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Sample records for active duty personnel

  1. Caring for Active Duty Military Personnel in the Civilian Sector

    PubMed Central

    Waitzkin, Howard; Noble, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Due to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the unmet medical and psychological needs of military personnel are creating major challenges. Increasingly, active duty military personnel are seeking physical and mental health services from civilian professionals. The Civilian Medical Resources Network attempts to address these unmet needs. Participants in the Network include primary care and mental health practitioners in all regions of the country. Network professionals provide independent assessments, clinical interventions in acute situations, and documentation that assists GIs in obtaining reassignment or discharge. Most clients who use Network services come from low-income backgrounds and manifest psychological rather than physical disorders. Qualitative themes in professional-client encounters have focused on ethical conflicts, the impact of violence without meaning (especially violence against civilians), and perceived problems in military health and mental health policies. Unmet needs of active duty military personnel deserve more concerted attention from medical professionals and policy makers. PMID:21339846

  2. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application for treatment; active duty personnel... Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical relief who is on active duty shall furnish a certificate identifying him. Such certificate shall be signed...

  3. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application for treatment; active duty personnel... Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical relief who is on active duty shall furnish a certificate identifying him. Such certificate shall be signed...

  4. 42 CFR 31.5 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application for treatment; active duty personnel... Survey and Public Health Service § 31.5 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. (a) An applicant for medical relief who is on active duty shall furnish a certificate identifying him....

  5. 42 CFR 31.5 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application for treatment; active duty personnel... Survey and Public Health Service § 31.5 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. (a) An applicant for medical relief who is on active duty shall furnish a certificate identifying him....

  6. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application for treatment; active duty personnel... Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical relief who is on active duty shall furnish a certificate identifying him. Such certificate shall be signed...

  7. 42 CFR 31.5 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application for treatment; active duty personnel... Survey and Public Health Service § 31.5 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. (a) An applicant for medical relief who is on active duty shall furnish a certificate identifying him....

  8. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application for treatment; active duty personnel... Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical relief who is on active duty shall furnish a certificate identifying him. Such certificate shall be signed...

  9. 42 CFR 31.5 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application for treatment; active duty personnel... Survey and Public Health Service § 31.5 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. (a) An applicant for medical relief who is on active duty shall furnish a certificate identifying him....

  10. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application for treatment; active duty personnel... Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical relief who is on active duty shall furnish a certificate identifying him. Such certificate shall be signed...

  11. Health literacy rates in a sample of active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Weld, Konstantine Keian; Padden, Diane; Ricciardi, Richard; Bibb, Sandra C Garmon

    2009-11-01

    The results reported in this article are from a larger descriptive study examining the health literacy rates in active duty military personnel receiving health care within a culture of universal access. The purpose of this article is to describe the health literacy skills among a sample of active duty military personnel with comparison to the national population. Data were collected using the shortened version of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) and the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) in a convenience sample of 155 active duty subjects at a major military hospital from January 2007 through May 2007. Results indicate that military personnel have adequate health literacy skills although variations were noted on the basis of health training and race/ethnicity. Although the S-TOFHLA was found to be a practical tool for assessing health literacy in a high-tempo health care setting, additional reliability and validity testing is needed.

  12. Suicides in Active-Duty Enlisted Navy Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawahara, Yoshito; Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    1991-01-01

    Compared completed suicides among U.S. Navy enlisted personnel from 1974-85 to suicides in U.S. general population and in U.S. Army. Navy suicide rate, lowest of three groups, increased between 1976 and 1983, in contrast to national and Army rates. Young white males in apprentice/recruit and blue-collar occupations had highest rates of suicide in…

  13. Caffeine Use among Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Joseph J.; Trone, Daniel W.; McGraw, Susan; Steelman, Ryan A.; Austin, Krista G.; Lieberman, Harris R.

    2016-01-01

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate 89% of Americans regularly consume caffeine, but these data do not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine use in Navy and Marine Corps personnel, including prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with use. A random sample of Navy and Marine Corps personnel was contacted and asked to complete a detailed questionnaire describing their use of caffeine-containing substances, in addition to their demographic, military, and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 1708 service members (SMs) completed the questionnaire. Overall, 87% reported using caffeinated beverages ≥1 time/week, with caffeine users consuming a mean ± standard error of 226 ± 5 mg/day (242 ± 7 mg/day for men, 183 ± 8 mg/day for women). The most commonly consumed caffeinated beverages (% users) were coffee (65%), colas (54%), teas (40%), and energy drinks (28%). Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine use (≥1 time/week) included older age, white race/ethnicity, higher alcohol consumption, and participating in less resistance training. Prevalence of caffeine use in these SMs was similar to that reported in civilian investigations, but daily consumption (mg/day) was higher. PMID:27735834

  14. Prevalence of Perceived Stress and Mental Health Indicators Among Reserve-Component and Active-Duty Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Marian E.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Bray, Robert M.; Williams, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined stress levels and other indicators of mental health in reservists and active-duty military personnel by deployment status. Methods. We used data from the Department of Defense Health-Related Behaviors surveys, which collect comprehensive, population-based data for reserve and active-duty forces. Data were collected from 18 342 reservists and 16 146 active-duty personnel. Results. Overall, with adjustment for sociodemographic and service differences, reservists reported similar or less work and family stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms than did active-duty personnel. However, reservists who had been deployed reported higher rates of suicidal ideation and attempts than did active-duty personnel who had been deployed and higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology than did any active-duty personnel and reservists who had not been deployed. The highest rates of suicidal ideation and attempts were among reservists who had served in theaters other than Iraq and Afghanistan. Conclusions. Our results suggest that deployment has a greater impact on reservists than on active-duty members, thus highlighting the urgent need for services addressing reservists’ unique postdeployment mental health issues. Also, deployment to any theater, not only Iraq or Afghanistan, represents unique threats to all service members’ mental well-being. PMID:22571709

  15. Effects of combat deployment on risky and self-destructive behavior among active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Cynthia J; Stander, Valerie A; McWhorter, Stephanie K; Rabenhorst, Mandy M; Milner, Joel S

    2011-10-01

    Although research has documented negative effects of combat deployment on mental health, few studies have examined whether deployment increases risky or self-destructive behavior. The present study addressed this issue. In addition, we examined whether deployment effects on risky behavior varied depending on history of pre-deployment risky behavior, and assessed whether psychiatric conditions mediated effects of deployment on risky behavior. In an anonymous survey, active duty members of the U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Navy (N = 2116) described their deployment experiences and their participation in risky recreational activities, unprotected sex, illegal drug use, self-injurious behavior, and suicide attempts during three time frames (civilian, military pre-deployment, and military post-deployment). Respondents also reported whether they had problems with depression, anxiety, or PTSD during the same three time frames. Results revealed that risky behavior was much more common in civilian than in military life, with personnel who had not deployed, compared to those who had deployed, reporting more risky behavior and more psychiatric problems as civilians. For the current time period, in contrast, personnel who had deployed (versus never deployed) were significantly more likely to report both risky behavior and psychiatric problems. Importantly, deployment was associated with increases in risky behavior only for personnel with a pre-deployment history of engaging in risky behavior. Although psychiatric conditions were associated with higher levels of risky behavior, psychiatric problems did not mediate associations between deployment and risky behavior. Implications for understanding effects of combat deployment on active duty personnel and directions for future research are discussed.

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury among US Active Duty Military Personnel and Negative Drinking-Related Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rachel Sayko; Larson, Mary Jo; Corrigan, John D.; Ritter, Grant A.; Williams, Thomas V.

    2013-01-01

    This study used the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors among Active Duty Military Personnel to determine whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with past year drinking-related consequences. The study sample included currently-drinking personnel who had a combat deployment in the past year and were home for ≥6 months (N = 3,350). Negative binomial regression models were used to assess the incidence rate ratios of consequences, by TBI-level. Experiencing a TBI with a loss of consciousness >20 minutes was significantly associated with consequences independent of demographics, combat exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder, and binge drinking. The study’s limitations are noted. PMID:23869456

  17. Sleep Disorders and Associated Medical Comorbidities in Active Duty Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Mysliwiec, Vincent; McGraw, Leigh; Pierce, Roslyn; Smith, Patrick; Trapp, Brandon; Roth, Bernard J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Describe the prevalence of sleep disorders in military personnel referred for polysomnography and identify relationships between demographic characteristics, comorbid diagnoses, and specific sleep disorders. Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Setting: Military medical treatment facility. Participants: Active duty military personnel with diagnostic polysomnogram in 2010. Measurements: Primary sleep disorder rendered by review of polysomnogram and medical record by a board certified sleep medicine physician. Demographic characteristics and conditions of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), anxiety, depression, and pain syndromes determined by medical record review. Results: Primary sleep diagnoses (n = 725) included: mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 207 (27.2%); insomnia, 188 (24.7%); moderate-to-severe OSA, 183 (24.0 %); and paradoxical insomnia,39 (5.1%); behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome, 68 (8.9%) and snoring, 40 (5.3%) comprised our control group. Short sleep duration (< 5 h) was reported by 41.8%. Overall 85.2% had deployed, with 58.1% having one or more comorbid diagnoses. Characteristics associated with moderate-to-severe OSA were age (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.03 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.0–1.05], sex (male) (adjusted OR, 19.97 [95% CI, 2.66–150.05], anxiety (adjusted OR, 0.58 [95% CI, 0.34–0.99]), and body mass index, BMI (adjusted OR 1.19 [95% CI, 1.13–1.25]; for insomnia, characteristics included PTSD (adjusted OR, 2.12 [95% CI, 1.31–3.44]), pain syndromes (adjusted OR, 1.48 [95%CI, 1.01–2.12]), sex (female) (adjusted OR, 0.22 [95% CI, 0.12–0.41]) and lower BMI (adjusted OR, 0.91 [95% CI, 0.87, 0.95]). Conclusions: Service-related illnesses are prevalent in military personnel who undergo polysomnography with significant associations between PTSD, pain syndromes, and insomnia. Despite having sleep disorders, almost half reported short sleep duration

  18. Incidence of Norovirus-Associated Medical Encounters among Active Duty United States Military Personnel and Their Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Rha, Brian; Lopman, Benjamin A.; Alcala, Ashley N.; Riddle, Mark S.; Porter, Chad K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Norovirus is a leading cause of gastroenteritis episodes and outbreaks in US military deployments, but estimates of endemic disease burden among military personnel in garrison are lacking. Methods Diagnostic codes from gastroenteritis-associated medical encounters of active duty military personnel and their beneficiaries from July 1998–June 2011 were obtained from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. Using time-series regression models, cause-unspecified encounters were modeled as a function of encounters for specific enteropathogens. Model residuals (representing unexplained encounters) were used to estimate norovirus-attributable medical encounters. Incidence rates were calculated using population data for both active duty and beneficiary populations. Results The estimated annual mean rate of norovirus-associated medically-attended visits among active duty personnel and their beneficiaries was 292 (95% CI: 258 to 326) and 93 (95% CI: 80 to 105) encounters per 10,000 persons, respectively. Rates were highest among beneficiaries <5 years of age with a median annual rate of 435 (range: 318 to 646) encounters per 10,000 children. Norovirus was estimated to cause 31% and 27% of all-cause gastroenteritis encounters in the active duty and beneficiary populations, respectively, with over 60% occurring between November and April. There was no evidence of any lag effect where norovirus disease occurred in one population before the other, or in one beneficiary age group before the others. Conclusions Norovirus is a major cause of medically-attended gastroenteritis among non-deployed US military active duty members as well as in their beneficiaries. PMID:27115602

  19. 42 CFR 31.5 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... him. (b) A temporary member of the Coast Guard Reserve except when on active duty or a member of the... responsible superior officer setting forth the facts and circumstances giving rise to the need for medical relief. In emergencies, such statement shall be furnished promptly after the member has received...

  20. A randomized, controlled trial of osteopathic manipulative treatment for acute low back pain in active duty military personnel

    PubMed Central

    Cruser, des Anges; Maurer, Douglas; Hensel, Kendi; Brown, Sarah K; White, Kathryn; Stoll, Scott T

    2012-01-01

    Objective Acute low back pain (ALBP) may limit mobility and impose functional limitations in active duty military personnel. Although some manual therapies have been reported effective for ALBP in military personnel, there have been no published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) in the military. Furthermore, current military ALBP guidelines do not specifically include OMT. Methods This RCT examined the efficacy of OMT in relieving ALBP and improving functioning in military personnel at Fort Lewis, Washington. Sixty-three male and female soldiers ages 18 to 35 were randomly assigned to a group receiving OMT plus usual care or a group receiving usual care only (UCO). Results The primary outcome measures were pain on the quadruple visual analog scale, and functioning on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Outcomes were measured immediately preceding each of four treatment sessions and at four weeks post-trial. Intention to treat analysis found significantly greater post-trial improvement in ‘Pain Now’ for OMT compared to UCO (P = 0·026). Furthermore, the OMT group reported less ‘Pain Now’ and ‘Pain Typical’ at all visits (P = 0·025 and P = 0·020 respectively). Osteopathic manipulative treatment subjects also tended to achieve a clinically meaningful improvement from baseline on ‘Pain at Best’ sooner than the UCO subjects. With similar baseline expectations, OMT subjects reported significantly greater satisfaction with treatment and overall self-reported improvement (P<0·01). Conclusion This study supports the effectiveness of OMT in reducing ALBP pain in active duty military personnel. PMID:23372389

  1. Pilot Study to determine interest of adult civilian dependants of active duty military personnel in participation in a weight control program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult civilian dependents of active duty military personnel (ADMP) may play a central role in influencing the home food environment and the risk of overweight and obesity in American Warfighters and military families. However, there is no information on whether this group would be receptive to weigh...

  2. 32 CFR 584.6 - Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL FAMILY SUPPORT, CHILD CUSTODY, AND PATERNITY § 584.6 Procedures governing nonactive duty or... paternity claims against former soldiers or other not on active duty will be sent to the Commander,...

  3. Precipitating circumstances of suicide among active duty U.S. Army personnel versus U.S. civilians, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents' military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent. PMID:25093259

  4. Precipitating Circumstances of Suicide among Active Duty U.S. Army Personnel Versus U.S. Civilians, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents’ military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent. PMID:25093259

  5. Help-Seeking Behaviors Among Active-Duty Military Personnel: Utilization of Chaplains and Other Mental Health Service Providers

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jessica Kelley; Hourani, Laurel; Lane, Marian E.; Tueller, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Military chaplains not only conduct religious services, but also provide counseling and spiritual support to military service members, operating as liaisons between soldiers and mental health professionals. In this study, active-duty soldiers (N = 889) reported help-seeking behaviors and mental health. Using logistic regressions, we describe the issues for which soldiers reported seeking help, then outline the characteristics of those who are most likely to seek help from a chaplain. Of the soldiers who sought help from a chaplain within the previous year, 29.9% reported high levels of combat exposure, 50.8% screened positive for depression, 39.1% had probable PTSD, and 26.6% screened positive for generalized anxiety disorder. The participant’s unit firing on the enemy, personally firing on the enemy, and seeing dead bodies or human remains predicted seeing a chaplain. Future research should examine ways to engage soldiers who have had more combat experiences with the chaplain community to address spiritual issues. PMID:27191375

  6. The Role of Natural Support Systems in the Post-deployment Adjustment of Active Duty Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Janet A; Olson, Jonathan; Perkins, Daniel F; Travis, Wendy J; Ormsby, LaJuana

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the relations among three different types of naturally occurring social support (from romantic partners, friends and neighbors, and unit leaders) and three indices of service member well-being (self reports of depressive symptoms, satisfaction with military life, and perceptions of unit readiness) for service members who did and did not report negative experiences associated with military deployment. Data were drawn from the 2011 Community Assessment completed anonymously by more than 63,000 USAF personnel. Regression analyses revealed that higher levels of social support was associated with better outcomes regardless of negative deployment experiences. Evidence of moderation was also noted, with all forms of social support moderating the impact of negative deployment experiences on depressive symptoms and support from unit leaders moderating the impact of negative deployment experience on satisfaction with military life. No moderation was found for perceptions of unit readiness. Subgroup analyses revealed slightly different patterns for male and female service members, with support providing fewer moderation effects for women. These findings may have value for military leaders and mental health professionals working to harness the power of naturally occurring relationships to maximize the positive adjustment of service members and their families. Implications for practices related to re-integration of post-deployment military personnel are discussed. PMID:26148977

  7. Understanding diet and modeling changes in the omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid composition of U.S. garrison foods for active duty personnel.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Bernadette P; Yu, Karina; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon; Johnson, Jeremiah; Hibbeln, Joseph R

    2014-11-01

    Research indicates that dietary omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are important in reducing the risk of mental illness. We used the DoD Survey of Health Related Behaviors among Active Duty Military Personnel (HRBS) to assess current military dietary patterns and meal locations. We used the Lands Equation to model PUFAs in a sample Garrison diet and the nutritional impact of substitution of foods higher in omega-3 PUFAs and lower in omega-6 PUFAs on tissue composition. The military diet was very poor quality compared to 2010 Healthy People Guidelines. A representative Garrison diet does not meet our estimated healthy n-3 HUFA intake at 3.5 g/d, corresponding with a tissue composition of 60% n-3 in HUFA (i.e., 40% n-6 in HUFA). Substitution of n-3 rich eggs, poultry, pork and other food commodities, combined with use on low linoleic acid oils, may contribute significantly to attaining healthier n-6/n-3 proportions in the tissue.

  8. Understanding diet and modeling changes in the omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid composition of U.S. garrison foods for active duty personnel.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Bernadette P; Yu, Karina; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon; Johnson, Jeremiah; Hibbeln, Joseph R

    2014-11-01

    Research indicates that dietary omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are important in reducing the risk of mental illness. We used the DoD Survey of Health Related Behaviors among Active Duty Military Personnel (HRBS) to assess current military dietary patterns and meal locations. We used the Lands Equation to model PUFAs in a sample Garrison diet and the nutritional impact of substitution of foods higher in omega-3 PUFAs and lower in omega-6 PUFAs on tissue composition. The military diet was very poor quality compared to 2010 Healthy People Guidelines. A representative Garrison diet does not meet our estimated healthy n-3 HUFA intake at 3.5 g/d, corresponding with a tissue composition of 60% n-3 in HUFA (i.e., 40% n-6 in HUFA). Substitution of n-3 rich eggs, poultry, pork and other food commodities, combined with use on low linoleic acid oils, may contribute significantly to attaining healthier n-6/n-3 proportions in the tissue. PMID:25373102

  9. 32 CFR 513.5 - Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged... governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel. (a) Procedures governing nonactive duty personnel. (1... address only if the conditions in § 513.5(c) are met. (b) Procedures governing discharged personnel....

  10. 32 CFR 584.6 - Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged... PERSONNEL FAMILY SUPPORT, CHILD CUSTODY, AND PATERNITY § 584.6 Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel. (a) Procedures governing nonactive duty personnel. (1) Nonsupport complaints...

  11. The Effect of Career Assessments and Follow-Up Counseling on Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy (CDMSE) among Active-Duty Coast Guard Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    This study (a) examined career decision-making self-efficacy (CDMSE) differences across gender, age, military grade, level of education, previous career assessments, previous career counseling, and currently attending college, and (b) examined the effect of career assessments with follow-up counseling on CDMSE among active-duty Coast Guard…

  12. 33 CFR 104.220 - Company or vessel personnel with security duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Company or vessel personnel with... Company or vessel personnel with security duties. Company and vessel personnel responsible for security duties must maintain a TWIC, and must have knowledge, through training or equivalent job experience,...

  13. 33 CFR 106.215 - Company or OCS facility personnel with security duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Company or OCS facility personnel... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Requirements § 106.215 Company or OCS facility personnel with security duties. Company and OCS facility personnel responsible for security duties must...

  14. 14 CFR 121.377 - Maintenance and preventive maintenance personnel duty time limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintenance and preventive maintenance personnel duty time limitations. 121.377 Section 121.377 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION..., Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 121.377 Maintenance and preventive maintenance personnel duty...

  15. Impact of childhood maltreatment on physical health-related quality of life in U.S. active duty military personnel and combat veterans.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Laura H; Lemmer, Jennifer; Nunnink, Sarah; McLay, Robert N; Baker, Dewleen G

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have found an association between childhood maltreatment (CM) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and to a lesser extent have considered whether psychiatric symptoms may explain the relationship. This study aimed to further our understanding of the link between CM and HRQoL by testing whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between childhood maltreatment and physical HRQoL. Mediation models were examined in a sample of male Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) active duty and combat veterans (n=249). PTSD and depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between CM and overall physical HRQoL, as well as participation in daily activities due to physical health, bodily pain, and social functioning. Mediation of the relationship between childhood maltreatment and physical and social functioning by depression and PTSD symptoms may lend support to neurobiological hypotheses that childhood maltreatment sensitizes the nervous system and after repeated trauma may lead to the development of psychiatric symptoms, which have a major impact on morbidity and mortality.

  16. An Exploratory Study of Educational Participation Issues Confronting Active Duty Air Force Personnel Assigned to McConnell Air Force Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Terry L., Sr.

    2012-01-01

    Serving in the military today is a very specialized and intense experience, with the use of technology requiring dedicated training and education. The military provides much of this specialized training, but also recognizes the value of higher education for its personnel. Our military personnel are supporting our country daily and their increased…

  17. 33 CFR 104.220 - Company or vessel personnel with security duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Company or vessel personnel with... HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: VESSELS Vessel Security Requirements § 104.220 Company or vessel personnel with security duties. Company and vessel personnel responsible for...

  18. 33 CFR 104.220 - Company or vessel personnel with security duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Company or vessel personnel with... HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: VESSELS Vessel Security Requirements § 104.220 Company or vessel personnel with security duties. Company and vessel personnel responsible for...

  19. 32 CFR 513.5 - Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... control. (See AR 140-1, para 1-6.) (iii) ARPERCEN for nonunit soldiers assigned to Control Groups of the... control the personal affairs of nonactive duty personnel. These personnel usually are in a civilian status.... (iii) That the Army no longer has control or authority over the discharged personnel. Therefore,...

  20. 32 CFR 513.5 - Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel. 513.5 Section 513.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS INDEBTEDNESS OF MILITARY PERSONNEL § 513.5...

  1. 14 CFR 121.377 - Maintenance and preventive maintenance personnel duty time limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance and preventive maintenance personnel duty time limitations. 121.377 Section 121.377 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS...

  2. 33 CFR 106.215 - Company or OCS facility personnel with security duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Company or OCS facility personnel with security duties. 106.215 Section 106.215 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility...

  3. Navy and Marine Corps active duty mortality patterns for 1995 to 1999.

    PubMed

    Almond, Myron D; Carlton, Jan; Bohnker, Bruce K

    2003-01-01

    The authors analyze all Navy and Marine Corps active duty deaths from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1999 (Navy, N=1231; Marine Corps, N=701). Data were obtained from official Navy and Marine Corps sources, including the Report of Casualty (DD form 1300) and the Navy Personnel Casualty Report (Control Symbol NMPC 1770-4) or the Marine Corps Personnel Casualty Report (MC-3040-02), as appropriate. Overall fatality rates were 68.2 per 100,000 active duty Navy personnel and 84.2 for active duty Marine Corps personnel. Rates were generally lower than those noted in previous studies and lower than comparable civilian groups. The officer fatality rates were strongly affected by aircraft mishap-related deaths. The only subgroup displaying higher rates than their civilian counterparts was mishap-related deaths for enlisted Marines age 17 to 24 years old. PMID:12546243

  4. Behavior-based rules for fitness-for-duty assessment of nuclear power plant personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.S.; Turnage, J.J.; Price, H.E.; Lane, N.E.

    1989-01-01

    The safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants requires that plant personnel not be under the influence of any substance, legal or illegal, or mentally or physically impaired from any cause that in any way adversely affects their ability to safely and competently perform their duties. This goal has been formalized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in their proposed rule for a fitness-for-duty program. The purpose of this paper is to describe a performance-based tool based on surrogate tests and dose equivalency methodologies that is a viable candidate for fitness-for-duty assessment. The automated performance test system (APTS) is a microcomputer-based human performance test battery that has been developed over a decade of research supported variously by the National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, US Department of Energy, and the US Navy and Army. Representing the most psychometrically sound test from evaluations of over 150 well-known tests of basic psychomotor and cognitive skills, the battery provides direct prediction of a worker's fitness for duty. Twenty-four tests are suitable for use, and a dozen have thus far been shown to be sensitive to the effects of legal and illegal drugs, alcohol, fatigue, stress, and other causes of impairment.

  5. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military duty...-time active military duty after a loan is closed not exceed six percent. Active military duty does...

  6. 16 CFR 613.1 - Duration of active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Duration of active duty alerts. 613.1 Section 613.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT DURATION OF ACTIVE DUTY ALERTS § 613.1 Duration of active duty alerts. The duration of an active duty alert shall...

  7. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military duty...-time active military duty after a loan is closed not exceed six percent. Active military duty does...

  8. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military duty...-time active military duty after a loan is closed not exceed six percent. Active military duty does...

  9. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military duty...-time active military duty after a loan is closed not exceed six percent. Active military duty does...

  10. 16 CFR 613.1 - Duration of active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Duration of active duty alerts. 613.1 Section 613.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT DURATION OF ACTIVE DUTY ALERTS § 613.1 Duration of active duty alerts. The duration of an active duty alert shall...

  11. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military duty...-time active military duty after a loan is closed not exceed six percent. Active military duty does...

  12. 16 CFR 613.1 - Duration of active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duration of active duty alerts. 613.1 Section 613.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT DURATION OF ACTIVE DUTY ALERTS § 613.1 Duration of active duty alerts. The duration of an active duty alert shall...

  13. Pectoralis major tendon repairs in the active-duty population.

    PubMed

    Antosh, Ivan J; Grassbaugh, Jason A; Parada, Stephen A; Arrington, Edward D

    2009-01-01

    Rupture of the pectoralis major tendon is an uncommon injury that typically occurs in young, active people. Of this injury population, active-duty military personnel represent a unique, athletic subset that is commonly treated with operative repair. For the retrospective case series reported here, we hypothesized that active-duty soldiers with acute and chronic pectoralis major tendon ruptures treated with operative repair would have high levels of patient satisfaction, quick return to work and sports, and few long-term complications. We retrospectively reviewed all pectoralis major tendon rupture repairs performed at our institution between 2000 and 2007. Charts were thoroughly reviewed, and patients were asked to complete DASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) and supplemental questionnaires. Paired Student's t test was performed, and Ps were calculated to analyze statistical differences between immediate- and delayed-treatment groups. Fourteen patients were identified. The most common mechanism of injury was bench-pressing weights. Overall DASH, Work Module, and Sports Module scores were good to excellent. There was a statistically significant difference between outcomes for the immediate- and delayed- treatment groups, with the immediate-treatment group having better overall DASH and Work Module scores. Patients had a 30% to 40% objective loss of strength after surgery. Active-duty soldiers reported acceptable overall outcomes after both immediate and delayed treatment for pectoralis major tendon ruptures, but a statistically significant difference was found in overall DASH and Work Module scores between the treatment groups.

  14. [Evolution of work duties in manufacturing activities].

    PubMed

    Guerra, F

    2001-01-01

    The present work deals with duties' evolution according to the aspect of the investment's increase in facilities and equipment for employ, of industry-wide agreement, of cost accounting, of added value, of plant lay-out, of job competence and of production technologies. The mutual relation between duties and risk of cumulative trauma disorders is studied in qualitative and quantitative way making use of active and waiting labour time allotment during the labour cycle, rest and fatigue factor, labour losses, collective and individual breaks, high repeated work and worked items' variability. In conclusion the paper presents elements and examples about investments in automation and organisation with relay-out.

  15. 78 FR 63459 - Notice of Active Duty Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Department of the Air Force Notice of Active Duty Determination AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Proposed Federal Register Notice of Active Duty Determination Under Public Law 95-202. SUMMARY... not be considered ``active duty'' for purposes of all laws administered by the Department of...

  16. Personnel Dose Assessment during Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Akkurt, Hatice; Patton, Bruce W

    2010-01-01

    A leading candidate in the detection of special nuclear material (SNM) is active interrogation (AI). Unlike passive interrogation, AI uses a source to enhance or create a detectable signal from SNM (usually fission), particularly in shielded scenarios or scenarios where the SNM has a low activity. The use of AI thus makes the detection of SNM easier or, in some scenarios, even enables previously impossible detection. During the development of AI sources, significant effort is put into determining the source strength required to detect SNM in specific scenarios. Usually during this process, but not always, an evaluation of personnel dose is also completed. In this instance personnel dose could involve any of the following: (1) personnel performing the AI; (2) unknown stowaways who are inside the object being interrogated; or (3) in clandestine interrogations, personnel who are known to be inside the object being interrogated but are unaware of the interrogation. In most instances, dose to anyone found smuggling SNM will be a secondary issue. However, for the organizations performing the AI, legal if not moral considerations should make dose to the personnel performing the AI, unknown stowaways, or innocent bystanders in clandestine interrogations a serious concern.

  17. 12 CFR 1022.121 - Active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Active duty alerts. 1022.121 Section 1022.121 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V) Duties of Consumer Reporting Agencies Regarding Identity Theft § 1022.121 Active duty alerts. (a) Duration....

  18. 12 CFR 1022.121 - Active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Active duty alerts. 1022.121 Section 1022.121 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V) Duties of Consumer Reporting Agencies Regarding Identity Theft § 1022.121 Active duty alerts. (a) Duration....

  19. 12 CFR 1022.121 - Active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Active duty alerts. 1022.121 Section 1022.121 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V) Duties of Consumer Reporting Agencies Regarding Identity Theft § 1022.121 Active duty alerts. (a) Duration....

  20. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  1. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  2. Chronic pain management in the active-duty military

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David; Cohen, Steven P.

