide does not involve Rho2p-Pck2p. Finally, Pck2p function is critical to maintain a Pmk1p basal activity that allows Pmk1p activation induced by heat stress. These data demonstrate the existence of a complex signalling network modulating Pmk1p activation in response to a variety of stresses in fission yeast.

  8. Aminopyrrolic synthetic receptors for monosaccharides: a class of carbohydrate-binding agents endowed with antibiotic activity versus pathogenic yeasts.

    PubMed

    Nativi, Cristina; Francesconi, Oscar; Gabrielli, Gabriele; De Simone, Irene; Turchetti, Benedetta; Mello, Tommaso; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ghelardini, Carla; Buzzini, Pietro; Roelens, Stefano

    2012-04-16

    The biological activity of a set of structurally related aminopyrrolic synthetic receptors for monosaccharides has been tested versus yeast and yeast-like microorganisms and compared to their binding affinity toward mannosides. Antibiotic activity comparable to that of well-known polyene (amphotericin B) or azole (ketoconazole) drugs has been found for some members of the family, along with a general correlation with binding abilities. A systematic structure-activity-affinity investigation shed light on the structural and functional requirements necessary for antibiotic activity and identified the tripodal compound 1 as the most potent compound of the set. Together with toxicity tests and inhibitor localization experiments performed through fluorescence microscopy, these studies led to the characterization of a new class of carbohydrate binding agents possessing antibiotic activity, in which pyrrolic groups precisely structured on a tripodal architecture appear to be responsible for permeability through the cell wall of pathogens, as well as for antibiotic activity inside the cytoplasm.

  9. In vivo yeast cell morphogenesis is regulated by a p21-activated kinase in the human pathogen Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Kylie J; Schreider, Lena; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2009-11-01

    Pathogens have developed diverse strategies to infect their hosts and evade the host defense systems. Many pathogens reside within host phagocytic cells, thus evading much of the host immune system. For dimorphic fungal pathogens which grow in a multicellular hyphal form, a central attribute which facilitates growth inside host cells without rapid killing is the capacity to switch from the hyphal growth form to a unicellular yeast form. Blocking this transition abolishes or severely reduces pathogenicity. Host body temperature (37 degrees C) is the most common inducer of the hyphal to yeast transition in vitro for many dimorphic fungi, and it is often assumed that this is the inducer in vivo. This work describes the identification and analysis of a new pathway involved in sensing the environment inside a host cell by a dimorphic fungal pathogen, Penicillium marneffei. The pakB gene, encoding a p21-activated kinase, defines this pathway and operates independently of known effectors in P. marneffei. Expression of pakB is upregulated in P. marneffei yeast cells isolated from macrophages but absent from in vitro cultured yeast cells produced at 37 degrees C. Deletion of pakB leads to a failure to produce yeast cells inside macrophages but no effect in vitro at 37 degrees C. Loss of pakB also leads to the inappropriate production of yeast cells at 25 degrees C in vitro, and the mechanism underlying this requires the activity of the central regulator of asexual development. The data shows that this new pathway is central to eliciting the appropriate morphogenetic response by the pathogen to the host environment independently of the common temperature signal, thus clearly separating the temperature- and intracellular-dependent signaling systems.

  10. Yeast Mnn9 is both a priming glycosyltransferase and an allosteric activator of mannan biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Striebeck, Alexander; Robinson, David A; Schüttelkopf, Alexander W; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2013-09-11

    The fungal cell possesses an essential carbohydrate cell wall. The outer layer, mannan, is formed by mannoproteins carrying highly mannosylated O- and N-linked glycans. Yeast mannan biosynthesis is initiated by a Golgi-located complex (M-Pol I) of two GT-62 mannosyltransferases, Mnn9p and Van1p, that are conserved in fungal pathogens. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans mnn9 knockouts show an aberrant cell wall and increased antibiotic sensitivity, suggesting the enzyme is a potential drug target. Here, we present the structure of ScMnn9 in complex with GDP and Mn(2+), defining the fold and catalytic machinery of the GT-62 family. Compared with distantly related GT-78/GT-15 enzymes, ScMnn9 carries an unusual extension. Using a novel enzyme assay and site-directed mutagenesis, we identify conserved amino acids essential for ScMnn9 'priming' α-1,6-mannosyltransferase activity. Strikingly, both the presence of the ScMnn9 protein and its product, but not ScMnn9 catalytic activity, are required to activate subsequent ScVan1 processive α-1,6-mannosyltransferase activity in the M-Pol I complex. These results reveal the molecular basis of mannan synthesis and will aid development of inhibitors targeting this process.

  11. Nur1 Dephosphorylation Confers Positive Feedback to Mitotic Exit Phosphatase Activation in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Molly; Kuilman, Thomas; Uhlmann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Substrate dephosphorylation by the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-opposing phosphatase, Cdc14, is vital for many events during budding yeast mitotic exit. Cdc14 is sequestered in the nucleolus through inhibitory binding to Net1, from which it is released in anaphase following Net1 phosphorylation. Initial Net1 phosphorylation depends on Cdk itself, in conjunction with proteins of the Cdc14 Early Anaphase Release (FEAR) network. Later on, the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) signaling cascade maintains Cdc14 release. An important unresolved question is how Cdc14 activity can increase in early anaphase, while Cdk activity, that is required for Net1 phosphorylation, decreases and the MEN is not yet active. Here we show that the nuclear rim protein Nur1 interacts with Net1 and, in its Cdk phosphorylated form, inhibits Cdc14 release. Nur1 is dephosphorylated by Cdc14 in early anaphase, relieving the inhibition and promoting further Cdc14 release. Nur1 dephosphorylation thus describes a positive feedback loop in Cdc14 phosphatase activation during mitotic exit, required for faithful chromosome segregation and completion of the cell division cycle. PMID:25569132

  12. Yeast AMP-activated Protein Kinase Monitors Glucose Concentration Changes and Absolute Glucose Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Bendrioua, Loubna; Smedh, Maria; Almquist, Joachim; Cvijovic, Marija; Jirstrand, Mats; Goksör, Mattias; Adiels, Caroline B.; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the time-dependent behavior of a signaling system can provide insight into its dynamic properties. We employed the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the transcriptional repressor Mig1 as readout to characterize Snf1-Mig1 dynamics in single yeast cells. Mig1 binds to promoters of target genes and mediates glucose repression. Mig1 is predominantly located in the nucleus when glucose is abundant. Upon glucose depletion, Mig1 is phosphorylated by the yeast AMP-activated kinase Snf1 and exported into the cytoplasm. We used a three-channel microfluidic device to establish a high degree of control over the glucose concentration exposed to cells. Following regimes of glucose up- and downshifts, we observed a very rapid response reaching a new steady state within less than 1 min, different glucose threshold concentrations depending on glucose up- or downshifts, a graded profile with increased cell-to-cell variation at threshold glucose concentrations, and biphasic behavior with a transient translocation of Mig1 upon the shift from high to intermediate glucose concentrations. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching data demonstrate that Mig1 shuttles constantly between the nucleus and cytoplasm, although with different rates, depending on the presence of glucose. Taken together, our data suggest that the Snf1-Mig1 system has the ability to monitor glucose concentration changes as well as absolute glucose levels. The sensitivity over a wide range of glucose levels and different glucose concentration-dependent response profiles are likely determined by the close integration of signaling with the metabolism and may provide for a highly flexible and fast adaptation to an altered nutritional status. PMID:24627493

  13. A mitochondria-targeting artemisinin derivative with sharply increased antitumor but depressed anti-yeast and anti-malaria activities

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Yu; Zhu, Pan; Zhou, Bing

    2017-01-01

    The potent anti-malarial drug artemisinins are additionally anti-tumorigenic and inhibitory to yeast growth. The action mechanism of artemisinins, however, is not well understood. Heme and mitochondrial membrane are both suggested to be involved in the action of artemisinins. Because heme is also synthesized in the mitochondrion, mitochondria appear to be a critical organelle for artemisinins’ activities. In this study, we synthesized a mitochondria-targeting artemisinin derivative by conjugating triphenylphosphonium (TPP) to artelinic acid (ARTa). ARTa-TPP displays far more potent anti-tumorigenic activity than its parent compound. In contrast, ARTa-TPP is much less active against yeast respiration growth and malarial parasites. Notably, ARTa-TPP is also associated with increased toxicity to other kinds of control mammalian cells. These results suggest divergent action modes for artemisinins against cancer cells and malaria or yeast cells. We conclude that mitochondrial targeting could substantially elevate the anticancer potency of artemisinins, but the accompanied increased toxicity to normal cells raises an alert. The mechanism regarding the opposing effects of TPP conjugation to ARTa on its anticancer and anti-malarial/anti-yeast potencies is discussed based on our current understandings of artemisinins’ action. PMID:28368011

  14. A mitochondria-targeting artemisinin derivative with sharply increased antitumor but depressed anti-yeast and anti-malaria activities.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Yu; Zhu, Pan; Zhou, Bing

    2017-04-03

    The potent anti-malarial drug artemisinins are additionally anti-tumorigenic and inhibitory to yeast growth. The action mechanism of artemisinins, however, is not well understood. Heme and mitochondrial membrane are both suggested to be involved in the action of artemisinins. Because heme is also synthesized in the mitochondrion, mitochondria appear to be a critical organelle for artemisinins' activities. In this study, we synthesized a mitochondria-targeting artemisinin derivative by conjugating triphenylphosphonium (TPP) to artelinic acid (ARTa). ARTa-TPP displays far more potent anti-tumorigenic activity than its parent compound. In contrast, ARTa-TPP is much less active against yeast respiration growth and malarial parasites. Notably, ARTa-TPP is also associated with increased toxicity to other kinds of control mammalian cells. These results suggest divergent action modes for artemisinins against cancer cells and malaria or yeast cells. We conclude that mitochondrial targeting could substantially elevate the anticancer potency of artemisinins, but the accompanied increased toxicity to normal cells raises an alert. The mechanism regarding the opposing effects of TPP conjugation to ARTa on its anticancer and anti-malarial/anti-yeast potencies is discussed based on our current understandings of artemisinins' action.

  15. Therapeutic activity of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based probiotic and inactivated whole yeast on vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Pericolini, Eva; Gabrielli, Elena; Ballet, Nathalie; Sabbatini, Samuele; Roselletti, Elena; Cayzeele Decherf, Amélie; Pélerin, Fanny; Luciano, Eugenio; Perito, Stefano; Jüsten, Peter; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2017-01-02

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is the most prevalent vaginal infection worldwide and Candida albicans is its major agent. Vulvovaginal candidiasis is characterized by disruption of the vaginal microbiota composition, as happens following large spectrum antibiotic usage. Recent studies support the effectiveness of oral and local probiotic treatment for prevention of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a safe yeast used as, or for, the production of ingredients for human nutrition and health. Here, we demonstrate that vaginal administration of probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae live yeast (GI) and, in part, inactivated whole yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (IY), used as post-challenge therapeutics, was able to positively influence the course of vaginal candidiasis by accelerating the clearance of the fungus. This effect was likely due to multiple interactions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Candida albicans. Both live and inactivated yeasts induced coaggregation of Candida and consequently inhibited its adherence to epithelial cells. However, only the probiotic yeast was able to suppress some major virulence factors of Candida albicans such as the ability to switch from yeast to mycelial form and the capacity to express several aspartyl proteases. The effectiveness of live yeast was higher than that of inactivated whole yeast suggesting that the synergy between mechanical effects and biological effects were dominant over purely mechanical effects. The protection of epithelial cells to Candida-induced damage was also observed. Overall, our data show for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based ingredients, particularly the living cells, can exert beneficial therapeutic effects on a widespread vaginal mucosal infection.

  16. Using an Active Sensor to Estimate Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata L.) Dry Matter Yield and Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing in the form of active sensors could be used to estimate forage biomass on spatial and temporal scales. The objective of this study is to use canopy reflectance measurements from an active remote sensor to compare different vegetation indices as a means of estimating final dry matter y...

  17. Yeasts preservation: alternatives for lyophilisation.

    PubMed

    Nyanga, Loveness K; Nout, Martinus J R; Smid, Eddy J; Boekhout, Teun; Zwietering, Marcel H

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two low-cost, low technology traditional methods for drying starter cultures with standard lyophilisation. Lyophilised yeast cultures and yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes and dry plant fibre strands were examined for viable cell counts during 6 months storage at 4 and 25 °C. None of the yeast cultures showed a significant loss in viable cell count during 6 months of storage at 4 °C upon lyophilisation and preservation in dry rice cakes. During storage at 25 °C in the dark, yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes, and lyophilised cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Issatchenkia orientalis showed no significant loss of viable cells up to 4 months of storage. Yeast cultures preserved in dry plant fibre strands had the greatest loss of viable count during the 6 months of storage at 25 °C. Preservation of yeasts cultures in dry rice cakes provided better survival during storage at 4 °C than lyophilisation. The current study demonstrated that traditional methods can be useful and effective for starter culture preservation in small-scale, low-tech applications.

  18. Variation of the Phytochemical Constituents and Antioxidant Activities of Zingiber officinale var. rubrum Theilade Associated with Different Drying Methods and Polyphenol Oxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh, Ali; Jaafar, Hawa Z E; Rahmat, Asmah

    2016-06-17

    The effects of different drying methods (freeze drying, vacuum oven drying, and shade drying) on the phytochemical constituents associated with the antioxidant activities of Z. officinale var. rubrum Theilade were evaluated to determine the optimal drying process for these rhizomes. Total flavonoid content (TFC), total phenolic content (TPC), and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity were measured using the spectrophotometric method. Individual phenolic acids and flavonoids, 6- and 8-gingerol and shogaol were identified by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography method. Ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays were used for the evaluation of antioxidant activities. The highest reduction in moisture content was observed after freeze drying (82.97%), followed by vacuum oven drying (80.43%) and shade drying (72.65%). The highest TPC, TFC, and 6- and 8-shogaol contents were observed in samples dried by the vacuum oven drying method compared to other drying methods. The highest content of 6- and 8-gingerol was observed after freeze drying, followed by vacuum oven drying and shade drying methods. Fresh samples had the highest PPO activity and lowest content of flavonoid and phenolic acid compounds compared to dried samples. Rhizomes dried by the vacuum oven drying method represent the highest DPPH (52.9%) and FRAP activities (566.5 μM of Fe (II)/g DM), followed by freeze drying (48.3% and 527.1 μM of Fe (II)/g DM, respectively) and shade drying methods (37.64% and 471.8 μM of Fe (II)/g DM, respectively) with IC50 values of 27.2, 29.1, and 34.8 μg/mL, respectively. Negative and significant correlations were observed between PPO and antioxidant activity of rhizomes. Vacuum oven dried rhizomes can be utilized as an ingredient for the development of value-added food products as they contain high contents of phytochemicals with valuable antioxidant potential.

  19. Novel active comb-shaped dry electrode for EEG measurement in hairy site.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Wu, Chung-Yu; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an important biopotential, and has been widely applied in clinical applications. The conventional EEG electrode with conductive gels is usually used for measuring EEG. However, the use of conductive gel also encounters with the issue of drying and hardening. Recently, many dry EEG electrodes based on different conductive materials and techniques were proposed to solve the previous issue. However, measuring EEG in the hairy site is still a difficult challenge. In this study, a novel active comb-shaped dry electrode was proposed to measure EEG in hairy site. Different form other comb-shaped or spike-shaped dry electrodes, it can provide more excellent performance of avoiding the signal attenuation, phase distortion, and the reduction of common mode rejection ratio. Even under walking motion, it can effectively acquire EEG in hairy site. Finally, the experiments for alpha rhythm and steady-state visually evoked potential were also tested to validate the proposed electrode.

  20. Active Yeast Telomerase Shares Subunits with Ribonucleoproteins RNase P and RNase MRP.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Bruno; Laterreur, Nancy; Perederina, Anna; Noël, Jean-François; Dubois, Marie-Line; Krasilnikov, Andrey S; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2016-05-19

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that replenishes telomeric DNA and maintains genome integrity. Minimally, telomerase activity requires a templating RNA and a catalytic protein. Additional proteins are required for activity on telomeres in vivo. Here, we report that the Pop1, Pop6, and Pop7 proteins, known components of RNase P and RNase MRP, bind to yeast telomerase RNA and are essential constituents of the telomerase holoenzyme. Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 binding is specific and involves an RNA domain highly similar to a protein-binding domain in the RNAs of RNase P/MRP. The results also show that Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 function to maintain the essential components Est1 and Est2 on the RNA in vivo. Consistently, addition of Pop1 allows for telomerase activity reconstitution with wild-type telomerase RNA in vitro. Thus, the same chaperoning module has allowed the evolution of functionally and, remarkably, structurally distinct RNPs, telomerase, and RNases P/MRP from unrelated progenitor RNAs.

  1. Fission yeast Cdk7 controls gene expression through both its CAK and C-terminal domain kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Devos, Maxime; Mommaerts, Elise; Migeot, Valerie; van Bakel, Harm; Hermand, Damien

    2015-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activation and RNA polymerase II transcription are linked by the Cdk7 kinase, which phosphorylates Cdks as a trimeric Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, and serine 5 within the polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) as transcription factor TFIIH-bound CAK. However, the physiological importance of integrating these processes is not understood. Besides the Cdk7 ortholog Mcs6, fission yeast possesses a second CAK, Csk1. The two enzymes have been proposed to act redundantly to activate Cdc2. Using an improved analogue-sensitive Mcs6-as kinase, we show that Csk1 is not a relevant CAK for Cdc2. Further analyses revealed that Csk1 lacks a 20-amino-acid sequence required for its budding yeast counterpart, Cak1, to bind Cdc2. Transcriptome profiling of the Mcs6-as mutant in the presence or absence of the budding yeast Cak1 kinase, in order to uncouple the CTD kinase and CAK activities of Mcs6, revealed an unanticipated role of the CAK branch in the transcriptional control of the cluster of genes implicated in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth. The analysis of a Cdc2 CAK site mutant confirmed these data. Our data show that the Cdk7 kinase modulates transcription through its well-described RNA Pol II CTD kinase activity and also through the Cdc2-activating kinase activity.

  2. Fission Yeast Cdk7 Controls Gene Expression through both Its CAK and C-Terminal Domain Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Devos, Maxime; Mommaerts, Elise; Migeot, Valerie; van Bakel, Harm

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activation and RNA polymerase II transcription are linked by the Cdk7 kinase, which phosphorylates Cdks as a trimeric Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, and serine 5 within the polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) as transcription factor TFIIH-bound CAK. However, the physiological importance of integrating these processes is not understood. Besides the Cdk7 ortholog Mcs6, fission yeast possesses a second CAK, Csk1. The two enzymes have been proposed to act redundantly to activate Cdc2. Using an improved analogue-sensitive Mcs6-as kinase, we show that Csk1 is not a relevant CAK for Cdc2. Further analyses revealed that Csk1 lacks a 20-amino-acid sequence required for its budding yeast counterpart, Cak1, to bind Cdc2. Transcriptome profiling of the Mcs6-as mutant in the presence or absence of the budding yeast Cak1 kinase, in order to uncouple the CTD kinase and CAK activities of Mcs6, revealed an unanticipated role of the CAK branch in the transcriptional control of the cluster of genes implicated in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth. The analysis of a Cdc2 CAK site mutant confirmed these data. Our data show that the Cdk7 kinase modulates transcription through its well-described RNA Pol II CTD kinase activity and also through the Cdc2-activating kinase activity. PMID:25691663

  3. Systematic exploration of ubiquitin sequence, E1 activation efficiency, and experimental fitness in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Roscoe, Benjamin P.; Bolon, Daniel N. A.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of biological interaction networks poses a challenge to understanding the function of individual connections in the overall network. To address this challenge, we developed a high throughput reverse engineering strategy to analyze how thousands of specific perturbations (encompassing all point mutations in a central gene) impact both a specific edge (interaction to a directly connected node) as well as overall network function. We analyzed the effects of ubiquitin mutations on activation by the E1 enzyme and compared these to effects on yeast growth rate. Using this approach, we delineated ubiquitin mutations that selectively impacted the ubiquitin-E1 edge. We find that the elasticity function relating the efficiency of ubiquitin-E1 interaction to growth rate is non-linear and that a greater than 50-fold decrease in E1 activation efficiency is required to reduce growth rate by two fold. Despite the robustness of fitness to decreases in E1 activation efficiency, the effects of most ubiquitin mutations on E1 activation paralleled the effects on growth rate. Our observations indicate that most ubiquitin mutations that disrupt E1 activation also disrupt other functions. The structurally characterized ubiquitin-E1 interface encompasses the interfaces of ubiquitin with most other known binding partners, and we propose that this enables E1 in wild-type cells to selectively activate ubiquitin protein molecules capable of binding to other partners from the cytoplasmic pool of ubiquitin protein that will include molecules with chemical damage and/or errors from transcription and translation. PMID:24862281

  4. Effect of freeze-drying on the antioxidant compounds and antioxidant activity of selected tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    Shofian, Norshahida Mohamad; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Osman, Azizah; Saari, Nazamid; Anwar, Farooq; Dek, Mohd Sabri Pak; Hairuddin, Muhammad Redzuan

    2011-01-01

    The effects of freeze-drying on antioxidant compounds and antioxidant activity of five tropical fruits, namely starfruit (Averrhoa carambola L.), mango (Mangifera indica L.), papaya (Carica papaya L.), muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), and watermelon Citruluss lanatus (Thunb.) were investigated. Significant (p < 0.05) differences, for the amounts of total phenolic compounds (TPC), were found between the fresh and freeze-dried fruit samples, except muskmelon. There was no significant (p > 0.05) change, however, observed in the ascorbic acid content of the fresh and freeze-dried fruits. Similarly, freeze-drying did not exert any considerable effect on β-carotene concentration of fruits, except for mango and watermelon, where significantly (p < 0.05) higher levels were detected in the fresh samples. The results of DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging and reducing power assays revealed that fresh samples of starfruit and mango had relatively higher antioxidant activity. In case of linoleic acid peroxidation inhibition measurement, a significant (p < 0.05) but random variation was recorded between the fresh and freeze-dried fruits. Overall, in comparison to β-carotene and ascorbic acid, a good correlation was established between the result of TPC and antioxidant assays, indicating that phenolics might have been the dominant compounds contributing towards the antioxidant activity of the fruits tested.

  5. Effect of Freeze-Drying on the Antioxidant Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Selected Tropical Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Shofian, Norshahida Mohamad; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Osman, Azizah; Saari, Nazamid; Anwar, Farooq; Dek, Mohd Sabri Pak; Hairuddin, Muhammad Redzuan

    2011-01-01

    The effects of freeze-drying on antioxidant compounds and antioxidant activity of five tropical fruits, namely starfruit (Averrhoa carambola L.), mango (Mangifera indica L.), papaya (Carica papaya L.), muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), and watermelon Citruluss lanatus (Thunb.) were investigated. Significant (p < 0.05) differences, for the amounts of total phenolic compounds (TPC), were found between the fresh and freeze-dried fruit samples, except muskmelon. There was no significant (p > 0.05) change, however, observed in the ascorbic acid content of the fresh and freeze-dried fruits. Similarly, freeze-drying did not exert any considerable effect on β-carotene concentration of fruits, except for mango and watermelon, where significantly (p < 0.05) higher levels were detected in the fresh samples. The results of DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging and reducing power assays revealed that fresh samples of starfruit and mango had relatively higher antioxidant activity. In case of linoleic acid peroxidation inhibition measurement, a significant (p < 0.05) but random variation was recorded between the fresh and freeze-dried fruits. Overall, in comparison to β-carotene and ascorbic acid, a good correlation was established between the result of TPC and antioxidant assays, indicating that phenolics might have been the dominant compounds contributing towards the antioxidant activity of the fruits tested. PMID:21845104

  6. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease.

    PubMed

    Flores, Alyssa M; Casey, Scott D; Felix, Christian M; Phuan, Puay W; Verkman, A S; Levin, Marc H

    2016-05-01

    Dry eye disorders, including Sjögren's syndrome, constitute a common problem in the aging population, with limited effective therapeutic options available. The cAMP-activated Cl(-) channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a major prosecretory channel at the ocular surface. We investigated whether compounds that target CFTR can correct the abnormal tear film in dry eye. Small-molecule activators of human wild-type CFTR identified by high-throughput screening were evaluated in cell culture and in vivo assays, to select compounds that stimulate Cl(-)-driven fluid secretion across the ocular surface in mice. An aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine, CFTRact-K089, fully activated CFTR in cell cultures with EC50 ∼250 nM and produced an ∼8.5 mV hyperpolarization in ocular surface potential difference. When delivered topically, CFTRact-K089 doubled basal tear volume for 4 h and had no effect in CF mice. CFTRact-K089 showed sustained tear film bioavailability without detectable systemic absorption. In a mouse model of aqueous-deficient dry eye produced by lacrimal ablation, topical administration of 0.1 nmol CFTRact-K089 3 times daily restored tear volume to basal levels, preventing corneal epithelial disruption when initiated at the time of surgery and reversing it when started after development of dry eye. Our results support the potential utility of CFTR-targeted activators as a novel prosecretory treatment for dry eye.-Flores, A. M., Casey, S. D., Felix, C. M., Phuan, P. W., Verkman, A. S., Levin, M. H. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease.

  7. Characterization of Bovine Interferon α1: Expression in Yeast Pichia pastoris, Biological Activities, and Physicochemical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jianwei; Cao, Chong; Bao, Jun; Liu, Hongtao; Peng, Tongquan

    2015-01-01

    A bovine interferon α (BoIFNα) gene that included signal sequence was amplified from bovine liver genomic DNA. The gene was named BoIFN-α1 according to the position at which the encoded gene of the bovine IFN was located in the bovine genome. The sequence included a 23-amino-acid signal peptide and a 166-amino-acid mature peptide. The structural characteristics and phylogenetic relationships of the BoIFN-α1 gene were analyzed. A recombinant mature BoIFN-α1 (rBoIFN-α1) was expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Physicochemical characteristics and antiviral activity were determined in vitro. Recombinant BoIFN-α1 was found to be highly sensitive to trypsin and stable at pH 2.0 or 65°C. It also exhibited antiviral activity, which was neutralized by a rabbit anti-rBoIFNα polyclonal antibody. This study revealed that rBoIFN-α1 has the typical characteristics of IFNα and can be used for both research and industrial application. PMID:25343404

  8. Positive Feedback Genetic Circuit Incorporating a Constitutively Active Mutant Gal3 into Yeast GAL Induction System.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Shintaro; Ishii, Jun; Matsuno, Toshihide; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Matsubara, Daiki; Tominaga, Masahiro; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-03-27

    The GAL expression system is the most frequently used induction technique in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we report a simple but powerful genetic circuit for use with the GAL induction system. Briefly, an artificial positive feedback circuit was incorporated into the GAL regulatory network. We selected green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter of GAL1 induction, and designed a strain that expressed a constitutively active Gal3 mutant protein (Gal3(c)) under control of the GAL10 promoter. In the resulting strain, GAL1 and GAL10 promoters regulate the expression of GFP and GAL3(c), respectively. Because Gal3(c) sequesters the Gal80 repressor away from the Gal4 transcriptional activator in the same manner as the galactose-bound Gal3, the expressed Gal3(c) protein provokes further expression of GFP and Gal3(c), yielding further enhancement of GAL induction. Thus, this GAL3(c)-mediated positive feedback circuit permits substantially enriched induction of a target gene at extremely low concentrations, or even in the absence, of galactose, while maintaining the strict glucose-mediated repression of the target.

  9. Overexpression of the yeast transcriptional activator ADR1 induces mutation of the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Cherry, J R; Denis, C L

    1989-05-01

    It was previously observed that increased dosages of the ADR1 gene, which encodes a yeast transcriptional activator required for alcohol dehydrogenase II (ADH II) expression, cause a decreased rate of growth in medium containing ethanol as the carbon source. Here we show that observed reduction in growth rate is mediated by the ADR1 protein which, when overexpressed, increases the frequency of cytoplasmic petites. Unlike previously characterized mutations known to potentiate petite formation, the ADR1 effect is dominant, with the petite frequency rising concomitantly with increasing ADR1 dosage. The ability of ADR1 to increase the frequency of mitochondrial mutation is correlated with its ability to activate ADH II transcription but is independent of the level of ADH II being expressed. Based on restoration tests using characterized mit- strains, ADR1 appears to cause non-specific deletions within the mitochondrial genome to produce rho- petites. Pedigree analysis of ADR1-overproducing strains indicates that only daughter cells become petite. This pattern is analogous to that observed for petite induction by growth at elevated temperature and by treatment with the acridine dye euflavine. One strain resistant to ADR1-induced petite formation displayed cross-resistance to petite mutation by growth at elevated temperature and euflavine treatment, yet was susceptible to petite induction by ethidium bromide. These results suggest that ADR1 overexpression disrupts the fidelity of mitochondrial DNA replication or repair.

  10. [Turbidostat culture of yeast during transition from a resting state to active growth].

    PubMed

    Kaliuzhin, V A

    1991-01-01

    The age components of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14 culture and the kinetics of its growth were studied afer the quiescent state at the onset active growth. The following factors induced the quiescent state: the cessation of a chemostat flow for 24 h, growth inhibition with 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) for 24 h, the storage of a culture growing on agar in a refrigerator during 24 h. The process of transition from the point of growth activation to the maximum rate of growth was then studied in turbidostat. This process took the shortest time in a refrigerated culture as well as in a culture that had been limited with a phosphorus source and in a culture limited with a nitrogen source and grown in chemostat at D = 0.26 h-1. The process was longer in cultures that had been either limited with glucose or inhibited with DNP and longest in a chemostat culture limited with a nitrogen source at D = 0.15 and 0.05 h-1. The rate of initial mitosis phases in the yeast is presumed to exert the greatest effect on the duration of this transition process.

  11. Evidence for Multiple Mediator Complexes in Yeast Independently Recruited by Activated Heat Shock Factor

    PubMed Central

    Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Moustafa, Yara W.; Chowdhary, Surabhi; Kainth, Amoldeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is an evolutionarily conserved coactivator complex essential for RNA polymerase II transcription. Although it has been generally assumed that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator is a stable trimodular complex, its structural state in vivo remains unclear. Using the “anchor away” (AA) technique to conditionally deplete select subunits within Mediator and its reversibly associated Cdk8 kinase module (CKM), we provide evidence that Mediator's tail module is highly dynamic and that a subcomplex consisting of Med2, Med3, and Med15 can be independently recruited to the regulatory regions of heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1)-activated genes. Fluorescence microscopy of a scaffold subunit (Med14)-anchored strain confirmed parallel cytoplasmic sequestration of core subunits located outside the tail triad. In addition, and contrary to current models, we provide evidence that Hsf1 can recruit the CKM independently of core Mediator and that core Mediator has a role in regulating postinitiation events. Collectively, our results suggest that yeast Mediator is not monolithic but potentially has a dynamic complexity heretofore unappreciated. Multiple species, including CKM-Mediator, the 21-subunit core complex, the Med2-Med3-Med15 tail triad, and the four-subunit CKM, can be independently recruited by activated Hsf1 to its target genes in AA strains. PMID:27185874

  12. The Ydj1 molecular chaperone facilitates formation of active p60v-src in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Dey, B; Caplan, A J; Boschelli, F

    1996-01-01

    Molecular chaperones have been implicated in the formation of active p60v-src tyrosine kinase. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of p60v-src causes cell death, a phenomenon that requires functional Hsp90. We show here that mutations in a member of a second class of chaperones, the yeast dnaJ homologue YDJ1, suppress the lethality caused by p60v-src. One p60v-src-resistant ydj1 mutant, ydj1-39, which has two point mutations in the highly conserved "J" domain, has reduced levels of v-src mRNA and protein. However, a ydj1 null mutant produces normal quantities of active p60v-src, indicating that Ydj1p facilitates, but is not essential for, the formation of active p60v-src. We also report p60v-src-resistance in a previously identified temperature-sensitive ydj1 mutant, ydj1-151. In this mutant, the level of p60v-src remains unaltered, but the protein is much less active in vivo. In addition, p60v-src immunoprecipitates from the ydj1-151 strain contained Hsp90 and Hsp70 in greater amounts than in wild-type strains. Ydj1 protein was also detected in p60v-src immunoprecipitates from both wild-type and ydj1-151 strains. These results indicate that Ydj1p participates in the formation of active p60v-src via molecular chaperone complexes. Images PMID:8741842

  13. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  14. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  15. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  16. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  17. Activation of the unfolded protein response pathway causes ceramide accumulation in yeast and INS-1E insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Sharon; Kirkpatrick, Clare L; Castillon, Guillaume A; Muñiz, Manuel; Riezman, Isabelle; David, Fabrice P A; Wollheim, Claes B; Riezman, Howard

    2012-03-01

    Sphingolipids are not only important components of membranes but also have functions in protein trafficking and intracellular signaling. The LCB1 gene encodes a subunit of the serine palmitoyltransferase, which is responsible for the first step of sphingolipid synthesis. Here, we show that activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) can restore normal ceramide levels and viability in yeast cells with a conditional defect in LCB1. Dependence on UPR was demonstrated by showing the HAC1-dependence of the suppression. A similar induction of ceramides by UPR seems to take place in mammalian cells. In rat pancreatic INS-1E cells, UPR activation induces the transcription of the CerS6 gene, which encodes a ceramide synthase. This correlates with the specific accumulation of ceramide with a C16 fatty acyl chain upon UPR activation. Therefore, our study reveals a novel connection between UPR induction and ceramide synthesis that seems to be conserved between yeast and mammalian cells.

  18. TORC1 activity is partially reduced under nitrogen starvation conditions in sake yeast Kyokai no. 7, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Nobushige; Sato, Aya; Hosaka, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Industrial yeasts are generally unable to sporulate but treatment with the immunosuppressive drug rapamycin restores this ability in a sake yeast strain Kyokai no. 7 (K7), Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This finding suggests that TORC1 is active under sporulation conditions. Here, using a reporter gene assay, Northern and Western blots, we tried to gain insight into how TORC1 function under nitrogen starvation conditions in K7 cells. Similarly to a laboratory strain, RPS26A transcription was repressed and Npr1 was dephosphorylated in K7 cells, indicative of the expected loss of TORC1 function under nitrogen starvation. The expression of nitrogen catabolite repression-sensitive genes, however, was not induced, the level of Cln3 remained constant, and autophagy was more slowly induced than in a laboratory strain, all suggestive of active TORC1. We conclude that TORC1 activity is partially reduced under nitrogen starvation conditions in K7 cells.

  19. Modeling of moisture diffusivity, activation energy and energy consumption in fluidized bed drying of rough rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanali, Majid; Banisharif, Alireza; Rafiee, Shahin

    2016-11-01

    The present work was an attempt to assess the effective moisture diffusivity, activation energy, and energy consumption of rough rice in a batch fluidized bed dryer. Drying experiments were conducted at drying air temperatures of 50, 60, and 70 °C, superficial fluidization velocities of 2.3, 2.5, and 2.8 m/s, and solids holdup of 1.32 kg. Drying kinetics showed that the whole fluidized bed drying of rough rice occurred in the falling rate period. The effective moisture diffusivity was described by an Arrhenius equation. The evaluated effective moisture diffusivity increased with drying air temperature and superficial fluidization velocity and was found to vary from 4.78 × 10-11 to 1.364 × 10-10 m2/s with R2 higher than 0.9643. The activation energy and the pre-exponential factor of Arrhenius equation were found to be in the range of 36.59-44.31 kJ/mol and 4.71 × 10-5-7.15 × 10-4 m2/s, respectively. Both maximum values of the specific energy consumption of 74.73 MJ/kg and the total energy need of 12.43 MJ were obtained at 60 °C drying air temperature and 2.8 m/s superficial fluidization velocity. Both minimum values of the specific energy consumption of 29.98 MJ/kg and the total energy need of 4.85 MJ were obtained under drying air temperature of 70 °C and superficial fluidization velocity of 2.3 m/s.

  20. Overexpression of the yeast transcription activator Msn2 confers furfural resistance and increases the initial fermentation rate in ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ukibe, Ken; Inai, Tomomi; Ohtsu, Iwao; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a promising source for bioethanol production, because it is abundant worldwide and has few competing uses. However, the treatment of lignocelllulosic biomass with weak acid to release cellulose and hemicellulose generates many kinds of byproducts including furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, which inhibit fermentation by yeast, because they generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. In order to acquire high tolerance to oxidative stress in bioethanol yeast strains, we focused on the transcription activator Msn2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which regulates numerous genes involved in antioxidative stress responses, and constructed bioethanol yeast strains that overexpress Msn2 constitutively. The Msn2-overexpressing bioethanol strains showed tolerance to oxidative stress, probably due to the high-level expression of various antioxidant enzyme genes. Unexpectedly, these strains showed ethanol sensitivity compared with the control strain, probably due to imbalance of the expression level between Msn2 and Msn4. In the presence of furfural, the engineered strains exhibited reduced intracellular ROS levels, and showed rapid growth compared with the control strain. The fermentation test in the presence of furfural revealed that the Msn2-overexpressing strains showed improvement of the initial rate of fermentation. Our results indicate that overexpression of the transcription activator Msn2 in bioethanol yeast strains confers furfural tolerance by reducing the intracellular ROS levels and enhances the initial rate of fermentation in the presence of furfural, suggesting that these strains are capable of adapting rapidly to various compounds that inhibit fermentation by inducing ROS accumulation. Our results not only promise to improve bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass, but also provide novel insights for molecular breeding of industrial yeast strains.

  1. Production and characterization of a novel yeast extracellular invertase activity towards improved dibenzothiophene biodesulfurization.

    PubMed

    Arez, Bruno F; Alves, Luís; Paixão, Susana M

    2014-11-01

    The main goal of this work was the production and characterization of a novel invertase activity from Zygosaccharomyces bailii strain Talf1 for further application to biodesulfurization (BDS) in order to expand the exploitable alternative carbon sources to renewable sucrose-rich feedstock. The maximum invertase activity (163 U ml(-1)) was achieved after 7 days of Z. bailii strain Talf1 cultivation at pH 5.5-6.0, 25 °C, and 150 rpm in Yeast Malt Broth with 25 % Jerusalem artichoke pulp as inducer substrate. The optimum pH and temperature for the crude enzyme activity were 5.5 and 50 °C, respectively, and moreover, high stability was observed at 30 °C for pH 5.5-6.5. The application of Talf1 crude invertase extract (1 %) to a BDS process by Gordonia alkanivorans strain 1B at 30 °C and pH 7.5 was carried out through a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) approach in which 10 g l(-1) sucrose and 250 μM dibenzothiophene were used as sole carbon and sulfur sources, respectively. Growth and desulfurization profiles were evaluated and compared with those of BDS without invertase addition. Despite its lower stability at pH 7.5 (loss of activity within 24 h), Talf1 invertase was able to catalyze the full hydrolysis of 10 g l(-1) sucrose in culture medium into invert sugar, contributing to a faster uptake of the monosaccharides by strain 1B during BDS. In SSF approach, the desulfurizing bacterium increased its μmax from 0.035 to 0.070 h(-1) and attained a 2-hydroxybiphenyl productivity of 5.80 μM/h in about 3 days instead of 7 days, corresponding to an improvement of 2.6-fold in relation to the productivity obtained in BDS process without invertase addition.

  2. High-throughput fluorescence screening assay for the identification and comparison of antimicrobial peptides' activity on various yeast species.

    PubMed

    Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-09-10

    New antifungal compounds that circumvent the resistance of the pathogen by directly damaging yeast cell surface structures are promising agents for the treatment of fungal infections, due to their different mechanism of action from current clinically used antifungal drugs. We present here a rapid and cost-effective fluorescence method suitable for identifying new potent drugs that directly target yeast cell surface structures, causing cell permeabilization and thus bypassing the multidrug resistance mechanisms of pathogens. The fluorescence assay enabled us to detect with high sensitivity damage to the Candida plasma membrane (its hyperpolarization and permeabilization) as a result of short-term exposure to the antifungal compounds. Results can be obtained in 1-2h with minimal effort and consumption of the tested compounds, also 96 samples can be analysed simultaneously. We used this method to study antimicrobial peptides isolated from the venom of bees and their synthetic analogs, compare the potency of the peptides and determine their minimal effective concentrations. The antimicrobial peptides were able to kill yeast cells at low concentrations within a 15-min treatment, the LL-III peptide exhibited a broad spectrum of antifungal activity on various Saccharomyces, pathogenic Candida and osmotolerant yeast species.

