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Sample records for active dynamic thermography

  1. Dynamic thermography in diagnostics of onychomycosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryca, Jaroslaw; Nowakowski, Antoni; Urbanowski, Slawomir

    2004-07-01

    The paper shows the results of the research on the active dynamic thermography used for diagnostics of onychomycosis and progress of the healing process. It seems that the most essential factor affecting the development of mycosis in nails is the microcirculation in the tissue close to the nail. Active dynamic thermography may prove to be a new diagnostic method and a sufficient tool for measurements of this parameter.

  2. Evaluation of the variable depth resolution of active dynamic thermography on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prindeze, Nicholas J.; Hoffman, Hilary A.; Carney, Bonnie C.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Loew, Murray H.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.

    2015-06-01

    Active dynamic thermography (ADT) is an imaging technique capable of characterizing the non-homogenous thermal conductance of damaged tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine optimal stimulation parameters and quantify the optical resolution of ADT through various depths of human skin. Excised tissue from plastic surgery operations was collected immediately following excision. A total of 12 thin to thick split-thickness grafts were harvested from 3 patients. Grafts were placed on top of a 3D printed resolution chart and thermal stimulation was applied from a 300W halogen lamp array for between 0.5-10 seconds to determine optimal parameters. Video was captured with a thermal camera, and analysis was performed by reconstructing an image from thermal gradients. In this study ADT resolved 0.445+/-0 lp/mm at a depth of 0.010", 0.356+/-0.048 lp/mm at a depth of 0.015", 0.334+/-0.027 lp/mm at a depth of 0.020" and 0.265+/-0.022 lp/mm at a depth of 0.025". The stimulus energy required for maximum resolution at each depth was 3- 4s, 8s, 12s and 12s respectively. ADT is a sensitive technique for imaging dermal structure, capable of resolving detail as fine as 1124 μm, 1427 μm, 1502 μm and 1893 μm in thin to thick split-thickness skin grafts respectively. This study has characterized a correlation between stimulus input and maximal resolution at differing depths of skin. It has also defined the functional imaging depth of ADT to below the sub-cutis, well below conventional spectrophotometric techniques.

  3. Thermography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cage, Bob N.

    1984-01-01

    Thermography, a diagnostic tool that combines photography and infrared sensing, permits direct measurement of apparent surface temperatures. Building energy losses can be detected and correction measures planned. Criteria for the use of thermography are provided. (MLF)

  4. Examination of the Early Diagnostic Applicability of Active Dynamic Thermography for Burn Wound Depth Assessment and Concept Analysis.

    PubMed

    Prindeze, Nicholas J; Fathi, Payam; Mino, Matthew J; Mauskar, Neil A; Travis, Taryn E; Paul, Dereck W; Moffatt, Lauren T; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in perfusion imaging, burn wound imaging technology continues to lag behind that of other fields. Quantification of blood flow is able to predict time for healing, but clear assessment of burn depth is still questionable. Active dynamic thermography (ADT) is a noncontact imaging modality capable of distinguishing tissue of different thermal conductivities. Utilizing the abnormal heat transfer properties of the burn zones, we examined whether ADT was useful in the determination of burn depth in a model of early burn wound evaluation. Duroc pigs (castrated male; n = 3) were anesthetized, and two burns were created with an aluminum billet at 3 and 12 seconds. These contact times resulted in superficial partial and deep partial thickness burn wounds, respectively. ADT and laser Doppler imaging (LDI) imaging were performed every 30 minutes postburn for a total of five imaging sessions ending 150 minutes postburn. For ADT, imaging excitation was performed for 42-120 seconds with dual quartz-infrared lamps, and subsequent infrared image capture was performed for 300 seconds. MATLAB-assisted image analysis was performed to determine burn zone region of interest thermal relaxation and characteristic patterns. LDI was performed with a moorLDI system, and biopsies were captured for histology following the 150-minute imaging session. Both ADT and LDI imaging modalities are able to detect different physical properties at 30, 60, 90 120, and 150 minutes postburn with statistical significance (P < 0.05). Resultant ADT cooling curves characterize greater differences with greater stimulation and a potentially more identifiable differential cooling characteristic. Histological analysis confirmed burn depth. This preliminary work confirms that ADT can measure burn depth and is deserving of further research either as a stand-alone imaging technology or in combination with a device to assess perfusion. PMID:25412050

  5. Medical applications of model-based dynamic thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Antoni; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Ruminski, Jacek; Hryciuk, Marcin; Renkielska, Alicja; Grudzinski, Jacek; Siebert, Janusz; Jagielak, Dariusz; Rogowski, Jan; Roszak, Krzysztof; Stojek, Wojciech

    2001-03-01

    The proposal to use active thermography in medical diagnostics is promising in some applications concerning investigation of directly accessible parts of the human body. The combination of dynamic thermograms with thermal models of investigated structures gives attractive possibility to make internal structure reconstruction basing on different thermal properties of biological tissues. Measurements of temperature distribution synchronized with external light excitation allow registration of dynamic changes of local temperature dependent on heat exchange conditions. Preliminary results of active thermography applications in medicine are discussed. For skin and under- skin tissues an equivalent thermal model may be determined. For the assumed model its effective parameters may be reconstructed basing on the results of transient thermal processes. For known thermal diffusivity and conductivity of specific tissues the local thickness of a two or three layer structure may be calculated. Results of some medical cases as well as reference data of in vivo study on animals are presented. The method was also applied to evaluate the state of the human heart during the open chest cardio-surgical interventions. Reference studies of evoked heart infarct in pigs are referred, too. We see the proposed new in medical applications technique as a promising diagnostic tool. It is a fully non-invasive, clean, handy, fast and affordable method giving not only qualitative view of investigated surfaces but also an objective quantitative measurement result, accurate enough for many applications including fast screening of affected tissues.

  6. Comparative defect evaluation of aircraft components by active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zauner, G.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2009-02-01

    Active Thermography has become a powerful tool in the field of non-destructive testing (NDT) in recent years. This infrared thermal imaging technique is used for non-contact inspection of materials and components by visualizing thermal surface contrasts after a thermal excitation. The imaging modality combined with the possibility of detecting and characterizing flaws as well as determining material properties makes Active Thermography a fast and robust testing method even in industrial-/production environments. Nevertheless, depending on the kind of defect (thermal properties, size, depth) and sample material (CFRP carbon fiber reinforced plastics, metal, glass fiber) or sample structure (honeycomb, composite layers, foam), active thermography can sometimes produce equivocal results or completely fails in certain test situations. The aim of this paper is to present examples of results of Active Thermography methods conducted on aircraft components compared to various other (imaging) NDT techniques, namely digital shearography, industrial x-ray imaging and 3D-computed tomography. In particular we focus on detection limits of thermal methods compared to the above-mentioned NDT methods with regard to: porosity characterization in CFRP, detection of delamination, detection of inclusions and characterization of glass fiber distributions.

  7. Evaluation of allergic response using dynamic thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, E.; Rok, T.; Tatoń, G.

    2015-03-01

    Skin dynamic termography supplemented by a mathematical model is presented as an objective and sensitive indicator of the skin prick test result. Termographic measurements were performed simultaneously with routine skin prick tests. The IR images were acquired every 70 s up to 910 s after skin prick. In the model histamine is treated as the principal mediator of the allergic reaction. Histamine produces vasolidation and the engorged vessels are responsible for an increase in skin temperature. The model parameters were determined by fitting the analytical solutions to the spatio-temporal distributions of the differences between measured and baseline temperatures. The model reproduces experimental data very well (coefficient of determination = 0.805÷0.995). The method offers a set of parameters to describe separately skin allergic reaction and skin reactivity. The release of histamine after allergen injection is the best indicator of allergic response. The diagnostic parameter better correlates with the standard evaluation of a skin prick test (correlation coefficient = 0.98) than the result of the thermographic planimetric method based on temperature and heated area determination (0.81). The high sensitivity of the method allows for determination of the allergic response in patients with the reduced skin reactivity.

  8. IR thermography for dynamic detection of laminar-turbulent transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Bernhard; Filius, Adrian; Tropea, Cameron; Grundmann, Sven

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the potential of infrared (IR) thermography for the dynamic detection of laminar-turbulent transition. The experiments are conducted on a flat plate at velocities of 8-14 m/s, and the transition of the laminar boundary layer to turbulence is forced by a disturbance source which is turned on and off with frequencies up to 10 Hz. Three different heating techniques are used to apply the required difference between fluid and structure temperature: a heated aluminum structure is used as an internal structure heating technique, a conductive paint acts as a surface bounded heater, while an IR heater serves as an example for an external heating technique. For comparison of all heating techniques, a normalization is introduced and the frequency response of the measured IR camera signal is analyzed. Finally, the different heating techniques are compared and consequences for the design of experiments on laminar-turbulent transition are discussed.

  9. Infrared micro-thermography of an actively heated preconcentrator device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2008-03-01

    We report infrared micro-thermography measurements and analysis of static and transient temperature maps of an actively heated micro-fabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a dual serpentine platinum heater trace deposited on a perforated polyimide membrane and suspended over a silicon frame. The sorbent coated perforated membrane is used to collect vapors and gases that flow through the preconcentrator. After heating, a concentrated pulse of analyte is released into the detector. Due to its small thermal mass, precise thermal management of the preconcentrator is critical to its performance. The sizes of features, the semi-transparent membrane, the need to flow air through the device, and changes in surface emissivity on a micron scale present many challenges for traditional infrared micro-thermography. We report an improved experimental test-bed. The hardware incorporates a custom-designed miniature calibration oven which, in conjunction with spatial filtering and a simple calibration algorithm, allows accurate temperature maps to be obtained. The test-bed incorporates a micro-bolometer array as the infrared imager. Instrumentation design, calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometers arrays can be used in certain radiometric applications. Heating profiles were examined with both uniform and non-uniform air flow through the device. The conclusions from this study provide critical information for optimal integration of the preconcentrator within a detection system, and in the design of the heater trace layout to achieve a more even temperature distribution across the device.

  10. Passive and active infrared thermography: An overview of applications for the inspection of mosaic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakeas, P.; Cheilakou, E.; Ftikou, E.; Koui, M.

    2015-11-01

    Infrared Thermography is a non destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) technique, which has been widely used for the investigation of cultural heritage and art objects. The main purpose of this study is to present the capabilities of both passive and active thermography for the inspection of mosaic structures, evaluating the performance of each testing approach through its application in representative mosaic structures. In situ passive thermography was applied on mosaic pavements in an attempt to acquire knowledge about their preservation state, while the active approach was used in order to study plastered mosaics and characterise the tesserae layer beneath the plaster. The results from this study revealed that passive approach can be efficiently applied as a moisture detection tool and a rapid monitoring technique of the mosaic condition, while the active thermographic investigation showed much more potentiality as quantitative information for the detected feature was further retrieved.

  11. Non-destructive Testing of Forged Metallic Materials by Active Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, S.; Cadith, J.; Bouteille, P.; Legros, G.; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Nowadays, infrared thermography is considered as the reference method in many applications such as safety, the inspection of electric installations, or the inspection of buildings' heat insulation. In recent years, the evolution of both material and data-processing tools also allows the development of thermography as a real non-destructive testing method. Thus, by subjecting the element to be inspected to an external excitation and by analyzing the propagation of heat in the examined zone, it is possible to highlight surface or subsurface defects such as cracks, delaminations, or corrosion. One speaks then about active infrared thermography. In this study, some results obtained during the collective studies carried out by CETIM and the University of Reims for the forging industry are presented. Various experimental possibilities offered by active thermography are presented and the interest in this method in comparison with the traditional non-destructive testing methods (penetrant testing and magnetic particle inspection) is discussed. For example, comparative results on a forged cracked hub, a steering joint, and a threaded rod are presented. They highlight the interest of infrared thermography stimulated by induction for forged parts.

  12. Nondestructive test of brazed cooling tubes of prototype bolometer camera housing using active infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Pandya, Santosh P; Pandya, Shwetang; Jha, Ratneshwar; Govindarajan, J

    2011-01-01

    The active infrared thermography technique is used for assessing the brazing quality of an actively cooled bolometer camera housing developed for steady state superconducting tokamak. The housing is a circular pipe, which has circular tubes vacuum brazed on the periphery. A unique method was adopted to monitor the temperature distribution on the internal surface of the pipe. A stainless steel mirror was placed inside the pipe and the reflected IR radiations were viewed using an IR camera. The heat stimulus was given by passing hot water through the tubes and the temperature distribution was monitored during the transient phase. The thermographs showed a significant nonuniformity in the brazing with a contact area of around 51%. The thermography results were compared with the x-ray radiographs and a good match between the two was observed. Benefits of thermography over x-ray radiography testing are emphasized. PMID:21280850

  13. Remote monitoring of breathing dynamics using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carina Barbosa; Yu, Xinchi; Czaplik, Michael; Rossaint, Rolf; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-11-01

    An atypical or irregular respiratory frequency is considered to be one of the earliest markers of physiological distress. In addition, monitoring of this vital parameter plays a major role in diagnosis of respiratory disorders, as well as in early detection of sudden infant death syndrome. Nevertheless, the current measurement modalities require attachment of sensors to the patient's body, leading to discomfort and stress. The current paper presents a new robust algorithm to remotely monitor breathing rate (BR) by using thermal imaging. This approach permits to detect and to track the region of interest (nose) as well as to estimate BR. In order to study the performance of the algorithm, and its robustness against motion and breathing disorders, three different thermal recordings of 11 healthy volunteers were acquired (sequence 1: normal breathing; sequence 2: normal breathing plus arbitrary head movements; and sequence 3: sequence of specific breathing patterns). Thoracic effort (piezoplethysmography) served as "gold standard" for validation of our results. An excellent agreement between estimated BR and ground truth was achieved. Whereas the mean correlation for sequence 1-3 were 0.968, 0.940 and 0.974, the mean absolute BR errors reached 0.33, 0.55 and 0.96 bpm (breaths per minute), respectively. In brief, this work demonstrates that infrared thermography is a promising, clinically relevant alternative for the currently available measuring modalities due to its performance and diverse remarkable advantages. PMID:26601003

  14. Remote monitoring of breathing dynamics using infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carina Barbosa; Yu, Xinchi; Czaplik, Michael; Rossaint, Rolf; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    An atypical or irregular respiratory frequency is considered to be one of the earliest markers of physiological distress. In addition, monitoring of this vital parameter plays a major role in diagnosis of respiratory disorders, as well as in early detection of sudden infant death syndrome. Nevertheless, the current measurement modalities require attachment of sensors to the patient’s body, leading to discomfort and stress. The current paper presents a new robust algorithm to remotely monitor breathing rate (BR) by using thermal imaging. This approach permits to detect and to track the region of interest (nose) as well as to estimate BR. In order to study the performance of the algorithm, and its robustness against motion and breathing disorders, three different thermal recordings of 11 healthy volunteers were acquired (sequence 1: normal breathing; sequence 2: normal breathing plus arbitrary head movements; and sequence 3: sequence of specific breathing patterns). Thoracic effort (piezoplethysmography) served as “gold standard” for validation of our results. An excellent agreement between estimated BR and ground truth was achieved. Whereas the mean correlation for sequence 1–3 were 0.968, 0.940 and 0.974, the mean absolute BR errors reached 0.33, 0.55 and 0.96 bpm (breaths per minute), respectively. In brief, this work demonstrates that infrared thermography is a promising, clinically relevant alternative for the currently available measuring modalities due to its performance and diverse remarkable advantages. PMID:26601003

  15. The use of infrared thermography to detect the skin temperature response to physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanda, G.

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity has a noticeable effect on skin blood flow and temperature. The thermal regulatory and hemodynamic processes during physical activity are controlled by two conflicting mechanisms: the skin vasoconstriction induced by the blood flow demand to active muscles and the skin vasodilation required by thermoregulation to increase warm blood flow and heat conduction to the skin. The time-evolution of skin temperature during exercise can give useful information about the adaptation of the subject as a function of specific type, intensity and duration of exercise. In this paper, infrared thermography is used to investigate the thermal response of skin temperature during running exercise on treadmill for a group of seven healthy and trained runners. Two different treadmill exercises are considered: a graded load exercise and a constant load exercise; for both exercises the duration was 30 minutes. Within the limits due to the relatively small size of the sample group, results typically indicate a fall in skin temperature during the initial stage of running exercise. As the exercise progresses, the dynamics of the skin temperature response depends on the type of exercise (graded versus constant load) and probably on the level of training of the subject.

  16. Clinical applications of computerized thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Computerized or digital, thermography is a rapidly growing diagnostic imaging modality. It has superseded contact thermography and analog imaging thermography which do not allow effective quantization. Medical applications of digital thermography can be classified in two groups: static and dynamic imaging. They can also be classified into macro thermography (resolution greater than 1 mm) and micro thermography (resolution less than 100 microns). Both modalities allow a thermal resolution of 0.1 C. The diagnostic power of images produced by any of these modalities can be augmented by the use of digital image enhancement and image recognition procedures. Computerized thermography has been applied in neurology, cardiovascular and plastic surgery, rehabilitation and sports medicine, psychiatry, dermatology and ophthalmology. Examples of these applications are shown and their scope and limitations are discussed.

  17. Clinical applications of dynamic infrared thermography in plastic surgery: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    John, Hannah Eliza; Niumsawatt, Vachara; Whitaker, Iain S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Infrared thermography (IRT) has become an increasingly utilized adjunct to more expensive and/or invasive investigations in a range of surgical fields, no more so than in plastic surgery. The combination of functional assessment, flow characteristics and anatomical localization has led to increasing applications of this technology. This article aims to perform a systematic review of the clinical applications of IRT in plastic surgery. Methods A systematic literature search using the keywords ‘IRT’ and ‘dynamic infrared thermography (DIRT)’ has been accomplished. A total of 147 papers were extracted from various medical databases, of which 34 articles were subjected to a full read by two independent reviewers, to ensure the papers satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Studies focusing on the use of IRT in breast cancer diagnosis were excluded. Results A systematic review of 29 publications demonstrated the clinical applications of IRT in plastic surgery today. They include preoperative planning of perforators for free flaps, post operative monitoring of free flaps, use of IRT as an adjunct in burns depth analysis, in assessment of response to treatment in hemangioma and as a diagnostic test for cutaneous melanoma and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Conclusions Modern infrared imaging technology with improved standardization protocols is now a credible, useful non-invasive tool in clinical practice. PMID:27047781

  18. Advanced multispectral dynamic thermography as a new tool for inspection of gas-fired furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pregowski, Piotr; Goleniewski, Grzegorz; Komosa, Wojciech; Korytkowski, Waldemar

    2004-04-01

    The main special feature of elaborated method is that the dynamic IR thermography (DIRT) bases on forming of single image consisting of pixels of chosen minimum (IMAX) or maximum (IMAX) value, noted during adequately long sequence of thermograms with total independence to the moment of its (image's) capture. In this way, additive or suppressed interferences of fluctuating character become bypassed. Due to this method thereafter elaborated in classic way such "artificial thermogram" offers the quality impossible to achieve with a classic "one shot" method. Although preliminary, results obtained clearly show great potential of the method. and confirmed the validity in decreasing errors caused by fluctuating disturbances. In the case of process furnaces of gas-fired type and especially of coal-fired, application of presented solutions should result in significant increasing the reliability of IR thermography application. By use of properly chosen optical filters and algorithm, elaborated method offers a new potential attractive to test temperature problems other than in tubes , as for example symmetry and efficiency of the furnace heaters.

  19. Dynamic Infrared Thermography Study of Blood Flow Relative to Lower Limp Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stathopoulos, I.; Skouroliakou, K.; Michail, C.; Valais, I.

    2015-09-01

    Thermography is an established method for studying skin temperature distribution. Temperature distribution on body surface is influenced by a variety of physiological mechanisms and has been proven a reliable indicator of various physiological disorders. Blood flow is an important factor that influences body heat diffusion and skin temperature. In an attempt to validate and further elucidate thermal models characterizing the human skin, dynamic thermography of the lower limp in horizontal and vertical position was performed, using a FLIR T460 thermographic camera. Temporal variation of temperature was recorded on five distinct points of the limp. Specific points were initially cooled by the means of an ice cube and measurements of the skin temperature were obtained every 30 seconds as the skin temperature was locally reduced and afterwards restored at its initial value. The return to thermal balance followed roughly the same pattern for all points of measurement, although the heating rate was faster when the foot was in horizontal position. Thermal balance was achieved faster at the spots that were positioned on a vein passage. Our results confirm the influence of blood flow on the thermal regulation of the skin. Spots located over veins exhibit different thermal behaviour due to thermal convection through blood flow. Changing the position of the foot from vertical to horizontal, effectively affects blood perfusion as in the vertical position blood circulation is opposed by gravity.

  20. Detection of seal contamination in heat-sealed food packaging based on active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'huys, Karlien; Saeys, Wouter; De Ketelaere, Bart

    2015-05-01

    In the food industry packaging is often applied to protect the product from the environment, assuring quality and safety throughout shelf life if properly performed. Packaging quality depends on the material used and the closure (seal). The material is selected based on the specific needs of the food product to be wrapped. However, proper closure of the package is often harder to achieve. One problem possibly jeopardizing seal quality is the presence of food particles between the seal. Seal contamination can cause a decreased seal strength and thus an increased packaging failure risk. It can also trigger the formation of microchannels through which air and microorganisms can enter and spoil the enclosed food. Therefore, early detection and removal of seal-contaminated packages from the production chain is essential. In this work, a pulsed-type active thermography method using the heat of the sealing bars as an excitation source was studied for detecting seal contamination. The cooling profile of contaminated seals was recorded. The detection performance of four processing methods (based on a single frame, a fit of the cooling profile, pulsed phase thermography and a matched filter) was compared. High resolution digital images served as a reference to quantify contamination. The lowest detection limit (equivalent diameter of 0.63 mm) and the lowest processing time (0.42 s per sample) were obtained for the method based on a single frame. Presumably, practical limitations in the recording stage prevented the added value of active thermography to be fully reflected in this application.

  1. Modeling static and dynamic thermography of the human breast under elastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray H.

    2011-01-01

    An abnormal thermogram has been shown to be a reliable indicator of increased risk of breast cancer. Numerical modeling techniques for thermography are proposed to quantify the complex relationships between the breast thermal behaviors and the underlying physiological/pathological conditions. Previous thermal modeling techniques did not account for gravity-induced elastic deformation arising from various body postures, nor did they suggest that a dynamic thermal procedure may be used to enhance clinical diagnosis. In this paper, 3D finite element method (FEM)-based thermal and elastic modeling techniques are developed to characterize comprehensively both the thermal and elastic properties of normal and tumorous breast tissues during static and dynamic thermography. In the steady state, gravity-induced breast deformation is found to cause an upper-lower asymmetric surface temperature contrast for sitting/standing up body posture, even though all the thermal and elastic properties are assumed uniform. Additionally, the tumor-induced surface temperature alterations are found to be caused primarily by shallow tumors and to be less sensitive to tumor size than to tumor depth. In the dynamic state, the breast exhibits distinctive temporal patterns that are associated with distinct thermal events: cold stress and thermal recovery induced by changes in the ambient temperature. Specifically, the tumor-induced thermal contrast shows an opposite initial change and delayed peak as compared with the deformation-induced thermal contrast. These findings are expected to provide a stronger foundation for, and greater specificity and precision in, thermographic diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer.

  2. Non Destructive Testing by active infrared thermography coupled with shearography under same optical heat excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, Louis-Daniel; Dumoulin, Jean; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    As infrastructures are aging, the evaluation of their health is becoming crucial. To do so, numerous Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods are available. Among them, thermal shearography and active infrared thermography represent two full field and contactless methods for surface inspection. The synchronized use of both methods presents multiples advantages. Most importantly, both NDT are based on different material properties. Thermography depend on the thermal properties and shearography on the mechanical properties. The cross-correlation of both methods result in a more accurate and exact detection of the defects. For real site application, the simultaneous use of both methods is simplified due to the fact that the excitation method (thermal) is the same. Active infrared thermography is the measure of the temperature by an infrared camera of a surface subjected to heat flux. Observation of the variation of temperature in function of time reveal the presence of defects. On the other hand, shearography is a measure of out-of-plane surface displacement. This displacement is caused by the application of a strain on the surface which (in our case) take the form of a temperature gradient inducing a thermal stress To measure the resulting out-of-plane displacement, shearography exploit the relation between the phase difference and the optical path length. The phase difference is measured by the observation of the interference between two coherent light beam projected on the surface. This interference is due to change in optical path length as the surface is deformed [1]. A series of experimentation have been conducted in laboratory with various sample of concrete reinforced with CFRP materials. Results obtained reveal that with both methods it was possible to detect defects in the gluing. An infrared lamp radiating was used as the active heat source. This is necessary if measurements with shearography are to be made during the heating process. A heating lamp in the

  3. Prospects and limitations of digital Shearography and Active Thermography in finding and rating flaws in CFRP sandwich parts with honeycomb core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, J.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2012-05-01

    This work shows the prospects and limitations of the non-destructive testing methods Digital Shearography and Active Thermography when applied to CFRP sandwich parts with honeycomb cores. Two specimens with different core materials (aluminum, NOMEX) and artificial flaws such as delaminations, disbonds and inclusions of foreign material, are tested with Digital Shearography and Pulse Thermography including Pulse Phase Thermography. Both methods provide a good ability for finding and rating the flaws.