    2012-06-01

    As in the general population, chronic pain is a prevalent and burdensome affliction in active-duty military personnel. Painful conditions in military members can be categorized broadly in terms of whether they arise directly from combat injuries (gunshot, fragmentation wound, blast impact) or whether they result from non-combat injuries (sprains, herniated discs, motor vehicle accidents). Both combat-related and non-combat-related causes of pain can further be classified as either acute or chronic. Here we discuss the state of pain management as it relates to the military population in both deployed and non-deployed settings. The term non-battle injury (NBI) is commonly used to refer to those conditions not directly associated with the combat actions of war. In the history of warfare, NBI have far outstripped battle-related injuries in terms not only of morbidity, but also mortality. It was not until improvements in health care and field medicine were applied in World War I that battle-related deaths finally outnumbered those attributed to disease and pestilence. However, NBI have been the leading cause of morbidity and hospital admission in every major conflict since the Korean War. Pain remains a leading cause of presentation to military medical facilities, both in and out of theater. The absence of pain services is associated with a low return-to-duty rate among the deployed population. The most common pain complaints involve the low-back and neck, and studies have suggested that earlier treatment is associated with more significant improvement and a higher return to duty rate. It is recognized that military medicine is often at the forefront of medical innovation, and that many fields of medicine have reaped benefit from the conduct of war.

  3. Tibial stress fractures in an active duty population: long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Kelly G; Dickens, Jonathan F; Rue, John-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tibial stress fractures are a common overuse injury among military recruits. The purpose of this study was to determine what, if any, long-term effects that tibial stress fractures have on military personnel with respect to physical activity level, completion of military training, recurrence of symptoms, and active duty service. Twenty-six military recruits included in a previous tibial stress fracture study were contacted 10 years after initial injury and asked a series of questions related to any long-term consequences of their tibial stress fracture. Of the 13 patients available for contact, no patients reported any necessary limited duty while on active duty, and no patient reported being separated or discharged from the military as a result of stress fracture. Tibial stress fractures in military recruits are most often an isolated injury and do not affect ability to complete military training or reflect a long-term need for decreased physical activity.

  4. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  5. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  6. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  7. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  8. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  9. [Duties of physicians and other medical personnel connected with diagnosis, treatment, dissemination of information, assessment and registration of TB patients].

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Tadeusz M

    2011-01-01

    Effective laws provide for a series of duties to be performed by physicians and other medical personnel in connection with TB. Every TB case and death resulting from TB as well as any case of undesirable result of BCG test requires notification and filling in of a special form. Physician has the duty to inform TB patients their legal guardians or close relatives or friends about the need to undergo sanitary and diagnostic procedure, treatment or vaccination as well as on how to prevent disease from spreading. Persons failing to comply with relevant numerous legal requirements in this area are subject to a fine. TB patients can use special sick benefits extending to 270 days. There is a requirement to use appropriate codes to define TB irrespective of ICD-10 classification.

  10. 38 CFR 3.12a - Minimum active-duty service requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum active-duty... Minimum active-duty service requirement. (a) Definitions. (1) The term minimum period of active duty means... continuous active duty. Non-duty periods that are excludable in determining the Department of...

  11. 38 CFR 3.12a - Minimum active-duty service requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minimum active-duty... Minimum active-duty service requirement. (a) Definitions. (1) The term minimum period of active duty means... continuous active duty. Non-duty periods that are excludable in determining the Department of...

  12. 38 CFR 3.12a - Minimum active-duty service requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum active-duty... Minimum active-duty service requirement. (a) Definitions. (1) The term minimum period of active duty means... continuous active duty. Non-duty periods that are excludable in determining the Department of...

  13. 38 CFR 3.12a - Minimum active-duty service requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum active-duty... Minimum active-duty service requirement. (a) Definitions. (1) The term minimum period of active duty means... continuous active duty. Non-duty periods that are excludable in determining the Department of...

  14. 38 CFR 3.12a - Minimum active-duty service requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum active-duty... Minimum active-duty service requirement. (a) Definitions. (1) The term minimum period of active duty means... continuous active duty. Non-duty periods that are excludable in determining the Department of...

  15. 33 CFR 104.220 - Company or vessel personnel with security duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... measures; (e) Crowd management and control techniques; (f) Security related communications; (g) Knowledge... duties must maintain a TWIC, and must have knowledge, through training or equivalent job experience, in the following, as appropriate: (a) Knowledge of current security threats and patterns; (b)...

  16. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14 Section 169a.14 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel...

  17. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14 Section 169a.14 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel...

  18. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14 Section 169a.14 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel...

  19. Unintended Pregnancy and Contraception Among Active Duty Servicewomen and Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Vinita; Borrero, Sonya; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla

    2012-01-01

    The number of women of childbearing age who are active duty service members or veterans of the U.S. military is increasing. These women may seek reproductive health care at medical facilities operated by the military, in the civilian sector or through the Department of Veterans Affairs. This article reviews the current data on unintended pregnancy and prevalence of and barriers to contraceptive use among active duty and veteran women. Active duty servicewomen have high rates of unintended pregnancy and low contraceptive use which may be due to official prohibition of sexual activity in the military, logistic difficulties faced by deployed women and limited patient and provider knowledge of available contraceptives. In comparison, little is known about rates of unintended pregnancy and contraceptive use among women veterans. Based on this review, research recommendations to address these issues are provided. PMID:22200252

  20. 75 FR 52326 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; EPA's Light-Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; EPA's Light-Duty In-Use Vehicle... owners of light-duty vehicles. Title: EPA's Light Duty In-Use Vehicle Testing Program (Renewal). ICR... has an ongoing program to evaluate the emission performance of in-use light-duty (passenger car...

  1. 32 CFR 161.10 - Benefits for active duty members of the uniformed services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benefits for active duty members of the..., Their Dependents, and Other Eligible Individuals § 161.10 Benefits for active duty members of the uniformed services. (a) This section describes the benefits for active duty uniformed services members...

  2. Virtual reality exposure therapy for active duty soldiers.

    PubMed

    Reger, Greg M; Gahm, Gregory A

    2008-08-01

    Virtual reality exposure (VRE) therapy is a promising treatment for a variety of anxiety disorders and has recently been extended to the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article, the authors briefly review the rationale for VRE and its key processes. They illustrate the treatment with an active-duty Army soldier diagnosed with combat-related PTSD. Six sessions of VRE were provided using an immersive simulation of a military convoy in Iraq. Self-reported PTSD symptoms and psychological distress were reduced at posttreatment relative to pretreatment reports, as assessed by the PTSD Checklist-Military Version and the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale-24. The case outcomes parallel those reported in the research with other disorders and suggest the applicability of VRE in treating active duty soldiers with combat-related PTSD. PMID:18612993

  3. Behavioural activation for the treatment of depression in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Whybrow, Dean

    2013-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: Depression is a common mental health problem in both civilian and military populations. Access to evidence based psychological therapies for treating common mental health problems such as depression may not be adequate at present. Behavioural Activation (BA) represents a National Institute for Clinical Excellence recommended, evidence-based treatment for depression. The aim of this review was to review the literature to determine how BA could work as a therapeutic approach for military personnel with depression. METHOD: Five specialty-specific electronic databases were searched using the key words 'behavioural activation', 'activity scheduling' and 'depression'. Emerging themes were drawn out of the literature using a long table approach to thematic analysis. RESULTS: Seven themes were identified: Clinical Effectiveness, Cultural Competence, Co-morbidity, Cost Effectiveness, Alternatives to Face-to-Face Therapy, Training and Patient Experience. CONCLUSIONS: Group based BA is a cost effective option that may build upon service personnel's cultural affinity to teamwork and peer support. Brief training workshops and supervision could be provided to military mental health nurses to deliver group based BA. However service delivery may also be enhanced by enabling some nurses to specialise as Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapists. More research is needed to understand whether this pragmatic, two pronged approach to training would result in the sustained dissemination of evidence based practice.

  4. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty... (CHAMPUS) § 199.16 Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members. (a) Purpose and applicability. (1) The purpose of this section is to implement, with respect to health care services provided...

  5. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty... (CHAMPUS) § 199.16 Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members. (a) Purpose and applicability. (1) The purpose of this section is to implement, with respect to health care services provided...

  6. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty... (CHAMPUS) § 199.16 Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members. (a) Purpose and applicability. (1) The purpose of this section is to implement, with respect to health care services provided...

  7. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty... (CHAMPUS) § 199.16 Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members. (a) Purpose and applicability. (1) The purpose of this section is to implement, with respect to health care services provided...

  8. Decision-Making Styles of Active-Duty Police Officers: A Multiple-Case Occupational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Patrick Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the decision-making styles of active-duty police officers or what the consequences of not understanding those decision-making styles may be. The purpose of the study was to describe the demographics and decision-making profiles of active-duty police officers, as well as any relationships that may exist among these variables,…

  9. Advanced Marketing 8130. Instructional Areas. Duties and Tasks. Learning Activities. Referenced Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond.

    This resource handbook, which is designed for use by instructors of courses in advanced marketing, consists of a duty/task list with referenced resources, a duty/task list with learning activities, and a list of resources. Included in each list are materials dealing with the following topics: communication in marketing, economics in marketing,…

  10. Idiopathic renal infarction in a previously healthy active duty soldier.

    PubMed

    Eickhoff, Christa; Mei, Jian M; Martinez, Jorge; Little, Dustin

    2014-02-01

    Renal infarction (RI) is rare, and usually occurs in patients with associated comorbidities. The majority of reported cases have presented with laboratory abnormalities, most notably leukocytosis and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A 50-year-old active duty white male nonsmoker without medical history presented with flank pain. Urinalysis, complete blood count, LDH, and serum creatinine were normal. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed a right-sided RI. The patient was admitted to the hospital and anticoagulated. Laboratory values remained normal, and a comprehensive workup failed to reveal an etiology for his RI. RI is rare, and affected patients often present with symptoms similar to more common conditions such as lumbago or nephrolithiasis. Elevated LDH may be a clue to the diagnosis, but unlike 92% of the reviewed cases, our patient presented with a normal value. This case suggests that clinicians should consider RI in patients with persistent symptoms for whom more common causes of flank pain have been excluded; including in nonsmoking patients without apparent risk factors for infarction who present with a normal LDH and no leukocytosis.

  11. Hospitalizations for fall-related injuries among active-duty Army soldiers, 1980–1998

    PubMed Central

    Senier, Laura; Bell, Nicole S.; Yore, Michelle M.; Amoroso, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Total Army Injury and Health Outcomes Database (TAIHOD) were used to describe 28,352 fall-related hospitalizations among active-duty Army soldiers between 1980 and 1998. Soldiers who were younger than age 26, single, and had a high school education or less were at greatest risk. Falls from a height were more likely to be fatal than other types of falls, accounting for 88% of all fatalities. In cases where duty status was known, 64% of the falls took place while the soldier was on duty and half of these occurred during training. The most common type of fall during training was fall from a height (37%). Falls on stairs and ladders accounted for 49% of all off-duty falls. Future research should include identification of specific behavioral and occupational risk factors for falls, particularly those occurring during training activities, and falls occurring off duty. PMID:12441580

  12. A Case of Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome in a Healthy Active Duty Marine.

    PubMed

    Thota, Darshan; Portouw, Steven J; Bruner, David I

    2015-10-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is an uncommon disorder that can lead to small bowel obstructions or perforations. Typical populations include young females with anorexia. However, there have been a few reports of healthy males with acute vomiting reported to have SMA syndrome. Our case report highlights an active duty Marine who developed SMA syndrome and the importance of recognizing this disease given the severity in delay of diagnosis in population of young healthy active duty members.

  13. 5 CFR 550.182 - Unscheduled duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unscheduled duty. 550.182 Section 550.182 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Premium Pay Law Enforcement Availability Pay § 550.182 Unscheduled duty. (a) Unscheduled Duty Hours....

  14. 5 CFR 550.182 - Unscheduled duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Unscheduled duty. 550.182 Section 550.182 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Premium Pay Law Enforcement Availability Pay § 550.182 Unscheduled duty. (a) Unscheduled Duty Hours....

  15. Mental Health and Substance Use Factors Associated With Unwanted Sexual Contact Among U.S. Active Duty Service Women.

    PubMed

    Stahlman, Shauna; Javanbakht, Marjan; Cochran, Susan; Hamilton, Alison B; Shoptaw, Steven; Gorbach, Pamina M

    2015-06-01

    Many U.S. military women are exposed to unwanted sexual contact during military service, which can have important implications for mental health. Using data from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors, we employed multiple logistic regression methods to examine whether unwanted sexual contact was associated with stress, screening positive for mental disorders, or substance use, among active duty service women. The sample included 7,415 female military personnel, of whom 13.4% reported unwanted sexual contact (including any touching of genitals) since entering the military. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, factors independently associated with unwanted sexual contact included military-related stress (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.44), family/personal life-related stress (AOR = 1.78), and gender-related stress (AOR = 1.98) in the past 12 months. In addition, screening positive for depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, or psychological distress, and suicidal ideation or attempt were associated with unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.57-2.11). For drug/alcohol use, only misuse of tranquilizers/muscle relaxers (past 12 months) was associated with report of unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.35). Given the prevalence of unwanted sexual contact and corresponding adverse health outcomes in this sample of active duty women, strategies to create military structural/cultural changes and reduce gender-related stress and sexism are needed. PMID:25976935

  16. Mental Health and Substance Use Factors Associated with Unwanted Sexual Contact among U.S. Active Duty Service Women

    PubMed Central

    Stahlman, Shauna; Javanbakht, Marjan; Cochran, Susan; Hamilton, Alison B.; Shoptaw, Steven; Gorbach, Pamina M.

    2015-01-01

    Many U.S. military women are exposed to unwanted sexual contact during military service, which can have important implications for mental health. Using data from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors, we employed multiple logistic regression methods to examine whether unwanted sexual contact was associated with stress, screening positive for mental disorders, or substance use, among active duty service women. The sample included 7,415 female military personnel, of whom 13.4% reported unwanted sexual contact (including any touching of genitals) since entering the military. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, factors independently associated with unwanted sexual contact included military-related stress (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 2.44), family/personal life-related stress (AOR = 1.78), and gender-related stress (AOR = 1.98) in the past 12 months. In addition, screening positive for depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, psychological distress, and suicidal ideation or attempt were associated with unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.57–2.11). For drug/alcohol use, only misuse of tranquilizers/muscle relaxers (past 12 months) was associated with report of unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.35). Given the prevalence of unwanted sexual contact and corresponding adverse health outcomes in this sample of active duty women, strategies to create military structural/cultural changes and reduce gender-related stress and sexism are needed. PMID:25976935

  17. 38 CFR 21.46 - Veteran ordered to active duty; extension of basic period of eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Veteran ordered to active... Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Periods of Eligibility § 21.46 Veteran ordered to active... active duty under 10 U.S.C. 688, 12301(a), 12301(d), 12301(g), 12302, or 12304, the veteran's...

  18. 38 CFR 21.46 - Veteran ordered to active duty; extension of basic period of eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Veteran ordered to active... Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Periods of Eligibility § 21.46 Veteran ordered to active... active duty under 10 U.S.C. 688, 12301(a), 12301(d), 12301(g), 12302, or 12304, the veteran's...

  19. Effectiveness of virtual reality exposure therapy for active duty soldiers in a military mental health clinic.

    PubMed

    Reger, Greg M; Holloway, Kevin M; Candy, Colette; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Difede, JoAnn; Rizzo, Albert A; Gahm, Gregory A

    2011-02-01

    Exposure therapy is an evidence-based treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but research evaluating its effectiveness with active duty service members is limited. This report examines the effectiveness of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRE) for active duty soldiers (N = 24) seeking treatment following a deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. Relative to their pretreatment self-reported symptoms on the PTSD Checklist, Military Version (M = 60.92; SD = 11.03), patients reported a significant reduction at posttreatment (M = 47.08; SD = 12.70; p < .001). Sixty-two percent of patients (n = 15) reported a reliable change of 11 points or more. This study supports the effectiveness of exposure therapy for active duty soldiers and extends previous research on VRE to this population. PMID:21294166

  20. 75 FR 49913 - Active Duty Service Determinations For Civilian or Contractual Groups

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Active Duty Service Determinations For Civilian or Contractual Groups SUMMARY: On... at Then `American Camp,' Now Named `Burma Camp,' Ghana' '' shall not be considered ``active...

  1. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... supplemental health care for active duty members—(1) Hospitals covered by DRG-based payment system. For a... the supplemental care program. As a participating provider, each hospital must accept the DRG-based... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active...

  2. Spice: a new "legal" herbal mixture abused by young active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Ramirez, Sasha; Varney, Shawn M

    2012-01-01

    Spice is an herbal mixture smoked for euphoria and mixed with synthetic cannabinoids that are undetected on urine drug screens. Spice use has increased in the military because it is considered legal and is not detected on urine drug screen. The authors describe 3 cases of Spice use in military members. Case 1: 19-year-old male presented with paranoia, agitation, and visual hallucinations after smoking the "Space" brand of Spice. Urine thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were negative. Case 2: 19-year-old female presented with sedation, amnesia, and agitation. She smoked the "Space" brand. She was alert within 3 hours of arrival. Urine GC-MS detected levorphanol. Case 3: 23-year-old male presented with delusions and paranoia. He complained of "monsters on his back." His symptoms improved in the emergency department (ED). His urine TLC and GC-MS were negative. All cases were admitted and evaluated by a toxicologist; all 3 had their history corroborated by family or friends, or with drug paraphernalia. Spice is a new herbal mixture that is increasingly used in the military. Expected effects are similar to cannabis, but may include more paranoia and hallucinations, and may differ for each brand.

  3. Estimated economic impact of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system on unintended pregnancy in active duty women.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, Ryan J; Mumford, Sunni L; Hill, Micah J; Armstrong, Alicia Y

    2014-10-01

    Unintended pregnancy is reportedly higher in active duty women; therefore, we sought to estimate the potential impact of the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) could have on unintended pregnancy in active duty women. A decision tree model with sensitivity analysis was used to estimate the number of unintentional pregnancies in active duty women which could be prevented. A secondary cost analysis was performed to analyze the direct cost savings to the U.S. Government. The total number of Armed Services members is estimated to be over 1.3 million, with an estimated 208,146 being women. Assuming an age-standardized unintended pregnancy rate of 78 per 1,000 women, 16,235 unintended pregnancies occur each year. Using a combined LNG-IUS failure and expulsion rate of 2.2%, a decrease of 794, 1588, and 3970 unintended pregnancies was estimated to occur with 5%, 10% and 25% usage, respectively. Annual cost savings from LNG-IUS use range from $3,387,107 to $47,352,295 with 5% to 25% intrauterine device usage. One-way sensitivity analysis demonstrated LNG-IUS to be cost-effective when the cost associated with pregnancy and delivery exceeded $11,000. Use of LNG-IUS could result in significant reductions in unintended pregnancy among active duty women, resulting in substantial cost savings to the government health care system. PMID:25269131

  4. Risk Factors for Clinically Significant Intimate Partner Violence among Active-Duty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith Slep, Amy M.; Foran, Heather M.; Heyman, Richard E.; Snarr, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesized risk factors for men's and women's clinically significant intimate partner violence (CS-IPV) from four ecological levels (i.e., individual, family, workplace, community) were tested in a representative sample of active-duty U.S. Air Force members (N = 42,744). When considered together, we expected only individual and family factors to…

  5. Certification and Duties of a Director of Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Russell

    2012-01-01

    In order for a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program to meet its full potential, a director of physical activity (DPA) is needed. To train physical educators for this new role, a task force recently created a professional development program endorsed by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education that certifies current…

  6. Treatment of active duty military with PTSD in primary care: A follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Rauch, Sheila A M; Mintz, Jim; Brundige, Antoinette; Avila, Laura L; Bryan, Craig J; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-12-01

    First-line trauma-focused therapies offered in specialty mental health clinics do not reach many veterans and active duty service members with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Primary care is an ideal environment to expand access to mental health care. Several promising clinical case series reports of brief PTSD therapies adapted for primary care have shown positive results, but the long-term effectiveness with military members is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of an open trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral primary care-delivered protocol developed specifically for deployment-related PTSD in a sample of 24 active duty military (15 men, 9 women). Measures of PTSD symptom severity showed statistically and clinically significant reductions from baseline to posttreatment that were maintained at the 6-month and 1-year follow-up assessments. Similar reductions were maintained in depressive symptoms and ratings of global mental health functioning. PMID:26519833

  7. Lesions Arising in a Tattoo of an Active Duty US Marine Corps Woman.

    PubMed

    Winn, Aubrey E; Rivard, Shayna C; Green, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Tattoos are ubiquitous in modern society; however, they do not come without risk of medical complications. When complications arise in the military community, a particularly thorough differential diagnosis should be considered based on the increased exposures service members have during deployment and throughout their military career. We present a case of a 38-year-old active duty US Marine Corps woman with worsening skin lesions arising within a tattoo 6 weeks after acquiring the tattoo on her right chest. Given environmental exposures from a recent deployment to the Middle East, a wide differential was considered. Ultimately, a skin biopsy revealed early hypertrophic scar formation responsive to therapy with intralesional triamcinolone acetonide (Kenalog® [ILK]). However, given the Marine had recently deployed and is part of the active duty population, consideration of alternative, albeit rare, etiologies was imperative. PMID:27450611

  8. Treatment of active duty military with PTSD in primary care: A follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Rauch, Sheila A M; Mintz, Jim; Brundige, Antoinette; Avila, Laura L; Bryan, Craig J; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-12-01

    First-line trauma-focused therapies offered in specialty mental health clinics do not reach many veterans and active duty service members with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Primary care is an ideal environment to expand access to mental health care. Several promising clinical case series reports of brief PTSD therapies adapted for primary care have shown positive results, but the long-term effectiveness with military members is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of an open trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral primary care-delivered protocol developed specifically for deployment-related PTSD in a sample of 24 active duty military (15 men, 9 women). Measures of PTSD symptom severity showed statistically and clinically significant reductions from baseline to posttreatment that were maintained at the 6-month and 1-year follow-up assessments. Similar reductions were maintained in depressive symptoms and ratings of global mental health functioning.

  9. Incidence and risk factors for acute low back pain in active duty infantry.

    PubMed

    Ernat, Justin; Knox, Jeffrey; Orchowski, Joseph; Owens, Brett

    2012-11-01

    Although much research has been performed on occupational risk factors for low back pain, little has been published on low back pain among infantrymen. This purpose of this study is to evaluate the incidence of acute low back pain amongst active duty infantrymen as compared to a matched control population. The Defense Medical Epidemiology Database was searched and incidence rates were calculated and compared between infantry and noninfantry soldiers. Data was stratified and controlled for age, race, marital status, rank, and branch of service using the Poisson multivariate regression analysis. Significantly lower rates of acute low back pain were discovered in active duty infantrymen when compared to matched controls (32.9 versus 49.5 cases per 1,000 person-years). Additionally, significantly lower rates were identified in the Marines versus the Army, and among junior enlisted compared to senior enlisted service members. PMID:23198512

  10. Healing Touch with Guided Imagery for PTSD in returning active duty military: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shamini; McMahon, George F; Hasen, Patricia; Kozub, Madelyn P; Porter, Valencia; King, Rauni; Guarneri, Erminia M

    2012-09-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains a significant problem in returning military and warrants swift and effective treatment. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine whether a complementary medicine intervention (Healing Touch with Guided Imagery [HT+GI]) reduced PTSD symptoms as compared to treatment as usual (TAU) returning combat-exposed active duty military with significant PTSD symptoms. Active duty military (n = 123) were randomized to 6 sessions (within 3 weeks) of HT+GI vs. TAU. The primary outcome was PTSD symptoms; secondary outcomes were depression, quality of life, and hostility. Repeated measures analysis of covariance with intent-to-treat analyses revealed statistically and clinically significant reduction in PTSD symptoms (p < 0.0005, Cohen's d = 0.85) as well as depression (p < 0.0005, Cohen's d = 0.70) for HT+GI vs. TAU. HT+GI also showed significant improvements in mental quality of life (p = 0.002, Cohen's d = 0.58) and cynicism (p = 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.49) vs. TAU. Participation in a complementary medicine intervention resulted in a clinically significant reduction in PTSD and related symptoms in a returning, combat-exposed active duty military population. Further investigation of GT and biofield therapy approaches for mitigating PTSD in military populations is warranted.

  11. 78 FR 60267 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Special Education-Personnel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Special Education--Personnel Preparation To... the Director of the Information Collection Clearance Division, U.S. Department of Education, 400... the use of information technology. Please note that written comments received in response to...

  12. Primary patellar tendon repair and early mobilization: results in an active-duty population.

    PubMed

    Enad, J G; Loomis, L L

    2001-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 13 patellar tendon repairs done over 32 months at a tertiary care, military medical center. Early mobilization was initiated within 2 weeks postoperatively. Clinical and functional results were statistically examined with relation to age, timing of surgery, length of follow-up, quadriceps atrophy, extensor lag, patella position, and time to full duty. At an average of 24 months' follow-up, six patients (46%) had thigh girth atrophy, and one patient (8%) had an extensor lag >5 degrees. Mean Lysholm score was 84 (range, 57 to 100). Maximum postoperative Tegner activity scores averaged 7.1 (range, 5 to 10). Clinical results classified five cases as excellent, three good, three fair, and two poor. Functional results classified three cases as excellent, four good, two fair, and four poor. Time to return to duty averaged 13 months. Our results suggest that adequate extensor function can be restored after primary repair and immediate motion therapy.

  13. Current Suicidal Ideation among Treatment-Engaged Active Duty Soldiers and Marines

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Lindsey; Villatte, Jennifer L.; Kerbrat, Amanda H.; Atkins, David C.; Flaster, Aaron; Comtois, Kate A.

    2015-01-01

    We examined suicidal ideation among 399 active duty Soldiers and Marines engaged in mental health treatment. Using a generalized linear model controlling for demographic and military factors, depression, and positive traumatic brain injury screen, we confirmed our hypothesis that self-report measures of current PTSD symptoms uniquely predicted suicidal ideation. The association between PTSD severity and suicidal ideation was moderated by gender with women at higher risk as PTSD severity increased. Female Soldiers and Marines with high levels of PTSD should receive additional monitoring and intervention. Self-report measures may aid with risk assessment and identify symptom-related distress associated with suicide risk. PMID:27170848

  14. A Case Report of Supplement-Induced Hepatitis in an Active Duty Service Member.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Michael J; Castaneda, Joni L; Huitron, Sonny S; Wang, James

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of drug-induced hepatic injury has been increasing as a result of more widespread use of workout supplements containing anabolic steroids to increase muscle mass. Synthetic androgenic steroids are shown to cause cholestatic liver injury, but the exact mechanism of injury is not completely understood. We present a case of a healthy, young, active duty Army male soldier who developed pruritis and jaundice shortly after starting to take a body-building supplement containing anabolic steroids, and was subsequently found to have significant biopsy proven drug-induced liver injury. PMID:26126259

  15. 78 FR 16654 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 77 FR 12562 (March 1, 2012). \\2\\ See Certain Activated Carbon... Duty Order, 77 FR 33420 (June 6, 2012). \\3\\ See Certain Activated Carbon from China: Determination, 78 FR 13894 (March 1, 2013); see also Certain Activated Carbon from China: Investigation No....

  16. Permanent press allergy in an active duty U.S. Army soldier.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, Shelley L; Murchland, Michael R; Henning, J Scott

    2011-05-01

    Ethylene urea/melamine formaldehyde resin (permanent press) is a common fabric finishing agent added to Army Combat Uniforms for a wrinkle-free appearance and to strengthen the fabric. We describe the case of an active duty U.S. Army soldier with a diffuse eczematous dermatitis in whom patch testing was used to identify an allergy to permanent press, a ubiquitous fabric finishing agent in the Army combat uniform. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a soldier with an allergic contact dermatitis to ethylene urea/melamine formaldehyde resin. This case highlights the importance of considering the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis in patients with a recurrent eczematous dermatitis that does not respond appropriately to therapy and the unique occupational impact of diagnosing an Army soldier with permanent press allergy.

  17. Military Beliefs and PTSD in Active Duty U.S. Army Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Loew, Benjamin; Carter, Sarah; Allen, Elizabeth; Markman, Howard; Stanley, Scott; Rhoades, Galena

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic distress after military combat is a major cost of war. One under-investigated factor potentially associated with PTSD symptoms is specific beliefs about one’s military service. This study examined post-deployment self-reports from 272 active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, to investigate potential associations between military-related PTSD symptom severity and three beliefs about the military: the importance and value ascribed to one’s own work in the Army, to current military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and to military service in general. Higher scores on these three beliefs were negatively correlated with military-related PTSD symptom severity. However, in a combined regression model that controlled for recent combat exposure, only the belief about current military operations had a significant, unique association with PTSD symptom severity. That is, more positive beliefs about the value of operations in Iraq or Afghanistan were associated with lower PTSD symptoms. PMID:25530729

  18. Clinical prediction of musculoskeletal-related "medically not ready" for combat duty statuses among active duty U.S. army soldiers.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D Alan; Kurina, Lianne M

    2013-12-01

    No evidence-based mechanism currently exists to inform U.S. Army clinicians of soldiers at risk of being found "Medically Not Ready" for combat duty. Historically, musculoskeletal conditions represent high-frequency medical problems among Army soldiers. We explored the feasibility of using centrally archived medical and administrative data on Army soldiers in the automated prediction of musculoskeletal-related Medically Not Ready soldiers who did not deploy. We examined 56,443 active duty U.S. Army soldiers who underwent precombat medical screening during March through December 2009 and in March 2010. Musculoskeletal problems were associated with 23.0% of nonreadiness cases in the study population. We used multivariable logistic regression in derivation cohorts to compute risk coefficients and cut points. We then applied these coefficients to covariates in validation cohorts, simulating predictions 2 to 3 months before their medical screenings. The analysis yielded c statistics ranging from 83 to 90%. The predictions identified 45 to 73% and 50 to 82% of the individual male and female outcome-positive soldiers, respectively, while obtaining 83 to 95% specificity. Our findings demonstrate the potential of Army data to create evidence-based estimates of nonreadiness risk. These methods could enable earlier patient referrals and improved management, and potentially reduce medically related nondeployment.