  3. Antioxidant Activity and Phenolic Content of Streblus asper Leaves from Various Drying Methods

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nor Mawarti; Mat, Ishak; Lim, Vuanghao; Ahmad, Ruzita

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanol extracts of oven and freeze-dried Streblus asper leaves were investigated using DPPH assay. The presence of phenolic compounds and flavonoids in the extracts, which were detected by Folin and colorimetric assays, respectively, may be responsible for the antioxidant activities of S. asper. The different drying treatments resulted in significant differences (p < 0.05) in the antioxidant properties as well as the phenolic and flavonoid contents of the S. asper extracts. Freeze-dried S. asper leaf extracts exhibited high DPPH radical scavenging activity ranging from 69.48% ± 0.03% to 89.25% ± 0.01% at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1 mg/mL, significantly higher compared with the oven-dried extracts which were in the range of 68.56% ± 0.01% to 86.68% ± 0.01%. Generally, the 70% ethanol extract of the freeze-dried samples exhibited higher phenolic and flavonoid content than the aqueous extract, with values of 302.85 ± 0.03 mg GAE/g and 22.70 ± 0.02 mg QE/g compared with 226.8 ± 0.03 mg GAE/g and 15.38 ± 0.05 mg QE/g, respectively. This study showed that S. asper leaf extracts contain a number of health promoting bioactive compounds, such as phenolic compounds, and are potential sources of natural antioxidants. PMID:26784343

  4. Effect of acoustically assisted treatments on vitamins, antioxidant activity, organic acids and drying kinetics of pineapple.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Óscar; Gomes, Wesley; Rodrigues, Sueli; Fernandes, Fabiano A N

    2017-03-01

    The effects of the application of an acoustically assisted treatment on the vitamins (C, B1, B2, B3, and B5), the antioxidant activity (DPPH, FRAP), the polyphenol and flavonoid contents, the organic acid contents (citric and malic) and drying kinetics of pineapple (Ananas comosus var. Perola) have been studied. Treatments were carried out using two different soaking media: distilled water and pineapple juice at 30°C during 10, 20 and 30min without and with acoustic assistance (23.2W/L). After treatment, samples were dried at 60°C and 0.5m/s during 8h. The quality parameters were determined in untreated, treated, and treated-dried samples. The acoustic assistance promoted an increment of vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B5, total flavonoid and malic acid contents, and a reduction of vitamin C, total polyphenol content, antioxidant activity and citric acid content in treated samples. However, in all treated-dried samples the final content of those quality parameters was higher than the observed in the untreated dried sample.

  5. An in Vivo 13C NMR Analysis of the Anaerobic Yeast Metabolism of 1-13C-Glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Brent J.; Matsche, Zenziwe; Egeland, Ryan D.; Reed, Ryan A.; Morioka, Scott S.; Taber, Richard L.

    1999-11-01

    A biochemistry laboratory experiment that studies the dynamics of the anaerobic yeast metabolism of 1-13C-D-glucose via NMR is described. Fleischmann's Active Dry yeast, under anaerobic conditions, produces primarily 2-13C-ethanol and some 1-13C-glycerol as end products. An experiment is described in which the yeast is subjected to osmotic shock from an increasing sodium chloride concentration. Under these conditions, the yeast increases the ratio of glycerol to ethanol. The experiment can be accomplished in a single laboratory period.

  6. Activity of a C. elegans GATA transcription factor, ELT-1, expressed in yeast.

    PubMed

    Shim, Y H; Bonner, J J; Blumenthal, T

    1995-11-10

    The GATA motif (WGATAR) is found in the promoter regions of numerous Caenorhabditis elegans genes, including two intestine-specific genes, vit-2 and ges-1, in which it has been shown to be required for promoter function. The protein ELT-1, encoded by a single-copy gene homologous to the GATA family of vertebrate transcription factors, is potentially capable of interacting with this element. In order to determine whether ELT-1 is a transcriptional activator that recognizes this sequence, we have expressed it under the control of the GAL1 promoter in yeast. lacZ driven by the CYC1 promoter lacking an upstream activation sequence (UAS) but containing GATA sequences was used as a reporter. beta-Galactosidase was expressed upon induction only when GATA sequences were present, and expression was increased dramatically by additional binding sites. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the C terminus, containing only one of the two zinc fingers, is sufficient for activation. In addition, the DNA-binding domain and two transactivation regions were identified by fusing these isolated domains to previously defined domains of heterologous transcription factors. While most single base alterations in the GATA core sequence eliminated activity, an A to C change in position four, creating a GATC core, was found to increase activity significantly. The deleted ELT-1 protein containing only the C-terminal Zn finger was sufficient for activation in response to GATA, but both fingers were required for activation at GATC. A variety of sites with non-optimal sequences surrounding the GATA core also were found to be excluded better by the protein containing both Zn fingers. Furthermore, a fusion protein containing the entire ELT-1 DNA binding domain fused to the VP16 activation domain was found to have an even greater preference for the GATC core, as well as the optimal flanking bases. We conclude that, although ELT-1 having only its C-terminal finger is capable of activation in response to

  7. Dried Pomegranate Potentiates Anti-Osteoporotic and Anti-Obesity Activities of Red Clover Dry Extracts in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Su Jin; Choi, Beom Rak; Kim, Seung Hee; Yi, Hae Yeon; Park, Hye Rim; Kim, Dong Chul; Choi, Seong Hun; Han, Chang Hyun; Park, Soo Jin; Song, Chang Hyun; Ku, Sae Kwang; Lee, Young Joon

    2015-01-01

    Red clover (RC) shows potential activity against menopausal symptoms and pomegranates have antioxidative and beneficial effects on postmenopausal symptoms; thus, we investigated whether the anti-climacteric activity of RC could be enhanced by the addition of dried pomegranate concentrate powder (PCP) extracts in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Regarding the anti-osteoporotic effects, bone mineral density increased significantly in OVX induced rats treated with 60 and 120 mg/kg of an RC:PCP 2:1 mixture, respectively, compared with OVX control rats. Additionally, femoral, tibia, and L4 bone resorption was decreased in OVX induced control rats treated with the RC:PCP 2:1 mixture (60 and 120 mg/kg), respectively, compared with OVX control rats. Regarding anti-obesity effects, the OVX induced rats treated with 60 and 120 mg/kg of the RC:PCP 2:1 mixture showed a decrease in total fat pad thickness, the mean diameters of adipocytes and the body weights gain compared with OVX induced control rats. The estradiol and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly increased in OVX induced rats treated with the RC:PCP 2:1 mixture (120 mg/kg) compared with OVX induced control rats, also, the uterine atrophy was significantly inhibited in 60 and 120 mg/kg of the RC:PCP 2:1 mixture treatment compared with OVX control rats. In conclusion, our results indicate that PCP enhanced the anti-climacteric effects of RC in OVX rats. The RC:PCP 2:1 mixture used in this study may be a promising new potent and protective agent for relieving climacteric symptoms. PMID:25912038

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Produces a Yeast Substance that Exhibits Estrogenic Activity in Mammalian Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, David; Stathis, Peter A.; Hirst, Margaret A.; Price Stover, E.; Do, Yung S.; Kurz, Walter

    1984-06-01

    Partially purified lipid extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contain a substance that displaces tritiated estradiol from rat uterine cytosol estrogen receptors. The yeast product induces estrogenic bioresponses in mammalian systems as measured by induction of progesterone receptors in cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and by a uterotrophic response and progesterone receptor induction after administration to ovariectomized mice. The findings raise the possibility that bakers' yeast may be a source of environmental estrogens.

  9. Effects of Drying Temperature on Antioxidant Activities of Tomato Powder and Storage Stability of Pork Patties

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of oven-dried tomato powder (OTP) as affected by drying temperature and the effect of OTP on the product quality of pork patties. Three OTP products were obtained by drying of fresh tomato at 60, 80 and 100℃ oven until constant weight was obtained. Total phenolic content of three kinds of OTPs ranged from 1.95 to 5.94 g/100 g. The highest amount of total phenolic compound was observed in OTP dried at 100℃. Antioxidant activity of three kinds of OTPs was measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-radical scavenging activity, iron chelating ability, reducing power and measurement of lipid peroxide in linoleic acid emulsion system. In all parameters, OTP at 100℃ showed the higher antioxidant activity than other temperatures (p<0.05). Based on the model study, the physicochemical properties, and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of pork patties containing 1% OTP were measured. Redness of pork patties were increased with the addition of OTPs (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values of raw pork patties containing OTPs were lower than those of control (CTL) until 7 d of storage, regardless of drying temperatures (p<0.05). Peroxide values of pork patties made with OTP (1%) were lower than those of CTL until the end of storage time (p<0.05). However, no antimicrobial activities were observed among the treatments (p>0.05). Therefore, OTPs could be used as a natural antioxidant in meat products. PMID:27499664

  10. Effect of emulsification and spray-drying microencapsulation on the antilisterial activity of transcinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Nga-Thi-Thanh; Lejmi, Raja; Gharsallaoui, Adem; Dumas, Emilie; Degraeve, Pascal; Thanh, Mai Le; Oulahal, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Spray-dried redispersible transcinnamaldehyde (TC)-in-water emulsions were prepared in order to preserve its antibacterial activity; 5% (w/w) TC emulsions were first obtained with a rotor-stator homogeniser in the presence of either soybean lecithin or sodium caseinate as emulsifiers. These emulsions were mixed with a 30% (w/w) maltodextrin solution before feeding a spray-dryer. The antibacterial activity of TC alone, TC emulsions with and without maltodextrin before and after spray-drying were assayed by monitoring the growth at 30 °C of Listeria innocua in their presence and in their absence (control). Whatever the emulsifier used, antilisterial activity of TC was increased following its emulsification. However, reconstituted spray-dried emulsions stabilised by sodium caseinate had a higher antibacterial activity suggesting that they better resisted to spray-drying. This was consistent with observation that microencapsulation efficiencies were 27.6% and 78.7% for emulsions stabilised by lecithin and sodium caseinate, respectively.

  11. Phenolic acids and antioxidant activity of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) as compared with corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sample sets of ground corn and the corresponding distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) were collected from three commercial plants in Iowa. Phenolic acids were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array and/or mass spectrometry. The antioxidant activity was ...

  12. Cyclin B-cdk activity stimulates meiotic rereplication in budding yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Strich, Randy; Mallory, Michael J; Jarnik, Michal; Cooper, Katrina F

    2004-01-01

    Haploidization of gametes during meiosis requires a single round of premeiotic DNA replication (meiS) followed by two successive nuclear divisions. This study demonstrates that ectopic activation of cyclin B/cyclin-dependent kinase in budding yeast recruits up to 30% of meiotic cells to execute one to three additional rounds of meiS. Rereplication occurs prior to the meiotic nuclear divisions, indicating that this process is different from the postmeiotic mitoses observed in other fungi. The cells with overreplicated DNA produced asci containing up to 20 spores that were viable and haploid and demonstrated Mendelian marker segregation. Genetic tests indicated that these cells executed the meiosis I reductional division and possessed a spindle checkpoint. Finally, interfering with normal synaptonemal complex formation or recombination increased the efficiency of rereplication. These studies indicate that the block to rereplication is very different in meiotic and mitotic cells and suggest a negative role for the recombination machinery in allowing rereplication. Moreover, the production of haploids, regardless of the genome content, suggests that the cell counts replication cycles, not chromosomes, in determining the number of nuclear divisions to execute. PMID:15342503

  13. Ring closure activates yeast γTuRC for species-specific microtubule nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Kollman, Justin M.; Greenberg, Charles H.; Li, Sam; Moritz, Michelle; Zelter, Alex; Fong, Kimberly K.; Fernandez, Jose-Jesus; Sali, Andrej; Kilmartin, John; Davis, Trisha N.; Agard, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC) is the primary microtubule nucleator in cells. γTuRC is assembled from repeating γ-tubulin small complex (γTuSC) subunits and is thought to function as a template by presenting a γ-tubulin ring that mimics microtubule geometry. However, a previous yeast γTuRC structure showed γTuSC in an open conformation that prevents matching to microtubule symmetry. By contrast, we show here that γ-tubulin complexes are in a closed conformation when attached to microtubules. To confirm its functional importance we trapped the closed state and determined its structure, showing that the γ-tubulin ring precisely matches microtubule symmetry and providing detailed insight into γTuRC architecture. Importantly, the closed state is a stronger nucleator, suggesting this conformational switch may allosterically control γTuRC activity. Finally, we demonstrate that γTuRCs have a profound preference for tubulin from the same species. PMID:25599398

  14. Pathway connectivity and signaling coordination in the yeast stress-activated signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Deborah; Ho, Yi-Hsuan; Berry, David B; Nemec, Corey M; MacGilvray, Matthew E; Hose, James; Merrill, Anna E; Lee, M Violet; Will, Jessica L; Coon, Joshua J; Ansari, Aseem Z; Craven, Mark; Gasch, Audrey P

    2014-01-01

    Stressed cells coordinate a multi-faceted response spanning many levels of physiology. Yet knowledge of the complete stress-activated regulatory network as well as design principles for signal integration remains incomplete. We developed an experimental and computational approach to integrate available protein interaction data with gene fitness contributions, mutant transcriptome profiles, and phospho-proteome changes in cells responding to salt stress, to infer the salt-responsive signaling network in yeast. The inferred subnetwork presented many novel predictions by implicating new regulators, uncovering unrecognized crosstalk between known pathways, and pointing to previously unknown ‘hubs’ of signal integration. We exploited these predictions to show that Cdc14 phosphatase is a central hub in the network and that modification of RNA polymerase II coordinates induction of stress-defense genes with reduction of growth-related transcripts. We find that the orthologous human network is enriched for cancer-causing genes, underscoring the importance of the subnetwork's predictions in understanding stress biology. PMID:25411400

  15. A thermostable GH45 endoglucanase from yeast: impact of its atypical multimodularity on activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The gene encoding an atypical multi-modular glycoside hydrolase family 45 endoglucanase bearing five different family 1 carbohydrate binding modules (CBM1), designated PpCel45A, was identified in the Pichia pastoris GS115 genome. Results PpCel45A (full-length open reading frame), and three derived constructs comprising (i) the catalytic module with its proximal CBM1, (ii) the catalytic module only, and (iii) the five CBM1 modules without catalytic module, were successfully expressed to high yields (up to 2 grams per litre of culture) in P. pastoris X33. Although the constructs containing the catalytic module displayed similar activities towards a range of glucans, comparison of their biochemical characteristics revealed striking differences. We observed a high thermostability of PpCel45A (Half life time of 6 h at 80°C), which decreased with the removal of CBMs and glycosylated linkers. However, both binding to crystalline cellulose and hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose and cellohexaose were substantially boosted by the presence of one CBM rather than five. Conclusions The present study has revealed the specific features of the first characterized endo β-1,4 glucanase from yeast, whose thermostability is promising for biotechnological applications related to the saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass such as consolidated bioprocessing. PMID:22145993

  16. Metabolic Engineering of Yeast and Plants for the Production of the Biologically Active Hydroxystilbene, Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Jeandet, Philippe; Delaunois, Bertrand; Aziz, Aziz; Donnez, David; Vasserot, Yann; Cordelier, Sylvain; Courot, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbenic compound deriving from the phenyalanine/polymalonate route, being stilbene synthase the last and key enzyme of this pathway, recently has become the focus of a number of studies in medicine and plant physiology. Increased demand for this molecule for nutraceutical, cosmetic and possibly pharmaceutic uses, makes its production a necessity. In this context, the use of biotechnology through recombinant microorganisms and plants is particularly promising. Interesting results can indeed arise from the potential of genetically modified microorganisms as an alternative mechanism for producing resveratrol. Strategies used to tailoring yeast as they do not possess the genes that encode for the resveratrol pathway, will be described. On the other hand, most interest has centered in recent years, on STS gene transfer experiments from various origins to the genome of numerous plants. This work also presents a comprehensive review on plant molecular engineering with the STS gene, resulting in disease resistance against microorganisms and the enhancement of the antioxidant activities of several fruits in transgenic lines. PMID:22654481

  17. Replacement of wybutine by hydrazines and its effect on the active conformation of yeast tRNAPhe.

    PubMed Central

    Schleich, H G; Wintermeyer, W; Zachau, H G

    1978-01-01

    The highly modified base wybutine (YWye) next to the anticodon of yeast tRNAPhe has been replaced by different hydrazine derivatives. The effect of the replacement on the activity of the tRNA has been studied in the heterologous aminoacylation with synthetase from E. coli and in the poly(U) directed binding to ribosomes from both yeast and E. coli. It was found that starting from tRNA-PheYWye the activity increased with increasing size, aromaticity, and stacking tendency of the substituent replacing YWye. It is concluded that YWye by the size of its aromatic system and by its stacking properties is particularly well suited for stabilizing the native conformation of tRNAPhe. PMID:351568

  18. Crop drying by indirect active hybrid solar - Electrical dryer in the eastern Algerian Septentrional Sahara

    SciTech Connect

    Boughali, S.; Bouchekima, B.; Mennouche, D.; Bouguettaia, H.; Bechki, D.; Benmoussa, H.

    2009-12-15

    In the present work, a new specific prototype of an indirect active hybrid solar-electrical dryer for agricultural products was constructed and investigated at LENREZA Laboratory, University of Ouargla (Algerian Sahara). In the new configuration of air drying passage; the study was done in a somewhat high range of mass flow rate between 0.04 and 0.08 kg/m{sup 2} s a range not properly investigated by most researchers. Experimental tests with and without load were performed in winter season in order to study the thermal behavior of the dryer and the effect of high air masse flow on the collector and system drying efficiency. The fraction of electrical and solar energy contribution versus air mass flow rate was investigated. Slice tomato was studied with different temperatures and velocities of drying air in order to study the influence of these parameters on the removal moisture content from the product and on the kinetics drying and also to determine their suitable values. Many different thin layer mathematical drying models were compared according to their coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) and reduced chi square ({chi}{sup 2}) to estimate experimental drying curves. The Middli model in this condition proved to be the best for predicting drying behavior of tomato slice with (R{sup 2} = 0.9995, {chi}{sup 2} = 0.0001). Finally an economic evaluation was calculated using the criterion of payback period which is found very small 1.27 years compared to the life of the dryer 15 years. (author)

  19. The SNF1 Kinase Ubiquitin-associated Domain Restrains Its Activation, Activity, and the Yeast Life Span.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Rubin; Postnikoff, Spike; Harkness, Troy A; Arnason, Terra G

    2015-06-19

    The enzyme family of heterotrimeric AMP-dependent protein kinases is activated upon low energy states, conferring a switch toward energy-conserving metabolic pathways through immediate kinase actions on enzyme targets and delayed alterations in gene expression through its nuclear relocalization. This family is evolutionarily conserved, including the presence of a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) motif in most catalytic subunits. The potential for the UBA domain to promote protein associations or direct subcellular location, as seen in other UBA-containing proteins, led us to query whether the UBA domain within the yeast AMP-dependent protein kinase ortholog, SNF1 kinase, was important in these aspects of its regulation. Here, we demonstrate that conserved UBA motif mutations significantly alter SNF1 kinase activation and biological activity, including enhanced allosteric subunit associations and increased oxidative stress resistance and life span. Significantly, the enhanced UBA-dependent longevity and oxidative stress response are at least partially dependent on the Fkh1 and Fkh2 stress response transcription factors, which in turn are shown to influence Snf1 gene expression.

  20. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Antioxidative Mechanism in Yeast through the Activation of the Transcription Factor Mac1

    PubMed Central

    Nasuno, Ryo; Aitoku, Miho; Manago, Yuki; Nishimura, Akira; Sasano, Yu; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses various defense mechanisms against environmental stresses that generate reactive oxygen species, leading to growth inhibition or cell death. Our recent study showed a novel antioxidative mechanism mediated by nitric oxide (NO) in yeast cells, but the mechanism underlying the oxidative stress tolerance remained unclear. We report here one of the downstream pathways of NO involved in stress-tolerance mechanism in yeast. Our microarray and real-time quantitative PCR analyses revealed that exogenous NO treatment induced the expression of genes responsible for copper metabolism under the control of the transcription factor Mac1, including the CTR1 gene encoding high-affinity copper transporter. Our ChIP analysis also demonstrated that exogenous NO enhances the binding of Mac1 to the promoter region of target genes. Interestingly, we found that NO produced under high-temperature stress conditions increased the transcription level of the CTR1 gene. Furthermore, NO produced during exposure to high temperature also increased intracellular copper content, the activity of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase Sod1, and cell viability after exposure to high-temperature in a manner dependent on Mac1. NO did not affect the expression of the MAC1 gene, indicating that NO activates Mac1 through its post-translational modification. Based on the results shown here, we propose a novel NO-mediated antioxidative mechanism that Mac1 activated by NO induces the CTR1 gene, leading to an increase in cellular copper level, and then Cu(I) activates Sod1. This is the first report to unveil the mechanism of NO-dependent antioxidative system in yeast. PMID:25423296

  1. The refolding activity of the yeast heat shock proteins Ssa1 and Ssa2 defines their role in protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Ssa1/2p, members of one of the yeast cytosolic hsp70 subfamilies, have been implicated in the translocation of secretory proteins into the lumen of the ER. The involvement of these hsp70s in translocation was tested directly by examining the effect of immunodepleting Ssa1/2p from yeast cytosol and subsequently testing the cytosol for its ability to support co- and post-translational translocation of prepro-alpha- factor. Depletion of Ssa1/2p had no effect on the efficiency of translocation in this in vitro assay. The system was used to examine the effect of the absence of Ssa1/2p on two other putative hsp70 functions: cotranslational folding of nascent luciferase and refolding of denatured luciferase. Depletion of Ssa1/2p had no effect on the ability of the yeast lysate to synthesize enzymatically active luciferase, but had a dramatic effect on the ability of the lysate to refold chemically denatured luciferase. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the refolding activity of Ssa1/2p in the context of the yeast cytosol, and define refolding activity as a chaperone function specific to Ssa1/2p, aprt from other cytosolic hsp70s. They also suggest that Ssa1/2p do not play a significant role in chaperoning the folding of nascent polypeptides. The implications of these findings for Ssa1/2p activity on their proposed role in the process of translocation are discussed. PMID:8947547

  2. Coat formation of surface-active proteins on aqueous surfaces during drying.

    PubMed

    Nijdam, J; Trouillet, V; Kachel, S; Scharfer, P; Schabel, W; Kind, M

    2014-11-01

    Segregation of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lactose in thin aqueous films during drying was investigated by examining the composition of the dried films using inverse micro Raman spectroscopy (IMRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) sputter-depth profiling. The composition was uniform through the thickness of the dried films except within a 10nm region at the exposed surface where BSA had accumulated, most likely due to its surface activity. The thickness of the BSA layer was similar to the diameter of a BSA molecule, which suggests that a single monolayer of BSA adsorbed at the exposed surface. The BSA surface concentration of the dried films was constant over a wide range of BSA bulk concentrations, indicating that the aqueous surface became saturated with BSA during drying. The BSA surface layer of order 10nm was significantly thinner than the film thickness of order 10 μm, which implies that BSA formed a surface coating rather than a shell, and thus lent no structural rigidity to the film.

  3. Yeast 1,3-beta-glucan synthase activity is inhibited by phytosphingosine localized to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Abe, M; Nishida, I; Minemura, M; Qadota, H; Seyama, Y; Watanabe, T; Ohya, Y

    2001-07-20

    1,3-beta-D-Glucan, a major filamentous component of the cell wall in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is synthesized by 1,3-beta-glucan synthase (GS). Although a yeast gene whose product is required for GS activity in vitro, GNS1, was isolated and characterized, its role in GS function has remained unknown. In the current study we show that Deltagns1 cells accumulate a non-competitive and non-proteinous inhibitor(s) in the membrane fraction. Investigations of inhibitory activity on GS revealed that the inhibitor(s) is mainly present in the sphingolipid fraction. It is shown that Deltagns1 cells contain phytosphingosine (PHS), an intermediate in the sphingolipid biosynthesis, 30-fold more than wild-type cells do. The membrane fraction isolated from Deltasur2 cells contains an increased amount of dihydrosphingosine (DHS) and also exhibits reduced GS activity. Among constituents of the sphingolipid fraction, PHS and DHS show striking inhibition in a non-competitive manner. The intracellular level of DHS is much lower than that of PHS in wild-type cells, suggesting that PHS is the primary inhibitor of GS in vivo. The localization of PHS to the endoplasmic reticulum in wild-type cells coincides with that of the inhibitor(s) in Deltagns1 cells. Taken together, our results indicate that PHS is a potent inhibitor of yeast GS in vivo.

  4. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

  5. Molecular cloning of amphioxus uncoupling protein and assessment of its uncoupling activity using a yeast heterologous expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kun; Sun, Guoxun; Lv, Zhiyuan; Wang, Chen; Jiang, Xueyuan; Li, Donghai; Zhang, Chenyu

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Invertebrates, for example amphioxus, do express uncoupling proteins. {yields} Both the sequence and the uncoupling activity of amphioxus UCP resemble UCP2. {yields} UCP1 is the only UCP that can form dimer on yeast mitochondria. -- Abstract: The present study describes the molecular cloning of a novel cDNA fragment from amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) encoding a 343-amino acid protein that is highly homologous to human uncoupling proteins (UCP), this protein is therefore named amphioxus UCP. This amphioxus UCP shares more homology with and is phylogenetically more related to mammalian UCP2 as compared with UCP1. To further assess the functional similarity of amphioxus UCP to mammalian UCP1 and -2, the amphioxus UCP, rat UCP1, and human UCP2 were separately expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the recombinant yeast mitochondria were isolated and assayed for the state 4 respiration rate and proton leak, using pYES2 empty vector as the control. UCP1 increased the state 4 respiration rate by 2.8-fold, and the uncoupling activity was strongly inhibited by GDP, while UCP2 and amphioxus UCP only increased the state 4 respiration rate by 1.5-fold and 1.7-fold in a GDP-insensitive manner, moreover, the proton leak kinetics of amphioxus UCP was very similar to UCP2, but much different from UCP1. In conclusion, the amphioxus UCP has a mild, unregulated uncoupling activity in the yeast system, which resembles mammalian UCP2, but not UCP1.

  6. Fission Yeast Receptor of Activated C Kinase (RACK1) Ortholog Cpc2 Regulates Mitotic Commitment through Wee1 Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Andrés; Franco, Alejandro; Soto, Teresa; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2010-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Wee1-dependent inhibitory phosphorylation of the highly conserved Cdc2/Cdk1 kinase determines the mitotic onset when cells have reached a defined size. The receptor of activated C kinase (RACK1) is a scaffolding protein strongly conserved among eukaryotes which binds to other proteins to regulate multiple processes in mammalian cells, including the modulation of cell cycle progression during G1/S transition. We have recently described that Cpc2, the fission yeast ortholog to RACK1, controls from the ribosome the activation of MAPK cascades and the cellular defense against oxidative stress by positively regulating the translation of specific genes whose products participate in the above processes. Intriguingly, mutants lacking Cpc2 display an increased cell size at division, suggesting the existence of a specific cell cycle defect at the G2/M transition. In this work we show that protein levels of Wee1 mitotic inhibitor are increased in cells devoid of Cpc2, whereas the levels of Cdr2, a Wee1 inhibitor, are down-regulated in the above mutant. On the contrary, the kinetics of G1/S transition was virtually identical both in control and Cpc2-less strains. Thus, our results suggest that in fission yeast Cpc2/RACK1 positively regulates from the ribosome the mitotic onset by modulating both the protein levels and the activity of Wee1. This novel mechanism of translational control of cell cycle progression might be conserved in higher eukaryotes. PMID:20974849

  7. Chemical characterization and antioxidant activities comparison in fresh, dried, stir-frying and carbonized ginger.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuxin; Hong, Yan; Han, Yanquan; Wang, Yongzhong; Xia, Lunzhu

    2016-02-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) is a common dietary adjunct that contributes to the taste and flavor of foods, and is also an important Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Different processing methods can produce different processed gingers with dissimilar chemical constituents and pharmacological activities. In this study, an ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/QTOF-MS) was applied to identify the complicated components from fresh, dried, stir-frying and carbonized ginger extracts. All of the 27 compounds were identified from four kinds of ginger samples (fresh, dried, stir-frying and carbonized ginger). Five main constituents (zingerone, 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 6-shogaol and 10-gingerol) in these four kinds of ginger sample extracts were simultaneously determined by UPLC-PDA. Meanwhile, the antioxidant effect of fresh, dried, stir-frying and carbonized gingers were evaluated by three assays (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazolinesulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)). The results demonstrated that antioxidant activity of dried ginger was the highest, for its phenolic contents are 5.2-, 1.1- and 2.4-fold higher than that of fresh, stir-frying and carbonized ginger, respectively, the antioxidant activities' results indicated a similar tendency with phenolic contents: dried ginger>stir-frying ginger>fresh ginger>carbonized ginger. The processing contributed to the decreased concentration of gingerols and the increased levels of shogaols, which reducing the antioxidant effects in pace with processing. This study elucidated the relationship of the heating process with the constituents and antioxidant activity, and provided a guide for choosing different kinds of ginger samples on clinical application.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  12. Establishment of a transgenic yeast screening system for estrogenicity and identification of the anti-estrogenic activity of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Baowei; Yeung, Eric K C; Chan, Chi Bun; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2008-12-15

    Endocrine disruptors refer to chemical compounds in the environment which interfere with the endocrine systems of organisms. Among them, environmental estrogens pose serious problems to aquatic organisms, in particular fish. It is therefore important and necessary to have a fast and low-cost system to screen the large number of different chemical compounds in the aquatic environment for their potential endocrine disrupting actions. In this study, a screening platform was developed to detect xenoestrogens in the aquatic environment using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and applied for compound screening. The aim was to demonstrate any significant potential differences between the fish screening system and the human screening system. To this end, a yeast expression vector harboring a fish estrogen receptor alpha and a reporter vector containing the estrogen responsive element fused with the Escherichia coli LacZ gene were constructed. After transformation with these two vectors, the transformed yeast clones were confirmed by Western blotting and selected on the basis of the beta-galactosidase activity. In this transgenic yeast system, the natural estrogen (estradiol) and other known xenoestrogens such as diethylstilbestrol, bisphenol A, genistein and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane exhibited dose-dependent activities. Using this system, more than 40 putative endocrine disruptors including phytoestrogens, pesticides, herbicides, industrial dyes and other industrial chemicals were screened. Ten of them were demonstrated to exhibit estrogenic actions. Industrial dyes such as malachite green (MG) that disrupt thyroid hormone synthesis are extensively used and are widely distributed in the aquatic environment. Using this system, MG did not show any estrogenic action, but was demonstrated to exhibit anti-estrogenic activity.

  13. Yeast mitochondria contain ATP-sensitive, reversible actin-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarino, D A; Boldogh, I; Smith, M G; Rosand, J; Pon, L A

    1994-01-01

    Sedimentation assays were used to demonstrate and characterize binding of isolated yeast mitochondria to phalloidin-stabilized yeast F-actin. These actin-mitochondrial interactions are ATP sensitive, saturable, reversible, and do not depend upon mitochondrial membrane potential. Protease digestion of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins or saturation of myosin-binding sites on F-actin with the S1 subfragment of skeletal myosin block binding. These observations indicate that a protein (or proteins) on the mitochondrial surface mediates ATP-sensitive, reversible binding of mitochondria to the lateral surface of microfilaments. Actin copurifies with mitochondria during subcellular fractionation and is released from the organelle upon treatment with ATP. Thus, actin-mitochondrial interactions resembling those observed in vitro may also exist in intact yeast cells. Finally, a yeast mutant bearing a temperature-sensitive mutation in the actin-encoding ACT1 gene (act1-3) displays temperature-dependent defects in transfer of mitochondria from mother cells to newly developed buds during yeast cell mitosis. Images PMID:7812049

  14. The different behaviors of three oxidative mediators in probing the redox activities of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinsheng; Wang, Min; Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Huaisheng; Yang, Zhengyu

    2007-07-30

    The different behaviors of three lipophilic mediators including 2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenedione(menadione), 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) in probing the redox activity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by several comparative factor-influencing experiments. Hydrophilic ferricyanide was employed as an extracellular electron acceptor, and constituted dual mediator system with each of three lipophilic mediators. Limiting-current microelectrode voltammetry was used to measure the quantity of ferrocyanide accumulations, giving a direct measure of the redox activity. It was found that under anaerobic condition, menadione interacts with anaerobic respiration pathway, whereas DCPIP and TMPD interact with fermentation pathway in the yeast. Based on the understanding of the interaction between the yeast and each of three mediators, three mediators were respectively employed in evaluating the toxicity of acetic acid on S. cerevisiae and, the results for the first showed that the mediators are complementary to each other when used as electron carriers in biotoxicity assay.

  15. Investigations on hydrolytic activities from Stachybotrys microspora and their use as an alternative in yeast DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Abdeljalil, Salma; Ben Hmad, Ines; Saibi, Walid; Amouri, Bahia; Maalej, Wiem; Kaaniche, Marwa; Koubaa, Aida; Gargouri, Ali

    2014-02-01

    Stachybotrys microspora is a filamentous fungus characterized by the secretion of multiple hydrolytic activities (cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic enzymes). The production of these biocatalysts was studied under submerged culture using glucose, cellulose, and wheat bran as carbon sources. Endoglucanases, pectinases, xylanases, β-glucanases, chitinases, and proteases were induced on cellulose-based medium and repressed on glucose in both strains with higher amounts produced by the mutant. β-glucosidases were roughly equally produced by both strains under glucose and cellulose conditions. The yield of chitinases, β-glucanases, and proteases produced by Stachybotrys strains was as much higher than the commercialized lysing enzyme called "zymolyase," currently used in yeast DNA extraction. In this context, we showed that S. microspora hydrolases can be successfully applied in the extraction of yeast DNA.

  16. Role of glutamate 64 in the activation of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jifeng; Sklenak, Stepan; Liu, Aizhuo; Felczak, Krzysztof; Wu, Yan; Li, Yue; Yan, Honggao

    2012-01-10

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) catalyzes the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine to uracil as well as the deamination of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. In this study, the role of Glu64 in the activation of the prodrug 5FC was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and computational studies. Steady-state kinetics studies showed that the mutation of Glu64 causes a dramatic decrease in k(cat) and a dramatic increase in K(m), indicating Glu64 is important for both binding and catalysis in the activation of 5FC. (19)F NMR experiments showed that binding of the inhibitor 5-fluoro-1H-pyrimidin-2-one (5FPy) to the wild-type yCD causes an upfield shift, indicating that the bound inhibitor is in the hydrated form, mimicking the transition state or the tetrahedral intermediate in the activation of 5FC. However, binding of 5FPy to the E64A mutant enzyme causes a downfield shift, indicating that the bound 5FPy remains in an unhydrated form in the complex with the mutant enzyme. (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis revealed trans-hydrogen bond D/H isotope effects on the hydrogen of the amide of Glu64, indicating that the carboxylate of Glu64 forms two hydrogen bonds with the hydrated 5FPy. ONIOM calculations showed that the wild-type yCD complex with the hydrated form of the inhibitor 1H-pyrimidin-2-one is more stable than the initial binding complex, and in contrast, with the E64A mutant enzyme, the hydrated inhibitor is no longer favored and the conversion has a higher activation energy, as well. The hydrated inhibitor is stabilized in the wild-type yCD by two hydrogen bonds between it and the carboxylate of Glu64 as revealed by (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis. To explore the functional role of Glu64 in catalysis, we investigated the deamination of cytosine catalyzed by the E64A mutant by ONIOM calculations. The results showed that without the assistance of Glu64, both proton transfers before and

  17. A novel high throughput method based on the DPPH dry reagent array for determination of antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Musa, Khalid Hamid; Abdullah, Aminah; Kuswandi, Bambang; Hidayat, M Amrun

    2013-12-15

    A stable chromogenic radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) is commonly used for the determination of antioxidant activity. In this paper, DPPH was dried into 96 well microplate to produce DPPH dry reagent array plate, based on which the highly sensitive and high throughput determination of antioxidant activities was achieved. The spectrophotometric characterization of the microplate containing dried or fresh DPPH free radicals was reported. The response of the DPPH dry reagent array towards different standard antioxidants was studied. The reaction for DPPH in fresh or dry reagent array with Trolox was reported and compared. The DPPH dry reagent array was used to study the antioxidant activity of banana, green tea, pink guava, and honeydew and the results were compared to the samples reacted with freshly prepared DPPH. The proposed method is comparable to the classical DPPH method, more convenient, simple to operate with minimal solvent required and excellent sensitivity.

  18. Conserved and Diverged Functions of the Calcineurin-Activated Prz1 Transcription Factor in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Vachon, Lianne; Kwon, Eun-Joo Gina; Chua, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Gene regulation in response to intracellular calcium is mediated by the calcineurin-activated transcription factor Prz1 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Genome-wide studies of the Crz1 and CrzA fungal orthologs have uncovered numerous target genes involved in conserved and species-specific cellular processes. In contrast, very few target genes of Prz1 have been published. This article identifies an extensive list of genes using transcriptome and ChIP-chip analyses under inducing conditions of Prz1, including CaCl2 and tunicamycin treatment, as well as a ∆pmr1 genetic background. We identified 165 upregulated putative target genes of Prz1 in which the majority contained a calcium-dependent response element in their promoters, similar to that of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog Crz1 These genes were functionally enriched for Crz1-conserved processes such as cell-wall biosynthesis. Overexpression of prz1(+)increased resistance to the cell-wall degradation enzyme zymolyase, likely from upregulation of theO-mannosyltransferase encoding gene omh1(+) Loss of omh1(+)abrogates this phenotype. We uncovered a novel inhibitory role in flocculation for Prz1. Loss of prz1(+)resulted in constitutive flocculation and upregulation of genes encoding the flocculins Gsf2 and Pfl3, as well as the transcription factor Cbf12. The constitutive flocculation of the ∆prz1 strain was abrogated by the loss of gsf2(+) or cbf12(+) This study reveals that Prz1 functions as a positive and negative transcriptional regulator of genes involved in cell-wall biosynthesis and flocculation, respectively. Moreover, comparison of target genes between Crz1/CrzA and Prz1 indicate some conservation in DNA-binding specificity, but also substantial rewiring of the calcineurin-mediated transcriptional regulatory network.

  19. Conserved and Diverged Functions of the Calcineurin-Activated Prz1 Transcription Factor in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Vachon, Lianne; Kwon, Eun-Joo Gina; Chua, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation in response to intracellular calcium is mediated by the calcineurin-activated transcription factor Prz1 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Genome-wide studies of the Crz1 and CrzA fungal orthologs have uncovered numerous target genes involved in conserved and species-specific cellular processes. In contrast, very few target genes of Prz1 have been published. This article identifies an extensive list of genes using transcriptome and ChIP-chip analyses under inducing conditions of Prz1, including CaCl2 and tunicamycin treatment, as well as a ∆pmr1 genetic background. We identified 165 upregulated putative target genes of Prz1 in which the majority contained a calcium-dependent response element in their promoters, similar to that of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog Crz1. These genes were functionally enriched for Crz1-conserved processes such as cell-wall biosynthesis. Overexpression of prz1+ increased resistance to the cell-wall degradation enzyme zymolyase, likely from upregulation of the O-mannosyltransferase encoding gene omh1+. Loss of omh1+ abrogates this phenotype. We uncovered a novel inhibitory role in flocculation for Prz1. Loss of prz1+ resulted in constitutive flocculation and upregulation of genes encoding the flocculins Gsf2 and Pfl3, as well as the transcription factor Cbf12. The constitutive flocculation of the ∆prz1 strain was abrogated by the loss of gsf2+ or cbf12+. This study reveals that Prz1 functions as a positive and negative transcriptional regulator of genes involved in cell-wall biosynthesis and flocculation, respectively. Moreover, comparison of target genes between Crz1/CrzA and Prz1 indicate some conservation in DNA-binding specificity, but also substantial rewiring of the calcineurin-mediated transcriptional regulatory network. PMID:26896331

  20. Monomeric yeast PCNA mutants are defective in interacting with and stimulating the ATPase activity of RFC.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Costin N; Shea, Kathleen A; Mehra, Rajendra; Prundeanu, Lucia; McAlear, Michael A

    2002-10-29

    Yeast PCNA is a homo-trimeric, ring-shaped DNA polymerase accessory protein that can encircle duplex DNA. The integrity of this multimeric sliding DNA clamp is maintained through the protein-protein interactions at the interfaces of adjacent subunits. To investigate the importance of trimer stability for PCNA function, we introduced single amino acid substitutions at residues (A112T, S135F) that map to opposite ends of the monomeric protein. Recombinant wild-type and mutant PCNAs were purified from E. coli, and they were tested for their properties in vitro. Unlike the stable wild-type PCNA trimers, the mutant PCNA proteins behaved as monomers when diluted to low nanomolar concentrations. In contrast to what has been reported for a monomeric form of the beta clamp in E. coli, the monomeric PCNAs were compromised in their ability to interact with their associated clamp loader, replication factor C (RFC). Similarly, monomeric PCNAs were not effective in stimulating the ATPase activity of RFC. The mutant PCNAs were able to form mixed trimers with wild-type subunits, although these mixed trimers were unstable when loaded onto DNA. They were able to function as weak DNA polymerase delta processivity factors in vitro, and when the monomeric PCNA-41 (A112T, S135F double mutant) allele was introduced as the sole source of PCNA in vivo, the cells were viable and healthy. These pol30-41 mutants were, however, sensitive to UV irradiation and to the DNA damaging agent methylmethane sulfonate, implying that DNA repair pathways have a distinct requirement for stable DNA clamps.