  4. Active and passive infrared thermography applied to the detection and characterization of hidden defects in structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Infrared thermography for Non Destructive Testing (NDT) has encountered a wide spreading this last 2 decades, in particular thanks to emergence on the market of low cost uncooled infrared camera. So, infrared thermography is not anymore a measurement technique limited to laboratory application. It has been more and more involved in civil engineering and cultural heritage applications, but also in many other domains, as indicated by numerous papers in the literature. Nevertheless, laboratory, measurements are done as much as possible in quite ideal conditions (good atmosphere conditions, known properties of materials, etc.), while measurement on real site requires to consider the influence of not controlled environmental parameters and additional unknown thermal properties. So, dedicated protocol and additional sensors are required for measurement data correction. Furthermore, thermal excitation is required to enhance the signature of defects in materials. Post-processing of data requires to take into account the protocol used for the thermal excitation and sometimes its nature to avoid false detection. This analysis step is based on signal and image processing tool and allows to carry out the detection. Characterization of anomalies detected at the previous step can be done by additional signal processing in particular for manufactured objects. The use of thermal modelling and inverse method allows to determine properties of the defective area. The present paper will first address a review of some protocols currently in use for field measurement with passive and/or active infrared measurements. Illustrations in various experiments carried out on civil engineering structure will be shown and discussed. In a second part, different post-processing approaches will be presented and discussed. In particular, a review of the most standard processing methods like Fast Fourier Analysis, Principal Components Analysis, Polynomial Decomposition, defect characterization using

  5. Facial thermography is a sensitive tool to determine antihistaminic activity: comparison of levocetirizine and fexofenadine

    PubMed Central

    Larbig, Michael; Burtin, Bernard; Martin, Laurent; Stamm, Holger; Luettig, Birgit; Hohlfeld, Jens M; Krug, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Aims To assess the antihistaminic activity of levocetirizine and fexofenadine 2 h and 24 h after drug administration using facial thermography and to compare the results with those using well-established parameters of antihistaminic activity in the nose and skin. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, three-treatment, three-period, single-dose, cross-over study in healthy males taking levocetirizine 5 mg, fexofenadine 120 mg or placebo. The primary endpoint was nasal skin temperature after nasal histamine challenge recorded for 20 min at 2 and 24 h after drug intake. The secondary endpoints were nasal symptoms and a histamine skin prick test. Results Thirty subjects were randomized. At 2 h after drug intake the inhibition of the nasal temperature increase from baseline was not significantly different between levocetirizine and fexofenadine. At 24 h it was significantly more pronounced after levocetirizine than fexofenadine (difference: least-squares mean: −0.13 °C; P ≤ 0.024, 95% CI −0.24, −0.02). Both drugs significantly reduced (P≤ 0.001) the mean temperature increase from baseline compared with placebo at 2 and 24 h (least-squares mean increase and (95% CI): levocetirizine, −0.28 °C (−0.42, −0.14) and −0.32 °C (−0.43, −0.21); fexofenadine −0.35 °C (−0.49, −0.21) and −0.19 °C (−0.30, −0.08), respectively). Results of nasal symptom score and wheal and flare were consistent with the thermography results. Conclusions Facial thermography is an objective, non-invasive and sensitive method to study antihistaminic activity at the nose level. Levocetirizine and fexofenadine demonstrate the same activity at 2 h after drug intake, but levocetirizine has a more sustained activity at 24 h. PMID:16842390

  6. Effects of peripheral dynamic movements on the lower-limb circulation assessed by thermography: three one-group studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaerki, Anne; Laehdeniemi, Matti

    2002-03-01

    Peripheral dynamic movements are used as part of postoperative protocols and for preventing vascular complications during bed rest. The effects of peripheral movements have not been studied. The purposes of these studies were to explain the effects of peripheral dynamic movements on lower limb circulation. The aim was also to explain how other factors like sex, age, BMI, medication, smoking, sports activity etc. affect the circulation. Healthy young subjects (N=19), healthy elderly subjects (N=19) and diabetic subjects (N=21) participated in the studies between 1997 and 1999. The study design was the same in each study. Infrared technology and image processing belong to our focus fields of applied research and IR is widely used in our real time industrial applications including also ongoing research of new possibilities. This paper presents the results of our newest application of IR thermography, where it was used to measure the skin temperature over the soleus muscle during and after dynamic ankle movements. The results showed that the skin temperature increased further during the recovery period after movements, and temperature was highest after 3- 5 minutes. Diabetic male subjects were the only subgroup that had immediate decrease during recovery period. The studies showed that smoking had a negative effect on circulation. BMI had also negative correlation (-0,356), showing that subjects with higher BMI had less increase. The results proved that peripheral movements were effective for increasing circulation in the soleus muscle and the effect was still seen after 15 minutes.

  7. Characterization of pores in high pressure die cast aluminum using active thermography and computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierhofer, Christiane; Myrach, Philipp; Röllig, Mathias; Jonietz, Florian; Illerhaus, Bernhard; Meinel, Dietmar; Richter, Uwe; Miksche, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    Larger high pressure die castings (HPDC) and decreasing wall thicknesses are raising the issue of casting defects like pores in aluminum structures. Properties of components are often strongly influenced by inner porosity. As these products are being established more and more in lightweight construction (e.g. automotive and other transport areas), non-destructive testing methods, which can be applied fast and on-site, are required for quality assurance. In this contribution, the application of active thermography for the direct detection of larger pores is demonstrated. The analysis of limits and accuracy of the method are completed by numerical simulation and the method is validated using computed tomography.

  8. An active thermography approach for thermal and electrical characterization of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streza, M.; Longuemart, S.; Guilmeau, E.; Strzalkowski, K.; Touati, K.; Depriester, M.; Maignan, A.; Sahraoui, A. Hadj

    2016-07-01

    The enhancement of figure of merit (ZT) of thermoelectrics is becoming extremely important for an efficient conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy. In this respect, reliable measurements of thermal and electrical parameters are of paramount importance in order to characterize thermoelectric materials in terms of their efficiency. In this work, a combined theoretical-experimental active thermography approach is presented. The method consists of selecting the right sequential interdependence between the excitation frequency and the sampling rate of the infrared camera, by computing a temporal Fourier analysis of each pixel of the recorded IR image. The method is validated by using a reference sample which is then applied to a recent synthesized titanium trisulphide thermoelectric material (TiS3). By combining AC and steady-state experiments, one can obtain information on both thermal and electrical parameters of TE materials (namely thermal diffusivity, Seebeck coefficient). The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of TiS3 are also measured using photothermal radiometry technique (PTR) and the resulting values of these parameters are α  =  9.7*10‑7 m2 s‑1 and k  =  2.2 W m‑1 K, respectively. The results obtained with the two techniques are in good agreement. In the case of TE materials, the main benefit of the proposed method is related to its non-contact nature and the possibility of obtaining the electric potential and temperature at the same probes. The Seebeck coefficient obtained by active IR thermography (S  =  ‑554 μV K‑1) is consistent with the one obtained using an ULVAC-ZEM3 system (S  =  ‑570 μV K‑1). For a large number of users of thermographic cameras, which are not equipped with a lock-in thermography module, the present approach provides an affordable and cheaper solution.

  9. A study of active thermography approaches for the non-destructive testing and evaluation of aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdelidis, Nicolas P.; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Marioli-Riga, Zaira P.; Bendada, Abdelhakim; Maldague, Xavier P. V.

    2008-03-01

    The prerequisite for more competent and cost effective aircraft has led to the evolution of innovative testing and evaluation procedures. Non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT & E) techniques for assessing the integrity of an aircraft structure are essential to both reduce manufacturing costs and out of service time of aircraft due to maintenance. Nowadays, active - transient thermal NDT & E (i.e. thermography) is commonly used for assessing aircraft composites. This research work evaluates the potential of pulsed thermography (PT) and/or pulsed phase thermography (PPT) for assessing defects (i.e. impact damage and inclusions for delaminations) on GLARE and GLARE type composites. Finally, in the case of the detection of inserts - delaminations C-Scan ultrasonic testing was also used with the intention of providing supplementary results.

  10. Active Thermography for the Detection of Defects in Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerrouk, Souheil; Ludwig, Reinhold; Apelian, Diran

    2007-03-01

    Active thermography is an established NDE technique that has become the method of choice in many industrial applications which require non-contact access to the parts under test. Unfortunately, when conducting on-line infrared (IR) inspection of powder metallic compacts, complications can arise due the generally low emissivity of metals and the thermally noisy environment typically encountered in manufacturing plants. In this paper we present results of an investigation that explores the suitability of active IR imaging of powder metallurgy compacts for the detection of surface and sub-surface defects in the pre-sinter state and in an on-line manufacturing setting to ensure complete quality assurance. Additional off-line tests can be carried out for statistical quality analyses. In this research, the IR imaging of sub-surface defects is based on a transient instrumentation approach that relies on an electric control system which synchronizes and monitors the thermal response due to an electrically generated heat source. Preliminary testing reveals that this newly developed pulsed thermography system can be employed for the detection of subsurface defects in green-state parts. Practical measurements agree well with theoretical predictions. The inspection approach being developed can be used for the testing of green-state compacts as they exit the compaction press at speeds of up to 1,000 parts per hour.

  11. Non-destructive testing of composite materials by means of active thermography-based tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizaranzu, Miguel; Lario, Alberto; Chiminelli, Agustín; Amenabar, Ibán

    2015-07-01

    Infrared analysis tools are nowadays widely used for the non-destructive testing of components made up in composite materials, belonging to many different industrial sectors. Being a non-contact method, its capability for the inspection of large areas in short periods of time justifies the great number of works and technical studies that can be found in this field. The growing interest in the technique is also supported by the development, during recent years, of increasingly powerful equipment and data analysis tools. In order to establish a base of knowledge to assist defect identification in real components inspections, the design and manufacturing of inspection samples including controlled defects, is a frequently used strategy. This paper deals with the analysis, by means of transient active thermography, of a set of inspection patterns made out of different composite materials and configurations that can be found in the wind turbine blade manufacturing industry. The design and manufacturing of these patterns are described, including different types of representative defects, stack configurations and composite manufacturing techniques. Reference samples are then inspected by means of active thermography analysis tools and the results obtained are discussed.

  12. Detection and characterisation of delamination in PV modules by active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, A.; Sastry, O. S.; Gupta, R.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a fast and efficient method for the detection and characterisation of delamination in photovoltaic (PV) modules by using active infrared thermography approach. A discrete part of PV module was irradiated by step heating and its thermal image sequence was used to detect and analyse delamination. Different types of heating source for thermal excitation for this application have been studied. An electro-thermal model was developed to simulate the active thermography approach for the characterisation of delamination in PV module by equivalent resistance-capacitance (RC) network using a circuit simulator. This simulation approach was used to estimate the extent of delamination in the module and to determine the optimum parameters for the characterisation of delamination. Different applications based on front and backsides of heating the module were also proposed in this paper. The proposed method has the potential to be employed for the quality check of PV modules during inline production as well as for the predictive maintenance of outdoor PV plants.

  13. Active Thermography for the Detection of Defects in Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Benzerrouk, Souheil; Ludwig, Reinhold; Apelian, Diran

    2007-03-21

    Active thermography is an established NDE technique that has become the method of choice in many industrial applications which require non-contact access to the parts under test. Unfortunately, when conducting on-line infrared (IR) inspection of powder metallic compacts, complications can arise due the generally low emissivity of metals and the thermally noisy environment typically encountered in manufacturing plants. In this paper we present results of an investigation that explores the suitability of active IR imaging of powder metallurgy compacts for the detection of surface and sub-surface defects in the pre-sinter state and in an on-line manufacturing setting to ensure complete quality assurance. Additional off-line tests can be carried out for statistical quality analyses. In this research, the IR imaging of sub-surface defects is based on a transient instrumentation approach that relies on an electric control system which synchronizes and monitors the thermal response due to an electrically generated heat source. Preliminary testing reveals that this newly developed pulsed thermography system can be employed for the detection of subsurface defects in green-state parts. Practical measurements agree well with theoretical predictions. The inspection approach being developed can be used for the testing of green-state compacts as they exit the compaction press at speeds of up to 1,000 parts per hour.

  14. Infrared thermography of evaporative fluxes and dynamics of salt deposition on heterogeneous porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachshon, Uri; Shahraeeni, Ebrahim; Or, Dani; Dragila, Maria; Weisbrod, Noam

    2011-12-01

    Evaporation of saline solutions from porous media, common in arid areas, involves complex interactions between mass transport, energy exchange and phase transitions. We quantified evaporation of saline solutions from heterogeneous sand columns under constant hydraulic boundary conditions to focus on effects of salt precipitation on evaporation dynamics. Mass loss measurements and infrared thermography were used to quantify evaporation rates. The latter method enables quantification of spatial and temporal variability of salt precipitation to identify its dynamic effects on evaporation. Evaporation from columns filled with texturally-contrasting sand using different salt solutions revealed preferential salt precipitation within the fine textured domains. Salt precipitation reduced evaporation rates from the fine textured regions by nearly an order of magnitude. In contrast, low evaporation rates from coarse-textured regions (due to low capillary drive) exhibited less salt precipitation and consequently less evaporation rate suppression. Experiments provided insights into two new phenomena: (1) a distinct increase in evaporation rate at the onset of evaporation; and (2) a vapor pumping mechanism related to the presence of a salt crust over semidry media. Both phenomena are related to local vapor pressure gradients established between pore water and the surface salt crust. Comparison of two salts: NaCl and NaI, which tend to precipitate above the matrix surface and within matrix pores, respectively, shows a much stronger influence of NaCl on evaporation rate suppression. This disparity reflects the limited effect of NaI precipitation on matrix resistivity for solution and vapor flows.

  15. Involuntary motion tracking for medical dynamic infrared thermography using a template-based algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Cila

    2013-01-01

    In medical applications, Dynamic Infrared (IR) Thermography is used to detect the temporal variation of the skin temperature. Dynamic Infrared Imaging first introduces a thermal challenge such as cooling on the human skin, and then a sequence of hundreds of consecutive frames is acquired after the removal of the thermal challenge. As a result, by analyzing the temporal variation of the skin temperature over the image sequence, the thermal signature of skin abnormality can be examined. However, during the acquisition of dynamic IR imaging, the involuntary movements of patients are unavoidable, and such movements will undermine the accuracy of diagnosis. In this study, based on the template-based algorithm, a tracking approach is proposed to compensate the motion artifact. The affine warping model is adopted to estimate the motion parameter of the image template, and then the Lucas-Kanade algorithm is applied to search for the optimized parameters of the warping function. In addition, the weighting mask is also incorporated in the computation to ensure the robustness of the algorithm. To evaluate the performance of the approach, two sets of IR image sequences of a subject’s hand are analyzed: the steady-state image sequence, in which the skin temperature is in equilibrium with the environment, and the thermal recovery image sequence, which is acquired after cooling is applied on the skin for 60 seconds. By selecting the target region in the first frame as the template, satisfactory tracking results were obtained in both experimental trials, and the robustness of the approach can be effectively ensured in the recovery trial. PMID:24392205

  16. Is It Possible to Detect Activated Brown Adipose Tissue in Humans Using Single-Time-Point Infrared Thermography under Thermoneutral Conditions? Impact of BMI and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schick, Fritz; Schwenzer, Nina F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility to detect activated brown adipose tissue (BAT) using single-time-point infrared thermography of the supraclavicular skin region under thermoneutral conditions. To this end, infrared thermography was compared with 18-F-FDG PET, the current reference standard for the detection of activated BAT. Methods 120 patients were enrolled in this study. After exclusion of 18 patients, 102 patients (44 female, 58 male, mean age 58±17 years) were included for final analysis. All patients underwent a clinically indicated 18F-FDG-PET/CT examination. Immediately prior to tracer injection skin temperatures of the supraclavicular, presternal and jugular regions were measured using spatially resolved infrared thermography at room temperature. The presence of activated BAT was determined in PET by typical FDG uptake within the supraclavicular adipose tissue compartments. Local thickness of supraclavicular subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) was measured on CT. Measured skin temperatures were statistically correlated with the presence of activated BAT and anthropometric data. Results Activated BAT was detected in 9 of 102 patients (8.8%). Local skin temperature of the supraclavicular region was significantly higher in individuals with active BAT compared to individuals without active BAT. However, after statistical correction for the influence of BMI, no predictive value of activated BAT on skin temperature of the supraclavicular region could be observed. Supraclavicular skin temperature was significantly negatively correlated with supraclavicular SCAT thickness. Conclusion We conclude that supraclavicular SCAT thickness influences supraclavicular skin temperature and thus makes a specific detection of activated BAT using single-time-point thermography difficult. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the possibility of BAT detection using alternative thermographic methods, e.g. dynamic thermography or MR-based thermometry taking into account BMI

  17. Two-stage neural algorithm for defect detection and characterization uses an active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzik, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    In the paper a two-stage neural algorithm for defect detection and characterization is presented. In order to estimate the defect depth two neural networks trained on data obtained using an active thermography were employed. The first stage of the algorithm is developed to detect the defect by a classification neural network. Then the defects depth is estimated using a regressive neural network. In this work the results of experimental investigations and simulations are shown. Further, the sensitivity analysis of the presented algorithm was conducted and the impacts of emissivity error and the ambient temperature error on the depth estimation errors were studied. The results were obtained using a test sample made of material with a low thermal diffusivity.

  18. Recognition of wall materials through active thermography coupled with numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Pietrarca, Francesca; Mameli, Mauro; Filippeschi, Sauro; Fantozzi, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of historical buildings, wall thickness as well as wall constituents are not often known a priori, and active IR thermography can be exploited as a nonintrusive method for detecting what kind of material lies beneath the external plaster layer. In the present work, the wall of a historical building is subjected to a heating stimulus, and the surface temperature temporal trend is recorded by an IR camera. A hybrid numerical model is developed in order to simulate the transient thermal response of a wall made of different known materials underneath the plaster layer. When the numerical thermal contrast and the appearance time match with the experimental thermal images, the material underneath the plaster can be qualitatively identified. PMID:27607254

  19. Detection and Characterization of Package Defects and Integrity Failure using Dynamic Scanning Infrared Thermography (DSIRT).

    PubMed

    Morris, Scott A

    2016-02-01

    A dynamic scanning infrared thermography (DSIRT) system developed at the Univ. of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) Packaging Lab relies on variation in transient thermal artifacts to indicate defects, and offers the possibility of characterization of many types of materials and structures. These include newer polymer and laminate-based structures for shelf-stable foods that lack a reliable, nondestructive method for inspection, which is a continuing safety issue. Preliminary trials were conducted on a polyester/aluminum foil/polypropylene retort pouch laminate containing artificially-induced failed seal and insulating inclusion defects ranging from 1 to 10 mm wide in the plane of the seal. The samples were placed in relative motion to a laterally positioned infrared laser, inducing heating through the plane of the seal. The emergent thermal artifact on the obverse side was sensed using either a bolometer camera or a thermopile sensor, with thermal anomalies indicating potential defects and the results of each sensors were compared. The bolometer camera detected defects to the limit of its measured optical resolution-approximately 1 mm at 20 cm-although the lower-resolution thermopile sensors were only capable of detecting 5 mm defects even at closer distances of approximately 5 mm. In addition, a supplementary magnification system was fitted to the bolometer camera which increased resolution but reduced field of view and would require a much higher frame rate to be useful. Automatic processing of the image data rapidly detected the model defects and can lead to development of an automated inspection system.  Much higher material throughput speeds are feasible using faster instruments, and the system is scalable. PMID:26720916

  20. Analysis of the accuracy of a neural algorithm for defect depth estimation using PCA processing from active thermography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzik, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the paper a neural algorithm, which uses an active thermography for defect depth estimation, is presented. Simulations of the algorithm, for three datasets representing different phases of the heat transfer process developing in the test sample were performed. The influence of the emissivity error of the test sample surface on the accuracy of defect depth estimation is discussed. The investigations were performed for test sample made of the material with low thermal diffusivity.

  1. Defects inspection of the solder bumps using self reference technology in active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiangning; Shi, Tielin; Han, Jiguang; Liao, Guanglan; Su, Lei; Wang, Suya

    2014-03-01

    With the decrease of solder bumps in dimension and pitch, defects inspection of the solder bumps become more difficult. A nondestructive detection system based on the active thermography has been developed for solder bumps inspection. However, heating non-uniformities and emissivity differences may impede the defects recognition. In this paper, we propose a method using a self reference technology based on a source distribution image (SDI) to eliminate the influence of unevenness in emissivity values and heating power distribution. Three thermograms captured right after the heat pulse are averaged to create the SDI. Then the SDI is subtracted from the original thermograms, and we get the thermal contrast images, in which eight points on the edge of each hot spot are selected as the feature points for the corresponding bump. Thermal difference between the feature points and the central point are adopted to quantify the thermal behaviors of the solder bumps, by which the missing bump is distinguished from the reference bumps. The results show that it is effective using the method to eliminate the impacts of emissivity unevenness and heating non-uniformities on defects identification in the active infrared test.

  2. Automatic detection of impact damage in carbon fiber composites using active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usamentiaga, R.; Venegas, P.; Guerediaga, J.; Vega, L.; López, I.

    2013-05-01

    Accidental impacts can severely reduce the structural strength and stability of composite materials, which can lead to severe consequences due to the degradation of the mechanical properties of components designed to perform for decades. Because accidental impacts are difficult to avoid, robust and reliable inspection methods to detect impact damage are required. Many methods have been proposed recently. However, most of them require an experienced technician to analyze the data, which leads to a significant decrease in manufacturing productivity. This work proposes a method to automatically detect impact damage in carbon fiber composites using active thermography. The proposed system detects defects caused by impact damage in the infrared images without human intervention. Impact damage detection is performed using a robust method based on an active thermographic inspection. Thermographic data is preprocessed to improve signal-to-noise ratio and to remove non-uniform background caused by non-uniform heating. Then, peaks and edges are identified and clustered, and regions corresponding to impact damage are detected. The proposed procedure has been applied to three specimens that contain 6 and 12 plies, different types of cores, and damage caused by energies from 6 J to 50 J. All defects are detected correctly.

  3. Active thermography and post-processing image enhancement for recovering of abraded and paint-covered alphanumeric identification marks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, R.; Quattrocchi, A.; Piccolo, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Alphanumeric marking is a common technique employed in industrial applications for identification of products. However, the realised mark can undergo deterioration, either by extensive use or voluntary deletion (e.g. removal of identification numbers of weapons or vehicles). For recovery of the lost data many destructive or non-destructive techniques have been endeavoured so far, which however present several restrictions. In this paper, active infrared thermography has been exploited for the first time in order to assess its effectiveness in restoring paint covered and abraded labels made by means of different manufacturing processes (laser, dot peen, impact, cold press and scribe). Optical excitation of the target surface has been achieved using pulse (PT), lock-in (LT) and step heating (SHT) thermography. Raw infrared images were analysed with a dedicated image processing software originally developed in Matlab™, exploiting several methods, which include thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR), guided filtering (GF), block guided filtering (BGF) and logarithmic transformation (LN). Proper image processing of the raw infrared images resulted in superior contrast and enhanced readability. In particular, for deeply abraded marks, good outcomes have been obtained by application of logarithmic transformation to raw PT images and block guided filtering to raw phase LT images. With PT and LT it was relatively easy to recover labels covered by paint, with the latter one providing better thermal contrast for all the examined targets. Step heating thermography never led to adequate label identification instead.

  4. Non-destructive inspection of drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels using active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usamentiaga, R.; Venegas, P.; Guerediaga, J.; Vega, L.; López, I.

    2012-11-01

    The aerospace industry is in constant need of ever-more efficient inspection methods for quality control. Product inspection is also essential to maintain the safe operation of aircraft components designed to perform for decades. This paper proposes a method for non-destructive inspection of drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels. Honeycomb sandwich panels are extensively employed in the aerospace industry due to their high strength and stiffness to weight ratios. In order to attach additional structures to them, panels are reinforced by filling honeycomb cells and drilling holes into the reinforced areas. The proposed procedure is designed to detect the position of the holes within the reinforced area and to provide a robust measurement of the distance between each hole and the boundary of the reinforced area. The result is a fast, safe and clean inspection method for drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels that can be used to robustly assess a possible displacement of the hole from the center of the reinforced area, which could have serious consequences. The proposed method is based on active infrared thermography, and uses state of the art methods for infrared image processing, including signal-to-nose ratio enhancement, hole detection and segmentation. Tests and comparison with X-ray inspections indicate that the proposed system meets production needs.

  5. Infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.C. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    Infrared thermography is a useful tool for the diagnosis of problems in building systems. In instances where a building owner has several large buildings, an investment in a typical $30,000 infrared system may be cost effective. In most instances, however, the rental of an infrared system or the hiring of an infrared consulting service is a cost effective alternative. As can be seen from the several applications presented here, any mechanical problem manifesting itself in an atypical temperature pattern can usually be detected. The two primary savings generated from infrared analysis of building systems are maintenance and energy.

  6. Thermography to Inspect Insulation of Large Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen; Youngquist, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Thermography has been used in the past to monitor active, large, cryogenic storage tanks. This approach proposes to use thermography to monitor new or refurbished tanks, prior to filling with cryogenic liquid, to look for insulation voids. Thermography may provide significant cost and schedule savings if voids can be detected early before a tank is returned to service.

  7. Buying Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madding, Robert P.

    1981-01-01

    The cost of thermographic information obtained by contracting for a service is compared to that of buying equipment and doing the work in-house. A breakeven analysis method is used to find the number of days per year an instrument must be used to justify buying it. Life-cycle costing techniques are used to find the equivalent annual cost of various classes of thermographic instruments. Results indicate that a full-time person earning 20,000 annually must use a 30,000 instrument at least 73 days per year if thermography can otherwise be contracted for $675 per day. By devoting a person to thermography part-time, the number of inspection days for this case can be reduced to about 28. Further in-house advantage can be gained by considering investment tax credits, salvage value and, to some extent, accelerated depreciation. Techniques for finding the breakeven number of inspection days for other costs are developed. A nomogram is included for rapid comparisons.

  8. Estimate of the diameter of surface defects on a pattern specimen made of Plexiglas through active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Barreto, M. H.; Giraldo, J. M.; Ramírez-Hurtado, A. L.; Llamosa, L.; Cruz, B.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years the use of Infrared Thermography (IRT) has reached a special importance in the industrial sector as a method of Non-Destructive Testing (NDT), for inspection of surface and subsurface defects of different types of materials. In order to determine the size of such defects by implementing the technique of Infrared Active Thermography, a Plexiglass sample (PMMA) with circular defects of different diameters and depths was designed and built. The sample was thermally stimulated by a continuous radiation from a halogen lamp, and subsequently the thermographic images were acquired by using the time-resolved infrared radiometry technique (TRIR). Images were obtained using Fluke TI-30 and TI-32 cameras, and a program was designed in Matlab for its further processing. Through a user interface, the program can display and filter the image; then it chooses a particular defect and calculates the diameter with their respective uncertainties. The best results for the calculated diameter were obtained with Ti-32 camera. The estimated uncertainties were below of 1.2mm, regard of defect diameter. Importantly, uncertainties grew when the diameter/depth ratio was 1 for depths of 4.0mm.

  9. Aerodynamic applications of infrared thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.

    1989-01-01

    A series of wind tunnel experiments were conducted as part of a systematic study for evaluation of infrared thermography as a viable non-intrusive thermal measurement technique for aerodynamic applications. The experiments consisted of obtaining steady-state surface temperature and convective heat transfer rates for a uniformly heated cylinder in transverse flow with a Reynolds number range of 46,000 to 250,000. The calculated convective heat transfer rates were in general agreement with classical data. Furthermore, IR thermography provided valuable real-time fluid dynamic information such as visualization of flow separation, transition and vortices.

  10. Thermography pattern analysis and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin; Bai, Libing; Woo, W. L.; Tian, Guiyun

    2014-06-01

    Analysis of thermography spatial-transient patterns has considerable potential to enable automatic identification and quantification of defects in non-destructive testing and evaluation. This Letter proposes a non-negative pattern separation model for eddy current pulsed thermography to automatically extract important spatial and time patterns according to the transient thermal sequences without any pre-training or prior knowledge. In particular, the method is scale-invariant, such that large differences in surface emissivity, hot spots, and cool areas with dynamic range of thermal contrast can be extracted. Finally, an artificial slot in a steel sample with shining, black strip on the surface is tested to validate the proposed method.

  11. Thermography inspection for detection and tracking of composite cylinder damage during load testing

    SciTech Connect

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Johnston, P. H.; Seebo, J. P.