  19. Alcohol and Other Risk Factors for Drowning among Male Active Duty U.S. Army Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Nicole S.; Amoroso, Paul J.; Yore, Michelle M.; Senier, Laura; Williams, Jeffrey O.; Smith, Gordon S.; Theriault, Alexis

    2007-01-01

    Background Risk factors for drowning are largely undocumented among military populations. Hypothesis Accident report narratives will provide important information about the role of alcohol use and other behaviors in drownings among active duty male U.S. Army soldiers. Methods Using a case series design, we describe drowning deaths reported to the U.S. Army Safety Center (1980–1997), documenting associated demographic factors, alcohol use, and other risk-taking behaviors. Results Drowning victims (n = 352) were disproportionately young, black, and single, with less time-in-service, and no college experience. Most drownings occurred off-duty (89%). Alcohol use was involved in at least 31% of the cases overall. Alcohol use was also associated with a 10-fold increase in reckless behavior (OR 9.6, 95% CI 4.5–20.7) and was most common among drownings in Europe (OR = 4.3, 95% CI 1.5–13.4). Most drownings occurred where no lifeguard was present (68%), but almost two-thirds occurred in the presence of others, with CPR initiated in less than one-third of these cases. Drownings involving minority victims were less likely to involve alcohol, but more likely to occur in unauthorized swimming areas. While most drownings did not involve violations of safety rules, over one-third of the cases involved some form of reckless behavior, particularly for those under age 21. Conclusions Intervention programs should be tailored to meet the needs of the demographic subgroups at highest risk since behavioral risk factors vary by race and age. CPR training and skills maintenance can improve survival rates. Narrative data are important for developing hypotheses and understanding risk factors for injuries. PMID:11763109

  20. Functional Improvement Following Diastasis Rectus Abdominus Repair in an Active Duty Navy Female.

    PubMed

    Gallus, Katerina M; Golberg, Kathy F; Field, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Return to physical activity following childbirth can be a difficult process complicated by structural changes during pregnancy. A common problem is the development of a diastasis of the rectus abdominus (DRA), defined as a horizontal separation of the abdominus muscles at the linea alba. Recent data indicate that the greater the distance of separation of the muscle, the worse the functional ability. We describe a 24-year-old active duty U.S. Navy female G1P2 with a diagnosis of DRA. At 2 months postpartum, she was referred to physical therapy because of back pain and inability to meet baseline activities of daily living. After 4 months of physical therapy, she was unable to complete curl ups as required by U.S. Navy physical fitness standards. Abdominoplasty with imbrication of the abdominal wall diastasis was performed followed by additional physical therapy, after which she returned to baseline functioning. The restoration of functional ability postoperatively suggests there is a therapeutic indication for surgical correction of DRA. In high-functioning military patients with DRA who fail to return to baseline level of activity following a trial of physical therapy, surgical intervention should be considered to obtain the optimal functional ability. PMID:27483541

  1. 17 CFR 270.17j-1 - Personal investment activities of investment company personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., or whose functions or duties in the ordinary course of business relate to the making of any... relate to the making of any recommendations with respect to such purchases or sales; and (ii) Any natural... or her regular functions or duties, makes or participates in making recommendations regarding...

  2. 78 FR 70533 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ...; 2011-2012, 78 FR 26748 (May 8, 2013) (``Preliminary Results''). DATES: Effective Date: November 26....\\12\\ \\2\\ See id. \\3\\ See id., 78 FR at 26749. \\4\\ See Memorandum to Christian Marsh, Deputy Assistant... Results, 78 FR at 26749; see also Notice of Antidumping Duty Order: Certain Activated Carbon from...

  3. Army Active Duty Members' Linkage to Veterans Health Administration Services After Deployments to Iraq or Afghanistan and Following Separation.

    PubMed

    Vanneman, Megan E; Harris, Alex H S; Chen, Cheng; Mohr, Beth A; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Williams, Thomas V; Larson, Mary Jo

    2015-10-01

    This study described the rate and predictors of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom active duty Army members' enrollment in and use of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) services (linkage), as well as variation in linkage rates by VHA facility. We used a multivariate mixed effect regression model to predict linkage to VHA, and also calculated linkage rates in the catchment areas of each facility (n = 158). The sample included 151,122 active duty members who deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan and then separated from the Army between fiscal years 2008 and 2012. Approximately 48% of the active duty members separating utilized VHA as an enrollee within one year. There was significant variation in linkage rates by VHA facilities (31-72%). The most notable variables associated with greater linkage included probable serious injury during index deployment (odds ratio = 1.81), separation because of disability (odds ratio = 2.86), and various measures of receipt of VHA care before and after separation. Information about the individual characteristics that predict greater or lesser linkage to VHA services can be used to improve delivery of health care services at VHA as well as outreach efforts to active duty Army members. PMID:26444467

  4. They Self-Ignited: Adult Student Journeys to an Associate's Degree While Active Duty Military or Military Spouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibus, Lindsay Pohl

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study was undertaken in order to gain an understanding of the lived experiences of adult students and how they made meaning of their journey. To that end, through in-depth interviews with twenty participants, the study inquired into the journeys to an associate's degree of adult students who were also active duty military service…

  5. 5 CFR 734.502 - Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Office of the President § 734.502 Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any... appropriation for the Executive Office of President; or (ii) An employee appointed by the President by and with... of the Vice President which are part of the Residence area or which are not regularly used solely...

  6. 5 CFR 734.502 - Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Office of the President § 734.502 Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any... appropriation for the Executive Office of President; or (ii) An employee appointed by the President by and with... of the Vice President which are part of the Residence area or which are not regularly used solely...

  7. 5 CFR 734.502 - Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Office of the President § 734.502 Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any... appropriation for the Executive Office of President; or (ii) An employee appointed by the President by and with... of the Vice President which are part of the Residence area or which are not regularly used solely...

  8. 5 CFR 734.502 - Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Office of the President § 734.502 Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any... appropriation for the Executive Office of President; or (ii) An employee appointed by the President by and with... of the Vice President which are part of the Residence area or which are not regularly used solely...

  9. 5 CFR 734.502 - Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Office of the President § 734.502 Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any... appropriation for the Executive Office of President; or (ii) An employee appointed by the President by and with... of the Vice President which are part of the Residence area or which are not regularly used solely...

  10. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  11. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  12. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  13. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  14. 8 CFR 329.5 - Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... service during World War II. 329.5 Section 329.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II. (a) A person desiring to... Armed Forces in the Far East, or (ii) Within the Commonwealth Army of the Philippines, the...

  15. 8 CFR 329.5 - Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... service during World War II. 329.5 Section 329.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II. (a) A person desiring to naturalize... Armed Forces in the Far East, or (ii) Within the Commonwealth Army of the Philippines, the...

  16. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  17. Outbreak of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Peruvian Military Personnel Undertaking Training Activities in the Amazon Basin, 2010.

    PubMed

    Oré, Marianela; Sáenz, Eliana; Cabrera, Rufino; Sanchez, Juan F; De Los Santos, Maxy B; Lucas, Carmen M; Núñez, Jorge H; Edgel, Kimberly A; Sopan, Justino; Fernández, Jorge; Carnero, Andres M; Baldeviano, G Christian; Arrasco, Juan C; Graf, Paul C F; Lescano, Andres G

    2015-08-01

    Military personnel deployed to the Amazon Basin are at high risk for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). We responded to an outbreak among Peruvian Army personnel returning from short-term training in the Amazon, conducting active case detection, lesion sample collection, and risk factor assessment. The attack rate was 25% (76/303); the incubation period was 2-36 weeks (median = 8). Most cases had one lesion (66%), primarily ulcerative (49%), and in the legs (57%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identified Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (59/61 = 97%) and L. (V.) guyanensis (2/61 = 3%). Being male (risk ratio [RR] = 4.01; P = 0.034), not wearing long-sleeve clothes (RR = 1.71; P = 0.005), and sleeping in open rooms (RR = 1.80; P = 0.009) were associated with CL. Sodium stibogluconate therapy had a 41% cure rate, less than previously reported in Peru (~70%; P < 0.001). After emphasizing pre-deployment education and other basic prevention measures, trainees in the following year had lower incidence (1/278 = 0.4%; P < 0.001). Basic prevention can reduce CL risk in deployed militaries.

  18. Outbreak of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Peruvian Military Personnel Undertaking Training Activities in the Amazon Basin, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Oré, Marianela; Sáenz, Eliana; Cabrera, Rufino; Sanchez, Juan F.; De Los Santos, Maxy B.; Lucas, Carmen M.; Núñez, Jorge H.; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Sopan, Justino; Fernández, Jorge; Carnero, Andres M.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Arrasco, Juan C.; Graf, Paul C. F.; Lescano, Andres G.

    2015-01-01

    Military personnel deployed to the Amazon Basin are at high risk for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). We responded to an outbreak among Peruvian Army personnel returning from short-term training in the Amazon, conducting active case detection, lesion sample collection, and risk factor assessment. The attack rate was 25% (76/303); the incubation period was 2–36 weeks (median = 8). Most cases had one lesion (66%), primarily ulcerative (49%), and in the legs (57%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identified Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (59/61 = 97%) and L. (V.) guyanensis (2/61 = 3%). Being male (risk ratio [RR] = 4.01; P = 0.034), not wearing long-sleeve clothes (RR = 1.71; P = 0.005), and sleeping in open rooms (RR = 1.80; P = 0.009) were associated with CL. Sodium stibogluconate therapy had a 41% cure rate, less than previously reported in Peru (∼ 70%; P < 0.001). After emphasizing pre-deployment education and other basic prevention measures, trainees in the following year had lower incidence (1/278 = 0.4%; P < 0.001). Basic prevention can reduce CL risk in deployed militaries. PMID:26078320

  19. Biological activity of particle exhaust emissions from light-duty diesel engines.

    PubMed

    Carraro, E; Locatelli, A L; Ferrero, C; Fea, E; Gilli, G

    1997-01-01

    Whole diesel exhaust has been classified recently as a probable carcinogen, and several genotoxicity studies have found particulate exhaust to be clearly mutagenic. Moreover, genotoxicity of diesel particulate is greatly influenced by fuel nature and type of combustion. In order to obtain an effective environmental pollution control, combustion processes using alternative fuels are being analyzed presently. The goal of this study is to determine whether the installation of exhaust after treatment-devices on two light-duty, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve-equipped diesel engines (1930 cc and 2500 cc) can reduce the mutagenicity associated with particles collected during U.S.A. and European driving cycles. Another interesting object was to compare the ability of alternative biodiesel and conventional diesel fuels to reduce the mutagenic activity associated with collected particles from two light duty diesel engines (both 1930 cc) during the European driving cycle. SOF mutagenicity was assayed using the Salmonella/microsome test (TA 98 and TA 100 strains, +/- S9 fraction). In the first part of our study, the highest mutagenicity was revealed by TA98 strain without enzymatic activation, suggesting a direct-acting mutagenicity prevalence in diesel particulate. The 2500 cc engine revealed twofold mutagenic activity compared with the 1930 cc engine (both EGR valve equipped), whereas an opposite result was found in particulate matter amount. The use of a noncatalytic ceramic trap produced a decrease of particle mutagenic activity in the 2500 cc car, whereas an enhancement in the 1930 cc engine was found. The catalytic converter and the electrostatic filter installed on the 2500 cc engine yielded a light particle amount and an SOF mutagenicity decrease. A greater engine stress was obtained using European driving cycles, which caused the strongest mutagenicity/km compared with the U.S.A. cycles. In the second part of the investigation, even though a small number of

  20. Biological activity of particle exhaust emissions from light-duty diesel engines.

    PubMed

    Carraro, E; Locatelli, A L; Ferrero, C; Fea, E; Gilli, G

    1997-01-01

    Whole diesel exhaust has been classified recently as a probable carcinogen, and several genotoxicity studies have found particulate exhaust to be clearly mutagenic. Moreover, genotoxicity of diesel particulate is greatly influenced by fuel nature and type of combustion. In order to obtain an effective environmental pollution control, combustion processes using alternative fuels are being analyzed presently. The goal of this study is to determine whether the installation of exhaust after treatment-devices on two light-duty, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve-equipped diesel engines (1930 cc and 2500 cc) can reduce the mutagenicity associated with particles collected during U.S.A. and European driving cycles. Another interesting object was to compare the ability of alternative biodiesel and conventional diesel fuels to reduce the mutagenic activity associated with collected particles from two light duty diesel engines (both 1930 cc) during the European driving cycle. SOF mutagenicity was assayed using the Salmonella/microsome test (TA 98 and TA 100 strains, +/- S9 fraction). In the first part of our study, the highest mutagenicity was revealed by TA98 strain without enzymatic activation, suggesting a direct-acting mutagenicity prevalence in diesel particulate. The 2500 cc engine revealed twofold mutagenic activity compared with the 1930 cc engine (both EGR valve equipped), whereas an opposite result was found in particulate matter amount. The use of a noncatalytic ceramic trap produced a decrease of particle mutagenic activity in the 2500 cc car, whereas an enhancement in the 1930 cc engine was found. The catalytic converter and the electrostatic filter installed on the 2500 cc engine yielded a light particle amount and an SOF mutagenicity decrease. A greater engine stress was obtained using European driving cycles, which caused the strongest mutagenicity/km compared with the U.S.A. cycles. In the second part of the investigation, even though a small number of

  1. 5 CFR 734.406 - Participation in political activities while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties, or... on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties, or using a... any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties by an individual employed or...

  2. Analysis of heavy-duty diesel truck activity and emissions data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huai, Tao; Shah, Sandip D.; Wayne Miller, J.; Younglove, Ted; Chernich, Donald J.; Ayala, Alberto

    Despite their relatively small population, heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) are (in 2005) disproportionate contributors to the emissions inventory for oxides of nitrogen (NO x) and particulate matter (PM) due to their high individual vehicle emissions rates, lack of engine aftertreatment, and high vehicle miles traveled. Beginning in the early 1990s, heavy-duty engine manufacturers began equipping their engines with electronic sensors and controls and on-board electronic computer modules (ECMs) to manage these systems. These ECMs can collect and store both periodic and lifetime engine operation data for a variety of engine and vehicle parameters including engine speed and load, time at idle, average vehicle speed, etc. The University of California, Riverside (UCR), under a contract with the California Air Resources Board (CARB), performed data analysis of 270 ECM data sets obtained from the CARB. The results from this analysis have provided insights into engine/vehicle operation that have not been obtained from previous on-board datalogger studies since those previous studies focused on vehicle operation and did not collect engine operating data. Results indicate that HDDVs spend a considerable amount of time at high-speed cruise and at idle and that a smaller percentage of time is spent under transient engine/vehicle operation. These results are consistent with other HDDV activity studies, and provide further proof of the validity of assumptions in CARB's emission factor (EMFAC2002) model. An additional important contribution of this paper is that the evaluation of vehicle ECM data provides several advantages over traditional global positioning system (GPS) and datalogger studies: (1) ECM data is significantly cheaper than the traditional method (50 record -1 vs. ˜2000 record -1) and (2) ECM data covers vehicle operation over the entire life of the vehicle, whereas traditional surveys cover only short periods of surveillance (days, weeks, or months). It is

  3. VR PTSD exposure therapy results with active duty OIF/OEF combatants.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Albert A; Difede, Joann; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Johnston, Scott; McLay, Robert N; Reger, Greg; Gahm, Greg; Parsons, Thomas; Graap, Ken; Pair, Jarrell

    2009-01-01

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is reported to be caused by traumatic events that are outside the range of usual human experience including military combat, violent personal assault, being kidnapped or taken hostage and terrorist attacks. Reports indicate that at least 1 out of 6 Iraq War veterans are exhibiting symptoms of depression, anxiety and PTSD. Virtual Reality exposure therapy has been previously used for PTSD with reports of positive outcomes. This paper will present a brief description of the USC/ICT Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan PTSD therapy application and present clinical outcome data from active duty patients treated at the Naval Medical Center-San Diego (NMCSD) as of October 2009. Initial outcomes from the first twenty patients to complete treatment indicate that 16 no longer meet diagnostic criteria for PTSD at post treatment. Research and clinical tests using the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan software are also currently underway at Weill Cornell Medical College, Emory University, Fort Lewis and WRAMC along with 20 other test sites. PMID:19377167

  4. A frequency-duty cycle equation for the ACGIH hand activity level

    PubMed Central

    Radwin, Robert G.; Azari, David P.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Ulin, Sheryl S.; Armstrong, Thomas J.; Rempel, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective A new equation for predicting the hand activity level (HAL) used in the ACGIH threshold limit value® (TLV®), was based on exertion frequency (F) and percentage duty cycle (D). Background The TLV® includes a table for estimating HAL from F and D originating from data in Latko et al. (1997) and post-hoc adjustments that includes extrapolations outside of the data range. Methods Multimedia video task analysis determined D for two additional jobs from Latko’s study not in the original data set, and a new non-linear regression equation was developed to better fit the data and create a more accurate table. Results The equation, HAL=6.56lnD[F1.311+3.18F1.31], generally matches the TLV® HAL lookup table, and is a substantial improvement over the linear model, particularly for F > 1.25 Hz and D > 60% jobs. Conclusion The equation more closely fits the data and applies the TLV® using a continuous function. Practitioner Summary The original HAL lookup table is limited in resolution, omits values, and extrapolates values outside of the range of data. A new equation and table was developed to address these issues. PMID:25343340

  5. Optimizing fitness for duty and post-combat clinical services for military personnel and combat veterans with ADHD—a systematic review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Iliyan; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Background Attention deficit hyper activity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder, most often diagnosed in childhood, and characterized by hyperactivity and inattention that negatively impacts one's ability to function and fulfill social and personal obligations. Individuals with past history of ADHD may enlist in the military under certain conditions, however the full impact of military training and deployment of later in life ADHD symptoms is unclear. It is of particular interest how military experience may affect ADHD in remission and if such individuals might be at elevated risk for relapse of ADHD symptoms. Method We performed a systematic review f the available literature including the Department of Defense (DOD) guidelines for both eligibility to enlist and fitness for deployment based on reported history and current symptomatology of ADHD. Results The after care for veterans with ADHD relapse is inconsistent and presents with number of challenges. We evaluate the DOD policies regarding the implications of ADHD for fitness for military service and post-combat mental health. Conclusion The full extend of the interaction between pre-existing ADHD and post-combat PTSD are not fully understood. The development of comprehensive and clear algorithms for diagnosing and treating ADHD in the military before and after deployment will have a strong positive impact on the quality of care delivered to soldiers and veterans. PMID:25206949

  6. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Physical Activity Behavior among Elementary School Personnel: Baseline Results from the ACTION! Worksite Wellness Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Larry S.; Rice, Janet C.; Johnson, Carolyn C.; Rose, Donald; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Berenson, Gerald S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the prevalence of obesity is increasing during adulthood, there have been few assessments of obesity, cardiovascular risk factors, and levels of physical activity among adult elementary school staff. Methods: Data were collected from 745 African-American and White female school personnel in a suburban school district in…

  7. Effect of an accelerometer on body weight and fitness in overweight and obese active duty soldiers.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Merica; Combest, Travis; Fonda, Stephanie J; Alfonso, Abel; Guerrero, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated whether using a web-linked accelerometer, plus mandatory physical training, is associated with various weight- and fitness-related outcomes in overweight/obese active duty soldiers. Soldiers who failed the height/weight standards of the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) were randomized to use a Polar FA20 accelerometer device (polar accelerometer group [PA], n = 15) or usual care (UC, n = 13) for 6 months. Both groups received 1.5 hours of lifestyle instruction. We collected data at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 months, and evaluated group differences in temporal changes in study outcomes. At 6 months, 1/28 subjects (UC) passed the APFT height/weight standards. There were no group differences in changes in weight (PA: -0.1 kg vs. UC: +0.3 kg; p = 0.9), body fat (PA: -0.9% vs. UC: -1.1%; p = 0.9), systolic blood pressure (PA: +1.3 mm Hg vs. UC: -2.1 mm Hg; p = 0.2), diastolic blood pressure (PA: +3.8 mm Hg vs. UC: -2.4 mm Hg; p = 0.3), or resting heart rate in beats per minute (bpm) (PA: +7.8 bpm vs. UC: +0.1 bpm; p = 0.2). These results suggest that using an accelerometer with web-based feedback capabilities plus mandatory physical training does not assist in significant weight loss or ability to pass the APFT height/weight standards among overweight/obese soldiers.

  8. The Impact of Environment and Occupation on the Health and Safety of Active Duty Air Force Members: Database Development and De-Identification.

    PubMed

    Erich, Roger; Eaton, Melinda; Mayes, Ryan; Pierce, Lamar; Knight, Andrew; Genovesi, Paul; Escobar, James; Mychalczuk, George; Selent, Monica

    2016-08-01

    Preparing data for medical research can be challenging, detail oriented, and time consuming. Transcription errors, missing or nonsensical data, and records not applicable to the study population may hamper progress and, if unaddressed, can lead to erroneous conclusions. In addition, study data may be housed in multiple disparate databases and complex formats. Merging methods may be incomplete to obtain temporally synchronized data elements. We created a comprehensive database to explore the general hypothesis that environmental and occupational factors influence health outcomes and risk-taking behavior among active duty Air Force personnel. Several databases containing demographics, medical records, health survey responses, and safety incident reports were cleaned, validated, and linked to form a comprehensive, relational database. The final step involved removing and transforming personally identifiable information to form a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant limited database. Initial data consisted of over 62.8 million records containing 221 variables. When completed, approximately 23.9 million clean and valid records with 214 variables remained. With a clean, robust database, future analysis aims to identify high-risk career fields for targeted interventions or uncover potential protective factors in low-risk career fields. PMID:27483519

  9. STS-103 crew practices driving personnel carrier, part of TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) (far right) practices driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. In front is Capt. George Hoggard, trainer with the KSC Fire Department. At far left is Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who are with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  10. HEAVY DUTY DIESEL VEHICLE LOAD ESTIMATION: DEVELOPMENT OF VEHICLE ACTIVITY OPTIMIZATION ALGORITHM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Heavy-Duty Vehicle Modal Emission Model (HDDV-MEM) developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology(Georgia Tech) has a capability to model link-specific second-by-second emissions using speed/accleration matrices. To estimate emissions, engine power demand calculated usin...

  11. 5 CFR 734.306 - Participation in political activities while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties, or... occupied in the discharge of official duties, or using a Federal vehicle. (a) An employee may not... any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties by an individual employed or...

  12. Effects of personal and occupational stress on injuries in a young, physically active population: a survey of military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bedno, Sheryl; Hauret, Keith; Loringer, Kelly; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Mallon, Timothy; Jones, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to document risk factors for any injury and sports- and exercise-related injuries, including personal and occupational stress among active duty service members (SMs) in the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. A total of 10,692 SMs completed the April 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Members. The survey asked about demographics, personal stress and occupational stress, injuries from any cause, and participation in sports- and exercise- related activities in the past year. The survey used a complex sampling procedure to create a representative sample of SMs. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations of injury outcomes with potential risk factors. 49% of SMs sought medical care for an injury in the past year and 25% sustained a sports- and exercise-related activities injury. Odds of injury were higher for the Army and Marine Corps than for the Air Force or Navy. This survey showed that higher personal and occupational stress was associated with higher risks of injury. SMs who experienced higher levels of personal or occupational stress reported higher risks of injuries. The effects of stress reduction programs on injury risks should be evaluated in military and other young physically active populations.

  13. 5 CFR 1800.1 - Filing complaints of prohibited personnel practices or other prohibited activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... course of any personnel action (unless the Special Counsel determines that the allegation may be resolved...: (800) 872-9855 (toll-free), or (202) 653-7188 (in the Washington, DC area); or (iii) Online, at: http://www.osc.gov (to print out and complete on paper, or to complete online). (5) A complainant can file...

  14. 5 CFR 1800.1 - Filing complaints of prohibited personnel practices or other prohibited activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... course of any personnel action (unless the Special Counsel determines that the allegation may be resolved...: (800) 872-9855 (toll-free), or (202) 653-7188 (in the Washington, DC area); or (iii) Online, at: http://www.osc.gov (to print out and complete on paper, or to complete online). (5) A complainant can file...

  15. 5 CFR 1800.1 - Filing complaints of prohibited personnel practices or other prohibited activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... course of any personnel action (unless the Special Counsel determines that the allegation may be resolved...: (800) 872-9855 (toll-free), or (202) 653-7188 (in the Washington, DC area); or (iii) Online, at: http://www.osc.gov (to print out and complete on paper, or to complete online). (5) A complainant can file...

  16. 5 CFR 1800.1 - Filing complaints of prohibited personnel practices or other prohibited activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... course of any personnel action (unless the Special Counsel determines that the allegation may be resolved...: (800) 872-9855 (toll-free), or (202) 653-7188 (in the Washington, DC area); or (iii) Online, at: http://www.osc.gov (to print out and complete on paper, or to complete online). (5) A complainant can file...

  17. 5 CFR 1800.1 - Filing complaints of prohibited personnel practices or other prohibited activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... course of any personnel action (unless the Special Counsel determines that the allegation may be resolved...: (800) 872-9855 (toll-free), or (202) 653-7188 (in the Washington, DC area); or (iii) Online, at: http://www.osc.gov (to print out and complete on paper, or to complete online). (5) A complainant can file...

  18. Bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures in a healthy, active duty soldier: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anthony E; Rose, Stephen D

    2006-12-01

    Unilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures are not uncommon. These injuries have been reported to occur spontaneously and after seemingly trivial trauma in elderly individuals, patients undergoing renal dialysis, and patients with metabolic derangements such as hyperparathyroidism. In young patients, unilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures have been reported as complications of burns, anabolic steroid abuse, and elective orthopedic surgery. Bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures in young healthy patients are rare injuries. We present the case of a young, healthy, active duty soldier who sustained bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures after a relatively minor trauma.

  19. Base camp personnel exposure to particulate matter during wildland fire suppression activities.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Marcy L; Semmens, Erin O; Gaskill, Steven; Palmer, Charles; Noonan, Curtis W; Ward, Tony J

    2012-01-01

    Wildland fire base camps commonly house thousands of support personnel for weeks at a time. The selection of the location of these base camps is largely a strategic decision that incorporates many factors, one of which is the potential impact of biomass smoke from the nearby fire event. Biomass smoke has many documented adverse health effects due, primarily, to high levels of fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)). Minimizing particulate matter exposure to potentially susceptible individuals working as support personnel in the base camp is vital. In addition to smoke from nearby wildland fires, base camp operations have the potential to generate particulate matter via vehicle emissions, dust, and generator use. We monitored particulate matter at three base camps during the fire season of 2009 in Washington, Oregon, and California. During the sampling events, 1-min time-weighted averages of PM(2.5) and particle counts from three size fractions (0.3-0.5 microns, 0.5-1.0 microns, and 1.0-2.5 microns) were measured. Results showed that all PM size fractions (as well as overall PM(2.5) concentrations) were higher during the overnight hours, a trend that was consistent at all camps. Our results provide evidence of camp-based, site-specific sources of PM(2.5) that could potentially exceed the contributions from the nearby wildfire. These exposures could adversely impact wildland firefighters who sleep in the camp, as well as the camp support personnel, who could include susceptible individuals. A better understanding of the sources and patterns of poor air quality within base camps would help to inform prevention strategies to reduce personnel exposures.

  20. Personnel Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    The document serves as a basic text for the indoctrination of all naval officers and as an introductory text for the officer who specializes in personnel administration or manpower management. Chapter 1 contains an introductory summary of the various functions of naval personnel administration and manpower management and describes the processes of…

  1. Obesity classification in military personnel: A comparison of body fat, waist circumference, and body mass index measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate obesity classifications from body fat percentage (BF%), body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC). A total of 451 overweight/obese active duty military personnel completed all three assessments. Most were obese (men, 81%; women, 98%) using National...

  2. Diagnostic Utility of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Checklist for Identifying Full and Partial PTSD in Active-Duty Military.

    PubMed

    Dickstein, Benjamin D; Weathers, Frank W; Angkaw, Abigail C; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Yurgil, Kate; Nash, William P; Baker, Dewleen G; Litz, Brett T

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine optimally efficient cutoff scores on the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL) for identifying full posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and partial PTSD (P-PTSD) in active-duty Marines and Sailors. Participants were 1,016 Marines and Sailors who were administered the PCL and Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) 3 months after returning from Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom. PCL cutoffs were tested against three CAPS-based classifications: full PTSD, stringent P-PTSD, and lenient P-PTSD. A PCL score of 39 was found to be optimally efficient for identifying full PTSD. Scores of 38 and 33 were found to be optimally efficient for identifying stringent and lenient P-PTSD, respectively. Findings suggest that the PCL cutoff that is optimally efficient for detecting PTSD in active-duty Marines and Sailors is substantially lower than the score of 50 commonly used by researchers. In addition, findings provide scores useful for identifying P-PTSD in returning service members.

  3. 5 CFR 9701.515 - Representation rights and duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Representation rights and duties. 9701.515 Section 9701.515 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT...

  4. Suicide Attempt Characteristics Among Veterans and Active-Duty Service Members Receiving Mental Health Services: A Pooled Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Villatte, Jennifer L.; O’Connor, Stephen S.; Leitner, Rebecca; Kerbrat, Amanda H.; Johnson, Lora L.; Gutierrez, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Past suicidal behaviors are among the strongest and most consistent predictors of eventual suicide and may be particularly salient in military suicide. The current study compared characteristics of suicide attempts in veterans (N = 746) and active-duty service members (N = 1,013) receiving treatment for acute suicide risk. Baseline data from six randomized controlled trials were pooled and analyzed using robust regression. Service members had greater odds of having attempted suicide relative to veterans, though there were no differences in number of attempts made. Service members also had higher rates of premilitary suicide attempts and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Veterans disproportionately attempted suicide by means of overdose. In veterans, combat deployment was associated with lower odds of lifetime suicide attempt, while history of NSSI was associated with greater attempt odds. Neither was significantly associated with lifetime suicide attempt in service members. Implications for suicide assessment and treatment are discussed. PMID:26740909

  5. DOE Technical Standards List. Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This is a periodic report on the level of agency participation in non-Government standards activities. This technical standards list is intended to assist US Department of Energy (DOE) management and other personnel involved in the DOE technical Standards Program by identifying those participating individuals. The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted a Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. Appendices to this document are provided to list the information by parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees.

  6. 44 CFR 208.39 - Reimbursement for personnel costs incurred during Activation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... costs for Activated Support Specialists will be limited to periods of time during which they were... sleep periods during Activation. Activated System Members are considered “on-duty” and must be available for immediate response at all times during Activation. (d) Regular rate. The regular rate for...