  1. Modulation of Spc1 stress-activated protein kinase activity by methylglyoxal through inhibition of protein phosphatase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Takatsume, Yoshifumi; Izawa, Shingo; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2007-11-30

    Methylglyoxal, a ubiquitous metabolite derived from glycolysis has diverse physiological functions in yeast cells. Previously, we have reported that extracellularly added methylglyoxal activates Spc1, a stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK), in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe [Y. Takatsume, S. Izawa, Y. Inoue, J. Biol. Chem. 281 (2006) 9086-9092]. Phosphorylation of Spc1 by treatment with methylglyoxal in S. pombe cells defective in glyoxalase I, an enzyme crucial for the metabolism of methylglyoxal, continues for a longer period than in wild-type cells. Here we show that methylglyoxal inhibits the activity of the protein phosphatase responsible for the dephosphorylation of Spc1 in vitro. In addition, we found that methylglyoxal inhibits human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) also. We propose a model for the regulation of the activity of the Spc1-SAPK signaling pathway by methylglyoxal in S. pombe.

  2. Production of monodisperse epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) microparticles by spray drying for high antioxidant activity retention.

    PubMed

    Fu, Nan; Zhou, Zihao; Jones, Tyson Byrne; Tan, Timothy T Y; Wu, Winston Duo; Lin, Sean Xuqi; Chen, Xiao Dong; Chan, Peggy P Y

    2011-07-15

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) originated from green tea is well-known for its pharmaceutical potential and antiproliferating effect on carcinoma cells. For drug delivery, EGCG in a micro-/nanoparticle form is desirable for their optimized chemopreventive effect. In this study, first time reports that EGCG microparticles produced by low temperature spray drying can maintain high antioxidant activity. A monodisperse droplet generation system was used to realize the production of EGCG microparticles. EGCG microparticles were obtained with narrow size distribution and diameter of 30.24 ± 1.88 μM and 43.39 ± 0.69 μM for pure EGCG and lactose-added EGCG, respectively. The EC50 value (the amount of EGCG necessary to scavenge 50% of free radical in the medium) of spray dried pure EGCG particles obtained from different temperature is in the range of 3.029-3.075 μM compared to untreated EGCG with EC50 value of 3.028 μM. Varying the drying temperatures from 70°C and 130°C showed little detrimental effect on EGCG antioxidant activity. NMR spectrum demonstrated the EGCG did not undergo chemical structural change after spray drying. The major protective mechanism was considered to be: (1) the use of low temperature and (2) the heat loss from water evaporation that kept the particle temperature at low level. With further drier optimization, this monodisperse spray drying technique can be used as an efficient and economic approach to produce EGCG micro-/nanoparticles.

  3. Activity and Enantioselectivity of the Hydroxynitrile Lyase MeHNL in Dry Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Paravidino, Monica; Sorgedrager, Menno J; Orru, Romano V A; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    Water concentration affects both the enantioselectivity and activity of enzymes in dry organic media. Its influence has been investigated using the hydrocyanation of benzaldehyde catalyzed by hydroxynitrile lyase cross-linked enzyme aggregate (MeHNL-CLEA) as a model reaction. The enzyme displayed higher enantioselectivity at higher water concentration, thus suggesting a positive effect of enzyme flexibility on selectivity. The activity increased on reducing the solvent water content, but drastic dehydration of the enzyme resulted in a reversible loss of activity. PMID:20486110

  4. Alcohol fermentation of starch by a genetic recombinant yeast having glucoamylase activity.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Kobayashi, F; Ohnaga, M; Sawada, T

    1997-01-05

    Alcohol fermentation of starch was investigated using a direct starch fermenting yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae SR93, constructed by integrating a glucoamylase-producing gene (STA1) into the chromosome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae SH1089. The glucoamylase was constitutively produced by the recombinant yeast. The ethanol concentration produced by the recombinant yeast was 14.3 g/L which was about 1.5-fold higher than by the conventional mixed culture using an amylolytic microorganism and a fermenting microorganism. About 60% of the starch was converted into ethanol by the recombinant yeast, and the ethanol yield reached its maximum value of 0.48 at the initial starch concentration of 50 g/L. The fed-batch culture, which maintains the starch concentration in the range of 30 to 50 g/L, was used to produce a large amount of ethanol from starch. The amount of ethanol produced in the fed-batch culture increased about 20% compared to the batch culture. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of type 2 crystalline titanates prepared with supercritical drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adwani, Hamad A. H.

    Supercritically dried silico-alumino-titanate (Si-Al-Ti) mixed oxides (T2CT) were successfully synthesized by a sol-gel method with hydrothermal synthesis temperatures less than 200°C and autogenic pressure. High-surface-area T2CT aerogels with meso- to macroporosity were obtained. All solid products, after calcination at 450°C, are semicrystalline. In addition, successful scale-up of T2CT synthesis in a one-gallon reactor yielding 500 g was achieved. Surface areas, pore volumes, and average pore diameters are greatly influenced by the drying method. Supercritical drying had no effect on the crystalline or molecular structure of the materials. The synthesized materials were characterized by means of nitrogen physisorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analysis, and diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy. The addition of different amounts of phosphorous and antimony affected neither the textural nor the structural aspects of T2CT. However, a decrease in surface area occurred. The catalytic activity of these materials was evaluated after being loaded with nickel and molybdenum by the incipient wetness method. Cyclohexene hydrogenation and thiophene hydrodesulfurization reactions are used in the catalytic activity study. The activities of some of the catalyst prepared in this study are in the same range as the commercial catalyst, Shell 324, but with lower metal loadings than the commercial catalysts. Thus, more efficient use of Mo and Ni was observed.

  6. Anti-yeast activity of mentha oil and vapours through in vitro and in vivo (real fruit juices) assays.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Gottardi, Davide; Malik, Anushree; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta

    2013-04-15

    The anti-yeast activity of mentha oil and vapours was evaluated against 8 food spoiling yeasts through disc diffusion, disc volatilisation and micro broth dilution method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) varied from 0.28 to 2.25 and 1.13 to 4.5 mg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, the anti-yeast efficacy of mentha oil alone and in combination with thermal treatment was evaluated in a real food system i.e. mixed fruit juices. The samples treated with a combination of mentha oil at the MIC, ½ MIC and ¼ MIC levels and thermal treatment enhanced the reduction viability. Chemical characterisation of mentha oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that the dominant compounds were cis-menthone (27.43%), menthol (24.3%), trans-menthone (9.23%), limonene (5.84%), menthofuran (4.44%) and isomenthol (3.21%). Present results established the superior performance of integrated treatment over individual exposure for fruit juice preservation.

  7. Dual control by Cdk1 phosphorylation of the budding yeast APC/C ubiquitin ligase activator Cdh1

    PubMed Central

    Höckner, Sebastian; Neumann-Arnold, Lea; Seufert, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and the ubiquitin ligase APC/C-Cdh1 is central to eukaryotic cell cycle control. APC/C-Cdh1 targets cyclin B and other regulatory proteins for degradation, whereas Cdks disable APC/C-Cdh1 through phosphorylation of the Cdh1 activator protein at multiple sites. Budding yeast Cdh1 carries nine Cdk phosphorylation sites in its N-terminal regulatory domain, most or all of which contribute to inhibition. However, the precise role of individual sites has remained unclear. Here, we report that the Cdk phosphorylation sites of yeast Cdh1 are organized into autonomous subgroups and act through separate mechanisms. Cdk sites 1–3 had no direct effect on the APC/C binding of Cdh1 but inactivated a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and thereby controlled the partitioning of Cdh1 between cytoplasm and nucleus. In contrast, Cdk sites 4–9 did not influence the cell cycle–regulated localization of Cdh1 but prevented its binding to the APC/C. Cdk sites 4–9 reside near two recently identified APC/C interaction motifs in a pattern conserved with the human Cdh1 orthologue. Thus a Cdk-inhibited NLS goes along with Cdk-inhibited APC/C binding sites in yeast Cdh1 to relay the negative control by Cdk1 phosphorylation of the ubiquitin ligase APC/C-Cdh1. PMID:27226481

  8. Dual control by Cdk1 phosphorylation of the budding yeast APC/C ubiquitin ligase activator Cdh1.

    PubMed

    Höckner, Sebastian; Neumann-Arnold, Lea; Seufert, Wolfgang

    2016-07-15

    The antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and the ubiquitin ligase APC/C-Cdh1 is central to eukaryotic cell cycle control. APC/C-Cdh1 targets cyclin B and other regulatory proteins for degradation, whereas Cdks disable APC/C-Cdh1 through phosphorylation of the Cdh1 activator protein at multiple sites. Budding yeast Cdh1 carries nine Cdk phosphorylation sites in its N-terminal regulatory domain, most or all of which contribute to inhibition. However, the precise role of individual sites has remained unclear. Here, we report that the Cdk phosphorylation sites of yeast Cdh1 are organized into autonomous subgroups and act through separate mechanisms. Cdk sites 1-3 had no direct effect on the APC/C binding of Cdh1 but inactivated a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and thereby controlled the partitioning of Cdh1 between cytoplasm and nucleus. In contrast, Cdk sites 4-9 did not influence the cell cycle-regulated localization of Cdh1 but prevented its binding to the APC/C. Cdk sites 4-9 reside near two recently identified APC/C interaction motifs in a pattern conserved with the human Cdh1 orthologue. Thus a Cdk-inhibited NLS goes along with Cdk-inhibited APC/C binding sites in yeast Cdh1 to relay the negative control by Cdk1 phosphorylation of the ubiquitin ligase APC/C-Cdh1.

  9. Overexpression of the active diacylglycerol acyltransferase variant transforms Saccharomyces cerevisiae into an oleaginous yeast.

    PubMed

    Kamisaka, Yasushi; Kimura, Kazuyoshi; Uemura, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Masakazu

    2013-08-01

    Lipid production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae was improved by overexpression of the yeast diacylglycerol acyltransferase Dga1p lacking the N-terminal 29 amino acids (Dga1∆Np), which was previously found to be an active form in the ∆snf2 mutant. Overexpression of Dga1∆Np in the ∆snf2 mutant, however, did not increase lipid content as expected, which prompted us to search for a more suitable strain in which to study the role of Dga1∆Np in lipid accumulation. We found that the overexpression of Dga1∆Np in the ∆dga1 mutant effectively increased the lipid content up to about 45 % in the medium containing 10 % glucose. The high lipid content of the transformant was dependent on glucose concentration, nitrogen limitation, and active leucine biosynthesis. To better understand the effect of dga1 disruption on the ability of Dga1∆Np to stimulate lipid accumulation, the ∆dga1-1 mutant, in which the 3'-terminal 36 bp of the dga1 open reading frame (ORF) remained, and the ∆dga1-2 mutant, in which the 3'-terminal 36 bp were also deleted, were prepared with URA3 disruption cassettes. Surprisingly, the overexpression of Dga1∆Np in the ∆dga1-1 mutant had a lower lipid content than the original ∆dga1 mutant, whereas overexpression in the ∆dga1-2 mutant led to a high lipid content of about 45 %. These results indicated that deletion of the 3' terminal region of the dga1 ORF, rather than abrogation of genomic Dga1p expression, was crucial for the effect of Dga1∆Np on lipid accumulation. To investigate whether dga1 disruption affected gene expression adjacent to DGA1, we found that the overexpression of Esa1p together with Dga1∆Np in the ∆dga1 mutant reverted the lipid content to the level of the wild-type strain overexpressing Dga1∆Np. In addition, RT-qPCR analysis revealed that ESA1 mRNA expression in the ∆dga1 mutant was decreased compared to the wild-type strain at the early stages of culture, suggesting that lowered Esa1p expression is

  10. Engineering of the yeast antioxidant enzyme Mpr1 for enhanced activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Iinoya, Kaoru; Kotani, Tetsuya; Sasano, Yu; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sigma1278b has the MPR1 gene, which confers resistance to the proline analogue azetidine-2-carboxylate (AZC). This gene encodes an N-acetyltransferase Mpr1 that detoxifies AZC, and the homologous genes have been found in many yeasts. Recently, we found that Mpr1 protects yeast cells by reducing the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels under oxidative stresses, such as heat-shock, freezing, or ethanol treatment. Unlike the known antioxidant enzymes, Mpr1 is thought to acetylate toxic metabolite(s) involved in ROS generation via oxidative events. To improve the enzymatic functions of Mpr1, we applied PCR random mutagenesis to MPR1. The mutagenized plasmid library was introduced into the S. cerevisiae S288C strain lacking MPR1, and we successfully isolated two Mpr1 variants with higher AZC resistance (K63R and F65L/L117V). Interestingly, overexpression of the K63R variant was found to increase cell viability or decrease intracellular ROS levels after exposure to H(2)O(2) or ethanol compared with the wild-type Mpr1. In vitro studies with the recombinant enzymes showed that the catalytic efficiency of the K63R variant for AZC and acetyl-CoA was higher than that of the wild-type Mpr1 and that the F65L mutation greatly enhanced the thermal stability. The mutational analysis and molecular modeling suggest that an alpha-helix containing Lys63 and Phe65 has important roles in the function of Mpr1. In addition, the wild-type and K63R variant Mpr1 reduced intracellular ROS levels under ethanol stress conditions on haploid sake yeast cells. These results suggest that engineering Mpr1 might be useful in breeding oxidative stress-tolerant yeast strains.

  11. The radiation resistance and cobalt biosorption activity of yeast strains isolated from the Lanyu low-level radioactive waste repository in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Chin; Chung, Hsiao-Ping; Wen, Hsiao-Wei; Chang, Ching-Tu; Wang, Ya-Ting; Chou, Fong-In

    2015-08-01

    The ubiquitous nature of microbes has made them the pioneers in radionuclides adsorption and transport. In this study, the radiation resistance and nuclide biosorption capacity of microbes isolated from the Lanyu low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) repository in Taiwan was assessed, the evaluation of the possibility of using the isolated strain as biosorbents for (60)Co and Co (II) from contaminated aqueous solution and the potential impact on radionuclides release. The microbial content of solidified waste and broken fragments of containers at the Lanyu LLRW repository reached 10(5) CFU/g. Two yeast strains, Candida guilliermondii (CT1) and Rhodotorula calyptogenae (RT1) were isolated. The radiation dose necessary to reduce the microbial count by one log cycle of CT1 and RT1 was 2.1 and 0.8 kGy, respectively. Both CT1 and RT1 can grow under a radiation field with dose rate of 6.8 Gy/h, about 100 times higher than that on the surface of the LLRW container in Lanyu repository. CT1 and RT1 had the maximum (60)Co biosorption efficiency of 99.7 ± 0.1% and 98.3 ± 0.2%, respectively in (60)Co aqueous solution (700 Bq/mL), and the (60)Co could stably retained for more than 30 days in CT 1. Nearly all of the Co was absorbed and reached equilibrium within 1 h by CT1 and RT1 in the 10 μg/g Co (II) aqueous solution. Biosorption efficiency test showed almost all of the Co (II) was adsorbed by CT1 in 20 μg/g Co (II) aqueous solution, the efficiency of biosorption by RT1 in 10 μg/g of Co (II) was lower. The maximum Co (II) sorption capacity of CT1 and RT1 was 5324.0 ± 349.0 μg/g (dry wt) and 3737.6 ± 86.5 μg/g (dry wt), respectively, in the 20 μg/g Co (II) aqueous solution. Experimental results show that microbial activity was high in the Lanyu LLRW repository in Taiwan. Two isolated yeast strains, CT1 and RT1 have high potential for use as biosorbents for (60)Co and Co (II) from contaminated aqueous solution, on the other hand, but may have the

  12. Comparison of antifungal activities of gentian violet and povidone-iodine against clinical isolates of Candida species and other yeasts: a framework to establish topical disinfectant activities.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Shigemi; Tabe, Yoko; Yamada, Toshihiko; Misawa, Shigeki; Oguri, Toyoko; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Miida, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated antifungal activity as assessed by the contact time in topical use of gentian violet (GV) and povidone-iodine (PI) against Candida strains. A total of 102 yeast isolates were used in this study. A markedly lower minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC)(90) of GV than of PI was detected for all yeast isolates. No remarkable difference in the MICs was observed among the identical strains isolated from different clinical sites for both GV and PI. Although the minimal fungicidal activities (MFCs) of PI were identical for all tested time points, the fungicidal activity of GV decreased during the time course of incubation. These results indicate that, whereas GV is more effective than PI, the topical disinfectant efficacy of GV should be estimated using the MFC(5 min) and not the MIC or the MFC(24 h) for overall prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections and oral infections.

  13. Inorganic nitrogen assimilation in yeasts: alteration in enzyme activities associated with changes in cultural conditions and growth phase.

    PubMed

    Thomulka, K W; Moat, A G

    1972-01-01

    Ammonia assimilation has been investigated in four strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring, at intervals throughout the growth cycle, the activities of several enzymes concerned with inorganic ammonia assimilation. Enzyme activities in extracts of cells were compared after growth in complete and defined media. The effect of shift from growth in a complete to growth in a defined medium (and the reverse) was also determined. The absence of aspartase (EC 4.3.1.1, l-aspartate-ammonia lyase) activity, the low specific activities of alanine dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase [EC 6.3.1.2, l-glutamate-ammonia ligase (ADP)], and the marked increase in activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) [EC 1.4.1.4, l-glutamate:NADP-oxidoreductase (deaminating)] during the early stages of growth support the conclusion that yeasts assimilate ammonia primarily via glutamate. The NADP-GDH showed a rapid increase in activity just before the initiation of exponential growth, reached a maximum at the mid-exponential stage, and then gradually declined in activity in the stationary phase. The NADP-GDH reached a higher level of activity when the yeasts were grown on the defined medium as compared with complete medium. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) [EC 1.4.1.2, l-glutamate:NAD-oxidoreductase (deaminating)] showed only slight increases in activity during the exponential phase of growth. There was an inverse relationship in that the NADP-GDH increased in activity as the NAD-GDH decreased. The NAD-GDH activity was higher after growth on the complete medium. The glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (EC 2.6.1.1. l-aspartate:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase) activity rose and fell in parallel with the NADP-GDH, although its specific activity was somewhat lower. Although other ammonia-assimilatory enzymes were demonstrable, it seems unlikely that their combined activities could account

  14. Oxidative stress activates FUS1 and RLM1 transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in an oxidant-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Staleva, Liliana; Hall, Andrea; Orlow, Seth J

    2004-12-01

    Mating in haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs after activation of the pheromone response pathway. Biochemical components of this pathway are involved in other yeast signal transduction networks. To understand more about the coordination between signaling pathways, we used a "chemical genetic" approach, searching for compounds that would activate the pheromone-responsive gene FUS1 and RLM1, a reporter for the cell integrity pathway. We found that catecholamines (l-3,4-hydroxyphenylalanine [l-dopa], dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline) elevate FUS1 and RLM1 transcription. N-Acetyl-cysteine, a powerful antioxidant in yeast, completely reversed this effect, suggesting that FUS1 and RLM1 activation in response to catecholamines is a result of oxidative stress. The oxidant hydrogen peroxide also was found to activate transcription of an RLM1 reporter. Further genetic analysis combined with immunoblotting revealed that Kss1, one of the mating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Mpk1, an MAPK of the cell integrity pathway, participated in l-dopa-induced stimulation of FUS1 and RLM1 transcription. We also report that Mpk1 and Hog1, the high osmolarity MAPK, were phosphorylated upon induction by hydrogen peroxide. Together, our results demonstrate that cells respond to oxidative stress via different signal transduction machinery dependent upon the nature of the oxidant.

  15. Immobilisation increases yeast cells' resistance to dehydration-rehydration treatment.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Rozenfelde, Linda; Pavlovska, Ilona; Rapoport, Alexander

    2014-08-20

    This study was performed with the goal of revealing if the dehydration procedure used in our new immobilisation method noticeably decreases the viability of yeast cells in immobilised preparations. Various yeasts were used in this research: Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that were rather sensitive to dehydration and had been aerobically grown in an ethanol-containing medium, a recombinant strain of S. cerevisiae grown in aerobic conditions which were completely non-resistant to dehydration and an anaerobically grown bakers' yeast strain S. cerevisiae, as well as a fairly resistant Pichia pastoris strain. Experiments performed showed that immobilisation of all these strains essentially increased their resistance to a dehydration-rehydration treatment. The increase of cells' viability (compared with control cells dehydrated in similar conditions) was from 30 to 60%. It is concluded that a new immobilisation method, which includes a dehydration stage, does not lead to an essential loss of yeast cell viability. Correspondingly, there is no risk of losing the biotechnological activities of immobilised preparations. The possibility of producing dry, active yeast preparations is shown, for those strains that are very sensitive to dehydration and which can be used in biotechnology in an immobilised form. Finally, the immobilisation approach can be used for the development of efficient methods for the storage of recombinant yeast strains.

  16. Association of joint occurrence of warm and dry conditions over Greece with anticyclonic activity during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzaki, Maria; Nastos, Panagiotis; Polychroni, Iliana; Flocas, Helena A.; Kouroutzoglou, John; Dalezios, Nicolas R.

    2016-04-01

    Anticyclones are often associated with extreme phenomena, like prolonged droughts or heatwaves and, thus, they can significantly impact fauna and flora, water resources and public health. In this study, the association of the summer anticyclonic activity with the joint occurrence of extreme warm and dry conditions over Greece is explored. The warm and dry extreme conditions are defined by utilizing the Warm/Dry (WD) index for representative meteorological stations from sub-regions of Greece with different climatic features. The WD index is the number of days over a period (here summer) having at the same time mean air temperature > 75th percentile of daily mean temperature and precipitation < 25th percentile of daily precipitation amounts. The anticyclonic activity is determined by the density of the anticyclonic systems over the greater Mediterranean region, which, during summer, is maximized over the Balkans and the northern African coast. The anticyclonic system density has resulted from the comprehensive climatology of Mediterranean anticyclones that was assembled with the aid of the finding and tracking scheme of the University of Melbourne (MS scheme), using the ERA-Interim mean sea-level pressure fields for 1979-2012. The examination of inter-annual and spatial variations of the WD index in association with shifts of the anticyclonic maxima shows that the different sub-regions of Greece are not affected evenly, stressing the role of the complex topography of the region and the variations in the subtropical jet position.

  17. Yeast: the soul of beer's aroma--a review of flavour-active esters and higher alcohols produced by the brewing yeast.

    PubMed

    Pires, Eduardo J; Teixeira, José A; Brányik, Tomás; Vicente, António A

    2014-03-01

    Among the most important factors influencing beer quality is the presence of well-adjusted amounts of higher alcohols and esters. Thus, a heavy body of literature focuses on these substances and on the parameters influencing their production by the brewing yeast. Additionally, the complex metabolic pathways involved in their synthesis require special attention. More than a century of data, mainly in genetic and proteomic fields, has built up enough information to describe in detail each step in the pathway for the synthesis of higher alcohols and their esters, but there is still place for more. Higher alcohols are formed either by anabolism or catabolism (Ehrlich pathway) of amino acids. Esters are formed by enzymatic condensation of organic acids and alcohols. The current paper reviews the up-to-date knowledge in the pathways involving the synthesis of higher alcohols and esters by brewing yeasts. Fermentation parameters affecting yeast response during biosynthesis of these aromatic substances are also fully reviewed.

  18. Dominant Mutations of Drosophila Map Kinase Kinase and Their Activities in Drosophila and Yeast Map Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Y. M.; Tsuda, L.; Inoue, Y. H.; Irie, K.; Adachi-Yamada, T.; Hata, M.; Nishi, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Nishida, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Eight alleles of Dsor1 encoding a Drosophila homologue of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase were obtained as dominant suppressors of the MAP kinase kinase kinase D-raf. These Dsor1 alleles themselves showed no obvious phenotypic consequences nor any effect on the viability of the flies, although they were highly sensitive to upstream signals and strongly interacted with gain-of-function mutations of upstream factors. They suppressed mutations for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs); torso (tor), sevenless (sev) and to a lesser extent Drosophila EGF receptor (DER). Furthermore, the Dsor1 alleles showed no significant interaction with gain-of-function mutations of DER. The observed difference in activity of the Dsor1 alleles among the RTK pathways suggests Dsor1 is one of the components of the pathway that regulates signal specificity. Expression of Dsor1 in budding yeast demonstrated that Dsor1 can activate yeast MAP kinase homologues if a proper activator of Dsor1 is coexpressed. Nucleotide sequencing of the Dsor1 mutant genes revealed that most of the mutations are associated with amino acid changes at highly conserved residues in the kinase domain. The results suggest that they function as suppressors due to increased reactivity to upstream factors. PMID:9136016

  19. T-screen and yeast assay for the detection of the thyroid-disrupting activities of cadmium, mercury, and zinc.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Liu, Yun; Kong, Dongdong; Ren, Shujuan; Li, Na

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, a two-hybrid yeast bioassay and a T-screen were used to screen for the thyroid receptor (TR)-disrupting activity of select metallic compounds (CdCl2, ZnCl2, HgCl2, CuSO4, MnSO4, and MgSO4). The results reveal that none of the tested metallic compounds showed TR-agonistic activity, whereas ZnCl2, HgCl2, and CdCl2 demonstrated TR antagonism. For the yeast assay, the dose-response relationship of these metallic compounds was established, and the concentrations producing 20 % of the maximum effect of ZnCl2, HgCl2, and CdCl2 were 9.1 × 10(-5), 3.2 × 10(-6), and 1.2 × 10(-6) mol/L, respectively. The T-screen also supported the finding that ZnCl2, HgCl2, and CdCl2 decreased the cell proliferation at concentrations ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-4) mol/L. Furthermore, the thyroid-disrupting activity of metallic compounds in environmental water samples collected from the Guanting Reservoir, Beijing, China was evaluated. Solid-phase extraction was used to separate the organic extracts, and a modified two-hybrid yeast bioassay revealed that the metallic compounds in the water samples could affect thyroid hormone-induced signaling by decreasing the binding of the thyroid hormone. The addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (30 mg/L) could eliminate the effects. Thus, the cause(s) of the thyroid toxicity in the water samples appeared to be partly related to the metallic compounds.

  20. Acceleration of yoghurt fermentation time by yeast extract and partial characterisation of the active components.

    PubMed

    Smith, Esti-Andrine; Myburgh, Jacobus; Osthoff, Gernot; de Wit, Maryna

    2014-11-01

    Water soluble autolysate of yeast, usually utilised for microbial growth support, was used as additive in yoghurt fermentation. The yeast extract (YE) resulted in a decrease of fermentation time by 21% to reach a pH of 4·6. However, the YE resulted in unacceptable flavour and taste. By size exclusion chromatography, a fraction of the YE was obtained that could account for the observed 21% decrease in fermentation time. The fraction contained molecules of low molecular weight, consisting of minerals, free amino acids and peptides. The acceleration of the yoghurt fermentation was ascribed to the short peptides in the fraction. It is proposed that the application of this extract in industrial yoghurt manufacture would result in savings for both the industry and the consumer.

  1. Solution Structures, Dynamics, and Ice Growth Inhibitory Activity of Peptide Fragments Derived from an Antarctic Yeast Protein

    PubMed Central

    Asmawi, Azren A.; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin A.; Murad, Abdul Munir A.; Mahadi, Nor M.; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha A.; Salleh, Abu B.; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Tejo, Bimo A.; Bhunia, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP) have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities. PMID:23209600

  2. Overexpression of multisubunit replication factors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Burgers, P M

    1999-07-01

    Facile genetic and biochemical manipulation coupled with rapid cell growth and low cost of growth media has established the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a versatile workhorse. This article describes the use of yeast expression systems for the overproduction of complex multipolypeptide replication factors. The regulated overexpression of these factors in yeast provides for a readily accessible and inexpensive source of these factors in large quantities. The methodology is illustrated with the five-subunit replication factor C. Whole-cell extracts are prepared by blending yeast cells with glass beads or frozen yeast with dry ice. Procedures are described that maximize the yield of these factors while minimizing proteolytic degradation.

  3. Dry/Wet Cycles Change the Activity and Population Dynamics of Methanotrophs in Rice Field Soil

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Conrad, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    The methanotrophs in rice field soil are crucial in regulating the emission of methane. Drainage substantially reduces methane emission from rice fields. However, it is poorly understood how drainage affects microbial methane oxidation. Therefore, we analyzed the dynamics of methane oxidation rates, composition (using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism [T-RFLP]), and abundance (using quantitative PCR [qPCR]) of methanotroph pmoA genes (encoding a subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase) and their transcripts over the season and in response to alternate dry/wet cycles in planted paddy field microcosms. In situ methane oxidation accounted for less than 15% of total methane production but was enhanced by intermittent drainage. The dry/wet alternations resulted in distinct effects on the methanotrophic communities in different soil compartments (bulk soil, rhizosphere soil, surface soil). The methanotrophic communities of the different soil compartments also showed distinct seasonal dynamics. In bulk soil, potential methanotrophic activity and transcription of pmoA were relatively low but were significantly stimulated by drainage. In contrast, however, in the rhizosphere and surface soils, potential methanotrophic activity and pmoA transcription were relatively high but decreased after drainage events and resumed after reflooding. While type II methanotrophs dominated the communities in the bulk soil and rhizosphere soil compartments (and to a lesser extent also in the surface soil), it was the pmoA of type I methanotrophs that was mainly transcribed under flooded conditions. Drainage affected the composition of the methanotrophic community only minimally but strongly affected metabolically active methanotrophs. Our study revealed dramatic dynamics in the abundance, composition, and activity of the various type I and type II methanotrophs on both a seasonal and a spatial scale and showed strong effects of dry/wet alternation cycles, which enhanced

  4. Dry/Wet cycles change the activity and population dynamics of methanotrophs in rice field soil.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke; Conrad, Ralf; Lu, Yahai

    2013-08-01

    The methanotrophs in rice field soil are crucial in regulating the emission of methane. Drainage substantially reduces methane emission from rice fields. However, it is poorly understood how drainage affects microbial methane oxidation. Therefore, we analyzed the dynamics of methane oxidation rates, composition (using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism [T-RFLP]), and abundance (using quantitative PCR [qPCR]) of methanotroph pmoA genes (encoding a subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase) and their transcripts over the season and in response to alternate dry/wet cycles in planted paddy field microcosms. In situ methane oxidation accounted for less than 15% of total methane production but was enhanced by intermittent drainage. The dry/wet alternations resulted in distinct effects on the methanotrophic communities in different soil compartments (bulk soil, rhizosphere soil, surface soil). The methanotrophic communities of the different soil compartments also showed distinct seasonal dynamics. In bulk soil, potential methanotrophic activity and transcription of pmoA were relatively low but were significantly stimulated by drainage. In contrast, however, in the rhizosphere and surface soils, potential methanotrophic activity and pmoA transcription were relatively high but decreased after drainage events and resumed after reflooding. While type II methanotrophs dominated the communities in the bulk soil and rhizosphere soil compartments (and to a lesser extent also in the surface soil), it was the pmoA of type I methanotrophs that was mainly transcribed under flooded conditions. Drainage affected the composition of the methanotrophic community only minimally but strongly affected metabolically active methanotrophs. Our study revealed dramatic dynamics in the abundance, composition, and activity of the various type I and type II methanotrophs on both a seasonal and a spatial scale and showed strong effects of dry/wet alternation cycles, which enhanced

  5. UCS protein Rng3p is essential for myosin-II motor activity during cytokinesis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; James, Michael L; Pollard, Luther W; Sirotkin, Vladimir; Lord, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    UCS proteins have been proposed to operate as co-chaperones that work with Hsp90 in the de novo folding of myosin motors. The fission yeast UCS protein Rng3p is essential for actomyosin ring assembly and cytokinesis. Here we investigated the role of Rng3p in fission yeast myosin-II (Myo2p) motor activity. Myo2p isolated from an arrested rng3-65 mutant was capable of binding actin, yet lacked stability and activity based on its expression levels and inactivity in ATPase and actin filament gliding assays. Myo2p isolated from a myo2-E1 mutant (a mutant hyper-sensitive to perturbation of Rng3p function) showed similar behavior in the same assays and exhibited an altered motor conformation based on limited proteolysis experiments. We propose that Rng3p is not required for the folding of motors per se, but instead works to ensure the activity of intrinsically unstable myosin-II motors. Rng3p is specific to conventional myosin-II and the actomyosin ring, and is not required for unconventional myosin motor function at other actin structures. However, artificial destabilization of myosin-I motors at endocytic actin patches (using a myo1-E1 mutant) led to recruitment of Rng3p to patches. Thus, while Rng3p is specific to myosin-II, UCS proteins are adaptable and can respond to changes in the stability of other myosin motors.

  6. Characterization and immunological activity of different forms of recombinant secreted Hc of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B products expressed in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Shi, DanYang; Chang, ShaoHong; Gong, Xin; Yu, YunZhou; Sun, ZhiWei; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant Hc proteins of botulinum neurotoxins and tetanus toxin are exclusively produced by intracellular heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris for use in subunit vaccines; the same Hc proteins produced by secreted heterologous expression are hyper-glycosylated and immunologically inert. Here, several different recombinant secreted Hc proteins of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BHc) were expressed in yeast and we characterized and assessed their immunological activity in detail. Recombinant low-glycosylated secreted BHc products (BSK) were also immunologically inert, similar to hyper-glycosylated BHc products (BSG), although deglycosylation restored their immunological activities. Unexpectedly, deglycosylated proBHc contained an unexpected pro-peptide of an α-factor signal and fortuitous N-linked glycosylation sites in the non-cleaved pro-peptide sequences, but not in the BHc sequences. Notably, a non-glycosylated secreted homogeneous BHc isoform (mBHc), which we successfully prepared after deleting the pro-peptide and removing its single potential glycosylation site, was immunologically active and could confer effective protective immunity, similarly to non-glycosylated rBHc. In summary, we conclude that a non-glycosylated secreted BHc isoform can be prepared in yeast by deleting the pro-peptide of the α-factor signal and mutating its single potential glycosylation site. This approach provides a rational and feasible strategy for the secretory expression of botulism or other toxin antigens. PMID:25567004

  7. SNPs altering ammonium transport activity of human Rhesus factors characterized by a yeast-based functional assay.

    PubMed

    Deschuyteneer, Aude; Boeckstaens, Mélanie; De Mees, Christelle; Van Vooren, Pascale; Wintjens, René; Marini, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    Proteins of the conserved Mep-Amt-Rh family, including mammalian Rhesus factors, mediate transmembrane ammonium transport. Ammonium is an important nitrogen source for the biosynthesis of amino acids but is also a metabolic waste product. Its disposal in urine plays a critical role in the regulation of the acid/base homeostasis, especially with an acid diet, a trait of Western countries. Ammonium accumulation above a certain concentration is however pathologic, the cytotoxicity causing fatal cerebral paralysis in acute cases. Alteration in ammonium transport via human Rh proteins could have clinical outcomes. We used a yeast-based expression assay to characterize human Rh variants resulting from non synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) with known or unknown clinical phenotypes and assessed their ammonium transport efficiency, protein level, localization and potential trans-dominant impact. The HsRhAG variants (I61R, F65S) associated to overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (OHSt), a disease affecting erythrocytes, proved affected in intrinsic bidirectional ammonium transport. Moreover, this study reveals that the R202C variant of HsRhCG, the orthologue of mouse MmRhcg required for optimal urinary ammonium excretion and blood pH control, shows an impaired inherent ammonium transport activity. Urinary ammonium excretion was RHcg gene-dose dependent in mouse, highlighting MmRhcg as a limiting factor. HsRhCG(R202C) may confer susceptibility to disorders leading to metabolic acidosis for instance. Finally, the analogous R211C mutation in the yeast ScMep2 homologue also impaired intrinsic activity consistent with a conserved functional role of the preserved arginine residue. The yeast expression assay used here constitutes an inexpensive, fast and easy tool to screen nsSNPs reported by high throughput sequencing or individual cases for functional alterations in Rh factors revealing potential causal variants.

  8. SNPs Altering Ammonium Transport Activity of Human Rhesus Factors Characterized by a Yeast-Based Functional Assay

    PubMed Central

    Deschuyteneer, Aude; Boeckstaens, Mélanie; De Mees, Christelle; Van Vooren, Pascale; Wintjens, René; Marini, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    Proteins of the conserved Mep-Amt-Rh family, including mammalian Rhesus factors, mediate transmembrane ammonium transport. Ammonium is an important nitrogen source for the biosynthesis of amino acids but is also a metabolic waste product. Its disposal in urine plays a critical role in the regulation of the acid/base homeostasis, especially with an acid diet, a trait of Western countries. Ammonium accumulation above a certain concentration is however pathologic, the cytotoxicity causing fatal cerebral paralysis in acute cases. Alteration in ammonium transport via human Rh proteins could have clinical outcomes. We used a yeast-based expression assay to characterize human Rh variants resulting from non synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) with known or unknown clinical phenotypes and assessed their ammonium transport efficiency, protein level, localization and potential trans-dominant impact. The HsRhAG variants (I61R, F65S) associated to overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (OHSt), a disease affecting erythrocytes, proved affected in intrinsic bidirectional ammonium transport. Moreover, this study reveals that the R202C variant of HsRhCG, the orthologue of mouse MmRhcg required for optimal urinary ammonium excretion and blood pH control, shows an impaired inherent ammonium transport activity. Urinary ammonium excretion was RHcg gene-dose dependent in mouse, highlighting MmRhcg as a limiting factor. HsRhCGR202C may confer susceptibility to disorders leading to metabolic acidosis for instance. Finally, the analogous R211C mutation in the yeast ScMep2 homologue also impaired intrinsic activity consistent with a conserved functional role of the preserved arginine residue. The yeast expression assay used here constitutes an inexpensive, fast and easy tool to screen nsSNPs reported by high throughput sequencing or individual cases for functional alterations in Rh factors revealing potential causal variants. PMID:23967154

  9. Expression of Pseudomonas syringae type III effectors in yeast under stress conditions reveals that HopX1 attenuates activation of the high osmolarity glycerol MAP kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Dor; Bosis, Eran; Dar, Daniel; Nachman, Iftach; Sessa, Guido

    2012-11-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) is the causal agent of speck disease in tomato. Pst pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion system that delivers effector proteins into host cells, where they promote disease by manipulating processes to the advantage of the pathogen. Previous studies identified seven Pst effectors that inhibit growth when expressed in yeast under normal growth conditions, suggesting that they interfere with cellular processes conserved in yeast and plants. We hypothesized that effectors also target conserved cellular processes that are required for yeast growth only under stress conditions. We therefore examined phenotypes induced by expression of Pst effectors in yeast grown in the presence of various stressors. Out of 29 effectors tested, five (HopX1, HopG1, HopT1-1, HopH1 and AvrPtoB) displayed growth inhibition phenotypes only in combination with stress conditions. Viability assays revealed that the HopX1 effector caused loss of cell viability under prolonged osmotic stress. Using transcription reporters, we found that HopX1 attenuated the activation of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which is responsible for yeast survival under osmotic stress, while other MAPK pathways were mildly affected by HopX1. Interestingly, HopX1-mediated phenotypes in yeast were dependent on the putative transglutaminase catalytic triad of the effector. This study enlarges the pool of phenotypes available for the functional analysis of Pst type III effectors in yeast, and exemplifies how analysis of phenotypes detected in yeast under stress conditions can lead to the identification of eukaryotic cellular processes affected by bacterial effectors.