    2011-06-23

    Two thermography techniques, passive and active, are used to detect damage initiation and progression in a cyclically loaded composite cylinder. The passive thermography tracks damage progression in real time during cyclic loading. Active flash thermography, using a flash tube enclosed within the cylinder, images delaminations. A differential thermography processing technique eliminates normal material variations and improves sensitivity to and sizing of delaminations. The thermography results were compared to non-immersion ultrasonic results.

  12. Thermography Inspection for Detection and Tracking of Composite Cylinder Damage During Load Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Seebo, J. P.; Johnston, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Two thermography techniques, passive and active, are used to detect damage initiation and progression in a cyclically loaded composite cylinder. The passive thermography tracks damage progression in real time during cyclic loading. Active flash thermography, using a flash tube enclosed within the cylinder, images delaminations in a cylinder under different loads. A differential thermography processing technique eliminates normal material variations and improves sensitivity to and sizing of delaminations. The thermography results were compared to nonimmersion ultrasonic results.

  13. Surface thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.

    1986-05-01

    The temperature sensitivity of many plasma materials interactions in both fusion plasmas and process plasmas requires the determination of the surface temperature of the material in contact with the plasma. The determination of the surface temperature is made difficult by the presence of the plasma, the large electrical potentials that may be present, and the need to not contaminate the surface. Radiation thermography permits determination of the surface temperature while overcoming the difficulties listed above. This paper briefly discusses thermal radiation, Planck's Law, and the selection of the best wavelength band for a given temperature range. Both one and two color pyrometry are discussed. Several considerations that are necessary for practical applications are discussed. Some examples of the use of radiation thermometry in fusion applications between 350 and 3000 /sup 0/C are presented. Surface heat flux has also been determined from the time variation of the surface temperature.

  14. Infrared thermography for CFRP inspection: computational model and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Henrique C.; Zhang, Hai; Morioka, Karen; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; López, Fernando; Maldague, Xavier P. V.; Tarpani, José R.

    2016-05-01

    Infrared Thermography (IRT) is a well-known Non-destructive Testing (NDT) technique. In the last decades, it has been widely applied in several fields including inspection of composite materials (CM), specially the fiber-reinforced polymer matrix ones. Consequently, it is important to develop and improve efficient NDT techniques to inspect and assess the quality of CM parts in order to warranty airworthiness and, at the same time, reduce costs of airline companies. In this paper, active IRT is used to inspect carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) at laminate with artificial inserts (built-in sample) placed on different layers prior to the manufacture. Two optical active IRT are used. The first is pulsed thermography (PT) which is the most widely utilized IRT technique. The second is a line-scan thermography (LST) technique: a dynamic technique, which can be employed for the inspection of materials by heating a component, line-by-line, while acquiring a series of thermograms with an infrared camera. It is especially suitable for inspection of large parts as well as complex shaped parts. A computational model developed using COMSOL Multiphysics® was used in order to simulate the inspections. Sequences obtained from PT and LST were processed using principal component thermography (PCT) for comparison. Results showed that it is possible to detect insertions of different sizes at different depths using both PT and LST IRT techniques.

  15. Dynamic and static thermal study of micromachined heaters: the advantages of visible and near-infrared thermography compared to classical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssieux, D.; Briand, D.; Charnay, J.; de Rooij, N. F.; Cretin, B.

    2008-06-01

    We report on the dynamic and static thermal characterization of microsystems using a visible and near-infrared (NIR) thermography system based on a low-cost standard CCD sensor. The interest of this method is that it is possible to obtain a true spatial resolution better than 500 nm, which is necessary in high spatial resolution applications (microsystem applications). Another interesting point of this optical method is that the temperature error versus the emissivity error is always very low (compared to infrared thermography). We show, in this study, that this behavior originates in the high sensitivity of Planck's law in this wavelength range (compared to infrared range). Thus, we demonstrate the principal advantages of this method for micromachined heater application. Thermal measurements (in dynamic and static modes) were performed on micro-heaters commonly used in microsystems, platinum- and silicon-based micromachined heaters. The results show the capability of the method in terms of the thermal resolution and spatial resolution as well as the capacity to quickly obtain static and dynamic thermal images of the studied sample.

  16. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  17. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors.

    PubMed

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  18. Remote sensing in environmental police investigations: aerial platforms and an innovative application of thermography to detect several illegal activities.

    PubMed

    Lega, M; Ferrara, C; Persechino, G; Bishop, P

    2014-12-01

    Being able to identify the environmental crimes and the guilty parties is central to police investigations, and new technologies enable the authorities to do this faster and more accurately than ever before. In recent years, our research team has introduced the use of a range of aerial platforms and an innovative application of thermography to detect several illegal activities; for example, illegal sanitary sewer and storm-drain connections, illicit wastewater discharges, and other "anomalies" on surface waters can be easily identified using their thermal infrared signatures. It can also be used to detect illegal solid/liquid waste dumps or illicit air discharges. This paper introduces first results of a Thermal Pattern and Thermal Tracking approach that can be used to identify different phenomena and several pollutants. The aims of this paper were to introduce a fingerprint paradigm for environmental police investigations, defining several specific signatures (patterns) that permit the identification of an illicit/anomalous activity, and establish a procedure to use this information to find the correlation (tracking) between the crime and the culprit or the source and the target. PMID:25154683

  19. Imaging the local forward current density of solar cells by dynamical precision contact thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Breitenstein, O.; Eberhardt, W.; Iwig, K.

    1994-12-31

    In spite of many techniques of measuring the local lifetime or the local short circuit current, no non-destructive technique has been available for imaging the local forward current density, which determines the open circuit voltage and the fill factor of solar cells. The authors demonstrate the application of a new analyzing technique, enabling non-destructive shunt hunting in forward direction. A periodical forward current is applied to the cell, and only the dynamical temperature response is measured in contact mode with a resolution below 10 {micro}K. Mechanical scanning of the T-sensor position yields a thermogram with a spatial resolution well below 1 mm and a current density resolution well below 1 mA/cm{sup 2}. First results show that both the edges of solar cells and their interior may have sites of a locally increased forward current. Hot spots measured in reverse bias direction only occasionally coincide with these warm spots measured in forward direction.

  20. IR Thermography NDE of ISS Radiator Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay; Winfree, William; Morton, Richard; Wilson, Walter; Reynolds, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The presentation covers an active and a passive infrared (IR) thermography for detection of delaminations in the radiator panels used for the International Space Station (ISS) program. The passive radiator IR data was taken by a NASA astronaut in an extravehicular activity (EVA) using a modified FLIR EVA hand-held camera. The IR data could be successfully analyzed to detect gross facesheet disbonds. The technique used the internal hot fluid tube as the heat source in analyzing the IR data. Some non-flight ISS radiators were inspected using an active technique of IR flash thermography to detect disbond of face sheet with honeycomb core, and debonds in facesheet overlap areas. The surface temperature and radiated heat emission from flight radiators is stable during acquisition of the IR video data. This data was analyzed to detect locations of unexpected surface temperature gradients. The flash thermography data was analyzed using derivative analysis and contrast evolutions. Results of the inspection are provided.

  1. Electro-thermography technique for nondestructive testing (NDT) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Hung, Y. Y.; Liu, L.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, Electro-Thermography is introduced in nondestructive testing applications. Electro-Thermography is one of the novel active thermography techniques for nondestructive testing. It gains the advantages from the optical and electromagnetic properties in full-field, non-contact, high inspection speed, and sensitivity in geometry variation. It is mostly applicable to all kind of ferrous-metal, some composites materials. A fundamental difference among electro-thermography and other active thermography techniques are the excitation mechanism. Electro-Thermography is a combination of the electromagnetic induction and surface thermal radiation measuring technique; it used the induction method to excite the object, and then it used the radiation properties to measure the distribution of surface temperature of the object. It detects flaws by the flaw's anomalous heating and heat transfer response. The method of excitation is also different from others irradiation excitation. Electro-Thermography needs an electromagnetic coil to generate eddy current through induction to change the surface and subsurface temperature. Electro-Thermography can detect surface and sub-surface flaws, unless the flaw is too remote and tiny from the surface. Some experiments in flaw detections and other types of inspections are demonstrated.

  2. Subsurface defect detection in first layer of pavement structure and reinforced civil engineering structure by FRP bonding using active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean; Ibos, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    In many countries road network ages while road traffic and maintenance costs increase. Nowadays, thousand and thousand kilometers of roads are each year submitted to surface distress survey. They generally lean on pavement surface imaging measurement techniques, mainly in the visible spectrum, coupled with visual inspection or image processing detection of emergent distresses. Nevertheless, optimisation of maintenance works and costs requires an early detection of defects within the pavement structure when they still are hidden from surface. Accordingly, alternative measurement techniques for pavement monitoring are currently under investigation (seismic methods, step frequency radar). On the other hand, strengthening or retrofitting of reinforced concrete structures by externally bonded Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) systems is now a commonly accepted and widespread technique. However, the use of bonding techniques always implies following rigorous installing procedures. To ensure the durability and long-term performance of the FRP reinforcements, conformance checking through an in situ auscultation of the bonded FRP systems is then highly suitable. The quality-control program should involve a set of adequate inspections and tests. Visual inspection and acoustic sounding (hammer tap) are commonly used to detect delaminations (disbonds) but are unable to provide sufficient information about the depth (in case of multilayered composite) and width of debonded areas. Consequently, rapid and efficient inspection methods are also required. Among the non destructive methods under study, active infrared thermography was investigated both for pavement and civil engineering structures through experiments in laboratory and numerical simulations, because of its ability to be also used on field. Pulse Thermography (PT), Pulse Phase Thermography (PPT) and Principal Component Thermography (PCT) approaches have been tested onto pavement samples and CFRP bonding on concrete

  3. Automated Induction Thermography of Generator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldammer, M.; Mooshofer, H.; Rothenfusser, M.; Bass, J.; Vrana, J.

    2010-02-01

    Using Active Thermography defects such as cracks can be detected fast and reliably. Choosing from a wide range of excitation techniques the method can be adapted to a number of tasks in non-destructive evaluation. Induction thermography is ideally suited for testing metallic components for cracks at or close to the surface. In power generation a number of components are subjected to high loads and stresses—therefore defect detection is crucial for a safe operation of the engines. Apart from combustion turbines this also applies to generators: At regular inspection intervals even small cracks have to be detected to avoid crack growth and consequently failure of the component. As an imaging technique thermography allows for a fast 100% testing of the complete surface of all relevant parts. An automated setup increases the cost effectiveness of induction thermography significantly. Time needed to test a single part is reduced, the number of tested parts per shift is increased, and cost for testing is reduced significantly. In addition, automation guarantees a reliable testing procedure which detects all critical defects. We present how non-destructive testing can be automated using as an example an industrial application at the Siemens sector Energy, and a new induction thermography setup for generator components.

  4. Induction and Conduction Thermography: Optimizing the Electromagnetic Excitation Towards Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrana, J.; Goldammer, M.; Bailey, K.; Rothenfusser, M.; Arnold, W.

    2009-03-01

    Active thermography, using electromagnetic excitation, allows detecting defects like cracks which distort the flow of current in the component under examination. Like other thermography techniques it is rapid and reliably utilizing infrared imaging. Electric current can be used in two ways for thermography: In induction thermography a current is coupled to the component by passing an AC current through a coil which is in close proximity to the component inspected, while in conduction thermography the current is coupled directly into the component. In this paper, the specific advantages of both coupling methods are discussed, including the efficiency of the coupling and optimization strategies for testing and also the necessary algorithms required to analyze the data. Taking these considerations into account a number of different systems for laboratory and practical application were developed.

  5. Thermography in undescended testes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghoff, Ruben; Sarti, Fernando; Urrutia, Azucena; Renee, Marcela; Lluesma, Eliseo G.

    2001-03-01

    Are one of the pathologies more frequent in infant surgery - intra-abdominal, inguinal or ectopic. With actual methods of diagnosis some inguinal and none of the abdominal are detectable. Change of temperature is one of the elements to explain the detection in the maturity and development of the testes. Hormonal stimuli are used to obtain the increase in the development and descent of the testis. In this research we will test if thermography can be an effective technology for the diagnosis in the localization and morphology testicular. Another important feature will be to test if thermography may detect some of the stimulus testis with induction hormonal.

  6. Nondestructive testing with thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Tarpani, José Ricardo; Maldague, Xavier P. V.

    2013-11-01

    Thermography is a nondestructive testing (NDT) technique based on the principle that two dissimilar materials, i.e., possessing different thermo-physical properties, would produce two distinctive thermal signatures that can be revealed by an infrared sensor, such as a thermal camera. The fields of NDT applications are expanding from classical building or electronic components monitoring to more recent ones such as inspection of artworks or composite materials. Furthermore, thermography can be conveniently used as a didactic tool for physics education in universities given that it provides the possibility of visualizing fundamental principles, such as thermal physics and mechanics among others.

  7. Thermography in Neurologic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Eduardo Borba; Vilaça-Alves, José; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor Machado

    2015-01-01

    One kind of medical images that has been developed in the last decades is thermal images. These images are assessed by infrared cameras and have shown an exponential development in recent years. In this sense, the aim of this study was to describe possibilities of thermography usage in the neurologic practice. It was performed a systematic review in Web of Knowledge (Thompson Reuters), set in all databases which used two combination of keywords as “topic”: “thermography” and “neurology”; and “thermography” and “neurologic”. The chronological period was defined from 2000 to 2014 (the least 15 years). Among the studies included in this review, only seven were with experimental design. It is few to bring thermography as a daily tool in clinical practice. However, these studies have suggested good results. The studies of review and an analyzed patent showed that the authors consider the thermography as a diagnostic tool and they recommend its usage. It can be concluded that thermography is already used as a diagnostic and monitoring tool of patients with neuropathies, particularly in complex regional pain syndrome, and stroke. And yet, this tool has great potential for future research about its application in diagnosis of other diseases of neurological origin. PMID:26191090

  8. [The instrument for thermography].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Shinsuke

    2014-07-01

    Thermography is an imaging method using the instrument to detect infrared rays emitted from the body surface, and to plot them as a distribution diagram of the temperature information. Therefore, a thermographic instrument can be assumed to measure the skin temperature of the diseased region. Such an instrument is a useful device for noninvasive and objective assessment of various diseases. Examination using a thermographic instrument can assess the autonomic dysfunction by measuring the skin blood flow involved with the sympathetic innervation. Thermography is useful in assisting the determination of the therapeutic effect. However, autonomic dysfunction should be confirmed correctly with the assessment of thermatome that shows abnormal thermal distribution in the region of the disease. Thermography should make noticeable the difference between the body temperature of abnormal and normal sites, and show the alteration of temperature. Monitoring using thermography is useful to determine the effect of sympathetic nerve block. If a thermographic instrument is used, it is important that examiners should understand the function of the instrument, as well as its advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25098130

  9. Applying Active Thermography in the Non-Destructive Investigation of Historical Objects/ Zastosowanie Termowizji Aktywnej Do Badań Nieniszczących Obiektów Zabytkowych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Henryk; Noszczyk, Paweł

    2015-06-01

    The paper pertains to the problem of historic building envelope investigation with the use of active thermography. Mainly emphasized is its application in the detection of different material inclusions in historic walls. Examples of active thermography in the reflective mode application and a description of the experimental investigation has been shown on a wall model with the inclusion of materials with significantly different thermal conductivity and heat capacity, i.e. styrofoam, steel and granite. Thermograms received for every kind of envelope are compared and analyzed. Finally, the summary and conclusion is shown along with the prospects of development and practical application of this kind of investigation in historic construction. Artykuł porusza zagadnienie wykorzystania termografii aktywnej w nieniszczących badaniach przegród budowlanych w obiektach zabytkowych. Opisane zostały potencjalne możliwości stosowania badań, takie jak: lokalizacja rodzaju zbrojenia w elementach żelbetowych, detekcja pustek powietrznych i przemurowań w przegrodach, określanie rodzaju struktury materiałowej zabytkowej przegrody lub identyfikacja ukrytych pod wartwą tynku lub farby malowideł ściennych. W pracy opisano przebieg doświadczenia z wykorzystaniem termografii aktywnej w trybie odbiciowym. W badanych modelach przegród, wewnętrzne wtrącenia materiałowe zostały wykonane ze styropianu XPS, stali oraz granitu. Otrzymane wyniki opisano za pomocą kontrastów temperaturowych (absolutny i standardowy) oraz zinterptretowano otrzymane termogramy. W podsumowaniu przedstawiono wnioski z przeprowadzonego doświadczenia. W artykule potwierdzono przydatność nieniszczących badań za pomocą termowizji aktywnej do detekcji przypowierzchniowych wtrąceń materiałowych.

  10. Pulsed thermography in multiple infrared spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzelmann, U.; Abuhamad, M.

    2010-03-01

    Spectrally resolved active thermography by flash pulse excitation was performed in four sub-bands of a mid-wave infrared camera using spectral filtering and in the full long-wave band of a second infrared camera. On zirconia thermal barrier coatings on steel and PVC blocks, spectrally dependent decay rates of the thermal contrast were found. The observed behaviour can be explained by the infrared spectra of the specimens.

  11. Infrared Thermography And The Expert Witness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Charles C.

    1985-03-01

    With the continued growth of legal activities involving litigation, lawsuits involving technical matters may be very complex. Expert witnesses are often hired by both plaintiffs and defendants to help clarify and simplify technical merits of a case in order for the jury to make an educated decision. The usage of infrared thermography in legal matters has also been growing. This paper reviews several areas where infrared thermography has been utilized in legal matters. These include analysis of building defects, fire analysis and equipment failures. Expert witness qualifications, test procedures and analyses are discussed. The role of industry and governmental standards is reviewed. Opinions from the infrared thermographic expert should be unbiased, factual and within the area of qualification of the expert.

  12. Aerial thermography for energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal infrared scanning from an aircraft is a convenient and commercially available means for determining relative rates of energy loss from building roofs. The need to conserve energy as fuel costs makes the mass survey capability of aerial thermography an attractive adjunct to community energy awareness programs. Background information on principles of aerial thermography is presented. Thermal infrared scanning systems, flight and environmental requirements for data acquisition, preparation of thermographs for display, major users and suppliers of thermography, and suggested specifications for obtaining aerial scanning services were reviewed.

  13. Department of National Defence's use of thermography for facilities maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittson, John E.

    1990-03-01

    Since the late seventies DND through the Director General Works has been actively encouraging the use of thermography as an efficient and effective technique for supporting preventive maintenance quality assurance and energy conservation programs at Canadian Forces Bases (CFBs). This paper will provide an overview of DND''s experiences in the utilization of thermography for facilities maintenance applications. 1. HISTORICAL MILESTONES The following are milestones of DND''s use of thermography: a. Purchase of Infrared Equipment In 1976/77 DND purchased five AGA 750 Infrared Thermovision Systems which were distributed to commands. In 1980/81/82 six AGA liOs five AGA TPT8Os two AGA 782s and one AGA 720 were acquired. Finally DND also purchased seven AGEMA 870 systems during 1987/88. b. First and Second Interdepartaental Building Thermography Courses In 1978 and 1980 DND hosted two building thermography courses that were conducted by Public Works Canada. c. CE Thermographer Specialist Training Courses DND developed a training standard in 1983 for Construction Engineering (CE) Thermographer qualification which included all CE applications of thermography. The first annual inhouse training course was conducted at CFB Borden Ontario in 1984. These are now being conducted at the CFB Chilliwack Detachment in Vernon British Columbia. 2 . MARKETING FACILITIES MAINTENANCE IR Of paramount importance for successfully developing DND appreciation for thermography was providing familiarization training to CE staff at commands and bases. These threeday presentations emphasized motivational factors conducting thermographic surveys and utilizing infrared data of roofs electrical/mechanical systems heating plants steam distribution and building enclosures. These factors consisted mainly of the following objectives: a. preventive maintenance by locating deficiencies to be repaired b. quality assurance by verification of workmanship materials and design c. energy conservation by locating

  14. Heat flux sensors for infrared thermography in convective heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  15. Heat Flux Sensors for Infrared Thermography in Convective Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  16. Techniques of infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Jatteau, M

    1975-01-01

    Considering the main objectives of thermographic techniques and the particular characteristics of passive infrared detection, the essential arguments in favor of single detector scanners have been pointed out after a brief discussion of the detection and image pickup methods when quantitative and precise (0.1 degrees C) information on the temperature distribution near ambient temperature must be obtained. Single detector scanners can have sufficiently good performance to reach the objectives of precise thermography, but their real technical limits must be well-known in practice; consequently, the thermograph performance must be clearly defined by means of the modulation transfer function, the intrinsic thermal resolution and the response uniformity, as we indicate in the second part of this paper. PMID:1180865

  17. Thermography in ocular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kawali, Ankush A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate ocular inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions using commercially available thermal camera. Materials and Methods: A non-contact thermographic camera (FLIR P 620) was used to take thermal pictures of seven cases of ocular inflammation, two cases of non-inflammatory ocular pathology, and one healthy subject with mild refractive error only. Ocular inflammatory cases included five cases of scleritis, one case of postoperative anterior uveitis, and a case of meibomian gland dysfunction with keratitis (MGD-keratitis). Non-inflammatory conditions included a case of conjunctival benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (BRLH) and a case of central serous chorio-retinopathy. Thermal and non-thermal photographs were taken, and using analyzing software, the ocular surface temperature was calculated. Results: Patient with fresh episode of scleritis revealed high temperature. Eyes with MGD-keratitis depicted lower temperature in clinically more affected eye. Conjunctival BRLH showed a cold lesion on thermography at the site of involvement, in contrast to cases of scleritis with similar clinical presentation. Conclusion: Ocular thermal imaging is an underutilized diagnostic tool which can be used to distinguish inflammatory ocular conditions from non-inflammatory conditions. It can also be utilized in the evaluation of tear film in dry eye syndrome. Its applications should be further explored in uveitis and other ocular disorders. Dedicated “ocular thermographic” camera is today's need of the hour. PMID:24347863

  18. Thermography in Occlusive Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mawdsley, C.; Samuel, E.; Sumerling, M. D.; Young, G. B.

    1968-01-01

    Cooling of the skin over the medial supraorbital region in 80% of patients who have an occlusion or severe stenosis of a carotid artery can be demonstrated by facial thermography. Minor stenotic lesions in the carotid arteries do not produce characteristic thermographic changes, while thermography is of no help in the diagnosis of vertebrobasilar arterial disease. Thermographic changes suggestive of carotid arterial lesions are found occasionally in patients whose angiograms are normal, owing to variations in the size of the frontal sinuses, or factors such as fever or inflammatory lesions. It is suggested that facial thermography is of value in the preliminary investigation of patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:5676953

  19. Tracking dynamic team activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tambe, M.

    1996-12-31

    AI researchers are striving to build complex multi-agent worlds with intended applications ranging from the RoboCup robotic soccer tournaments, to interactive virtual theatre, to large-scale real-world battlefield simulations. Agent tracking - monitoring other agent`s actions and inferring their higher-level goals and intentions - is a central requirement in such worlds. While previous work has mostly focused on tracking individual agents, this paper goes beyond by focusing on agent teams. Team tracking poses the challenge of tracking a team`s joint goals and plans. Dynamic, real-time environments add to the challenge, as ambiguities have to be resolved in real-time. The central hypothesis underlying the present work is that an explicit team-oriented perspective enables effective team tracking. This hypothesis is instantiated using the model tracing technology employed in tracking individual agents. Thus, to track team activities, team models are put to service. Team models are a concrete application of the joint intentions framework and enable an agent to track team activities, regardless of the agent`s being a collaborative participant or a non-participant in the team. To facilitate real-time ambiguity resolution with team models: (i) aspects of tracking are cast as constraint satisfaction problems to exploit constraint propagation techniques; and (ii) a cost minimality criterion is applied to constrain tracking search. Empirical results from two separate tasks in real-world, dynamic environments one collaborative and one competitive - are provided.

  20. Veterinary applications of infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Rekant, Steven I; Lyons, Mark A; Pacheco, Juan M; Arzt, Jonathan; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal body temperature is a major indicator of disease; infrared thermography (IRT) can assess changes in body surface temperature quickly and remotely. This technology can be applied to a myriad of diseases of various etiologies across a wide range of host species in veterinary medicine. It is used to monitor the physiologic status of individual animals, such as measuring feed efficiency or diagnosing pregnancy. Infrared thermography has applications in the assessment of animal welfare, and has been used to detect soring in horses and monitor stress responses. This review addresses the variety of uses for IRT in veterinary medicine, including disease detection, physiologic monitoring, welfare assessment, and potential future applications. PMID:26709943

  1. Airborne infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Geoffrey M.

    2003-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of utilizing an IR imaging system to support flow visualization studies, an initial series of tests were conducted using an AN/AAS-38, NITE Hawk targeting pod. The targeting pod, installed on the left side of an F/A-18 aircraft provides a stabilized infrared imaging capability in the 8-12 micron spectral band. Initial data acquired with system indicated that IR thermography was a very promising tool for flow visualization. For the next phase of the investigation, an advanced version of the NITE Hawk targeting pod equipped with a staring 3-5 micron sensor was utilized. Experimental results obtained with this sensor indicated improved sensitivity and resolution. This method was limited to position the experiment and chase aircraft sufficiently close to each other and with the sightline angle required to acquire the region of interest. For the current phase of the investigation, the proven 3-5 micron staring sensor was deployed in an externally mounted podlet, located on the experimental aircraft with a fixed line of sight, centered on the region of interest. Based on initial data collection efforts, this approach appears to provide consistent high quality data for a wide range of flight conditions. To minimize the size of the podlet and resultant drag, the sensor was oriented parallel to the air flow. This also placed the line of sight parallel to the experiment. A fold mirror was incorporated in the design to fold the line of sight inboard and down to center on the region of interest. The experimental results obtained during the current test phase have provided consistently high quality images clearly mapping regions of laminar and turbulent flow. Several examples of these images and further details of the experimental approach are presented.

  2. Veterinary applications of infrared thermography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abnormal temperature is a major indicator of disease; infrared thermography (IRT) can assess changes in surface temperature quickly and remotely. This technology can be applied to myriad diseases in veterinary medicine, ranging across host species and disease etiologies. It can also be used to deter...

  3. Experimental developments towards an ITER thermography diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichle, R.; Brichard, B.; Escourbiac, F.; Gardarein, J. L.; Hernandez, D.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.; Serra, J. J.; Badie, J. M.; van Ierschot, S.; Jouve, M.; Martinez, S.; Ooms, H.; Pocheau, C.; Rauber, X.; Sans, J. L.; Scheer, E.; Berghmans, F.; Decréton, M.

    2007-06-01

    In the course of the development of a concept for a spectrally resolving thermography diagnostic for the ITER divertor using optical fibres experimental development work has been carried out in three different areas. Firstly ZrF4 fibres and hollow fibres (silica capillaries with internal AG/AgJ coating) were tested in a Co60 irradiation facility under γ irradiation up to doses of 5 kGy and 27 kGy, respectively. The ZrF4 fibres suffered more radiation induced degradation (>1 db/m) then the hollow fibres (0-0.4 db/m). Secondly multi-colour pyroreflectometry is being developed towards tokamak applicability. The emissivity and temperature of tungsten samples were measured in the range of 700-1500 °C. The angular working range for off normal observation of the method was 20-30°. The working distance of the method has been be increased from cm to the m range. Finally, encouraging preliminary results have been obtained concerning the application of pulsed and modulated active thermography.