  7. 41 CFR 302-2.9 - If I am furloughed to perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the relocation within the time limitation? 302-2.9 Section 302-2.9 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits §...

  8. 41 CFR 302-2.9 - If I am furloughed to perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the relocation within the time limitation? 302-2.9 Section 302-2.9 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits §...

  9. 41 CFR 302-2.9 - If I am furloughed to perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the relocation within the time limitation? 302-2.9 Section 302-2.9 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits §...

  10. 41 CFR 302-2.9 - If I am furloughed to perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the relocation within the time limitation? 302-2.9 Section 302-2.9 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits §...

  11. 41 CFR 302-2.9 - If I am furloughed to perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the relocation within the time limitation? 302-2.9 Section 302-2.9 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits §...

  12. Students Help a Teacher Called to Active Duty: What a Great Feeling to Have a Group of Students Who Are Excited and Want to Help a Teacher in Need so Many Miles from Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuill, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The author shares how his technology education students at Tecumseh Middle School help his former student from a Purdue class, Ryan Smith, who was called to active military duty. Ryan was teaching technology education at Lafayette Jefferson High School when he was called by the military in the fall of 2004 to report to active duty. Before…

  13. Prevalence and correlates of needle-stick injuries among active duty police officers in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, María Luisa; Beletsky, Leo; Patiño, Efraín; Abramovitz, Daniela; Rocha, Teresita; Arredondo, Jaime; Bañuelos, Arnulfo; Rangel, Gudelia; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Police officers are at an elevated risk for needle-stick injuries (NSI), which pose a serious and costly occupational health risk for HIV and viral hepatitis. However, research on NSIs among police officers is limited, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the legality of syringe possession in Mexico, half of people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana report extrajudicial syringe-related arrests and confiscation by police, which has been associated with needle-sharing and HIV infection. We assessed the prevalence and correlates of NSIs among Tijuana police officers to inform efforts to improve occupational safety and simultaneously reduce HIV risks among police and PWID. Methods Tijuana's Department of Municipal Public Safety (SSPM) is among Mexico's largest. Our binational, multi-sectoral team analyzed de-identified data from SSPM's 2014 anonymous self-administered occupational health survey. The prevalence of NSI and syringe disposal practices was determined. Logistic regression with robust variance estimation via generalized estimating equations identified factors associated with ever having an occupational NSI. Results Approximately one-quarter of the Tijuana police force was given the occupational health survey (N=503). Respondents were predominantly male (86.5%) and ≤35 years old (42.6%). Nearly one in six officers reported ever having a NSI while working at SSPM (15.3%), of whom 14.3% reported a NSI within the past year. Most participants reported encountering needles/syringes while on duty (n=473, 94%); factors independently associated with elevated odds of NSIs included frequently finding syringes that contain drugs (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.98; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.56–5.67) and breaking used needles (AOR: 2.25; 95% CI: 1.29–3.91), while protective factors included being willing to contact emergency services in case of NSIs (AOR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.22–0.69), and wearing needle-stick resistant gloves (AOR: 0

  14. Fatty Acid Blood Levels, Vitamin D Status, Physical Performance, Activity, and Resiliency: A Novel Potential Screening Tool for Depressed Mood in Active Duty Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Barringer, Nicholas D; Kotwal, Russ S; Lewis, Michael D; Funderburk, Leslee K; Elliott, Timothy R; Crouse, Stephen F; Smith, Stephen B; Greenwood, Michael; Kreider, Richard B

    2016-09-01

    This study examined whether blood fatty acid levels, vitamin D status, and/or physical activity are associated with physical fitness scores; a measure of mood, Patient Health Questionnaire-9; and a measure of resiliency, Dispositional Resiliency Scale-15 in active duty Soldiers. 100 active duty males at Fort Hood, Texas, underwent a battery of psychometric tests, anthropometric measurements, and fitness tests, and they also provided fasting blood samples for fatty acid and vitamin D analysis. Pearson bivariate correlation analysis revealed significant correlations among psychometric tests, anthropometric measurements, physical performance, reported physical inactivity (sitting time), and fatty acid and vitamin D blood levels. On the basis of these findings, a regression equation was developed to predict a depressed mood status as determined by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The equation accurately predicted depressed mood status in 80% of our participants with a sensitivity of 76.9% and a specificity of 80.5%. Results indicate that the use of a regression equation may be helpful in identifying Soldiers at higher risk for mental health issues. Future studies should evaluate the impact of exercise and diet as a means of improving resiliency and reducing depressed mood in Soldiers. PMID:27612362

  15. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, N.; Moore, C.; Grant, T.; Fleming, T.; Hunt, P.; Martin, R.; Murphy, S.; Hauth, J.; Wilson, R.; Bittner, A.; Bramwell, A.; Macaulay, J.; Olson, J.; Terrill, E.; Toquam, J. )

    1991-09-01

    This report presents an overview of the NRC licensees' implementation of the FFD program during the first full year of the program's operation and provides new information on a variety of FFD technical issues. The purpose of this document is to contribute to appropriate changes to the rule, to the inspection process, and to other NRC activities. It describes the characteristics of licensee programs, discusses the results of NRC inspections, updates technical information covered in previous reports, and identifies lessons learned during the first year. Overall, the experience of the first full year of licensees' FFD program operations indicates that licensees have functioning fitness for duty programs devoted to the NRC rule's performance objectives of achieving drug-free workplaces in which nuclear power plant personnel are not impaired as they perform their duties. 96 refs., 14 tabs.

  16. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... actively engaged in farming, the person may be considered to be actively engaged in farming if the... determined to be, actively engaged in farming if the person would not have been called to active duty. If the person is called to active duty after being determined to be actively engaged in farming,...

  17. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... actively engaged in farming, the person may be considered to be actively engaged in farming if the... determined to be, actively engaged in farming if the person would not have been called to active duty. If the person is called to active duty after being determined to be actively engaged in farming,...

  18. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... actively engaged in farming, the person may be considered to be actively engaged in farming if the... determined to be, actively engaged in farming if the person would not have been called to active duty. If the person is called to active duty after being determined to be actively engaged in farming,...

  19. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... actively engaged in farming, the person may be considered to be actively engaged in farming if the... determined to be, actively engaged in farming if the person would not have been called to active duty. If the person is called to active duty after being determined to be actively engaged in farming,...

  20. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... actively engaged in farming, the person may be considered to be actively engaged in farming if the... determined to be, actively engaged in farming if the person would not have been called to active duty. If the person is called to active duty after being determined to be actively engaged in farming,...

  1. Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies.

  2. 77 FR 73038 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Allowance in Duties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... of other forms of information technology; and (e) the annual cost burden to respondents or record... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for.... ACTION: 60-day notice and request for comments; Extension of an existing collection of...

  3. Families and School Personnel Involved in a Literacy and Physical Activity Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, James A.; Richardson, Maurine V.; Sacks, Mary Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    A traditional part of American education has been to include the families in the educational process of their children. The needs and complexities of today's families and classrooms have never been greater. Programs and activities used with families, and school interactions 10 to 15 years ago are not effective for today's complex families and…

  4. Rates of ankle and foot injuries in active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, 2000-2006.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Robert F; Wahi, Monika M; Hill, Owen T; Kay, Ashley B

    2011-03-01

    Ankle and foot injuries (AFI) are a major cause of Active-Duty Army (ADA) soldiers' time lost from training and combat operations. We used the Total Army Injury and Health Outcomes Database to compute the rates of AFI to identify high-risk ADA groups for the years 2000-2006. During this time, 16% of soldiers were clinically seen at least once for an AFI. Yearly, 60% to 70% of ADA soldiers with AFI had an ankle sprain/strain, and ankle sprain/strain had the highest 7-year rate of all AFIs (103 per 1,000). From 2000 to 2006, all AFI rates declined; however, enlisted male soldiers < or = 30 years of age without an advanced degree were at highest risk. A history of an AFI in the previous 2 years increased AFI rates by 93% to 160%. Our findings provide preliminary evidence for identifying specific ADA groups at high risk of AFI; these groups should be targeted for preventive interventions. PMID:21456354

  5. 5 CFR 9701.509 - Powers and duties of the HSLRB.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powers and duties of the HSLRB. 9701.509 Section 9701.509 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Labor-Management Relations § 9701.509 Powers and duties of the...

  6. 5 CFR 9701.518 - Duty to bargain, confer, and consult.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duty to bargain, confer, and consult. 9701.518 Section 9701.518 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Labor-Management Relations § 9701.518 Duty to bargain,...

  7. 5 CFR 9701.515 - Representation rights and duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Representation rights and duties. 9701.515 Section 9701.515 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Labor-Management Relations § 9701.515 Representation rights...

  8. PERSONNEL DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Birkhoff, R.D.; Hubbell, H.H. Jr.; Johnson, R.M.

    1959-02-24

    A personnel dosimeter sensitive to both gamma and beta radiation is described. The dosimeter consists of an electrical conductive cylinder having a wall thickness of substantially 7 milligrams per square centimeter and an electrode disposed axially within the cylinder and insulated therefrom to maintain a potential impressed between the electrode and the cylinder. A cylindrical perforated shield provided with a known percentage of void area is disposed concentrically about the cylinder. The shield is formed of a material which does not contain more than 15 percent of an element higher than atomic weight 13. The dose actually received is at most the gamma dose plus the beta dose indicated by discharge of the dosimeter divided by the known percentage.

  9. Reviews of Data on Science Resources, No. 29. Current and Future Utilization of Scientific and Technical Personnel in Energy-Related Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    This National Science Foundation (NSF) bulletin summarizes the NSF program of energy manpower studies that assessed the impact of past energy developments and future options for scientific and technical manpower. This document summarizes the utilization of scientific personnel in energy-related activities in private industry in 1975 and shortages…

  10. A randomized, controlled trial of virtual reality-graded exposure therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder in active duty service members with combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    McLay, Robert N; Wood, Dennis P; Webb-Murphy, Jennifer A; Spira, James L; Wiederhold, Mark D; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Wiederhold, Brenda K

    2011-04-01

    Abstract Virtual reality (VR)-based therapy has emerged as a potentially useful means to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but randomized studies have been lacking for Service Members from Iraq or Afghanistan. This study documents a small, randomized, controlled trial of VR-graded exposure therapy (VR-GET) versus treatment as usual (TAU) for PTSD in Active Duty military personnel with combat-related PTSD. Success was gauged according to whether treatment resulted in a 30 percent or greater improvement in the PTSD symptom severity as assessed by the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) after 10 weeks of treatment. Seven of 10 participants improved by 30 percent or greater while in VR-GET, whereas only 1 of the 9 returning participants in TAU showed similar improvement. This is a clinically and statistically significant result (χ(2) = 6.74, p < 0.01, relative risk 3.2). Participants in VR-GET improved an average of 35 points on the CAPS, whereas those in TAU averaged a 9-point improvement (p < 0.05). The results are limited by small size, lack of blinding, a single therapist, and comparison to a relatively uncontrolled usual care condition, but did show VR-GET to be a safe and effective treatment for combat-related PTSD. PMID:21332375

  11. Posttraumatic stress disorder in veterans and military personnel: epidemiology, screening, and case recognition.

    PubMed

    Gates, Margaret A; Holowka, Darren W; Vasterling, Jennifer J; Keane, Terence M; Marx, Brian P; Rosen, Raymond C

    2012-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that affects 7-8% of the general U.S. population at some point during their lifetime; however, the prevalence is much higher among certain subgroups, including active duty military personnel and veterans. In this article, we review the empirical literature on the epidemiology and screening of PTSD in military and veteran populations, including the availability of sensitive and reliable screening tools. Although estimates vary across studies, evidence suggests that the prevalence of PTSD in deployed U.S. military personnel may be as high as 14-16%. Prior studies have identified trauma characteristics and pre- and posttrauma factors that increase risk of PTSD among veterans and military personnel. This information may help to inform prevention and screening efforts, as screening programs could be targeted to high-risk populations. Large-scale screening efforts have recently been implemented by the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs. Given the prevalence and potential consequences of PTSD among veterans and active duty military personnel, development and continued evaluation of effective screening methods is an important public health need. PMID:23148803

  12. Missed opportunity to screen and diagnose PTSD and depression among deploying shipboard US military personnel

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Braden R.; Michael, Nelson L.; Scott, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are significant risks for suicide and other adverse events among US military personnel, but prevalence data among ship-assigned personnel at the onset of deployment are unknown. Aims To determine the prevalence of shipboard personnel who screen positive for PTSD and/or major depressive disorder (MDD) at the onset of deployment, and also those who reported these diagnoses made by a physician or healthcare professional in the year prior to deployment. Method Active-duty ship-assigned personnel (N = 2078) completed anonymous assessments at the beginning of deployment. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D; score of ≥22), and PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Checklist–Civilian Version (PCL-C; both score and symptom criteria were used). Results In total, 7.3% (n = 151 of 2076) screened positive for PTSD and 22% (n = 461 of 2078) for MDD at deployment onset. Only 6% and 15% of those who screened positive for PTSD or MDD, respectively, had been diagnosed by a healthcare professional in the past year. Conclusions Missed opportunities for mental healthcare among screen-positive shipboard personnel reduce the benefits associated with early identification and linkage to care. Improved methods of mental health screening that promote early recognition and referral to care may mitigate psychiatric events in theatre. Declaration of interest This work was performed as part of the official duties of the authors as military service members or employees of the US Government. Copyright and usage This work was prepared by military service members or employees of the US Government as part of their official duties. As such, copyright protection is not available for this work (Title 17, USC, §105). PMID:27713833

  13. Height, weight and body mass index (BMI) in psychiatrically ill US Armed Forces personnel

    PubMed Central

    WYATT, R. J.; HENTER, I. D.; MOJTABAI, R.; BARTKO, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In both psychiatrically ill and psychiatrically healthy adults, the connection between health and individuals’ height and weight has long been examined. Specifically, research on the idea that individuals with certain body types were prone to particular psychiatric diseases has been explored sporadically for centuries. The hypothesis that psychiatrically ill individuals were shorter and weighed less than psychiatrically healthy counterparts would correspond with the neurodevelopmental model of psychiatric disease. Method To evaluate possible links between psychiatric illness and physique, the height, weight and BMI of 7514 patients and 85 940 controls were compared. All subjects were part of the National Collaborative Study of Early Psychosis and Suicide (NCSEPS). Patients were US military active duty personnel hospitalized for either bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, or schizophrenia and controls were psychiatrically-healthy US military active duty personnel matched for date of entry into the service. Results No consistent differences in height, weight or BMI were found between patients and controls, or between patient groups. Some weak ANOVA differences were found between age at the time of entering active duty and weight, as well as BMI, but not height. Conclusions Unlike most previous studies that have looked at the links between height and psychiatric illness, this study of the NCSEPS cohort found that, at entry into the US Armed Forces, there were no consistent decreases in height for patients with bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder or schizophrenia compared with a large control group. Furthermore, there were no consistent differences for weight or BMI. PMID:12622316

  14. Duty Calls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ernest L.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the importance of elementary and secondary student participation in community service activities for effective civic education and citizen development. Suggests that if commitment to service were an integral part of educational processes students would continue participating in community service programs as adults. (MAB)

  15. A case of person-to-person transmission of Q fever from an active duty serviceman to his spouse.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Marisa H; Veryser, Andrea Kay; Anderson, Alicia D; Hofinger, Diedre; Lee, Samuel A; Tancik, Corey

    2010-06-01

    Coxiella burnetii has recently gained military relevance given its potential as a bioterrorism agent, and the multiple cases reported among U.S. military personnel deployed to the Middle East. Sexual transmission of Q fever is rare but has been reported in the literature. We describe the possible sexual transmission of Q fever from a returning serviceman from Iraq to his wife. In a recent editorial commentary, Dr. Raoult wrote about the reemergence of Q fever after September 11, 2001 (Raoult 2009). Indeed, C. burnetii has gained military relevance given its potential as a bioterrorism agent and the multiple cases reported among military personnel deployed in Southwest/Central Asia and North Africa (Botros et al. 1995 , Meskini et al. 1995 , Leung-Shea and Danaher 2006 ). Human serosurveys in these geographic areas have reported prevalence rates for Q fever ranging from 10% to 37% in contrast to the United States, which has an estimated Q fever seroprevalence of 3.1% (Botros et al. 1995, Meskini et al. 1995, Anderson et al. 2009). There is no data available for Q fever seroprevalence in Iraq. As a consequence, native populations in these regions may be more likely to possess immunity, and newcomers, such as U.S. military personnel, would be vulnerable to acute infection (Derrick 1973). We report on the possible sexual transmission of C. burnetii from a serviceman in the late recovery of acute Q fever to his wife.

  16. 5 CFR 551.211 - Effect of performing different work or duties for a temporary period of time on FLSA exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Exemptions and Exclusions § 551.211 Effect of performing different work or duties for...

  17. 5 CFR 551.211 - Effect of performing different work or duties for a temporary period of time on FLSA exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Exemptions and Exclusions § 551.211 Effect of performing different work or duties for...

  18. 5 CFR 551.211 - Effect of performing different work or duties for a temporary period of time on FLSA exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Exemptions and Exclusions § 551.211 Effect of performing different work or duties for...

  19. 5 CFR 551.211 - Effect of performing different work or duties for a temporary period of time on FLSA exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Exemptions and Exclusions § 551.211 Effect of performing different work or duties for...

  20. 5 CFR 551.211 - Effect of performing different work or duties for a temporary period of time on FLSA exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Exemptions and Exclusions § 551.211 Effect of performing different work or duties for...

  1. A new method for tracking and analyzing illness and morbidity among active duty U.S. Air Force aviators.

    PubMed

    Zwart, B P

    1994-08-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) presents a unique opportunity to investigate disease incidence, duration, and severity, through analysis of flyer medical records. This article describes the creation and analysis of a 15,275-record database of flyer-physician interactions, recorded over several years from 18 U.S. Air Force Bases. A descriptive analysis presents the leading causes of outpatient morbidity as measured by total days disqualified for flying duties (downtime). Upper respiratory infection (URI)/cold/congestion was the leading cause of illness, representing 4,485/15,700 visits with a median downtime of 6 d, and with 90% of the flyers allowed back into the cockpit within 15 d. A diagnosis coding system was developed specifically for this project that differs from the standard International Classification of Disease-Revision 9 (ICD-9 CM) (1) nomenclature. The rationale for such an approach is discussed.

  2. 38 CFR 17.31 - Duty periods defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Definitions and Active Duty § 17.31 Duty periods defined. Full-time duty as a member of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, Women's Reserve of the Navy and Marine Corps and Women's Reserve of the Coast Guard... Patient Rights...

  3. 38 CFR 17.31 - Duty periods defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Definitions and Active Duty § 17.31 Duty periods defined. Definitions of duty periods applicable to... designated by the Secretary concerned and performed by them on a voluntary basis in connection with the... work or study performed in connection with correspondence courses, or attendance at an...

  4. Characteristics of particle number and mass emissions during heavy-duty diesel truck parked active DPF regeneration in an ambient air dilution tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seungju; Quiros, David C.; Dwyer, Harry A.; Collins, John F.; Burnitzki, Mark; Chernich, Donald; Herner, Jorn D.

    2015-12-01

    Diesel particle number and mass emissions were measured during parked active regeneration of diesel particulate filters (DPF) in two heavy-duty diesel trucks: one equipped with a DPF and one equipped with a DPF + SCR (selective catalytic reduction), and compliant with the 2007 and 2010 emission standards, respectively. The emission measurements were conducted using an ambient air dilution tunnel. During parked active regeneration, particulate matter (PM) mass emissions measured from a 2007 technology truck were significantly higher than the emissions from a 2010 technology truck. Particle number emissions from both trucks were dominated by nucleation mode particles having a diameter less than 50 nm; nucleation mode particles were orders of magnitude higher than accumulation mode particles having a diameter greater than 50 nm. Accumulation mode particles contributed 77.8 %-95.8 % of the 2007 truck PM mass, but only 7.3 %-28.2 % of the 2010 truck PM mass.

  5. 33 CFR 105.210 - Facility personnel with security duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: (a) Knowledge of current security threats and patterns; (b) Recognition and detection of dangerous... effects, baggage, cargo, and vessel stores; and (m) The meaning and the consequential requirements of...

  6. 33 CFR 105.210 - Facility personnel with security duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... must have knowledge, through training or equivalent job experience, in the following, as appropriate: (a) Knowledge of current security threats and patterns; (b) Recognition and detection of dangerous... to threaten security; (d) Techniques used to circumvent security measures; (e) Crowd management...

  7. Female genital mutilation and reporting duties for all clinical personnel.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Gabrielle; Armstrong, Jane

    2016-07-01

    Female genital mutilation is illegal. It is now mandatory for health-care professionals to report female genital mutilation to the police. Professionals caring for women and girls of all ages must understand how female genital mutilation presents, and what action to take. PMID:27388382

  8. 33 CFR 105.210 - Facility personnel with security duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must have knowledge, through training or equivalent job experience, in the following, as appropriate: (a) Knowledge of current security threats and patterns; (b) Recognition and detection of dangerous... control techniques; (f) Security related communications; (g) Knowledge of emergency procedures...

  9. Female genital mutilation and reporting duties for all clinical personnel.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Gabrielle; Armstrong, Jane

    2016-07-01

    Female genital mutilation is illegal. It is now mandatory for health-care professionals to report female genital mutilation to the police. Professionals caring for women and girls of all ages must understand how female genital mutilation presents, and what action to take.

  10. 14 CFR 117.15 - Flight duty period: Split duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... opportunity to sleep) in a suitable accommodation during his or her flight duty period, the time that the... of the flight duty period has been completed. (f) The combined time of the flight duty period and the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight duty period: Split duty....

  11. Do patients have duties?

    PubMed

    Evans, H M

    2007-12-01

    The notion of patients' duties has received periodic scholarly attention but remains overwhelmed by attention to the duties of healthcare professionals. In a previous paper the author argued that patients in publicly funded healthcare systems have a duty to participate in clinical research, arising from their debt to previous patients. Here the author proposes a greatly extended range of patients' duties grounding their moral force distinctively in the interests of contemporary and future patients, since medical treatment offered to one patient is always liable to be an opportunity cost (however justifiable) in terms of medical treatment needed by other patients. This generates both negative and positive duties. Ten duties-enjoining obligations ranging from participation in healthcare schemes to promoting one's own earliest recovery from illness-are proposed. The characteristics of these duties, including their basis, moral force, extent and enforceability, are considered. They are tested against a range of objections-principled, societal, epistemological and practical-and found to survive. Finally, the paper suggests that these duties could be thought to reinforce a regrettably adversarial characteristic, shared with rights-based approaches, and that a preferable alternative might be sought through the (here unexplored) notion of a "virtuous patient" contributing to a problem-solving partnership with the clinician. However, in defining and giving content to that partnership, there is a clear role for most, if not all, of the proposed duties; their value thus extends beyond the adversarial context in which they might first be thought to arise.

  12. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-06-16

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments. (ACR)

  13. Cosmetology Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for three occupations in the cosmetology series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide…

  14. Welding Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for six occupations in the welding series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide space for…

  15. Horticulture Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for 9 occupations in the horticulture series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide space…

  16. The psychometric properties of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) in a clinical sample of active duty military service members.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Damon; Francis, Joseph P; Tafrate, Raymond Chip

    2005-11-01

    The increasing prominence of the construct of readiness to change in the field of substance abuse treatment has led to the development of instruments designed to assess the construct. We examined the psychometric properties of one such instrument, the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), in a sample of treatment-seeking, active duty, U.S. military service members diagnosed with alcohol and/or drug dependence. A principal components analysis of the items was consistent with the tridimensional structure of the SOCRATES found among treatment-seeking civilians but resulted in a 14-item scale, as opposed to the 19-item version found for civilians. Normative data, in the form of means and decile rankings for the SOCRATES subscales, for substance-dependent military patients are provided to complement those available for civilian patients. Future research should examine the concurrent and predictive validity of the scale.

  17. Successful Nonoperative Management of HAGL (Humeral Avulsion of Glenohumeral Ligament) Lesion With Concurrent Axillary Nerve Injury in an Active-Duty US Navy SEAL.

    PubMed

    Ernat, Justin J; Bottoni, Craig R; Rowles, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    Humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) is a lesion that has been recognized as a cause of recurrent shoulder instability. To our knowledge there are no reports of successful return to full function in young, competitive athletes or return to manual labor following nonoperative management of a HAGL lesion. A 26-year-old Navy SEAL was diagnosed with a HAGL injury, and associated traction injury of the axillary nerve as well as a partial tear of the rotator cuff. Operative intervention was recommended; however, due to issues with training and with inability to properly rehab with the axillary nerve injury, surgical plans were delayed. Interestingly, the patient demonstrated both clinical and radiographic magnetic resonance imaging healing of his lesion over an 18-month period. At 18 months the patient had returned to full active duty without pain or instability as a Navy SEAL. PMID:27552458

  18. 5 CFR 551.431 - Time spent on standby duty or in an on-call status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Time spent on standby duty or in an on-call status. 551.431 Section 551.431 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Hours of Work Special...

  19. 5 CFR 551.431 - Time spent on standby duty or in an on-call status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Time spent on standby duty or in an on-call status. 551.431 Section 551.431 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... consumption or use of certain medications. (2) An employee is not considered restricted for...

  20. 5 CFR 551.431 - Time spent on standby duty or in an on-call status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Time spent on standby duty or in an on-call status. 551.431 Section 551.431 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... consumption or use of certain medications. (2) An employee is not considered restricted for...

  1. 5 CFR 551.431 - Time spent on standby duty or in an on-call status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Time spent on standby duty or in an on-call status. 551.431 Section 551.431 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... consumption or use of certain medications. (2) An employee is not considered restricted for...

  2. 5 CFR 551.431 - Time spent on standby duty or in an on-call status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Time spent on standby duty or in an on-call status. 551.431 Section 551.431 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... consumption or use of certain medications. (2) An employee is not considered restricted for...

  3. Personnel Management Indexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcione, Carol

    1984-01-01

    Concentrates on four specialized indexes that are devoted exclusively to personnel and human resources topics: "Personnel Literature,""Personnel Management Abstracts,""Human Resources Abstracts," and "Work Related Abstracts." A concluding section compares strengths and weaknesses of these publications to three broader indexes: "The Business…

  4. The School Personnel Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Rodney F.

    This paper provides an overview of the development of the school-personnel administrator role. It first describes the influence of the science-management and human-relations movements and the behavioral sciences on personnel administration and human resource management. It next discusses the role of the personnel-performance-appraisal system and…

  5. 42 CFR 21.32 - Boards; appointment of; powers and duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Boards; appointment of; powers and duties. 21.32 Section 21.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PERSONNEL COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.32 Boards; appointment of; powers and duties. The Surgeon General...

  6. 42 CFR 21.32 - Boards; appointment of; powers and duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boards; appointment of; powers and duties. 21.32 Section 21.32 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PERSONNEL COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.32 Boards; appointment of; powers and duties. The Surgeon General...

  7. Do patients have duties?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, H M

    2007-01-01

    The notion of patients' duties has received periodic scholarly attention but remains overwhelmed by attention to the duties of healthcare professionals. In a previous paper the author argued that patients in publicly funded healthcare systems have a duty to participate in clinical research, arising from their debt to previous patients. Here the author proposes a greatly extended range of patients' duties grounding their moral force distinctively in the interests of contemporary and future patients, since medical treatment offered to one patient is always liable to be an opportunity cost (however justifiable) in terms of medical treatment needed by other patients. This generates both negative and positive duties. Ten duties—enjoining obligations ranging from participation in healthcare schemes to promoting one's own earliest recovery from illness—are proposed. The characteristics of these duties, including their basis, moral force, extent and enforceability, are considered. They are tested against a range of objections—principled, societal, epistemological and practical—and found to survive. Finally, the paper suggests that these duties could be thought to reinforce a regrettably adversarial characteristic, shared with rights‐based approaches, and that a preferable alternative might be sought through the (here unexplored) notion of a “virtuous patient” contributing to a problem‐solving partnership with the clinician. However, in defining and giving content to that partnership, there is a clear role for most, if not all, of the proposed duties; their value thus extends beyond the adversarial context in which they might first be thought to arise. PMID:18055897

  8. Extreme health sensing: the challenges, technologies, and strategies for active health sustainment of military personnel during training and combat missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buller, Mark; Welles, Alexander; Chadwicke Jenkins, Odest; Hoyt, Reed

    2010-04-01

    Military personnel are often asked to accomplish rigorous missions in extremes of climate, terrain, and terrestrial altitude. Personal protective clothing and individual equipment such as body armor or chemical biological suits and excessive equipment loads, exacerbate the physiological strain. Health, over even short mission durations, can easily be compromised. Measuring and acting upon health information can provide a means to dynamically manage both health and mission goals. However, the measurement of health state in austere military environments is challenging; (1) body worn sensors must be of minimal weight and size, consume little power, and be comfortable and unobtrusive enough for prolonged wear; (2) health states are not directly measureable and must be estimated; (3) sensor measurements are prone to noise, artifact, and failure. Given these constraints we examine current successful ambulatory physiological status monitoring technologies, review maturing sensors that may provide key health state insights in the future, and discuss unconventional analytical techniques that optimize health, mission goals, and doctrine from the perspective of thermal work strain assessment and management.

  9. Multiple Past Concussions Are Associated with Ongoing Post-Concussive Symptoms but Not Cognitive Impairment in Active-Duty Army Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Dretsch, Michael N; Silverberg, Noah D; Iverson, Grant L

    2015-09-01

    The extent to which multiple past concussions are associated with lingering symptoms or mental health problems in military service members is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between lifetime concussion history, cognitive functioning, general health, and psychological health in a large sample of fit-for-duty U.S. Army soldiers preparing for deployment. Data on 458 active-duty soldiers were collected and analyzed. A computerized cognitive screening battery (CNS-Vital Signs(®)) was used to assess complex attention (CA), reaction time (RT), processing speed (PS), cognitive flexibility (CF), and memory. Health questionnaires included the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI), PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M), Zung Depression and Anxiety Scales (ZDS; ZAS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the Alcohol Use and Dependency Identification Test (AUDIT). Soldiers with a history of multiple concussions (i.e., three or more concussions) had significantly greater post-concussive symptom scores compared with those with zero (d=1.83, large effect), one (d=0.64, medium effect), and two (d=0.64, medium effect) prior concussions. Although the group with three or more concussions also reported more traumatic stress symptoms, the results revealed that traumatic stress was a mediator between concussions and post-concussive symptom severity. There were no significant differences on neurocognitive testing between the number of concussions. These results add to the accumulating evidence suggesting that most individuals recover from one or two prior concussions, but there is a greater risk for ongoing symptoms if one exceeds this number of injuries.