  10. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of losartan and its active metabolite on dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Raju, S Satyanarayana; Vali, R Mastan; Sankar, G Girija

    2012-08-01

    A simple and rapid quantitative bioanalytical liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous determination of losartan and its active metabolite, losartan carboxylic acid on rat dried blood spots was developed and validated as per regulatory guidelines. Losartan and its metabolite were extracted from dried blood spots using 50% aqueous methanol and separated on Waters XTerra(®) RP18 (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) column using mobile phase composed of 40% acetonitrile and 60% aqueous ammonium acetate (10mM). The eluents were monitored using ESI tandem mass spectrometric detection with negative polarity in MRM mode using ion transitions m/z 421.2→179.0, m/z 435.3→157.0 and m/z 427.3→193.0 for losartan, losartan carboxylic acid and Irbesartan (internal standard), respectively. The method was validated over the linear range of 1-200 ng/mL and 5-1000 ng/mL with lower limits of quantification of 1.0 ng/mL and 5.0 ng/mL for losartan and losartan carboxylic acid, respectively. Inter and intra-day precision and accuracy (Bias) were below 5.96% and between -2.8 and 1.5%, respectively. The mean recoveries of the analytes from dried blood spots were between 89% and 97%. No significant carry over and matrix effects were observed. The stability of stock solution, whole blood, dried blood spot and processed samples were tested under different conditions and the results were found to be well within the acceptable limits. Additional validation parameters such as influence of hematocrit and spot volume were also evaluated and found to be well within the acceptable limits.

  11. Role of the essential yeast protein PSU1 in p6anscriptional enhancement by the ligand-dependent activation function AF-2 of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudon, C; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) can function as ligandinducible transregulators in both mammalian and yeast cells, indicating that important features of transcriptional control have been conserved throughout evolution. We report here the isolation and characterization of an essential yeast protein of unknown function, PSU1, which exhibits properties expected for a co-activator/mediator of the ligand-dependent activation function AF-2 present in the ligand-binding domain (LBD, region E) of NRs. PSU1 interacts in a ligand-dependent manner with the LBD of several NRs, including retinoic acid (RARalpha), retinoid X (RXRalpha), thyroid hormone (TRalpha), vitamin D3 (VDR) and oestrogen (ERalpha) receptors. Importantly, both in yeast and in vitro, these interactions require the integrity of the AF-2 activating domain. When tethered to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, PSU1 can activate transcription on its own. By using yeast reporter cells that express PSU1 conditionally, we show that PSU1 is required for transactivation by the AF-2 of ERalpha. Taken together these data suggest that in yeast, PSU1 is involved in ligand-dependent transactivation by NRs. Sequence analysis revealed that in addition to a highly conserved motif found in a family of MutT-related proteins, PSU1 contains several alpha-helical leucine-rich motifs sharing the consensus sequence LLxPhiL (x, any amino acid; Phi, hydrophobic amino acid) in regions that elicit either transactivation or NR-binding activity. PMID:10205176

  12. Effects of Different Drying Methods and Storage Time on Free Radical Scavenging Activity and Total Phenolic Content of Cosmos Caudatus.

    PubMed

    Mediani, Ahmed; Abas, Faridah; Tan, Chin Ping; Khatib, Alfi

    2014-05-07

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of air (AD), oven (OD) and freeze drying (FD) on the free radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content (TPC) of Cosmos caudatus and the effect of storage time by the comparison with a fresh sample (FS). Among the three drying methods that were used, AD resulted in the highest free radical scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) (IC50 = 0.0223 mg/mL) and total phenolic content (27.4 g GAE/100 g), whereas OD produced the lowest scavenging activity and TPC value. After three months of storage, the dried samples showed a high and consistent free radical scavenging activity when compared to stored fresh material. The drying methods could preserve the quality of C. caudatus during storage and the stability of its bioactive components can be maintained.

  13. Effects of Different Drying Methods and Storage Time on Free Radical Scavenging Activity and Total Phenolic Content of Cosmos caudatus

    PubMed Central

    Mediani, Ahmed; Abas, Faridah; Tan, Chin Ping; Khatib, Alfi

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of air (AD), oven (OD) and freeze drying (FD) on the free radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content (TPC) of Cosmos caudatus and the effect of storage time by the comparison with a fresh sample (FS). Among the three drying methods that were used, AD resulted in the highest free radical scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) (IC50 = 0.0223 mg/mL) and total phenolic content (27.4 g GAE/100 g), whereas OD produced the lowest scavenging activity and TPC value. After three months of storage, the dried samples showed a high and consistent free radical scavenging activity when compared to stored fresh material. The drying methods could preserve the quality of C. caudatus during storage and the stability of its bioactive components can be maintained. PMID:26784876

  14. In vitro estrogen receptor binding of PCBs: measured activity and detection of hydroxylated metabolites in a recombinant yeast assay.

    PubMed

    Layton, Alice C; Sanseverino, John; Gregory, Betsy W; Easter, James P; Sayler, Gary S; Schultz, T Wayne

    2002-05-01

    The estrogenic activities of 17beta-estradiol, biphenyl, chlorinated biphenyls, and Aroclor mixtures 1221, 1242, and 1248 were measured with a modified recombinant yeast estrogen assay (i.e., a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based lac-Z (beta-galactosidase) reporter assay). Modifications of the assay included the use of glass vials instead of plastic microtiter plates and the addition of the medium and yeast before the test substrate. 14C-labeled compounds were used to follow improvements in the assay procedures. 14C-17beta-estradiol recovery from plastic microtiter plates and glass vials using the standard or the modified procedure was approximately 89%. However, 14C-4-CB (4-chlorobiphenyl) recovery was considerably less, ranging from 3% in plastic microtiter plates using the standard procedure to 26% in vials using the modified procedure. These results suggest that the toxicity of strongly hydrophobic chemicals may be underestimated. Using the modified yeast estrogen assay, full agonist activity was observed for 4-CB, 2,4,6-CB, and 2,5-CB while each of the Aroclor mixtures were only partial agonists. The equivalent EC50 values in ppm were in environmentally relevant concentrations for biphenyl (19 ppm), 4-CB (4.5 ppm), 2,5-CB (21 ppm), 2,4,6-CB (0.8 ppm), Aroclor 1221 (2.9 ppm), Aroclor 1242 (0.65 ppm), and Aroclor 1248 (2.3 ppm). Estrogen receptor binding for the individual PCB congeners was 25- to 650-fold less than the reported estrogen binding for the corresponding hydroxylated PCB metabolite. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis of yeast extracts indicated that S. cerevisiae hydroxylated the individual PCB congeners in the ppb range. With the exception of biphenyl, the concentration of hydroxylated metabolites obtained from incubation of S. cerevisiae with PCB congeners was consistent with the concentration necessary to elicit a positive estrogen receptor-binding response. This work provides evidence that S. cerevisiae are capable of metabolic

  15. The natural yeast extract isolated by ethanol precipitation inhibits melanin synthesis by modulating tyrosinase activity and downregulating melanosome transfer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Jin; Rhee, Do Young; Bang, Seung Hyun; Kim, Su Yeon; Won, Chong Hyun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Chang, Sung Eun

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of EP-2, a natural yeast extract isolated by ethanol precipitation from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, on melanogenesis and to determine its underlying mechanism of action. Our results show that although EP-2 is not a direct tyrosinase inhibitor, when EP-2 was added to the culture media of B16F10 melanoma cells, intracellular tyrosinase activity was decreased. However, EP-2 had no effect on the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor or tyrosinase. EP-2 was found to inhibit melanogenesis and melanosome transfer when it was added to melanocytes and keratinocytes in coculture. In addition, protease-activated receptor 2, a key protein associated with melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes, was downregulated in the presence of EP-2. In conclusion, EP-2 is a potent inhibitor of melanogenesis and its hypomelanogenic effect is related to the inhibition of tyrosinase activity and transfer of melanosomes.

  16. Production and detailed characterization of biologically active olive pollen allergen Ole e 1 secreted by the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Huecas, S; Villalba, M; González, E; Martínez-Ruiz, A; Rodríguez, R

    1999-04-01

    The glycoprotein Ole e 1 is a significant aeroallergen from the olive tree (Olea europaea) pollen, with great clinical relevance in the Mediterranean area. To produce a biologically active form of recombinant Ole e 1, heterologous expression in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris was carried out. A cDNA encoding Ole e 1, fused to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-mating factor prepropeptide using the pPIC9 vector, was inserted into the yeast genome under the control of the AOX1 promoter. After induction with methanol, the protein secreted into the extracellular medium was purified by ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The structure of the isolated recombinant Ole e 1 was determined by chemical and spectroscopic techniques, and its immunological properties analysed by blotting and ELISA inhibition with Ole e 1-specific monoclonal antibodies and IgE from sera of allergic patients. The allergen was produced at a yield of 60 mg per litre of culture as a homogeneous glycosylated protein of around 18.5 kDa. Recombinant Ole e 1 appears to be properly folded, as it displays spectroscopic properties (CD and fluorescence) and immunological reactivities (IgG binding to monoclonal antibodies sensitive to denaturation and IgE from sera of allergic patients) indistinguishable from those of the natural protein. This approach gives high-yield production of homogeneous and biologically active allergen, which should be useful for scientific and clinical purposes.

  17. Leishmania major metacaspase can replace yeast metacaspase in programmed cell death and has arginine-specific cysteine peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    González, Iveth J; Desponds, Chantal; Schaff, Cédric; Mottram, Jeremy C; Fasel, Nicolas

    2007-02-01

    The human protozoan parasite Leishmania major has been shown to exhibit several morphological and biochemical features characteristic of a cell death program when differentiating into infectious stages and under a variety of stress conditions. Although some caspase-like peptidase activity has been reported in dying parasites, no caspase gene is present in the genome. However, a single metacaspase gene is present in L. major whose encoded protein harbors the predicted secondary structure and the catalytic dyad histidine/cysteine described for caspases and other metacaspases identified in plants and yeast. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae metacaspase YCA1 has been implicated in the death of aging cells, cells defective in some biological functions, and cells exposed to different environmental stresses. In this study, we describe the functional heterologous complementation of a S. cerevisiae yca1 null mutant with the L. major metacaspase (LmjMCA) in cell death induced by oxidative stress. We show that LmjMCA is involved in yeast cell death, similar to YCA1, and that this function depends on its catalytic activity. LmjMCA was found to be auto-processed as occurs for caspases, however LmjMCA did not exhibit any activity with caspase substrates. In contrast and similarly to Arabidopsis thaliana metacaspases, LmjMCA was active towards substrates with arginine in the P1 position, with the activity being abolished following H147A and C202A catalytic site mutations. These results suggest that metacaspases are members of a family of peptidases with a role in cell death conserved in evolution notwithstanding possible differences in their catalytic activity.

  18. A plant proton-pumping inorganic pyrophosphatase functionally complements the vacuolar ATPase transport activity and confers bafilomycin resistance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Castiñeira, José R; Hernández, Agustín; Drake, Rocío; Serrano, Aurelio

    2011-07-15

    V-ATPases (vacuolar H+-ATPases) are a specific class of multi-subunit pumps that play an essential role in the generation of proton gradients across eukaryotic endomembranes. Another simpler proton pump that co-localizes with the V-ATPase occurs in plants and many protists: the single-subunit H+-PPase [H+-translocating PPase (inorganic pyrophosphatase)]. Little is known about the relative contribution of these two proteins to the acidification of intracellular compartments. In the present study, we show that the expression of a chimaeric derivative of the Arabidopsis thaliana H+-PPase AVP1, which is preferentially targeted to internal membranes of yeast, alleviates the phenotypes associated with V-ATPase deficiency. Phenotypic complementation was achieved both with a yeast strain with its V-ATPase specifically inhibited by bafilomycin A1 and with a vma1-null mutant lacking a catalytic V-ATPase subunit. Cell staining with vital fluorescent dyes showed that AVP1 recovered vacuole acidification and normalized the endocytic pathway of the vma mutant. Biochemical and immunochemical studies further demonstrated that a significant fraction of heterologous H+-PPase is located at the vacuolar membrane. These results raise the question of the occurrence of distinct proton pumps in certain single-membrane organelles, such as plant vacuoles, by proving yeast V-ATPase activity dispensability and the capability of H+-PPase to generate, by itself, physiologically suitable internal pH gradients. Also, they suggest new ways of engineering macrolide drug tolerance and outline an experimental system for testing alternative roles for fungal and animal V-ATPases, other than the mere acidification of subcellular organelles.

  19. Links between nucleolar activity, rDNA stability, aneuploidy and chronological aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Miedziak, Beata; Kulak, Klaudia; Molon, Mateusz; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-06-01

    The nucleolus is speculated to be a regulator of cellular senescence in numerous biological systems (Guarente, Genes Dev 11(19):2449-2455, 1997; Johnson et al., Curr Opin Cell Biol 10(3):332-338, 1998). In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alterations in nucleolar architecture, the redistribution of nucleolar protein and the accumulation of extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA circles (ERCs) during replicative aging have been reported. However, little is known regarding rDNA stability and changes in nucleolar activity during chronological aging (CA), which is another yeast aging model used. In the present study, the impact of aberrant cell cycle checkpoint control (knock-out of BUB1, BUB2, MAD1 and TEL1 genes in haploid and diploid hemizygous states) on CA-mediated changes in the nucleolus was studied. Nucleolus fragmentation, changes in the nucleolus size and the nucleolus/nucleus ratio, ERC accumulation, expression pattern changes and the relocation of protein involved in transcriptional silencing during CA were revealed. All strains examined were affected by oxidative stress, aneuploidy (numerical rather than structural aberrations) and DNA damage. However, the bub1 cells were the most prone to aneuploidy events, which may contribute to observed decrease in chronological lifespan. We postulate that chronological aging may be affected by redox imbalance-mediated chromosome XII instability leading to both rDNA instability and whole chromosome aneuploidy. CA-mediated nucleolus fragmentation may be a consequence of nucleolus enlargement and/or Nop2p upregulation. Moreover, the rDNA content of chronologically aging cells may be a factor determining the subsequent replicative lifespan. Taken together, we demonstrated that the nucleolus state is also affected during CA in yeast.

  20. Characterization of cationic starch flocculants synthesized by dry process with ball milling activating method.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuting; Du, Hongying; Huo, Yinqiang; Xu, Yongliang; Wang, Jie; Wang, Liying; Zhao, Siming; Xiong, Shanbai

    2016-06-01

    The cationic starch flocculants were synthesized by the reaction of maize starch which was activated by a ball-milling treatment with 2,3-epoxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chlorides (ETMAC) using the dry method. The cationic starches were characterized by several approaches including scanning electron microscope (SEM), degree of substitution (DS), infrared spectrum (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), flocculating activity, electron spin resonance (ESR), and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The effect of mechanical activation on starch etherifying modification was investigated. The mechanical activation cracked starch granules and destructed their crystal structures. This resulted in enhancements to the reaction activity and reaction efficiency, which was approved by ESR and solid state NMR. The starch flocculants, synthesized by the reaction of mechanically activated starches at 90°C for 2.5h with ETMAC at molar ratio of 0.40:1.00, showed good flocculation activity. The substitution degree (0.300) and reaction efficiency (75.06%) of starch flocculants synthesized with mechanically activated starches were significantly greater than those of starch flocculants with native starches (P<0.05).

  1. Inhibition of progesterone receptor activity in recombinant yeast by soot from fossil fuel combustion emissions and air particulate materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Xie, Ping; Kettrup, Antonius; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2005-10-15

    Numerous environmental pollutants have been detected for estrogenic activity by interacting with the estrogen receptor, but little information is available about their interactions with the progesterone receptor. In this study, emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion (FFC) and air particulate material (APM) collected from an urban location near a traffic line in a big city of China were evaluated to interact with the human progesterone receptor (hPR) signaling pathway by examining their ability to interact with the activity of hPR expressed in yeast. The results showed that the soot of a petroleum-fired vehicle possessed the most potent anti-progesteronic activity, that of coal-fired stove and diesel fired agrimotor emissions took the second place, and soot samples of coal-fired heating work and electric power station had lesser progesterone inhibition activity. The anti-progesteronic activity of APM was between that of soot from petroleum-fired vehicle and soot from coal-fired establishments and diesel fired agrimotor. Since there was no other large pollution source near the APM sampling sites, the endocrine disrupters were most likely from vehicle emissions, tire attrition and house heating sources. The correlation analysis showed that a strong relationship existed between estrogenic activity and anti-progesteronic activity in emissions of fossil fuel combustion. The discoveries that some environmental pollutants with estrogenic activity can also inhibit hPR activity indicate that further studies are required to investigate potential mechanisms for the reported estrogenic activities of these pollutants.

  2. A role for calcium in the regulation of neutral trehalase activity in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Alejandro; Soto, Teresa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Paredes, Vanessa; Madrid, Marisa; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2003-01-01

    Neutral trehalases mobilize trehalose accumulated by fungal cells as a protective and storage carbohydrate. A structural feature of these enzymes is the presence of an EF-like motif similar to that shown by many Ca2+-binding proteins. In this study we provide direct evidence for physical binding of Ca2+ to neutral trehalase (Ntp1p) of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and show that aspartic residues at positions 97 and 108 in the conserved putative Ca2+-binding motif of Ntp1p appear to be responsible for this interaction. Mutations in these residues do not interfere with the ability of Ntp1p to associate in vivo with trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, but prevent activation of neutral trehalase triggered by the addition of glucose or by subjecting cells to stressing conditions. Strains expressing Ntp1p variants that are unable to bind Ca2+ partially resemble those devoid of the ntp1+ gene in terms of trehalose hyperaccumulation. Gel filtration of cell extracts from wild-type cells after EDTA treatment or from cells containing Ntp1p with mutations in aspartic acid residues within the Ca2+-binding site revealed that Ntp1p eluted mainly in an inactive conformation instead of the dimeric or trimeric active form of the enzyme. These results suggest that activation of S. pombe Ntp1p under different conditions depends upon Ca2+ binding through the Ca2+-binding motif as a prerequisite for correct enzyme oligomerization to its active form. Given the high degree of conservation of the Ca2+ accommodation site, this might be a general mechanism regulating neutral trehalase activity in other yeasts and filamentous fungi. PMID:12943532

  3. Combinatorial Screening for Transgenic Yeasts with High Cellulase Activities in Combination with a Tunable Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoichiro; Yamanishi, Mamoru; Ikeuchi, Akinori; Imamura, Chie; Matsuyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Combinatorial screening used together with a broad library of gene expression cassettes is expected to produce a powerful tool for the optimization of the simultaneous expression of multiple enzymes. Recently, we proposed a highly tunable protein expression system that utilized multiple genome-integrated target genes to fine-tune enzyme expression in yeast cells. This tunable system included a library of expression cassettes each composed of three gene-expression control elements that in different combinations produced a wide range of protein expression levels. In this study, four gene expression cassettes with graded protein expression levels were applied to the expression of three cellulases: cellobiohydrolase 1, cellobiohydrolase 2, and endoglucanase 2. After combinatorial screening for transgenic yeasts simultaneously secreting these three cellulases, we obtained strains with higher cellulase expressions than a strain harboring three cellulase-expression constructs within one high-performance gene expression cassette. These results show that our method will be of broad use throughout the field of metabolic engineering. PMID:26692026

  4. Development of engineered yeast for biosorption of beer haze-active polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Cejnar, Rudolf; Hložková, Kateřina; Jelínek, Lukáš; Kotrba, Pavel; Dostálek, Pavel

    2017-02-01

    Compared to most other alcoholic beverages, the shelf life of beer is much more limited due to its instability in the bottle. That instability is most likely to appear as turbidity (haze), even sedimentation, during storage. The haze in beer is mostly caused by colloidal particles formed by interactions between proteins and polyphenols within the beer. Therefore, beers are usually stabilized by removing at least one of these components. We developed and constructed a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with a proline-rich QPF peptide attached to the cell wall, using the C-terminal anchoring domain of α-agglutinin. The QPF peptide served to bind polyphenols during fermentation and, thus, to decrease their concentration. Strains displaying QPF were able to bind about twice as much catechin and epicatechin as a control strain displaying only the anchoring domain. All these experiments were done with model solutions. Depending on the concentration of yeast, uptake of polyphenols was 1.7-2.5 times higher. Similarly, the uptake of proanthocyanidins was increased by about 20 %. Since the modification of yeasts with QPF did not affect their fermentation performance under laboratory conditions, the display of QPF appears to be an approach to increase the stability of beer.

  5. Effect of Evolutionary Adaption on Xylosidase Activity in Thermotolerant Yeast Isolates Kluyveromyces marxianus NIRE-K1 and NIRE-K3.

    PubMed

    Behera, Shuvashish; Sharma, Nilesh K; Arora, Richa; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-08-01

    Efficient use of xylose along with glucose is necessary for the economic production of lignocellulosic based biofuels. Xylose transporters play an important role in the microorganisms for efficient utilization of xylose. In the present study, a novel method has been developed for a rapid assay of xylose transport activity in the xylose-utilizing isolates and other known yeasts. An assay was conducted to compare the activity of β-xylosidase using p-nitrophenyl-β-D-xylopyranoside (pNPX) in the intact, intracellular, and extracellular yeasts cells showing xylose transporter. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (MTCC 170) showed no xylosidase activity, while little growth was observed in the xylose-containing medium. Although other yeasts, i.e., Kluyveromyces marxianus NIRE-K1 (MTCC 5933), K. marxianus NIRE-K3 (MTCC 5934), and Candida tropicalis (MTCC 230), showed xylosidase activity in intact, intracellular, and extracellular culture. The xylosidase activity in intact cell was higher than that of extracellular and intracellular activity in all the yeast cells. The enzyme activity was higher in case of K. marxianus NIRE-K1 and K. marxianus NIRE-K3 rather than the C. tropicalis. Further, better xylosidase activity was observed in adapted K. marxianus cells which were 2.79-28.46 % higher than that of native (non-adapted) strains, which indicates the significant improvement in xylose transportation.

  6. Fission yeast APC/C activators Slp1 and Fzr1 sequentially trigger two consecutive nuclear divisions during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Chikashige, Yuji; Yamane, Miho; Okamasa, Kasumi; Osakada, Hiroko; Tsutsumi, Chihiro; Nagahama, Yuki; Fukuta, Noriko; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2017-02-28

    In meiosis, two rounds of nuclear division occur consecutively without DNA replication between the divisions. We isolated a fission yeast mutant in which the nucleus divides only once to generate two spores, as opposed to four, in meiosis. In this mutant, we found that the initiation codon of the slp1(+) gene is converted to ATA, producing a reduced amount of Slp1. As a member of the Fizzy family of APC/C activators, Slp1 is essential for vegetative growth; however, the mutant allele shows a phenotype only in meiosis. Slp1 insufficiency delays degradation of maturation-promoting factor (MPF) at the first meiotic division, and another APC/C activator, Fzr1, which acts late in meiosis, terminates meiosis immediately after the delayed first division to produce two viable spores. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. The antioxidant activities of six (1→3)-β-d-glucan derivatives prepared from yeast cell wall.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qilin; Huang, Gangliang; Zhao, Fengying; Zhou, Lu; Huang, Shiqi; Li, Hui

    2017-02-02

    The alkali-insoluble (1→3)-β-d-glucan (PJ) was extracted from yeast cell wall by acid-base method. The sulfated glucan (S-PJ), carboxymethylated glucan (CM-PJ), phosphorylated glucan (P-PJ), carboxymethylated-phosphorylated glucan (CP-PJ), carboxymethylated-sulfated glucan (CS-PJ), and sulfated-phosphorylated glucan (SP-PJ) were prepared and characterized, respectively. The reduction ability, hydroxyl radical/superoxide anion scavenging activities, and anti-lipid peroxidation effect of above-mentioned derivatives were assayed. It indicated that S-PJ had the significant reduction capacity, P-PJ had the obvious hydroxyl radical/superoxide anion scavenging activities and anti-lipid peroxidation effect.

  8. Dry, portable calorimeter for nondestructive measurement of the activity of nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Norman S.; Lewis, Robert N.; Perry, Ronald B.

    1976-01-01

    The activity of a quantity of heat-producing nuclear fuel is measured rapidly, accurately and nondestructively by a portable dry calorimeter comprising a preheater, an array of temperature-controlled structures comprising a thermally guarded temperature-controlled oven, and a calculation and control unit. The difference between the amounts of electric power required to maintain the oven temperature with and without nuclear fuel in the oven is measured to determine the power produced by radioactive disintegration and hence the activity of the fuel. A portion of the electronic control system is designed to terminate a continuing sequence of measurements when the standard deviation of the variations of the amount of electric power required to maintain oven temperature is within a predetermined value.

  9. Yeasts associated with Manteca.

    PubMed

    Suzzi, Giovanna; Schirone, Maria; Martuscelli, Maria; Gatti, Monica; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Neviani, Erasmo

    2003-04-01

    Manteca is a traditional milk product of southern Italy produced from whey deriving from Caciocavallo Podolico cheese-making. This study was undertaken to obtain more information about the microbiological properties of this product and particularly about the presence, metabolic activities, and technological significance of the different yeast species naturally occurring in Manteca. High numbers of yeasts were counted after 7 days ripening (10(4)-10(5) cfu g(-1)) and then decreased to 10(2) at the end. A total of 179 isolates were identified and studied for their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. The most frequently encountered species were Trichosporon asahii (45), Candida parapsilosis (33), Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (32), Candida inconspicua (29). Some of these yeasts showed lipolytic activity (32 strains) and proteolytic activity (29 strains), NaCl resistance up to 10% and growth up to 45 degrees C (42 strains). Biogenic amines were formed by proteolytic strains, in particular phenylethylamine, putrescine and spermidine. Spermidine was produced by all the yeasts tested in this work, but only Trichosporon produced a great quantity of this compound. Histamine was not detectable. Caseinolytic activity was common to almost all strains, corresponding to the ability to efficiently split off amino-terminal amino acids. The highest and most constant activity expressed by all species was X-prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. The findings suggest that the presence of yeasts may play a significant role in justifying interactions with lactic acid bacteria, and consequently with their metabolic activity in the definition of the peculiar characteristics of Manteca cheese.

  10. Oxygen Consumption by Postfermentation Wine Yeast Lees: Factors Affecting Its Rate and Extent under Oenological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jonas; Schmidt, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Summary Postfermentation wine yeast lees show antioxidant properties based on their ability to consume dissolved oxygen. The oxygen consumption capacity of suspended yeast lees obtained after fermentations with six commercial active dry yeast strains was investigated in model, white and red wines using fluorescence-based oxygen sensors operating in a nondestructive way. In model solution, the oxygen consumption rate of yeast lees was shown to depend on their amount, yeast strain, sulfur dioxide and temperature. It is slightly lower in red than in white wines. It is strongly decreased by current levels of free sulfur dioxide, thus excluding the complementary use of both as antioxidants in wine. However, in 25 randomly sampled white wines produced under commercial conditions, the rate and extent of oxygen consumption during the first six months of postfermentation had no significant correlation with any of these interacting factors, making it difficult to predict the actual antioxidant effect of yeast lees. In these wines, yeast lees consumed 0 to 47% of the dissolved oxygen. Although total oxygen consumption capacity of yeast lees is not a limiting factor under commercial winemaking conditions, their oxygen consumption proceeds at a limited rate that reduces but cannot totally prevent concomitant chemical oxidation of the wine. PMID:28115896

  11. Bacterial Community Composition and Extracellular Enzyme Activity in Temperate Streambed Sediment during Drying and Rewetting

    PubMed Central

    Pohlon, Elisabeth; Ochoa Fandino, Adriana; Marxsen, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Droughts are among the most important disturbance events for stream ecosystems; they not only affect stream hydrology but also the stream biota. Although desiccation of streams is common in Mediterranean regions, phases of dryness in headwaters have been observed more often and for longer periods in extended temperate regions, including Central Europe, reflecting global climate change and enhanced water withdrawal. The effects of desiccation and rewetting on the bacterial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity, a key process in the carbon flow of streams and rivers, were investigated in a typical Central European stream, the Breitenbach (Hesse, Germany). Wet streambed sediment is an important habitat in streams. It was sampled and exposed in the laboratory to different drying scenarios (fast, intermediate, slow) for 13 weeks, followed by rewetting of the sediment from the fast drying scenario via a sediment core perfusion technique for 2 weeks. Bacterial community structure was analyzed using CARD-FISH and TGGE, and extracellular enzyme activity was assessed using fluorogenic model substrates. During desiccation the bacterial community composition shifted toward composition in soil, exhibiting increasing proportions of Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria and decreasing proportions of Bacteroidetes and Betaproteobacteria. Simultaneously the activities of extracellular enzymes decreased, most pronounced with aminopeptidases and less pronounced with enzymes involved in the degradation of polymeric carbohydrates. After rewetting, the general ecosystem functioning, with respect to extracellular enzyme activity, recovered after 10 to 14 days. However, the bacterial community composition had not yet achieved its original composition as in unaffected sediments within this time. Thus, whether the bacterial community eventually recovers completely after these events remains unknown. Perhaps this community undergoes permanent changes, especially after

  12. Phosphatase activity and culture conditions of the yeast Candida mycoderma sp. and analysis of organic phosphorus hydrolysis ability.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mang; Yu, Liufang; Zhang, Liang; Guo, Yuexia; Dai, Kewei; Chen, Yuru

    2014-11-01

    Orthophosphate is an essential but limiting macronutrient for plant growth. About 67% cropland in China lacks sufficient phosphorus, especially that with red soil. Extensive soil phosphorus reserves exist in the form of organic phosphorus, which is unavailable for root uptake unless hydrolyzed by secretory acid phosphatases. Thus, many microorganisms with the ability to produce phosphatase have been exploited. In this work, the activity of an extracellular acid phosphatase and yeast biomass from Candida mycoderma was measured under different culture conditions, such as pH, temperature, and carbon source. A maximal phosphatase activity of 8.47×10(5)±0.11×10(5)U/g was achieved by C. Mycoderma in 36 hr under the optimal conditions. The extracellular acid phosphatase has high activity over a wide pH tolerance range from 2.5 to 5.0 (optimum pH3.5). The effects of different phosphorus compounds on the acid phosphatase production were also studied. The presence of phytin, lecithin or calcium phosphate reduced the phosphatase activity and biomass yield significantly. In addition, the pH of the culture medium was reduced significantly by lecithin. The efficiency of the strain in releasing orthophosphate from organic phosphorus was studied in red soil (used in planting trees) and rice soil (originating as red soil). The available phosphorus content was increased by 230% after inoculating 20 days in rice soil and decreased by 50% after inoculating 10 days in red soil. This work indicates that the yeast strain C. mycoderma has potential application for enhancing phosphorus utilization in plants that grow in rice soil.

  13. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Dry Mouth What Is Dry Mouth? Dry mouth is the feeling that there is ... when a person has dry mouth. How Dry Mouth Feels Dry mouth can be uncomfortable. Some people ...

  14. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  15. Force- and length-dependent catastrophe activities explain interphase microtubule organization in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Foethke, Dietrich; Makushok, Tatyana; Brunner, Damian; Nédélec, François

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is essential for the maintenance of cell morphology in eukaryotes. In fission yeast, for example, polarized growth sites are organized by actin, whereas microtubules (MTs) acting upstream control where growth occurs. Growth is limited to the cell poles when MTs undergo catastrophes there and not elsewhere on the cortex. Here, we report that the modulation of MT dynamics by forces as observed in vitro can quantitatively explain the localization of MT catastrophes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. However, we found that it is necessary to add length-dependent catastrophe rates to make the model fully consistent with other previously measured traits of MTs. We explain the measured statistical distribution of MT-cortex contact times and re-examine the curling behavior of MTs in unbranched straight tea1Delta cells. Importantly, the model demonstrates that MTs together with associated proteins such as depolymerizing kinesins are, in principle, sufficient to mark the cell poles.

  16. The SLT2(MPK1) MAP kinase is activated during periods of polarized cell growth in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Zarzov, P; Mazzoni, C; Mann, C

    1996-01-01

    The SLT2(MPK1) mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pa thway has been implicated in several biological processes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including the regulation of cytoskeletal and cell wall structure, polarized cell growth, and response to nutrient availability, hypo-osmotic shock and heat shock. We examined the conditions under which the SLT2 pathway is activated. We found that the SLT2 kinase is tyrosine phosphorylated and activated during periods in which yeast cells are undergoing polarized cell growth, namely during bud formation of vegetative cell division and during projection formation upon treatment with mating pheromone. BCK1(SLK1), a MEK kinase, is required for SLT2 activation in both of these situations. Upstream of BCK1(SLK1), we found that the STE20 kinase was required for SLT2 activation by mating pheromone, but was unnecessary for its activation during the vegetative cell cycle. Finally, SLT2 activation during vegetative growth was partially dependent on CDC28 in that the stimulation of SLT2 tyrosine phosphorylation was significantly reduced directly after a temperature shift in cdc28 ts mutants. Our data are consistent with a role for SLT2 in promoting polarized cell growth. Images PMID:8598209

  17. Artificial neural network modelling of the antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds of bananas submitted to different drying treatments.

    PubMed

    Guiné, Raquel P F; Barroca, Maria João; Gonçalves, Fernando J; Alves, Mariana; Oliveira, Solange; Mendes, Mateus

    2015-02-01

    Bananas (cv. Musa nana and Musa cavendishii) fresh and dried by hot air at 50 and 70°C and lyophilisation were analysed for phenolic contents and antioxidant activity. All samples were subject to six extractions (three with methanol followed by three with acetone/water solution). The experimental data served to train a neural network adequate to describe the experimental observations for both output variables studied: total phenols and antioxidant activity. The results show that both bananas are similar and air drying decreased total phenols and antioxidant activity for both temperatures, whereas lyophilisation decreased the phenolic content in a lesser extent. Neural network experiments showed that antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds can be predicted accurately from the input variables: banana variety, dryness state and type and order of extract. Drying state and extract order were found to have larger impact in the values of antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds.

  18. Activated drying in hydrophobic nanopores and the line tension of water

    PubMed Central

    Guillemot, Ludivine; Biben, Thierry; Galarneau, Anne; Vigier, Gérard; Charlaix, Élisabeth

    2012-01-01

    We study the slow dynamics of water evaporation out of hydrophobic cavities by using model porous silica materials grafted with octylsilanes. The cylindrical pores are monodisperse, with a radius in the range of 1–2 nm. Liquid water penetrates in the nanopores at high pressure and empties the pores when the pressure is lowered. The drying pressure exhibits a logarithmic growth as a function of the driving rate over more than three decades, showing the thermally activated nucleation of vapor bubbles. We find that the slow dynamics and the critical volume of the vapor nucleus are quantitatively described by the classical theory of capillarity without adjustable parameter. However, classical capillarity utterly overestimates the critical bubble energy. We discuss the possible influence of surface heterogeneities, long-range interactions, and high-curvature effects, and we show that a classical theory can describe vapor nucleation provided that a negative line tension is taken into account. The drying pressure then provides a determination of this line tension with much higher precision than currently available methods. We find consistent values of the order of −30 pN in a variety of hydrophobic materials. PMID:23144219

  19. Spray dried inhalable ciprofloxacin powder with improved aerosolisation and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Osman, Rihab; Kan, Pei Lee; Awad, Gehanne; Mortada, Nahed; El-Shamy, Abd-Elhameed; Alpar, Oya

    2013-06-05

    In this study, the spray drying technique was used to prepare ciprofloxacin microparticles (CFX-MPs) for pulmonary administration. By virtue of its amphoteric properties, CFX was dissolved in either a slightly alkaline or acidic solution depending on the used polymer. Dextran and chitosan were used to prepare the MPs and modify the release characteristics of the drug. Particle surface modification was done with either DPPC or PEG. The effects of the manufacturing and formulation parameters on the drug-polymer interactions were investigated by thermal analysis and infrared spectroscopy. CFX-MPs showed improved aerosolisation properties and the encapsulated drug possessed high antimicrobial activity against two of the common and resistant respiratory pathogens: Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococus aureus. MPs were safe on the lung epithelial cells. Modulation of particle characteristics and drug release was possible by altering not only the polymer but also the type of the acid from which the powders were spray dried. MPs prepared with glutamic and aspartic acids showed better characteristics than those prepared with acetic and hydrochloric acids. Dextran modified particles showed improved aerosolisation properties and safety on lung epithelial cells.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Pac1/LIS1-mediated Dynein Targeting: Implications for Regulation of Dynein Activity in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Markus, Steven M.; Plevock, Karen M.; St. Germain, Bryan J.; Punch, Jesse J.; Meaden, Christopher W.; Lee, Wei-Lih

    2011-01-01

    LIS1 is a critical regulator of dynein function during mitosis and organelle transport. Here, we investigated how Pac1, the budding yeast LIS1 homologue, regulates dynein targeting and activity during nuclear migration. We show that Pac1 and Dyn1 (dynein heavy chain) are dependent upon each other and upon Bik1 (budding yeast CLIP-170 homologue) for plus end localization, whereas Bik1 is independent of either. Dyn1, Pac1 and Bik1 interact in vivo at the plus ends, where an excess amount of Bik1 recruits approximately equal amounts of Pac1 and Dyn1. Overexpression of Pac1 enhanced plus end targeting of Dyn1 and vice versa, while affinity-purification of Dyn1 revealed that it exists in a complex with Pac1 in the absence of Bik1, leading us to conclude that the Pac1-Dyn1 complex preassembles in the cytoplasm prior to loading onto Bik1-decorated plus ends. Strikingly, we found that Pac1-overexpression augments cortical dynein activity through a mechanism distinct from loss of She1, a negative regulator of dynein-dynactin association. While Pac1-overexpression enhances the frequency of cortical targeting for dynein and dynactin, the stoichiometry of these complexes remains relatively unchanged at the plus ends compared to that in wild-type cells (~3 dynein to 1 dynactin). Loss of She1, however, enhances dynein-dynactin association at the plus ends and the cell cortex, resulting in an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry. Our results reveal differential regulation of cortical dynein activity by She1 and Pac1, and provide a potentially new regulatory step in the off-loading model for dynein function. PMID:21294277

  1. Yeast: A Research Organism for Teaching Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manney, Thomas R.; Manney, Monta L.

    1992-01-01

    Explains why laboratory strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are particularly suited for classroom science activities. Describes the sexual life cycle of yeast and the genetic system with visible mutations. Presents an overview of activities that can be done with yeast and gives a source for teachers to obtain more information. (PR)

  2. Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and Yeast-Like Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; de Maeseneire, Sofie L.; Vandamme, Erick J.

    Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans, glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and glucuronoxylomannans. Despite these differences, almost all of the yeast exopolysaccharides display some sort of biological activity. Some of them have already applications in chemistry, pharmacy, cosmetics or as probiotic. Furthermore, some yeast exopolysaccharides, such as pullulan, exhibit specific physico-chemical and rheological properties, making them useful in a wide range of technical applications. A survey is given here of the production, the characteristics and the application potential of currently well studied yeast extracellular polysaccharides.

  3. Superiority of wet-milled over dry-milled superfine powdered activated carbon for adsorptive 2-methylisoborneol removal.

    PubMed

    Pan, Long; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2016-10-01

    Superfine powdered activated carbon (SPAC), which is produced from conventionally sized powdered activated carbon (PAC) by wet milling in a bead mill, has attracted attention for its high adsorptive removal ability in both research and practice. In this study, the performance of dry-milled SPAC was investigated. 2-Methylisoborneol (MIB), an earthy-musty compound commonly targeted by water treatment systems, was used as the target adsorbate. Dry-milled SPAC exhibited lower adsorptive removal of MIB than wet-milled SPAC, even when both SPACs were produced from the same PAC and were composed of particles of the same size. One reason for the lower removal of MIB by the dry-milled SPAC was a higher degree of aggregation in the dry-milled SPAC after production; as a result the apparent particle size of dry-milled SPAC was larger than that of wet-milled SPAC. The dry-milled SPAC was also more negatively charged than the wet-milled SPAC, and, owing to its higher repulsion, it was more amenable to dispersion by ultrasonication. However, even after the dry-milled SPAC was ultrasonicated so that its apparent particle size was similar to or less than that of the wet-milled SPAC, the dry-milled SPAC was still inferior in adsorptive removal to the wet-milled SPAC. Therefore, another reason for the lower adsorptive removal of dry-milled SPAC was its lower equilibrium adsorption capacity due to the oxidation during the milling. The adsorption kinetics by SPACs with different degrees of particle aggregation were successfully simulated by a pore diffusion model and a fractal aggregation model.