  4. Active thermography for potato characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Sheng-Jen; Sun, Chih-Chen

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a semi-automated heating and scanning system and analytic method for potato characterization. Potatoes are heated using lamps in a heating chamber and then transferred on a movable fixture to an imaging chamber. A non-linear model was designed to predict which potatoes have excessive sugar defects and the model was evaluated with good results. Results from this research will benefit potato growers and manufacturers/producers of potato-based products such as chips and fries.

  5. Defect characterization by inductive heated thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noethen, Matthias; Meyendorf, Norbert

    2012-05-01

    During inductive-thermographic inspection, an eddy current of high intensity is induced into the inspected material and the thermal response is detected by an infrared camera. Anomalies in the surface temperature during and after inductive heating correspond to inhomogeneities in the material. A finite element simulation of the surface crack detection process using active thermography with inductive heating has been developed. The simulation model is based on the finite element software ANSYS. The simulation tool was tested and used for investigations on steel components with different longitudinal orientated cracks, varying in shape, width and height. This paper focuses on surface connected longitudinal orientated cracks in austenitic steel. The results show that depending on the excitation frequency the temperature distribution of the material under test are different and a possible way to measure the depth of the crack will be discussed.

  6. Active Control of Engine Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    Active control can alleviate design constraints and improve the response to operational requirements in gas turbines. The Course presented the state-of-the-art including experimental, theoretical knowledge and practical information. Topics treated: stability characteristics; active control approaches; robustness and fundamental limits; combustion systems processes; combustor dynamics; compression system dynamics models; diagnostics and control of compression instabilities; sensor and actuator architectures; R&D needs of future prospects. The course has shown that for combustion systems, as well as in actuator and sensor technologies the active control approach is a viable option even at full scale with potential for aero engines and air breathing missiles.

  7. Inspection of composite structures using line scanning thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Obdulia; Butera, Manny; Godinez, Valery

    2012-06-01

    This work deals with the non destructive analysis of different composite parts and structures using Line Scanning Thermography (LST), a non-contact inspection method based in dynamic thermography. The LST technique provides a quick and efficient methodology to scan wide areas rapidly; the technique has been used on the inspection of composite propellers, sandwich panels, motor case tubes and wind turbine blades, among others. In LST a line heat source is used to thermally excite the surface under study while an infrared detector records the transient surface temperature variation of the heated region. Line Scanning Thermography (LST), has successfully been applied to determine the thickness of metallic plates and to assess boiler tube thinning. In this paper the LST protocols developed for the detection of sub-surface defects in different composite materials commonly used in aerospace applications, plates will be presented. In most cases the thermal images acquired using LST will be compared with ultrasonic c-scans. The fundamentals of LST will be discussed, as well as the limitations of this technique for NDT inspection.

  8. On line sensing of weld penetration using infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Chin, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research is to apply new sensing techniques, artificial intelligence, and robotics to improve the welding process through control of penetration depth and width parameters. By producing a constant depth and width of penetration through on line control, the quality and strength of welds may be improved to a new level of reliability previously unobtainable. Experimental data presented in this paper indicate that depth and width of penetration can be monitored by infrared thermography and hence controlled dynamically during the weld process. Infrared thermography is used to monitor surface temperature distributions in the vicinity of the molten metal pool. Characteristics of temperature distributions perpendicular to the direction of arc travel are analyzed and correlated with weld bead width and depth as measured by destructive examination after the weld production. The results show that there is a linear relationship between peak weld plate surface temperature and depth of penetration. Additionally, surface puddle width is found to be directly correlated to measured distance separating solidus temperatures of the molten metal as measured by infrared thermography.

  9. On Line Sensing Of Weld Penetration Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwen; Chin, B. A.

    1986-10-01

    The objective of this research is to apply new sensing techniques, artificial intelligence, and robotics to improve the welding process through control of penetration depth and width parameters. By producing a constant depth and width of penetration through on line control, the quality and strength of welds may be improved to a new level of reliability previously unobtainable. Experimental data presented in this paper indicate that depth and width of penetration can be monitored by infrared thermography and hence controlled dynamically during the weld process. Infrared thermography is used to monitor surface temperature distributions in the vicinity of the molten metal pool. Characteristics of temperature distributions perpendicular to the direction of arc travel are analyzed and correlated with weld bead width and depth as measured by destructive examination after the weld production. The results show that there is a linear relationship between peak weld plate surface temperature and depth of penetration. Additionally, surface puddle width is found to be directly correlated to measured distance separating solidus temperatures of the molten metal as measured by infrared thermography.

  10. Crack detection by stimulated infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the potential of stimulated infrared thermography is studied for the detection of cracks located in metallic materials. To start with, the feasibility of the method is shown with the use of numerical simulations. Stimulated infrared thermography allows detecting emerging cracks in samples whether reflective or not as well as non-emerging cracks. In addition, crack detection is due to the radiative effects and/or the thermal effects induced by the defects. Then, the experimental device implemented for the study is detailed. Finally, experiments confirm that stimulated infrared thermography enables to detect microscopic cracks, whether emerging or non-emerging, in metal samples.

  11. Reliable aerial thermography for energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.; Bowman, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A method for energy conservation, the aerial thermography survey, is discussed. It locates sources of energy losses and wasteful energy management practices. An operational map is presented for clear sky conditions. The map outlines the key environmental conditions conductive to obtaining reliable aerial thermography. The map is developed from defined visual and heat loss discrimination criteria which are quantized based on flat roof heat transfer calculations.

  12. Use of infra-red thermography for automotive climate control analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, S.D.; Hassani, V.; Penney, T.R.

    1994-03-01

    In this paper, several automotive climate control applications for IR thermography are described. Some of these applications can be performed using conventional IR techniques. Others, such as visualizing the air temperature distribution within the cabin, at duct exits, and at heater and evaporator faces, require new experimental methods. In order to capture the temperature distribution within an airstream, a 0.25-mm-thick (0.01 inch) fiberglass screen is used. This screen can be positioned perpendicular or parallel to the flow to obtain three-dimensional spatial measurements. In many cases, the air flow pattern can be inferred from the resulting temperature distribution, allowing improved air distribution designs. In all cases, significant improvement in the speed, ease, and quantity of temperature distribution information can be realized with thermography as compared to conventional thermocouple array techniques. Comparisons are presented between IR thermography images and both thermocouple measurements and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions.

  13. Trends in quantitative aerial thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Schott, J.R.; Wilkinson, E.P.

    1983-06-01

    Recent improvements in aerial thermographic techniques, particularly in achievable spatial resolution and noise equivalent temperature variation, have enabled the use of thermography in a more objective fashion. Interpretation of the information contained in thermograms has also been improved through the use of certain techniques accounting for roof material type (emissivity), background effects, and atmospheric variables. With current methods, roof surface temperature from aerial imagery can be measured to within 1.8/sup 0/F (1.0/sup 0/C) of the actual temperature. These advances in thermogram analysis have opened the door for potential direct measurement of rooftop heat-loss levels from thermogram data. Ultimately, it is felt that this type of information would make it feasible to direct intensive energy-conservation efforts toward a smaller population, where the need and cost benefits will be the greatest.

  14. Dynamics of active actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Simone

    2014-03-01

    Local mechanical and structural properties of a eukaryotic cell are determined by its cytoskeleton. To adapt to their environment, cells rely on constant self-organized rearrangement processes of their actin cytoskeleton. To shed light on the principles underlying these dynamic self-organization processes we investigate a minimal reconstituted active system consisting of actin filaments, crosslinking molecules and molecular motor filaments. Using quantitative fluorescence microscopy and image analysis, we show, that these minimal model systems exhibit a generic structure formation mechanism. The competition between force generation by molecular motors and the stabilization of the network by crosslinking proteins results in a highly dynamic reorganization process which is characterized by anomalous transport dynamics with a superdiffusive behavior also found in intracellular dynamics. In vitro, these dynamics are governed by chemical and physical parameters that alter the balance of motor and crosslinking proteins, such as pH. These findings can be expected to have broad implications in our understanding of cytoskeletal regulation in vivo.

  15. Dynamics of active semiflexible polymers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Gov, N S

    2014-09-01

    Active fluctuations, driven by processes that consume ATP, are prevalent in living cells and are mostly driven by different forms of molecular motors. Such motors often move and transmit forces along biopolymers, which in general can be treated as semiflexible chains. We present a theoretical analysis of the active (out of thermal equilibrium) fluctuation of semiflexible polymers, using both analytical and simulation methods. We find that enhanced diffusion, even superdiffusive, occurs in a well-defined temporal regime, defined by the thermal modes of the chain and the typical timescale of the activity. In addition, we find a dynamic resonance-like condition between the elastic modes of the chain and the duration of the active force, which leads to enhanced spatial correlation of local displacements. These results are in qualitative agreement with observations of cytoskeletal biopolymers, and were recently observed for the dynamics of chromatin in interphase cells. We therefore propose that the interplay between elasticity and activity is driving long-range correlations in our model system, and may also be manifest inside living cells. PMID:25185542

  16. An investigation of dynamic failure events in steels using full field high-speed infrared thermography and high-speed photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guduru, Pradeep R.

    An infrared (IR) imaging system has been developed for measuring the temperature increase during the dynamic deformation of materials. The system consists of an 8 x 8 HgCdTe focal plane array, each with its own preamplifier. Outputs from all 64 signals are simultaneously acquired and held using a bank of track and hold amplifiers. An array of eight 8:1 multiplexers then routes the signals to eight 10MHz digitizers, acquiring data from each row of detectors in parallel. The maximum rate is one million frames per second. Crack tip temperature rise during dynamic deformation is known to alter the fracture mechanisms and consequently the fracture toughness of a material. However, no direct experimental measurements have ever been made to determine the same because of limited diagnostic tools. By transcending the existing experimental limitations, this investigation presents detailed, real time evolution of the transient crack tip temperature fields in two different steels (C300 and HY100 steels), using the 2-D high speed IR camera. The crack tip temperature rise at initiation in C300 steel was found to be about 55K. In case of HY100, which is a highly ductile steel, the crack tip temperature rise was above 200K and was seen to be a strong function of loading rate. HRR elastic-plastic singular field has been used to extract J integral evolution from the measured temperature field. An experimental investigation has been conducted to study the initiation and propagation characteristics of dynamic shear bands in C300 maraging steel. Pre-fatigued single edge notched specimens were impacted on the edge under the notch to produce shear dominated mixed mode stress fields. The optical technique of coherent gradient sensing (CGS) was employed to study the evolution of the mixed mode stress intensity factors. Simultaneously, a newly developed high speed IR camera was employed to obtain the temperature field evolution during the initiation and propagation of the shear bands. The

  17. Bridge concrete deteriorating diagnosis by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hiroki; Fukuyama, Nobuhiro; Sakuma, Joji; Mochizuki, Jun; Kimura, Yukinori

    2006-04-01

    Bridge is indispensable as social overhead capital. In the past, concrete construction was believed to be semi-permanent. Actually, however, concrete is deteriorated by various factors including seawater damage, annual temperature change, etc. Therefore, it is now obvious that maintenance and management are essential to keep performance of the bridge. In Japan, we had many reports of using infrared thermography for diagnosis of building, mainly for delamination of tile and mortar used for surface of the building for more than 10 years. In recent years, infrared thermogrephy is more actively used for delamination of surface of the bridge. Passive method is usually used for open-air concrete structure diagnosis, which utilizes intraday environmental temperature change and/or radiation energy emitted from the sun which create delta-T of delamination portion of the concrete structure. It is very important to take thermal image at right conditions. Otherwise, you may easily fall onto false diagnosis. In our presentation, many case examples and study of thermal data will be shown, which are taken at the right condition.

  18. Crack depth determination with inductive thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald-Tranta, B.; Schmidt, R.

    2015-05-01

    Castings, forgings and other steel products are nowadays usually tested with magnetic particle inspection, in order to detect surface cracks. An alternative method is active thermography with inductive heating, which is quicker, it can be well automated and as in this paper presented, even the depth of a crack can be estimated. The induced eddy current, due to its very small penetration depth in ferro-magnetic materials, flows around a surface crack, heating this selectively. The surface temperature is recorded during and after the short inductive heating pulse with an infrared camera. Using Fourier transformation the whole IR image sequence is evaluated and the phase image is processed to detect surface cracks. The level and the local distribution of the phase around a crack correspond to its depth. Analytical calculations were used to model the signal distribution around cracks with different depth and a relationship has been derived between the depth of a crack and its phase value. Additionally, also the influence of the heating pulse duration has been investigated. Samples with artificial and with natural cracks have been tested. Results are presented comparing the calculated and measured phase values depending on the crack depth. Keywords: inductive heating, eddy current, infrared

  19. Open crack depth sizing by laser stimulated infrared lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedala, Y.; Streza, M.; Roger, J.-P.; Tessier, G.; Boué, C.

    2014-11-01

    Recent advances in infrared imaging have made active thermography an interesting non destructive technique for sub-surface defect detection. Here, we present a method for the estimation of the depth of open surface defects by infrared lock-in thermography, based on the relation between the crack depth and the Laplacian of the surface temperature distribution induced by a local heating using a laser. A comparison to numerical finite element modelling for different depths allows an accurate determination of fatigue crack depth in Inconel alloy test blocks.

  20. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  1. Technologies of high-performance thermography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, R.; Cabanski, Wolfgang A.; Mauk, K. H.; Kock, R.; Rode, W.

    1997-08-01

    A family of 2 dimensional detection modules based on 256 by 256 and 486 by 640 platinum silicide (PtSi) focal planes, or 128 by 128 and 256 by 256 mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) focal planes for applications in either the 3 - 5 micrometer (MWIR) or 8 - 10 micrometer (LWIR) range was recently developed by AIM. A wide variety of applications is covered by the specific features unique for these two material systems. The PtSi units provide state of the art correctability with long term stable gain and offset coefficients. The MCT units provide extremely fast frame rates like 400 Hz with snapshot integration times as short as 250 microseconds and with a thermal resolution NETD less than 20 mK for e.g. the 128 by 128 LWIR module. The unique design idea general for all of these modules is the exclusively digital interface, using 14 bit analog to digital conversion to provide state of the art correctability, access to highly dynamic scenes without any loss of information and simplified exchangeability of the units. Device specific features like bias voltages etc. are identified during the final test and stored in a memory on the driving electronics. This concept allows an easy exchange of IDCAs of the same type without any need for tuning or e.g. the possibility to upgrade a PtSi based unit to an MCT module by just loading the suitable software. Miniaturized digital signal processor (DSP) based image correction units were developed for testing and operating the units with output data rates of up to 16 Mpixels/s. These boards provide the ability for freely programmable realtime functions like two point correction and various data manipulations in thermography applications.

  2. Fabrication of 0.0075-Scale Orbiter Phosphor Thermography Test Models for Shuttle RTF Aeroheating Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Powers, Michael A.; Griffith, Mark S.; Hopins, John W.; Veneris, Pete H.; Kuykendoll, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    This report details the techniques and fidelity associated with aeroheating models constructed in support of the return-to-flight boundary layer transition (BLT) activity for STS-114. This report provides technical descriptions of the methods, materials, and equipment used, as well as the surface quality results obtained with the cast ceramic phosphor thermography models.

  3. Tone Burst Eddy-Current Thermography (tbet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ch. N. Kiran; Krishnamurthy, C. V.; Maxfield, Bruce W.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2008-02-01

    This paper reports on a Tone Burst Eddycurrent Thermography (TBET) technique that uses short-time bursts of eddy-currents induced in conducting media to generate local heating inside the material. The transient diffusion of the heat inside the material, induced by pulsed/short-time induction heating, is imaged by measuring the transient temperature profiles on the surface of the material. The presence and characteristics of the defects inside the materials changes the surface temperature transients and thus can be used for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of conducting materials. Axisymmetric numerical models of the conventional transient thermography technique are used to benchmark the TBET technique. From the temperature profile data, temperature contrast information is obtained for the different defect depths. Temperature contrast data obtained for TBET, in this process, was compared with that obtained from conventional transient thermography data. It was found that the frequency of the eddy-current and, consequently, the skin-depth of the induced field play an important role in the effective utilization of this technique. Simulation details and the experimental results are presented in the paper. Possible advantages of TBET over conventional flash thermography are also discussed and supported by experimental data.

  4. 3D thermography imaging standardization technique for inflammation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xiangyang; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Siebert, J. Paul

    2005-01-01

    We develop a 3D thermography imaging standardization technique to allow quantitative data analysis. Medical Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging is very sensitive and reliable mean of graphically mapping and display skin surface temperature. It allows doctors to visualise in colour and quantify temperature changes in skin surface. The spectrum of colours indicates both hot and cold responses which may co-exist if the pain associate with an inflammatory focus excites an increase in sympathetic activity. However, due to thermograph provides only qualitative diagnosis information, it has not gained acceptance in the medical and veterinary communities as a necessary or effective tool in inflammation and tumor detection. Here, our technique is based on the combination of visual 3D imaging technique and thermal imaging technique, which maps the 2D thermography images on to 3D anatomical model. Then we rectify the 3D thermogram into a view independent thermogram and conform it a standard shape template. The combination of these imaging facilities allows the generation of combined 3D and thermal data from which thermal signatures can be quantified.

  5. Exit Presentation: Infrared Thermography on Graphite/Epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comeaux, Kayla

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on the internship project that was accomplished during the summer of 2010. The objectives of the project were to: (1) Simulate Flash Thermography on Graphite/Epoxy Flat Bottom hole Specimen and thin void specimens, (2) Obtain Flash Thermography data on Graphite/Epoxy flat bottom hole specimens, (3) Compare experimental results with simulation results, Compare Flat Bottom Hole Simulation with Thin Void Simulation to create a graph to determine size of IR Thermography detected defects

  6. The Effect of Penetration Depth on Thermal Contrast of NDT by Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip; DiGregorio, Anthony; Russell, Samuel S.

    1999-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation by Thermography (TNDE) is generally classified into two categories, the passive approach and the active approach. The passive approach is usually performed by measuring the natural temperature difference between the ambient and the material or structure to be tested. The active approach, on the other hand, requires the application of an external energy source to stimulate the material for inspection. A laser, a heater, a hot air blower, a high power thermal pulse, mechanical, or electromagnetic energy may provide the energy sources. For the external heating method to inspect materials for defects and imperfection at ambient temperature, a very short burst of heat can be introduced to one of the surfaces or slow heating of the side opposite to the side being observed. Due to the interruption of the heat flow through the defects, the thermal images will reveal the defective area by contrasting against the surrounding good materials. This technique is called transient Thermography, pulse video Thermography, or thermal wave imaging. As an empirical rule, the radius of the smallest defect should be at least one to two times larger than its depth under the surface. Thermography is being used to inspect void, debond, impact damage, and porosity in composite materials. It has been shown that most of the defects and imperfection can be detected. However, the current method of inspection using thermographic technique is more of an art than a practical scientific and engineering approach. The success rate of determining the defect location and defect type is largely depend on the experience of the person who operates thermography system and performs the inspection. The operator has to try different type of heat source, different duration of its application time, as well as experimenting with the thermal image acquisition time and interval during the inspection process. Further-more, the complexity of the lay-up and structure of composites makes it

  7. Thermography analyses of the hole-drilling residual stress measuring technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honner, Milan; Litoš, Pavel; Švantner, Michal

    2004-03-01

    The paper deals with methods and results of thermography analyses of the hole-drilling residual stress measuring technique. Surface IR properties of the drilling mill and sample with strain gauge rosette of millimeter dimensions are determined by the emissivity and reflectivity measurements. Dynamic surface temperature field measurement is accompanied by the strain measurement during step-by-step drilling. Possible sources of errors in relation to the residual stress determination are discussed.

  8. Infrared Thermography in the Architectural Field

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography is becoming ever more popular in civil engineering/architecture mainly due to its noncontact character which includes two great advantages. On one side, it prevents the object, under inspection, from any alteration and this is worthwhile especially in the presence of precious works of art. On the other side, the personnel operate in a remote manner far away from any hazard and this complies well with safety at work regulations. What is more, it offers the possibility to quickly inspect large surfaces such as the entire facade of a building. This paper would be an overview of the use of infrared thermography in the architectural and civil engineering field. First, some basic testing procedures are described, and then some key examples are presented owing to both laboratory tests and applications in situ spanning from civil habitations to works of art and archaeological sites. PMID:24319358

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of Pulsed Thermography, Lock-in Thermography and Vibrothermography on Foreign Object Defect (FOD) in CFRP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Hai; Fernandes, Henrique; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    In this article, optical excitation thermographic techniques, including pulsed thermography and lock-in thermography, were used to detect foreign object defect (FOD) and delamination in CFRP. Then, vibrothermography as an ultrasonic excitation technique was used to detect these defects for the comparative purposes. Different image processing methods, including cold image subtraction (CIS), principal component thermography (PCT), thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR) and Fourier transform (FT), were performed. Finally, a comparison of optical excitation thermography and vibrothermography was conducted, and a thermographic probability of detection was given. PMID:27213403

  10. Quantitative Evaluation of Pulsed Thermography, Lock-in Thermography and Vibrothermography on Foreign Object Defect (FOD) in CFRP

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Hai; Fernandes, Henrique; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    In this article, optical excitation thermographic techniques, including pulsed thermography and lock-in thermography, were used to detect foreign object defect (FOD) and delamination in CFRP. Then, vibrothermography as an ultrasonic excitation technique was used to detect these defects for the comparative purposes. Different image processing methods, including cold image subtraction (CIS), principal component thermography (PCT), thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR) and Fourier transform (FT), were performed. Finally, a comparison of optical excitation thermography and vibrothermography was conducted, and a thermographic probability of detection was given. PMID:27213403

  11. Some fundamentals of handheld snow surface thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, C.; Jamieson, B.

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the concepts needed to perform snow surface thermography with a modern thermal imager. Snow-specific issues in the 7.5 to 13 μm spectrum such as ice emissivity, photographic angle, operator heating, and others receive detailed review and discussion. To illustrate the usefulness of this measurement technique, various applications are presented. These include detecting spatial temperature variation on snow pit walls and measuring the dependence of heat conduction on grain type.

  12. Some fundamentals of handheld snow surface thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, C.; Jamieson, B.

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents the concepts needed to perform snow surface thermography with a modern thermal imager. Snow-specific issues in the 7.5 to 13 μm spectrum such as ice emissivity, photographic angle, operator heating, and others receive detailed review and discussion. To illustrate the usefulness of this measurement technique, various applications are presented. These include detecting spatial temperature variation on snow pit walls and measuring the dependence of heat conduction on grain type.

  13. CFRP sandwiched facesheets inspected by pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijuan; Huo, Yan; Cai, Liangxu; Huang, Zhenhua

    2010-10-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) has been always used in aerospace, Sandwiched structures composed by a honeycomb core between two multi-layer CFRP facesheets are very common on aerospace parts. As to the application of the CFRP sandwiched facesheets is extended, The demand for quality control of CFRP sandwiched composites is increasing, Infrared thermography is one of several non-destructive testing techniques which can be used for defect detection in aircraft materials such as carbon-fibre-reinforced composites. Infrared thermography can be potentially useful, as it is quick, real time, non-contact and can examine over a relatively large area in one inspection procedure. The technique is based on heating the sample surface with different heat sources and monitoring the surface temperature of the sample with an IR camera, any abnormal behavior of the surface temperature distribution indicates the subsurface defect. This kind of structure is normally affected by anomalies such as delaminations, disbonding, water ingressing to the core. in this paper, several different kinds of defects which are of various size and depth below the test surface are planted in the CFRP composites, the Teflon inserts between the plies in the facesheet represents the delaminations, the Teflon inserts between the inner facesheet and adhensive or between adhensive and core are simulated disbonding in the composites, they are all tested by pulsed thermography, meanwhile, these samples are also inspected by ultrasonic testing, compare with each characteristic and the results got by these two different methods, it shows that pulsed thermography is an effective nondestructive technique for inspecting CFRP composites.

  14. NDT of railway components using induction thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzelmann, U.; Walle, G.; Ehlen, A.; Lugin, S.; Finckbohner, M.; Bessert, S.

    2016-02-01

    Induction or eddy current thermography is used to detect surface cracks in ferritic steel. The technique is applied to detect surface cracks in rails from a moving test car. Cracks were detected at a train speed between 2 and 15 km/h. An automated demonstrator system for testing railway wheels after production is described. While the wheel is rotated, a robot guides the detection unit consisting of inductor and infrared camera over the surface.

  15. Corrosion detection on pipelines by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bison, P.; Marinetti, S.; Cuogo, G.; Molinas, B.; Zonta, P.; Grinzato, E.

    2011-05-01

    IR thermography is applied to detect hidden corrosion on carbon steel pipelines for oil transportation. The research is oriented to set up a robust technique to carry out in situ the early detection of corroded zones that may evolve either towards leakage or failure. The use of thermography associated with a transient thermal technique is investigated on 12.2 mm thick samples, machined to artificially create a reduction of wall thickness that simulates the effect of real corrosion in pipes. The extension and depth of the artificial defects is controlled by ultrasounds which represents the reference for the results obtained by thermography. Two approaches are proposed: the first is based on the processing of a single thermogram taken at the optimum time after a finite pulse heating of a large area of the external surface; the second technique is carried out by scanning the pipeline by means of a device composed of a linear lamp and a thermographic camera which move jointly over the surface to test. A suitable reconstruction provides a map of the tested surface with possible hot spots in correspondence with the corroded areas. The analysis of the thermal problem by Finite Element Method is used to optimize the experimental parameters. The experimental results demonstrate a detection capability starting from 15 % of wall thickness reduction.

  16. Infrared thermography inspection of glass reinforced plastic (GRP) wind turbine blades and the concept of an automated scanning device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdelidis, Nicolas P.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Maldague, X. P. V.

    2013-05-01

    Infrared thermography techniques have been used for many years in the non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT and E) of materials and structures. The main advantage of thermography over classical NDT techniques resides in the possibility of inspecting large areas in a fast and safe manner without needing to have access to both sides of the component. Nonetheless infrared thermography is limited to the detection of relatively shallow defects (a few millimetres under the surface), since it is affected by 3D heat diffusion. However, the most common types of anomalies found on composites, such as GRP wind turbine blades are delaminations, disbonds, water ingress, node failure and core crushing, and can be effectively detected and sometimes quantified using active thermographic techniques. This research work presents the use of infrared thermography on glass reinforced plastic (GRP) wind turbine blades assessment. Finally, the development of an autonomous, novel and lightweight multi-axis scanning system, as a concept, deploying in situ thermography NDT is also presented, with the intention of developing maximisation of the blade area coverage in a single run, at a known sensitivity, with the utilisation of the minimum number of system degrees of freedom and the maximum repeatability, as well as positional accuracy possible.