  10. Food Service Worker. Dietetic Support Personnel Achievement Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater.

    This guide contains a series of multiple-choice items and guidelines to assist instructors in composing criterion-referenced tests for use in the food service worker component of Oklahoma's Dietetic Support Personnel training program. Test items addressing each of the following occupational duty areas are provided: human relations; personal…

  11. Food Production Worker. Dietetic Support Personnel Achievement Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater.

    This guide contains a series of multiple-choice items and guidelines to assist instructors in composing criterion-referenced tests for use in the food production worker component of Oklahoma's Dietetic Support Personnel training program. Test items addressing each of the following occupational duty areas are provided: human relations; hygiene and…

  12. 10 CFR 26.125 - Licensee testing facility personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Licensee testing facility personnel. 26.125 Section 26.125 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.125..., medical technology, or equivalent. He or she shall also have training and experience in the theory...

  13. Food Service Supervisor. Dietetic Support Personnel Achievement Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater.

    This guide contains a series of multiple-choice items and guidelines to assist instructors in composing criterion-referenced tests for use in the food service supervisor component of Oklahoma's Dietetic Support Personnel training program. Test items addressing each of the following occupational duty areas are provided: human relations; nutrient…

  14. DEVELOPMENT WORK FOR IMPROVED HEAVY-DUTY VEHICLE MODELING CAPABILITY DATA MINING--FHWA DATASETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A heavy-duty vehicle can produce 10 to 100 times the emissions (of NOx and PM emissions especially) of a light-duty vehicle, so heavy-duty vehicle activity needs to be well characterized. Key uncertainties with the use of MOBILE6 regarding heavy-duty vehicle emissions include th...

  15. Spanish for Health Care Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Joe L.; Shawl, James R.

    1978-01-01

    Because a degree of competency in Spanish has become recognized as an essential skill for persons involved in health care activities, Northern Illinois University has developed a Spanish course tailored to the background and abilities of pre-service and in-service medical personnel. (Author/NCR)

  16. 5 CFR 2638.203 - Duties of the designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Duties of the designated agency ethics official. 2638.203 Section 2638.203 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Designated Agency...

  17. 5 CFR 2638.203 - Duties of the designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Duties of the designated agency ethics official. 2638.203 Section 2638.203 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Designated Agency...

  18. 5 CFR 2638.203 - Duties of the designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Duties of the designated agency ethics official. 2638.203 Section 2638.203 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Designated Agency...

  19. 5 CFR 2638.203 - Duties of the designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Duties of the designated agency ethics official. 2638.203 Section 2638.203 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Designated Agency...

  20. 20 CFR 416.216 - You are a child of armed forces personnel living overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false You are a child of armed forces personnel... Which You Are Otherwise Eligible § 416.216 You are a child of armed forces personnel living overseas. (a... § 416.1881 who is a member of the armed forces of the United States assigned to permanent duty...

  1. 20 CFR 416.216 - You are a child of armed forces personnel living overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false You are a child of armed forces personnel... Which You Are Otherwise Eligible § 416.216 You are a child of armed forces personnel living overseas. (a... § 416.1881 who is a member of the armed forces of the United States assigned to permanent duty...

  2. 20 CFR 416.216 - You are a child of armed forces personnel living overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false You are a child of armed forces personnel... Which You Are Otherwise Eligible § 416.216 You are a child of armed forces personnel living overseas. (a... § 416.1881 who is a member of the armed forces of the United States assigned to permanent duty...

  3. 49 CFR 1540.109 - Prohibition against interference with screening personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prohibition against interference with screening... Prohibition against interference with screening personnel. No person may interfere with, assault, threaten, or intimidate screening personnel in the performance of their screening duties under this subchapter....

  4. In vitro and in vivo activities of E-101 solution against Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from U.S. military personnel.

    PubMed

    Denys, G A; Davis, J C; O'Hanley, P D; Stephens, J T

    2011-07-01

    We evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of a novel topical myeloperoxidase-mediated antimicrobial, E-101 solution, against 5 multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates recovered from wounded American soldiers. Time-kill studies demonstrated rapid bactericidal activity against all A. baumannii strains tested in the presence of 3% blood. The in vitro bactericidal activity of E-101 solution against A. baumannii strains was confirmed in a full-thickness excision rat model. Additional in vivo studies appear warranted.

  5. Tuberculin skin testing in US Navy and Marine Corps personnel and recruits, 1980-86.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, E R; Hyams, K C

    1990-01-01

    An extensive skin testing program is part of the United States Naval Medical Command's infectious disease control effort. From 1980 to 1986, 2,306,533 skin tests, using five TU PPD, were performed on active-duty Navy and Marine Corps personnel, 0.97 percent of which were positive. A downward trend in positive tests was found with a high of 1.43 percent in 1980 and a low of 0.80 percent in 1983. Since 1984, the percentage of positive tests has remained the same or increased. Shore-based medical facilities around the world reported 1,491,646 skin tests with 1.07 percent positive; Navy ships reported 814,887 skin tests with 0.78 percent positive. PPD-positivity for ships in the Pacific area was higher (0.98 percent) than for ships in the Atlantic (0.62 percent). During this same period, the percentage of positive tests in Navy and Marine Corps recruits ranged from a high of 1.82 percent in 1981 to a low of 1.23 percent in 1986. Since 1984, the percentage of positive tests has remained relatively stable in recruits. The frequency of positive PPD tests found in this study is lower than the percentage positive (1.59 percent) found in active-duty Navy personnel in 1969 and the percentage positive (5.2 percent) found in a study of Navy and Marine Corps recruits between 1958 and 1969. PMID:2316764

  6. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 21 - Activities to Which This Part Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Activities to Which This Part Applies A Appendix A... 1964 Pt. 21, App. A Appendix A to Part 21—Activities to Which This Part Applies 1. Use of grants made.... 141(a)). 6. Use of Coast Guard personnel for duty in connection with maritime instruction and...

  7. 78 FR 42157 - Agency Information Collection Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... Information System (IRIS). OMB Control Number: 2900-0619. Type of Review: Revision of a currently approved... veterans, dependents, and active duty personnel worldwide. IRIS allows a customer to submit questions... more quickly than through standard mail. IRIS does not provide applications to veterans or serve as...

  8. Military return to duty and civilian return to work factors following burns with focus on the hand and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Ted T; Richard, Reg L; Hedman, Travis L; Chisholm, Gary B; Quick, Charles D; Baer, David G; Dewey, William S; Jones, John S; Renz, Evan M; Barillo, David J; Cancio, Leopold C; Chung, Kevin K; Holcomb, John B; Wolf, Steven E

    2008-01-01

    Functional recovery and outcome from severe burns is oftentimes judged by the time required for a person to return to work (RTW) in civilian life. The equivalent in military terms is return to active duty. Many factors have been described in the literature as associated with this outcome. Hand function, in particular, is thought to have a great influence on the resumption of preburn activities. The purpose of this investigation was to compare factors associated with civilian RTW with combat injured military personnel. A review of the literature was performed to assimilate the many factors reported as involved with RTW or duty. Additionally, a focus on the influence of hand burns is included. Thirty-four different parameters influencing RTW have been reported inconsistently in the literature. In a military population of combat burns, TBSA burn, length of hospitalization and intensive care and inhalation injury were found as the most significant factors in determining return to duty status. In previous RTW investigations of civilian populations, there exists a scatter of factors reported to influence patient disposition with a mixture of conflicting results. In neither military nor civilian populations was the presence of a hand burn found as a dominant factor. Variety in patient information collected and statistical approaches used to analyze this information were found to influence the results and deter comparisons between patient populations. There is a need for a consensus data set and corresponding statistical approach used to evaluate RTW and duty outcomes after burn injury.

  9. 33 CFR 143.105 - Personnel landings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personnel landings. 143.105 Section 143.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT OCS Facilities § 143.105 Personnel landings....

  10. Personnel Management Institutes, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinman, Stanley B., Jr., Comp.

    This publication is a compilation of five papers presented at the 1975 Personnel Management Institutes held by the New York State School Boards Association. Although the meeting was intended to provide useful information about personnel matters specifically for school board members and school administrators from New York, much of the content of…

  11. Projecting Personnel Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Philip T.

    Increased reliance on personnel services is placing school districts' business operations in a no-win situation. This report evaluates methods of student population projection in relation to teacher costs. Educational costs reflect personnel costs in light of a decrease in the number of pupils being served. Increased enrollment projections create…

  12. Development and testing of virtual reality exposure therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder in active duty service members who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    McLay, Robert N; Graap, Kenneth; Spira, James; Perlman, Karen; Johnston, Scott; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Difede, JoAnn; Deal, William; Oliver, David; Baird, Alicia; Bordnick, Patrick S; Spitalnick, Josh; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Rizzo, Albert

    2012-06-01

    This study was an open-label, single-group, treatment-development project aimed at developing and testing a method for applying virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) to active duty service members diagnosed with combat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Forty-two service members with PTSD were enrolled, and 20 participants completed treatment. The PTSD Checklist-Military version, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for depression, and the Beck Anxiety Inventory were used as outcome measures. Of those who completed post-treatment assessment, 75% had experienced at least a 50% reduction in PTSD symptoms and no longer met DSM-IV criteria for PTSD at post treatment. Average PSTD scores decreased by 50.4%, depression scores by 46.6%, and anxiety scores by 36%. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that statistically significant improvements in PTSD, depression, and anxiety occurred over the course of treatment and were maintained at follow up. There were no adverse events associated with VRET treatment. This study provides preliminary support for the use of VRET in combat-related PTSD. Further study will be needed to determine the wider utility of the method and to determine if it offers advantages over other established PTSD treatment modalities. PMID:22730837

  13. Risk factors for medial tibial stress syndrome in physically active individuals such as runners and military personnel: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamstra-Wright, Karrie L; Bliven, Kellie C Huxel; Bay, Curt

    2015-03-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a common injury in runners and military personnel. There is a lack of agreement on the aetiological factors contributing to MTSS, making treatment challenging and highlighting the importance of preventive efforts. Understanding the risk factors for MTSS is critical for developing preventive measures. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess what factors put physically active individuals at risk to develop MTSS. Selected electronic databases were searched. Studies were included if they contained original research that investigated risk factors associated with MTSS, compared physically active individuals with MTSS and physically active individuals without MTSS, were in the English language and were full papers in peer-reviewed journals. Data on research design, study duration, participant selection, population, groups, MTSS diagnosis, investigated risk factors and risk factor definitions were extracted. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed. When the means and SDs of a particular risk factor were reported three or more times, that risk factor was included in the meta-analysis. There were 21 studies included in the systematic review and nine risk factors qualified for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Increased BMI (weighted mean difference (MD)=0.79, 95% CI 0.38 to 1.20, p<0.001), navicular drop (MD=1.19 mm, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.84, p<0.001), ankle plantarflexion range of motion (ROM; MD=5.94°, 95% CI 3.65 to 8.24, p<0.001) and hip external rotation ROM (MD=3.95°, 95% CI 1.78 to 6.13, p<0.001) were risk factors for MTSS. Dorsiflexion and quadriceps-angle were clearly not risk factors for MTSS. There is a need for high-quality, prospective studies using consistent methodology evaluating MTSS risk factors. Our findings suggest that interventions focused on addressing increased BMI, navicular drop, ankle plantarflexion ROM and hip external rotation ROM may be a good starting point for

  14. Risk factors for medial tibial stress syndrome in physically active individuals such as runners and military personnel: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamstra-Wright, Karrie L; Bliven, Kellie C Huxel; Bay, Curt

    2015-03-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a common injury in runners and military personnel. There is a lack of agreement on the aetiological factors contributing to MTSS, making treatment challenging and highlighting the importance of preventive efforts. Understanding the risk factors for MTSS is critical for developing preventive measures. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess what factors put physically active individuals at risk to develop MTSS. Selected electronic databases were searched. Studies were included if they contained original research that investigated risk factors associated with MTSS, compared physically active individuals with MTSS and physically active individuals without MTSS, were in the English language and were full papers in peer-reviewed journals. Data on research design, study duration, participant selection, population, groups, MTSS diagnosis, investigated risk factors and risk factor definitions were extracted. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed. When the means and SDs of a particular risk factor were reported three or more times, that risk factor was included in the meta-analysis. There were 21 studies included in the systematic review and nine risk factors qualified for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Increased BMI (weighted mean difference (MD)=0.79, 95% CI 0.38 to 1.20, p<0.001), navicular drop (MD=1.19 mm, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.84, p<0.001), ankle plantarflexion range of motion (ROM; MD=5.94°, 95% CI 3.65 to 8.24, p<0.001) and hip external rotation ROM (MD=3.95°, 95% CI 1.78 to 6.13, p<0.001) were risk factors for MTSS. Dorsiflexion and quadriceps-angle were clearly not risk factors for MTSS. There is a need for high-quality, prospective studies using consistent methodology evaluating MTSS risk factors. Our findings suggest that interventions focused on addressing increased BMI, navicular drop, ankle plantarflexion ROM and hip external rotation ROM may be a good starting point for

  15. DOE technical standards list: Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity, which is attached to the end of this document. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. The committees or governing bodies in which the person participates is listed after each name. An asterisk preceding the committee notation indicates that the person has identified himself or herself as the DOE representative on that committee. Appendices to this document are also provided to sort the information by the parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees. DOE employees and contractors listed in this technical standards list are those recorded as of May 1, 1999.

  16. DOE technical standards list: Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity, which is attached to the end of this document and to DOE Order 1300.2A. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. The committees or governing bodies in which the person participates is listed after each name. An asterisk preceding the committee notation indicates that the person has identified himself or herself as the DOE representative on that committee. Appendices to this document are also provided to sort the information by the parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees. DOE employees and contractors listed in this TSL are those recorded as of July 1, 1996.

  17. Design and use of a constant geometry system to measure activated indium foil in personnel security badges

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, R.K.

    1984-06-01

    A device for measuring the exposure rate from neutron-activated indium foil, under constant geometry, has been designed, constructed, and tested. The device is intended for use with the Juno ionization chambers, although it adapts to Victoreen CDV-700 and Victoreen 193 G-M instruments. Juno dose-response data for low (53 rad) and high (226 rad) doses were compiled and modeled. This model was compared to that assumed from the indium foil dose-response model in current use; plots of fitted and assumed models are congruent. An analysis of data from both Juno and CDV-700 instruments indicates that the constant geometry device may be used effectively to monitor the decay of In-116m. Tolerance limits for the Juno dose-response curve increase with time after activation, which results in diminished precision of dose estimates made by indium foil measurement. From the data collected in these experiments, the system appears to be most useful if activation is measured within 250 min after exposure. 5 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  18. 34 CFR 303.118 - Comprehensive system of personnel development (CSPD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... development— (a) Must include— (1) Training personnel to implement innovative strategies and activities for... consistent with early learning personnel development standards funded under the State Advisory Council...

  19. 34 CFR 303.118 - Comprehensive system of personnel development (CSPD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... development— (a) Must include— (1) Training personnel to implement innovative strategies and activities for... consistent with early learning personnel development standards funded under the State Advisory Council...

  20. Achilles tendon ruptures stratified by age, race, and cause of injury among active duty U.S. Military members.

    PubMed

    Davis, J J; Mason, K T; Clark, D A

    1999-12-01

    A total of 865 members of the U.S. military underwent repair of Achilles tendon ruptures at U.S. military hospitals during calendar years 1994, 1995, and 1996. The discharge summaries of these patients were analyzed for patient demographic information, including age, race, and causative activity. Patients were then stratified by age, race, and cause of injury. Blacks were at increased risk for undergoing repair of the Achilles tendon compared with nonblacks (overall relative risk = 4.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.63, 4.74; summary odds ratio controlling for age = 3.69, CI = 3.25, 4.19). Participation in the game of basketball accounted for 64.9% of all injuries in black patients and 34.0% of all injuries in nonblack patients. Among those injured, blacks had a significantly increased risk for injury related to playing basketball than nonblacks (relative risk = 1.82, CI = 1.58, 2.10). This finding suggests that there may be other predisposing factor(s) that result in a higher risk of Achilles tendon ruptures in black individuals.

  1. LEGAL DUTIES OF PHYSICIANS

    PubMed Central

    Sandor, Andrew A.

    1951-01-01

    The history of the physician's legal duties has been traced from the first recorded writings of the Babylonian era to the present day. There has been a transition from the days of absolute liability to the modern idea of liability based on culpability. The doctrine of stare decisis developed in early English law forms the very backbone of our own jurisprudence. Broadly, if a physician renders reasonable care and skill, he is absolved from liability. Some of the more important legal duties and proscriptions applying to physicians are discussed in particular in this presentation. PMID:14848696

  2. Using a web-based patient-provider messaging system to enhance patient satisfaction among active duty sailors and Marines seen in the psychiatric outpatient clinic: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Abanes, Jane J; Adams, Susie

    2014-03-01

    Patient satisfaction is imperative in providing safe, effective, and quality patient care. Several articles have examined the effect of a secure on-line communication system in the primary care setting to improve the delivery of patient care. This article describes the use of an asynchronous Web-based messaging system in the psychiatric outpatient setting to enhance patient satisfaction among active duty military service members.

  3. [Medico-legal opinionating in cases of insobriety in medical personnel].

    PubMed

    Jurek, Tomasz; Swiatek, Barbara; Drozd, Radosław

    2009-01-01

    The authors analyzed the medico-legal opinions in cases of insobriety in medical personnel. The studies were based on the results of 157 medico-legal evaluations in criminal cases performed in the years 2005-2007. Expert appraisals included: correctness of medical management, degree of exposure to direct danger of death or grave detriment to health associated with alcohol intoxication of a physician, regardless of his activities being correct in their merits, as well as influence of insobriety on personnel behavior. Penal responsibility is implemented in case of exposing the patient to direct danger to life or severe detriment to health. The necessary analysis should include activities that have been or should have been performed by a physician with respect to his patients, their health status (degree of danged to life or health) and the effect of the physician's alcohol intoxication on his abilities to perceive and assess the reality, make decisions and perform his duties. The Polish law in force lacking the equivalent of Article 147 found in the Polish penal code of 1969 causes problems in penalization of insobriety in medical personnel.

  4. Modeling Personnel Turnover in the Parametric Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1991-01-01

    A primary issue in organizing a new parametric cost analysis function is to determine the skill mix and number of personnel required. The skill mix can be obtained by a functional decomposition of the tasks required within the organization and a matrixed correlation with educational or experience backgrounds. The number of personnel is a function of the skills required to cover all tasks, personnel skill background and cross training, the intensity of the workload for each task, migration through various tasks by personnel along a career path, personnel hiring limitations imposed by management and the applicant marketplace, personnel training limitations imposed by management and personnel capability, and the rate at which personnel leave the organization for whatever reason. Faced with the task of relating all of these organizational facets in order to grow a parametric cost analysis (PCA) organization from scratch, it was decided that a dynamic model was required in order to account for the obvious dynamics of the forming organization. The challenge was to create such a simple model which would be credible during all phases of organizational development. The model development process was broken down into the activities of determining the tasks required for PCA, determining the skills required for each PCA task, determining the skills available in the applicant marketplace, determining the structure of the dynamic model, implementing the dynamic model, and testing the dynamic model.

  5. Demographic differences in body composition of Navy and Marine Corps personnel: findings from the perception of wellness and readiness assessment.

    PubMed

    Graham, W F; Hourani, L L; Sorenson, D; Yuan, H

    2000-01-01

    With the recent increase in women's representation in the military, baseline physical measurement data are needed to help set appropriate accession and retention standards and to design useful prevention and intervention programs in the areas of physical fitness and health. This study incorporated several body composition indices to obtain anthropometric data for a representative sample of 1,292 active duty Navy and Marine Corps women and men. It also assessed the extent to which personnel met weight-for-height and body fat standards. The prevalence of overweight was considerably lower among Marine Corps women compared with Navy women and was slightly less for Marine Corps men compared with their Navy counterparts. Between one-fifth and one-third of military personnel exceeded Navy/Marine Corps weight-for-height standards. Navy women tended to meet weight standards more often than Navy men. Fewer Marine Corps women than men were overweight, but more exceeded their weight-for-height standards.

  6. STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES FOR ADULTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FARMER, MARTHA L.

    THIS REFERENCE WORK ON PERSONNEL SERVICES IN EVENING COLLEGES INCLUDES PAPERS ON THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF EVENING COLLEGES, AND ON STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES, ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION, ADMISSIONS, STUDENT ACTIVITIES, COUNSELING, PLACEMENT, TRAINING OF PERSONNEL WORKERS, SERVICE TO BUSINESS, INDUSTRY, AND LABOR, FINANCIAL AID, AND THE…

  7. Balancing Duties and Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Martha M.; Webb, L. Dean

    2000-01-01

    Schools are legally obligated to protect students from injury, report child abuse, and curtail harassment and hate crimes. Educators' duties to maintain safe school environments often conflict with students' constitutionally protected rights governing expression, appearance, unreasonable searches, and due process regarding zero-tolerance policies…

  8. Stand-off detection of hidden threat objects on personnel at checkpoints and in public areas using active millimetre-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Rory S.; Lyons, Brendan N.; Lettington, Alan H.; McEnroe, Tony; Walshe, John; McNaboe, John; Curtin, Peter; Bleszynski, Stan

    2004-12-01

    The use of millimetre-wave imaging to identify threat objects such as guns and bomb material concealed on the person is well documented. However, the technology has been hindered by the performance and cost barriers typically associated with imaging at mm-wave frequencies. A novel scanning technique that minimises the receiver count while operating at very high efficiency levels has made it possible to build a cost-effective and high-performance mm-wave imager that can make security screening a commercial reality. The imager design allows for either passive or active operation and its compact form factor is suitable for practical installation in security channel situations. The uses of this technology include portal screening of personnel for high-resolution imaging of concealed threat objects or longer distance surveillance type monitoring of checkpoints and crowds. This presentation details the use of the imager in an active configuration to observe a checkpoint or crowd scene at stand-off distances of up to 50 metres. Target objects to be detected are the hidden metal components associated with suicide bomb constructions. A typical bomb consists of several explosive filled pipes strapped to the body or clusterings of small metallic objects embedded in explosives. Trials at 94GHz have yielded positive results by showing the presence of concealed metallic objects on people at distances of 25 metres. Objects detected have included simulated bomb constructions such as groups of metal pipes and clusters of nuts and bolts. These tests have been conducted using a Gunn based CW source and direct detect receiver unit. Further enhancement of the system includes the use of an FMCW front-end configuration.

  9. Potential of Visual Sensory Screening, Diagnostic Evaluation, and Training for Treatment of Postconcussive Symptoms and Performance Enhancement for Special Forces Qualified Personnel.

    PubMed

    Suttles, Sean T

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussive injuries remain a challenge for both athletes and clinicians, given high incidence rates and heterogeneous clinical trajectories. Moreover, exposure to blast in combat is compounded by chronic, frequent exposure to a variety of subclinical impacts and overpressure, in some cases annually over many years. Subsequent injuries are often more severe than the original and lead to higher incidence of chronic symptoms in combat units, particularly Special Operations Forces (SOF), which is compounded by a propensity to underreport or avoid Army medical systems altogether. The unique nature and psychological makeup of SOF Soldiers suggest that new guidelines for progressive return-to-activity and return-to-duty decision-making within the traditional medical setting may not be generalizable to this population. Further, the traditional criteria for return to duty and return to play in sport may be insensitive to persistent deficits, resulting in premature return. There is presidential and Department of Defense mandates for continued research in the areas of diagnostics, treatment, and assessments for return to duty. With recent shift toward understanding clinical trajectories, particularly visual and vestibular trajectories, promising new technology from the field of sports vision may prove useful toward that endeavor. Since the advent of performance programs within SOF units, these Soldiers build trust with performance personnel, which include rehabilitative personnel, through consistent and regular shared experience. Implementation of comprehensive vision and visual performance screening in conjunction with the study of sports vision technology within the performance setting, in conjunction with unit medical personnel, may yield important findings for diagnosis and treatment of mTBI; to include the chronically symptomatic postconcussive Soldiers. Last, with a wealth of literature supporting visual skills training for athlete

  10. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Stanton

    2010-12-31

    aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

  11. Personnel Management. Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus. Management Improvement Program.

    This manual is one of 10 completed in the Ohio Management Improvement Program (MIP) during the 1971-73 biennium. In this project, Ohio's 34 public universities and colleges, in an effort directed and staffed by the Ohio Board of Regents, have developed manuals of management practices, in this case, concerning personnel management. Emphasis in this…

  12. Educational Personnel Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. Donald

    1985-01-01

    In this successful 10-year-old Salt Lake City, Utah, personnel evaluation program, every employee is entitled to and guaranteed the protection of due process--shortcomings are identified, assistance provided, and peers involved in employment decisions. Employees who cannot provide satisfactory service or learn the necessary skills are dismissed.…

  13. Training of Hydrometeorological Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hzmaljan, K. A.; And Others

    A working group of the Commission for Hydrometeorology has prepared this report to fill a need for detailed syllabi for instruction in hydrometeorology required by different levels of personnel. This situation has been brought about by the shortage or lack of national cadres of hydrologists in developing countries to undertake comprehensive water…

  14. Personnel Management in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Richard, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Twelve articles discuss personnel management in libraries. Topics covered include building job commitment among employers, collective bargaining, entry-level recruitment, employee turnover, performance evaluation, managing resistance to change, training problems, productivity, employee stress, compensation systems, and the Allerton Park Institute.…

  15. Day Care Personnel Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi Strauss Foundation, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    The information presented in this guide focuses on the knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes needed for effective personnel management in day care settings. Information included in this publication came from the suggestions of day care directors who participated in Training for Child Care Project workshops on administration, as well as from…

  16. 30 CFR 250.918 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the installation phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the CVA's primary duties during the... Platforms and Structures Platform Verification Program § 250.918 What are the CVA's primary duties during... independent assessment of the installation activities. (b) Primary duties of the CVA during the...

  17. 30 CFR 250.918 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the installation phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the CVA's primary duties during the... Platforms and Structures Platform Verification Program § 250.918 What are the CVA's primary duties during... independent assessment of the installation activities. (b) Primary duties of the CVA during the...

  18. 30 CFR 250.918 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the installation phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the CVA's primary duties during the... Structures Platform Verification Program § 250.918 What are the CVA's primary duties during the installation... assessment of the installation activities. (b) Primary duties of the CVA during the installation...

  19. 30 CFR 250.918 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the installation phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the CVA's primary duties during the... Platforms and Structures Platform Verification Program § 250.918 What are the CVA's primary duties during... independent assessment of the installation activities. (b) Primary duties of the CVA during the...

  20. Personnel occupied woven envelope robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, F. C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of nonmetallic or fabric structures for space application is considered. The following structures are suggested: (1) unpressurized space hangars; (2) extendable tunnels for soft docking; and (3) manned habitat for space stations, storage facilities, and work structures. The uses of the tunnel as a passageway: for personnel and equipment, eliminating extravehicular activity, for access to a control cabin on a space crane and between free flyers and the space station are outlined. The personnal occupied woven envelope robot (POWER) device is shown. The woven envelope (tunnel) acts as part of the boom of a crane. Potential applications of POWER are outlined. Several possible deflection mechanisms and design criteria are determined.

  1. Assessing fitness-for-duty and predicting performance with cognitive neurophysiological measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael E.; Gevins, Alan

    2005-05-01

    Progress is described in developing a novel test of neurocognitive status for fitness-for-duty testing. The Sustained Attention & Memory (SAM) test combines neurophysiologic (EEG) measures of brain activation with performance measures during a psychometric test of sustained attention and working memory, and then gauges changes in neurocognitive status relative to an individual"s normative baseline. In studies of the effects of common psychoactive substances that can affect job performance, including sedating antihistamines, caffeine, alcohol, marijuana, and prescription medications, test sensitivity was greater for the combined neurophysiological and performance measures than for task performance measures by themselves. The neurocognitive effects of overnight sleep deprivation were quite evident, and such effects predicted subsequent performance impairment on a flight simulator task. Sensitivity to diurnal circadian variations was also demonstrated. With further refinement and independent validation, the SAM Test may prove useful for assessing readiness-to-perform in high-asset personnel working in demanding, high risk situations.

  2. 14 CFR 135.100 - Flight crewmember duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... way with the proper conduct of those duties. Activities such as eating meals, engaging in nonessential...,000 feet, except cruise flight. Note: Taxi is defined as “movement of an airplane under its own...

  3. Occupational Food Service Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for six occupations in the occupational food service series. Each occupation is divided into three to eight duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and…

  4. Emergency Medical Technician Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for 12 duties in the occupation of emergency medical technician. Each duty is divided into a number of tasks. A separate page for each duty lists the task with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide space for comments. The 12 duties…

  5. Auto Mechanics Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for eight occupations in the auto mechanics series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide…

  6. Diesel Mechanics Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for 11 occupations in the diesel mechanics series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide…

  7. Residential Carpentry Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for nine occupations in the residential carpentry series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to…

  8. The Swedish duty hour enigma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Swedish resident duty hour limit is regulated by Swedish and European legal frameworks. With a maximum average of 40 working hours per week, the Swedish duty hour regulation is one of the most restrictive in the world. At the same time, the effects of resident duty hour limits have been neither debated nor researched in the Swedish context. As a result, little is known about the Swedish conceptual framework for resident duty hours, their restriction, or their outcomes: we call this “the Swedish duty hour enigma.” This situation poses a further question: How do Swedish residents themselves construct a conceptual framework for duty hour restrictions? Methods A case study was conducted at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm – an urban, research-intensive hospital setting. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 34 residents currently in training in 6 specialties. The empirical data analysis relied on theoretical propositions and was conducted thematically using a pattern-matching technique. The interview guide was based on four main topics: the perceived effect of duty hour restrictions on (1) patient care, (2) resident education, (3) resident well-being, and (4) research. Results The residents did not perceive the volume of duty hours to be the main determinant of success or failure in the four contextual domains of patient care, resident education, resident well-being, and research. Instead, they emphasized resident well-being and a desire for flexibility. Conclusions According to Swedish residents’ conceptual framework on duty hours, the amount of time spent on duty is not a proxy for the quality of resident training. Instead, flexibility, organization, and scheduling of duty hours are considered to be the factors that have the greatest influence on resident well-being, quality of learning, and opportunities to attain the competence needed for independent practice. PMID:25559074

  9. Models of Personnel Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Beverly

    This report presents samples of models and strategies for determining professional development needs of special education personnel. The following areas are covered: definitions of needs and the needs assessment process; personnel needs assessment regulations under the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development, the Individuals with…

  10. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  11. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  12. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  13. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  14. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  15. Waivers for disqualifying medical conditions in U.S. Naval aviation personnel.