  4. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity associated with the yeast viral p91/20S RNA ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuéllar, M P; Esteban, R; Fujimura, T

    1997-01-01

    20S RNA is a noninfectious viral single-stranded RNA found in most laboratory strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. 20S RNA encodes a protein of 91 kDa (p91) that contains the common motifs found among RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from RNA viruses. p91 and 20S RNA are noncovalently associated in vivo, forming a ribonucleoprotein complex. We detected an RNA polymerase activity in p91/20S RNA complexes isolated by high-speed centrifugation. The activity was not inhibited by actinomycin D nor alpha-amanitin. The majority of the in vitro products was 20S RNA and the rest was the complementary strands of 20S RNA. Because the extracts were prepared from cells accumulating 20S RNA over its complementary strands, these in vitro products reflect the corresponding activities in vivo. When the p91/20S RNA complexes were subjected to sucrose gradient centrifugation, the polymerase activity cosedimented with the complexes. Furthermore, an RNA polymerase activity was detected in the complex by an antibody-linked polymerase assay using anti-p91 antiserum, suggesting that p91 is present in the active RNA polymerase machinery. These results together indicate that p91 is the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or a subunit thereof responsible for 20S RNA replication. PMID:8990396

  5. A novel fluorescence-activated cell sorter-based screen for yeast endocytosis mutants identifies a yeast homologue of mammalian eps15

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of endocytosis requires the discovery and characterization of the protein machinery that mediates this aspect of membrane trafficking. A novel genetic screen was used to identify yeast mutants defective in internalization of bulk lipid. The fluorescent lipophilic styryl dye FM4-64 was used in conjunction with FACS to enrich for yeast mutants that exhibit internalization defects. Detailed characterization of two of these mutants, dim1-1 and dim2-1, revealed defects in the endocytic pathway. Like other yeast endocytosis mutants, the temperature-sensitive dim mutant were unable to endocytose FM4-64 or radiolabeled alpha-factor as efficiently as wild-type cells. In addition, double mutants with either dim1-delta or dim2-1 and the endocytosis mutants end4-1 or act1-1 displayed synthetic growth defects, indicating that the DIM gene products function in a common or parallel endocytic pathway. Complementation cloning of the DIM genes revealed identity of DIM1 to SHE4 and DIM2 to PAN1. Pan1p shares homology with the mammalian clathrin adaptor-associated protein, eps15. Both proteins contain multiple EH (eps15 homology) domains, a motif proposed to mediate protein-protein interactions. Phalloidin labeling of filamentous actin revealed profound defects in the actin cytoskeleton in both dim mutants. EM analysis revealed that the dim mutants accumulate vesicles and tubulo-vesicular structures reminiscent of mammalian early endosomes. In addition, the accumulation of novel plasma membrane invaginations where endocytosis is likely to occur were visualized in the mutants by electron microscopy using cationized ferritin as a marker for the endocytic pathway. This new screening strategy demonstrates a role for She4p and Pan1p in endocytosis, and provides a new general method for the identification of additional endocytosis mutants. PMID:8978817

  6. Importance of neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis in relatively dry, low-porosity rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.; Philbin, P.W.; Boynton, G.R.; Wager, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of variations in the neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis, capture gamma-ray measurements were made in relatively dry, low-porosity gabbro of the Duluth Complex. Although sections of over a meter of solid rock were encountered in the borehole, there was significant fracturing with interstitial water leading to a substantial variation of water with depth in the borehole. The linear-correlation coefficients calculated for the peak intensities of several elements compared to the chemical core analyses were generally poor throughout the depth investigated. The data suggest and arguments are given which indicate that the variation of the thermal-to-intermediate-to-fast neutron flux density as a function of borehole depth is a serious source of error and is a major cause of the changes observed in the capture gamma-ray peak intensities. These variations in neutron energy may also cause a shift in the observed capture gamma-ray energy.

  7. A bullet fired in dry water: an investigative activity to learn hydrodynamics concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo Leitão, Ulisses; dos Anjos Pinheiro da Silva, Antonio; Trindade do Nascimento, Natália Cristina; Mara Benedita da Cruz Gervásio, Lilian

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we report an investigative activity on hydrodynamics, in the context of an inquiry-based learning project. The aim is to analyse the experiment of a bullet shot underwater. Using Tracker, a video analysing and modelling software, the displacement of the bullet was measured as function of time, processing a slow motion video from YouTube. It was found that the displacement of the bullet is well described in the first 20 ms by the inviscid flow regime, where the Newtonian drag force overcomes the viscous drag. This behaviour is discussed in the context of what Richard Feynman’s famous Lectures on Physics describes as ‘The Flow of Dry Water’.

  8. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  9. Effects of water activity on the lipid oxidation and antioxidants of dried laver (porphyra) during storage in the dark.

    PubMed

    Choe, Eunok; Oh, Soojung

    2013-08-01

    Lipid oxidation and antioxidant degradation in dried laver (Porphyra) were determined during storage at water activities (Aw ) of 0.11, 0.30, 0.51, 0.75, or 0.89 in the dark at 40 °C for 15 d. Lipid oxidation was evaluated by measuring peroxide value (POV) and conjugated dienoic acid (CDA) contents, and fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography. Contents of polyphenols, tocopherols, and porphyran were determined by spectrophotometry, HPLC, and gravimetry, respectively. The POV and CDA contents of the dried laver lipids increased during storage as Aw increased from 0.11 to 0.30, 0.51, 0.75, and 0.89, whereas the relative content of eicosapentaenoic acid was decreased; however, the contents of polyphenols, α-tocopherol, and porphyran in dried laver showed the reverse phenomena. Lipid oxidation and antioxidant degradation in dried laver sharply increased at an Aw of 0.51. Polyphenols, α-tocopherol, and porphyran contributed to reduction of lipid oxidation in dried laver. The degree of lipid oxidation of dried laver was more dependent on the concentration of α-tocopherol than that of either polyphenols or porphyran during storage in the dark. The results strongly suggest that the quality of dried laver can be improved by preserving tocopherols as much as possible while decreasing A(w) during storage.

  10. Effectiveness of a Sugar-Yeast Monitor and a Chemical Lure for Detecting Bed Bugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narinderpal; Wang, Changlu; Cooper, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Effective bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) monitors have been actively sought in the past few years to help detect bed bugs and measure the effectiveness of treatments. Most of the available active monitors are either expensive or ineffective. We designed a simple and affordable active bed bug monitor that uses sugar-yeast fermentation and an experimental chemical lure to detect bed bugs. The sugar-yeast mixture released carbon dioxide at a similar rate (average 405.1 ml/min) as dry ice (average 397.0 ml/min) during the first 8 h after activation. In naturally infested apartments, the sugar-yeast monitor containing an experimental chemical lure (nonanal, L-lactic acid, 1-octen-3-ol, and spearmint oil) was equally effective as the dry ice monitor containing the same lure in trapping bed bugs. Placing one sugar-yeast monitor per apartment for 1-d was equally effective as 11-d placement of 6-18 Climbup insect interceptors (a commonly used bed bug monitor) under furniture legs for trapping bed bugs. When carbon dioxide was present, pair-wise comparisons showed the experimental lure increased trap catch by 7.2 times. This sugar-yeast monitor with a chemical lure is an affordable and effective tool for monitoring bed bugs. This monitor is especially useful for monitoring bed bugs where a human host is not present.

  11. Novel glutaredoxin activity of the yeast prion protein Ure2 reveals a native-like dimer within fibrils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zai-Rong; Perrett, Sarah

    2009-05-22

    Ure2 is the protein determinant of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae prion [URE3]. Ure2 has structural similarity to glutathione transferases, protects cells against heavy metal and oxidant toxicity in vivo, and shows glutathione-dependent peroxidase activity in vitro. Here we report that Ure2 (which has no cysteine residues) also shows thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity similar to that of glutaredoxin enzymes. This demonstrates that disulfide reductase activity can be independent of the classical glutaredoxin CXXC/CXXS motif or indeed an intrinsic catalytic cysteine residue. The kinetics of the glutaredoxin activity of Ure2 showed positive cooperativity for the substrate glutathione in both the soluble native state and in amyloid-like fibrils, indicating native-like dimeric structure within Ure2 fibrils. Characterization of the glutaredoxin activity of Ure2 sheds light on its ability to protect yeast from heavy metal ion and oxidant toxicity and suggests a role in reversible protein glutathionylation signal transduction. Observation of allosteric enzyme behavior within amyloid-like Ure2 fibrils not only provides insight into the molecular structure of the fibrils but also has implications for the mechanism of [URE3] prion formation.

  12. Regulation of Cdc28 Cyclin-Dependent Protein Kinase Activity during the Cell Cycle of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Michael D.; Hodge, Amy E.

    1998-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK) encoded by CDC28 is the master regulator of cell division in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By mechanisms that, for the most part, remain to be delineated, Cdc28 activity controls the timing of mitotic commitment, bud initiation, DNA replication, spindle formation, and chromosome separation. Environmental stimuli and progress through the cell cycle are monitored through checkpoint mechanisms that influence Cdc28 activity at key cell cycle stages. A vast body of information concerning how Cdc28 activity is timed and coordinated with various mitotic events has accrued. This article reviews that literature. Following an introduction to the properties of CDKs common to many eukaryotic species, the key influences on Cdc28 activity—cyclin-CKI binding and phosphorylation-dephosphorylation events—are examined. The processes controlling the abundance and activity of key Cdc28 regulators, especially transcriptional and proteolytic mechanisms, are then discussed in detail. Finally, the mechanisms by which environmental stimuli influence Cdc28 activity are summarized. PMID:9841670

  13. Application of the yeast-based reporter gene bioassay for the assessment of estrogenic activity in cow's milk from Poland.

    PubMed

    Stypuła-Trębas, Sylwia; Minta, Maria; Radko, Lidia; Żmudzki, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Milk contain compounds acting through the estrogen receptor signaling. The still open question whether such estrogens pose a risk for human health, encouraged us to measure the overall estrogenic activity of cow's milk in the in vitro yeast reporter bioassay. First, we assessed the ability of the bioassay to detect estrogens frequently detected in milk. The relative potencies of 16 compounds descended in the order: 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), 17α-ethinylestradiol, diethylstilbestrol, dienestrol, 17α-E2, estrone, zearalenone, estriol, equol, genistein, 17β-E2 glucuronide, bisphenol A, apigenin, daidzein. Flavone, 4-n-nonylphenol and 4-t-octylphenol shown no activity in the bioassay.The estrogenic activities of milk samples without hydrolysis were below the detection limit, whereas in 50% of the deconjugated samples they varied between 0.29 and 0.49 ng EEQ mL(-1). We also compared the estrogenic activity in raw cow's milk collected from rural and industrial locations in Poland. In our pilot study we did not observe statistically significant difference in estrogenic activities in milk collected from the two locations. We found that the daily intake of estrogens with milk may be higher than estrogen levels in human serum. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the significance of milk and dairy as a source of estrogens for humans.

  14. Screening the foods of an endangered parrot, the kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), for oestrogenic activity using a recombinant yeast bioassay.

    PubMed

    Fidler, A E; Zwart, S; Pharis, R P; Weston, R J; Lawrence, S B; Jansen, P; Elliott, G; Merton, D V

    2000-01-01

    In recent years the possibility of environmental oestrogens affecting the reproduction of vertebrates has become an issue of both public and scientific interest. Although the significance of such chemicals remains controversial there is clear evidence that, in some contexts, environmental oestrogens can influence the fertility of vertebrates. Highly endangered species represent a situation in which even modest reductions in the fertility of key individuals may have implications for the survival of the entire species. This paper reports the screening of both natural and supplementary foods of the kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), a critically endangered New Zealand nocturnal parrot, for oestrogenic activity using a recombinant yeast based bioassay. Low levels of oestrogenic activity were detected in one of the 'chick-raising' foods, but no oestrogenic activity was detected in the adult supplementary foods. The oestrogenicity of a range of phytochemicals possibly associated with the kakapo natural diet was also examined. Two such phytochemicals, podocarpic acid and its reduced derivative podocarpinol, showed weak oestrogenic activity (approximately 10(-6) and 10(-4) of the activity of 17-beta-oestradiol, respectively).

  15. Active segregation of yeast mitochondria by Myo2 is essential and mediated by Mmr1 and Ypt11.

    PubMed

    Chernyakov, Irina; Santiago-Tirado, Felipe; Bretscher, Anthony

    2013-09-23

    Active segregation of essential organelles is required for successful cell division. The essential budding yeast myosin V Myo2 actively segregates most organelles along polarized actin cables. The mechanism of mitochondrial segregation remains controversial, with movement driven by actin polymerization, movement driven by association with transported cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and direct transport by Myo2 proposed as models. Two nonessential proteins, Mmr1 and the Rab GTPase Ypt11, bind Myo2 and have been implicated in mitochondrial inheritance, although their specific roles are also contended. We generated myo2(sens) mutations that exhibit no overt phenotype but render MMR1 essential and have compromised Ypt11 binding. We then isolated myo2(sens)mmr1(ts) conditional mutants and determined that they have a specific and severe defect in active mitochondrial inheritance, revealing mitochondrial transport by Myo2 as an essential function. ypt11Δ mmr1(ts) cells also have conditional defects in growth and active transport of mitochondria into the bud, both of which are suppressed by artificially forcing mitochondrial inheritance. At the restrictive temperature, cells defective in mitochondrial inheritance give rise to dead buds that go through cytokinesis normally, showing no evidence of a proposed cell-cycle mitochondrial inheritance checkpoint. Thus, active mitochondrial inheritance is an essential process and a function of Myo2 that requires either Mmr1 or Ypt11.

  16. Maximal stimulation of meiotic recombination by a yeast transcription factor requires the transcription activation domain and a DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, D T; Fan, Q; Petes, T D

    1999-01-01

    The DNA sequences located upstream of the yeast HIS4 represent a very strong meiotic recombination hotspot. Although the activity of this hotspot requires the transcription activator Rap1p, the level of HIS4 transcription is not directly related to the level of recombination. We find that the recombination-stimulating activity of Rap1p requires the transcription activation domain of the protein. We show that a hybrid protein with the Gal4p DNA-binding domain and the Rap1p activation domain can stimulate recombination in a strain in which Gal4p-binding sites are inserted upstream of HIS4. In addition, we find recombination hotspot activity associated with the Gal4p DNA-binding sites that is independent of known transcription factors. We suggest that yeast cells have two types of recombination hotspots, alpha (transcription factor dependent) and beta (transcription factor independent). PMID:10224246

  17. Dried extracts of Encholirium spectabile (Bromeliaceae) present antioxidant and photoprotective activities in vitro

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Raimundo Gonçalves; Souza, Grasielly Rocha; Guimarães, Amanda Leite; de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Silva Morais, Amanda Caroline; da Cruz Araújo, Edigênia Cavalcante; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva

    2013-01-01

    The antioxidant and photoprotective activities of dried extracts from the leaves of Encholirium spectabile were investigated. It was also evaluated the total phenolic and flavonoid contents by the Folin–Ciocalteu and aluminum chloride methods, respectively. Antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by using of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil (DPPH) radical scavenging and β-carotene–linoleic acid bleaching and compared with ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used as reference compounds. The photoprotective effect was evaluated by the spectrophotometric method. The most significant total phenolic and flavonoid contents was of 188.50 ± 27.50 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g and 129.70 ± 4.59 mg of catechin equivalent/g, respectively, for chloroform fraction (Es-CHCl3). The Es-CHCl3 also presented the best antioxidant activity (IC50 25.35 ± 4.35 μg/ml) for DPPH scavenging. The ethanol extract (Es-EtOH), Es-CHCl3 and the fraction ethyl acetate (Es-AcOEt) showed characteristic absorption bands in regions UVB and UVA in a concentration-dependent manner. Es-CHCl3 presented the highest sun protection factor SPF (8.89 ± 2.11). It shows the possibility to use this extract as sunscreen in pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:24396251

  18. Dried extracts of Encholirium spectabile (Bromeliaceae) present antioxidant and photoprotective activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Raimundo Gonçalves; Souza, Grasielly Rocha; Guimarães, Amanda Leite; de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Silva Morais, Amanda Caroline; da Cruz Araújo, Edigênia Cavalcante; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva

    2013-09-01

    The antioxidant and photoprotective activities of dried extracts from the leaves of Encholirium spectabile were investigated. It was also evaluated the total phenolic and flavonoid contents by the Folin-Ciocalteu and aluminum chloride methods, respectively. Antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by using of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil (DPPH) radical scavenging and β-carotene-linoleic acid bleaching and compared with ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used as reference compounds. The photoprotective effect was evaluated by the spectrophotometric method. The most significant total phenolic and flavonoid contents was of 188.50 ± 27.50 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g and 129.70 ± 4.59 mg of catechin equivalent/g, respectively, for chloroform fraction (Es-CHCl3). The Es-CHCl3 also presented the best antioxidant activity (IC50 25.35 ± 4.35 μg/ml) for DPPH scavenging. The ethanol extract (Es-EtOH), Es-CHCl3 and the fraction ethyl acetate (Es-AcOEt) showed characteristic absorption bands in regions UVB and UVA in a concentration-dependent manner. Es-CHCl3 presented the highest sun protection factor SPF (8.89 ± 2.11). It shows the possibility to use this extract as sunscreen in pharmaceutical preparations.

  19. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of dried powder formulations of Agaricus blazei and Lentinus edodes.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Andreia A J; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Dueñas, Montserrat; Barros, Lillian; da Silva, Roberto; Gomes, Eleni; Santos-Buelga, Celestino

    2013-06-15

    Several mushroom species have been pointed out as sources of antioxidant compounds, in addition to their important nutritional value. Agaricus blazei and Lentinus edodes are among the most studied species all over the world, but those studies focused on their fruiting bodies instead of other presentations, such as powdered preparations, used as supplements. In the present work the chemical composition (nutrients and bioactive compounds) and antioxidant activity (free radical scavenging activity, reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition) of dried powder formulations of the mentioned mushroom species (APF and LPF, respectively) were evaluated. Powder formulations of both species revealed the presence of essential nutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates and unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, they present a low fat content (<2g/100g) and can be used in low-calorie diets, just like the mushrooms fruiting bodies. APF showed higher antioxidant activity and higher content of tocopherols and phenolic compounds (124 and 770 μg/100g, respectively) than LPF (32 and 690 μg/100g). Both formulations could be used as antioxidant sources to prevent diseases related to oxidative stress.

  20. High-density tiling microarray analysis of the full transcriptional activity of yeast.

    PubMed

    David, Lior; Clauder-Münster, Sandra; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between DNA sequence variation and phenotypic variation in complex or quantitative traits is one of the major challenges in modern biology. We are witnessing a deluge of DNA sequence information and association studies of genetic polymorphisms with phenotypes of interest in families and populations. In addition, it has become clear that large portions of eukaryotic genomes beyond protein-coding genes are transcribed, generating numerous noncoding RNA (ncRNA) molecules whose functions remain mostly unknown.DNA oligonucleotide microarrays constitute a powerful technology for studying the expression of genes in different organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae tiling array presents a significant advance over previous array-based platforms. It has a high density of overlapping probes that start on average every 8 bp along each strand of the genome, enabling precise definition of transcript structure. Furthermore, the array includes probes specific for the polymorphic positions of another, distantly related yeast strain, allowing accurate measurement of allele-specific expression in a hybrid of the two strains. This technology thus allows high-resolution, quantitative, strand- and allele-specific measurements of transcription from a full eukaryotic genome. In this chapter, we describe the methods for extracting RNA, synthesizing first-strand cDNA, fragmenting, and labeling of samples for hybridization to the tiling array. Combining genome-wide information on variation in DNA sequence with variation in transcript structure and levels promises to increase our understanding of the genotype-to-phenotype relationship.

  1. Alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3 activates glucose alcoholic fermentation in genetically engineered Dekkera bruxellensis yeast.

    PubMed

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Siurkus, Juozas; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Joerck-Ramberg, Dorte; Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Nerve; Blevins, James E; Sibirny, Andriy A; Piškur, Jure; Ishchuk, Olena P

    2016-04-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis is a non-conventional Crabtree-positive yeast with a good ethanol production capability. Compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its tolerance to acidic pH and its utilization of alternative carbon sources make it a promising organism for producing biofuel. In this study, we developed an auxotrophic transformation system and an expression vector, which enabled the manipulation of D. bruxellensis, thereby improving its fermentative performance. Its gene ADH3, coding for alcohol dehydrogenase, was cloned and overexpressed under the control of the strong and constitutive promoter TEF1. Our recombinant D. bruxellensis strain displayed 1.4 and 1.7 times faster specific glucose consumption rate during aerobic and anaerobic glucose fermentations, respectively; it yielded 1.2 times and 1.5 times more ethanol than did the parental strain under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The overexpression of ADH3 in D. bruxellensis also reduced the inhibition of fermentation by anaerobiosis, the "Custer effect". Thus, the fermentative capacity of D. bruxellensis could be further improved by metabolic engineering.

  2. Effects of dietary sodium selenite and selenium yeast on antioxidant enzyme activities and oxidative stability of chicken breast meat.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Hussain; Tian, Jinke; Wang, Jianjun; Khan, Muhammad Ammar; Wang, Yuanxiao; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Tian

    2012-07-25

    The effects of sodium selenite (SS) and selenium yeast (SY) alone and in combination (MS) on the selenium (Se) content, antioxidant enzyme activities (AEA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and oxidative stability of chicken breast meat were investigated. The results showed that the highest (p < 0.05) glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was found in the SS-supplemented chicken breast meat; however, SY and MS treatments significantly increased (p < 0.05) the Se content and the activities of catalase (CAT), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), and TAC, but decreased (p < 0.05) the malondialdehyde (MDA) content at 42 days of age. Twelve days of storage at 4 °C decreased (p < 0.05) the activity of the GSH-Px, but CAT, T-SOD, and TAC remained stable. SY decreased the lipid oxidation more effectively in chicken breast meat. It was concluded that SY and MS are more effective than SS in increasing the AEA, TAC, and oxidative stability of chicken breast meat.

  3. Presence of estrogenic activity from emission of fossil fuel combustion as detected by a recombinant yeast bioassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxian; Wu, Wenzhong; Henkelmann, Bernhard; You, Li; Kettrup, Antonius; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    Estrogenic activities of emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion were investigated with human estrogen receptor (ER) recombinant yeast bioassay. The results showed that there were weak but clear estrogenic activities in combustion emissions of fossil fuels including coal, petroleum, and diesel. The estrogenic relative potency (RP) of fossil fuel combustion was the highest in petroleum-fired car, followed by coal-fired stove, diesel-fired agrimotor, coal-fired electric power station. On the other hand, the estrogenic relative inductive efficiency (RIE) was the highest in coal-fired stove and coal-fired electric power station, followed by petroleum-fired car and diesel-fired agrimotor. The estrogenic activities in the sub-fractions from chromatographic separation of emitted materials were also determined. The results indicated that different chemical fractions in these complex systems have different estrogenic potencies. The GC/MS analysis of the emission showed that there were many aromatic carbonyls, big molecular alcohol, PAHs and derivatives, and substituted phenolic compounds and derivatives which have been reported as environmental estrogens. The existence of estrogenic substances in fossil fuel combustion demands further investigation of their potential adverse effects on human and on the ecosystem. The magnitude of pollution due to global usage of fossil fuels makes it imperative to understand the issue of fossil fuel-derived endocrine activities and the associated health risks, particularly the aggregated risks stemmed from exposure to toxicants of multiple sources.

  4. Activity of Isavuconazole and Other Azoles against Candida Clinical Isolates and Yeast Model Systems with Known Azole Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Alix T.

    2015-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a novel, broad-spectrum, antifungal azole. In order to evaluate its interactions with known azole resistance mechanisms, isavuconazole susceptibility among different yeast models and clinical isolates expressing characterized azole resistance mechanisms was tested and compared to those of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole. Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the Candida albicans and C. glabrata ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters (CDR1, CDR2, and CgCDR1), major facilitator (MDR1), and lanosterol 14-α-sterol-demethylase (ERG11) alleles with mutations were used. In addition, pairs of C. albicans and C. glabrata strains from matched clinical isolates with known azole resistance mechanisms were investigated. The expression of ABC transporters increased all azole MICs, suggesting that all azoles tested were substrates of ABC transporters. The expression of MDR1 did not increase posaconazole, itraconazole, and isavuconazole MICs. Relative increases of azole MICs (from 4- to 32-fold) were observed for fluconazole, voriconazole, and isavuconazole when at least two mutations were present in the same ERG11 allele. Upon MIC testing of azoles with clinical C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates with known resistance mechanisms, the MIC90s of C. albicans for fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and isavuconazole were 128, 2, 1, 0.5, and 2 μg/ml, respectively, while in C. glabrata they were 128, 2, 4, 4, and 16 μg/ml, respectively. In conclusion, the effects of azole resistance mechanisms on isavuconazole did not differ significantly from those of other azoles. Resistance mechanisms in yeasts involving ABC transporters and ERG11 decreased the activity of isavuconazole, while MDR1 had limited effect. PMID:26482310

  5. Nitrogen depletion in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe causes nucleosome loss in both promoters and coding regions of activated genes

    PubMed Central

    Kristell, Carolina; Orzechowski Westholm, Jakub; Olsson, Ida; Ronne, Hans; Komorowski, Jan; Bjerling, Pernilla

    2010-01-01

    Gene transcription is associated with local changes in chromatin, both in nucleosome positions and in chemical modifications of the histones. Chromatin dynamics has mostly been studied on a single-gene basis. Those genome-wide studies that have been made primarily investigated steady-state transcription. However, three studies of genome-wide changes in chromatin during the transcriptional response to heat shock in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed nucleosome eviction in promoter regions but only minor effects in coding regions. Here, we describe the short-term response to nitrogen starvation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Nitrogen depletion leads to a fast induction of a large number of genes in S. pombe and is thus suitable for genome-wide studies of chromatin dynamics during gene regulation. After 20 min of nitrogen removal, 118 transcripts were up-regulated. The distribution of regulated genes throughout the genome was not random; many up-regulated genes were found in clusters, while large parts of the genome were devoid of up-regulated genes. Surprisingly, this up-regulation was associated with nucleosome eviction of equal magnitudes in the promoters and in the coding regions. The nucleosome loss was not limited to induction by nitrogen depletion but also occurred during cadmium treatment. Furthermore, the lower nucleosome density persisted for at least 60 min after induction. Two highly induced genes, urg1+ and urg2+, displayed a substantial nucleosome loss, with only 20% of the nucleosomes being left in the coding region. We conclude that nucleosome loss during transcriptional activation is not necessarily limited to promoter regions. PMID:20086243

  6. Effects of low power microwave radiation on biological activity of Collagenase enzyme and growth rate of S. Cerevisiae yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsuhaim, Hamad S.; Vojisavljevic, Vuk; Pirogova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, microwave radiation, a type/subset of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) has been widely used in industry, medicine, as well as food technology and mobile communication. Use of mobile phones is rapidly growing. Four years from now, 5.1 billion people will be mobile phone users around the globe - almost 1 billion more mobile users than the 4.3 billion people worldwide using them now. Consequently, exposure to weak radiofrequency/microwave radiation generated by these devices is markedly increasing. Accordingly, public concern about potential hazards on human health is mounting [1]. Thermal effects of radiofrequency/microwave radiation are very well-known and extensively studied. Of particular interest are non-thermal effects of microwave exposures on biological systems. Nonthermal effects are described as changes in cellular metabolism caused by both resonance absorption and induced EMR and are often accompanied by a specific biological response. Non-thermal biological effects are measurable changes in biological systems that may or may not be associated with adverse health effects. In this study we studied non-thermal effects of low power microwave exposures on kinetics of L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme and growth rate of yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae strains type II. The selected model systems were continuously exposed to microwave radiation at the frequency of 968MHz and power of 10dBm using the designed and constructed (custom made) Transverse Electro-Magnetic (TEM) cell [2]. The findings reveal that microwave radiation at 968MHz and power of 10dBm inhibits L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity by 26% and increases significantly (15%) the proliferation rate of yeast cells.

  7. Rga4 modulates the activity of the fission yeast cell integrity MAPK pathway by acting as a Rho2 GTPase-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Soto, Teresa; Villar-Tajadura, Maria Antonia; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar; Cansado, José

    2010-04-09

    Rho GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are responsible for the inactivation of Rho GTPases, which are involved in the regulation of critical biological responses in eukaryotic cells, ranging from cell cycle control to cellular morphogenesis. The genome of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains six genes coding for putative Rho GTPases, whereas nine genes code for predicted Rho GAPs (Rga1 to Rga9). One of them, Rga4, has been recently described as a Cdc42 GAP, involved in the control of cell diameter and symmetry in fission yeast. In this work we show that Rga4 is also a Rho2 GAP that negatively modulates the activity of the cell integrity pathway and its main effector, MAPK Pmk1. The DYRK-type protein kinase Pom1, which regulates both the localization and phosphorylation state of Rga4, is also a negative regulator of the Pmk1 pathway, but this control is not dependent upon the Rga4 role as a Rho2-GAP. Hence, two subsets of Rga4 negatively regulate Cdc42 and Rho2 functions in a specific and unrelated way. Finally, we show that Rga7, another Rho2 GAP, down-regulates the Pmk1 pathway in addition to Rga4. These results reinforce the notion of the existence of complex mechanisms determining the selectivity of Rho GAPs toward Rho GTPases and their functions.

  8. Enhanced Stability of Blood Matrices Using a Dried Sample Spot Assay to Measure Human Butyrylcholinesterase Activity and Nerve Agent Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jonas W.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Watson, Caroline M.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    Dried matrix spots are safer to handle and easier to store than wet blood products, but factors such as intra-spot variability and unknown sample volumes have limited their appeal as a sampling format for quantitative analyses. In this work, we introduce a dried spot activity assay for quantifying butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) specific activity which is BChE activity normalized to the total protein content in a sample spot. The method was demonstrated with blood, serum, and plasma spotted on specimen collection devices (cards) which were extracted to measure total protein and BChE activity using a modified Ellman assay. Activity recovered from dried spots was ∼80% of the initial spotted activity for blood and >90% for plasma and serum. Measuring total protein in the sample and calculating specific activity substantially improved quantification and reduced intra-spot variability. Analyte stability of nerve agent adducts was also evaluated, and the results obtained via BChE-specific activity measurements were confirmed by quantification of BChE adducts using a previously established LC-MS/MS method. The spotted samples were up to 10-times more resistant to degradation compared to unspotted control samples when measuring BChE inhibition by the nerve agents sarin and VX. Using this method, both BChE activity and adducts can be accurately measured from a dried sample spot. This use of a dried sample spot with normalization to total protein is robust, demonstrates decreased intra-spot variability without the need to control for initial sample volume, and enhances analyte stability. PMID:25955132

  9. Structural basis for antifreeze activity of ice-binding protein from arctic yeast.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hyuck; Park, Ae Kyung; Do, Hackwon; Park, Kyoung Sun; Moh, Sang Hyun; Chi, Young Min; Kim, Hak Jun

    2012-03-30

    Arctic yeast Leucosporidium sp. produces a glycosylated ice-binding protein (LeIBP) with a molecular mass of ∼25 kDa, which can lower the freezing point below the melting point once it binds to ice. LeIBP is a member of a large class of ice-binding proteins, the structures of which are unknown. Here, we report the crystal structures of non-glycosylated LeIBP and glycosylated LeIBP at 1.57- and 2.43-Å resolution, respectively. Structural analysis of the LeIBPs revealed a dimeric right-handed β-helix fold, which is composed of three parts: a large coiled structural domain, a long helix region (residues 96-115 form a long α-helix that packs along one face of the β-helix), and a C-terminal hydrophobic loop region ((243)PFVPAPEVV(251)). Unexpectedly, the C-terminal hydrophobic loop region has an extended conformation pointing away from the body of the coiled structural domain and forms intertwined dimer interactions. In addition, structural analysis of glycosylated LeIBP with sugar moieties attached to Asn(185) provides a basis for interpreting previous biochemical analyses as well as the increased stability and secretion of glycosylated LeIBP. We also determined that the aligned Thr/Ser/Ala residues are critical for ice binding within the B face of LeIBP using site-directed mutagenesis. Although LeIBP has a common β-helical fold similar to that of canonical hyperactive antifreeze proteins, the ice-binding site is more complex and does not have a simple ice-binding motif. In conclusion, we could identify the ice-binding site of LeIBP and discuss differences in the ice-binding modes compared with other known antifreeze proteins and ice-binding proteins.

  10. Dry etching techniques for active devices based on hexagonal boron nitride epilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Grenadier, Samuel; Li, Jing; Lin, Jingyu; Jiang, Hongxing

    2013-11-15

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as a fundamentally and technologically important material system owing to its unique physical properties including layered structure, wide energy bandgap, large optical absorption, and neutron capture cross section. As for any materials under development, it is necessary to establish device processing techniques to realize active devices based on hBN. The authors report on the advancements in dry etching techniques for active devices based on hBN epilayers via inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The effect of ICP radio frequency (RF) power on the etch rate and vertical side wall profile was studied. The etching depth and angle with respect to the surface were measured using atomic force microscopy showing that an etching rate ∼1.25 μm/min and etching angles >80° were obtained. Profilometer data and scanning electron microscope images confirmed these results. This work demonstrates that SF{sub 6} is very suitable for etching hBN epilayers in RF plasma environments and can serve as a guide for future hBN device processing.

  11. Rho1 GTPase and PKC ortholog Pck1 are upstream activators of the cell integrity MAPK pathway in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Soto, Teresa; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Viana, Raúl A; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar; Cansado, José

    2014-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe the cell integrity pathway (CIP) orchestrates multiple biological processes like cell wall maintenance and ionic homeostasis by fine tuning activation of MAPK Pmk1 in response to various environmental conditions. The small GTPase Rho2 positively regulates the CIP through protein kinase C ortholog Pck2. However, Pmk1 retains some function in mutants lacking either Rho2 or Pck2, suggesting the existence of additional upstream regulatory elements to modulate its activity depending on the nature of the environmental stimulus. The essential GTPase Rho1 is a candidate to control the activity of the CIP by acting upstream of Pck2, whereas Pck1, a second PKC ortholog, appears to negatively regulate Pmk1 activity. However, the exact regulatory nature of these two proteins within the CIP has remained elusive. By exhaustive characterization of strains expressing a hypomorphic Rho1 allele (rho1-596) in different genetic backgrounds we show that both Rho1 and Pck1 are positive upstream regulatory members of the CIP in addition to Rho2 and Pck2. In this new model Rho1 and Rho2 control Pmk1 basal activity during vegetative growth mainly through Pck2. Notably, whereas Rho2-Pck2 elicit Pmk1 activation in response to most environmental stimuli, Rho1 drives Pmk1 activation through either Pck2 or Pck1 exclusively in response to cell wall damage. Our study reveals the intricate and complex functional architecture of the upstream elements participating in this signaling pathway as compared to similar routes from other simple eukaryotic organisms.

  12. Detoxification of Eucheuma spinosum Hydrolysates with Activated Carbon for Ethanol Production by the Salt-Tolerant Yeast Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Ra, Chae Hun; Jung, Jang Hyun; Sunwoo, In Young; Kang, Chang Han; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the slurry contents and salt concentrations for ethanol production from hydrolysates of the seaweed Eucheuma spinosum. A monosaccharide concentration of 44.2 g/l as 49.6% conversion of total carbohydrate of 89.1 g/l was obtained from 120 g dw/l seaweed slurry. Monosaccharides from E. spinosum slurry were obtained by thermal acid hydrolysis and enzymatic hydrolysis. Addition of activated carbon at 2.5% (w/v) and the adsorption time of 2 min were used in subsequent adsorption treatments to prevent the inhibitory effect of HMF. The adsorption surface area of the activated carbon powder was 1,400-1,600 m(2)/g and showed selectivity to 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) from monosaccharides. Candida tropicalis KCTC 7212 was cultured in yeast extract, peptone, glucose, and high-salt medium, and exposed to 80, 90, 100, and 110 practical salinity unit (psu) salt concentrations in the lysates. The 100 psu salt concentration showed maximum cell growth and ethanol production. The ethanol fermentations with activated carbon treatment and use of C. tropicalis acclimated to a high salt concentration of 100 psu produced 17.9 g/l of ethanol with a yield (YEtOH) of 0.40 from E. spinosum seaweed.

  13. Antifungal activity of four honeys of different types from Algeria against pathogenic yeast: Candida albicans and Rhodotorula sp.

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Ahmed; Noureddine, Djebli; Saad, Aissat; Abdelmelek, Meslem; Abdelkader, Benhalima

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antifungal activity of four honeys of different types from Algeria against pathogenic yeast i.e. Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Rhodotorula sp. Methods Four Algeria honeys of different botanical origin were analyzed to test antifungal effect against C. albicans, and Rhodotorula sp. Different concentrations (undiluted, 10%, 30%, 50% and 70% w/v) of honey were studied in vitro for their antifugal activity using C. albicans and Rhodotorula sp. as fungal strains. Results The range of the diameter of zone of inhibition of various concentrations of tested honeys was (7–23 mm) for Rhodotorula sp., while C. albicans showed clearly resistance towards all concentrations used. The MICs of tested honey concentrations against C. albicans and Rhodotorula sp. were (70.09–93.48)% and (4.90–99.70)% v/v, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrates that, in vitro, these natural products have clearly an antifungal activity against Rhodotorula sp. and C. albicans. PMID:23569970

  14. Mechanochemical phosphorylation and solubilisation of β-D-glucan from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its biological activities.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Shi, Jikui; Li, Yongfu

    2014-01-01

    To obtain a water-soluble β-D-glucan derivative cleanly and conveniently, a highly efficient mechanochemical method, planetary ball milling, was used to phosphorylate β-D-glucan isolated from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in solid state. Soluble β-D-glucan phosphate (GP) with a high degree of substitution (0.77-2.09) and an apparent PEAK molecular weight of 6.6-10.0 kDa was produced when β-D-glucan was co-milled with sodium hexametaphosphate at 139.5-186.0 rad/s for 12-20 min. The energy transferred was 3.03-11.98 KJ/g. The phosphorylation of GPs was demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and 13C and 31P Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Three GP products with different degree of substitution (DS) and degree of polymerisation (DP) were able to upregulate the functional events mediated by activated murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, among which GP-2 with a DS of 1.24 and DP of 30.5 exerted the highest immunostimulating activity. Our results indicate that mechanochemical processing is an efficient method for preparing water-soluble and biologically active GP with high DS.