  17. Detection of pathogenic gram negative bacteria using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Divya, M. P.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Thomas, Sabu; Philip, John

    2012-11-01

    Detection of viable bacteria is of prime importance in all fields of microbiology and biotechnology. Conventional methods of enumerating bacteria are often time consuming and labor-intensive. All living organisms generate heat due to metabolic activities and hence, measurement of heat energy is a viable tool for detection and quantification of bacteria. In this article, we employ a non-contact and real time method - infrared thermography (IRT) for measurement of temperature variations in four clinically significant gram negative pathogenic bacteria, viz. Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We observe that, the energy content, defined as the ratio of heat generated by bacterial metabolic activities to the heat lost from the liquid medium to the surrounding, vary linearly with the bacterial concentration in all the four pathogenic bacteria. The amount of energy content observed in different species is attributed to their metabolisms and morphologies that affect the convection velocity and hence heat transport in the medium.

  18. Shuttle Entry Imaging Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas; Berry, Scott; Alter, Stephen; Blanchard, Robert; Schwartz, Richard; Ross, Martin; Tack, Steve

    2007-01-01

    During the Columbia Accident Investigation, imaging teams supporting debris shedding analysis were hampered by poor entry image quality and the general lack of information on optical signatures associated with a nominal Shuttle entry. After the accident, recommendations were made to NASA management to develop and maintain a state-of-the-art imagery database for Shuttle engineering performance assessments and to improve entry imaging capability to support anomaly and contingency analysis during a mission. As a result, the Space Shuttle Program sponsored an observation campaign to qualitatively characterize a nominal Shuttle entry over the widest possible Mach number range. The initial objectives focused on an assessment of capability to identify/resolve debris liberated from the Shuttle during entry, characterization of potential anomalous events associated with RCS jet firings and unusual phenomenon associated with the plasma trail. The aeroheating technical community viewed the Space Shuttle Program sponsored activity as an opportunity to influence the observation objectives and incrementally demonstrate key elements of a quantitative spatially resolved temperature measurement capability over a series of flights. One long-term desire of the Shuttle engineering community is to calibrate boundary layer transition prediction methodologies that are presently part of the Shuttle damage assessment process using flight data provided by a controlled Shuttle flight experiment. Quantitative global imaging may offer a complementary method of data collection to more traditional methods such as surface thermocouples. This paper reviews the process used by the engineering community to influence data collection methods and analysis of global infrared images of the Shuttle obtained during hypersonic entry. Emphasis is placed upon airborne imaging assets sponsored by the Shuttle program during Return to Flight. Visual and IR entry imagery were obtained with available airborne

  19. Dual-band infrared thermography for quantitative nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, P.F.; Del Grande, N.K.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.; Shapiro, A.B.

    1993-04-01

    The authors have developed dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermography that is being applied to quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aging aircraft. The DBIR technique resolves 0.2 degrees C surface temperature differences for inspecting interior flaws in heated aircraft structures. It locates cracks, corrosion sites, disbonds or delaminations in metallic laps and composite patches. By removing clutter from surface roughness effects, the authors clarify interpretation of subsurface flaws. To accomplish this, the authors ratio images recorded at two infrared bands, centered near 5 microns and 10 microns. These image ratios are used to decouple temperature patterns associated with interior flaw sites from spatially varying surface emissivity noise. They also discuss three-dimensional (3D) dynamic thermal imaging of structural flaws using dual-band infrared (DBIR) computed tomography. Conventional thermography provides single-band infrared images which are difficult to interpret. Standard procedures yield imprecise (or qualitative) information about subsurface flaw sites which are typically masked by surface clutter. They use a DBIR imaging technique pioneered at LLNL to capture the time history of surface temperature difference patterns for flash-heated targets. They relate these patterns to the location, size, shape and depth of subsurface flaws. They have demonstrated temperature accuracies of 0.2{degree}C, timing synchronization of 3 ms (after onset of heat flash) and intervals of 42 ms, between images, during an 8 s cooling (and heating) interval characterizing the front (and back) surface temperature-time history of an epoxy-glue disbond site in a flash-heated aluminum lap joint.

  20. Collective dynamics of active filament complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogucci, Hironobu; Ishihara, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    Networks of biofilaments are essential for the formation of cellular structures that support various biological functions. For the most part, previous studies have investigated the collective dynamics of rodlike biofilaments; however, the shapes of the actual subcellular components are often more elaborate. In this study, we considered an active object composed of two active filaments, which represents the progression from rodlike biofilaments to complex-shaped biofilaments. Specifically, we numerically assessed the collective behaviors of these active objects in two dimensions and observed several types of dynamics, depending on the density and the angle of the two filaments as shape parameters of the object. Among the observed collective dynamics, a moving density band that we named a "moving smectic" is introduced here for the first time. By analyzing the trajectories of individual objects and the interactions among them, this study demonstrated how interactions among active biofilaments with complex shapes could produce collective dynamics in a nontrivial manner.

  1. Air-coupled acoustic thermography for in-situ evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Winfree, William P. (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic thermography uses a housing configured for thermal, acoustic and infrared radiation shielding. For in-situ applications, the housing has an open side adapted to be sealingly coupled to a surface region of a structure such that an enclosed chamber filled with air is defined. One or more acoustic sources are positioned to direct acoustic waves through the air in the enclosed chamber and towards the surface region. To activate and control each acoustic source, a pulsed signal is applied thereto. An infrared imager focused on the surface region detects a thermal image of the surface region. A data capture device records the thermal image in synchronicity with each pulse of the pulsed signal such that a time series of thermal images is generated. For enhanced sensitivity and/or repeatability, sound and/or vibrations at the surface region can be used in feedback control of the pulsed signal applied to the acoustic sources.

  2. Defect dynamics in active nematics

    PubMed Central

    Giomi, Luca; Bowick, Mark J; Mishra, Prashant; Sknepnek, Rastko; Cristina Marchetti, M

    2014-01-01

    Topological defects are distinctive signatures of liquid crystals. They profoundly affect the viscoelastic behaviour of the fluid by constraining the orientational structure in a way that inevitably requires global changes not achievable with any set of local deformations. In active nematic liquid crystals, topological defects not only dictate the global structure of the director, but also act as local sources of motion, behaving as self-propelled particles. In this article, we present a detailed analytical and numerical study of the mechanics of topological defects in active nematic liquid crystals. PMID:25332389

  3. Value of Mammary Thermography in Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, B. E.; Burn, J. Ian; MacErlean, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Thermographic examinations of the breasts were carried out in 359 women, most of whom had mammary symptoms. Of the 195 patients with abnormal thermograms, 27 had cancer of the breast, 53 had benign lesions, and 115 had no confirmed organic disease. The incidence of false-positive thermograms was 59%. Of the 164 patients with normal thermograms, 116 had no confirmed organic disease, 41 had benign lesions, and 7 had cancer. The incidence of false-negative mammary thermograms was 29%. We conclude that mammary thermography is of no practical value in the differential diagnosis of symptomatic mammary disease. PMID:5022040

  4. Line scanning thermography for rapid nondestructive inspection of large scale composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; Ley, O.; Godinez, V.; Bandos, B.

    2011-06-23

    As next generation structures are utilizing larger amounts of composite materials, a rigorous and reliable method is needed to inspect these structures in order to prevent catastrophic failure and extend service life. Current inspection methods, such as ultrasonic, generally require extended down time and man hours as they are typically carried out via point-by-point measurements. A novel Line Scanning Thermography (LST) System has been developed for the non-contact, large-scale field inspection of composite structures with faster scanning times than conventional thermography systems. LST is a patented dynamic thermography technique where the heat source and thermal camera move in tandem, which allows the continuous scan of long surfaces without the loss of resolution. The current system can inspect an area of 10 in{sup 2} per 1 second, and has a resolution of 0.05x0.03 in{sup 2}. Advanced data gathering protocols have been implemented for near-real time damage visualization and post-analysis algorithms for damage interpretation. The system has been used to successfully detect defects (delamination, dry areas) in fiber-reinforced composite sandwich panels for Navy applications, as well as impact damage in composite missile cases and armor ceramic panels.

  5. Implementing recommendations of the Columbia accident investigation board: development of on-orbit IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottens, Brian P.; Parker, Bradford; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2005-03-01

    One of NASA"s Space Shuttle Return-to-Flight (RTF) efforts has been to develop thermography for the on-orbit inspection of the Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) portion of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge (WLE). This paper addresses the capability of thermography to detect cracks in RCC by using in-plane thermal gradients that naturally occur on-orbit. Crack damage, which can result from launch debris impact, is a detection challenge for other on-orbit sensors under consideration for RTF, such as the Intensified Television Camera and Laser Dynamic Range Imager. We studied various cracks in RCC, both natural and simulated, along with material characteristics, such as emissivity uniformity, in steady-state thermography. Severity of crack, such as those likely and unlikely to cause burn through were tested, both in-air and in-vacuum, and the goal of this procedure was to assure crew and vehicle safety during re-entry by identification and quantification of a damage condition while on-orbit. Expected thermal conditions are presented in typical shuttle orbits, and the expected damage signatures for each scenario are presented. Finally, through statistical signal detection, our results show that even at very low in-plane thermal gradients, we are able to detect damage at or below the threshold for fatality in the most critical sections of the WLE, with a confidence exceeding 1 in 10,000 probability of false negative.

  6. Implementing Recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board - Development of on-Orbit RCC Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Brian; Parker, Brad; Stephen, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    One of NASA s Space Shuttle Return-to-Flight (RTF) efforts has been to develop thermography for the on-orbit inspection of the Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) portion of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge (WLE). This paper addresses the capability of thermography to detect cracks in RCC by using in-plane thermal gradients that naturally occur on-orbit. Crack damage, which can result from launch debris impact, is a detection challenge for other on-orbit sensors under consideration for RTF, such as the Intensified Television Camera and Laser Dynamic Range Imager. We studied various cracks in RCC, both natural and simulated, along with material characteristics, such as emissivity uniformity, in steady-state thermography. Severity of crack, such as those likely and unlikely to cause burn through were tested, both in-air and in-vacuum, and the goal of this procedure was to assure crew and vehicle safety during re-entry by identification and quantification of a damage condition while on-orbit. Expected thermal conditions are presented in typical shuttle orbits, and the expected damage signatures for each scenario are presented. Finally, through statistical signal detection, our results show that even at very low in-plane thermal gradients, we are able to detect damage at or below the threshold for fatality in the most critical sections of the WLE, with a confidence exceeding 1 in 10,000 probability of false negative.

  7. Implementing Recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board: Development of On-Orbit IR Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Brian P.; Parker, Bradford; Stephan, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    One of NASA's Space Shuttle Return-to-Flight (RTF) efforts has been to develop thermography for the on-orbit inspection of the Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) portion of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge (WLE). This paper addresses the capability of thermography to detect cracks in RCC by using in-plane thermal gradients that naturally occur on-orbit. Crack damage, which can result from launch debris impact, is a detection challenge for other on-orbit sensors under consideration for RTF, such as the Intensified Television Camera and Laser Dynamic Range Imager. We studied various cracks in RCC, both natural and simulated, along with material characteristics, such as emissivity uniformity, in steady-state thermography. Severity of crack, such as those likely and unlikely to cause burn through were tested, both in-air and in-vacuum, and the goal of this procedure was to assure crew and vehicle safety during reentry by identification and quantification of a damage condition while on-orbit. Expected thermal conditions are presented in typical shuttle orbits, and the expected damage signatures for each scenario are presented. Finally, through statistical signal detection, our results show that even at very low in-plane thermal gradients, we are able to detect damage at or below the threshold for fatality in the most critical sections of the WLE, with a confidence exceeding 1 in 10,000 probability of false negative.

  8. Thermophotonic radar imaging: An emissivity-normalized modality with advantages over phase lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, Nima; Mandelis, Andreas; Amaechi, Bennett T.

    2011-04-01

    One major problem of frequency-domain photothermal radiometry, or alternatively in two-dimensional lock-in thermography, is the compromise one has to make between dynamic range (probing depth) and depth resolution. The thermal-wave radar incorporates chirped excitation through matched filtering to maintain good resolution and depth range inside a sample. This letter experimentally demonstrates the advantages of chirped modulation and introduces a thermophotonic modality of thermal-wave radar based on an emissivity-normalized, higher-dynamic-range contrast parameter known as cross-correlation phase. Finally, comparisons made on a biological (dental) sample show potential applications of the method.

  9. A comparative investigation for the nondestructive testing of honeycomb structures by holographic interferometry and infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarra, S.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Avdelidis, N. P.; Genest, M.; Bouchagier, L.; Kourousis, D.; Tsimogiannis, A.; Anastassopoulous, A.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.; Ambrosini, D.; Paoletti, D.

    2010-03-01

    The nondestructive testing (NDT) of honeycomb sandwich structures has been the subject of several studies. Classical techniques such as ultrasound testing and x-rays are commonly used to inspect these structures. Holographic interferometry (HI) and infrared thermography (IT) have shown to be interesting alternatives. Holography has been successfully used to detect debonding between the skin and the honeycomb core on honeycomb panels under a controlled environment. Active thermography has proven to effectively identify the most common types of defects (water ingress, debonding, crushed core, surface impacts) normally present in aeronautical honeycomb parts while inspecting large surfaces in a fast manner. This is very attractive for both the inspection during the manufacturing process and for in situ regular NDT assessment. A comparative experimental investigation is discussed herein to evaluate the performance of HI and IT for the NDT on a honeycomb panel with fabricated defects. The main advantages and limitations of both techniques are enumerated and discussed.

  10. Visco-elastic Dynamics of an Active Polar Dynamic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2015-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction that are embedded in visco-elastic media. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria and molecular motors. Because the ordered state only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the velocity of the active units. The passive visco-elastic medium is described by a relaxing strain tensor. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this two-fluid (two-velocity) system. The dynamics is rather different compared to the case of passive, static polar order. In particular, we find a complicated normal mode structure that reflects the broken time-reversal symmetry due to the non-equilibrium situation, anisotropy of first sound and a possible second sound excitation due to the active velocity, and various manifestations of the visco-elastic relaxation. We discuss critically the role of the so-called active term in the stress tensor as well as the thermodynamically correct description of the hydrodynamic transport velocities.

  11. Flash Infrared Thermography Contrast Data Analysis Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides information on an IR Contrast technique that involves extracting normalized contrast versus time evolutions from the flash thermography inspection infrared video data. The analysis calculates thermal measurement features from the contrast evolution. In addition, simulation of the contrast evolution is achieved through calibration on measured contrast evolutions from many flat-bottom holes in the subject material. The measurement features and the contrast simulation are used to evaluate flash thermography data in order to characterize delamination-like anomalies. The thermal measurement features relate to the anomaly characteristics. The contrast evolution simulation is matched to the measured contrast evolution over an anomaly to provide an assessment of the anomaly depth and width which correspond to the depth and diameter of the equivalent flat-bottom hole (EFBH) similar to that used as input to the simulation. A similar analysis, in terms of diameter and depth of an equivalent uniform gap (EUG) providing a best match with the measured contrast evolution, is also provided. An edge detection technique called the half-max is used to measure width and length of the anomaly. Results of the half-max width and the EFBH/EUG diameter are compared to evaluate the anomaly. The information provided here is geared towards explaining the IR Contrast technique. Results from a limited amount of validation data on reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) hardware are included in this paper.

  12. Thermal diffusivity estimation with quantitative pulsed phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina-Borras, J. E.; Florez-Ospina, Juan F.; Benitez-Restrepo, H. D.; Maldague, X.

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative Pulsed Phase Thermography (PPT) has been only used to estimate defect parameters such as depth and thermal resistance. Here, we propose a thermal quadrupole based method that extends quantitative pulsed phase thermography. This approach estimates thermal diffusivity by solving a inversion problem based on non-linear squares estimation. This approach is tested with pulsed thermography data acquired from a composite sample. We compare our results with another technique established in time domain. The proposed quantitative analysis with PPT provides estimates of thermal diffusivity close to those obtained with the time domain approach. This estimation requires only the a priori knowledge of sample thickness.

  13. Dynamics differentiate between active and inactive inteins.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Melissa; Coolbaugh, Michael J; Nellis, David; Zhu, Jianwei; Wood, David W; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2015-02-16

    The balance between stability and dynamics for active enzymes can be somewhat quantified by studies of intein splicing and cleaving reactions. Inteins catalyze the ligation of flanking host exteins while excising themselves. The potential for applications led to engineering of a mini-intein splicing domain, where the homing endonuclease domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA (Mtu recA) intein was removed. The remaining domains were linked by several short peptides, but splicing activity in all was substantially lower than the full-length intein. Native splicing activity was restored in some cases by a V67L mutation. Using computations and experiments, we examine the impact of this mutation on the stability and conformational dynamics of the mini-intein splicing domain. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to delineate the factors that determine the active state, including the V67L mini-intein mutant, and peptide linker. We found that (1) the V67L mutation lowers the global fluctuations in all modeled mini-inteins, stabilizing the mini-intein constructs; (2) the connecting linker length affects intein dynamics; and (3) the flexibilities of the linker and intein core are higher in the active structure. We have observed that the interaction of the linker region and a turn region around residues 35-41 provides the pathway for the allostery interaction. Our experiments reveal that intein catalysis is characterized by non-linear Arrhenius plot, confirming the significant contribution of protein conformational dynamics to intein function. We conclude that while the V67L mutation stabilizes the global structure, cooperative dynamics of all intein regions appear more important for intein function than high stability. Our studies suggest that effectively quenching the conformational dynamics of an intein through engineered allosteric interactions could deactivate intein splicing or cleaving. PMID:25087201

  14. Active Polar Two-Fluid Macroscopic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2014-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria (in a solvent, shoals of fish (moving in water currents), flocks of birds and migrating insects (flying in windy air). Because the preferred direction only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the macroscopic velocity associated with the motion of the active units. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this second velocity. We find a normal mode structure quite different compared to the static descriptions, as well as linear couplings between (active) flow and e.g. densities and concentrations due to the genuine two-fluid transport derivatives. On the other hand, we get, quite similar to the static case, a direct linear relation between the stress tensor and the structure tensor. This prominent ``active'' term is responsible for many active effects, meaning that our approach can describe those effects as well. In addition, we also deal with explicitly chiral systems, which are important for many active systems. In particular, we find an active flow-induced heat current specific for the dynamic chiral polar order.

  15. Activated Dynamics in Dense Model Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shijie; Schweizer, Kenneth

    The nonlinear Langevin equation approach is applied to investigate the ensemble-averaged activated dynamics of small molecule liquids (or disconnected segments in a polymer melt) in dense nanocomposites under model isobaric conditions where the spherical nanoparticles are dynamically fixed. Fully thermalized and quenched-replica integral equation theory methods are employed to investigate the influence on matrix dynamics of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium nanocomposite structure, respectively. In equilibrium, the miscibility window can be narrow due to depletion and bridging attraction induced phase separation which limits the study of activated dynamics to regimes where the barriers are relatively low. In contrast, by using replica integral equation theory, macroscopic demixing is suppressed, and the addition of nanoparticles can induce much slower activated matrix dynamics which can be studied over a wide range of pure liquid alpha relaxation times, interfacial attraction strengths and ranges, particle sizes and loadings, and mixture microstructures. Numerical results for the mean activated relaxation time, transient localization length, matrix elasticity and kinetic vitrification in the nanocomposite will be presented.

  16. Characterizing tunable dynamics in an active gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkin, Gil; Decamp, Stephen; Chen, Daniel; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2014-03-01

    We experimentally investigate dynamics of an active gel of bundled microtubules that is driven to far-from-equilibrium steady states by clusters of kinesin molecular motors. Upon the addition of ATP, the coordinated action of thousands of molecular motors drives this gel to an active, percolating state that persists for hours and is only limited by the stability of constituent proteins and the availability of the chemical fuel ATP. We extensively characterize how enhanced transport in emergent macroscopic flows depends on relevant molecular parameters, including ATP, motor, and depletant concentrations, microtubule concentration and length, as well as structure of the motor clusters. Our results show that the properties and dynamics of this active isotropic gel are highly tunable, suggesting that this is an ideal system for studying the behavior of active materials.

  17. Wavelet-based subsurface defect characterization in pulsed phase thermography for non-destructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zauner, G.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2009-02-01

    Active infrared thermography is a method for non-destructive testing (NDT) of materials and components. In pulsed thermography (PT), a brief and high intensity flash is used to heat the sample. The decay of the sample surface temperature is detected and recorded by an infrared camera. Any subsurface anomaly (e.g. inclusion, delamination, etc.) gives rise to a local temperature increase (thermal contrast) on the sample surface. Conventionally, in Pulsed Phase Thermography (PPT) the analysis of PT time series is done by means of Discrete Fourier Transform producing phase images which can suppress unwanted physical effects (due to surface emissivity variations or non-uniform heating). The drawback of the Fourier-based approach is the loss of temporal information, making quantitative inversion procedures tricky (e.g. defect depth measurements). In this paper the complex Morlet-Wavelet transform is used to preserve the time information of the signal and thus provides information about the depth of a subsurface defect. Additionally, we propose to use the according phase contrast value to derive supplementary information about the thermal reflection properties at the defect interface. This provides additional information (e.g. about the thermal mismatch factor between the specimen and the defect) making interpretation of PPT results easier and perhaps unequivocal.

  18. Laser lock-in thermography for fatigue crack detection in an uncoated metallic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yun-Kyu; Kim, Ji Min; Sohn, Hoon

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a noncontact laser lock-in thermography (LLT) technique for surface-breaking fatigue crack detection. LLT utilizes a modulated continuous wave (CW) laser as a heat source for lock-in thermography instead of commonly used flash and halogen lamps. LLT has following merits compared to conventional active thermography techniques: (1) the laser heat source can be precisely positioned at a long distance from a target structure thank to its directionality and low energy loss, (2) a large target structure can be inspected using a scanning laser heat source, (3) no special surface treatment is necessary to measure thermal wavefields and (4) background noises reflected from arbitrary surrounding heat sources can be eliminated. The LLT system is developed by integrating and synchronizing a modulated CW laser, galvanometer and infrared camera. Then, a holder exponent filter is proposed for crack identification, localization and quantification. Test results confirm that a surface-breaking fatigue crack on a steel plate is successfully evaluated using the proposed technique without any special surface treatment.

  19. Infrared Thermography for Temperature Measurement and Non-Destructive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Usamentiaga, Rubèn; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed. PMID:25014096

  20. Induction thermography for non-destructive evaluation of adhesive bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, L.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive bonding is widely used in automotive industry in the recent times. One of the major problems with adhesive bonds is the lack of a suitable non-destructive evaluation technique for assessing bonding. In this paper, an experimental study was carried out to apply induction thermography technique to evaluate adhesively bonded steel plates. Samples were fabricated with artificial defects such as air gap, foreign material, and improper adhesive filling. Induction thermography technique was found to detect defects and foreign inclusions. The sample specimen was also inspected using standard techniques such as Ultrasonic testing and Radiography testing. Defect detecting capabilities of the three techniques are compared. Induction thermography heating was FE modelled in 3D using COMSOL 3.5a. The simulated Induction thermography model was compared and validated with experimental results.

  1. Airborne thermography of temperature patterns in sugar beet piles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D. G.; Bichsel, S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the use of thermography for locating spoilage areas (chimneys) within storage piles and to subsequently use the information for the scheduling of their processing. Thermal-infrared quantitative scanner data were acquired initially on January 16, 1975, over the storage piles at Moorhead, Minnesota, both during the day and predawn. Photographic data were acquired during the day mission to evaluate the effect of uneven snow cover on the thermal emittance, and the predawn thermography was used to locate potential chimneys. The piles were examined the day prior for indications of spoilage areas, and the ground crew indicated that no spoilage areas were located using their existing methods. Nine spoilage areas were interpreted from the thermography. The piles were rechecked by ground methods three days following the flights. Six of the nine areas delineated by thermography were actual spoilage areas.

  2. Building thermography and energy performance directive of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppinen, Timo; Siikanen, Sami

    2012-06-01

    Energy Performance of Buildings Directive came in to the force in Europe couple of years ago and it had an immediate effect on Building Codes in Europe. Finland have changed its building codes since 2007 - the insulation requirements have been tightened and the requirements have been specified. The biggest change is energy efficient calculations and determination of energy efficiency and energy label for buildings. This has caused a boom of new service providers (thermography services, air-tightness measurements and other services like new calculation tools). Thermography is used in verification in performance of buildings. In this presentation some examples of building thermography in walk-through energy audits combined with the results of energy efficiency calculations are presented - also some special problems in buildings of specific use (e.g. an art museum) and use of thermography to solve them.

  3. On-orbit Passive Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Patricia A.; Winfree, William P.; Cramer, K. Elliott

    2008-01-01

    On July 12, 2006, British-born astronaut Piers Sellers became the first person to conduct thermal nondestructive evaluation experiments in space, demonstrating the feasibility of a new tool for detecting damage to the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) structures of the Shuttle. This new tool was an EVA (Extravehicular Activity, or spacewalk) compatible infrared camera developed by NASA engineers. Data was collected both on the wing leading edge of the Orbiter and on pre-damaged samples mounted in the Shuttle s cargo bay. A total of 10 infrared movies were collected during the EVA totaling over 250 megabytes of data. Images were downloaded from the orbiting Shuttle to Johnson Space Center for analysis and processing. Results are shown to be comparable to ground-based thermal inspections performed in the laboratory with the same type of camera and simulated solar heating. The EVA camera system detected flat-bottom holes as small as 2.54cm in diameter with 50% material loss from the back (hidden) surface in RCC during this first test of the EVA IR Camera. Data for the time history of the specimen temperature and the capability of the inspection system for imaging impact damage are presented.

  4. Understanding human dynamics in microblog posting activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yubao; Wang, Hui; Li, Pei

    2013-02-01

    Human activity patterns are an important issue in behavior dynamics research. Empirical evidence indicates that human activity patterns can be characterized by a heavy-tailed inter-event time distribution. However, most researchers give an understanding by only modeling the power-law feature of the inter-event time distribution, and those overlooked non-power-law features are likely to be nontrivial. In this work, we propose a behavior dynamics model, called the finite memory model, in which humans adaptively change their activity rates based on a finite memory of recent activities, which is driven by inherent individual interest. Theoretical analysis shows a finite memory model can properly explain various heavy-tailed inter-event time distributions, including a regular power law and some non-power-law deviations. To validate the model, we carry out an empirical study based on microblogging activity from thousands of microbloggers in the Celebrity Hall of the Sina microblog. The results show further that the model is reasonably effective. We conclude that finite memory is an effective dynamics element to describe the heavy-tailed human activity pattern.

  5. Thermography in mass screening investigations of industrial workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehter, A. I.; Ginsburg, L. I.; Traktinsky, A. G.

    1993-11-01

    The role of thermography in screening, directed to diagnose breast diseases, chronic tonsillitis, neurocirculatory dystonia, gall bladder dyskinesia, sinusitis, and to detect the character of influence of harmful factors on workers organisms is studied. The investigations demonstrate a possibility of a successful utilization of thermography in mass prophylactive examinations in order to diagnose these diseases, but the problem of breast tumors diagnostics demands the following investigations.