    PubMed

    Bailey, D A; Gilleran, L G; Merchant, P G

    1995-05-01

    In the United States Navy, many diagnoses are considered disqualifying for aviation duty, but aircrew may be "waived" to return to flight duties after resolution of the disease or appropriate treatment of the condition. Personnel with waivers are usually subject to more frequent physical examinations and/or special diagnostic procedures. Although the Naval Aerospace and Operational Medical Institute promulgates written aeromedical guidelines as to which diseases may be waived and which may not, waivers are granted on a case-by-case basis considering not only the diagnosis, but the age, experience, and type of aviation duty of the individual in question. This study was undertaken to determine which conditions were most and least likely to be waived. We reviewed all records of aviators entered into the Naval Aviation Medical Data Retrieval System who had been diagnosed with a condition considered disqualifying for aviation duty, totaling over 39,000 records. Cases were stratified by diagnosis and aviation duty, and the percentage waived was calculated for major diagnostic groups. Among designated aviation personnel, approximately 68% of all aviators with a disqualifying diagnosis were recommended for a waiver. Otolaryngologic, musculoskeletal, and cardiovascular disorders accounted for nearly 50% of diagnoses in personnel recommended for a waiver. Fear of flying, personality disorders, and adjustment disorders were the three diagnoses least likely to be granted a waiver. The most frequently occurring disqualifying diagnoses were allergic rhinitis, obesity, disorders of refraction and accommodation, urolithiasis, and alcohol dependence. PMID:7619031

  16. [Violence against health personnel].

    PubMed

    Eller, Nanna Hurwitz

    2014-01-20

    Health personnel are at risk of threats and violence, especially when young and inexperienced. Also, working in emergency departments, psychiatric wards, and eldercare bears a risk. The phenomenon is reported from all over the world and may originate in intoxication, confusion or frustration during long waiting hours and uncertainty of treatment and prognosis. Experiences of threats and violence result in decreased well-being, anger, helplessness and thoughts about change of workplace or quitting the job. Training in communication and teamwork may prevent threats and violence. PMID:24629677

  17. PERSONNEL NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Fitzgerald, J.J.; Detwiler, C.G. Jr.

    1960-05-24

    A description is given of a personnel neutron dosimeter capable of indicating the complete spectrum of the neutron dose received as well as the dose for each neutron energy range therein. The device consists of three sets of indium foils supported in an aluminum case. The first set consists of three foils of indium, the second set consists of a similar set of indium foils sandwiched between layers of cadmium, whereas the third set is similar to the second set but is sandwiched between layers of polyethylene. By analysis of all the foils the neutron spectrum and the total dose from neutrons of all energy levels can be ascertained.

  18. EXHAUST MAIN PERSONNEL EXPOSURE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. Su

    1999-09-29

    The purpose of this activity is to identify and determine potential radiation hazards in the service exhaust main due to a waste package leakage from an emplacement drift. This work supports the subsurface ventilation system design for the EDA II, which consists of an accessible service exhaust main for personnel, and an exhaust main for hot air flow. The objective is to provide the necessary radiation exposure calculations to determine if the service exhaust main is accessible following a waste package leak. This work includes the following items responsive to the stated purpose and objective: Calculate the limiting transient radiation exposure of personnel in the service exhaust main due to the passage of airborne radioactive material through the ventilation raise and connecting horizontal raise to the exhaust main in the event of a leaking waste package Calculate the potential exposures to maintenance workers in the service exhaust main from residual radioactive material deposited inside of the ventilation raise and connecting horizontal raise This calculation is limited to external radiation only, since the airborne and contamination sources will be contained in the ventilation raise and connecting horizontal raise.

  19. 5 CFR 550.406 - Work assignments during evacuation; return to duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Work assignments during evacuation... SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Payments During Evacuation § 550.406 Work assignments during evacuation; return to duty. (a) Evacuated employees at safe havens may be assigned to perform...

  20. 5 CFR 550.406 - Work assignments during evacuation; return to duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Work assignments during evacuation... SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Payments During Evacuation § 550.406 Work assignments during evacuation; return to duty. (a) Evacuated employees at safe havens may be assigned to perform...

  1. 32 CFR 154.6 - Standards for access to classified information or assignment to sensitive duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) General. Only U.S. citizens shall be granted a personnel security clearance, assigned to sensitive duties, or granted access to classified information unless an authority designated in Appendix E has... Department of Defense mission, including, special expertise, to assign an individual who is not a citizen...

  2. 32 CFR 154.6 - Standards for access to classified information or assignment to sensitive duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) General. Only U.S. citizens shall be granted a personnel security clearance, assigned to sensitive duties, or granted access to classified information unless an authority designated in Appendix E has... Department of Defense mission, including, special expertise, to assign an individual who is not a citizen...

  3. 32 CFR 154.6 - Standards for access to classified information or assignment to sensitive duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) General. Only U.S. citizens shall be granted a personnel security clearance, assigned to sensitive duties, or granted access to classified information unless an authority designated in Appendix E has... Department of Defense mission, including, special expertise, to assign an individual who is not a citizen...

  4. Taking aims seriously: repository research and limits on the duty to return individual research findings

    PubMed Central

    Ossorio, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Most discussions of researchers’ duties to return incidental findings or research results to research participants or repository contributors fail to provide an adequate theoretical grounding for such duties. Returning findings is a positive duty, a duty to help somebody. Typically, such duties are specified narrowly such that helping is only a duty when it poses little or no risk or burden to the helper and does not interfere with her legitimate aims. Under current budgetary and personnel constraints, and with currently available information technology, routine return of individual findings from research using repository materials would constitute a substantial burden on the scientific enterprise and would seriously frustrate the aims of both scientists and specimen/data contributors. In most cases, researchers’ limited duties to help repository contributors probably can be fulfilled by some action less demanding than returning individual findings. Furthermore, the duty-to-return issue should be analyzed as a conflict between (possibly) helping some contributors now and (possibly) helping a greater number of people who would benefit in the future from the knowledge produced by research. PMID:22402758

  5. College Curriculum for Correctional Instructional Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EPD Consortium C, Houston, TX.

    The project objective was to gather data for the purpose of identifying the scope and sequence of activities needed by instructional personnel in Texas correctional settings to meet the needs of students in a multidisciplinary setting. Six questionnaires were developed and administered to seven different sample groups: inmates, parolees, teachers,…

  6. Individual and environmental contingencies associated with multiple suicide attempts among U.S. military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Rudd, M David; Wertenberger, Evelyn

    2016-08-30

    Suicidal behavior among U.S. military personnel persists as a significant public health issue. Previous research indicates the primary motive for suicide attempts among military personnel is the desire to reduce or alleviate emotional distress, a finding that converges with studies in nonmilitary samples. Much less is understood about the consequences of a first suicide attempt that could influence the occurrence of additional suicide attempts. In order to identify these contingencies, 134 active duty Soldiers who had attempted suicide (n=69 first-time attempters, n=65 multiple attempters) participated in structured interviews focused on their experiences immediately following their first attempt. Soldiers were more likely to have made multiple suicide attempts if they were younger at the time of their first attempt, were not admitted to a hospital or treatment program after their first attempt, or experienced emotional and psychological relief immediately afterwards. Results suggest that Soldiers who experience emotional and/or psychological relief immediately after their first suicide attempt or do not receive treatment are more likely to make additional suicide attempts. PMID:27262267

  7. Personnel emergency carrier vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lester J. (Inventor); Fedor, Otto H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A personnel emergency carrier vehicle is disclosed which includes a vehicle frame supported on steerable front wheels and driven rear wheels. A supply of breathing air is connected to quick connect face mask coupling and umbilical cord couplings for supplying breathing air to an injured worker or attendant either with or without a self-contained atmospheric protection suit for protection against hazardous gases at an accident site. A non-sparking hydraulic motion is utilized to drive the vehicle and suitable direction and throttling controls are provided for controlling the delivery of a hydraulic driving fluid from a pressurized hydraulic fluid accumulator. A steering axis is steerable through a handle to steer the front wheels through a linkage assembly.

  8. Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Falk, R.B.; Tyree, W.H.

    1982-03-03

    A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

  9. Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Falk, Roger B.; Tyree, William H.

    1984-12-18

    A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

  10. Preparation of Leadership Personnel in Adapted Physical Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbin, Jeffrey A.

    This final report discusses the activities and outcomes of a federally funded project designed to prepare leadership personnel in the area of adapted physical education. An element unique to the project was the successful collaborative effort of personnel and resources from the University of Utah and Oregon State University used in the preparation…

  11. The Impact of Multiple Concussions on Emotional Distress, Post-Concussive Symptoms, and Neurocognitive Functioning in Active Duty United States Marines Independent of Combat Exposure or Emotional Distress

    PubMed Central

    Lathan, Corinna E.; Bleiberg, Joseph; Tsao, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Controversy exists as to whether the lingering effects of concussion on emotional, physical, and cognitive symptoms is because of the effects of brain trauma or purely to emotional factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder or depression. This study examines the independent effects of concussion on persistent symptoms. The Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment, a clinical decision support tool, was used to assess neurobehavioral functioning in 646 United States Marines, all of whom were fit for duty. Marines were assessed for concussion history, post-concussive symptoms, emotional distress, neurocognitive functioning, and deployment history. Results showed that a recent concussion or ever having experienced a concussion was associated with an increase in emotional distress, but not with persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) or neurocognitive functioning. Having had multiple lifetime concussions, however, was associated with greater emotional distress, PPCS, and reduced neurocognitive functioning that needs attention and rapid discrimination, but not for memory-based tasks. These results are independent of deployment history, combat exposure, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Results supported earlier findings that a previous concussion is not generally associated with post-concussive symptoms independent of covariates. In contrast with other studies that failed to find a unique contribution for concussion to PPCS, however, evidence of recent and multiple concussion was seen across a range of emotional distress, post-concussive symptoms, and neurocognitive functioning in this study population. Results are discussed in terms of implications for assessing concussion on return from combat. PMID:25003552

  12. [Patients' rights--doctors' duties].

    PubMed

    Jaeger, L; Bertram, E; Grate, S; Mischkowsky, T; Paul, D; Probst, J; Scala, E; Wbllenweber, H D

    2015-06-01

    On 26 February 2013 the new "Law on Patients' Rights" (hereinafter also the "Law") became effective. This Law strengthens patients' rights vis-à-vis the insurdnce company and also regulates patients' rights regarding their relation to the doctor. This has consequences for the laws on medical liability all doctors must consider. The doctor's performance is and remains a service and such service does not hold any guarantee of success. Nevertheless, this Law primarily reads as a "law on the duties of physicians". To duly take into account these duties and to avoid mistakes and misinterpretation of the Law, the Ethics Committee of the Consortium of Osteosynthesis Trauma Germany (AOTRAUMA-D) has drafted comments on the Law. Brief summaries of its effects are to be found at the end of the respective comment under the heading "Consequences for Practice". The text of the law was influenced particularly by case law, as continuously developed by the German Federal Court of Justice ("BGH"). The implementation of the Law on Patients' Rights was effected by the newly inserted sections 630a to 630h of the German Civil Code (the "BGB"), which are analysed below. The following comments are addressed to physicians only and do not deal with the specific requirements and particularities of the other medical professions such as physiotherapy, midwifery and others so on. Special attention should be paid to the comments on the newly inserted Duty to inform, which has to be fullfilled prior to any diagnostic or therapeutic procedure (sec. 630c para 2 sentence 1 BGB). Under certain conditions the doctor also has to inform the patient about the circumstances that lead to the presumed occurance of a therapeutic or diagnostic malpractice (sec. 630c para. 2 sentence 2 BGB), based on the manifestation of an undesired event or an undesired outcome. As before, the patient's valid consent to any procedure (sec. 630d BGB) is directly linked to the comprehensive and timely provision of information

  13. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE uniform health maintenance organization (HMO) benefit--Prime enrollment fee exemption for survivors of active duty deceased sponsors and medically retired uniformed services members and their dependents. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-09-30

    This final rule creates an exception to the usual rule that TRICARE Prime enrollment fees are uniform for all retirees and their dependents and responds to public comments received to the proposed rule published in the Federal Register on June 7, 2013. Survivors of Active Duty Deceased Sponsors and Medically Retired Uniformed Services Members and their Dependents are part of the retiree group under TRICARE rules. In acknowledgment and appreciation of the sacrifices of these two beneficiary categories, the Secretary of Defense has elected to exercise his authority under the United States Code to exempt Active Duty Deceased Sponsors and Medically Retired Uniformed Services Members and their Dependents enrolled in TRICARE Prime from paying future increases to the TRICARE Prime annual enrollment fees. The Prime beneficiaries in these categories have made significant sacrifices for our country and are entitled to special recognition and benefits for their sacrifices. Therefore, the beneficiaries in these two TRICARE beneficiary categories who enrolled in TRICARE Prime prior to 10/1/2013, and those since that date, will have their annual enrollment fee frozen at the appropriate fiscal year rate: FY2011 rate $230 per single or $460 per family, FY2012 rate $260 or $520, FY2013 rate $269.38 or $538.56, or the FY2014 rate $273.84 or $547.68. The future beneficiaries added to these categories will have their fee frozen at the rate in effect at the time they are classified in either category and enroll in TRICARE Prime or, if not enrolling, at the rate in effect at the time of enrollment. The fee remains frozen as long as at least one family member remains enrolled in TRICARE Prime and there is not a break in enrollment. The fee charged for the dependent(s) of a Medically Retired Uniformed Services Member would not change if the dependent(s) was later re-classified a Survivor. PMID:25269153

  14. Creating a positive work environment for therapeutic recreation personnel.

    PubMed

    Keller, M J

    1985-01-01

    It is the role of management in therapeutic recreation to create a working environment where personnel can accomplish their duties; create and maintain relationships; and work together harmoniously and creatively to obtain the organization's mission or purpose. This is an awesome job and therapeutic recreation managers are at times confronted with low-morale environments. Yet, there are strategies which can be employed to create positive working environments. Yet, there are strategies which can be employed to create positive working environments for therapeutic recreation personnel. These transformation techniques are: acknowledging negativity, identifying the positives, being available, providing positive recognition, avoiding negative game playing, refraining from negative conversation, avoiding putdowns, and using positive and effective communication. A successful therapeutic recreation supervisor can bring about positive change in the work environment so that staff members can rise to new levels of performance and self-esteem. PMID:10271684

  15. Post-traumatic stress among Swedish ambulance personnel

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, A; Segesten, K; Mattsson, B

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Emergency workers, including ambulance personnel, must cope with a variety of duty related stressors including traumatic incident exposures. Little is known about the variables that might be associated with post-traumatic stress symptom in high risk occupational groups such as ambulance personnel. This study investigated the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder among Swedish ambulance personnel. Methods: To estimate the prevalence of trauma related disorders, a representative group of 362 ambulance personal from the county of Västra Götaland in Sweden was surveyed through use of a Swedish version of Antonovsky's 13-item short version of Sense of Coherence Scale, to measure reactions to traumatic events two instruments were used, Impact of Event Scale (IES-15) and the Post Traumatic Symptom Scale (PTSS-10). A total of 223 of the ambulance personnel reported that they had had experience of what they described as traumatic situations. Results: Of those who reported a traumatic situation 15.2% scored 31 or more on the IES-15 sub scale. Scores over 31 indicate a stress reaction with certain likelihood of post-traumatic disorder. On the PTSS-10 subscale 12.1% scored 5 or more, which indicates a relative strong reaction. The study indicates that lower sense of coherence predicts post-traumatic stress. Other predictors for the extent of traumatic stress were longer job experience, age, physical and psychological workload. Conclusions: The high prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in ambulance personnel indicates an inability to cope with stress in daily work. The strong relation between post-traumatic stress and Sense of Coherence Scale may be useful in predicting vulnerability for post-traumatic symptoms among recently employed ambulance service personnel. To prevent or reduce the upcoming of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms it must be possible to take leave of absence, or for a longer or shorter time be transferred to non

  16. Physical Assault of School Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajs, Lawrence T.; Schumacher, Gary; Vital, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Physical assault against school personnel is a serious problem, although not highly publicized. This workplace violence can result in debilitating injury to school employees along with major monetary costs. This article looks at legal issues that address physical assault against school personnel as well as the roles professional associations have…

  17. Guidelines for School Personnel Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, George, Ed.; And Others

    Primary considerations for a positive school personnel policy are outlined in eight sections, as follows: (1) Faculty and staff recruitment and selection; (2) job analysis and classification; (3) personnel assignment and evaluation; (4) policy development; (5) welfare benefits, including leaves, fringe benefits, continuing contracts, working…

  18. The Dartnell Personnel Director's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheer, Wilbert E.

    This handbook for personnel directors is designed to help improve the acquisition, selection, development, welfare, and general administration and control of business and industrial employees. Overall objectives and functions of personnel management are considered first. Part 2 (Employment) stresses advance planning; recruiting and interviewing;…

  19. Readings in Professional Personnel Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Personnel Management Association, Washington, DC.

    Thirteen papers are presented that discuss issues in public personnel decision making, specifically in the area of personnel selection. After an introduction by James P. Springer, the following papers are presented: (1) "History of Employment Testing" (Matthew Hale); (2) "Job Families: A Review and Discussion of Their Implications for Personnel…

  20. The Personnel Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piland, William M.; Talay, Theodore A.; Stone, Howard W.

    1990-01-01

    NASA has begun to study candidate vehicles for manned access to space in support of the Space Station or other future missions requiring on-demand transportation of people to and from earth orbit. One such system, which would be used to complement the present Shuttle or an upgraded version, is the Personnel Launch System (PLS), which is envisioned as a reusable priority vehicle to place people and small payloads into orbit using an experimental launch vehicle. The design of the PLS is based on a Space Station crew changeout requirement whereby eight passengers and two crew members are flown to the station and a like number are returned within a 72 hour mission duration. Experimental and computational aerothermodynamic heating studies have been conducted using a new two-color thermographic technique that involved coating the model with a phosphor that radiates at varying color intensities as a function of temperature when illuminated with UV light. A full-scale model, the HL-20, has been produced and will be used for man-machine research. Three launch vehicle concepts are being considered, a Titan IV, the Advanced Launch System, and a Shuttle equipped with liquid rocket boosters.

  1. Expert systems for personnel assignment

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, J.L.; Liepins, G.

    1986-01-01

    In order to reduce stress on assignment personnel (detailers) and ensure maximum fairness and consistency in the Navy's personnel assignment process, The Navy Military Personnel Command (NMPC) has begun to explore the potential use of expert systems to supplement current manual and computerized distribution methods. The Detailer's Assistant expert system is being developed to improve the detailers' ability to satisfy the needs of their constituents and Navy management. An initial prototype of the Detailer's Assistant is now being evaluated. Numerous upgrades and extensions should lead to an operational system in the near future. Further development to a production system will involve additional research in machine learning, intelligent database methods, and cooperating expert systems.

  2. 40 CFR 86.1811-09 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-09 Section 86.1811-09 Protection of... § 86.1811-09 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty...

  3. 40 CFR 86.1811-10 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-10 Section 86.1811-10 Protection of... § 86.1811-10 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty...

  4. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, Donald W.

    2011-06-03

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy’s Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of our objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded.

  5. Personnel occupied woven envelope robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis; Teoh, William; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1988-01-01

    The Personnel Occupied Woven Envelope Robot (POWER) provides an alternative to extravehicular activity (EVA) of space suited astronauts and/or use of long slender manipulator arms such as are used in the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. POWER provides the capability for a shirt sleeved astronaut to perform such work by entering a control pod through air locks at both ends of an inflated flexible bellows (access tunnel). The exoskeleton of the tunnel is a series of six degrees of freedom (Six-DOF) articulated links compressible to 1/6 of their fully extended length. The operator can maneuver the control pod to almost any location within about 50 m of the base attachment to the space station. POWER can be envisioned as a series of hollow Six-DOF manipulator segments or arms wherein each arm grasps the shoulder of the next arm. Inside the hollow arms ia a bellow-type access tunnel. The control pod is the fist of the series of linked hollow arms. The fingers of the fist are conventional manipulator arms under direct visual control of the nearby operator in the pod. The applications and progress to date of the POWER system is given.

  6. Electrostatic forces for personnel restraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, N.; Ciciora, J.; Gardner, R.; Porter, K.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing electrostatic forces for personnel retention devices on exterior spacecraft surfaces was analyzed. The investigation covered: (1) determination of the state of the art; (2) analysis of potential adhesion surfaces; (3) safety considerations for personnel; (4) electromagnetic force field determination and its effect on spacecraft instrumentation; and (5) proposed advances to current technology based on documentation review, analyses, and experimental test data.

  7. Time utilization, productivity and costs of solo and extended duty auxiliary dental practice.

    PubMed

    Tan, H H; van Gemert, H G

    1977-07-01

    A study was conducted to compare the time utilization of the dentist, and productivity and costs for solo (one dentist, one chairside assistant and one treatment room) and extended duty settings (one dentist, two extended duty dental hygienists, one chairside assistant and two treatment rooms). Only amalgam and composite restorations done in a general group practice were included. In the extended duty setting the dentist spent more time in managerial activities and less time in treatment than in the solo setting. Nevertheless, the dentist in the extended duty setting produced 53% more restorations as compared with solo practice. The cost ratio of solo to extended duty practice was computed to 1:1.52. From the point of view of microeconomics, the extended duty setting was found no worse than the solo setting. PMID:268260

  8. Perceptions of Missouri 4-H Youth Development Personnel Regarding Interorganizational Cooperative Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, Billy R.; Torres, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Perceptions of 4-H youth development personnel regarding interorganizational cooperation were studied between the perceived and desired levels of cooperative activities between 4-H youth development personnel and secondary agriculture teachers. Results indicated that 4-H youth development personnel wanted higher levels of coordinated efforts…

  9. 21 CFR 820.25 - Personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Quality System Requirements § 820.25 Personnel. (a) General. Each manufacturer shall have sufficient personnel with the necessary education, background, training, and experience...

  10. Drafting Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This task list is intended for use in planning and/or evaluating a competency-based course in drafting. The tasks required to perform the duties of seven types of drafters (i.e., general, architectural, electronic, civil, structural, mechanical, and process pipe drafters) and technical illustrators are outlined. The following are among the duties…

  11. Electricity Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This task list is intended for use in planning and/or evaluating a competency-based course in electricity. The guide outlines the tasks entailed in 10 different duties typically required of employees in the following occupations: residential electrician apprentice, material handler/supply clerk, maintenance electrician apprentice,…

  12. Automated Scheduling of Personnel to Staff Operations for the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Russell; Mishkin, Andrew; Allbaugh, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Leveraging previous work on scheduling personnel for space mission operations, we have adapted ASPEN (Activity Scheduling and Planning Environment) [1] to the domain of scheduling personnel for operations of the Mars Science Laboratory. Automated scheduling of personnel is not new. We compare our representations to a sampling of employee scheduling systems available with respect to desired features. We described the constraints required by MSL personnel schedulers and how each is handled by the scheduling algorithm.

  13. Extent and etiology of aeromedical duty restrictions at a U.S. Coast Guard air station.

    PubMed

    Ungs, T J

    1991-10-01

    Aircrew are subject to flight and duty restrictions for various health-related problems. The major classifications of aeromedical limitations in the US Coast Guard are: Fit For Limited Duty (FFLD), fit for Duty Not Involving Flying (DNIF), and Sick In Quarters (SIQ). I studied the etiology and distribution of these restrictions among aircrew at a busy Coast Guard Air Station. Data were collected over a 6-month period from personnel Health Records and various medical reporting systems. A total of 391 health care episodes among 179 (56.6%) flight crew resulted in 1,961 days of flight/duty restriction. There were 1,349 (68.8%) days of DNIF, 439 (22.4%) days of FFLD, and 173 (8.8%) days of SIQ. The annual crude rate of restrictions per flight crew is 12.4 d. The most common causes for flight or duty restriction were infectious diseases of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract and musculoskeletal problems. In conclusion, aeromedical flight/duty restrictions are substantial and have impact on flight crew availability.

  14. Laser/rf personnel identification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zari, Michael C.; Ward, Reeder N.; Hess, David A.; Anderson, Christopher S.

    1995-05-01

    This paper documents the design of a Laser/RF Personnel Identification System developed for the US Army Communications and Electronics Command (CECOM) for soldier identification. The system has dual use applications, including law enforcement officer protection, and includes a laser interrogation unit with a programmable activation code. The interrogation unit is very directive for low probability of intercept (LPI), which is of interest during covert operations. A responder unit, worn by the law enforcement personnel or soldier, transmits an LPI radio frequency (RF) response only after receiving the proper interrogation code. The basic subsystems for the identification system are a laser interrogation unit, an RF responder unit, and a programming/synchronization unit. In this paper, the operating principles for the subsystems are reviewed and design issues are discussed. In addition to the design performed for CECOM, a breadboard system was developed to validate the concept. Hardware implementation is reviewed and field testing of the breadboard is presented.

  15. 19 CFR 151.65 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.65 Duties. Duties on wool or hair... determination of clean yield. Estimated and liquidated duties on wool or hair tested for clean yield pursuant to... appropriate adjustment of the estimated percentage clean yield shown on the entry summary for the wool or...

  16. 19 CFR 151.65 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.65 Duties. Duties on wool or hair... determination of clean yield. Estimated and liquidated duties on wool or hair tested for clean yield pursuant to... appropriate adjustment of the estimated percentage clean yield shown on the entry summary for the wool or...

  17. 19 CFR 151.65 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.65 Duties. Duties on wool or hair... determination of clean yield. Estimated and liquidated duties on wool or hair tested for clean yield pursuant to... appropriate adjustment of the estimated percentage clean yield shown on the entry summary for the wool or...

  18. 19 CFR 151.65 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.65 Duties. Duties on wool or hair... determination of clean yield. Estimated and liquidated duties on wool or hair tested for clean yield pursuant to... appropriate adjustment of the estimated percentage clean yield shown on the entry summary for the wool or...

  19. 47 CFR 51.100 - General duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General duty. 51.100 Section 51.100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Telecommunications Carriers § 51.100 General duty. (a) Each telecommunications carrier has the duty: (1)...

  20. 19 CFR 151.65 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.65 Duties. Duties on wool or hair... determination of clean yield. Estimated and liquidated duties on wool or hair tested for clean yield pursuant to... appropriate adjustment of the estimated percentage clean yield shown on the entry summary for the wool or...

  1. DIRECTORY OF PERSONNEL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Association of Departments of Extension and Summer Schools, Ottawa (Ontario).

    THIS DIRECTORY OF THE CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF DEPARTMENTS OF EXTENSION AND SUMMER SCHOOLS (CADESS) LISTS IN FRENCH AND ENGLISH THE ORGANIZATION'S PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES, MEMBERSHIP CRITERIA, ON GOING AND CURRENT ACTIVITIES, AND OFFICERS. THE ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF ITS 39 MEMBER INSTITUTIONS INCLUDES FOR EACH THE ADDRESS AND PHONE NUMBER, THE…

  2. 49 CFR 99.735-81 - Post-employment duties and responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Departure From Government Service § 99.735-81 Post-employment duties and responsibilities. The duties and obligations of a Government employee (or a special Government employee) do not end when government service... service. Section 208 of the same title relates to activities performed while a Government employee...

  3. Workshop for Key Personnel Concerned With Out-of-School Scientific Activities by Young People. Report of a Regional Workshop (Bangkok, Thailand, August 24 - September 2, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    This workshop was designed to discuss the role of out-of-school science activities both in formal and non-formal education programs. Fifteen participants from Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and Thailand attended the workshop. Highlights…

  4. 19 CFR 141.1 - Liability of importer for duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liability of importer for duties. 141.1 Section... Merchandise § 141.1 Liability of importer for duties. (a) Time duties accrue. Duties and the liability for... for by law. (b) Payment of duties—(1) Personal debt of importer. The liability for duties,...

  5. 19 CFR 159.21 - Quantity upon which duties based.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Quantity upon which duties based. 159.21 Section 159.21 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) LIQUIDATION OF DUTIES Weight, Gage, and Measure § 159.21 Quantity upon which duties based. Insofar as duties are...

  6. The knowledge levels of health personnel in Turkey regarding forensic evidence.

    PubMed

    Calışkan, Nurcan; Ozden, Dilek

    2012-09-01

    It is important that health personnel have extensive and adequate knowledge and practice regarding forensic evidence. This article describes the knowledge and practices of health personnel, who work in emergency rooms and health centers, regarding forensic evidence. The health personnel in a city in Central Anatolia, Turkey, constitute the population of this descriptive study and 233 personnel constitute its sample. It was determined that 31.3% stated that the practices of forensic evidence collection are inadequate. It was determined that average knowledge scores of health personnel with respect to forensic evidence are 23.5 ± 7.28 of 40. It was found that there was a statistically significant difference between knowledge scores on the subject of forensic with respect to duty (p = 0.005), level of education (p = 0.005), and institution of health personnel (p = 0.015). It was determined that the scores of the health personnel, who work in emergency services and health centers, on the subject of forensic evidence, are not at a desirable level.

  7. Fit for the frontline? A focus group exploration of auditory tasks carried out by infantry and combat support personnel.