  15. Mechanochemical Phosphorylation and Solubilisation of β-D-Glucan from Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Its Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Shi, Jikui; Li, Yongfu

    2014-01-01

    To obtain a water-soluble β-D-glucan derivative cleanly and conveniently, a highly efficient mechanochemical method, planetary ball milling, was used to phosphorylate β-D-glucan isolated from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in solid state. Soluble β-D-glucan phosphate (GP) with a high degree of substitution (0.77–2.09) and an apparent PEAK molecular weight of 6.6–10.0 kDa was produced when β-D-glucan was co-milled with sodium hexametaphosphate at 139.5–186.0 rad/s for 12–20 min. The energy transferred was 3.03–11.98 KJ/g. The phosphorylation of GPs was demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and 13C and 31P Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Three GP products with different degree of substitution (DS) and degree of polymerisation (DP) were able to upregulate the functional events mediated by activated murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, among which GP-2 with a DS of 1.24 and DP of 30.5 exerted the highest immunostimulating activity. Our results indicate that mechanochemical processing is an efficient method for preparing water-soluble and biologically active GP with high DS. PMID:25075740

  16. Complex stability and dynamic subunit interchange modulates the disparate activities of the yeast moonlighting proteins Hal3 and Vhs3

    PubMed Central

    Abrie, J. Albert; Molero, Cristina; Ariño, Joaquín; Strauss, Erick

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hal3 and Vhs3 are moonlighting proteins, acting both as inhibitors of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase Ppz1 and as subunits (together with Cab3) of the unique heterotrimeric phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme of Hemiascomycetous yeast. Both these roles are essential: PPCDC catalyses the third step of coenzyme A biosynthesis, while Ppz1 inhibition is required for regulation of monovalent cation homeostasis. However, the mechanisms by which these proteins’ disparate activities are regulated are not well understood. The PPCDC domains (PDs) of Hal3, Vhs3 and Cab3 constitute the minimum requirement for these proteins to show both PPCDC activity and, in the case of Hal3 and Vhs3, to bind to Ppz1. Using these PD proteins as a model system to study the possibility of dynamic interchange between these roles, we provide evidence that Hal3 binds Ppz1 as a monomer (1:1 stoichiometry), requiring it to de-oligomerize from its usual homo- and heterotrimeric states (the latter having PPCDC activity). This de-oligomerization is made possible by structural features that set Hal3 apart from Vhs3, increasing its ability to undergo monomer exchange. These findings suggest that oligomer interchange may be a significant factor in the functional regulation of these proteins and their various unrelated (moonlighting) functions. PMID:26514574

  17. RPD1 (SIN3/UME4) is required for maximal activation and repression of diverse yeast genes

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, M.; Gaber, R.F. ); Strich, R.; Esposito, R.E. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors show that the extent of transcriptional regulation of many, apparently unrelated, genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent on RPD1 (and RPD3). Genes regulated by stimuli as diverse as external signals (PH05), cell differentiation processes (SPO11 and SPO13), cell type (RME1, FUS1, H0, TY2, STE6, STE3, and BAR1), and genes whose regulatory signals remain unknown (TRK2) depend on RPD1 to achieve maximal states of transcriptional regulation. RPD1 enhances both positive and negative regulation of these genes: in rpdl{Delta} mutants, higher levels of expression are observed under repression conditions and lower levels are observed under activation conditions. They show that several independent genetic screens, designed to identify yeast transcriptional regulator, have detected the RPD1 locus (also known as SIN3, SD11, and UME4). The inferred RPD1 protein contains four regions predicted to take on helix-loop-helix-like secondary structures and three regions (acidic, glutamine rich, and proline rich) reminiscent of the activating domains of transcriptional activators.

  18. Effect of drying methods with the application of vacuum microwaves on the bioactive compounds, color, and antioxidant activity of strawberry fruits.

    PubMed

    Wojdyło, Aneta; Figiel, Adam; Oszmiański, Jan

    2009-02-25

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of vacuum-microwave drying (240, 360, and 480 W) in the production process of dehydrated strawberry and to compare and contrast the quality of these dehydrated strawberries in terms of their polyphenol compounds, concentration of some heat liable components, and color to that of freeze-dried, convective, and vacuum-dried strawberry. Thus, the effect of vacuum-microwave drying and other drying methods on the antioxidant activity of berries was evaluated. Whole fresh and dried fruits were assessed for phenolics (anthocyanins, flavanols, hydroxycinnamic acids, and flavonols), ascorbic acid, and antioxidant activity (all parameters were calculated on a dry matter basis). Analysis of data shows that ellagic acid and flavanol changes were affected by drying techniques and cultivar. Drying destroyed anthocyanins, flavanols, and ascorbic acid, and there was a significant decrease in antioxidant activity. The most striking result was that conventional and vacuum drying decreased antioxidant activity in both cultivars, whereas contradictory results were found for vacuum-microwave processed strawberry. This study has demonstrated that vacuum-microwave drying, especially at 240 W, can produce high-quality products, with the additional advantage of reduced processing times, compared to other processes such as freeze-drying.

  19. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  20. A dried yeast fermentate selectively modulates both the luminal and mucosal gut microbiota and protects against inflammation, as studied in an integrated in vitro approach.

    PubMed

    Possemiers, Sam; Pinheiro, Iris; Verhelst, An; Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Maignien, Lois; Laukens, Debby; Reeves, Stuart G; Robinson, Larry E; Raas, Thomas; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Van de Wiele, Tom; Marzorati, Massimo

    2013-10-02

    EpiCor, derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been shown to have immunomodulating properties in human clinical trials and in vitro. However, the underlying mechanisms behind its immune protection via the gut remain largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use an integrated in vitro approach to evaluate the metabolism of EpiCor by the intestinal microflora, its modulating effect on the gut microbiota, and its anti-inflammatory activity on human-derived cell lines. Using the SHIME model, in combination with a mucus adhesion assay, has shown that low doses of EpiCor have a prebiotic-like modulatory effect on the luminal- and mucosa-associated microbiota. These include gradual changes in general community structure, reduction of potential pathogens, quantitative increase in lactobacilli, and qualitative modulation of bifidobacteria. Moreover, by combination of the SHIME with Caco-2 cells and Caco-2/THP1 cocultures, a significant decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines was observed at the end of the treatment period.

  1. Evaluation of antioxidant activity, sugar composition, and flow packaging potential for california dried and fresh figs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potential sensory perception and antioxidant capacity varied among these 20 cultivars tested that included dry and fresh traditional and recently introduced potentially dry or fresh varieties. Fructose, sweetness power and total phenolics levels were similar between the new introductions varieties a...

  2. Effect of drying temperatures on structural performance and photocatalytic activity of BiOCl synthesized by a soft chemical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guang, Lu; Hui, Wang; Xuejun, Zou

    2016-07-01

    A group of BiOCl photocatalysts with different drying temperatures were prepared by a soft chemical method. The effects of drying temperatures on the crystalline phase, morphology, surface area and optical property of as-prepared samples were investigated in detail by XRD, SEM, N2 absorption-desorption and DRS. Moreover, their photocatalytic activities on the degradation of rhodamine B were evaluated under visible light irradiation. It was found that the sample dried at 120 °C had the best photocatalytic activity, which was mainly attributed to the highest exposing proportion of {001} facets correspond to BiOCl, largest BET and minimum bandgap. The degradation mechanism was explored that superoxide radicals were mainly contributed to the degradation of chromophore, however, holes and hydroxyl were mainly contributed to the photo degradation. Moreover, holes and hydroxyl dominated the degradation of RhB.

  3. Signaling of chloroquine-induced stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the Hog1 and Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Shivani; Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Singh, Vikash; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2014-09-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) has been under clinical use for several decades, and yet little is known about CQ sensing and signaling mechanisms or about their impact on various biological pathways. We employed the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study the pathways targeted by CQ. Our screening with yeast mutants revealed that it targets histone proteins and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we also describe the novel role of mitogen-activated protein kinases Hog1 and Slt2, which aid in survival in the presence of CQ. Cells deficient in Hog1 or Slt2 are found to be CQ hypersensitive, and both proteins were phosphorylated in response to CQ exposure. CQ-activated Hog1p is translocated to the nucleus and facilitates the expression of GPD1 (glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), which is required for the synthesis of glycerol (one of the major osmolytes). Moreover, cells treated with CQ exhibited an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and the effects were rescued by addition of reduced glutathione to the medium. The deletion of SOD1, the superoxide dismutase in yeast, resulted in hypersensitivity to CQ. We have also observed P38 as well as P42/44 phosphorylation in HEK293T human cells upon exposure to CQ, indicating that the kinds of responses generated in yeast and human cells are similar. In summary, our findings define the multiple biological pathways targeted by CQ that might be useful for understanding the toxicity modulated by this pharmacologically important molecule.

  4. The influence of different drying methods on constituents and antioxidant activity of saffron from china.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yingpeng; Zhu, Xingyi; Yan, Yongqiu; Liu, Ruoxi; Gong, Feng; Zhang, Ling; Hu, Jiangning; Fang, Ling; Wang, Ruwei; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    More and more saffron has been cultivated in China because of the increasing saffron demand, but no paper has studied the influence of drying methods on the quality of Chinese saffron. In this paper, three different dehydration treatments applied in actual production were evaluated: dehydration with electric oven, vacuum oven, and microwave. We determined that the highest quality of saffron will be obtained when fresh saffron is treated at higher temperatures (no more than 70°C) for a long time by electric oven drying and vacuum oven drying. In microwave drying, treatments at lower microwave power and longer time benefit the quality of saffron. In addition, the influence of the drying method on antioxidants in saffron is discussed. The correlation between individual saffron profiles and the antioxidant value was estimated by spectrum-effect relationships analysis.

  5. Impact of yeast starter formulations on the production of volatile compounds during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Romano, Patrizia; Pietrafesa, Rocchina; Romaniello, Rossana; Zambuto, Marianna; Calabretti, Antonella; Capece, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The most diffused starter formulation in winemaking is actually represented by active dry yeast (ADY). Spray-drying has been reported as an appropriate preservation method for yeast and other micro-organisms. Despite the numerous advantages of this method, the high air temperatures used can negatively affect cell viability and the fermentative performance of dried cells. In the present study, 11 wine S. cerevisiae strains (both indigenous and commercial) were submitted to spray-drying; different process conditions were tested in order to select the conditions allowing the highest strain survival. The strains exhibited high variability for tolerance to spray-drying treatment. Selected strains were tested in fermentation at laboratory scale in different formulations (free fresh cells, free dried cells, immobilized fresh cells and immobilized dried cells), in order to assess the influence of starter formulation on fermentative fitness of strains and aromatic quality of wine. The analysis of volatile fraction in the experimental wines produced by selected strains in different formulations allowed identification of > 50 aromatic compounds (alcohols, esters, ketones, aldehydes and terpenes). The results obtained showed that the starter formulation significantly influenced the content of volatile compounds. In particular, the wines obtained by strains in dried forms (as both free and immobilized cells) contained higher numbers of volatile compounds than wines obtained from fresh cells.

  6. Effect of Infrared Blanching on Enzyme Activity and Retention of β-Carotene and Vitamin C in Dried Mango.

    PubMed

    Guiamba, Isabel R F; Svanberg, Ulf; Ahrné, Lilia

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of this work were to evaluate infrared (IR) dry blanching in comparison with conventional water blanching prior to hot air drying of mango to inactivate polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) enzymes, and to study its effect on color change and retention of vitamin C and β-carotene. Mango cylinders were blanched under similar temperature-time conditions either by IR heating or by immersion in a water bath during 2 min at 90 °C (high-temperature-short-time-HTST) or for 10 min at 65 °C (low-temperature-long-time-LTLT). After blanching mango was hot air dried at 70 °C. PPO was completely inactivated during the blanching treatments, but AAO had a moderate remaining activity after LTLT treatment (∼30%) and a low remaining activity after HTST treatment (9% to 15%). A higher retention of vitamin C was observed in mango subjected to IR dry blanching, 88.3 ± 1.0% (HTST) and 69.2 ± 2.9% (LTLT), compared with water blanching, 61.4 ± 5.3% (HTST) and 50.7 ± 9.6% (LTLT). All-trans-β-carotene retention was significantly higher in water blanched dried mango, 93.2 ± 5.2% (LTLT) and 91.4 ± 5.1% (HTST), compared with IR dry blanched, 73.6 ± 3.6% (LTLT) and 76.9 ± 2.9% (HTST). Increased levels of 13-cis-β-carotene isomer were detected only in IR dry blanched mango, and the corresponding dried mango also had a slightly darker color. IR blanching of mango prior to drying can improve the retention of vitamin C, but not the retention of carotenoids, which showed to be more dependent on the temperature than the blanching process. A reduction of drying time was observed in LTLT IR-blanching mango.

  7. Effect of drying temperatures on structural performance and photocatalytic activity of BiOCl synthesized by a soft chemical method

    SciTech Connect

    Guang, Lu; Hui, Wang; Xuejun, Zou

    2016-07-15

    A group of BiOCl photocatalysts with different drying temperatures were prepared by a soft chemical method. The effects of drying temperatures on the crystalline phase, morphology, surface area and optical property of as-prepared samples were investigated in detail by XRD, SEM, N{sub 2} absorption–desorption and DRS. Moreover, their photocatalytic activities on the degradation of rhodamine B were evaluated under visible light irradiation. It was found that the sample dried at 120 °C had the best photocatalytic activity, which was mainly attributed to the highest exposing proportion of {001} facets correspond to BiOCl, largest BET and minimum bandgap. The degradation mechanism was explored that superoxide radicals were mainly contributed to the degradation of chromophore, however, holes and hydroxyl were mainly contributed to the photo degradation. Moreover, holes and hydroxyl dominated the degradation of RhB. - Graphical abstract: Holes, hydroxyl and superoxide radicals can attribute to the degradation process but take different degradation pathways. Superoxide radicals mainly contribute to the degradation of chromophore, however, holes and hydroxyl mainly contribute to the photo degradation. Display Omitted - Highlights: • BiOCl nanosheets were prepared by a soft chemical method. • Effect of drying temperatures on as-prepared BiOCl samples was studied. • The highest removal efficiency of RhB was obtained over the sample dried at 120 °C.

  8. Purification of soluble beta-glucan with immune-enhancing activity from the cell wall of yeast.

    PubMed

    Lee, J N; Lee, D Y; Ji, I H; Kim, G E; Kim, H N; Sohn, J; Kim, S; Kim, C W

    2001-04-01

    Beta-glucan, one of the major cell wall components of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been found to enhance immune functions, especially by activating macrophages. However, a major obstacle to the clinical application of beta-(1-->3)-glucan is its low solubility in aqueous media. In this study, soluble beta-glucan, free of mannoprotein, was prepared, and its effects on TNF-alpha secretion and phagocytosis by macrophages were evaluated. Beta-glucan was first rendered soluble from the yeast cell wall by alkaline extraction (glucan-p1). The extract contained 2.8% of protein which was subsequently removed by successive DEAE-cellulose and ConA chromatography. Beta-glucan thus prepared was completely free of mannoprotein and was soluble at neutral pH (glucan-p3). The effects of beta-glucan on phagocytosis and TNF-alpha release activity were investigated. While glucan-p1 moderately induced TNF-alpha secretion at 200 microg/ml (550 pg of TNF-alpha/5 x 10(5) cells), glucan-p3 markedly stimulated macrophages at 200 microg/ml (2,860 pg of TNF-alpha/5 x 10(5) cells). Furthermore, glucan-p3 stimulated phagocytosis about 20% more than glucan-p1 did. In conclusion, we purified water-soluble beta-glucan which was completely devoid of mannoprotein and effectively stimulated the macrophage function, enabling it to be used as an intravenous injection for sepsis.

  9. Blad-Containing Oligomer Fungicidal Activity on Human Pathogenic Yeasts. From the Outside to the Inside of the Target Cell

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana M.; Carreira, Alexandra; Rollo, Filipe; Fernandes, Rui; Ferreira, Ricardo B.; Monteiro, Sara A.

    2016-01-01

    Blad polypeptide comprises residues 109–281 of Lupinus albus β-conglutin precursor. It occurs naturally as a major subunit of an edible, 210 kDa oligomer which accumulates to high levels, exclusively in the cotyledons of Lupinus seedlings between the 4th and 14th day after the onset of germination. Blad-containing oligomer (BCO) exhibits a potent and broad spectrum fungicide activity toward plant pathogens and is now on sale in the US under the tradename FractureTM. In this work we demonstrate its antifungal activity toward human pathogens and provide some insights on its mode of action. BCO bioactivity was evaluated in eight yeast species and compared to that of amphotericin B (AMB). BCO behaved similarly to AMB in what concerns both cellular inhibition and cellular death. As a lectin, BCO binds strongly to chitin. In addition, BCO is known to possess ‘exochitinase’ and ‘endochitosanase’ activities. However, no clear disruption was visualized at the cell wall after exposure to a lethal BCO concentration, except in cell buds. Immunofluorescent and immunogold labeling clearly indicate that BCO enters the cell, and membrane destabilization was also demonstrated. The absence of haemolytic activity, its biological origin, and its extraordinary antifungal activity are the major outcomes of this work, and provide a solid background for a future application as a new antifungal therapeutic drug. Furthermore, its predictable multisite mode of action suggests a low risk of inducing resistance mechanisms, which are now a major problem with other currently available antifungal drugs. PMID:27933037

  10. VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Non; Miyoshi, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Nakazono, Toshimitsu; Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2015-12-15

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is synthesized through decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine (PS), catalysed by PS decarboxylase 1 (Psd1p) and 2 (Psd2p) and the cytidine 5'-diphosphate (CDP)-ethanolamine (CDP-Etn) pathway. PSD1 null (psd1Δ) and PSD2 null (psd2Δ) mutants are viable in a synthetic minimal medium, but a psd1Δ psd2Δ double mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy, which is incorporated into PE through the CDP-Etn pathway. We have previously shown that psd1Δ is synthetic lethal with deletion of VID22 (vid22Δ) [Kuroda et al. (2011) Mol. Microbiol. 80: , 248-265]. In the present study, we found that vid22Δ mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy under PSD1-depressed conditions. Deletion of VID22 in wild-type and PSD1-depressed cells caused partial defects in PE formation through decarboxylation of PS. The enzyme activity of PS decarboxylase in an extract of vid22Δ cells was ∼70% of that in wild-type cells and similar to that in psd2Δ cells and the PS decarboxylase activity remaining in the PSD1-depressed cells became almost negligible with deletion of VID22. Thus, the vid22Δ mutation was suggested to cause a defect in the Psd2p activity. Furthermore, vid22Δ cells were shown to be defective in expression of the PSD2 gene tagged with 6×HA, the defect being ameliorated by replacement of the native promoter of the PSD2 gene with a CYC1 promoter. In addition, an α-galactosidase reporter assay revealed that the activity of the promoter of the PSD2 gene in vid22Δ cells was ∼5% of that in wild-type cells. These results showed that VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene.

  11. Catalase activity is stimulated by H(2)O(2) in rich culture medium and is required for H(2)O(2) resistance and adaptation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Catalases are efficient scavengers of H2O2 and protect cells against H2O2 stress. Examination of the H2O2 stimulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that the cytosolic catalase T (Ctt1) protein level increases 15-fold on H2O2 challenge in synthetic complete media although previous work revealed that deletion of the CCT1 or CTA1 genes (encoding peroxisomal/mitochondrial catalase A) does not increase the H2O2 sensitivity of yeast challenged in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). This we attributed to our observation that catalase activity is depressed when yeast are challenged with H2O2 in nutrient-poor media. Hence, we performed a systematic comparison of catalase activity and cell viability of wild-type yeast and of the single catalase knockouts, ctt1∆ and cta1∆, following H2O2 challenge in nutrient-rich medium (YPD) and in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Ctt1 but not Cta1 activity is strongly induced by H2O2 when cells are challenged in YPD but suppressed when cells are challenged in buffer. Consistent with the activity results, exponentially growing ctt1∆ cells in YPD are more sensitive to H2O2 than wild-type or cta1∆ cells, whereas in buffer all three strains exhibit comparable H2O2 hypersensitivity. Furthermore, catalase activity is increased during adaptation to sublethal H2O2 concentrations in YPD but not in buffer. We conclude that induction of cytosolic Ctt1 activity is vital in protecting yeast against exogenous H2O2 but this activity is inhibited by H2O2 when cells are challenged in nutrient-free media.

  12. Low-activity spectrometric gamma-ray logging technique for delineation of coal/rock interfaces in dry blast holes.

    PubMed

    Asfahani, J; Borsaru, M

    2007-06-01

    A low-activity spectrometric gamma-ray logging technique is proposed in this paper as a sensitive tool for the delineation of coal/rock interfaces in dry blast holes. The advantages and superiority of this technique over traditional micro-density non-spectrometric gamma-ray tools are demonstrated.

  13. From Yeast to Hair Dryers: Effective Activities for Teaching Environmental Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Kathleen A.

    2001-01-01

    Reports on four experiments and/or activities that were used to stimulate student interest in environmental science. Makes the case that varying classroom activities in the environmental science classroom makes the teaching and learning experience more alive and vital to both instructor and student. (Author/MM)

  14. Active layer thermal monitoring of a Dry Valley of the Ellsworth Mountains, Continental Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto; Michel, Roberto; Souza, Karoline; Senra, Eduardo; Bremer, Ulisses

    2015-04-01

    The Ellsworth Mountains occur along the southern edge of the Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf and are subdivided by the Minnesota Glacier into the Heritage Range to the east and the Sentinel Range to the West. The climate of the Ellsworth Mountains is strongly controlled by proximity to the Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf and elevation. The mean annual air temperature at the 1,000 m level is estimated to be -25°C, and the average annual accumulation of water-equivalent precipitation likely ranges from 150 to 175 mm yr-1 (Weyant, 1966). The entire area is underlain by continuous permafrost of unknown thickness. Based on data collected from 22 pits, 41% of the sites contained dry permafrost below 70 cm, 27% had ice-cemented permafrost within 70 cm of the surface, 27% had bedrock within 70 cm, and 5% contained an ice-core (Bockheim, unpublished; Schaefer et al., 2015). Dry-frozen permafrost, which may be unique to Antarctica, appears to form from sublimation of moisture in ice-cemented permafrost over time. Active-layer depths in drift sheets of the Ellsworth Mountains range from 15 to 50 cm (Bockheim, unpublished); our understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, especially at the continent. The active layer monitoring sites were installed at Edson Hills, Ellsworth_Mountains, in the summer of 2012, and consist of thermistors (accuracy ± 0.2 °C) installed at 1 m above ground for air temperature measurements at two soil profiles on quartzite drift deposits, arranged in a vertical array (Lithic Haplorthel 886 m asl, 5 cm, 10 cm, 30 cm and Lithic Anyorthel 850 m asl, 5 cm, 10 cm, 30 cm). All probes were connected to a Campbell Scientific CR 1000 data logger recording data at hourly intervals from January 2nd 2012 until December 29th 2013. We calculated the thawing days (TD), freezing days (FD); isothermal days (ID), freeze thaw days (FTD), thawing degree days (TDD) and freezing degree days (FDD); all according to Guglielmin et al. (2008). Temperature at 5 cm reaches a maximum

  15. Abnormal activity of corneal cold thermoreceptors underlies the unpleasant sensations in dry eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Illés; Luna, Carolina; Quirce, Susana; Mizerska, Kamila; Callejo, Gerard; Riestra, Ana; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Meseguer, Victor M.; Cuenca, Nicolás; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Acosta, M. Carmen; Gasull, Xavier; Belmonte, Carlos; Gallar, Juana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dry eye disease (DED) affects >10% of the population worldwide, and it provokes an unpleasant sensation of ocular dryness, whose underlying neural mechanisms remain unknown. Removal of the main lachrymal gland in guinea pigs caused long-term reduction of basal tearing accompanied by changes in the architecture and density of subbasal corneal nerves and epithelial terminals. After 4 weeks, ongoing impulse activity and responses to cooling of corneal cold thermoreceptor endings were enhanced. Menthol (200 μM) first excited and then inactivated this augmented spontaneous and cold-evoked activity. Comparatively, corneal polymodal nociceptors of tear-deficient eyes remained silent and exhibited only a mild sensitization to acidic stimulation, whereas mechanonociceptors were not affected. Dryness-induced changes in peripheral cold thermoreceptor responsiveness developed in parallel with a progressive excitability enhancement of corneal cold trigeminal ganglion neurons, primarily due to an increase of sodium currents and a decrease of potassium currents. In corneal polymodal nociceptor neurons, sodium currents were enhanced whereas potassium currents remain unaltered. In healthy humans, exposure of the eye surface to menthol vapors or to cold air currents evoked unpleasant sensations accompanied by increased blinking frequency that we attributed to cold thermoreceptor stimulation. Notably, stimulation with menthol reduced the ongoing background discomfort of patients with DED, conceivably due to use-dependent inactivation of cold thermoreceptors. Together, these data indicate that cold thermoreceptors contribute importantly to the detection and signaling of ocular surface wetness, and develop under chronic eye dryness conditions an injury-evoked neuropathic firing that seems to underlie the unpleasant sensations experienced by patients with DED. PMID:26675826

  16. Abnormal activity of corneal cold thermoreceptors underlies the unpleasant sensations in dry eye disease.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Illés; Luna, Carolina; Quirce, Susana; Mizerska, Kamila; Callejo, Gerard; Riestra, Ana; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Meseguer, Victor M; Cuenca, Nicolás; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Acosta, M Carmen; Gasull, Xavier; Belmonte, Carlos; Gallar, Juana

    2016-02-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) affects >10% of the population worldwide, and it provokes an unpleasant sensation of ocular dryness, whose underlying neural mechanisms remain unknown. Removal of the main lachrymal gland in guinea pigs caused long-term reduction of basal tearing accompanied by changes in the architecture and density of subbasal corneal nerves and epithelial terminals. After 4 weeks, ongoing impulse activity and responses to cooling of corneal cold thermoreceptor endings were enhanced. Menthol (200 μM) first excited and then inactivated this augmented spontaneous and cold-evoked activity. Comparatively, corneal polymodal nociceptors of tear-deficient eyes remained silent and exhibited only a mild sensitization to acidic stimulation, whereas mechanonociceptors were not affected. Dryness-induced changes in peripheral cold thermoreceptor responsiveness developed in parallel with a progressive excitability enhancement of corneal cold trigeminal ganglion neurons, primarily due to an increase of sodium currents and a decrease of potassium currents. In corneal polymodal nociceptor neurons, sodium currents were enhanced whereas potassium currents remain unaltered. In healthy humans, exposure of the eye surface to menthol vapors or to cold air currents evoked unpleasant sensations accompanied by increased blinking frequency that we attributed to cold thermoreceptor stimulation. Notably, stimulation with menthol reduced the ongoing background discomfort of patients with DED, conceivably due to use-dependent inactivation of cold thermoreceptors. Together, these data indicate that cold thermoreceptors contribute importantly to the detection and signaling of ocular surface wetness, and develop under chronic eye dryness conditions an injury-evoked neuropathic firing that seems to underlie the unpleasant sensations experienced by patients with DED.

  17. Study of antitumor activity in breast cell lines using silver nanoparticles produced by yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Francisco G; Fernández-Baldo, Martín A; Fernández, Jorge G; Serrano, María J; Sanz, María I; Diaz-Mochón, Juan J; Lorente, José A; Raba, Julio

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we describe a study of antitumor activity in breast cell lines using silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) synthesized by a microbiological method. These Ag NPs were tested for their antitumor activity against MCF7 and T47D cancer cells and MCF10-A normal breast cell line. We analyzed cell viability, apoptosis induction, and endocytosis activity of those cell lines and we observed that the effects of the biosynthesized Ag NPs were directly related with the endocytosis activity. Moreover, Ag NPs had higher inhibition efficacy in tumor lines than in normal lines of breast cells, which is due to the higher endocytic activity of tumor cells compared to normal cells. In this way, we demonstrate that biosynthesized Ag NPs can be an alternative for the treatment of tumors. PMID:25844035

  18. Study of antitumor activity in breast cell lines using silver nanoparticles produced by yeast.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco G; Fernández-Baldo, Martín A; Fernández, Jorge G; Serrano, María J; Sanz, María I; Diaz-Mochón, Juan J; Lorente, José A; Raba, Julio

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we describe a study of antitumor activity in breast cell lines using silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) synthesized by a microbiological method. These Ag NPs were tested for their antitumor activity against MCF7 and T47D cancer cells and MCF10-A normal breast cell line. We analyzed cell viability, apoptosis induction, and endocytosis activity of those cell lines and we observed that the effects of the biosynthesized Ag NPs were directly related with the endocytosis activity. Moreover, Ag NPs had higher inhibition efficacy in tumor lines than in normal lines of breast cells, which is due to the higher endocytic activity of tumor cells compared to normal cells. In this way, we demonstrate that biosynthesized Ag NPs can be an alternative for the treatment of tumors.

  19. Truncation of Arabidopsis thaliana and Selaginella lepidophylla trehalose-6-phosphate synthase unlocks high catalytic activity and supports high trehalose levels on expression in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijck, Patrick; Mascorro-Gallardo, José O; De Bus, Martien; Royackers, Katrien; Iturriaga, Gabriel; Thevelein, Johan M

    2002-01-01

    Plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Selaginella lepidophylla, contain genes homologous with the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) genes of bacteria and fungi. Most plants do not accumulate trehalose with the desert resurrection plant S. lepidophylla, being a notable exception. Overexpression of the plant genes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae tps1 mutant results in very low TPS-catalytic activity and trehalose accumulation. We show that truncation of the plant-specific N-terminal extension in the A. thaliana AtTPS1 and S. lepidophylla SlTPS1 homologues results in 10-40-fold higher TPS activity and 20-40-fold higher trehalose accumulation on expression in yeast. These results show that the plant TPS enzymes possess a high-potential catalytic activity. The growth defect of the tps1 strain on glucose was restored, however, the proper homoeostasis of glycolytic flux was not restored, indicating that the plant enzymes were unable to substitute for the yeast enzyme in the regulation of hexokinase activity. Further analysis of the N-terminus led to the identification of two conserved residues, which after mutagenesis result in strongly enhanced trehalose accumulation upon expression in yeast. The plant-specific N-terminal region may act as an inhibitory domain allowing modulation of TPS activity. PMID:11978181

  20. In Vitro Activity of the New Triazole Voriconazole (UK-109,496) against Opportunistic Filamentous and Dimorphic Fungi and Common and Emerging Yeast Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Espinel-Ingroff, Ana

    1998-01-01

    The in vitro antifungal activity of a new triazole derivative, voriconazole, was compared with those of itraconazole and amphotericin B against 67 isolates of Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Bipolaris spp., Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, Pseudallescheria boydii, Rhizopus arrhizus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Sporothrix schenckii. The in vitro activities of voriconazole were also compared with those of amphotericin B, fluconazole, and itraconazole against 189 isolates of emerging and common yeast pathogens of Blastoschizomyces capitatus, Candida (13 species), Cryptococcus neoformans, Hansenula anomala, Rhodotorula rubra, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Sporobolomyces salmonicolor, and Trichosporon beigelii. MICs were determined according to a procedure under evaluation by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) for broth microdilution testing of filamentous fungi and by the NCCLS M27-A broth microdilution method for yeasts. The in vitro activities of voriconazole were similar to or better than those of itraconazole and amphotericin B against Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp., and P. boydii as well as against B. dermatitidis and H. capsulatum. The activities of voriconazole were also comparable to or better than those of amphotericin B, fluconazole, and itraconazole against most species of yeasts tested. Exceptions were certain isolates of R. rubra and S. salmonicolor. These results suggest that voriconazole has a wide spectrum of activity in vitro; its effectiveness in the treatment of human mycoses is under evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:9431946

  1. Estrogenic activity of isolated compounds and essential oils of Pimpinella species from Turkey, evaluated using a recombinant yeast screen.

    PubMed

    Tabanca, Nurhayat; Khan, Shabana I; Bedir, Erdal; Annavarapu, Srinivas; Willett, Kristine; Khan, Ikhlas A; Kirimer, Nese; Baser, K Husnu Can

    2004-08-01

    Several plants and plant-derived pure compounds, designated as phytoestrogens, have been reported to cause estrogenic effects. They have been used for alleviation of menopausal symptoms, prevention of osteoporosis, heart disease and cancer. There is an increased interest in studying phytoestrogens such as isoflavones and lignans for their use as replacements for synthetic estrogens. In this study, the estrogenic activity of essential oils of eleven Pimpinella species and the compounds isolated from these species were evaluated using the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay. The essential oils containing (E)-anethole as major compound showed estrogenic activity in the YES assay, except for the aerial parts without fruits of P. anisetum and P. flabellifolia. The percent maximal response produced by most anethole-containing oils was 30-50%. Fruits of P. isaurica and P. peucedanifolia were estrogenic in spite of the absence or trace amount of anethole, respectively. This study indicates that the estrogenic activity of Pimpinella oils is not solely due to the presence of anethole. Components other than anethole may be responsible for contributing towards the estrogenic activity. The essential oils from different species varied in their estrogenic potencies (relative potency from 8.3 x 10(-8) to 1.2 x 10(-6) compared to 17 beta-estradiol) and among the different plant parts, the fruit oils of most species were estrogenic followed by the aerial parts without fruits and the root oils and their EC50 values varied from 45 micrograms/mL to 650 micrograms/mL.

  2. Preparation of activated carbon from dried pods of Prosopis cineraria with zinc chloride activation for the removal of phenol.

    PubMed

    Nath, Kaushik; Panchani, Suresh; Bhakhar, M S; Chatrola, Sandip

    2013-06-01

    Utilization of agrowaste materials for the production of activated carbon, as an excellent adsorbent with large surface area, is well established industrially, for dephenolation of wastewater. In the present work, dried pods of Prosopis cineraria-a novel and low-cost agrowaste material-were used to prepare activated carbons by zinc chloride activation. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out to study the effects of various physicochemical parameters such as initial phenol concentration, adsorbent dose, initial solution pH, and temperature. Pseudo-first-order second-order and diffusion kinetic models were used to identify the possible mechanisms of such adsorption process. The Langmuir and Freundlich equations were used to analyze the adsorption equilibrium. Maximum removal efficiency of 86 % was obtained with 25 mg L(-1) of initial phenol concentration. The favorable pH for maximum phenol adsorption was 4.0. Freundlich equation represented the adsorption equilibrium data more ideally than the Langmuir. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained was 78.32 mg g(-1) at a temperature of 30 °C and 25 mg L(-1) initial phenol concentration. The adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. The pseudo-second-order model, an indication of chemisorption mechanism, fitted the experimental data better than the pseudo-first-order Lagergren model. Regeneration of spent activated carbon was carried out using Pseudomonas putida MTCC 2252 as the phenol-degrading microorganism. Maximum regeneration up to 57.5 % was recorded, when loaded phenol concentration was 25 mg L(-1). The data obtained in this study would be useful in designing and fabricating an efficient treatment plant for phenol-rich effluents.

  3. Data in support of antioxidant activities of the non-extractable fraction of dried persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.).

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yoko; Ito, Toshihiro; Yano, Hisakazu; Kita, Eiji; Mikasa, Keiichi; Okada, Masatoshi; Furutani, Azusa; Murono, Yuka; Shibata, Mitsuru; Nishii, Yasue; Kayano, Shin-Ichi

    2016-09-01

    This data article is related to the research article entitled, "Antioxidant potential in non-extractable fraction of dried persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.)" (Matsumura et al., 2016) [1]. We investigated antioxidant activities of the non-extractable fraction of dried persimmon fruits in vitro and in vivo. We evaluated both extracted fraction and non-extractable fraction, and reported that non-extractable fraction may possess significantly antioxidant potential in vivo on the basis of the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). We showed our experimental raw data about antioxidant capacity of dried persimmon, plasma triglycerides (TG) and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and this data article might contribute to evaluate real antioxidant capacity of other fruits and vegetables.

  4. Color formation in nitrite-free dried hams as related to Zn-protoporphyrin IX and Zn-chelatase activity.

    PubMed

    Parolari, Giovanni; Benedini, Riccardo; Toscani, Tania

    2009-08-01

    The development of red pigment Zn-protoporphyrin IX (ZPP) in nitrite-free Parma hams was investigated in 5 leg muscles at several stages of processing and the activity of muscle Zn-chelatase was concurrently assayed for its potential role in ZPP formation. A steady increase of the pigment was observed throughout the manufacturing stages at mild temperatures while no development was observed during the prior cold resting phase. The enzyme was partly inactivated according to a muscle-dependent pattern, resulting in similar ZPP contents, hence color, in finished hams. It is concluded that enzyme-dependent synthesis of ZPP in nitrite-free dried hams contributes to color development, enabling muscles in dried hams to become more similar in redness than in green thighs. Therefore, checking raw meat for the enzyme content may be a means to control color formation in nitrite-free dry-cured meat derivatives.

  5. Inulin sugar glasses preserve the structural integrity and biological activity of influenza virosomes during freeze-drying and storage.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Jørgen; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Wilschut, Jan; Huckriede, Anke; Frijlink, Henderik W

    2007-09-01

    Influenza virosomes are reconstituted influenza virus envelopes that may be used as vaccines or as carrier systems for cellular delivery of therapeutic molecules. Here we present a procedure to generate influenza virosomes as a stable dry-powder formulation by freeze-drying (lyophilization) using an amorphous inulin matrix as a stabilizer. In the presence of inulin the structural integrity and fusogenic activity of virosomes were fully preserved during freeze-drying. For example, the immunological properties of the virosomes, i.e. the HA potency in vitro and the immunogenic potential in vivo, were maintained during lyophilization in the presence of inulin. In addition, compared to virosomes dispersed in buffer, inulin-formulated virosomes showed substantially prolonged preservation of the HA potency upon storage. Also the capacity of virosomes to mediate cellular delivery of macromolecules was maintained during lyophilization in the presence of inulin and upon subsequent storage. Specifically, when dispersed in buffer, virosomes with encapsulated plasmid DNA lost their transfection activity completely within 6 weeks, whereas their transfection activity was fully preserved for at least 12 weeks after incorporation in an inulin matrix. Thus, in the presence of inulin as a stabilizing agent, the shelf-life of influenza virosomes with and without encapsulated macromolecules was considerably prolonged. Formulation of influenza virosomes as a dry-powder is advantageous for storage and transport and offers the possibility to develop needle-free dosage forms, e.g. for oral, nasal, pulmonal, or dermal delivery.

  6. The yeast VAP homolog Scs2p has a phosphoinositide-binding ability that is correlated with its activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kagiwada, Satoshi Hashimoto, Misa

    2007-12-28

    The yeast VAMP-associated protein (VAP) homolog Scs2p is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/nuclear membrane protein that binds to an FFAT (diphenylalanine in an acidic tract) motif found in various lipid-metabolic proteins, including Opi1p, a negative regulator of phospholipid biosynthesis. Here, we show that Scs2p is a novel phosphoinositide-binding protein that can bind to phosphatidylinositol monophosphates and bisphosphates in vitro. The phosphoinositide-binding domain was assigned to the N-terminal major sperm protein (MSP) domain which also contains the FFAT-binding domain. When several lysine residues in the MSP domain were substituted for alanine, the resulting mutant Scs2 proteins lost the phosphoinositide-binding ability and failed to complement the inositol auxotrophy of an scs2 deletion strain. However, the mutant proteins still localized in the ER/nuclear membrane, in a similar manner to wild-type Scs2p. These results suggest the possibility that Scs2p activity is regulated by phosphoinositides to coordinate phospholipid biosynthesis in response to changes in phospholipid composition.

  7. Detection of estrogenic activity in Flemish surface waters using an in vitro recombinant assay with yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Witters, H E; Vangenechten, C; Berckmans, P

    2001-01-01

    Numerous environmental chemicals possess estrogen-like properties. At elevated doses, natural estrogens and environmental estrogen-like chemicals are known to produce adverse effects on humans and wildlife. Sources of potential exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds have to be identified for risk and hazard assessment. Extracts prepared from 16 selected water samples taken in Flemish rivers, effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants and reservoirs for drinking water production were analysed for estrogenic activity with a cellular bioassay. Yeast cells, which are stably transfected with the DNA sequence of hER and which contain expression plasmids with the reporter gene lac-Z, encoding the enzyme beta-galactosidase, were used to measure receptor binding. Flemish rivers showed the highest estrogenic potency, compared to effluents of waste water treatment plants and reservoirs which showed low induction factors (beta-galactosidase production) relative to solvent control conditions. By comparison with a standard curve for 17 beta-estradiol (E2), estrogenic potency in water samples was calculated as E2-equivalents and ranged from below detection limit (approximately 2.75 ng E2/l) up to 81.4 ng/l E2-equivalents. About 7 water samples had more than 10 ng/l E2-equivalents. These elevated levels of E2-equivalents are likely to exert significant adverse effects on reproduction success of wildlife, which should be verified with in vivo studies.