  6. Angular effects on thermochromic liquid crystal thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodzwa, Paul M.; Eaton, John K.

    2007-12-01

    This paper directly discusses the effects of lighting and viewing angles on liquid crystal thermography. This is because although thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs) are a widely-used and accepted tool in heat transfer research, little effort has been directed to analytically describing these effects. Such insight is invaluable for the development of effective mitigation strategies. Using analytical relationships that describe the perceived color shift, a systematic manner of improving the performance of a TLC system is presented. This is particularly relevant for applications where significant variations in lighting and/or viewing angles are expected (such as a highly curved surface). This discussion includes an examination of the importance of the definition of the hue angle used to calibrate the color of a TLC-painted surface. The theoretical basis of the validated high-accuracy calibration approach reported by Kodzwa et al. (Exp Fluids s00348-007-0310-6, 2007) is presented.

  7. Thermography evaluation of metal bonding materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safai, Morteza

    The thermographic technique used for the nondestructive evaluation of bondline integrity in metal and silicone rubber bonded material is described. An AGEMA model 880 IR thermographic scanner combined with a 20-deg lens was used to detect the IR radiation from the test panel. A video tape recorder was used to record the live temperature distribution at 25 picture frames per second. A personal computer with an AGEMA TIC-8000 digital image processor was used to record and plot the temperature vs time. The technique was found to be capable of detecting subsurface disbonds as small as 0.0625 sq in. in 0.187-in.-thick thermal protection system bonded materials. The thermography technique meets all the requirements of other approved NDT techniques, and it works well with complex structures and is noncontaminating, noncontact, real-time, and portable.

  8. Thermography evaluation of metal bonding materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safai, Morteza

    1992-04-01

    The thermographic technique used for the nondestructive evaluation of bondline integrity in metal and silicone rubber bonded material is described. An AGEMA model 880 IR thermographic scanner combined with a 20-deg lens was used to detect the IR radiation from the test panel. A video tape recorder was used to record the live temperature distribution at 25 picture frames per second. A personal computer with an AGEMA TIC-8000 digital image processor was used to record and plot the temperature vs time. The technique was found to be capable of detecting subsurface disbonds as small as 0.0625 sq in. in 0.187-in.-thick thermal protection system bonded materials. The thermography technique meets all the requirements of other approved NDT techniques, and it works well with complex structures and is noncontaminating, noncontact, real-time, and portable.

  9. Random bursts determine dynamics of active filaments.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph A; Suzuki, Ryo; Schaller, Volker; Aranson, Igor S; Bausch, Andreas R; Frey, Erwin

    2015-08-25

    Constituents of living or synthetic active matter have access to a local energy supply that serves to keep the system out of thermal equilibrium. The statistical properties of such fluctuating active systems differ from those of their equilibrium counterparts. Using the actin filament gliding assay as a model, we studied how nonthermal distributions emerge in active matter. We found that the basic mechanism involves the interplay between local and random injection of energy, acting as an analog of a thermal heat bath, and nonequilibrium energy dissipation processes associated with sudden jump-like changes in the system's dynamic variables. We show here how such a mechanism leads to a nonthermal distribution of filament curvatures with a non-Gaussian shape. The experimental curvature statistics and filament relaxation dynamics are reproduced quantitatively by stochastic computer simulations and a simple kinetic model. PMID:26261319

  10. Random bursts determine dynamics of active filaments

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Christoph A.; Suzuki, Ryo; Schaller, Volker; Aranson, Igor S.; Bausch, Andreas R.; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Constituents of living or synthetic active matter have access to a local energy supply that serves to keep the system out of thermal equilibrium. The statistical properties of such fluctuating active systems differ from those of their equilibrium counterparts. Using the actin filament gliding assay as a model, we studied how nonthermal distributions emerge in active matter. We found that the basic mechanism involves the interplay between local and random injection of energy, acting as an analog of a thermal heat bath, and nonequilibrium energy dissipation processes associated with sudden jump-like changes in the system’s dynamic variables. We show here how such a mechanism leads to a nonthermal distribution of filament curvatures with a non-Gaussian shape. The experimental curvature statistics and filament relaxation dynamics are reproduced quantitatively by stochastic computer simulations and a simple kinetic model. PMID:26261319

  11. INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY OF CUTANEOUS MELANOMA METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Shada, Amber L.; Dengel, Lynn T.; Petroni, Gina R.; Smolkin, Mark E.; Acton, Scott; Slingluff, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Differentiating melanoma metastasis from benign cutaneous lesions currently requires biopsy or costly imaging, such as positron emission tomography scans. Melanoma metastases have been observed to be subjectively warmer than similarly appearing benign lesions. We hypothesized that infrared (IR) thermography would be sensitive and specific in differentiating palpable melanoma metastases from benign lesions. Materials and methods Seventy-four patients (36 females and 38 males) had 251 palpable lesions imaged for this pilot study. Diagnosis was determined using pathologic confirmation or clinical diagnosis. Lesions were divided into size strata for analysis: 0–5, >5–15, >15–30, and >30 mm. Images were scored on a scale from −1 (colder than the surrounding tissue) to +3 (significantly hotter than the surrounding tissue). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each stratum. Logistical challenges were scored. Results IR imaging was able to determine the malignancy of small (0–5 mm) lesions with a sensitivity of 39% and specificity of 100%. For lesions >5–15 mm, sensitivity was 58% and specificity 98%. For lesions >15–30 mm, sensitivity was 95% and specificity 100%, and for lesions >30 mm, sensitivity was 78% and specificity 89%. The positive predictive value was 88%–100% across all strata, and the negative predictive value was 95% for >15–30 mm lesions and 80% for >30 mm lesions. Conclusions Malignant lesions >15 mm were differentiated from benign lesions with excellent sensitivity and specificity. IR imaging was well tolerated and feasible in a clinic setting. This pilot study shows promise in the use of thermography for the diagnosis of malignant melanoma with further potential as a noninvasive tool to follow tumor responses to systemic therapies. PMID:23043862

  12. Aerial thermography in archaeological prospection: Applications & processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Autumn Chrysantha

    Aerial thermography is one of the least utilized archaeological prospection methods, yet it has great potential for detecting anthropogenic anomalies. Thermal infrared radiation is absorbed and reemitted at varying rates by all objects on and within the ground depending upon their density, composition, and moisture content. If an area containing archaeological features is recorded at the moment when their thermal signatures most strongly contrast with that of the surrounding matrix, they can be visually identified in thermal images. Research conducted in the 1960s and 1970s established a few basic rules for conducting thermal survey, but the expense associated with the method deterred most archaeologists from using this technology. Subsequent research was infrequent and almost exclusively appeared in the form of case studies. However, as the current proliferation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and compact thermal cameras draws renewed attention to aerial thermography as an attractive and exciting form of survey, it is appropriate and necessary to reevaluate our approach. In this thesis I have taken a two-pronged approach. First, I built upon the groundwork of earlier researchers and created an experiment to explore the impact that different environmental and climatic conditions have on the success or failure of thermal imaging. I constructed a test site designed to mimic a range of archaeological features and imaged it under a variety of conditions to compare and contrast the results. Second, I explored a new method for processing thermal data that I hope will lead to a means of reducing noise and increasing the clarity of thermal images. This step was done as part of a case study so that the effectiveness of the processing method could be evaluated by comparison with the results of other geophysical surveys.

  13. Air tightness monitoring by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinzato, Ermanno G.; Marinetti, Sergio; Bison, Paolo G.

    2004-04-01

    The standard air tightness test of containers is based on measurement of global parameters as the outlet of a specific gas, detected by specialised mass spectrometers. The identification and location of air leakages is extremely important especially for the container manufacturer. At the same time, the measure of the mass flux is of importance. IR Thermography has been successfully applied for leakages detection on buildings, but unfortunately, the noise due to The standard air tightness test of containers is based on measurement of global parameters as the outlet of a specific gas, detected by specialised mass spectrometers. The identification and location of air leakages is extremely important especially for the container manufacturer. At the same time, the measure of the mass flux is of importance. IR Thermography has been successfully applied for leakage detection on buildings, but unfortunately, the noise due to environment limits its applicability, particularly in case of a small flux. A new thermal procedure has been developed for the leakage detection. The technique is based on the stimulation of the envelope with a low oscillating heat flux and lock-in analysis. An airflow is injected, with a harmonically varying flowrate and a slightly higher temperature than the ambient. Then, the thermograms sequence is analyzed in the frequency domain. A review of quantitative techniques for the convective heat exchange measurement is reported. The procedure has been utilized for special containers used for both transport and exhibition of pictures inside museums. Tests performed before and after gaskets improvements show the capability of the technique to estimate qualitatively the airflow.

  14. On the dynamics of active aging.

    PubMed

    Schroots, Johannes J F

    2012-01-01

    The conceptual basis of active aging is extended with a dynamic systems model, called Janus. The Janus model accounts for the life-course dynamics of simple and more complex growth and decline functions, on the strength of three principles. The first principle of transition states that the unitary lifespan trajectory of development and aging is the product of two complementary forces, growth and senescence, which are effective from conception until death. The first principle solves the traditional problem of the age at which development ends and the process of aging starts. The second and third principles of peak capacity and peak time refer, respectively, to the impact of growth rate (peak capacity) and rate of senescence (peak time) on the life-course of dynamic systems. The validity of the Janus model is demonstrated by simulating the empirical lifespan trajectories of functional capacity, intelligence, and mortality. The Janus model contributes to the concept of active aging by underlining the dynamic limits of human nature, by stimulating effective policies for promoting active aging in the first half of life, and by emphasizing the growth potential of older people in the second half. PMID:22973306

  15. On the Dynamics of Active Aging

    PubMed Central

    Schroots, Johannes J. F.

    2012-01-01

    The conceptual basis of active aging is extended with a dynamic systems model, called Janus. The Janus model accounts for the life-course dynamics of simple and more complex growth and decline functions, on the strength of three principles. The first principle of transition states that the unitary lifespan trajectory of development and aging is the product of two complementary forces, growth and senescence, which are effective from conception until death. The first principle solves the traditional problem of the age at which development ends and the process of aging starts. The second and third principles of peak capacity and peak time refer, respectively, to the impact of growth rate (peak capacity) and rate of senescence (peak time) on the life-course of dynamic systems. The validity of the Janus model is demonstrated by simulating the empirical lifespan trajectories of functional capacity, intelligence, and mortality. The Janus model contributes to the concept of active aging by underlining the dynamic limits of human nature, by stimulating effective policies for promoting active aging in the first half of life, and by emphasizing the growth potential of older people in the second half. PMID:22973306

  16. Optically and non-optically excited thermography for composites: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruizhen; He, Yunze

    2016-03-01

    Composites, such as glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), and adhesive bonding are being increasingly used in fields of aerospace, renewable energy, civil and architecture, and other industries. Flaws and damages are inevitable during either fabrication or lifetime of composites structures or components. Thus, nondestructive testing (NDT) are extremely required to prevent failures and to increase reliability of composite structures or components in both manufacture and in-service inspection. Infrared thermography techniques including pulsed thermography, pulsed phase thermography, and lock-in thermography have shown the great potential and advantages. Besides conventional optical thermography, other sources such as laser, eddy current, microwave, and ultrasound excited thermography are drawing increasingly attentions for composites. In this work, a fully, in-depth and comprehensive review of thermography NDT techniques for composites inspection was conducted based on an orderly and concise literature survey and detailed analysis. Firstly, basic concepts for thermography NDT were defined and introduced, such as volume heating thermography. Next, the developments of conventional optic, laser, eddy current, microwave, and ultrasound thermography for composite inspection were reviewed. Then, some case studies for scanning thermography were also reviewed. After that, the strengths and limitations of thermography techniques were concluded through comparison studies. At last, some research trends were predicted. This work containing critical overview, detailed comparison and extensive list of references will disseminates knowledge between users, manufacturers, designers and researchers involved in composite structures or components inspection by means of thermography NDT techniques.

  17. Dynamics of Avalanche Activities in Financial Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-Hyun; Park, C. H.; Kim, Soo Yong; Kim, Kyungsik; Scalas, Enrico

    We study the dynamical properties of avalanche activities in the Korean Treasury Bond (KTB) futures price and the S&P 500 stock index. We apply the detrended fluctuation analysis, multiscale sample entropy and wavelet coefficient correlation to them, which revealed the scale-free dynamics of the bursting time series, avalanche size, and laminar time. We found that the laminar time and the avalanche size are anti-correlated in a short scale but in a large scale strongly correlated in KTB503, and are strongly correlated over all scales in S&P 500.

  18. Analysis of solar collector array systems using thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Eden, A.

    1980-01-01

    The use of thermography to analyze large solar collector array systems under dynamic operating conditions is discussed. The research has focused on thermographic techniques and equipment to determine temperature distributions, flow patterns, and air blockages in solar collectors. The results of this extensive study, covering many sites and types of collectors, illustrate the capabilities of infrared analysis as an analysis tool and operation and maintenance procedure when applied to large arrays. Thermographic analysis of most collector systems showed temperature distributions that indicated balanced flow patterns with both the thermographs and the hand-held unit. In three significant cases, blocked or broken collector arrays, which previously had gone undetected, were discovered. Using this analysis, validation studies of large computer codes could examine collector arrays for flow patterns or blockages that could cause disagreement between actual and predicted performance. Initial operation and balancing of large systems could be accomplished without complicated sensor systems not needed for normal operations. Maintenance personnel could quickly check their systems without climbing onto the roof and without complicated sensor systems.

  19. Improving spatial resolution in skin-contact thermography: comparison between a spline based and linear interpolation.

    PubMed

    Giansanti, Daniele

    2008-07-01

    A wearable device for skin-contact thermography [Giansanti D, Maccioni G. Development and testing of a wearable integrated thermometer sensor for skin contact thermography. Med Eng Phys 2006 [ahead of print

  20. Dynamic patterns of academic forum activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Gao, Ya-Chun; Cai, Shi-Min; Zhou, Tao

    2016-11-01

    A mass of traces of human activities show rich dynamic patterns. In this article, we comprehensively investigate the dynamic patterns of 50 thousands of researchers' activities in Sciencenet, the largest multi-disciplinary academic community in China. Through statistical analyses, we found that (i) there exists a power-law scaling between the frequency of visits to an academic forum and the number of corresponding visitors, with the exponent being about 1.33; (ii) the expansion process of academic forums obeys the Heaps' law, namely the number of distinct visited forums to the number of visits grows in a power-law form with exponent being about 0.54; (iii) the probability distributions of time intervals and the number of visits taken to revisit the same academic forum both follow power-laws, indicating the existence of memory effect in academic forum activities. On the basis of these empirical results, we propose a dynamic model that incorporates the exploration, preferential return with memory effect, which can well reproduce the observed scaling laws.

  1. Breast cancer detection in rotational thermography images using texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Sheeja V.; Sasikala, M.; Bhavani Bharathi, G.; Jaipurkar, Sandeep D.

    2014-11-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of mortality in young women in the developing countries. Early diagnosis is the key to improve survival rate in cancer patients. Breast thermography is a diagnostic procedure that non-invasively images the infrared emissions from breast surface to aid in the early detection of breast cancer. Due to limitations in imaging protocol, abnormality detection by conventional breast thermography, is often a challenging task. Rotational thermography is a novel technique developed in order to overcome the limitations of conventional breast thermography. This paper evaluates this technique's potential for automatic detection of breast abnormality, from the perspective of cold challenge. Texture features are extracted in the spatial domain, from rotational thermogram series, prior to and post the application of cold challenge. These features are fed to a support vector machine for automatic classification of normal and malignant breasts, resulting in a classification accuracy of 83.3%. Feature reduction has been performed by principal component analysis. As a novel attempt, the ability of this technique to locate the abnormality has been studied. The results of the study indicate that rotational thermography holds great potential as a screening tool for breast cancer detection.

  2. Dynamics and Emergent Structures in Active Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, Aparna

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we consider an active fluid of colloidal sized particles, with the primary manifestation of activity being a self-replenishing velocity along one body axis of the particle. This is a minimal model for varied systems such as bacterial colonies, cytoskeletal filament motility assays vibrated granular particles and self propelled diffusophoretic colloids, depending on the nature of interaction among the particles. Using microscopic Brownian dynamics simulations, coarse-graining using the tools of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and analysis of macroscopic hydrodynamic theories, we characterize emergent structures seen in these systems, which are determined by the symmetry of the interactions among the active units, such as propagating density waves, dense stationary bands, asters and phase separated isotropic clusters. We identify a universal mechanism, termed ``self-regulation,'' as the underlying physics that leads to these structures in diverse systems. Support from NSF through DMR-1149266 and DMR-0820492.

  3. A Dynamic Absorber With Active Vibration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.-J.; Lian, R.-J.

    1994-12-01

    The design and construction of a dynamic absorber incorporating active vibration control is described. The absorber is a two-degrees-of-freedom spring — lumped mass system sliding on a guide pillar, with two internal vibration disturbance sources. Both the main mass and the secondary absorber mass are acted on by DC servo motors, respectively, to suppress the vibration amplitude. The state variable technique is used to model this dynamic system and a decoupling PID control method is used. First, the discrete time state space model is identified by using the commercial software MATLAB. Then the decoupling controller of this multi-input/multi-output system is derived from the identified model. Finally the results of some experiments are presented. The experimental results show that the system is effective in suppressing vibration. Also, the performance of this control strategy for position tracking control is evaluated based on experimental data.

  4. Glued structures inspection based on lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Laetitia; Autrique, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Active thermography is a widely employed technique for parametric identification and non-destructive inspection. This attractive method is based on the observation of thermal waves propagation induced by a periodic heating. For nondestructive testing usual approaches are based on a global heating (a large surface of the inspected material is submitted to thermal excitation). In the following a local approach is investigated: the heated area is small (order of magnitude is one square centimeter) and lateral propagation is studied in order to reveal the defect in the sample. In fact, both modulus (heat wave amplitude) and phase lag (delay) of the measured periodic signal are modified by the defect neighborhood and the search for the most effective area leads to the defect localization. Several results are highlighted in this communication in order to investigate an automated procedure. Temperatures are measured by an infrared camera and analyses of modulus cartography are performed in order to estimate the defect location. In such an aim, the downhill simplex method is implemented in order to converge toward defect location. Illustrations are dedicated to glued structures (two plates separated by a thin glue interface) for which unknown defect is a lack of glue which can be considered as a bubble (air trapped between the lower and the upper plane surface). Automated method attractiveness is established in several configurations.

  5. Dynamics of Actively Driven Crosslinked Microtubule Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Vikrant; Stanhope, Kasimira; Evans, Arthur A.; Ross, Jennifer L.

    We have designed a model experiment to explore dynamics of crosslinked active microtubule clusters crosslinked with MAP65. Microtubule clusters are allowed to settle on a slide coated with kinesin-1 molecular motors, which move microtubules. We systematically tune either concentration of cross linkers bound to microtubule (ρc) or the global concentration of microtubules (ρMT) . We quantified the shape of the cluster by measuring the standard deviation (σ) of the cluster outline. At low ρMTor ρc the network is in an expanding state. At higher ρMTor ρc expansion slows down, reaches zero at a critical density, and become negative indicating contraction. Further increase of ρMTor ρc halts any kind of dynamics. The ρMT-ρc phase space shows distinct regions of extensile, contractile and static regimes. We model these results using active hydrodynamic theory. Microtubules are modeled as active rods whereas effect of crosslinkers is modeled using a collision term that prefers anti-parallel alignment of microtubules. A linearized analysis of hydrodynamic equation predicts existence of density driven expanding, contracting, and static phases for microtubule clusters.

  6. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  7. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  8. Infrared thermography at EDF: common technique for high-voltage lines but new in monitoring and diagnosis of PWR plant components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Daniel

    1996-03-01

    Infrared thermography is a remarkable aid in maintenance, and has been used for a number of years in testing high-voltage lines and transformer substations. Electricite de France (EDF) has developed a special infrared thermography system for this type of application. Until recently, use of IRT in both fossil and nuclear power plants was only sporadic and depended on the interest shown in the technique by individual maintenance managers. In power stations, it was primarily used for tests on switchyards, electrical control cabinets and insulation. The General Engineering Department of the EDF Generation and Transmission Division was responsible for assessing new equipment and studying special development requirements as they arose. Routine infrared thermography tests were performed by two teams from the Division, one handling northern France and the other southern France. Today, infrared thermography has become a fully-fledged monitoring and diagnosis tool in its own right, and related activities are being reorganized accordingly. Its recent success can be attributed to a number of factors: more high-powered IRT techniques, valuable feedback from American utility companies, and technical and economic assessments conducted by EDF over the last two years on equipment such as electrical and mechanical components, valves and insulation. EDF's reorganization of infrared thermography activities will begin with an overview of the resources now existing within the company. This inventory will be carried out by the General Engineering Department. At the same time, a report will be drawn up bearing on IRT testing over the last decade in conventional and nuclear power plants in France and the United States. Lastly, EDF will draw up a list of components to be monitored in this way, essentially on the basis of RCM studies. These measures will provide power plants with a catalogue of infrared thermography applications for specific component/failure combinations.

  9. Medical applications of infrared thermography: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Jayakumar, T.; Philip, John

    2012-07-01

    Abnormal body temperature is a natural indicator of illness. Infrared thermography (IRT) is a fast, passive, non-contact and non-invasive alternative to conventional clinical thermometers for monitoring body temperature. Besides, IRT can also map body surface temperature remotely. Last five decades witnessed a steady increase in the utility of thermal imaging cameras to obtain correlations between the thermal physiology and skin temperature. IRT has been successfully used in diagnosis of breast cancer, diabetes neuropathy and peripheral vascular disorders. It has also been used to detect problems associated with gynecology, kidney transplantation, dermatology, heart, neonatal physiology, fever screening and brain imaging. With the advent of modern infrared cameras, data acquisition and processing techniques, it is now possible to have real time high resolution thermographic images, which is likely to surge further research in this field. The present efforts are focused on automatic analysis of temperature distribution of regions of interest and their statistical analysis for detection of abnormalities. This critical review focuses on advances in the area of medical IRT. The basics of IRT, essential theoretical background, the procedures adopted for various measurements and applications of IRT in various medical fields are discussed in this review. Besides background information is provided for beginners for better understanding of the subject.

  10. Hidden heterogeneous materials recognition in pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhi; Tao, Ning; Feng, Lichun; Li, Yue; Zhang, Cunlin

    2012-05-01

    Pulsed thermography has been proven to effectively identify fluid ingress in aerospace honeycomb parts while inspecting large areas in a fast manner. Water, hydraulic oil and excess glue between skin and core may have similar appearance in the infrared image sequences, it is useful to detect what kind of ingress it is. In this study, a simple structure was used to simulate the fluid ingress in a honeycomb part, a 20mm thick steel slab was machined four 1.1mm depth and four 2mm depth circular flat-bottom holes with 20mm diameter at the same side. All holes were filled with different materials: water, oil, air and wax to simulate fluid ingress and excess glue. An algorithm was proposed to first find each hole based on fundamental imaging processing technologies, and then it is based on temporal thermal diffusive properties to automatically recognize what kind of fluid ingress it is in each hole. It was verified with the experimental results of different quantities of fluid ingress and several different flash power levels.

  11. Infrared thermography for condition monitoring - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagavathiappan, S.; Lahiri, B. B.; Saravanan, T.; Philip, John; Jayakumar, T.

    2013-09-01

    Temperature is one of the most common indicators of the structural health of equipment and components. Faulty machineries, corroded electrical connections, damaged material components, etc., can cause abnormal temperature distribution. By now, infrared thermography (IRT) has become a matured and widely accepted condition monitoring tool where the temperature is measured in real time in a non-contact manner. IRT enables early detection of equipment flaws and faulty industrial processes under operating condition thereby, reducing system down time, catastrophic breakdown and maintenance cost. Last three decades witnessed a steady growth in the use of IRT as a condition monitoring technique in civil structures, electrical installations, machineries and equipment, material deformation under various loading conditions, corrosion damages and welding processes. IRT has also found its application in nuclear, aerospace, food, paper, wood and plastic industries. With the advent of newer generations of infrared camera, IRT is becoming a more accurate, reliable and cost effective technique. This review focuses on the advances of IRT as a non-contact and non-invasive condition monitoring tool for machineries, equipment and processes. Various conditions monitoring applications are discussed in details, along with some basics of IRT, experimental procedures and data analysis techniques. Sufficient background information is also provided for the beginners and non-experts for easy understanding of the subject.

  12. Membrane fouling characterization by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndukaife, Kennethrex O.; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Agwu Nnanna, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    An infrared thermography (IRT) technique for characterization of fouling on flat sheet membrane surface has been developed. In this work, an IR camera was used to measure surface temperature and emissivity of foulant on a membrane surface. Different fouling experiments were performed using different feed concentrations of aluminum oxide nanoparticle mixed with deionized water so as to investigate the effect of feed concentration on the degree of fouling and on the emissivity values measured on the membrane surfaces. Our findings revealed that the emissivity of the fouled membrane surface is contingent on the surface roughness as well as the material composition of the foulant. The technique was utilized to distinguish between foulants made of metallic materials from those that are non-metallic. This approach, which is simple to use and nondestructive represents an important addition to the toolset of fouling analysis techniques and would benefit a wide range of applications from observation of foulant structure to qualitative assessment of composition of foulant material.

  13. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R.; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J.; Singh, M.

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  14. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J. ); Singh, M. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-01-01

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  15. Defect characterisation based on heat diffusion using induction thermography testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunze; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) thermography (a.k.a. induction thermography) has been successfully applied to detect defects (corrosion, cracks, impact, and delamination) in metal alloy and carbon fiber reinforced plastic. During these applications, the defect detection mechanism is mainly investigated based on the eddy current interaction with defect. In this paper, defect characterisation for wall thinning defect and inner defect in steel is investigated based on heat diffusion. The paper presents the PEC thermography testing, which integrates the reflection mode and transmission mode by means of configuring two cameras on both sides of sample. The defect characterisation methods under transmission mode and reflection mode are investigated and compared through 1D analytical analysis, 3D numerical studies, and experimental studies. The suitable detection mode for wall thinning and inner defects quantification is concluded.

  16. Transient infrared thermography for damage evaluation in aerospace composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, S.; Peters, K.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of defect detection using long duration transient thermography for woven composite laminates subjected to low-velocity impacts. Two types of defects are studied: inclusions represented by foam tabs inserted into the laminate during fabrication and barely visible impact damage due to low-velocity impacts. These defects represent the expected damage states that are necessary for inspection during the service life of a woven composite aircraft component. The long duration transient thermography is demonstrated to successfully detect the embedded inclusions, with a dimension to depth ratio detection capability of approximately 3. It is also demonstrated that the detection of low velocity impact damage with the transient thermography is less successful due to uneven emissivity of the surface. Therefore, processing of the image using a self referencing algorithm is performed which improves the damage detection clarity.