    PubMed

    Bevis, Zoe L; Semeraro, Hannah D; van Besouw, Rachel M; Rowan, Daniel; Lineton, Ben; Allsopp, Adrian J

    2014-01-01

    In order to preserve their operational effectiveness and ultimately their survival, military personnel must be able to detect important acoustic signals and maintain situational awareness. The possession of sufficient hearing ability to perform job-specific auditory tasks is defined as auditory fitness for duty (AFFD). Pure tone audiometry (PTA) is used to assess AFFD in the UK military; however, it is unclear whether PTA is able to accurately predict performance on job-specific auditory tasks. The aim of the current study was to gather information about auditory tasks carried out by infantry personnel on the frontline and the environment these tasks are performed in. The study consisted of 16 focus group interviews with an average of five participants per group. Eighty British army personnel were recruited from five infantry regiments. The focus group guideline included seven open-ended questions designed to elicit information about the auditory tasks performed on operational duty. Content analysis of the data resulted in two main themes: (1) the auditory tasks personnel are expected to perform and (2) situations where personnel felt their hearing ability was reduced. Auditory tasks were divided into subthemes of sound detection, speech communication and sound localization. Reasons for reduced performance included background noise, hearing protection and attention difficulties. The current study provided an important and novel insight to the complex auditory environment experienced by British infantry personnel and identified 17 auditory tasks carried out by personnel on operational duties. These auditory tasks will be used to inform the development of a functional AFFD test for infantry personnel.

  8. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Risk Factors for Infection Among Military Personnel in a Shipboard Setting.

    PubMed

    Curry, Jennifer A; Maguire, Jason D; Fraser, Jamie; Tribble, David R; Deiss, Robert G; Bryan, Coleman; Tisdale, Michele D; Crawford, Katrina; Ellis, Michael; Lalani, Tahaniyat

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcal skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), especially those due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are an important public health issue for the military. Limited data exist regarding the prevalence of S. aureus colonization in the shipboard setting. We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study to determine the point prevalence of S. aureus colonization among military personnel onboard a naval vessel. Asymptomatic active duty personnel completed a survey for risk factors associated with colonization and SSTIs. Culture specimens were obtained from the anterior nares, pharynx, groin, and perirectal regions. MRSA isolates underwent testing for antimicrobial resistance, virulence factors, and pulsed-field type. 400 individuals were enrolled, 198 (49.5%) of whom were colonized with S. aureus, with MRSA identified in 14 participants (3.5%). No significant risk factors were associated with MRSA colonization. USA800 was the most common colonizing MRSA strain in the cohort and was detected in 10 participants (71%). Two participants (14%) were colonized with USA300 MRSA. In this first report of S. aureus epidemiology in a shipboard setting, we observed high rates of S. aureus and MRSA colonization. Longitudinal studies are needed to document the incident rates of S. aureus colonization during shipboard deployment and its impact on SSTI risk.

  9. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Risk Factors for Infection Among Military Personnel in a Shipboard Setting.

    PubMed

    Curry, Jennifer A; Maguire, Jason D; Fraser, Jamie; Tribble, David R; Deiss, Robert G; Bryan, Coleman; Tisdale, Michele D; Crawford, Katrina; Ellis, Michael; Lalani, Tahaniyat

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcal skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), especially those due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are an important public health issue for the military. Limited data exist regarding the prevalence of S. aureus colonization in the shipboard setting. We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study to determine the point prevalence of S. aureus colonization among military personnel onboard a naval vessel. Asymptomatic active duty personnel completed a survey for risk factors associated with colonization and SSTIs. Culture specimens were obtained from the anterior nares, pharynx, groin, and perirectal regions. MRSA isolates underwent testing for antimicrobial resistance, virulence factors, and pulsed-field type. 400 individuals were enrolled, 198 (49.5%) of whom were colonized with S. aureus, with MRSA identified in 14 participants (3.5%). No significant risk factors were associated with MRSA colonization. USA800 was the most common colonizing MRSA strain in the cohort and was detected in 10 participants (71%). Two participants (14%) were colonized with USA300 MRSA. In this first report of S. aureus epidemiology in a shipboard setting, we observed high rates of S. aureus and MRSA colonization. Longitudinal studies are needed to document the incident rates of S. aureus colonization during shipboard deployment and its impact on SSTI risk. PMID:27244061

  10. 21 CFR 600.10 - Personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Personnel. 600.10 Section 600.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS: GENERAL Establishment Standards § 600.10 Personnel. (a) (b) Personnel. Personnel shall...

  11. 21 CFR 600.10 - Personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Personnel. 600.10 Section 600.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS: GENERAL Establishment Standards § 600.10 Personnel. (a) (b) Personnel. Personnel shall...

  12. 21 CFR 600.10 - Personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Personnel. 600.10 Section 600.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS: GENERAL Establishment Standards § 600.10 Personnel. (a) (b) Personnel. Personnel shall...

  13. 48 CFR 752.7007 - Personnel compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personnel compensation... Personnel compensation. The following clause shall be used in all USAID cost-reimbursement contracts. Personnel Compensation (JUL 2007) (a) Direct compensation of the Contractor's personnel will be...

  14. 10 CFR 36.55 - Personnel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... accident dose ranges (see 10 CFR 20.1501(c)). Each personnel dosimeter must be assigned to and worn by only one individual. Film badges must be processed at least monthly, and other personnel dosimeters must be... § 36.55 Personnel monitoring. (a) Irradiator operators shall wear a personnel dosimeter that...

  15. 10 CFR 36.55 - Personnel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... accident dose ranges (see 10 CFR 20.1501(c)). Each personnel dosimeter must be assigned to and worn by only one individual. Film badges must be processed at least monthly, and other personnel dosimeters must be... § 36.55 Personnel monitoring. (a) Irradiator operators shall wear a personnel dosimeter that...

  16. 21 CFR 600.10 - Personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Personnel. 600.10 Section 600.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS: GENERAL Establishment Standards § 600.10 Personnel. (a) (b) Personnel. Personnel shall...

  17. Operation Duties on the F-15B Research Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Samson S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation entails what I have done this past summer for my Co-op tour in the Operations Engineering Branch. Activities included supporting the F-15B Research Testbed, supporting the incoming F-15D models, design work, and other operations engineering duties.

  18. Teaching Students about Their Civic Obligation--Jury Duty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Leah T.; Steinbrink, John E.

    2001-01-01

    Contends that early adolescents need to learn how the jury trial system works. Provides background information on the topic for teachers. Includes a two-day lesson plan on jury duty as a civic obligation, background information for students, and extension activities relating to jury trials in the appendix. (CMK)

  19. 32 CFR 516.39 - Duties and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Environmental Litigation § 516.39 Duties and procedures. (a) Water rights... protection of water rights for Army military installations and activities. This will include litigation in State general adjudications of water rights under the McCarran Amendment, 43 U.S.C. 666, for...

  20. Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett.; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2014-05-01

    This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

  1. 40 CFR 86.1811-09 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-09 Section 86.1811-09 Protection of... Vehicles § 86.1811-09 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1811-09 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-09 Section 86.1811-09 Protection of... Vehicles § 86.1811-09 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and...

  3. 40 CFR 86.1811-10 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-10 Section 86.1811-10 Protection of... Vehicles § 86.1811-10 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and...

  4. 40 CFR 86.1811-10 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-10 Section 86.1811-10 Protection of... Vehicles § 86.1811-10 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and...

  5. 40 CFR 86.1811-10 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-10 Section 86.1811-10 Protection of... Vehicles § 86.1811-10 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and...

  6. 40 CFR 86.1811-09 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-09 Section 86.1811-09 Protection of... Vehicles § 86.1811-09 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and...

  7. 40 CFR 86.1811-09 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-09 Section 86.1811-09 Protection of... Vehicles § 86.1811-09 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and...

  8. 40 CFR 86.1811-10 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-10 Section 86.1811-10 Protection of... Vehicles § 86.1811-10 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and...

  9. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Activities in the Exploration of Antarctica: Introduction to Antarctica (Including USGS Field Personnel: 1946-59)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tony K. Meunier Edited by Williams, Richard S.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    2007-01-01

    3) significant changes that have occurred in Antarctic exploration and research since World War II will be discussed at the end of this report. Subsequent Open-File Reports will provide a year-by-year documentation of USGS scientific activities and accomplishments in Antarctica beginning with the post-IGY, 1959-60 research team. One Open-File Report is planned to be written for each field-based season. For an example of the series format, see Open-File Reports 2006-1113 (Meunier, 2007a) and 2006-1114 (Meunier, 2007b). This report is a companion document to Open-File Report 2006-1116 (Meunier, 2007c). The USGS mapping and science programs in Antarctica are among the longest continuously funded projects in the United States Antarctic Program (USAP). The 2005-06 field season is the 56th consecutive U.S. expedition in which USGS scientists have been participants, starting in 1946. USGS and the National Science Foundation (NSF) cooperation began with the establishment by NSF of the U.S. Antarctic (Research) Program [USA(R)P] in 1958-59 under Operation Deep Freeze IV (DF IV) and was given the responsibility for the principal coordination and management of all U.S. scientific activities in Antarctica in Deep Freeze 60 (DF 60) (1959-60). Financial support from NSF, mostly in the form of Memorandum of Understandings (MOUs) and Cooperative Agreements, extends back to this period and can be attributed to the need for accurate geologic, geophysical, and topographic base maps of specific field areas or regions where NSF-funded science projects were planned. The epoch of Antarctic exploration during the IGY was driven by science and, in a spirit of peaceful cooperation, the international scientific community wanted to limit military activities on the continent to logistical support (Meunier, 1979 [2007], p. 38). The USGS, a Federal civilian science agency in the Department of the Interior, has, since its founding in 1879, carried out numerous field-based national (and some

  10. Rights & Responsibilities. Personnel Management Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Gale; And Others

    This module on rights and responsibilities is intended to introduce the hospitality manager or supervisor to sound personnel management practices that comply with the law. The material is presented in a self-instructional format in seven sections. At the beginning of each section is a statement of the objectives that will be achieved as a result…

  11. Personnel Management in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millett, John D.; And Others

    This document on personnel management in higher education contains three papers that are designed to be used as guidelines for educational administrators. The first two papers, by John D. Millett, discuss the scope and problems of higher education administration and the problems associated with collective bargaining and tenure on college campuses.…

  12. Health Instruction Packages: Dental Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Gary E.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules designed to instruct non-professional dental personnel in selected job-related skills. The first module, by Gary E. Hayes, describes how to locate the hinge axis point of the jaw, place and secure a bitefork, and perform a facebow transfer. The second module,…

  13. LANSCE personnel access control system

    SciTech Connect

    Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. The Personnel Access Control System (PACS) is a component of the RSS that is designed to prevent personnel access to areas where prompt radiation is a hazard. PACS was designed to replace several older personnel safety systems (PSS) with a single modem unified design. Lessons learned from the operation over the last 20 years were incorporated into a redundant sensor, single-point failure safe, fault tolerant, and tamper-resistant system that prevents access to the beam areas by controlling the access keys and beam stoppers. PACS uses a layered philosophy to the physical and electronic design. The most critical assemblies are battery backed up, relay logic circuits; less critical devices use Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for timing functions and communications. Outside reviewers have reviewed the operational safety of the design. The design philosophy, lessons learned, hardware design, software design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  14. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Activities in the Exploration of Antarctica: Introduction to Antarctica (Including USGS Field Personnel: 1946-59)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tony K. Meunier Edited by Williams, Richard S.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    2007-01-01

    3) significant changes that have occurred in Antarctic exploration and research since World War II will be discussed at the end of this report. Subsequent Open-File Reports will provide a year-by-year documentation of USGS scientific activities and accomplishments in Antarctica beginning with the post-IGY, 1959-60 research team. One Open-File Report is planned to be written for each field-based season. For an example of the series format, see Open-File Reports 2006-1113 (Meunier, 2007a) and 2006-1114 (Meunier, 2007b). This report is a companion document to Open-File Report 2006-1116 (Meunier, 2007c). The USGS mapping and science programs in Antarctica are among the longest continuously funded projects in the United States Antarctic Program (USAP). The 2005-06 field season is the 56th consecutive U.S. expedition in which USGS scientists have been participants, starting in 1946. USGS and the National Science Foundation (NSF) cooperation began with the establishment by NSF of the U.S. Antarctic (Research) Program [USA(R)P] in 1958-59 under Operation Deep Freeze IV (DF IV) and was given the responsibility for the principal coordination and management of all U.S. scientific activities in Antarctica in Deep Freeze 60 (DF 60) (1959-60). Financial support from NSF, mostly in the form of Memorandum of Understandings (MOUs) and Cooperative Agreements, extends back to this period and can be attributed to the need for accurate geologic, geophysical, and topographic base maps of specific field areas or regions where NSF-funded science projects were planned. The epoch of Antarctic exploration during the IGY was driven by science and, in a spirit of peaceful cooperation, the international scientific community wanted to limit military activities on the continent to logistical support (Meunier, 1979 [2007], p. 38). The USGS, a Federal civilian science agency in the Department of the Interior, has, since its founding in 1879, carried out numerous field-based national (and some

  15. Epidemiology of Sexually Transmitted Infections among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive United States Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jeff S; Clark, Leslie L; Garges, Eric C; Otto, Jean Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background. Minimal data exist that describe the epidemiology of sexually transmitted infections (STI) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive populations across the pre- and post-diagnosis periods for HIV. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the epidemiology of gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, herpes simplex virus, and human papillomavirus in an HIV-positive population. Methods. All 1,961 HIV seropositive United States active duty military personnel from 2000-2010 were identified. STI diagnoses relative to HIV diagnosis from 1995, which was the earliest electronic medical record available, to 2010 were examined. Results. The incidence diagnosis rates of STI generally increased during the period leading up to eventual HIV diagnosis. The rates of STI during the post-HIV diagnosis period fluctuated, but remained elevated compared to pre-HIV diagnosis period. Approximately 45%-69% with an STI in the HIV seropositive military population were diagnosed with their first STI greater than one year after their HIV diagnosis. Of those who were diagnosed with an STI in the post-HIV diagnosis period, 70.6% had one STI diagnosis, 23.5% had two STI diagnoses, and 5.8% had three or more STI diagnoses. Conclusions. Despite aggressive counseling, high-risk sexual behavior continues to occur in the HIV-positive military population.

  16. Is there a moral duty to die?

    PubMed

    Corlett, J A

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of philosophical discussion about the alleged moral right to die. If there is such a moral right, then it would seem to imply a moral duty of others to not interfere with the exercise of the right. And this might have important implications for public policy insofar as public policy ought to track what is morally right. But is there a moral duty to die? If so, under what conditions, if any, ought one to have such a duty, and why? In this paper, I distinguish between different moral grounds for the putative moral duty to die: deontological, intuitionist, and contractarian. Subsequently, I argue in support of Paul Menzel's theory of health care distribution. More precisely, I concur with his claim that there is a moral duty to die inexpensively in health care contexts. Then I provide and defend a philosophical analysis of the conditions in which such a duty could exist.

  17. 76 FR 21270 - Interpretation of Duty and Rest Provisions for Maintenance Personnel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you may visit http... time, impaired short-term memory, decreased vigilance, reduced motivation, increased irritability, and... vigilance and impaired short term memory, resulting in a likely increase in human error. A common...

  18. 29 CFR 1960.58 - Training of collateral duty safety and health personnel and committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Order 12196; this part; agency procedures for the reporting, evaluation and abatement of hazards; agency... SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.58 Training...

  19. 29 CFR 1960.58 - Training of collateral duty safety and health personnel and committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Order 12196; this part; agency procedures for the reporting, evaluation and abatement of hazards; agency... SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.58 Training...

  20. 29 CFR 1960.58 - Training of collateral duty safety and health personnel and committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Order 12196; this part; agency procedures for the reporting, evaluation and abatement of hazards; agency... SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.58 Training...

  1. 32 CFR 513.5 - Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... commander concerned for Ready Reservists assigned to troop program units under their control. (See AR 140-1, para 1-6.) (iii) ARPERCEN for nonunit soldiers assigned to Control Groups of the Ready Reserve, Standby... method of delivery. (ii) That the military department does not control the personal affairs of...

  2. 32 CFR 584.6 - Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... units under his or her control. (See AR 140-1, para 1-6.) (iii) Commander, RCPAC for nonunit members assigned to Control Groups of the Ready Reserve, Standby Reserve, and Retired Reserve. (3) The officials... delivery. (ii) That the military department does not control the personal affairs of nonactive...

  3. 32 CFR 584.6 - Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... under his or her control. (See AR 140-1, para 1-6.) (iii) Commander, RCPAC for nonunit members assigned to Control Groups of the Ready Reserve, Standby Reserve, and Retired Reserve. (3) The officials cited... delivery. (ii) That the military department does not control the personal affairs of nonactive...

  4. 32 CFR 584.6 - Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... units under his or her control. (See AR 140-1, para 1-6.) (iii) Commander, RCPAC for nonunit members assigned to Control Groups of the Ready Reserve, Standby Reserve, and Retired Reserve. (3) The officials... delivery. (ii) That the military department does not control the personal affairs of nonactive...

  5. 7 CFR 800.185 - Duties of official personnel and warehouse samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... weighing. Appropriate areas in the elevator may be specified by the Service in conjunction with the elevator management for observing each service. The areas shall be safe, shall afford a clear...

  6. 7 CFR 800.185 - Duties of official personnel and warehouse samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... weighing. Appropriate areas in the elevator may be specified by the Service in conjunction with the elevator management for observing each service. The areas shall be safe, shall afford a clear...

  7. Personnel

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-13

    Le président du conseil M.Doran explique la décision que le conseil du Cern vient de prendre sur la 4.étape du régime complémentaire des pensions. Le président du comité des finances le Dr.Andersen ainsi que le Prof.Connor(?) prennent aussi la parole

  8. Personnel

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Le président du conseil M.Doran explique la décision que le conseil du Cern vient de prendre sur la 4.étape du régime complémentaire des pensions. Le président du comité des finances le Dr.Andersen ainsi que le Prof.Connor(?) prennent aussi la parole

  9. Individual rights versus societal duties.

    PubMed

    Vermeersch, E

    1999-10-29

    In 'bioethics', the rights to self-determination and to informed consent of the patient are prerequisites to every medical decision: paternalism is no longer a justifiable attitude. Hence, it seems that compulsory vaccination is an unacceptable praxis. Even John Stuart Mill. however, took into account other values: e.g. the duty not to harm others. This article is dedicated to the analysis of the historical development of these values and to their relevance for the ethics of vaccination. The acceptability of coercion is upheld, but no clear-cut answers are given in general: in every case the pros and cons of coercion are to be weighed carefully against each other.

  10. Understanding the Code: the duty of candour.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2015-08-01

    A key recommendation of the Mid Staffordshire Inquiry (Francis, 2013) was to establish a culture of openness in all health services through a duty of candour. A professional duty of candour is a key requirement of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's revised Code (2015). It requires all district nurses to be candid with patients about any errors in their care and treatment. District nurses working in England are also subject to a statutory duty of candour imposed on their employer by the Care Quality Commission. In this article, the author considers the organisational and professional duties of candour and their effect on a district nurse's practice. PMID:26252239

  11. 7 CFR 1207.328 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan National Potato Promotion Board § 1207.328 Duties. The Board...

  12. 7 CFR 1207.328 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan National Potato Promotion Board § 1207.328 Duties. The Board...

  13. 7 CFR 1207.328 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan National Potato Promotion Board § 1207.328 Duties. The Board...

  14. 7 CFR 1207.328 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan National Potato Promotion Board § 1207.328 Duties. The Board...

  15. 7 CFR 1207.328 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan National Potato Promotion Board § 1207.328 Duties. The Board...

  16. Personnel Management: A J/A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasca, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Recently, personnel executives and their staffs are being asked to help management solve an increasing number of human resource and business problems. Personnel management must undergo some changes if it is to achieve its full potential. (Author/AJ)

  17. 34 CFR 303.361 - Personnel standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Program and Service Components of a Statewide System of Early Intervention Services Personnel... trained personnel to provide early intervention services to eligible children, including, in a...

  18. The Control Process In Personnel Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Lane

    1976-01-01

    The concept of human resource planning in personnel administration is gradually reintroducing the need for control over personnel functions as is usually demanded of other functions such as production and finance. (Author/TA)

  19. Organizational Characteristics as Predictors of Personnel Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Susan E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Investigated relationship between organizational context characteristics and personnel practices. Results from 267 organizations supported hypothesis that personnel practices vary as function of organizational characteristics (industry sector, pursuit of innovation as competitive strategy, manufacturing technology, organizational structure).…

  20. 10 CFR 36.55 - Personnel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... irradiator. The personnel dosimeter processor must be accredited for high energy photons in the normal and accident dose ranges (see 10 CFR 20.1501(c)). Each personnel dosimeter must be assigned to and worn by...

  1. 10 CFR 36.55 - Personnel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... irradiator. The personnel dosimeter processor must be accredited for high energy photons in the normal and accident dose ranges (see 10 CFR 20.1501(c)). Each personnel dosimeter must be assigned to and worn by...

  2. 10 CFR 36.55 - Personnel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... irradiator. The personnel dosimeter processor must be accredited for high energy photons in the normal and accident dose ranges (see 10 CFR 20.1501(c)). Each personnel dosimeter must be assigned to and worn by...

  3. Banking and Financial Services Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for five occupations in the banking and financial services series. Each occupation is divided into seven or eight duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been…

  4. 19 CFR 141.104 - Computation of duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computation of duties. 141.104 Section 141.104 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Deposit of Estimated Duties § 141.104 Computation of duties....

  5. 19 CFR 159.38 - Rates for estimated duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rates for estimated duties. 159.38 Section 159.38... TREASURY (CONTINUED) LIQUIDATION OF DUTIES Conversion of Foreign Currency § 159.38 Rates for estimated duties. For purposes of calculating estimated duties, the port director shall use the rate or...

  6. Duty leads to right, right leads to duty. Dutch Red Cross, nursing and war 1870-1918.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Leo

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of conscription in the second half of the nineteenth century the Dutch army began to exist of "sons of our home" instead of mercenaries. This led to a cry for better medical care to which the military and political authorities responded by calling into being a Dutch Red Cross organization. The home front would be satisfied and being a voluntary organization, military budgets would stay intact. However this was criticized in two ways. Radical nursing organizations opted for aid given by the state so nurses would be properly paid and soldiers would receive aid from well trained personnel. Wounded soldiers had the right to be helped and nurses had the right to be satisfactorily paid and only the state could guarantee both. Others also opted for state help, but for other reasons. Where radical nurses underlined the rights, they mainly pointed at obligations. Soldiers had the duty to fight and nurses had the duty to assist those who got sick or wounded so they too could do their bit for the Fatherland in need. PMID:21999007

  7. Duty leads to right, right leads to duty. Dutch Red Cross, nursing and war 1870-1918.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Leo

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of conscription in the second half of the nineteenth century the Dutch army began to exist of "sons of our home" instead of mercenaries. This led to a cry for better medical care to which the military and political authorities responded by calling into being a Dutch Red Cross organization. The home front would be satisfied and being a voluntary organization, military budgets would stay intact. However this was criticized in two ways. Radical nursing organizations opted for aid given by the state so nurses would be properly paid and soldiers would receive aid from well trained personnel. Wounded soldiers had the right to be helped and nurses had the right to be satisfactorily paid and only the state could guarantee both. Others also opted for state help, but for other reasons. Where radical nurses underlined the rights, they mainly pointed at obligations. Soldiers had the duty to fight and nurses had the duty to assist those who got sick or wounded so they too could do their bit for the Fatherland in need.

  8. 5 CFR 293.302 - Establishment of Official Personnel Folder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Establishment of Official Personnel Folder. 293.302 Section 293.302 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL RECORDS Official Personnel Folder § 293.302 Establishment of Official Personnel...

  9. 5 CFR 293.302 - Establishment of Official Personnel Folder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Establishment of Official Personnel Folder. 293.302 Section 293.302 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL RECORDS Official Personnel Folder § 293.302 Establishment of Official Personnel...

  10. 5 CFR 293.302 - Establishment of Official Personnel Folder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment of Official Personnel Folder. 293.302 Section 293.302 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL RECORDS Official Personnel Folder § 293.302 Establishment of Official Personnel...

  11. 5 CFR 293.302 - Establishment of Official Personnel Folder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Establishment of Official Personnel Folder. 293.302 Section 293.302 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL RECORDS Official Personnel Folder § 293.302 Establishment of Official Personnel...

  12. 5 CFR 293.302 - Establishment of Official Personnel Folder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Establishment of Official Personnel Folder. 293.302 Section 293.302 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL RECORDS Official Personnel Folder § 293.302 Establishment of Official Personnel...

  13. Firefighting training for nuclear facility personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Ken L.; Bates, E.F.

    1980-07-01

    As a result of the Browns Ferry incident of 1975, an increasing amount of attention has been devoted to fire protection at nuclear power plants in the United States. Regulatory Guide 1.120, NUREG-0050, and NRC Branch Technical Position 9.5-1 were developed to specifically address the nature of such programs, including fire suppression training for plant fire brigades. In early 1978, the Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center (NSC) and the Fire Protection Training Division of the Texas Engineering Extension Service developed a one-week course emphasizing hands-on exercises to meet the need for training nuclear power plant personnel in firefighting skills. During the past two years six NSC staff members have completed the program, and the result has been greatly increased confidence and improved ability to handle fire situations as well as other types of emergencies. As a result of this, we believe that this type of training is very valuable, if not essential for selected research reactor personnel from each facility. Proposed standard ANS 15.17 would require that 'active fire protection elements' such as brigade training of this nature be a part of each research reactor's fire protection program. This paper discusses a special course that is designed for non-utility nuclear personnel needing combined fire and radiological emergency training. Included in the curriculum are classroom lectures on theory and numerous field exercises covering the use of breathing apparatus under fire conditions, application techniques for handheld extinguishers, and flammable liquid fire control. Special sessions cover the control of radioactive contamination in fire emergencies, with live isotopes used to give the student realistic training in this area. (author)

  14. The Changing World of Personnel Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Eileen R.

    Although personnel management in the public sector has become increasingly difficult because of recent social changes, more worker and middle management involvement in decision-making processes can improve all levels of personnel management. The social changes affecting personnel management have assumed three forms: (1) the entrance into the work…

  15. 40 CFR 265.16 - Personnel training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration (OSHA) regulations 29 CFR 1910.120(p)(8) and 1910.120(q), the facility is not required to provide... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personnel training. 265.16 Section 265... FACILITIES General Facility Standards § 265.16 Personnel training. (a)(1) Facility personnel...

  16. 40 CFR 264.16 - Personnel training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration (OSHA) regulations 29 CFR 1910.120(p)(8) and 1910.120(q), the facility is not required to provide... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personnel training. 264.16 Section 264... Facility Standards § 264.16 Personnel training. (a)(1) Facility personnel must successfully complete...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2711 - Personnel health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Personnel health. 193.2711 Section 193.2711 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2711 Personnel health. Each...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2711 - Personnel health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Personnel health. 193.2711 Section 193.2711 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2711 Personnel health. Each...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2711 - Personnel health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personnel health. 193.2711 Section 193.2711 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2711 Personnel health. Each...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2711 - Personnel health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Personnel health. 193.2711 Section 193.2711 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2711 Personnel health. Each...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2711 - Personnel health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Personnel health. 193.2711 Section 193.2711 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2711 Personnel health. Each...

  2. Personnel Development Practices in Turkish Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir, Tuncay Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays everything develops and changes very quickly and sustainability of organizational goals will be possible only when personnel can keep up with these changes. From administrative aspect it is important to enhance personnel's potential and prompt them to achieve organizational goals. Personnel development is a process which influences and…

  3. 40 CFR 160.29 - Personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personnel. 160.29 Section 160.29 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Organization and Personnel § 160.29 Personnel. (a) Each individual engaged in...

  4. 14 CFR 1206.403 - Duty hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Duty hours. 1206.403 Section 1206.403 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Location for Inspection and Request of Agency Records § 1206.403 Duty hours. The...

  5. 14 CFR 1206.403 - Duty hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duty hours. 1206.403 Section 1206.403 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Location for Inspection and Request of Agency Records § 1206.403 Duty hours. The...

  6. 29 CFR 785.15 - On duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false On duty. 785.15 Section 785.15 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS HOURS WORKED Application of Principles Waiting Time § 785.15 On duty. A stenographer who reads a...

  7. 29 CFR 785.15 - On duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false On duty. 785.15 Section 785.15 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS HOURS WORKED Application of Principles Waiting Time § 785.15 On duty. A stenographer who reads a...

  8. 29 CFR 785.16 - Off duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Off duty. 785.16 Section 785.16 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS HOURS WORKED Application of Principles Waiting Time § 785.16 Off duty. (a) General. Periods...

  9. Light Duty Truck Aftertreatment - Experience and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Redon, Fabien

    2000-08-20

    Detroit Diesel's test experience on light duty truck PM aftertreatment technology development will be presented. The Tier-II extremely low emissions standards combined with the light-duty test cycle impose a significant challenge for the development of production-viable emissions technologies. A robust general path to achieve these emissions targets will be outlined.

  10. 29 CFR 541.700 - Primary duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Primary duty. 541.700 Section 541.700 Labor Regulations... Definitions and Miscellaneous Provisions § 541.700 Primary duty. (a) To qualify for exemption under this part, an employee's “primary duty” must be the performance of exempt work. The term “primary duty”...

  11. 29 CFR 541.700 - Primary duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Primary duty. 541.700 Section 541.700 Labor Regulations... Definitions and Miscellaneous Provisions § 541.700 Primary duty. (a) To qualify for exemption under this part, an employee's “primary duty” must be the performance of exempt work. The term “primary duty”...

  12. 7 CFR 993.36 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Duties. 993.36 Section 993.36 Agriculture Regulations... Regulating Handling Prune Marketing Committee § 993.36 Duties. The committee shall have, among others, the... to prunes as the committee may deem appropriate, or as the Secretary may request; (h) To prepare...