  8. Active RNAP pre-initiation sites are highly mutated by cytidine deaminases in yeast, with AID targeting small RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin JM; Wu, Yee Ling; Rada, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Cytidine deaminases are single stranded DNA mutators diversifying antibodies and restricting viral infection. Improper access to the genome leads to translocations and mutations in B cells and contributes to the mutation landscape in cancer, such as kataegis. It remains unclear how deaminases access double stranded genomes and whether off-target mutations favor certain loci, although transcription and opportunistic access during DNA repair are thought to play a role. In yeast, AID and the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G preferentially mutate transcriptionally active genes within narrow regions, 110 base pairs in width, fixed at RNA polymerase initiation sites. Unlike APOBEC3G, AID shows enhanced mutational preference for small RNA genes (tRNAs, snoRNAs and snRNAs) suggesting a putative role for RNA in its recruitment. We uncover the high affinity of the deaminases for the single stranded DNA exposed by initiating RNA polymerases (a DNA configuration reproduced at stalled polymerases) without a requirement for specific cofactors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03553.001 PMID:25237741

  9. In vitro equine embryo production using air-dried spermatozoa, with different activation protocols and culture systems.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A; Baca Castex, C; Ferrante, A; Pinto, M; Castañeira, C; Trasorras, V; Gambarotta, M C; Losinno, L; Miragaya, M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of air-dried spermatozoa for in vitro production of equine embryos and verify if sperm extract activation and in vivo culture improve in vitro embryo production. Cooled spermatozoa (control) and air-dried spermatozoa stored for 2, 14 or 28 days were used for ICSI sperm extract, or ionomycin was used for oocyte activation, and embryos were in vitro or in vivo (in mare's oviduct) cultured for 7 days. With in vitro culture, cleavage rate was higher when activating with sperm extract (P < 0.05). No differences in embryo development were seen between the two activation treatments nor between storage periods (P > 0.05). Blastocysts were obtained with cooled spermatozoa, and morulae were achieved using in vivo culture with 28-day storage spermatozoa and ionomycin-activated oocytes. When in vivo culture was performed, sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed using the sperm chromatin dispersion test and did not show statistical correlation with cleavage nor embryo recovery rates. In conclusion, equine embryos can be produced using air-dried spermatozoa stored for several weeks. Sperm extract activation increased cleavage rates but did not improve embryo development. In vivo culture allowed intrauterine stage embryos to be achieved.

  10. Expanding the yeast prion world

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Genjiro; Tanaka, Motomasa

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian and fungal prion proteins form self-perpetuating β-sheet-rich fibrillar aggregates called amyloid. Prion inheritance is based on propagation of the regularly oriented amyloid structures of the prion proteins. All yeast prion proteins identified thus far contain aggregation-prone glutamine/asparagine (Gln/Asn)-rich domains, although the mammalian prion protein and fungal prion protein HET-s do not contain such sequences. In order to fill this gap, we searched for novel yeast prion proteins lacking Gln/Asn-rich domains via a genome-wide screen based on cross-seeding between two heterologous proteins and identified Mod5, a yeast tRNA isopentenyltransferase, as a novel non-Gln/Asn-rich yeast prion protein. Mod5 formed self-propagating amyloid fibers in vitro and the introduction of Mod5 amyloids into non-prion yeast induced dominantly and cytoplasmically heritable prion state [MOD+], which harbors aggregates of endogenous Mod5. [MOD+] yeast showed an increased level of membrane lipid ergosterol and acquired resistance to antifungal agents. Importantly, enhanced de novo formation of [MOD+] was observed when non-prion yeast was grown under selective pressures from antifungal drugs. Our findings expand the family of yeast prions to non-Gln/Asn-rich proteins and reveal the acquisition of a fitness advantage for cell survival through active prion conversion. PMID:23117914

  11. Glucuronidation does not suppress the estrogenic activity of quercetin in yeast and human breast cancer cell model systems.

    PubMed

    Ruotolo, Roberta; Calani, Luca; Brighenti, Furio; Crozier, Alan; Ottonello, Simone; Del Rio, Daniele

    2014-10-01

    Several plant-derived molecules, referred to as phytoestrogens, are thought to mimic the actions of endogenous estrogens. Among these, quercetin, one of the most widespread flavonoids in the plant kingdom, has been reported as estrogenic in some occasions. However, quercetin occurs in substantial amounts as glycosides such as quercetin-3-O-glucoside (isoquercitrin) and quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (rutin) in dietary sources. It is now well established that quercetin undergoes substantial phase II metabolism after ingestion by humans, with plasma metabolites after a normal dietary intake rarely exceeding nmol/L concentrations. Therefore, attributing phytoestrogenic activity to flavonoids without taking into account the fact that it is their phase II metabolites that enter the circulatory system, will almost certainly lead to misleading conclusions. With the aim of clarifying the above issue, the goal of the present study was to determine if plant-associated quercetin glycosides and human phase II quercetin metabolites, actually found in human biological fluids after intake of quercetin containing foods, are capable of interacting with the estrogen receptors (ER). To this end, we used a yeast-based two-hybrid system and an estrogen response element-luciferase reporter assay in an ER-positive human cell line (MCF-7) to probe the ER interaction capacities of quercetin and its derivatives. Our results show that quercetin-3-O-glucuronide, one of the main human phase II metabolites produced after intake of dietary quercetin, displays ERα- and ERβ-dependent estrogenic activity, the functional consequences of which might be related to the protective activity of diets rich in quercetin glycosides.

  12. Glutamic acid-149 is important for enzymatic activity of yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, M A; Cooperman, B S

    1986-11-04

    Modification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase) with 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide is known to lead to a loss of enzymatic activity, the rate of which is decreased in the presence of ligands binding to the active site [Cooperman, B. S., & Chiu, N. Y. (1973) Biochemistry 12, 1676-1682; Heitman, P., & Uhlig, H. J. (1974) Acta Biol. Med. Ger. 32, 565-594]. In this work we show that, when such inactivation is carried out in the presence of [14C]glycine ethyl ester (GEE), GEE is covalently incorporated into PPase, incorporation into the most highly labeled tryptic peptide is site-specific, as evidenced by the reduction of such incorporation in the presence of the active site ligands Zn2+ and Pi, the extent of formation of this specifically labeled peptide correlates with the fractional loss of PPase activity, and the specifically labeled peptide corresponds to residues 145-153 and the position of incorporation within this peptide is Glu-149. The significance of our findings for the location of the active site and for the catalytic mechanism of PPase is briefly considered in the light of the 3-A X-ray crystallographic structure of Arutyunyun and his colleagues [Arutyunyun, E. G., et al. (1981) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 258, 1481-1485; Kuranova, I. P., et al. (1983) Bioorg. Khim. 9, 1611-1919; Terzyan, S. S., et al. (1984) Bioorg. Khim. 10, 1469-1482].

  13. Construction of a Highly Active Xylanase Displaying Oleaginous Yeast: Comparison of Anchoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Duquesne, Sophie; Bozonnet, Sophie; Bordes, Florence; Dumon, Claire; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Marty, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Three Yarrowia lipolytica cell wall proteins (YlPir, YlCWP1 and YlCBM) were evaluated for their ability to display the xylanase TxXYN from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus on the cell surface of Y. lipolytica. The fusion proteins were produced in Y. lipolytica JMY1212, a strain engineered for mono-copy chromosomal insertion, and enabling accurate comparison of anchoring systems. The construction using YlPir enabled cell bound xylanase activity to be maximised (71.6 U/g). Although 48% of the activity was released in the supernatant, probably due to proteolysis at the fusion zone, this system is three times more efficient for the anchoring of TxXYN than the YlCWP1 system formerly developed for Y. lipolytica. As far as we know it represents the best displayed xylanase activity ever published. It could be an attractive alternative anchoring system to display enzymes in Y. lipolytica. PMID:24743311

  14. Antioxidant activities of lead (Leucaena leucocephala) seed as affected by extraction solvent, prior dechlorophyllisation and drying methods.

    PubMed

    Benjakul, Soottawat; Kittiphattanabawon, Phanat; Sumpavapol, Punnanee; Maqsood, Sajid

    2014-11-01

    Extracts of brown lead (Leucaena leucocephala) seed prepared using different extraction solvents were determined for antioxidative activities using different assays. The highest yield (3.4-4.0%) was obtained when water was used as an extraction solvent, compared with all ethanolic extracts used (1.2-2.0 %) (P < 0.05). Much lower chlorophyll content was found in the water extract. When hot water was used, the resulting extract contained lower total phenolic and mimosine contents (P < 0.05). In general, 60-80 % ethanolic extracts had higher 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activities, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and metal chelating activity than water extracts (P < 0.05). When brown lead seed was dechlorophyllised prior to extraction, the water extract had slightly increased yield with lower chlorophyll content. Nevertheless, prior chlorophyll removal resulted in the increase in antioxidative activities but lower total phenolic and mimosine contents (P < 0.05). Generally, phenolic compounds and mimosine were more released when water was used as the extraction solvent, while the lower amount of chlorophyll was extracted. Oven-drying exhibited the negative effect on antioxidative activities and mimosine content. The higher antioxidative activities with concomitant higher total phenolic and mimosine contents were found in water extract dried by freeze drying. Thus, extraction solvent, dechlorophyllisation and drying methods directly influenced the yield and antioxidative activity of lead seed extract.

  15. Yeast allosteric chorismate mutase is locked in the activated state by a single amino acid substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidheini, T.; Moesch, H.U.; Braus, G. ); Evans, J.N.S. )

    1990-04-17

    Chorismate mutase, a branch-point enzyme in the aromatic amino acid pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and also a mutant chorismate mutase with a single amino acid substitution in the C-terminal part of the protein have been purified approximately 20-fold and 64-fold from overproducing strains, respectively. The wild-type enzyme is activated by tryptophan and subject to feedback inhibition by tyrosine, whereas the mutant enzyme does not respond to activation by tryptophan nor inhibition by tyrosine. Both enzymes are dimers consisting of two identical subunits of M{sub r} 30,000, each one capable of binding one substrate and one activator molecule. Each subunit of the wild-type enzyme also binds one inhibitor molecule, whereas the mutant enzyme lost this ability. The enzyme reaction was observed by {sup 1}H NMR and shows a direct and irreversible conversion of chorismate to prephenate without the accumulation of any enzyme-free intermediates. The kinetic data of the wild-type chorismate mutase show positive cooperativity toward the substrate with a Hill coefficient of 1.71 and a (S){sub 0.5} value of 4.0 mM. In the presence of the activator tryptophan, the cooperativity is lost. The enzyme has an (S){sub 0.5} value of 1.2 mM in the presence of 10 {mu}M tryptophan and an increased (S){sub 0.5} value of 8.6 mM in the presence of 300 {mu}M tyrosine. In the mutant enzyme, a loss of the cooperativity was observed, and (S){sub 0.5} was reduced to 1.0 mM. This enzyme is therefore locked in the activated state by a single amino acid substitution.

  16. Study of the volatile compounds and odor-active compounds of dry-cured Iberian ham extracted by SPME.

    PubMed

    del Pulgar, José Sánchez; García, Carmen; Reina, Raquel; Carrapiso, Ana I

    2013-06-01

    The volatile compounds and the most odor-active compounds of dry-cured Iberian ham were investigated by extracting them using a solid phase microextraction technique with a 2 cm Carboxen/PDMS/DVB fiber. The detection frequency method was applied to estimate the potential contribution of each compound to the odor of hams. Twenty-one volatile compounds were tentatively identified for the first time in dry-cured ham by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and eight in dry-cured Iberian ham. Gas chromatography-olfactometry allowed the identification for the first time of six compounds not previously reported as odorants of Iberian ham, and also two odorants were newly identified in dry-cured ham. According to the detection frequency method, the most odor active compounds found were 3-methylbutanoic acid (dirty sock-like smelling), hexanal (cut grass-like odor), 3-methylbutanal (sweaty and bitter almond-like odor), 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (toasted nuts-like odor) and 1-octen-3-one (mushroom-like odor).

  17. Cks1-dependent proteasome recruitment and activation of CDC20 transcription in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Morris, May C; Kaiser, Peter; Rudyak, Stanislav; Baskerville, Chris; Watson, Mark H; Reed, Steven I

    2003-06-26

    Cks proteins are small evolutionarily conserved proteins that interact genetically and physically with cyclin-dependent kinases. However, in spite of a large body of genetic, biochemical and structural research, no compelling unifying model of their functions has emerged. Here we show, by investigating the essential role of Cks1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that the protein is primarily involved in promoting mitosis by modulating the transcriptional activation of the APC/C protein-ubiquitin ligase activator Cdc20. Cks1 is required for both the periodic dissociation of Cdc28 kinase from the CDC20 promoter and the periodic association of the proteasome with the promoter. We propose that the essential role of Cks1 is to recruit the proteasome to, and/or dissociate the Cdc28 kinase from, the CDC20 promoter, thus facilitating transcription by remodelling transcriptional complexes or chromatin associated with the CDC20 gene.

  18. Inactivation of Yeast on Grapes by Plasma-Activated Water and Its Effects on Quality Attributes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Huang, Kang; Wang, Xiao; Lyu, Chenang; Yang, Nannan; Li, Yanbin; Wang, Jianping

    2017-02-01

    Plasma-activated water (PAW) is a promising nonthermal technology in food preservation and food safety. The inactivation efficacy of PAW was investigated against Saccharomyces cerevisiae CICC 1374 inoculated on grape berries. PAW30 and PAW60 were obtained by activating water with plasma for 30 and 60 min, respectively. Grapes were directly treated with PAW, and a 0.38- to 0.53-log CFU/ml reduction of S. cerevisiae was achieved in a time-dependent manner (P < 0.05). The oxidation-reduction potential and pH values of PAW30 and PAW60 were also in a time-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Grape quality assessment demonstrated no significant change in surface color and total anthocyanin content after 30 min of PAW60 treatment (P > 0.05). Although grape quality was unaffected by PAW in this study, this technology should be optimized to enhance inactivation efficiency.

  19. Relation between lipophilicity of alkyl gallates and antifungal activity against yeasts and filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Leal, P C; Mascarello, A; Derita, M; Zuljan, F; Nunes, R J; Zacchino, S; Yunes, R A

    2009-03-15

    The antifungal activity of a complete series of 15 n-alkyl gallates and six analogues acting against a representative panel of opportunistic pathogenic fungi was studied in order to analyze their role in: the importance of the fungi tested, the importance of the hydroxyls, the influence of the chain length and the hydrophobicity of the compounds. It was demonstrated that dermatophytes were the most susceptible species and that hydroxyls appear to be necessary but not sufficient for the activity. When the logP of each gallate was calculated and related to the different values of MIC against Microsporum gypseum it was observed that hexyl, heptyl, octyl and nonyl gallates exhibit a significant positive deviation from the curve corresponding to a polynomial equation obtained for the other gallates. This suggests that these compounds have a further mode of action besides their hydrophobicity, possibly the inhibition of some enzyme involved in ergosterol biosynthesis.

  20. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1

    PubMed Central

    Callender, Tracy L.; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T.; Gaines, William A.; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G. Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1. PMID:27483004

  1. Rhodotorula Mucilaginosa, a Quorum Quenching Yeast Exhibiting Lactonase Activity Isolated from a Tropical Shoreline

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Norshazliza Ab; Sulaiman, Joanita; Ismail, Zahidah; Chan, Xin-Yue; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Two microbial isolates from a Malaysian shoreline were found to be capable of degrading N-acylhomoserine lactones. Both Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry and 18S rDNA phylogenetic analyses confirmed that these isolates are Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. Quorum quenching activities were detected by a series of bioassays and rapid resolution liquid chromatography analysis. The isolates were able to degrade various quorum sensing molecules namely N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL) and N-(3-hydroxyhexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-hydroxy-C6-HSL). Using a relactonisation assay to verify the quorum quenching mechanism, it is confirmed that Rh. mucilaginosa degrades the quorum sensing molecules via lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of the fact that Rh. mucilaginosa has activity against a broad range of AHLs namely C6-HSL, 3-oxo-C6-HSL and 3-hydroxy-C6-HSL. PMID:24721765

  2. STT3, a highly conserved protein required for yeast oligosaccharyl transferase activity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, R; Knauer, R; Burda, P; Stagljar, I; te Heesen, S; Lehle, L; Aebi, M

    1995-01-01

    N-linked glycosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification, and is essential for viability in eukaryotic cells. A lipid-linked core-oligosaccharide is assembled at the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum and transferred to selected asparagine residues of nascent polypeptide chains by the oligosaccharyl transferase (OTase) complex. Based on the synthetic lethal phenotype of double mutations affecting the assembly of the lipid-linked core-oligosaccharide and the OTase activity, we have performed a novel screen for mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with altered N-linked glycosylation. Besides novel mutants deficient in the assembly of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide (alg mutants), we identified the STT3 locus as being required for OTase activity in vivo. The essential STT3 protein is approximately 60% identical in amino acid sequence to its human homologue. A mutation in the STT3 locus affects substrate specificity of the OTase complex in vivo and in vitro. In stt3-3 cells very little glycosyl transfer occurs from incomplete lipid-linked oligosaccharide, whereas the transfer of full-length Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 is hardly affected as compared with wild-type cells. Depletion of the STT3 protein results in loss of transferase activity in vivo and a deficiency in the assembly of OTase complex. Images PMID:7588624

  3. Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, a quorum quenching yeast exhibiting lactonase activity isolated from a tropical shoreline.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Norshazliza Ab; Sulaiman, Joanita; Ismail, Zahidah; Chan, Xin-Yue; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-04-09

    Two microbial isolates from a Malaysian shoreline were found to be capable of degrading N-acylhomoserine lactones. Both Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry and 18S rDNA phylogenetic analyses confirmed that these isolates are Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. Quorum quenching activities were detected by a series of bioassays and rapid resolution liquid chromatography analysis. The isolates were able to degrade various quorum sensing molecules namely N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL) and N-(3-hydroxyhexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-hydroxy-C6-HSL). Using a relactonisation assay to verify the quorum quenching mechanism, it is confirmed that Rh. mucilaginosa degrades the quorum sensing molecules via lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of the fact that Rh. mucilaginosa has activity against a broad range of AHLs namely C6-HSL, 3-oxo-C6-HSL and 3-hydroxy-C6-HSL.

  4. Longevity of U cells of differentiated yeast colonies grown on respiratory medium depends on active glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Čáp, Michal; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2015-01-01

    Colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains pass through specific developmental phases when growing on solid respiratory medium. During entry into the so-called alkali phase, in which ammonia signaling is initiated, 2 prominent cell types are formed within the colonies: U cells in upper colony regions, which have a longevity phenotype and activate the expression of a large number of metabolic genes, and L cells in lower regions, which die more quickly and exhibit a starvation phenotype. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of the activities of enzymes of central carbon metabolism in lysates of both cell types and determined several fermentation end products, showing that previously reported expression differences are reflected in the different enzymatic capabilities of each cell type. Hence, U cells, despite being grown on respiratory medium, behave as fermenting cells, whereas L cells rely on respiratory metabolism and possess active gluconeogenesis. Using a spectrum of different inhibitors, we showed that glycolysis is essential for the formation, and particularly, the survival of U cells. We also showed that β-1,3-glucans that are released from the cell walls of L cells are the most likely source of carbohydrates for U cells.

  5. Ammonium assimilation by Candida albicans and other yeasts: evidence for activity of glutamate synthase.

    PubMed

    Holmes, A R; Collings, A; Farnden, K J; Shepherd, M G

    1989-06-01

    Activities and properties of the ammonium assimilation enzymes NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamate synthase (GOGAT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) were determined in batch and continuous cultures of Candida albicans. NADP+-dependent GDH activity showed allosteric kinetics, with an S0.5 for 2-oxoglutarate of 7.5 mM and an apparent Km for ammonium of 5.0 mM. GOGAT activity was affected by the buffer used for extraction and assay, but in phosphate buffer, kinetics were hyperbolic, yielding Km values for glutamine of 750 microM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 65 microM. The enzymes GOGAT and NADP+-dependent GDH were also assayed in batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and three other pathogenic Candida spp.: Candida tropicalis, Candida pseudotropicalis and Candida parapsilosis. Evidence is presented that GS/GOGAT is a major pathway for ammonium assimilation in Candida albicans and that this pathway is also significant in other Candida species.

  6. Inhibitory effects of the dietary flavonoid quercetin on the enzyme activity of zinc(II)-dependent yeast alcohol dehydrogenase: Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Bhuiya, Sutanwi; Haque, Lucy; Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Das, Suman

    2017-02-01

    A multispectroscopic exploration was employed to investigate the interaction between the metallo-enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from yeast with bioflavonoid quercetin (QTN). Here, we have characterized the complex formation between QTN and Zn(2+) in aqueous solution and then examined the effect of such complex formation on the enzymatic activity of a zinc(II)-dependent enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase from yeast. We have observed an inhibition of enzymatic activity of ADH in presence of QTN. Enzyme inhibition kinetic experiments revealed QTN as a non-competitive inhibitor of yeast ADH. Perturbation of Circular dichroic (CD) spectrum of ADH in presence of QTN is observed due to the structural changes of ADH on complexation with the above flavonoid. Our results indicate a conformational change of ADH due to removal of Zn(2+) present in the enzyme by QTN. This was further established by molecular modeling study which shows that the flavonoid binds to the Zn(2+) ion which maintains the tertiary structure of the metallo-enzyme. So, QTN abstracts only half of the Zn(2+) ions present in the enzyme i.e. one Zn(2+) ion per monomer. From the present study, the structural alteration and loss of enzymatic activity of ADH are attributed to the complex formation between QTN and Zn(2+).

  7. Reduced-order modeling and active control of dry-low-emission combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tongxun

    This dissertation is a complementary experimental and theoretical investigation of combustion instability and lean blowout (LBO) in dry-low-emission (DLE) gas turbine engines, aiming to understand the fundamental mechanisms and shed light on active combustion control. Combustion instability involves complicated physicochemical processes, and many of the underlying mechanisms remain unknown, despite extensive research in the past several decades. A practical control system must be able to achieve satisfactory control performances in the presence of large uncertainties, large variations, and even unknown system dynamics. Toward this goal, an observer-based controller, capable of attenuating multiple unstable modes with unknown characteristics, is developed. A mechanism suitable for online prediction of the safety margin to the onset of combustion instability is presented, which does not require knowing the unstable frequencies. The shortage of a reliable, high-frequency, proportional fuel actuator is a major technical challenge for active combustion control. A complementary theoretical and experimental study is performed on a pump-style, high-frequency, magnetostrictive fuel actuator. Improvements to the fuel setup have been made according to the model predictions, which have been experimentally shown to be beneficial to combustion instability control. The second part of this dissertation is about modeling, prediction, and control of lean blowout. The experimentally observed, "intensified", low frequency, near-LBO combustion oscillations have been used as incipient LBO precursors, and are characterized as low-dimension chaotic behavior in the present study. The normalized chemiluminescence RMS and the normalized cumulative duration of LBO precursor events are recommended for LBO prediction in generic gas turbine engines. Linear stability analysis shows that, with decreasing equivalence ratios, a complex conjugate pair of eigenvalues emerges from three negative real

  8. Determination of estrogenic activity by LYES-assay (yeast estrogen screen-assay assisted by enzymatic digestion with lyticase).

    PubMed

    Schultis, T; Metzger, J W

    2004-12-01

    In order to enhance the sensitivity and the speed of the yeast estrogen screen (YES)-assay, which has been established in many laboratories for the determination of estrogenic activity of compounds and environmental samples, the LYES-assay, a modified version of the YES-assay including a digestion step with the enzyme lyticase, was developed. With the LYES-assay the estrogenic activities of natural (17beta-estradiol E2 and estrone), synthetic (17alpha-ethinylestradiol EE2) and pharmaceutical estrogens (diethylstilbestrol DES) as well as xenoestrogens (4-nonylphenol NP and five parabens) were determined and compared with the results obtained by other in vitro-assays namely the conventional YES-assay, the E-Screen-assay (MCF-7 breast tumor cell proliferation) and a receptor binding-assay (RB) with human estrogen receptors hER-alpha and hER-beta. In the case of E2 the LYES-assay had a significantly lower limit of quantification (LOQ) than the conventional YES-assay and even two orders of magnitude lower than the RB-assay. Compared to the E-Screen-assay the LOQ of the LYES-assay was almost one order of magnitude higher. The time required to perform the LYES-assay was as little as seven hours compared to three to five days for the conventional YES-assay. Thus, the LYES-assay is a very good alternative to existing estrogenic in vitro-assays, since it has a good sensitivity, is cheap and much faster than the other assays.

  9. Yeast growth in raffinose results in resistance to acetic-acid induced programmed cell death mostly due to the activation of the mitochondrial retrograde pathway.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralević, Maša; Lattanzio, Paolo; Marzulli, Domenico; Pracheil, Tammy; Liu, Zhengchang; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    In order to investigate whether and how a modification of mitochondrial metabolism can affect yeast sensitivity to programmed cell death (PCD) induced by acetic acid (AA-PCD), yeast cells were grown on raffinose, as a sole carbon source, which, differently from glucose, favours mitochondrial respiration. We found that, differently from glucose-grown cells, raffinose-grown cells were mostly resistant to AA-PCD and that this was due to the activation of mitochondrial retrograde (RTG) response, which increased with time, as revealed by the up-regulation of the peroxisomal isoform of citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase isoform 1, RTG pathway target genes. Accordingly, the deletion of RTG2 and RTG3, a positive regulator and a transcription factor of the RTG pathway, resulted in AA-PCD, as shown by TUNEL assay. Neither deletion in raffinose-grown cells of HAP4, encoding the positive regulatory subunit of the Hap2,3,4,5 complex nor constitutive activation of the RTG pathway in glucose-grown cells due to deletion of MKS1, a negative regulator of RTG pathway, had effect on yeast AA-PCD. The RTG pathway was found to be activated in yeast cells containing mitochondria, in which membrane potential was measured, capable to consume oxygen in a manner stimulated by the uncoupler CCCP and inhibited by the respiratory chain inhibitor antimycin A. AA-PCD resistance in raffinose-grown cells occurs with a decrease in both ROS production and cytochrome c release as compared to glucose-grown cells en route to AA-PCD.

  10. Cloud condensation nucleus activity comparison of dry- and wet-generated mineral dust aerosol: the significance of soluble material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, S.; Huang, Y.-w.; Seewald, J. S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-11-01

    This study examines the interaction of clay mineral particles and water vapor to determine the conditions required for cloud droplet formation. Droplet formation conditions are investigated for three clay minerals: illite, sodium-rich montmorillonite, and Arizona Test Dust. Using wet and dry particle generation coupled to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and cloud condensation nuclei counter, the critical activation of the clay mineral particles as cloud condensation nuclei is characterized. Electron microscopy (EM) is used to determine non-sphericity in particle shape. EM is also used to determine particle surface area and account for transmission of multiply charged particles by the DMA. Single particle mass spectrometry and ion chromatography are used to investigate soluble material in wet-generated samples and demonstrate that wet and dry generation yield compositionally different particles. Activation results are analyzed in the context of both κ-Köhler theory and Frenkel, Halsey, and Hill (FHH) adsorption activation theory. This study has two main results: (1) κ-Köhler is a suitable framework, less complex than FHH theory, to describe clay mineral nucleation activity despite apparent differences in κ with respect to size. For dry-generated particles the size dependence is likely an artifact of the shape of the size distribution: there is a sharp drop-off in particle concentration at ~300 nm, and a large fraction of particles classified with a mobility diameter less than ~300 nm are actually multiply charged, resulting in a much lower critical supersaturation for droplet activation than expected. For wet-generated particles, deviation from κ-Köhler theory is likely a result of the dissolution and redistribution of soluble material. (2) Wet-generation is found to be unsuitable for simulating the lofting of fresh dry dust because it changes the size-dependent critical supersaturations by fractionating and re-partitioning soluble material.

  11. Nitric oxide signaling in yeast.

    PubMed

    Astuti, Rika Indri; Nasuno, Ryo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    As a cellular signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) is widely conserved from microorganisms, such as bacteria, yeasts, and fungi, to higher eukaryotes including plants and mammals. NO is mainly produced by NO synthase (NOS) or nitrite reductase (NIR) activity. There are several NO detoxification systems, including NO dioxygenase (NOD) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). NO homeostasis based on the balance between NO synthesis and degradation is important for the regulation of its physiological functions because an excess level of NO causes nitrosative stress due to the high reactivity of NO and NO-derived compounds. In yeast, NO may be involved in stress responses, but NO and its signaling have been poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NOS orthologs in the genome. Even though the activities of NOS and NIR have been observed in yeast cells, the gene encoding NOS and the NO production mechanism catalyzed by NIR remain unclear. On the other hand, yeast cells employ NOD and GSNOR to maintain an intracellular redox balance following endogenous NO production, exogenous NO treatment, or environmental stresses. This article reviews NO metabolism (synthesis, degradation) and its regulation in yeast. The physiological roles of NO in yeast, including the oxidative stress response, are also discussed here. Such investigations into NO signaling are essential for understanding the NO-dependent genetic and physiological modulations. In addition to being responsible for the pathology and pharmacology of various degenerative diseases, NO signaling may be a potential target for the construction and engineering of industrial yeast strains.

  12. Assessment of Antioxidant Activity of Spray Dried Extracts of Psidium guajava Leaves by DPPH and Chemiluminescence Inhibition in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, M. R. V.; Azzolini, A. E. C. S.; Martinez, M. L. L.; Souza, C. R. F.; Lucisano-Valim, Y. M.; Oliveira, W. P.

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts (SDE) from Psidium guajava L. leaves. Different drying carriers, namely, maltodextrin, colloidal silicon dioxide, Arabic gum, and β-cyclodextrin at concentrations of 40 and 80% relative to solids content, were added to drying composition. SDE were characterized through determination of the total phenolic, tannins, and flavonoid content. Antioxidant potential of the SDE was assessed by two assays: cellular test that measures the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL) produced by neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the DPPH radical scavenging (DPPH∗ method). In both assays the antioxidant activity of the SDE occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and showed no toxicity to the cells. Using the CLlum method, the IC50 ranged from 5.42 to 6.50 µg/mL. The IC50 of the SDE ranged from 7.96 to 8.11 µg/mL using the DPPH• method. Psidium guajava SDE presented significant antioxidant activity; thus they show high potential as an active phytopharmaceutical ingredient. Our findings in human neutrophils are pharmacologically relevant since they indicate that P. guajava SDE is a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in human cells. PMID:24822200

  13. Activation of the mitochondrial signaling pathway in response to organic solvent stress in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nishida-Aoki, Nao; Mori, Hitoshi; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have demonstrated that organic solvent stress activated the pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) pathway, which involves the transcription factors Pdr1p and Pdr3p. Pdr1p and Pdr3p are functionally homologous in multidrug resistance, although Pdr3p has been reported to have some distinct functions. Here, we analyzed the functions of Pdr1p and Pdr3p during the cellular response to isooctane, as a representative of organic solvents, and observed the differential functions of Pdr1p and Pdr3p. In response to organic solvent stress, only Pdr3p contributed to the regulation of downstream genes of the PDR pathway, while Pdr1p had a rather inhibitory role on transcriptional induction through competition with Pdr3p for binding to their recognition sequence, pleiotropic drug response element. Our results demonstrated that organic solvent stress was likely to damage mitochondria, causing generation of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial fragmentation, and to activate retrograde signaling pathway via Pdr3p to upregulate PDR5 expression. Therefore, the unique function of Pdr3p in organic solvent stress distinguishes this pathway from the multidrug response.

  14. A Link between ORC-Origin Binding Mechanisms and Origin Activation Time Revealed in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hoggard, Timothy; Shor, Erika; Müller, Carolin A.; Nieduszynski, Conrad A.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication origins are selected in G1-phase when the origin recognition complex (ORC) binds chromosomal positions and triggers molecular events culminating in the initiation of DNA replication (a.k.a. origin firing) during S-phase. Each chromosome uses multiple origins for its duplication, and each origin fires at a characteristic time during S-phase, creating a cell-type specific genome replication pattern relevant to differentiation and genome stability. It is unclear whether ORC-origin interactions are relevant to origin activation time. We applied a novel genome-wide strategy to classify origins in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on the types of molecular interactions used for ORC-origin binding. Specifically, origins were classified as DNA-dependent when the strength of ORC-origin binding in vivo could be explained by the affinity of ORC for origin DNA in vitro, and, conversely, as ‘chromatin-dependent’ when the ORC-DNA interaction in vitro was insufficient to explain the strength of ORC-origin binding in vivo. These two origin classes differed in terms of nucleosome architecture and dependence on origin-flanking sequences in plasmid replication assays, consistent with local features of chromatin promoting ORC binding at ‘chromatin-dependent’ origins. Finally, the ‘chromatin-dependent’ class was enriched for origins that fire early in S-phase, while the DNA-dependent class was enriched for later firing origins. Conversely, the latest firing origins showed a positive association with the ORC-origin DNA paradigm for normal levels of ORC binding, whereas the earliest firing origins did not. These data reveal a novel association between ORC-origin binding mechanisms and the regulation of origin activation time. PMID:24068963

  15. Impact of supramolecular interactions of dextran-β-cyclodextrin polymers on invertase activity in freeze-dried systems.

    PubMed

    Santagapita, Patricio R; Mazzobre, M Florencia; Buera, M Pilar; Ramirez, Héctor L; Brizuela, Leissy Gómez; Corti, Horacio R; Villalonga, Reynaldo

    2015-01-01

    β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD)-grafted dextrans with spacer arms of different length were employed to evaluate the impact of supramolecular interactions on invertase activity. The modified dextrans were used as single additives or combined with trehalose in freeze-dried formulations containing invertase. Enzyme activity conservation was analyzed after freeze-drying and thermal treatment. The change of glass transition temperature (Tg ) was also evaluated and related to effective interactions. Outstanding differences on enzyme stability were mainly related to the effect of the spacer arm length on polymer-enzyme interactions, since both the degree of substitution and the molecular weight were similar for the two polymers. This change of effective interactions was also manifested in the pronounced reduction of Tg values, and were related to the chemical modification of the backbone during oxidation, and to the attachment of the β-CD units with spacer arms of different length on dextran.

  16. Antifungal activity of sodium silicate on Fusarium sulphureum and its effect on dry rot of potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Li, Y C; Bi, Y; Ge, Y H; Sun, X J; Wang, Y

    2009-06-01

    The antifungal activity of sodium silicate on Fusarium sulphureum and its inhibitory effect on dry rot of potato tubers were investigated. Sodium silicate strongly inhibited spore germination and mycelial growth. Morphological changes in sodium silicate-treated hyphae such as mycelium sparsity and asymmetry, hyphal swelling, curling, and cupped shape were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Ultrastructural alterations were also observed using transmission electron microscopy, including thickening of the hyphal cell walls, cell distortion, cavity, or electron-dense material in hyphal cells. Daughter hyphae and new daughter hyphae inside of the collapsed hyphal cells were often detected in the cytoplasm of sodium silicate-treated hyphae, although the septa of treated hyphae remained uniform. In vivo testing showed that sodium silicate at 100 and 200 mM effectively controlled dry rot of tubers that were challenged by inoculation with a F. sulphureum spore suspension. These findings suggest that sodium silicate has direct fungitoxic activity against the pathogen.

  17. VMA11, a novel gene that encodes a putative proteolipid, is indispensable for expression of yeast vacuolar membrane H(+)-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, N; Ohya, Y; Anraku, Y

    1991-12-25

    A gene, VMA11, is indispensable for expression of the vacuolar membrane H(+)-ATPase activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Ohya, Y., Umemoto, N., Tanida, I., Ohta, A., Iida, H., and Anraku, Y. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 13971-13977). The VMA11 gene was isolated from a yeast genomic DNA library by complementation of the vma11 mutation. The nucleotide sequence of the gene predicts a hydrophobic proteolipid of 164 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 17,037 daltons. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 56.7% identity, and significant coincidence in amino acid composition with the 16-kDa subunit c (a VMA3 gene product) of the yeast vacuolar membrane H(+)-ATPase. VMA11 and VMA3 on a multicopy plasmid did not suppress the vma3 and vma11 mutation, respectively, suggesting functional independence of the two gene products. Biochemical detection of the VMA11 gene product was unsuccessful, but vacuoles in the VMA11-disrupted cells were not assembled with either subunit c or subunits a and b of the H(+)-ATPase, resulting in defects of the activity and in vivo vacuolar acidification.

  18. Yng1p Modulates the Activity of Sas3p as a Component of the Yeast NuA3 Histone Acetyltransferase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Howe, LeAnn; Kusch, Thomas; Muster, Nemone; Chaterji, Ranjana; Yates III, John R.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2002-01-01

    The mammalian ING1 gene encodes a tumor suppressor required for the function of p53. In this study we report a novel function for YNG1, a yeast homolog of ING1. Yng1p is a stable component of the NuA3 histone acetyltransferase complex, which contains Sas3p, the yeast homolog of the mammalian MOZ proto-oncogene product, as its catalytic subunit. Yng1p is required for NuA3 function in vivo but surprisingly is not required for the integrity of the complex. Instead, we find that Yng1p mediates the interaction of Sas3p with nucleosomes and is thus required for the ability of NuA3 to modify histone tails. These data, and the observations that other ING1 homologs are found in additional yeast complexes that posttranslationally modify histones, suggest that members of the ING1 class of proteins may have broad roles in enhancing or modifying the activities of chromatin-modifying complexes, thereby regulating their activities in transcription control. PMID:12077334

  19. CNS activities of liquid and spray-dried extracts from Lippia alba-Verbenaceae (Brazilian false melissa).

    PubMed

    Zétola, M; De Lima, T C M; Sonaglio, D; González-Ortega, G; Limberger, R P; Petrovick, P R; Bassani, V L

    2002-10-01

    The CNS activity of Lippia alba liquid and spray-dried extracts, containing the non-volatile fraction from the leaves, was investigated. L. alba liquid extracts were prepared by percolation with EtOH 40, 60 or 80%. The liquid extracts, named ES(40%,) ES(60%) and ES(80%,) were concentrated, the ethanol eliminated and then tested in Swiss mice to evaluate its sedative and anticonvulsant effects. The animals received the extracts, orally, in doses corresponding to 200 mg of dry residue by kilogram of body weight. All mice were evaluated in the barbiturate-induced sleep test. Similarly, other groups of mice were submitted to convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). The concentrated extract obtained from ES(80%) showed the most significant sedative and myorelaxant effects as well as the highest total flavonoid content (66 mg/100 g, expressed in apigenin). Two spray-dried powders, SDP(1) and SDP(2), were prepared from ES(80%) using as excipients, respectively, colloidal silicon dioxide (CSD) and CSD associated to beta-cyclodextrin. Only SDP(1) showed sedative profile similar to that presented by ES(80). In conclusion, we demonstrated that the non-volatile fraction of L. alba, extracted in ethanol 80% (v/v), presents sedative and myorelaxant effects and that, among the tested extracts, this presents the highest flavonoid content. We demonstrated also the technological feasibility of spray-dried extracts and the influence of the excipient on its sedative properties.

  20. Fungi Treated with Small Chemicals Exhibit Increased Antimicrobial Activity against Facultative Bacterial and Yeast Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Zutz, Christoph; Bandian, Dragana; Neumayer, Bernhard; Speringer, Franz; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    For decades, fungi have been the main source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. Recent sequencing efforts revealed a still high number of so far unknown “cryptic” secondary metabolites. The production of these metabolites is presumably epigenetically silenced under standard laboratory conditions. In this study, we investigated the effect of six small mass chemicals, of which some are known to act as epigenetic modulators, on the production of antimicrobial compounds in 54 spore forming fungi. The antimicrobial effect of fungal samples was tested against clinically facultative pathogens and multiresistant clinical isolates. In total, 30 samples of treated fungi belonging to six different genera reduced significantly growth of different test organisms compared to the untreated fungal sample (growth log reduction 0.3–4.3). For instance, the pellet of Penicillium restrictum grown in the presence of butyrate revealed significant higher antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and multiresistant S. aureus strains and displayed no cytotoxicity against human cells, thus making it an ideal candidate for antimicrobial compound discovery. Our study shows that every presumable fungus, even well described fungi, has the potential to produce novel antimicrobial compounds and that our approach is capable of rapidly filling the pipeline for yet undiscovered antimicrobial substances. PMID:25121102

  1. Yap5 is an iron-responsive transcriptional activator that regulates vacuolar iron storage in yeast.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangtao; Bagley, Dustin; Ward, Diane M; Kaplan, Jerry

    2008-02-01

    The transporter Ccc1 imports iron into the vacuole, which is the major site of iron storage in fungi and plants. CCC1 mRNA is destabilized under low-iron conditions by the binding of Cth1 and Cth2 to the 3' untranslated region (S. Puig, E. Askeland, and D. J. Thiele, Cell 120:99-110, 2005). Here, we show that the transcription of CCC1 is stimulated by iron through a Yap consensus site in the CCC1 promoter. We identified YAP5 as being the iron-sensitive transcription factor and show that a yap5Delta strain is sensitive to high iron. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Yap5 is localized to the nucleus and occupies the CCC1 promoter independent of the iron concentration. Yap5 contains two cysteine-rich domains, and the mutation of the cysteines to alanines in each of the domains affects the transcription of CCC1 but not DNA binding. The fusion of the Yap5 cysteine-containing domains to a GAL4 DNA binding domain results in iron-sensitive GAL1-lacZ expression. Iron affects the sulfhydryl status of Yap5, which is indicative of the generation of intramolecular disulfide bonds. These results show that Yap5 is an iron-sensing transcription factor and that iron regulates transcriptional activation.