  17. Defect characterisation based on heat diffusion using induction thermography testing.

    PubMed

    He, Yunze; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) thermography (a.k.a. induction thermography) has been successfully applied to detect defects (corrosion, cracks, impact, and delamination) in metal alloy and carbon fiber reinforced plastic. During these applications, the defect detection mechanism is mainly investigated based on the eddy current interaction with defect. In this paper, defect characterisation for wall thinning defect and inner defect in steel is investigated based on heat diffusion. The paper presents the PEC thermography testing, which integrates the reflection mode and transmission mode by means of configuring two cameras on both sides of sample. The defect characterisation methods under transmission mode and reflection mode are investigated and compared through 1D analytical analysis, 3D numerical studies, and experimental studies. The suitable detection mode for wall thinning and inner defects quantification is concluded. PMID:23126785

  18. Effects of moisture in infrared thermography of resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Kantsios, A. G.; Mcerlean, E. A.; Babcock, R. A.; Buckingham, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Several multiply graphite polyimide composite specimens were examined by real-time infrared thermography in order to study the effects of moisture on their thermograms. Heat was injected from one side and IR emission detected on the opposite side using AGA Thermovision System-680. No differences between the thermograms of dry and water containing specimens were detected for defect-free specimens. However, the presence of trapped water in defective specimens modified the thermographic contrast significantly. It is concluded that: (1) IR thermography can be used to detect moisture in defective composites, and (2) because of the possibility of moisture camouflaging defects, IR thermography for subsurface defect detection should be supplemented by other techniques - such as acoustical imaging and X-radiography.

  19. Infrared thermography as a high-throughput tool in catalysis research.

    PubMed

    Loskyll, Jonas; Stoewe, Klaus; Maier, Wilhelm F

    2012-05-14

    The so-called "emissivity corrected infrared thermography" (ecIRT) has been successfully developed and used to great effect in the field of combinatorial high-throughput studies in catalysis. A short introduction to the basics of ecIRT and the description of a typical setup is given. Research efforts from 1998 until present are summarized and selected publications with IRT applications in catalysis are highlighted. The last section of the article covers potential problems, which the observant may misinterpret as activity of the materials. The effects are classified and it is explained why they occur and what can be done to bypass them. PMID:22432458

  20. Dynamics of Active Sensing and Perceptual Selection

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Charles E; Wilson, Donald A.; Radman, Thomas; Scharfman, Helen; Lakatos, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Sensory processing is often regarded as a passive process in which a biological sensors like photo- and mechanoreceptors transducer physical energy into a neural code. Recent findings, however, suggest that: 1) most sensory processing is active, and largely determined by motor/attentional sampling routines, 2) due to rhythmicity in the motor routine, as well as to its entrainment of ambient rhythms in sensory regions, sensory inflow tends to be rhythmic, and 3) attentional manipulation of rhythms in sensory pathways is instrumental to perceptual selection. These observations outline the essentials of an Active Sensing paradigm, and argue for increased emphasis on the study of sensory processes as specific to the dynamic motor/attentional context in which inputs are acquired. PMID:20307966

  1. Dynamics of Active Sensing and perceptual selection.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Charles E; Wilson, Donald A; Radman, Thomas; Scharfman, Helen; Lakatos, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Sensory processing is often regarded as a passive process in which biological receptors like photoreceptors and mechanoreceptors transduce physical energy into a neural code. Recent findings, however, suggest that: first, most sensory processing is active, and largely determined by motor/attentional sampling routines; second, owing to rhythmicity in the motor routine, as well as to its entrainment of ambient rhythms in sensory regions, sensory inflow tends to be rhythmic; third, attentional manipulation of rhythms in sensory pathways is instrumental to perceptual selection. These observations outline the essentials of an Active Sensing paradigm, and argue for increased emphasis on the study of sensory processes as specific to the dynamic motor/attentional context in which inputs are acquired. PMID:20307966

  2. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  3. Dynamics of two interacting active Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, Parvin; Najafi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Starting from a microscopic model for a spherically symmetric active Janus particle, we study the interactions between two such active motors. The ambient fluid mediates a long range hydrodynamic interaction between two motors. This interaction has both direct and indirect hydrodynamic contributions. The direct contribution is due to the propagation of fluid flow that originated from a moving motor and affects the motion of the other motor. The indirect contribution emerges from the re-distribution of the ionic concentrations in the presence of both motors. Electric force exerted on the fluid from this ionic solution enhances the flow pattern and subsequently changes the motion of both motors. By formulating a perturbation method for very far separated motors, we derive analytic results for the translation and rotational dynamics of the motors. We show that the overall interaction at the leading order modifies the translational and rotational speeds of motors which scale as O (" separators=" [ 1 / D ] 3 ) and O (" separators=" [ 1 / D ] 4 ) with their separation, respectively. Our findings open up the way for studying the collective dynamics of synthetic micro-motors.

  4. Computer Assisted Thermography And Its Application In Ovulation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. H.; Shah, A. V.

    1984-08-01

    Hardware and software of a computer-assisted image analyzing system used for infrared images in medical applications are discussed. The application of computer-assisted thermography (CAT) as a complementary diagnostic tool in centralized diagnostic management is proposed. The authors adopted 'Computer Assisted Thermography' to study physiological changes in the breasts related to the hormones characterizing the menstrual cycle of a woman. Based on clinical experi-ments followed by thermal image analysis, they suggest that 'differential skin temperature (DST)1 be measured to detect the fertility interval in the menstrual cycle of a woman.

  5. IR Thermography of International Space Station Radiator Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay; Winfree, WIlliam; Morton, Richard; Howell, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Several non-flight qualification test radiators were inspected using flash thermography. Flash thermography data analysis used raw and second derivative images to detect anomalies (Echotherm and Mosaic). Simple contrast evolutions were plotted for the detected anomalies to help in anomaly characterization. Many out-of-family indications were noted. Some out-of-family indications were classified as cold spot indications and are due to additional adhesive or adhesive layer behind the facesheet. Some out-of-family indications were classified as hot spot indications and are due to void, unbond or lack of adhesive behind the facesheet. The IR inspection helped in assessing expected manufacturing quality of the radiators.

  6. Nondestructive evaluation technique using infrared thermography and terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Shiozawa, Daiki; Tamaki, Yoshitaka; Iwama, Tatsuya

    2016-05-01

    Nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques using pulse heating infrared thermography and terahertz (THz) imaging were developed for detecting deterioration of oil tank floor, such as blister and delamination of corrosion protection coating, or corrosion of the bottom steel plate under coating. Experimental studies were conducted to demonstrate the practicability of developed techniques. It was found that the pulse heating infrared thermography was utilized for effective screening inspection and THz-TDS imaging technique performed well for the detailed inspection of coating deterioration and steel corrosion.

  7. Locating levels in tanks and silos using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, John R., Jr.; Schwoegler, Matt

    2004-04-01

    Thermography is a powerful tool for locating or verifying levels in tanks and silos. But one could ask "Why bother?" All too often existing level indication instruments are simply not reliable or positive verification of instrumentation readings is required. When properly used, thermography can reveal not only the liquid/gas interface, but also sludge buildup and floating materials such as waxes and foams. Similar techniques can be used to locate levels and bridging problems in silos containing fluidized solids. This paper discusses the parameters and limitations that must be addressed, shows techniques that can be employed, and illustrates the discussions with numerous thermal images.

  8. Parameterisation of non-homogeneities in buried object detection by means of thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanić, Josip; Malinovec, Marina; Švaić, Srećko; Krstelj, Vjera

    2004-05-01

    Landmines and their natural environment form a system of complex dynamics with variable characteristics. A manifestation of that complexity within the context of thermography-based landmines detection is excessive noise in thermograms. That has severely suppressed application of thermography in landmines detection for the purposes of humanitarian demining. (To be differentiated from military demining and demining for military operations other than war [Land Mine Detection DOD's Research Program Needs a Comprehensive Evaluation Strategy, US GAO Report, GAO-01 239, 2001; International Mine Action Standards, Chapter 4.--Glossary. Available at: < http://www.mineactionstandards.org/IMAS_archive/Final/04.10.pdf>].) The discrepancy between the existing role and the actual potential of thermography in humanitarian demining motivated systematic approach to sources of noise in thermograms of buried objects. These sources are variations in mine orientation relative to soil normal, which modify the shape of mine signature on thermograms, as well as non-homogeneities in soil and vegetation layer above the mine, which modify the overall quality of thermograms. This paper analyses the influence of variable mines, and more generally the influence of axially symmetric buried object orientation on the quality of its signature on thermograms. The following two angles have been extracted to serve as parameters describing variation in orientation: (i) θ--angle between the local vertical axis and mine symmetry axis and (ii) ψ--angle between local vertical axis and soil surface normal. Their influence is compared to the influence of (iii) d--the object depth change, which serves as control parameter. The influences are quantified and ranked within a statistically planned experiment. The analysis has proved that among the parameters listed, the most influential one is statistical interaction dψ, followed with the statistical interaction dθ. According to statistical tests, these two

  9. Infrared thermography as a diagnostic tool to indicate sick-house-syndrome: a case-study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    1996-03-01

    Every third child and many adults in Sweden have allergic reactions caused by indoor environmental problems. A lot of buildings constructed during the building-boom period of 1950 - 1990 expose the sick-house-syndrome, due to built-in moisture problems and poor ventilation performance of the building. Leaky building construction, transport of humid air condensing on thermal bridges within the construction gives rise to a humid environment, and forms a base for a microbial deterioration process of organic materials, with emissions hazardous for human health. So far there are no universal and cost efficient techniques or methods developed which could be used to reveal the sick-house-syndrome. In this paper we present the results of a case-study of the sick-house-syndrome, and an investigation concept with a combination of different techniques and methods to detect and to map underlying factors that form the base for microbial activities. The concept includes mobile and indoor thermography, functional control of ventilation systems, tracer gas techniques for measurement of air flow exchange rate in different rooms, microbial investigation of emissions, field inspections within the building construction and the building envelope, and medical investigation of the health status of the people working in the building. Mobile thermography of the exterior facades has been performed with a longwave AGEMA THV 900, respectively THV 1000 infrared system, during the period December 1994 - June 1995, at different and similar weather and radiation conditions, and with the building pressurized at one accession. Indoor thermography has been performed with a shortwave AGEMA THV 470 system, for a selection of objects/surfaces with thermal deviations, indicated in thermograms from the different mobile thermographic surveys. Functional control was performed for the ventilation systems, and air flow rates were measured using tracer gas technique for a selection of rooms with different

  10. Evaluation of Microbolometer-Based Thermography for Gossamer Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jonathan J.; Blandino, Joseph R.; Jenkins, Christopher H.; Pappa, Richard S.; Banik, Jeremy; Brown, Hunter; McEvoy, Kiley

    2005-01-01

    In August 2003, NASA's In-Space Propulsion Program contracted with our team to develop a prototype on-board Optical Diagnostics System (ODS) for solar sail flight tests. The ODS is intended to monitor sail deployment as well as structural and thermal behavior, and to validate computational models for use in designing future solar sail missions. This paper focuses on the thermography aspects of the ODS. A thermal model was developed to predict local sail temperature variations as a function of sail tilt to the sun, billow depth, and spectral optical properties of front and back sail surfaces. Temperature variations as small as 0.5 C can induce significant thermal strains that compare in magnitude to mechanical strains. These thermally induced strains may result in changes in shape and dynamics. The model also gave insight into the range and sensitivity required for in-flight thermal measurements and supported the development of an ABAQUS-coupled thermo-structural model. The paper also discusses three kinds of tests conducted to 1) determine the optical properties of candidate materials; 2) evaluate uncooled microbolometer-type infrared imagers; and 3) operate a prototype imager with the ODS baseline configuration. (Uncooled bolometers are less sensitive than cooled ones, but may be necessary because of restrictive ODS mass and power limits.) The team measured the spectral properties of several coated polymer samples at various angles of incidence. Two commercially available uncooled microbolometer imagers were compared, and it was found that reliable temperature measurements are feasible for both coated and uncoated sides of typical sail membrane materials.

  11. Evaluation of microbolometer-based thermography for gossamer space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jonathan J.; Blandino, Joseph R.; Jenkins, Christopher H. M.; Pappa, Richard S.; Banik, Jeremy; Brown, Hunter; McEvoy, Kiley

    2005-08-01

    In August 2003, NASA's In-Space Propulsion Program contracted with our team to develop a prototype on-board Optical Diagnostics System (ODS) for solar sail flight tests. The ODS is intended to monitor sail deployment as well as structural and thermal behavior, and to validate computational models for use in designing future solar sail missions. This paper focuses on the thermography aspects of the ODS. A thermal model was developed to predict local sail temperature variations as a function of sail tilt to the sun, billow depth, and spectral optical properties of front and back sail surfaces. Temperature variations as small as 0.5 oC can induce significant thermal strains that compare in magnitude to mechanical strains. These thermally induced strains may result in changes in shape and dynamics. The model also gave insight into the range and sensitivity required for in-flight thermal measurements and supported the development of an ABAQUS-coupled thermo-structural model. The paper also discusses three kinds of tests conducted to 1) determine the optical properties of candidate materials; 2) evaluate uncooled microbolometer-type infrared imagers; and 3) operate a prototype imager with the ODS baseline configuration. (Uncooled bolometers are less sensitive than cooled ones, but may be necessary because of restrictive ODS mass and power limits.) The team measured the spectral properties of several coated polymer samples at various angles of incidence. Two commercially available uncooled microbolometer imagers were compared, and it was found that reliable temperature measurements are feasible for both coated and uncoated sides of typical sail membrane materials.

  12. Inspecting thermal barrier coatings by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bison, Paolo G.; Marinetti, Sergio; Grinzato, Ermanno G.; Vavilov, Vladimir P.; Cernuschi, Federico; Robba, Daniele

    2003-04-01

    As far as power generation is concerned, coating technologies find the main and more advanced applications. Nowadays, superalloys available for manufacturing hot path components in gas turbine like combustion liners, blades and vanes can not sustain temperatures up to 1100°C. In order to guarantee a significative temperature drop ceramic thermal barrier coatings are deposited onto the metallic core. The thickness of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) ranges from a few hundreds microns up to 1 millimetre or more, depending on component and deposition technique (mainly Air Plasma Spray or Electron Beam Physical Vapour Deposition). The structural integrity of both the substrate and the coating and their mutual adhesion is a key point because any loss of the protective layer exposes the bulk material to an extremely aggressive environment in terms of oxidation and temperature. Therefore, TBC must be tested for detecting of defects during both quality control and periodic in-service inspections. Because of the key role played by thickness and low thermal diffusivity of TBC in the decreasing of the substrate material temperature, both delaminations and thickness variation must be detected and classified. Pulsed Thermography has been successfully applied to this application field. Nevertheless, the procedure gives ambiguous results when thickness or thermal properties change in a continuous way within the thermal barrier. In this paper, a specific study on the detection performances of NDE techniques is presented, even when a non-uniform TBC thickness is superimposed to the disbonding defect. Tests performed at workshop on real and specifically manufactured components are reported. Dedicated processing algorithms improving the test reliability and effectiveness are presented as well. Tests on real components on the field are also reported.

  13. High-resolution survey of buildings by lock-in IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolin, A.; Cadelano, G.; Ferrarini, G.; Bison, P.; Peron, F.; Maldague, X.

    2013-05-01

    Applications of Infrared Thermography in buildings surveys are not limited to the identification of the temperature distribution and heat losses on building envelopes. As it is well known from NDT testing in industrial applications, active IR thermographic methods such as heating-up/cooling-down or lock-in thermography improve the results in many investigations. In civil engineering these techniques have not been used widely. Mostly, thermography is used in a quasistatic manner. This paper illustrates a new approach to achieve, by the lock-in technique, an in depth view of the structure of the wall evidencing the presence of buried elements, interfaces and cracks. The idea is to take advantage of the periodic heating and cooling of earth surface due to the alternating of day and night. The corresponding thermal wave has a period equal to 24 hours that can probe the walls of buildings with a penetration depth of the order of some centimeters. The periodic temperature signal is analysed to extract amplitude and phase. It is expected that the phase image gives the indication of inhomogeneity buried in the wall structure. As a case study, the exterior surface of Palazzo Ducale in Venice is analysed and illustrated. In addition to IR images, visible electromagnetic band is considered to evaluate the strength of the solar radiation and the geometrical distortion. Indeed, the periodicity due to the Earth rotation is only approximately of 24 hours. The passing clouds or the possibility of rainy days can superimpose other heating or cooling frequencies to the main one. The Fourier analysis of the impinging radiation on the wall is performed. The façade of Palazzo Ducale is tiled with stone of two different colours and types. A final attempt to automatically classify the stone tiles in the visible and infrared images is conducted.

  14. The quantitative inspection of iron aluminide green sheet using transient thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Michael L.; Hinders, Mark K.; Scorey, Clive; Winfree, William

    1999-12-01

    The recent development of manufacturing techniques for the fabrication of thin iron aluminide, FeAl, sheet requires advanced quantitative methods for on-line inspection. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for flaws and the development of appropriate flaw detection methods are key elements in an effective quality management system. The first step in the fabrication of thin FeAl alloy sheet is the formation of a green sheet, either by cold rolling or tape casting FeAl powder mixed with organic binding agents. The finished sheet is obtained using a series of process steps involving binder elimination, densification, sintering, and annealing. Non-uniformities within the green sheet are the major contributor to material failure in subsequent sheet processing and the production of non-conforming finished sheet. Previous work has demonstrated the advantages of using active thermography to detect the flaws and heterogeneity within green powder composites (1)(2)(3). The production environment and physical characteristics of these composites provide for unique challenges in developing a rapid nondestructive inspection capability. Thermography is non-contact and minimizes the potential damage to the fragile green sheet. Limited access to the material also demands a one-sided inspection technique. In this paper, we will describe the application of thermography for 100% on-line inspection within an industrial process. This approach is cost competitive with alternative technologies, such as x-ray imaging systems, and provides the required sensitivity to the variations in material composition. The formation of green sheet flaws and their transformation into defects within intermediate and finished sheet products will be described. A green sheet conformance criterion will be presented which would significantly reduce the probability of processing poor quality green sheet which contributes to higher waste and inferior bulk alloy sheet.

  15. Dynamic response of active twist rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, Sang Joon; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2001-02-01

    Dynamic characteristics of active twist rotor (ATR) blades are investigated analytically and experimentally in this paper. The ATR system is intended for vibration and potentially for noise reductions in helicopters through individual blade control. An aeroelastic model is developed to identify frequency response characteristics of the ATR blade with integral, generally anisotropic, strain actuators embedded in its composite construction. An ATR prototype blade was designed and manufactured to experimentally study the vibration reduction capabilities of such systems. Several bench and hover tests were conducted and those results are presented and discussed here. Selected results on sensitivity of the ATR system to collective setting (i.e. blade loading), blade rpm (i.e. centrifugal force and blade station velocity), and media density (i.e. altitude) are presented. They indicated that the twist actuation authority of the ATR blade is independent of the collective setting up to approximately 10P, and dependent on rotational speed and altitude near the torsional resonance frequency due to its dependency on the aerodynamic damping. The proposed model captures very well the physics and sensitivities to selected test parameters of the ATR system. The numerical result of the blade torsional loads show an average error of 20% in magnitude and virtually no difference in phase for the blade frequency response. Overall, the active blade model is in very good agreement with the experiments and can be used to analyze and design future active helicopter blade systems.

  16. New activity pattern in human interactive dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formentin, Marco; Lovison, Alberto; Maritan, Amos; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the response function of human agents as demonstrated by written correspondence, uncovering a new pattern for how the reactive dynamics of individuals is distributed across the set of each agent’s contacts. In long-term empirical data on email, we find that the set of response times considered separately for the messages to each different correspondent of a given writer, generate a family of heavy-tailed distributions, which have largely the same features for all agents, and whose characteristic times grow exponentially with the rank of each correspondent. We furthermore show that this new behavioral pattern emerges robustly by considering weighted moving averages of the priority-conditioned response-time probabilities generated by a basic prioritization model. Our findings clarify how the range of priorities in the inputs from one’s environment underpin and shape the dynamics of agents embedded in a net of reactive relations. These newly revealed activity patterns might be universal, being present in other general interactive environments, and constrain future models of communication and interaction networks, affecting their architecture and evolution.

  17. Toward understanding the complex mechanisms behind breast thermography: an overview for comprehensive numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray H.

    2011-03-01

    The abnormal thermogram has been shown to be a reliable indicator of a high risk of breast cancer. Nevertheless, a major weakness of current infrared breast thermography is its poor sensitivity for deeper tumors. Numerical modeling for breast thermography provides an effective tool to investigate the complex relationships between the breast thermal behaviors and the underlying patho-physiological conditions. We have developed a set of new modeling techniques to take into account some subtle factors usually ignored in previous studies, such as gravity-induced elastic deformations of the breast, nonlinear elasticity of soft tissues, and dynamic behavior of thermograms. Conventional "forward problem" modeling cannot be used directly to improve tumor detectability, however, because the underlying tissue thermal properties are generally unknown. Therefore, we propose an "inverse problem" modeling technique that aims to estimate the tissue thermal properties from the breast surface thermogram. Our data suggest that the estimation of the tumor-induced thermal contrast can be improved significantly by using the proposed inverse problem solving techniques to provide the individual-specific thermal background, especially for deeper tumors. We expect the proposed new methods, taken together, to provide a stronger foundation for, and greater specificity and precision in, thermographic diagnosis, and treatment, of breast cancer.

  18. Use of aerial thermography in Canadian energy conservation programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Brown, R. J.; Lawrence, G.; Barry, J. N.; James, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of aerial thermography in energy conservation programs within Canada were summarized. Following a brief review of studies conducted during the last three years, methodologies of data acquisition, processing, analysis and interpretation was discussed. Examples of results from an industrial oriented project were presented and recommendations for future basic work were outlined.

  19. Investigation on choosing technical parameters for pulse thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijuan

    2015-04-01

    Composite material connected by glue has gained popularity as a replacement for conventional materials and structures to reduce weight and improve strength in the aerospace industry, with the development of material science and structural mechanics. However, the adhesive bonding process is more susceptible to quality variations during manufacturing than traditional joining methods. The integrality, strength and rigidity of product would be broken by disbonding. Infrared thermography is one of several non-destructive testing techniques which can be used for defect detection in aircraft materials. Pulsed infrared thermography has been widely used in aerospace and mechanical manufacture industry because it can offer noncontact, quickly and visual examinations of disbonding defects. However the parameter choosing method is difficult to decide. Investigate the choosing technical parameters for pulse thermograpghy is more important to ensure the product quality and testing efficiency. In this paper, two kinds of defects which are of various size, shape and location below the test surface are planted in the honeycomb structure, they are all tested by pulsed thermography. This paper presents a study of single factor experimental research on damage sample in simulation was carried out. The impact of the power of light source, detection distance, and the wave band of thermography camera on detecting effect is studied. The select principle of technique is made, the principle supplied basis for selection of detecting parameters in real part testing.

  20. Using infrared thermography to study freezing in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that determine when and to what extent a plant will freeze are complex. While thermocouples have served as the main method of monitoring the freezing process in plants, infrared thermography offers distinct advantages, and the use of this latter technology has provided new insights on the p...

  1. Defect Detection in Composite Coatings by Computational Simulation Aided Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, R. M.; Souza, M. P. V.; Rebello, J. M. A.

    2010-02-01

    Thermography is based on the measurement of superficial temperature distribution of an object inspected subjected to tension, normally thermal heat. This measurement is performed with a thermographic camera that detects the infrared radiation emitted by every object. In this work thermograph was simulated by COMSOL software for optimize experimental parameters in composite material coatings inspection.

  2. Infrared thermography to detect residual ceramic in gas turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meola, C.; Carlomagno, G. M.; di Foggia, M.; Natale, O.

    2008-06-01

    A serious problem in the production of gas turbine blades is the detection of residual ceramic cores inside the cooling passages; in fact, the presence of even small ceramic pieces affects turbine performance and may cause difficulties in successive manufacturing. Therefore, it is important to have a non-destructive technique that must be capable of detecting tiny ceramic fragments in a fast and easy way. In this perspective, the suitability of infrared thermography was investigated within cooperation between the University of Naples and the Europea Microfusioni Aerospaziali S.p.A. (EMA). Several blades of three different types were inspected revealing that in many cases infrared thermography can discover small ceramic fragments which were missed by X-ray inspection. In addition, infrared thermography allows gaining of information about other types of anomalies (e.g., surface defects) during the same testing step (by eventually changing the test parameters) and then saving time and money. The obtained results look promising in view of introducing infrared thermography among industrial instrumentation as an alternative to, or integrated with, the most currently utilized non-destructive techniques.

  3. Investigation of honeycomb structure using pulse infrared thermography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijuan

    2010-11-01

    To reduce weight and improve strength in the aerospace industry, composite structure has gained popularity as a replacement for conventional materials and structures, such as adhesive bonding and honeycomb structure. Honeycomb structures composed by a honeycomb core between two facesheets are very common on aerospace parts. However, the adhesive bonding process is more susceptible to quality variations during manufacturing than traditional joining methods. With the large increase in the use of composite materials and honeycomb structures, the need for high speed, large area inspection for fracture critical, sub-surface defects in aircraft, missiles and marine composites led to broad acceptance of infrared based NDT methods. Infrared thermography is one of several non-destructive testing techniques which can be used for defect detection in aircraft materials. Infrared thermography can be potentially useful, as it is quick, real time, non-contact and can examine over a relatively large area in one inspection procedure. In this paper, two kinds of defects which are of various size, shape and location below the test surface are planted in the honeycomb structure, they are all tested by pulsed thermography, analyze the thermal sequence and intensity graph got by this methods, it shows that pulsed thermography is an effective nondestructive technique for inspecting disbonding defect, can distinguish the location and the dimension of the defect exactly.

  4. Concept And Development Of Instruments For ITER Thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Reichle, R.; Balorin, C.; Carpentier, S.; Corre, Y.; Davi, M.; Delchambre, E.; Desgrange, C.; Escourbiac, F.; Fougerolle, S.; Gardarein, J. L.; Gauthier, E.; Guilhem, D.; Jouve, M.; Loarer, Th.; Martins, J. P.; Patterlini, J. C.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Salasca, S.; Travere, J. M.

    2008-03-12

    We give here a short overview of the status of the development for ITER thermography as performed by the CEA-Cadarache and some of its collaboration partners. The topics that have been included in this synthesis are the status of the optical design, the role of multi-wavelength mesurements, multicolour pyroreflectometry, photothermal methods, and reflection simulations and measurements.

  5. Infrared thermography to evaluate lameness in pregnant sows

    PubMed Central

    Amezcua, Rocio; Walsh, Shannon; Luimes, Paul H.; Friendship, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of lameness in sows is important to reduce losses and improve animal welfare. Mild-to-moderate lameness is difficult to diagnose in sows. Infrared thermography (IRT) was evaluated as a method of detecting signs of inflammation in the lower limbs as an aid in lameness detection. PMID:24587511

  6. Heat transfer investigation in pipe by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppel, Tiit; Ainola, Leo; Ekholm, Ari; Lahdeniemi, Matti

    2000-03-01

    The IR-thermography has proved to be a useful contactless instrument in fluid flow research, especially for investigation of heat transfer processes. Series of experimental measurements of suddenly accelerated and pulsating pipe flow were made at Satakunta Polytechnic, Technology in Pori, Finland, with this aim.