  13. Determination of the duty cycle of WLAN for realistic radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Wout; Pareit, Daan; Vermeeren, Günter; Naudts, Dries; Verloock, Leen; Martens, Luc; Moerman, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) are commonly deployed in various environments. The WLAN data packets are not transmitted continuously but often worst-case exposure of WLAN is assessed, assuming 100% activity and leading to huge overestimations. Actual duty cycles of WLAN are thus of importance for time-averaging of exposure when checking compliance with international guidelines on limiting adverse health effects. In this paper, duty cycles of WLAN using Wi-Fi technology are determined for exposure assessment on large scale at 179 locations for different environments and activities (file transfer, video streaming, audio, surfing on the internet, etc.). The median duty cycle equals 1.4% and the 95th percentile is 10.4% (standard deviation SD = 6.4%). Largest duty cycles are observed in urban and industrial environments. For actual applications, the theoretical upper limit for the WLAN duty cycle is 69.8% and 94.7% for maximum and minimum physical data rate, respectively. For lower data rates, higher duty cycles will occur. Although counterintuitive at first sight, poor WLAN connections result in higher possible exposures. File transfer at maximum data rate results in median duty cycles of 47.6% (SD = 16%), while it results in median values of 91.5% (SD = 18%) at minimum data rate. Surfing and audio streaming are less intensively using the wireless medium and therefore have median duty cycles lower than 3.2% (SD = 0.5-7.5%). For a specific example, overestimations up to a factor 8 for electric fields occur, when considering 100% activity compared to realistic duty cycles. PMID:23085070

  14. Dependence of pulsed focused ultrasound induced thrombolysis on duty cycle and cavitation bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Feng, Yi; Liu, Runna; Liu, Xiaodong; Hu, Yaxin; Han, Shimin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed, focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis, the duty cycle (2.3%, 9%, and 18%) and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. The efficiency of thrombolysis was evaluated through the degree of mechanical fragmentation, namely the number, mass, and size of clot debris particles. First, we found that the total number and mass of clot debris particles were highest when a duty cycle of 9% was used and that the mean diameter of clot debris particles was smallest. Second, we found that the size distribution of cavitation bubbles was mainly centered around the linear resonance radius (2.5μm) of the emission frequency (1.2MHz) of the FUS transducer when a 9% duty cycle was used, while the majority of cavitation bubbles became smaller or larger than the linear resonance radius when a 2.3% or 18% duty cycle was used. In addition, the inertial cavitation dose from the treatment performed at 9% duty cycle was much higher than the dose obtained with the other two duty cycles. The data presented here suggest that there is an optimal duty cycle at which the thrombolysis efficiency and cavitation activity are strongest. They further indicate that using a pulsed FUS may help control the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range, which we found to be near the linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer.

  15. Automatic control of clock duty cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Xiaoxin (Inventor); Roper, Weston (Inventor); Seefeldt, James D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In general, this disclosure is directed to a duty cycle correction (DCC) circuit that adjusts a falling edge of a clock signal to achieve a desired duty cycle. In some examples, the DCC circuit may generate a pulse in response to a falling edge of an input clock signal, delay the pulse based on a control voltage, adjust the falling edge of the input clock signal based on the delayed pulse to produce an output clock signal, and adjust the control voltage based on the difference between a duty cycle of the output clock signal and a desired duty cycle. Since the DCC circuit adjusts the falling edge of the clock cycle to achieve a desired duty cycle, the DCC may be incorporated into existing PLL control loops that adjust the rising edge of a clock signal without interfering with the operation of such PLL control loops.

  16. Personnel Launch System (PLS) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, Carl F., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    NASA is currently studying a personnel launch system (PLS) approach to help satisfy the crew rotation requirements for the Space Station Freedom. Several concepts from low L/D capsules to lifting body vehicles are being examined in a series of studies as a potential augmentation to the Space Shuttle launch system. Rockwell International Corporation, under contract to NASA, analyzed a lifting body concept to determine whether the lifting body class of vehicles is appropriate for the PLS function. The results of the study are given.

  17. BETA-GAMMA PERSONNEL DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Davis, D.M.; Gupton, E.D.; Hart, J.C.; Hull, A.P.

    1961-01-17

    A personnel dosimeter is offered which is sensitive to both gamma and soft beta radiations from all directions within a hemisphere. The device is in the shape of a small pill box which is worn on a worker-s wrist. The top and sides of the device are provided with 50 per cent void areas to give 50 per cent response to the beta rays and complete response to the gamma rays. The device is so constructed as to have a response which will approximate the dose received by the basal layer of the human epidermis.

  18. Influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel.

    PubMed

    Wicker, Sabine; Marckmann, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The thought is terrifying--you are admitted to the hospital and you die of a nosocomial infection. What sounds like a horror scenario, happens every day in hospitals all over the world. Nosocomial influenza is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality among patients with underlying diseases (especially immunocompromised patients), the elderly, and neonates. Although vaccination of healthcare personnel (HCP) is the main measure for preventing nosocomial influenza and is consistently recommended by public-health authorities, vaccine uptake among HCP remains low. (1.) PMID:25483507

  19. 40 CFR 86.1811-04 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emissions measured on the federal Highway Fuel Economy Test in 40 CFR part 600, subpart B, must not be... vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-04 Section 86.1811-04 Protection of... Vehicles § 86.1811-04 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and...

  20. 40 CFR 86.1811-04 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emissions measured on the federal Highway Fuel Economy Test in 40 CFR part 600, subpart B, must not be... vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-04 Section 86.1811-04 Protection of... Vehicles § 86.1811-04 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and...

  1. 40 CFR 86.1811-04 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emissions measured on the federal Highway Fuel Economy Test in 40 CFR part 600, subpart B, must not be... vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-04 Section 86.1811-04 Protection of... Vehicles § 86.1811-04 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1811-04 - Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emissions measured on the federal Highway Fuel Economy Test in 40 CFR part 600, subpart B, must not be... vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles. 86.1811-04 Section 86.1811-04 Protection of... Vehicles § 86.1811-04 Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and...

  3. Seventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1981-12-01

    The Seventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted March 31-April 10, 1981, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dosimeters from 34 participating agencies were mounted on anthropomorphic phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (1.5-15.0mSv neutron and 0.1-2.8 mSv gamma) which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor, operating in the steady-state mode, served as the source of radiation for two equivalent sets of six separate exposures. Lucite and concrete shields along with the unshielded reactor provided three different neutron and gamma spectra for five of the exposures in each set. Results reported by the participating agencies showed that no single type of neutron dosimeter exhibited acceptable performance characteristics for all mixed-field environments encountered in this study. Film, TLD, and TLD-albed dosimeters were found to be inadequate for neutron dose equivalent measurements when large numbers of slow neutrons are present unless significant corrections are made to measured results. Track dosimeters indicated the least sensitivity to spectral characteristics, but did not always yield to the most accurate results. Gamma dose measurements showed that TLD-700 dosimeters produced significantly more accurate results than film dosimeters which tend to overestimate gamma doses in mixed radiation fields.

  4. [Preventive vaccinations for medical personnel].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, Klaus; Goedecke, Marcel; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2014-05-01

    Vaccinations are among the most efficient and important preventive medical procedures. Modern vaccines are well tolerated. In Germany there are no longer laws for mandatory vaccinations, either for the general public or for medical personnel. Vaccinations are now merely "officially recommended" by the top health authorities on the basis of recommendations from the Standing Committee on Vaccinations (STIKO) of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) according to § 20 para 3 of the Protection against Infection law (IfSG). The management of vaccine damage due to officially recommended vaccinations is guaranteed by the Federal States. Whereas vaccinations in childhood are generally considered to be a matter of course, the willingness to accept them decreases markedly with increasing age. In the medical sector vaccinations against, for example, hepatitis B are well accepted while other vaccinations against, for example, whooping cough or influenza are not considered to be so important. The fact that vaccinations, besides offering protection for the medical personnel, may also serve to protect the patients entrusted to medical care from nosocomial infections is often ignored.

  5. Preliminary radiation dose assessment to WIPP waste handling personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Harvill, J P

    1985-02-01

    For CH TRU waste handling operations, the receipt and unloading of the TRUPACT is estimated to result in doses to the waste handlers and radiation control personnel of 4.46 man-rem and 0.45 man-rem, respectively. Another portion of the CH TRU waste handling operation which is estimated to result in a relatively high percentage of the total dose is the transfer of CH TRU waste containers from the hoist cage area and subsequent storage in the underground areas. The doses calculated for waste handling and radiation control personnel are 1.87 and 0.45 man-rem, respectivley. These doses represent 24% and 30% of the total CH TRU waste handling doses for these two occupational groups. For RH TRU waste handling the doses are more evenly distributed over the operational steps. The only operational segment which may be clearly considered as resulting in a large percentage of the total RH TRU waste handling dose is the emplacement operation. The series of steps comprising the emplacement operation result in 0.35 man-rem and 0.034 man-rem to the waste handlers and radiation control personnel, respectively. Annual, external wholebody doses for all waste handling operations and support activities are estimated as 11.02 man-rem for waste handlers and 2.41 man-rem for radiation control personnel. With current manpower levels of 16 waste handlers and 8 radiation control personnel, the calculated dose per worker is 0.69 rem for waste handlers and 0.30 rem for radiation control personnel. Combining the highest calculated organ dose with the external wholebody dose, the total dose to the bone per worker is 0.81 rem for waste handlers and 0.45 rem for radiation control personnel. These estimated doses fall below the Department of Energy design requirement that the combined external and internal doses be less than ones rem per person per year.

  6. 32 CFR 21.540 - What are the duties of the DoD Components' central points for the DAADS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the duties of the DoD Components... Information Reporting on Awards Subject to 31 U.S.C. Chapter 61 § 21.540 What are the duties of the DoD... point for collecting DAADS information from contracting activities within each DoD Component must:...

  7. 11. Historic view of Building 100 control room, showing personnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic view of Building 100 control room, showing personnel operating rocket engine test controls and observer watching activity from observation room. May 27, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA photo number C-45020. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 100, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  8. Status of Teacher Personnel in Utah 1992-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This report provides data regarding the supply of and the demand for teachers as well as the status of currently active teachers in Utah. Statistical data assembled in this report have been divided into five color-coded sections according to the classification of information. The first section, "Total Professional Personnel," covers total number…

  9. Interpersonal Communications Inventory: A Need Assessment of the Communication Skill Competencies of Educational Personnel Attending In-Service Training Activities Conducted by the Cherokee Bilingual Project, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackbert, Peter H.; Sather, Gregory A.

    The Interpersonal Communications Inventory (ICI), developed by Bienvenu, identifies and compares the communication patterns, characteristics, styles, and processes of educational personnel. One hundred forty-three individuals, most of whom were teachers or teacher aides from bilingual schools in six school districts in northeastern Oklahoma,…

  10. A Personnel Centric Knowledge Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Baisakhi; Gautam, Meghbartma

    A Knowledge Management System (KMS) is designed to serve as an effective tool for the proper extraction, utilization and dissemination of knowledge. Traditional KMS models incur cost overhead on the extraction of tacit knowledge and conversion to explicit knowledge. The proposed model in this paper takes the concept of mining the tacit knowledge and using it in the KMS instead of following conventional KMS norms. Through interactions and socialization of the personnel participating in the system, the tacit knowledge is extracted, converted to explicit knowledge and preserved in the Knowledge Management System through proper maintenance of knowledge repository. Our model is based on the technology that encourages active participation and sharing of tacit knowledge through interactions of individuals in the knowledge environment. The model builds a database of queries based on user feedback and the database is enhanced and maintained through creation of tags that makes the KMS dynamic and easily maintainable.

  11. Modeling personnel turnover in the parametric organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1991-01-01

    A model is developed for simulating the dynamics of a newly formed organization, credible during all phases of organizational development. The model development process is broken down into the activities of determining the tasks required for parametric cost analysis (PCA), determining the skills required for each PCA task, determining the skills available in the applicant marketplace, determining the structure of the model, implementing the model, and testing it. The model, parameterized by the likelihood of job function transition, has demonstrated by the capability to represent the transition of personnel across functional boundaries within a parametric organization using a linear dynamical system, and the ability to predict required staffing profiles to meet functional needs at the desired time. The model can be extended by revisions of the state and transition structure to provide refinements in functional definition for the parametric and extended organization.

  12. Fitness for duty in the nuclear industry: Update of the technical issues 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, N.; Grant, T.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an update of information on the technical issues surrounding the creation, implementation, and maintenance of fitness-for-duty (FFD) policies and programs. It has been prepared as a resource for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and nuclear power plant personnel who deal with FFD programs. It contains a general overview and update on the technical issues that the NRC considered prior to the publication of its original FFD rule and the revisions to that rule (presented in earlier NUREG/CRs). It also includes chapters that address issues about which there is growing concern and/or about which there have been substantial changes since NUREG/CR-5784 was published. Although this report is intended to support the NRC`s rule making on fitness for duty, the conclusions of the authors of this report are their own and do not necessarily represent the opinions of the NRC.

  13. Reusable ultralight personnel carrier (RUPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, B. C., III; McCandless, B., II

    1992-08-01

    Attention is given to a personnel-carrying space vehicle concept developed to minimize the cost of access to LEO. The RUPC could provide alternate access to Space Station Freedom (SSF) for six passengers per flight. It can also bring and return small amounts of cargo, up to and including one SSF double rack. These capabilities are ideal for utilization flights during man-tended operations at SSF and for crew rotation during permanently manned periods. The RUPC is a reusable conical reentry vehicle and disposable adapter with propulsion and power subsystems. Avionics subsystem benefit from advanced low-power high-performance microelectronics developed for both the civilian and military space sectors. The RUPC core cabin concept has growth potential for other applications, including assured crew return, ground-launched crew rescue, delivery and retrieval of SSF cargo, and crew cabin for flights to the moon.

  14. Neutron personnel dosimetry intecomparison studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted sixteen Neutron Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Studies (PDIS) since 1974. During these studies dosimeters are mailed to DOSAR, exposed to low-level (typically in the 0.3 -- 5.0 mSv range) neutron dose equivalents in a variety of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields, and then returned to the participants for evaluation. The Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) was used as the primary radiation source in PDIS 1--12 and radioisotopic neutron sources at DOSAR's Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) were mainly used, along with sources and accelerators at cooperating institutions, in PDIS 13--16. Conclusions based on 13,560 measurements made by 146 different participating organizations (102 - US) are presented.

  15. Constraining duty cycles through a Bayesian technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Guidorzi, C.; Segreto, A.; Ducci, L.; Vercellone, S.

    2014-12-01

    The duty cycle (DC) of astrophysical sources is generally defined as the fraction of time during which the sources are active. It is used to both characterize their central engine and to plan further observing campaigns to study them. However, DCs are generally not provided with statistical uncertainties, since the standard approach is to perform Monte Carlo bootstrap simulations to evaluate them, which can be quite time consuming for a large sample of sources. As an alternative, considerably less time-consuming approach, we derived the theoretical expectation value for the DC and its error for sources whose state is one of two possible, mutually exclusive states, inactive (off) or flaring (on), as based on a finite set of independent observational data points. Following a Bayesian approach, we derived the analytical expression for the posterior, the conjugated distribution adopted as prior, and the expectation value and variance. We applied our method to the specific case of the inactivity duty cycle (IDC) for supergiant fast X-ray transients, a subclass of flaring high mass X-ray binaries characterized by large dynamical ranges. We also studied IDC as a function of the number of observations in the sample. Finally, we compare the results with the theoretical expectations. We found excellent agreement with our findings based on the standard bootstrap method. Our Bayesian treatment can be applied to all sets of independent observations of two-state sources, such as active galactic nuclei, X-ray binaries, etc. In addition to being far less time consuming than bootstrap methods, the additional strength of this approach becomes obvious when considering a well-populated class of sources (Nsrc ≥ 50) for which the prior can be fully characterized by fitting the distribution of the observed DCs for all sources in the class, so that, through the prior, one can further constrain the DC of a new source by exploiting the information acquired on the DC distribution derived

  16. Computer-assisted warehouse personnel scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Sandra C.; Malstrom, Eric J.; Usmani, Tariq

    1992-02-01

    A decision support system is developed for personnel scheduling in a multiple warehouse environment. The system incorporates current manpower level, historical data of workers used, empirical load distributions, and performance standards to generate manpower requirements for a specified planning horizon. The software has been developed to be easily adaptable to varying situational details, therefore is widely applicable in different warehouse settings. The system offers personnel managers a valuable tool for evaluating alternative schedules and making intelligent decisions regarding personnel scheduling in warehouses.

  17. 21 CFR 606.20 - Personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., training and experience, including professional training as necessary, or combination thereof, to assure..., purity, potency, identity and effectiveness it purports or is represented to possess. All personnel...

  18. 33 CFR 127.707 - Security personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Security § 127.707 Security personnel. The...

  19. 33 CFR 127.707 - Security personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Security § 127.707 Security personnel. The...

  20. 33 CFR 127.707 - Security personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Security § 127.707 Security personnel. The...

  1. 33 CFR 127.707 - Security personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Security § 127.707 Security personnel. The...

  2. 40 CFR 792.29 - Personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (b) Each testing facility shall maintain a current summary of training and experience and job...) Personnel shall take necessary personal sanitation and health precautions designed to avoid contamination...

  3. 7 CFR 915.29 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 915.29 Duties. The committee shall have, among others, the... with any one meeting of the committee; and (n) To investigate compliance with the provisions of...

  4. 7 CFR 915.29 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 915.29 Duties. The committee shall have, among others, the... with any one meeting of the committee; and (n) To investigate compliance with the provisions of...

  5. Ethics, pandemics, and the duty to treat.

    PubMed

    Malm, Heidi; May, Thomas; Francis, Leslie P; Omer, Saad B; Salmon, Daniel A; Hood, Robert

    2008-08-01

    Numerous grounds have been offered for the view that healthcare workers have a duty to treat, including expressed consent, implied consent, special training, reciprocity (also called the social contract view), and professional oaths and codes. Quite often, however, these grounds are simply asserted without being adequately defended or without the defenses being critically evaluated. This essay aims to help remedy that problem by providing a critical examination of the strengths and weaknesses of each of these five grounds for asserting that healthcare workers have a duty to treat, especially as that duty would arise in the context of an infectious disease pandemic. Ultimately, it argues that none of the defenses is currently sufficient to ground the kind of duty that would be needed in a pandemic. It concludes by sketching some practical recommendations in that regard.

  6. 7 CFR 987.30 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... salaries, define the duties and where desirable fix the bonds of such employees. (f) To cause the books of... available to the Committee to prevent violations of this part. (h) To furnish the Committee viewpoints...

  7. 7 CFR 993.36 - Duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... any time; (c) To make, subject to the prior approval of the Secretary, scientific and other studies..., which are necessary in connection with the performance of its official duties; (d) To select, from...

  8. 38 CFR 3.6 - Duty periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from an injury incurred or aggravated in line of duty or from an acute myocardial infarction, a cardiac... means any of the following: (i) An acute myocardial infarction. (ii) A cardiac arrest. (iii)...

  9. 38 CFR 3.6 - Duty periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from an injury incurred or aggravated in line of duty or from an acute myocardial infarction, a cardiac... means any of the following: (i) An acute myocardial infarction. (ii) A cardiac arrest. (iii)...

  10. 38 CFR 3.6 - Duty periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from an injury incurred or aggravated in line of duty or from an acute myocardial infarction, a cardiac... means any of the following: (i) An acute myocardial infarction. (ii) A cardiac arrest. (iii)...

  11. 38 CFR 3.6 - Duty periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from an injury incurred or aggravated in line of duty or from an acute myocardial infarction, a cardiac... means any of the following: (i) An acute myocardial infarction. (ii) A cardiac arrest. (iii)...

  12. 38 CFR 3.6 - Duty periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from an injury incurred or aggravated in line of duty or from an acute myocardial infarction, a cardiac... means any of the following: (i) An acute myocardial infarction. (ii) A cardiac arrest. (iii)...

  13. Light duty utility arm baseline system description

    SciTech Connect

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1996-02-01

    This document describes the configuration of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) Baseline System. The baseline system is the initial configuration of the LDUA system that will be qualified for hot deployment in Hanford single shell underground storage tanks.

  14. 49 CFR 272.5 - General duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS PLANS General § 272.5 General duty. A railroad subject to this part shall adopt a written critical incident stress plan approved by the Federal Railroad Administration...

  15. Surrogacy, rights and duties: a partial commentary.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A V

    2000-01-01

    In response to criticisms of proposed regulation of surrogacy, it is argued that surrogate mothers and providers of fertility services have duties which make the selling of claims to parenthood unethical and which justify regulation of surrogacy arrangements. PMID:10977159

  16. 19 CFR 134.2 - Additional duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... this part shall be subject to additional duties of 10 percent of the final appraised value unless... container) to indicate the English name of the country of origin of the article or to include words...

  17. Using Personnel Evaluation To Focus on the Development of Teaching Skills: Faculty Ideas and University Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Neil; Fenton, Ray

    The role of the personnel evaluation process in improving the performance of teachers as classroom communicators is explored by contrasting the personnel evaluation system of Alaska Pacific University (APU) with that of the Anchorage School District (Alaska). While the APU system offers little specification for formative evaluation activities, the…

  18. ORGANIZATION OF A PUPIL PERSONNEL COUNCIL IN A SHARED SERVICES PROJECT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FLANDERS, ROBERT E.; JACKSON, WILLATHEA G.

    A DESCRIPTION OF THE RATIONALE AND BASIC PROCEDURES OF ORGANIZING A PUPIL PERSONNEL COUNCIL ARE PRESENTED. THE COUNCIL SHOULD BE COMPOSED OF PUPIL PERSONNEL WORKERS IN THE SCHOOL SYSTEM. CASE CONFERENCES, CONSULTATION WITH ADMINISTRATORS, AND PROCEDURAL DECISIONS ARE AMONG THE POSSIBLE ACTIVITIES OF SUCH A COUNCIL. (NS)

  19. 19 CFR 151.66 - Duty on samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Duty on samples. 151.66 Section 151.66 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.66 Duty on samples....

  20. 19 CFR 151.66 - Duty on samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Duty on samples. 151.66 Section 151.66 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.66 Duty on samples....

  1. 19 CFR 151.66 - Duty on samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Duty on samples. 151.66 Section 151.66 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.66 Duty on samples....

  2. 19 CFR 151.66 - Duty on samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Duty on samples. 151.66 Section 151.66 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.66 Duty on samples....

  3. 19 CFR 191.123 - Refund of duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Refund of duties. 191.123 Section 191.123 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Meats Cured With Imported Salt § 191.123 Refund of duties. Drawback shall be refunded...

  4. 19 CFR 151.22 - Estimated duties on raw sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estimated duties on raw sugar. 151.22 Section 151... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.22 Estimated duties on raw sugar. Estimated duties shall be taken on raw sugar, as...

  5. 19 CFR 151.22 - Estimated duties on raw sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estimated duties on raw sugar. 151.22 Section 151... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.22 Estimated duties on raw sugar. Estimated duties shall be taken on raw sugar, as...

  6. 19 CFR 151.22 - Estimated duties on raw sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estimated duties on raw sugar. 151.22 Section 151... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.22 Estimated duties on raw sugar. Estimated duties shall be taken on raw sugar, as...

  7. 19 CFR 151.22 - Estimated duties on raw sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estimated duties on raw sugar. 151.22 Section 151... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.22 Estimated duties on raw sugar. Estimated duties shall be taken on raw sugar, as...

  8. 19 CFR 151.22 - Estimated duties on raw sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estimated duties on raw sugar. 151.22 Section 151... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.22 Estimated duties on raw sugar. Estimated duties shall be taken on raw sugar, as...

  9. Marketing Education/Business Management & Ownership Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for eight occupations in the marketing education/business management and ownership series. Each occupation is divided into 4 to 12 duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular…

  10. 19 CFR 141.105 - Voluntary deposit of additional duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Voluntary deposit of additional duties. 141.105 Section 141.105 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Deposit of Estimated Duties § 141.105...

  11. 19 CFR 151.66 - Duty on samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duty on samples. 151.66 Section 151.66 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.66 Duty on samples....

  12. Towards a duty of care for biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Earl, G; Curtis, A; Allan, C

    2010-04-01

    The decline in biodiversity is a worldwide phenomenon, with current rates of species extinction more dramatic than any previously recorded. Habitat loss has been identified as the major cause of biodiversity decline. In this article we suggest that a statutory duty of care would complement the current mix of policy options for biodiversity conservation. Obstacles hindering the introduction of a statutory duty of care include linguistic ambiguity about the terms 'duty of care' and 'stewardship' and how they are applied in a natural resource management context, and the absence of a mechanism to guide its implementation. Drawing on international literature and key informant interviews we have articulated characteristics of duty of care to reduce linguistic ambiguity, and developed a framework for implementing a duty of care for biodiversity at the regional scale. The framework draws on key elements of the common law 'duty of care', the concepts of 'taking reasonable care' and 'avoiding foreseeable harm', in its logic. Core elements of the framework include desired outcomes for biodiversity, supported by current recommended practices. The focus on outcomes provides opportunities for the development of innovative management practices. The framework incorporates multiple pathways for the redress of non-compliance including tiered negative sanctions, and positive measures to encourage compliance. Importantly, the framework addresses the need for change and adaptation that is a necessary part of biodiversity management.

  13. Towards a Duty of Care for Biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earl, G.; Curtis, A.; Allan, C.

    2010-04-01

    The decline in biodiversity is a worldwide phenomenon, with current rates of species extinction more dramatic than any previously recorded. Habitat loss has been identified as the major cause of biodiversity decline. In this article we suggest that a statutory duty of care would complement the current mix of policy options for biodiversity conservation. Obstacles hindering the introduction of a statutory duty of care include linguistic ambiguity about the terms ‘duty of care’ and ‘stewardship’ and how they are applied in a natural resource management context, and the absence of a mechanism to guide its implementation. Drawing on international literature and key informant interviews we have articulated characteristics of duty of care to reduce linguistic ambiguity, and developed a framework for implementing a duty of care for biodiversity at the regional scale. The framework draws on key elements of the common law ‘duty of care’, the concepts of ‘taking reasonable care’ and ‘avoiding foreseeable harm’, in its logic. Core elements of the framework include desired outcomes for biodiversity, supported by current recommended practices. The focus on outcomes provides opportunities for the development of innovative management practices. The framework incorporates multiple pathways for the redress of non-compliance including tiered negative sanctions, and positive measures to encourage compliance. Importantly, the framework addresses the need for change and adaptation that is a necessary part of biodiversity management.

  14. Identifying obstacles to return to duty in severely injured combat-related servicemembers with amputation.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Richard K; Rivera, Jessica C; Wenke, Joseph C; Krueger, Chad A

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of servicemembers with amputation to return to duty after combat-related amputation and the associated disabilities remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the disabling conditions and return to duty rates of servicemembers with amputation across all service branches following major limb amputations from September 2001 through July 2011. Pertinent medical information, military occupation status, return to duty designation, disabling conditions, and disability ratings for each servicemember were obtained from the Physical Evaluation Board Liaison Office (PEBLO). Across all service branches, 16 (2%) servicemembers were found fit for duty (Fit) and allowed to continue with their preinjury occupation. Another 103 (11%) were allowed to continue on Active Duty (COAD) in a less physically demanding role. More than half (554, 56%) were determined fully disabled (PEBLO rating > 75); the average disability rating was 73. COAD and Fit Army servicemembers had lower Injury Severity Scores than other servicemembers (17.4, p = 0.009 and 11.2, p < 0.001, respectively). Despite improvements in their care and rehabilitation, only 13% of all servicemembers with amputation are able to return to Active Duty and many have multiple disabling conditions that contribute to a very high level of disability.

  15. Design of a continuous duty cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.

    1985-05-01

    A continuous duty cryopump system was designed and developed that comprises a self-contained cryopump for installation into a vacuum chamber, and a microprocessor controller for automatic operation. This deuterium pump has two units in a single housing, arranged so that one is pumping while the other is being regenerated. Liquid helium-cooled, finned sections in each unit pump deuterium by condensation, and a third pump integral within the cryopump housing collects the regenerated gas. A microprocessor unit controls distribution of liquid and gaseous helium, used for conditioning the pumping units, and operates remote actuators for the regeneration. Software provides fully automatic, timed sequencing of the repetitive cryopump events which include: cooldown of the pumping units, opening of the louvers isolating the unit from the vacuum chamber, closing of the louvers, and warming up of the unit for regeneration. Default values in the software can be reprogrammed by the operator through the keyboard in response to prompts displayed on the computer. An override allows the operator to control the cryopump manually by activating switches on a control panel. Interlocks to prevent cryogen lockup are included in the software.

  16. Supporting the personnel reliability decision-making process with artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Harte, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    Recent legislation concerning personnel security has vastly increased the responsibility and accountability of the security manager. Access authorization, fitness for duty, and personnel security access programs require decisions regarding an individual's trustworthiness and reliability based on the findings of a background investigation. While these guidelines provide significant data and are useful as a tool, limited resources are available to the adjudicator of derogatory information on what is and is not acceptable in terms of granting access to sensitive areas of nuclear plants. The reason why one individual is deemed unacceptable and the next acceptable may be questioned and cause discriminatory accusations. This paper is continuation of discussion on workforce reliability, focusing on the use of artificial intelligence to support the decisions of a security manager. With this support, the benefit of previous decisions helps ensure consistent adjudication of background investigations.

  17. The Implementation of the Program Personnel Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veynbender, Tatyana; Vershinina, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    The article contains analysis software products used in the preparation of professionals through which they can realize themselves in this industry. The aim of the study is the analysis of personnel petroleum education in specialized university. The result is a sociological study on the question of the need and importance of personnel support…

  18. 20 CFR 404.1621 - Personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Personnel. 404.1621 Section 404.1621 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determinations of Disability Administrative Responsibilities and Requirements § 404.1621 Personnel. (a)...

  19. 33 CFR 154.840 - Personnel training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personnel training. 154.840... Personnel training. (a) A person in charge of a transfer operation utilizing a vapor control system must have completed a training program covering the particular system installed at the facility....

  20. 10 CFR 34.47 - Personnel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personnel monitoring. 34.47 Section 34.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Radiation Safety Requirements § 34.47 Personnel monitoring. (a) The licensee may not permit any individual to act as...