  2. Recovery from rapamycin: drug-insensitive activity of yeast target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) supports residual proliferation that dilutes rapamycin among progeny cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Stephanie K; Burgess, Karl E V; Gray, Joseph V

    2014-09-19

    The target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is a key conserved regulator of eukaryotic cell growth. The xenobiotic rapamycin is a potent inhibitor of the yeast complex. Surprisingly, the EGO complex, a nonessential in vivo activator of TORC1, is somehow required for yeast cells to recover efficiently from a period of treatment with rapamycin. Why? Here, we found that rapamycin is only a partial inhibitor of TORC1. We confirmed that saturating amounts of rapamycin do not fully inhibit proliferation of wild-type cells, and we found that the residual proliferation in the presence of the drug is dependent on the EGO complex and on the activity of TORC1. We found that this residual TORC1-dependent proliferation is key to recovery from rapamycin treatment. First, the residual proliferation rate correlates with the ability of cells to recover from treatment. Second, the residual proliferation rate persists long after washout of the drug and until cells recover. Third, the total observable pool of cell-associated rapamycin is extremely stable and decreases only with increasing cell number after washout of the drug. Finally, consideration of the residual proliferation rate alone accurately and quantitatively accounts for the kinetics of recovery of wild-type cells and for the nature and severity of the ego- mutant defect. Overall, our results revealed that rapamycin is a partial inhibitor of yeast TORC1, that persistence of the drug limits recovery, and that rapamycin is not detoxified by yeast but is passively diluted among progeny cells because of residual proliferation.

  3. Effect of yeast biomass with high content of carotenoids on erythrocyte deformability, NO production and Na,K-ATPase activity in healthy and LPS treated rats.

    PubMed

    Radosinska, J; Mezesova, L; Okruhlicova, L; Frimmel, K; Breierova, E; Bartekova, M; Vrbjar, N

    2016-11-25

    Measurements of red blood cell (RBC) deformability together with estimation of NO-synthase activity and Na,K-ATPase activity were used for characterization of RBC functionality in rats subjected to single dose of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides (LPS) at a dose of 1 mg/kg. We hypothesized that LPS might initiate a malfunction of RBC. We also investigated the potential effect of carotenoids (10 mg/kg/day) produced in red yeast biomass of Rhodotorula glutinis on RBC in LPS-challenged rats. LPS significantly reduced the deformability of RBC (by 14%) together with decrease of NO-synthase activity by 20%. Daily supplementation of carotenoids for 10 days attenuated the LPS-induced injury, as observed by 22% increase of RBC deformability and 23% increase of NO-synthase activity. The activity of Na,K-ATPase was also improved probably due to increased number of active enzyme molecules as indicated by 66% enhancement of Vmax value, hence maintaining the activity of erythrocyte Na,K-ATPase to the level even higher as compared with healthy control animals. It may be concluded that administration of yeast biomass with high content of carotenoids resulted in advanced function of erythrocytes as concerns their ability to squeeze through narrow capillaries of the circulation, better intrinsic production of NO and improvement of intracellular homeostasis of sodium.

  4. Tailor-Made Zinc-Finger Transcription Factors Activate FLO11 Gene Expression with Phenotypic Consequences in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Jia-Ching; Cheng, Yu-Che; Su, Mao-Chang; Moore, Michael; Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Cys2His2 zinc fingers are eukaryotic DNA-binding motifs, capable of distinguishing different DNA sequences, and are suitable for engineering artificial transcription factors. In this work, we used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the ability of tailor-made zinc finger proteins to activate the expression of the FLO11 gene, with phenotypic consequences. Two three-finger peptides were identified, recognizing sites from the 5′ UTR of the FLO11 gene with nanomolar DNA-binding affinity. The three-finger domains and their combined six-finger motif, recognizing an 18-bp site, were fused to the activation domain of VP16 or VP64. These transcription factor constructs retained their DNA-binding ability, with the six-finger ones being the highest in affinity. However, when expressed in haploid yeast cells, only one three-finger recombinant transcription factor was able to activate the expression of FLO11 efficiently. Unlike in the wild-type, cells with such transcriptional activation displayed invasive growth and biofilm formation, without any requirement for glucose depletion. The VP16 and VP64 domains appeared to act equally well in the activation of FLO11 expression, with comparable effects in phenotypic alteration. We conclude that the functional activity of tailor-made transcription factors in cells is not easily predicted by the in vitro DNA-binding activity. PMID:17710146

  5. Expression of the GM2-activator protein in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, purification, isotopic labeling, and biophysical characterization.

    PubMed

    Wendeler, Michaela; Hoernschemeyer, Joerg; John, Michael; Werth, Norbert; Schoeniger, Maike; Lemm, Thorsten; Hartmann, Rudolf; Kessler, Horst; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2004-03-01

    The GM2-activator protein (GM2AP) belongs to a group of five small, nonenzymatic proteins that are essential cofactors for the degradation of glycosphingolipids in the lysosome. It mediates the interaction between the water-soluble enzyme beta-hexosaminidase A and its membrane-embedded substrate, ganglioside GM2, at the lipid-water interphase. Inherited defects in the gene encoding this glycoprotein cause a fatal neurological storage disorder, the AB variant of GM2 gangliosidosis. With the aim to establish a convenient eukaryotic system that allows the efficient production of functionally folded, glycosylated GM2AP and offers the potential of cost-efficient isotopic labeling for structural studies by NMR spectroscopy, we established the expression of recombinant GM2AP in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. For the construction of expression plasmids, either the full cDNA encoding human GM2AP preproprotein was cloned in the expression vector pPIC3.5K, or the cDNA encoding only the mature form of GM2AP was inserted in the vector pPIC9K under control of the alcohol oxidase 1 promoter. Both plasmids led to the successful secretory expression of active, glycosylated GM2AP, which could easily be purified by Ni-NTA chromatography due to the hexahistidine tag introduced at the C-terminus. Remarkably, the expression of this membrane-active protein in P. pastoris was accompanied by two peculiarities which were not encountered in other expression systems for GM2AP: First, a significant fraction of the secreted protein existed in the form of aggregates, and second, considerable amounts of noncovalently bound lipids were associated with the recombinant protein. A three-step purification scheme was therefore devised consisting of Ni-NTA, reversed phase, and gel filtration chromatography, which finally yielded 10-12 mg of purified, monomeric GM2AP per liter of expression supernatant. MALDI- and ESI-TOF mass spectrometry were employed to assess the processing, homogeneity

  6. In vitro ability of beer fermentation residue and yeast-based products to bind aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Bovo, Fernanda; Franco, Larissa Tuanny; Rosim, Roice Eliana; Barbalho, Ricardo; de Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Fernandes

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to verify the in vitro ability of beer fermentation residue (BFR) containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and five commercial products that differed in the viability and integrity of S. cerevisiae cells to remove aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) from a citrate-phosphate buffer solution (CPBS). BFR was collected at a microbrewery and prepared by drying and milling. The commercial yeast-based products were as follows: inactive intact yeast cells from beer alcoholic fermentation, inactive intact yeast cells from sugarcane alcoholic fermentation, hydrolyzed yeast cells, yeast cell walls and active yeast cells. Adsorption assays were performed in CPBS spiked with 1.0 μg AFB1/mL at pH 3.0 and 6.0 for a contact time of 60 min at room temperature. Analysis of AFB1 in the samples was performed by high performance liquid chromatography. AFB1 adsorption by the products ranged from 45.5% to 69.4% at pH 3.0 and from 24.0% to 63.8% at pH 6.0. The higher percentages (p < 0.05) of AFB1 binding at both pH values were achieved with products containing hydrolyzed yeast cells or yeast cell walls rather than intact cells. The AFB1 binding percentages of BFR were 55.0 ± 5.0% at pH 3.0 and 49.2 ± 4.5% at pH 6.0, which was not significantly different (p > 0.05) from commercial products containing inactive intact yeast cells. The results of this trial indicate that the yeast-based products tested, especially the BFR, have potential applications in animal feeds as a suitable biological method for reducing the adverse effects of aflatoxins.

  7. In vitro ability of beer fermentation residue and yeast-based products to bind aflatoxin B1

    PubMed Central

    Bovo, Fernanda; Franco, Larissa Tuanny; Rosim, Roice Eliana; Barbalho, Ricardo; de Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to verify the in vitro ability of beer fermentation residue (BFR) containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and five commercial products that differed in the viability and integrity of S. cerevisiae cells to remove aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) from a citrate-phosphate buffer solution (CPBS). BFR was collected at a microbrewery and prepared by drying and milling. The commercial yeast-based products were as follows: inactive intact yeast cells from beer alcoholic fermentation, inactive intact yeast cells from sugarcane alcoholic fermentation, hydrolyzed yeast cells, yeast cell walls and active yeast cells. Adsorption assays were performed in CPBS spiked with 1.0 μg AFB1/mL at pH 3.0 and 6.0 for a contact time of 60 min at room temperature. Analysis of AFB1 in the samples was performed by high performance liquid chromatography. AFB1 adsorption by the products ranged from 45.5% to 69.4% at pH 3.0 and from 24.0% to 63.8% at pH 6.0. The higher percentages (p < 0.05) of AFB1 binding at both pH values were achieved with products containing hydrolyzed yeast cells or yeast cell walls rather than intact cells. The AFB1 binding percentages of BFR were 55.0 ± 5.0% at pH 3.0 and 49.2 ± 4.5% at pH 6.0, which was not significantly different (p > 0.05) from commercial products containing inactive intact yeast cells. The results of this trial indicate that the yeast-based products tested, especially the BFR, have potential applications in animal feeds as a suitable biological method for reducing the adverse effects of aflatoxins. PMID:26273277

  8. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  9. [Thermoresistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts].

    PubMed

    Kaliuzhin, V A

    2011-01-01

    Under natural conditions, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reproduce, as a rule, on the surface of solid or liquid medium. Thus, life cycle of yeast populations is substantially influenced by diurnal changes in ambient temperature. The pattern in the response of unrestricted yeast S. cerevisiae culture to changes in the temperature of cultivation is revealed experimentally. Yeast population, in the absence of environmental constraints on the functioning of cell chemosmotic bioenergetic system, demonstrates the ability of thermoresistance when the temperature of cultivation switches from the range of 12-36 degrees C to 37.5-40 degrees C. During the transient period that is associated with the temperature switching and lasts from 1 to 4 turnover cycles, yeast reproduction rate remains 1.5-2 times higher than under stationary conditions. This is due to evolutionary acquired adaptive activity of cell chemosmotic system. After the adaptive resources exhausting, yeast thermoresistance fully recovers at the temperature range of 12-36 degrees C within one generation time under conditions of both restricted and unrestricted nourishment. Adaptive significance of such thermoresistance seems obvious enough--it allows maintaining high reproduction rate in yeast when ambient temperature is reaching a brief maximum shortly after noon.

  10. Enhancement of the proline and nitric oxide synthetic pathway improves fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions in industrial baker's yeast

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast, mostly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is exposed to baking-associated stresses, such as air-drying and freeze-thaw stress. These baking-associated stresses exert severe injury to yeast cells, mainly due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cell death and reduced fermentation ability. Thus, there is a great need for a baker's yeast strain with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Recently, we revealed a novel antioxidative mechanism in a laboratory yeast strain that is involved in stress-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from proline via proline oxidase Put1 and N-acetyltransferase Mpr1. We also found that expression of the proline-feedback inhibition-less sensitive mutant γ-glutamyl kinase (Pro1-I150T) and the thermostable mutant Mpr1-F65L resulted in an enhanced fermentation ability of baker's yeast in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress and air-drying stress, respectively. However, baker's yeast strains with high fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stresses have not yet been developed. Results We constructed a self-cloned diploid baker's yeast strain with enhanced proline and NO synthesis by expressing Pro1-I150T and Mpr1-F65L in the presence of functional Put1. The engineered strain increased the intracellular NO level in response to air-drying stress, and the strain was tolerant not only to oxidative stress but also to both air-drying and freeze-thaw stresses probably due to the reduced intracellular ROS level. We also showed that the resultant strain retained higher leavening activity in bread dough after air-drying and freeze-thaw stress than that of the wild-type strain. On the other hand, enhanced stress tolerance and fermentation ability did not occur in the put1-deficient strain. This result suggests that NO is synthesized in baker's yeast from proline in response to oxidative stresses that induce ROS generation and that increased NO

  11. Phytase production by Rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus biofilm: characterization of enzymatic activity after spray drying in presence of carbohydrates and nonconventional adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Sato, Vanessa Sayuri; Jorge, João Atílio; Oliveira, Wanderley Pereira; Souza, Claudia Regina Fernandez; Guimarães, Luis Henrique Souza

    2014-02-28

    Microbial phytases are enzymes with biotechnological interest for the feed industry. In this article, the effect of spray-drying conditions on the stability and activity of extracellular phytase produced by R. microsporus var. microsporus biofilm is described. The phytase was spray-dried in the presence of starch, corn meal (>150 μm), soy bean meal (SB), corn meal (<150 μm) (CM), and maltodextrin as drying adjuvants. The residual enzyme activity after drying ranged from 10.7% to 60.4%, with SB and CM standing out as stabilizing agents. Water concentration and residual enzyme activity were determined in obtained powders as a function of the drying condition. When exposed to different pH values, the SB and CM products were stable, with residual activity above 50% in the pH range from 4.5 to 8.5 for 60 min. The use of CM as drying adjuvant promoted the best retention of enzymatic activity compared with SB. Spray drying of the R. microsporus var. microsporus phytase using different drying adjuvants showed interesting results, being quite feasible with regards their biotechnological applications, especially for poultry diets.

  12. In vivo "photofootprint" changes at sequences between the yeast GAL1 upstream activating sequence and "TATA" element require activated GAL4 protein but not a functional TATA element.

    PubMed Central

    Selleck, S B; Majors, J

    1988-01-01

    Transcription of the yeast GAL1 and GAL10 genes is induced by growth on galactose. Using the technique of photofootprinting in vivo, we previously documented equivalent transcription-dependent footprints within the putative "TATA" elements of both genes. To explore the functional significance of these observations, we created a 3-base-pair substitution mutation within the GAL1 promoter TATA element, which disrupted the ATATAA consensus sequence but left intact the photomodification targets. The mutation reduced galactose-induced RNA levels by a factor of 100. The mutant promoter no longer displayed the characteristic TATA sequence footprint, supporting the hypothesis that transcription activation involves the binding of a TATA box factor. We also observed a collection of transcription-correlated alterations in the modification pattern at sites between the UASG and the GAL1 TATA element, within sequences that are not required for inducible transcription. These patterns, characteristic of the induced wild-type GAL1 gene, were still galactose inducible with the TATA mutant GAl1 promoter, despite the low level of transcription from this promoter. We conclude that the GAL4-dependent protein/DNA structure responsible for the altered pattern within nonessential sequences is therefore not strictly coupled to an active TATA element or to high levels of expression. Nonetheless, the patterns probably reflect a stable protein-dependent structure that accompanies assembly of the transcription initiation complex. Images PMID:3041409

  13. Yeast and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenases: potential problems in target size analysis and evidence for a monomer active unit

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, M.D.; Ferguson-Miller, S.

    1987-06-16

    Yeast and horse alcohol dehydrogenases are commonly used as standards for radiation inactivation analysis of proteins, usually assuming that the minimal functional unit corresponds to the physical size in solution, a tetramer (M/sub r/ = 148,000) and a dimer (M/sub r/ = 80,000), respectively. Results described in this paper demonstrate that molecular weight overestimates may be obtained for the yeast protein as a result of its unusual sensitivity to secondary radiation products. Irradiation in the presence of sulhydryl reagents results in a smaller functional size estimate (67,000 +/- 3000) than that obtained in their absence (128,000 +/- 5000), indicating that some sulfhydryl groups in the enzyme may be particularly susceptible to attack by radiolytic species. Analysis of the horse liver enzyme reveals that although it has structural and functional similarities to the yeast protein, it is not as prone to secondary radiation damage and gives a minimal functional size estimate (33,000 +/= 1000) that most closely corresponds to a monomer. Quantitation of disappearance of the protein from a sodium dodecyl sulfate gel as a function of radiation dose also gives a target size (48,000 +/- 3000) in reasonable agreement with the monomer molecular weight. These results indicate that the individual subunits of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase have independent catalytic capacity and imply that the same may be true for the yeast enzyme.

  14. Effect of repeated drying-wetting-freezing-thawing cycles on the active soil organic carbon pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. M.; Kogut, B. M.; Lukin, S. M.

    2014-04-01

    Samples of soddy-podzolic soil (long-term overgrown fallow and continuous bare fallow), gray forest soil (forest, farming agrocenosis), and a typical chernozem (virgin steppe, forest area, farming agrocenosis, continuous bare fallow) have been incubated under stable conditions; other samples of these soils have been subjected to six drying-wetting-incubation-freezing-thawing-incubation cycles during 136 days. The wetting of dried soils and the thawing of frozen soils result in an abrupt but short increase in the emission rate of C-CO2 by 2.7-12.4 and 1.6-2.7 times, respectively, compared to the stable incubation conditions. As the soil is depleted in potentially mineralizable organic matter, the rate of the C-CO2 emission pulses initiated by disturbing impacts decreases. The cumulative extra production of C-CO2 by soils of natural lands for six cycles makes up 21-40% of that in the treatments with stable incubation conditions; the corresponding value for cultivated soils, including continuous clean fallow, is in the range of 45-82%. The content of potentially mineralizable organic matter in the soils subjected to recurrent drying-wetting-freezingthawing cycles decreased compared to the soils without disturbing impacts by 1.6-4.4 times, and the mineralization constants decreased by 1.9-3.6 times. It has been emphasized that the cumulative effect of drying-wetting-freezing-thawing cycles is manifested not only in the decrease in the total Corg from the soil but also in the reduction of the mineralization potential of the soil organic matter.

  15. Genetic evidence that high noninduced maltase and maltose permease activities, governed by MALx3-encoded transcriptional regulators, determine efficiency of gas production by baker's yeast in unsugared dough.

    PubMed

    Higgins, V J; Braidwood, M; Bell, P; Bissinger, P; Dawes, I W; Attfield, P V

    1999-02-01

    Strain selection and improvement in the baker's yeast industry have aimed to increase the speed of maltose fermentation in order to increase the leavening activity of industrial baking yeast. We identified two groups of baker's strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that can be distinguished by the mode of regulation of maltose utilization. One group (nonlagging strains), characterized by rapid maltose fermentation, had at least 12-fold more maltase and 130-fold-higher maltose permease activities than maltose-lagging strains in the absence of inducing sugar (maltose) and repressing sugar (glucose). Increasing the noninduced maltase activity of a lagging strain 13-fold led to an increase in CO2 production in unsugared dough. This increase in CO2 production also was seen when the maltose permease activity was increased 55-fold. Only when maltase and maltose permease activities were increased in concert was CO2 production by a lagging strain similar to that of a nonlagging strain. The noninduced activities of maltase and maltose permease constitute the largest determinant of whether a strain displays a nonlagging or a lagging phenotype and are dependent upon the MALx3 allele. Previous strategies for strain improvement have targeted glucose derepression of maltase and maltose permease expression. Our results suggest that increasing noninduced maltase and maltose permease levels is an important target for improved maltose metabolism in unsugared dough.

  16. A Four-Hour Yeast Bioassay for the Direct Measure of Estrogenic Activity in Wastewater without Sample Extraction, Concentration, or Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Balsiger, Heather A.; de la Torre, Roberto; Lee, Wen-Yee; Cox, Marc B.

    2010-01-01

    The assay described here represents an improved yeast bioassay that provides a rapid yet sensitive screening method for EDCs with very little hands-on time and without the need for sample preparation. Traditional receptor-mediated reporter assays in yeast were performed twelve to twenty four hours after ligand addition, used colorimetric substrates, and, in many cases, required high, non-physiological concentrations of ligand. With the advent of new chemiluminescent substrates a ligand-induced signal can be detected within thirty minutes using high picomolar to low nanomolar concentrations of estrogen. As a result of the sensitivity (EC50 for estradiol is ~ 0.7 nM) and the very short assay time (2-4 hours) environmental water samples can typically be assayed directly without sterilization, extraction, and concentration. Thus, these assays represent rapid and sensitive approaches for determining the presence of contaminants in environmental samples. As proof of principle, we directly assayed wastewater influent and effluent taken from a wastewater treatment plant in the El Paso, TX area for the presence of estrogenic activity. The data obtained in the four-hour yeast bioassay directly correlated with GC-mass spectrometry analysis of these same water samples. PMID:20074779

  17. Sir2 phosphorylation through cAMP-PKA and CK2 signaling inhibits the lifespan extension activity of Sir2 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kang, Woo Kyu; Kim, Yeong Hyeock; Kang, Hyun Ah; Kwon, Ki-Sun; Kim, Jeong-Yoon

    2015-09-02

    Silent information regulator 2 (Sir2), an NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase, has been proposed to be a longevity factor that plays important roles in dietary restriction (DR)-mediated lifespan extension. In this study, we show that the Sir2's role for DR-mediated lifespan extension depends on cAMP-PKA and casein kinase 2 (CK2) signaling in yeast. Sir2 partially represses the transcription of lifespan-associated genes, such as PMA1 (encoding an H(+)-ATPase) and many ribosomal protein genes, through deacetylation of Lys 16 of histone H4 in the promoter regions of these genes. This repression is relieved by Sir2 S473 phosphorylation, which is mediated by active cAMP-PKA and CK2 signaling. Moderate DR increases the replicative lifespan of wild-type yeast but has no effect on that of yeast expressing the Sir2-S473E or S473A allele, suggesting that the effect of Sir2 on DR-mediated lifespan extension is negatively regulated by S473 phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a mechanism by which Sir2 contributes to lifespan extension.

  18. A four-hour yeast bioassay for the direct measure of estrogenic activity in wastewater without sample extraction, concentration, or sterilization.

    PubMed

    Balsiger, Heather A; de la Torre, Roberto; Lee, Wen-Yee; Cox, Marc B

    2010-02-15

    The assay described here represents an improved yeast bioassay that provides a rapid yet sensitive screening method for EDCs with very little hands-on time and without the need for sample preparation. Traditional receptor-mediated reporter assays in yeast were performed twelve to twenty four hours after ligand addition, used colorimetric substrates, and, in many cases, required high, non-physiological concentrations of ligand. With the advent of new chemiluminescent substrates a ligand-induced signal can be detected within thirty minutes using high picomolar to low nanomolar concentrations of estrogen. As a result of the sensitivity (EC(50) for estradiol is approximately 0.7nM) and the very short assay time (2-4h) environmental water samples can typically be assayed directly without sterilization, extraction, and concentration. Thus, these assays represent rapid and sensitive approaches for determining the presence of contaminants in environmental samples. As proof of principle, we directly assayed wastewater influent and effluent taken from a wastewater treatment plant in the El Paso, TX area for the presence of estrogenic activity. The data obtained in the four-hour yeast bioassay directly correlated with GC-mass spectrometry analysis of these same water samples.

  19. Prevention of Yeast Spoilage in Feed and Food by the Yeast Mycocin HMK

    PubMed Central

    Lowes, K. F.; Shearman, C. A.; Payne, J.; MacKenzie, D.; Archer, D. B.; Merry, R. J.; Gasson, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The yeast Williopsis mrakii produces a mycocin or yeast killer toxin designated HMK; this toxin exhibits high thermal stability, high pH stability, and a broad spectrum of activity against other yeasts. We describe construction of a synthetic gene for mycocin HMK and heterologous expression of this toxin in Aspergillus niger. Mycocin HMK was fused to a glucoamylase protein carrier, which resulted in secretion of biologically active mycocin into the culture media. A partial purification protocol was developed, and a comparison with native W. mrakii mycocin showed that the heterologously expressed mycocin had similar physiological properties and an almost identical spectrum of biological activity against a number of yeasts isolated from silage and yoghurt. Two food and feed production systems prone to yeast spoilage were used as models to assess the ability of mycocin HMK to act as a biocontrol agent. The onset of aerobic spoilage in mature maize silage was delayed by application of A. niger mycocin HMK on opening because the toxin inhibited growth of the indigenous spoilage yeasts. This helped maintain both higher lactic acid levels and a lower pH. In yoghurt spiked with dairy spoilage yeasts, A. niger mycocin HMK was active at all of the storage temperatures tested at which yeast growth occurred, and there was no resurgence of resistant yeasts. The higher the yeast growth rate, the more effective the killing action of the mycocin. Thus, mycocin HMK has potential applications in controlling both silage spoilage and yoghurt spoilage caused by yeasts. PMID:10698773

  20. Some Aspects of Yeast Anaerobic Metabolism Examined by the Inhibition of Pyruvate Decarboxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Earl V.

    1998-10-01

    Incubation of yeast cells with various sugars in aqueous alkaline phosphate solutions under anaerobic conditions results in the accumulation of pyruvate in the cell medium after short periods of up to 15 minutes. This accumulation of pyruvate as the end product of glycolysis results from the inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylase under the conditions. This pyruvate production can be readily measured in the cell-free medium by a spectrophotometric assay using lactic dehydrogenase and NADH. The production of pyruvate can be directly related to the ability of the yeast cells to metabolize particular carbon sources provided. Comparison of pyruvate production by yeast from a variety of common sugars, for example, provides students with a means to assess what sugars are readily utilized by this organism. An additional advantage for student laboratory studies is the availability of Sacchromyces cerevisiae at minimal cost as dry granules which are easily weighed and quickly activated.

  1. A new biological test of water toxicity-yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae conductometric test.

    PubMed

    Dolezalova, Jaroslava; Rumlova, Lubomira

    2014-11-01

    This new biological test of water toxicity is based on monitoring of specific conductivity changes of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae suspension as a result of yeast fermentation activity inhibition in toxic conditions. The test was verified on ten substances with various mechanisms of toxic effect and the results were compared with two standard toxicity tests based on Daphnia magna mobility inhibition (EN ISO 6341) and Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition (EN ISO 11348-2) and with the results of the S. cerevisiae lethal test (Rumlova and Dolezalova, 2012). The new biological test - S. cerevisiae conductometric test - is an express method developed primarily for field conditions. It is applicable in case of need of immediate information about water toxicity. Fast completion is an advantage of this test (time necessary for test completion is about 60min), the test is simple and the test organism - dried instant yeast - belongs among its biggest advantages because of its long-term storage life and broad availability.

  2. An atypical active cell death process underlies the fungicidal activity of ciclopirox olamine against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Bruno; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Carvalho, Joana; Silva, Manuel T; Leão, Cecília; Rodrigues, Fernando; Ludovico, Paula

    2007-05-01

    Ciclopirox olamine (CPO), a fungicidal agent widely used in clinical practice, induced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae an active cell death (ACD) process characterized by changes in nuclear morphology and chromatin condensation associated with the appearance of a population in the sub-G(0)/G(1) cell cycle phase and an arrest delay in the G(2)/M phases. This ACD was associated neither with intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling, as revealed by the use of different classes of ROS scavengers, nor with a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive phenotype. Furthermore, CPO-induced cell death seems to be dependent on unknown protease activity but independent of the apoptotic regulators Aif1p and Yca1p and of autophagic pathways involving Apg5p, Apg8p and Uth1p. Our results show that CPO triggers in S. cerevisiae an atypical nonapoptotic, nonautophagic ACD with as yet unknown regulators.

  3. Unique regulation of glyoxalase I activity during osmotic stress response in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe: neither the mRNA nor the protein level of glyoxalase I increase under conditions that enhance its activity.

    PubMed

    Takatsume, Yoshifumi; Izawa, Shingo; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2005-03-01

    Glyoxalase I is a ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of methylglyoxal, a toxic 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis, to S-D-lactoylglutathione. The activity of glyoxalase I in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was increased by osmotic stress induced by sorbitol. However, neither the mRNA levels of its structural gene nor its protein levels increased under the same conditions. Cycloheximide blocked the induction of glyoxalase I activity in cells exposed to osmotic stress. In addition, glyoxalase I activity was increased in stress-activated protein kinase-deficient mutants (wis1 and spc1). We present evidence for the post-translational regulation of glyoxalase I by osmotic stress in the fission yeast.

  4. Tanshinones extend chronological lifespan in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2014-10-01

    Natural products with anti-aging property have drawn great attention recently but examples of such compounds are exceedingly scarce. By applying a high-throughput assay based on yeast chronological lifespan measurement, we screened the anti-aging activity of 144 botanical materials and found that dried roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge have significant anti-aging activity. Tanshinones isolated from the plant including cryptotanshione, tanshinone I, and tanshinone IIa, are the active components. Among them, cryptotanshinone can greatly extend the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chronological lifespan (up to 2.5 times) in a dose- and the-time-of-addition-dependent manner at nanomolar concentrations without disruption of cell growth. We demonstrate that cryptotanshinone prolong chronological lifespan via a nutrient-dependent regime, especially essential amino acid sensing, and three conserved protein kinases Tor1, Sch9, and Gcn2 are required for cryptotanshinone-induced lifespan extension. In addition, cryptotanshinone significantly increases the lifespan of SOD2-deleted mutants. Altogether, those data suggest that cryptotanshinone might be involved in the regulation of, Tor1, Sch9, Gcn2, and Sod2, these highly conserved longevity proteins modulated by nutrients from yeast to humans.

  5. Mitochondrial inheritance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Benedikt

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondria are the site of oxidative phosphorylation, play a key role in cellular energy metabolism, and are critical for cell survival and proliferation. The propagation of mitochondria during cell division depends on replication and partitioning of mitochondrial DNA, cytoskeleton-dependent mitochondrial transport, intracellular positioning of the organelle, and activities coordinating these processes. Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be a valuable model organism to study the mechanisms that drive segregation of the mitochondrial genome and determine mitochondrial partitioning and behavior in an asymmetrically dividing cell. Here, I review past and recent advances that identified key components and cellular pathways contributing to mitochondrial inheritance in yeast. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Guest Editors: Manuela Pereira and Miguel Teixeira.

  6. Improving the Concentrations of the Active Components in the Herbal Tea Ingredient, Uraria crinita: The Effect of Post-harvest Oven-drying Processing

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jung; Dai, Yuntao; Cheng, Hao-Yuan; Lam, Wing; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Li, Ke; Peng, Wen-Huang; Pao, Li-Heng; Hsieh, Ming-Tsuen; Qin, Xue-Mei; Lee, Meng-Shiou

    2017-01-01

    Uraria crinita is widely used as a popular folk drink; however, little is known about how the post-harvest operations affect the chemical composition and bioactivity of UC. We assessed three drying methods (Oven-drying, Air-drying, Sun-drying), as well as the Oven-drying temperature using metabolomics approaches and bioactivity assays. The samples processed at 40 degree show a greater effect on the levels of estrogen receptor-alpha activity and nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 activity, anti-oxidative activity, and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition compared with the other samples. A multivariate analysis showed a clear separation between the 40 degree Oven-dried samples and the other samples, which is consistent with the results of bioactivity assay. These results are ascribed to at least two-fold increase in the concentrations of flavonoids, spatholosineside A and triterpenoids in the oven-dried samples compared with the other groups. The proposed Oven-drying method at 40 degree results in an improved quality of UC. PMID:28079108

  7. Improving the Concentrations of the Active Components in the Herbal Tea Ingredient, Uraria crinita: The Effect of Post-harvest Oven-drying Processing.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jung; Dai, Yuntao; Cheng, Hao-Yuan; Lam, Wing; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Li, Ke; Peng, Wen-Huang; Pao, Li-Heng; Hsieh, Ming-Tsuen; Qin, Xue-Mei; Lee, Meng-Shiou

    2017-01-12

    Uraria crinita is widely used as a popular folk drink; however, little is known about how the post-harvest operations affect the chemical composition and bioactivity of UC. We assessed three drying methods (Oven-drying, Air-drying, Sun-drying), as well as the Oven-drying temperature using metabolomics approaches and bioactivity assays. The samples processed at 40 degree show a greater effect on the levels of estrogen receptor-alpha activity and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 activity, anti-oxidative activity, and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition compared with the other samples. A multivariate analysis showed a clear separation between the 40 degree Oven-dried samples and the other samples, which is consistent with the results of bioactivity assay. These results are ascribed to at least two-fold increase in the concentrations of flavonoids, spatholosineside A and triterpenoids in the oven-dried samples compared with the other groups. The proposed Oven-drying method at 40 degree results in an improved quality of UC.

  8. Aym1, a mouse meiotic gene identified by virtue of its ability to activate early meiotic genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Malcov, Mira; Cesarkas, Karen; Stelzer, Gil; Shalom, Sarah; Dicken, Yosef; Naor, Yaniv; Goldstein, Ronald S; Sagee, Shira; Kassir, Yona; Don, Jeremy

    2004-12-01

    Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that operate during differentiation of mitotically dividing spermatogonia cells into spermatocytes lags way behind what is known about other differentiating systems. Given the evolutionary conservation of the meiotic process, we screened for mouse proteins that could specifically activate early meiotic promoters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells, when fused to the Gal4 activation domain (Gal4AD). Our screen yielded the Aym1 gene that encodes a short peptide of 45 amino acids. We show that a Gal4AD-AYM1 fusion protein activates expression of reporter genes through the promoters of the early meiosis-specific genes IME2 and HOP1, and that this activation is dependent on the DNA-binding protein Ume6. Aym1 is transcribed predominantly in mouse primary spermatocytes and in gonads of female embryos undergoing the corresponding meiotic divisions. Aym1 immunolocalized to nuclei of primary spermatocytes and oocytes and to specific type A spermatogonia cells, suggesting it might play a role in the processes leading to meiotic competence. The potential functional relationship between AYM1 and yeast proteins that regulate expression of early meiotic genes is discussed.

  9. Cloud condensation nucleus activity comparison of dry- and wet-generated mineral dust aerosol: the significance of soluble material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, S.; Huang, Y.-W.; Seewald, J. S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    This study examines the interaction of clay mineral particles and water vapor for determining the conditions required for cloud droplet formation. Droplet formation conditions are investigated for two common clay minerals, illite and sodium-rich montmorillonite, and an industrially derived sample, Arizona Test Dust. Using wet and dry particle generation coupled to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and cloud condensation nuclei counter, the critical activation of the clay mineral particles as cloud condensation nuclei is characterized. Electron microscopy (EM) is used in order to determine non-sphericity in particle shape. It is also used in order to determine particle surface area and account for transmission of multiply charged particles by the DMA. Single particle mass spectrometry and ion chromatography are used to investigate soluble material in wet-generated samples and demonstrate that wet and dry generation yield compositionally different particles. Activation results are analyzed in the context of both κ-Köhler theory (κ-KT) and Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption activation theory. This study has two main results: (1) κ-KT is the suitable framework to describe clay mineral nucleation activity. Apparent differences in κ with respect to size arise from an artifact introduced by improper size-selection methodology. For dust particles with mobility sizes larger than ~300 nm, i.e., ones that are within an atmospherically relevant size range, both κ-KT and FHH theory yield similar critical supersaturations. However, the former requires a single hygroscopicity parameter instead of the two adjustable parameters required by the latter. For dry-generated particles, the size dependence of κ is likely an artifact of the shape of the size distribution: there is a sharp drop-off in particle concentration at ~300 nm, and a large fraction of particles classified with a mobility diameter less than ~300 nm are actually multiply charged, resulting in a much

  10. The transcription factors ADR1 or CAT8 are required for RTG pathway activation and evasion from yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death in raffinose

    PubMed Central

    Laera, Luna; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marzulli, Domenico; Liu, Zhengchang; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on glucose undergoes programmed cell death (PCD) induced by acetic acid (AA-PCD), but evades PCD when grown in raffinose. This is due to concomitant relief of carbon catabolite repression (CCR) and activation of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, a mitochondria-to-nucleus communication pathway causing up-regulation of various nuclear target genes, such as CIT2, encoding peroxisomal citrate synthase, dependent on the positive regulator RTG2 in response to mitochondrial dysfunction. CCR down-regulates genes mainly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. In this work, we investigated the relationships between the RTG and CCR pathways in the modulation of AA-PCD sensitivity under glucose repression or de-repression conditions. Yeast single and double mutants lacking RTG2 and/or certain factors regulating carbon source utilization, including MIG1, HXK2, ADR1, CAT8, and HAP4, have been analyzed for their survival and CIT2 expression after acetic acid treatment. ADR1 and CAT8 were identified as positive regulators of RTG-dependent gene transcription. ADR1 and CAT8 interact with RTG2 and with each other in inducing cell resistance to AA-PCD in raffinose and controlling the nature of cell death. In the absence of ADR1 and CAT8, AA-PCD evasion is acquired through activation of an alternative factor/pathway repressed by RTG2, suggesting that RTG2 may play a function in promoting necrotic cell death in repressing conditions when RTG pathway is inactive. Moreover, our data show that simultaneous mitochondrial retrograde pathway activation and SNF1-dependent relief of CCR have a key role in central carbon metabolism reprogramming which modulates the yeast acetic acid-stress response. PMID:28357334

  11. Evaluation of estrogenic activity of parabens and their chlorinated derivatives by using the yeast two-hybrid assay and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Masanori; Kamata, Ryo; Shiraishi, Fujio; Makino, Masakazu

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the estrogen agonist activities of 21 parabens and their chlorinated derivatives by using yeast two-hybrid assays incorporating either the human or medaka (Oryzias latipes) estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha and medERalpha, respectively), and by using hERalpha competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ER-ELISA). In the two-hybrid assay with hERalpha, five parabens and three chlorinated derivatives exhibited estrogenic activity, and their relative activity (17beta-estradiol [E2] = 1) ranged from 2.0 x 10(-5) to 2.0 x 10(-4), with the highest activity observed in i-butylparaben. In the medERalpha assay, six parabens and six chlorinated derivatives exhibited estrogenic activity and their relative activity ranged from 2.7 x 10(-5) to 3.5 x 10(-3), with the highest activity observed in benzylparaben, its monochlorinated derivative, i-butylparaben, and n-butylparaben. Although medERalpha demonstrated an activity to E2 that was three times lower than that demonstrated by hERalpha, medERalpha has a higher sensitivity to parabens than hERa (1.3-8.9 times). Five parabens and two chlorinated derivatives exhibited a binding affinity to ERa in the ER-ELISA; of the parabens, i-butylparaben exhibited the strongest binding affinity. The yeast two-hybrid assay and the ER-ELISA also revealed that many of the assayed chlorinated parabens were much weaker than the parent compound. In addition, the results mainly showed that parabens with a bulk substituent (e.g., i-butyl and benzyl groups) had a higher activity than those with a sterically small substituent. It is considered that derivatization masks the apparent estrogenic activity of parabens, but the resulting chlorinated compounds may represent a potential hazard and therefore other toxicity tests should be performed to determine the toxicity of the chlorinated derivatives.

  12. Electro-Hydrodynamics and Kinetic Modeling of Dry and Humid Air Flows Activated by Corona Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    P. Sarrette, J.; Eichwald, O.; Marchal, F.; Ducasse, O.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-05-01

    The present work is devoted to the 2D simulation of a point-to-plane Atmospheric Corona Discharge Reactor (ACDR) powered by a DC high voltage supply. The corona reactor is periodically crossed by thin mono filamentary streamers with a natural repetition frequency of some tens of kHz. The study compares the results obtained in dry air and in air mixed with a small amount of water vapour (humid air). The simulation involves the electro-dynamics, chemical kinetics and neutral gas hydrodynamics phenomena that influence the kinetics of the chemical species transformation. Each discharge lasts about one hundred of a nanosecond while the post-discharge occurring between two successive discharges lasts one hundred of a microsecond. The ACDR is crossed by a lateral dry or humid air flow initially polluted with 400 ppm of NO. After 5 ms, the time corresponding to the occurrence of 50 successive discharge/post-discharge phases, a higher NO removal rate and a lower ozone production rate are found in humid air. This change is due to the presence of the HO2 species formed from the H primary radical in the discharge zone.

  13. Structure of drying costs

    SciTech Connect

    Sztabert, Z.T.

    1996-05-01

    A knowledge of cost structure and cost behavior is necessary in the management activities, particularly in the domain of investment or production decision making, as well as in the areas of production cost planning and control. Prediction and analysis of values of cost components for different technologies of drying are important when selection of a drying method and drying equipment should be done. Cost structures of lumber and coal drying processes together with an application of the factor method for prediction of the drying cost are presented.

  14. Sca