  7. NASA MUST Paper: Infrared Thermography of Graphite/Epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comeaux, Kayla; Koshti, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this project is to use Infrared Thermography, a non-destructive test, to detect detrimental cracks and voids beneath the surface of materials used in the space program. This project will consist of developing a simulation model of the Infrared Thermography inspection of the Graphite/Epoxy specimen. The simulation entails finding the correct physical properties for this specimen as well as programming the model for thick voids or flat bottom holes. After the simulation is completed, an Infrared Thermography inspection of the actual specimen will be made. Upon acquiring the experimental test data, an analysis of the data for the actual experiment will occur, which includes analyzing images, graphical analysis, and analyzing numerical data received from the infrared camera. The simulation will then be corrected for any discrepancies between it and the actual experiment. The optimized simulation material property inputs can then be used for new simulation for thin voids. The comparison of the two simulations, the simulation for the thick void and the simulation for the thin void, provides a correlation between the peak contrast ratio and peak time ratio. This correlation is used in the evaluation of flash thermography data during the evaluation of delaminations.

  8. Infrared thermography based defect detection in ferromagnetic specimens using a low frequency alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Soumya, C.; Mahendran, V.; Pillai, V. P. M.; Philip, John; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-05-01

    A new active infrared thermography based technique is proposed for defect detection in ferromagnetic specimens using a low frequency alternating magnetic field induced heating. The test specimens (four mild steel specimens with artificial rectangular slots of 8.0, 5.0, 3.3 and 3.0 mm depths) are magnetized using a low frequency alternating magnetic field and by using an infrared camera, the surface temperature is remotely monitored in real time. An alternating magnetic field induces an eddy current in the specimen which increases the specimen temperature due to the Joule's heating. The experimental results show a thermal contrast in the defective region that decays exponentially with the defect depth. The observed thermal contrast is attributed to the reduction in induction heating due to the leakage of magnetic flux caused by magnetic permeability gradient in the defective region. The proposed technique is suitable for rapid non-contact wide area inspection of ferromagnetic materials and offers several advantages over the conventional active thermography techniques like fast direct heating, no frequency optimization, no dependence on the surface absorption coefficient and penetration depth.

  9. T.S.A. and Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, W. N.

    1987-04-01

    The SIRA SPATE equipment for thermal stress analysis is a successful example of the application of modern instrumentation technology to the development and application of classical concepts in physics. The use of Infra Red Optics to monitor small temperature changes over the surface of a solid material has great advantages in many applications as it is rapid, non contacting and non-invasive, and produces signals which can be recorded and analysed in many ways. These advantages have already been exploited to some extent in other applications such as conventional thermography, in which the distribution of heat in a structure is monitored by an I.R. imager using a rotating scanning system, or an I.R. pyroelectric vidicon tube. Such systems are widely employed in monitoring electrical power supplies or chemical plant, but have proved of less relevance to problems of nondestructive testing. In recent years this idea has been combined with that of introducing an alternating or on-off source of heat by means of a chopped laser beam for example, and using recording equipment such as SPATE to monitor the flow heat through a solid. It can be shown that such a source produces a train of critically damped waves of length A where 1/2 A = 2{1T4 where a is the thermal diffusivity of the solid and v is the frequency of chopping and the wave amplitude falls to l/e of its initial value in one wavelength. For waves of frequency 1Hz in copper, A is about 20mm, but normally it is necessary to work at frequencies of 100Hz or more in materials of much lower diffusivity. Consequently this method is chiefly of interest in the examination of thin sheets or coatings up to 1-2mm in thickness. In another development which is more specifically adaptable 'to many problems of NDT, heat is introduced over a chosen area at a high rate for a predetermined time of between lms and about 10s. The subsequent flow through the solid is then monitored by means of an I.R. imager compatible with current TV

  10. IR thermography for the assessment of the thermal conductivity of thermoelectric modules at intermediate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, S.; Ferrario, A.; Bison, P.; Miozzo, A.; Montagner, F.; Fabrizio, M.

    2016-05-01

    The correct measurement of the performances of thermoelectric (TE) modules for energy conversion is a mandatory task both for laboratory research and for industries engaged in TE modules development or in their integration into thermoelectric generators. A testing device oriented to the maximum flexibility, based on the heat flow meter method at the cold side of the module has been developed. The system is conceived to test TE modules (single or in cascade) with a footprint up to 60x60 mm2, from room temperature up to intermediate temperature. Modules can be tested under vacuum or inert atmosphere. Specifically, the flow meter is made of a block of material, with known thermal conductivity, in contact with the cold side of the thermoelectric module. The heat flow is finally determined by measuring the temperature profile along the heat flow path and that is obtained by IR thermography. IR thermography is also utilized to evaluate the contact resistance between the active thermoelectric elements made of ceramic materials and the ceramic layer working as heat diffuser and mechanical support. Some finite element thermal analyses of the system performed for its design are presented.

  11. Spreading Dynamics Following Bursty Activity Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Alexei

    The dynamics of many social, technological and economic phenomena are driven by individual human actions, turning the quantitative understanding of human behavior into a central question of modern science. Recent empirical evidence indicates that the timing of individual human actions follow non-Poisson statistics, characterized by bursts of rapidly occurring events separated by long periods of inactivity. In this work we analyze how this bursty dynamics impacts the dynamics of spreading processes in computer and social systems. We demonstrate that the non-Poisson nature of the contact dynamics results in prevalence decay times significantly larger than predicted by the standard Poisson process based models. Thanks to this slow dynamics the spreading entity, namely a virus, rumor, etc., can persist in the system for long times.

  12. Inverse Temperature Mapping of Re-Entry Vehicle Control Surfaces Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, C.; Hirtz, B.; Vuilleumier, A.; Roesgen, T.; Vos, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of an optical system to deliver rear face temperatures thermal maps of an EXPERT vehicle flap using near infrared thermography. The optical system consists of a wide angle lens assembly placed behind the flap, a fiber optic cable and a high rate near infrared camera. The camera transfers images to an autonomous data handling unit located on a colder area of the vehicle. After flight the temperature on the flap windward face is computed using the stored thermal maps as input to a coupled fluid dynamics-heat transfer calculation. The system has been successfully qualified for the EXPERT mission and the inverse temperature reconstruction will be tested in the Scirocco Plasma Wind tunnel. A further evolution of this system allowing simultaneous measurement of temperature and emissivity is planned for the IXV vehicle

  13. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  14. From photothermal radiometry to lock-in thermography methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, Gerd

    2010-03-01

    This thermal wave conference dates back to 1979 when it was held for the first time in Ames/Iowa. All participants have this area still in mind, maybe not only due to the landscape but also to the cheerleader courses held parallel to our sessions on the same campus. So after 30 years time has come to review some thermal wave developments that started back in 1979 and to see how they affected other fields, e.g. NDE. This paper traces the origin of lock-in thermography back to the roots which is essentially to show how initially two different areas (thermal waves and thermography) merged partially together to become a powerful tool for modern NDE.

  15. Thermography Applied to Interfacial Phenomena, Potentials and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, M.; Sefiane, K.

    Infrared (IR) thermography is a non-intrusive method for temperature measurement. Its ability to produce two-dimensional temperature images makes it a powerful tool for investigating systems exhibiting spatial variation of temperature. IR temperature measurements are almost always surface measurements; the technique has therefore found use in obtaining interfacial temperatures, primarily in heat and mass transfer investigations. The reasons for the technique's limited uptake likely stems from the requirement of accurate material emissivity data and the large number of potential sources of error. This chapter provides an overview of the underlying theory of radiative heat transfer. Key considerations and problems in the application of IR thermography are discussed with reference to some examples of recent successful applications.

  16. Divertor IR thermography on Alcator C-Mod.

    PubMed

    Terry, J L; LaBombard, B; Brunner, D; Payne, J; Wurden, G A

    2010-10-01

    Alcator C-Mod is a particularly challenging environment for thermography. It presents issues that will similarly face ITER, including low-emissivity metal targets, low-Z surface films, and closed divertor geometry. In order to make measurements of the incident divertor heat flux using IR thermography, the C-Mod divertor has been modified and instrumented. A 6° toroidal sector has been given a 2° toroidal ramp in order to eliminate magnetic field-line shadowing by imperfectly aligned divertor tiles. This sector is viewed from above by a toroidally displaced IR camera and is instrumented with thermocouples and calorimeters. The camera provides time histories of surface temperatures that are used to compute incident heat-flux profiles. The camera sensitivity is calibrated in situ using the embedded thermocouples, thus correcting for changes and nonuniformities in surface emissivity due to surface coatings. PMID:21034041

  17. Divertor IR thermography on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J. L.; LaBombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Payne, J.; Wurden, G. A.

    2010-10-15

    Alcator C-Mod is a particularly challenging environment for thermography. It presents issues that will similarly face ITER, including low-emissivity metal targets, low-Z surface films, and closed divertor geometry. In order to make measurements of the incident divertor heat flux using IR thermography, the C-Mod divertor has been modified and instrumented. A 6 deg. toroidal sector has been given a 2 deg. toroidal ramp in order to eliminate magnetic field-line shadowing by imperfectly aligned divertor tiles. This sector is viewed from above by a toroidally displaced IR camera and is instrumented with thermocouples and calorimeters. The camera provides time histories of surface temperatures that are used to compute incident heat-flux profiles. The camera sensitivity is calibrated in situ using the embedded thermocouples, thus correcting for changes and nonuniformities in surface emissivity due to surface coatings.

  18. Divertor IR thermography on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J. L.; LaBombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Payne, J.; Wurden, G. A.

    2010-10-01

    Alcator C-Mod is a particularly challenging environment for thermography. It presents issues that will similarly face ITER, including low-emissivity metal targets, low-Z surface films, and closed divertor geometry. In order to make measurements of the incident divertor heat flux using IR thermography, the C-Mod divertor has been modified and instrumented. A 6° toroidal sector has been given a 2° toroidal ramp in order to eliminate magnetic field-line shadowing by imperfectly aligned divertor tiles. This sector is viewed from above by a toroidally displaced IR camera and is instrumented with thermocouples and calorimeters. The camera provides time histories of surface temperatures that are used to compute incident heat-flux profiles. The camera sensitivity is calibrated in situ using the embedded thermocouples, thus correcting for changes and nonuniformities in surface emissivity due to surface coatings.

  19. Developing written inspection procedures for thermal/infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, J.

    1996-12-31

    Written inspection procedures are essential to acquiring valid data on a repeatable basis. They are also vital to the safety of the thermographer, and may, for that reason alone, be required by a company. Many thermographers are working with no written procedures. To date only a few of the necessary procedures have been developed by recognized standards organizations. The lack of procedures is limiting the use of thermography. Where thermography is being used without them, results are often less than optimum. This paper will (1) survey existing procedures and standards; (2) discuss current efforts by standards organizations to develop standards and procedures; and (3) present a general methodology from which written inspection procedures can be developed for many thermographic inspections.

  20. Using thermography for an obstruction of the lower lacrimal system.

    PubMed

    Machado, Marco Antonio de Campos; Silva, João Amaro Ferrari; Brioschi, Marcos Leal; Allemann, Norma

    2016-02-01

    Obstructions in the lacrimal pathways quite often require accurate and reliable image scanning for confirmation and documentation. Infrared thermal imaging, known as thermography, is a resource that complements diagnosis; it does not require touching the patient or applying contrast materials and has been used in various medical procedures for decades. However, there have been few studies in the literature about its use in ophthalmology. In this paper, the authors have presented a case of dacryocystitis where the obstruction of the lacrimal punctum was so acute that conventional dacryocystography could not be used. The authors have successfully reported the use of thermography as a complementary propaedeutic and will discuss the method they used. PMID:26840168

  1. The use of infrared thermography for nondestructive evaluation of joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meola, Carosena; Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; Squillace, Antonino; Giorleo, Giuseppe

    2004-12-01

    A junction between two similar, or dissimilar, materials represents generally a weak structural point and so it requires accurate choice of the most adequate joining technique and nondestructive evaluation of joined parts whatever the joining technique. The attention of the present paper is focused on the aid provided by infrared thermography for nondestructive evaluation of three types of joints: aluminum adhesively bonded joints, stainless steel laser welded joints and Glare ® mechanical fastened joints. Both techniques, pulse and modulated thermography with optical stimulation, are used. The attention is particularly focused on the second method because phase images are practically not affected by local nonuniform heating and/or local variation of the emissivity coefficient as thermal images.

  2. Detection of foreign substances in food using thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinlschmidt, Peter; Maergner, Volker

    2002-03-01

    This paper gives a short introduction into the possibility of detecting foreign bodies in food by using IR thermography. The first results shown for combinations of cherries and chocolate and berries contaminated with leaves, stalks, pedicel and thorns could be easily evaluated manually. Therefore the differing emissivity coefficients or the different heat conductivities and/or capacities are used for differentiation. Applying pulse thermography, first heat conductivity measurements of different food materials are performed. Calculating the contrast of possible food / contaminant combinations shows the difficulty of differentiating certain materials. A possible automatic evaluation for raisins contaminated with wooden sticks and almonds blended with stones could be shown. The power of special adapted algorithms using statistical or morphological analysis is shown to distinguish the foreign bodies from the foodstuff.

  3. Eddy current pulsed phase thermography and feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunze; Tian, GuiYun; Pan, Mengchun; Chen, Dixiang

    2013-08-01

    This letter proposed an eddy current pulsed phase thermography technique combing eddy current excitation, infrared imaging, and phase analysis. One steel sample is selected as the material under test to avoid the influence of skin depth, which provides subsurface defects with different depths. The experimental results show that this proposed method can eliminate non-uniform heating and improve defect detectability. Several features are extracted from differential phase spectra and the preliminary linear relationships are built to measure these subsurface defects' depth.

  4. Surface temperature measurement of insulating glass units using infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Elmahdy, H.

    1996-12-31

    Infrared (IR) thermography is a process to produce, by means of an infrared scanner, thermal images of surfaces by detecting the radiation emitted from the surfaces. The application of IR thermography as a diagnostic tool in building science assists in determining existing anomalies in the building envelope and other building components. In this paper, IR thermography is used to compare the glass surface temperatures of insulating glass (IG) units made with two types of spacer bar (metal and silicone foam) and different gap widths. The results from this research are compared with data obtained from another research laboratory using a different IR scanner and also with data from finite-element computer modeling. All the tests and simulations were performed on identical IG units. Tests performed on seven IG units indicated that IR thermography could be used to assess the edge-of-glass temperature of IG units for the prediction of condensation resistance of the units. The image processing and analysis depend on the knowledge of accurate emissivity of the surfaces under investigation as well as other variables that affect the final thermal image (e.g., ambient temperature, relative humidity of air in the optical path, and the optical path length). The IR scanner records all the radiation (both direct and reflected) it sees either from the intended target or from any other radiative surfaces in its field of view (FOV). The vertical temperature profiles of all the tested units showed considerable reduction of temperature at the bottom section of the IG unit. The degree of temperature reduction is affected by the type of spacer bar material and the gap thickness.

  5. Individual and group dynamics in purchasing activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Guo, Jin-Li; Fan, Chao; Liu, Xue-Jiao

    2013-01-01

    As a major part of the daily operation in an enterprise, purchasing frequency is in constant change. Recent approaches on the human dynamics can provide some new insights into the economic behavior of companies in the supply chain. This paper captures the attributes of creation times of purchase orders to an individual vendor, as well as to all vendors, and further investigates whether they have some kind of dynamics by applying logarithmic binning to the construction of distribution plots. It’s found that the former displays a power-law distribution with approximate exponent 2.0, while the latter is fitted by a mixture distribution with both power-law and exponential characteristics. Obviously, two distinctive characteristics are presented for the interval time distribution from the perspective of individual dynamics and group dynamics. Actually, this mixing feature can be attributed to the fitting deviations as they are negligible for individual dynamics, but those of different vendors are cumulated and then lead to an exponential factor for group dynamics. To better describe the mechanism generating the heterogeneity of the purchase order assignment process from the objective company to all its vendors, a model driven by product life cycle is introduced, and then the analytical distribution and the simulation result are obtained, which are in good agreement with the empirical data.

  6. Infrared Contrast Analysis Technique for Flash Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the infrared flash thermography inspection to detect and analyze delamination-like anomalies in nonmetallic materials. It provides information on an IR Contrast technique that involves extracting normalized contrast verses time evolutions from the flash thermography infrared video data. The paper provides the analytical model used in the simulation of infrared image contrast. The contrast evolution simulation is achieved through calibration on measured contrast evolutions from many flat bottom holes in the subject material. The paper also provides formulas to calculate values of the thermal measurement features from the measured contrast evolution curve. Many thermal measurement features of the contrast evolution that relate to the anomaly characteristics are calculated. The measurement features and the contrast simulation are used to evaluate flash thermography inspection data in order to characterize the delamination-like anomalies. In addition, the contrast evolution prediction is matched to the measured anomaly contrast evolution to provide an assessment of the anomaly depth and width in terms of depth and diameter of the corresponding equivalent flat-bottom hole (EFBH) or equivalent uniform gap (EUG). The paper provides anomaly edge detection technique called the half-max technique which is also used to estimate width of an indication. The EFBH/EUG and half-max width estimations are used to assess anomaly size. The paper also provides some information on the "IR Contrast" software application, half-max technique and IR Contrast feature imaging application, which are based on models provided in this paper.

  7. Application of IR thermography for unsteady fluid-flow research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppel, Tiit; Lahdeniemi, Matti; Ekholm, Ari

    1998-03-01

    In the recent years the IR thermography technique has been sued successfully as a new contactless instrument for gas and fluid flow research in pipes and on the surface of a flat plate. It is well known that most energy changes in the flow take place in the boundary layer. This is in turn important for the intensity of convective heat transfer in pipe flows and enables to measure processes connected with energy changes in the flow from outside the pipe. Series of measurements of suddenly accelerated and pulsating pipe flow were made at Satakunta Polytechnic, Technology Pori, Finland. The theoretical criterion describing the transition from laminar to turbulent regime is found depending on the critical thickness of the boundary layer of suddenly accelerated flow. At the moment of transition of the 'plug' type flow into turbulent flow, the velocities in the wall region diminish and this can be detected using the IR thermography from the wall temperature changes. the experimental results of the mean velocity development and transition criteria correspond to the theoretical calculations. The changes of the internal structure of the flow affect the convective heat transfer and this in turn influences the pipe wall temperature. IR thermography measures pipe wall temperature changes and consequently we can detect flow structure changes in the boundary layer in the accelerated and decelerated phase of the pulsating pipe flow.

  8. Applications of the thermography in the animal production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeiro, Carlos; Vizcaino, Elena; Morales, Joaquín.; Manso, Alberto; Díaz, Immaculada; Montalvo, Gema

    2015-04-01

    Infrared thermography is a working technology for over decades, which have been applied mainly in the buildings. We want to move this use to the animal production in order to help us to detect problems of energy efficiency in the facilities preventing, for example, the animal's welfare. In animal production it is necessary to provide a suitable microclimate according to age and production stage of the animals. This microclimate is achieved in the facilities through the environment modification artificially, providing an appropriate comfort for the animals. Many of the problems detected in farms are related to a poor environmental management and control. This is where infrared thermography becomes an essential diagnostic tool to detect failures in the facilities that will be related with health and performance of the animals. The use of this technology in energy audits for buildings, facilities, etc. is becoming more frequent, enabling the technician to easily detect and assess the temperature and energy losses, and it can be used as a support to draft reports and to transmit the situation to the owner in a visual format. In this way, both will be able to decide what improvements are required. Until now, there was not an appropriate technology with affordable prices and easy to manage enough in order to allow the use of the thermography like a routine tool for the diagnostic of these problems, but currently there are some solutions which are starting to appear on the market to meet the requirements needed by the industry.

  9. Use of infrared thermography for the diagnosis and grading of sprained ankle injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, João; Vardasca, Ricardo; Pimenta, Madalena; Gabriel, Joaquim; Torres, João

    2016-05-01

    -Wallis tests for non-parametric samples, however, did not confer statistical significance to the differences encountered in the graphics analysis (p > 0.05). The major conclusions were that thermographic analysis of ankle sprain injuries might have some potential to be used clinically, especially in acute settings such as those that occur in hospital emergency areas and in sports practice. There is currently no practical technology to be used for grading ankle sprain lesions, with the gold standard being magnetic resonance imaging. Thermography provides results rapidly and without the need for extensive equipment operating expertise. Based on scientific data present in the literature, this is the first description of the use of this technology with such an objective regarding ankle sprain lesions. Further work is needed, nonetheless, to amplify the sample number with the herein chosen parameters and possibly use dynamic thermography.

  10. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  11. Dynamic labyrinthine pattern in an active liquid film.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Jun; Nagamine, Yuko; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2009-11-01

    We report the generation of a dynamic labyrinthine pattern in an active alcohol film. A dynamic labyrinthine pattern is formed along the contact line of air/pentanol/aqueous three phases. The contact line shows a clear time-dependent change with regard to both perimeter and area of a domain. An autocorrelation analysis of time development of the dynamics of the perimeter and area revealed a strong geometric correlation between neighboring patterns. The pattern showed autoregressive behavior. The behavior of the dynamic pattern is strikingly different from those of stationary labyrinthine patterns. The essential aspects of the observed dynamic pattern are reproduced by a diffusion-controlled geometric model. PMID:20365076

  12. Dynamic-Loads Analysis of Flexible Aircraft With Active Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, B. I.; Durling, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Integrated system of stand-along computer programs, DYLOFLEX, analyzes dynamic loads on flexible aircraft with active controls. DYLOFLEX capabilities include calculating dynamic loads due to continuous atmospheric turbulence, discrete gusts, and discrete control inputs. Each of the eight individual DYLOFLEX programs may be used alone or in conjunction with other DYLOFLEX programs.

  13. Competing dynamic phases of active polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Simon; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R.

    Recent experiments on in-vitro reconstituted assemblies of F-actin, myosin-II motors, and cross-linking proteins show that tuning local network properties can changes the fundamental biomechanical behavior of the system. For example, by varying cross-linker density and actin bundle rigidity, one can switch between contractile networks useful for reshaping cells, polarity sorted networks ideal for directed molecular transport, and frustrated networks with robust structural properties. To efficiently investigate the dynamic phases of actomyosin networks, we developed a coarse grained non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of model semiflexible filaments, molecular motors, and cross-linkers with phenomenologically defined interactions. The simulation's accuracy was verified by benchmarking the mechanical properties of its individual components and collective behavior against experimental results at the molecular and network scales. By adjusting the model's parameters, we can reproduce the qualitative phases observed in experiment and predict the protein characteristics where phase crossovers could occur in collective network dynamics. Our model provides a framework for understanding cells' multiple uses of actomyosin networks and their applicability in materials research. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  14. Infrared thermography based studies on the effect of age on localized cold stress induced thermoregulation in human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Nishanthi, K.; Mohanalakshmi, K.; Veni, L.; Saumya; Yacin, S. M.; Philip, John

    2016-05-01

    Thermoregulatory control of blood flow plays an important role in maintaining the human body temperature and it provides physiological resistance against extreme environmental thermal stresses. To understand the role of age on thermal signals from veins and the thermoregulatory mechanism, the dynamic variation of the vein temperature on the hands of 17 human subjects, under a localized cold stress, was studied using infrared thermography. It was observed that the vein temperature of the stimulated hand initially decreased with time up to a time interval (called 'inversion time'), which was attributed to the localized cutaneous vasoconstriction. Beyond inversion time, a rise in the vein temperature of the stimulated hand was observed. A shift in the inversion time to higher values was observed for the older subjects, which was attributed to the reduced efficiency and responsiveness of the cutaneous vasoconstriction mechanism in these subjects. Our studies indicated that the inversion time increased linearly with subject age with strong positive Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.94. It was also observed that the contralateral symmetry in vasoconstriction was much lower in older subjects than the younger subjects. The absolute difference between the left and right inversion time varied between 11-118 s and 5-28 s for the older and younger subjects, respectively. Our study clearly demonstrated that infrared thermography is one of the most effective experimental tool for studying dynamic variation in vein pixel temperature under localized thermal stresses.

  15. Inversion of tone burst eddy current thermography data for defect sizing - A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biju, N.; Ganesan, N.; Krishnamurthy, C. V.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the results of the simulation study to reconstruct the size of the defects from the data obtained using the active thermography technique based on transient induction heating, will be presented. The forward problem of electro-magnetic induction was solved with an axi-symmetric model using finite element method and from the temperature history profiles, an inverse analysis was performed using Genetic Algorithm (GA) to size the defect. Simulations were performed using the finite element model to obtain the temperature data which are then used to reconstruct the radius (rd) and depth (dd) of the wall thinning defects in aluminum plate using inversion method. Two cases, coil inner radius less than the defect radius (rcrd), were considered. The analysis of the sensitivity of coil dimensions to the calculated peak temperature at the observation point was carried out.

  16. Photothermal and infrared thermography characterizations of thermal diffusion in hydroxyapatite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, J.; Conde-Contreras, M.; Trujillo, S.; Martinez-Torres, P.; Cruz-Jimenez, B.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2009-02-01

    Non destructive analysis of hydroxyapatite materials is an active research area mainly in the study of dental pieces and bones due to the importance these pieces have in medicine, archeology, dentistry, forensics and anthropology. Infrared thermography and photothermal techniques constitute highly valuable tools in those cases. In this work the quantitative analysis of thermal diffusion in bones is presented. The results obtained using thermographic images are compared with the ones obtained from the photothermal radiometry. Special emphasis is done in the analysis of samples with previous thermal damage. Our results show that the treatments induce changes in the physical properties of the samples. These results could be useful in the identification of the agents that induced modifications of unknown origin in hydroxyapatite structures.

  17. Thermography and k-means clustering methods for anti-reflective coating film inspection: scratch and bubble defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xunfei; Wang, Hongjin; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen (Tony)

    2016-05-01

    Anti-reflective coating is widely used on telescopes, eyeglasses and screens to effectively enhance the transmission of light. However, the presence of defects such as bubbles or scratches lowers the usability and functionality of optical film. Optical cameras are often used for coating inspection, but their accuracy relies heavily on the illumination source, camera viewing angles and defect location. This paper describes an active thermography approach that can potentially overcome this issue. Eighteen scratch and bubble defects were located on AR film with dimensions ranging from 0.03mm to 4.4 mm. An infrared camera was used to capture thermal images of those defects over 65 seconds of heating. After the thermal images were acquired, time-domain analysis and space-domain analysis were conducted and k-means clustering methodology was used to highlight the defective area. Results suggest active thermography can be used to detect scratch defects with widths of 0.03mm to 4.40 mm and bubble defects with diameters ranging from 0.08 to 4 mm. For defects with dimensions larger than 0.4 mm, our algorithm can estimate the dimension with less than 15% bias. However, for defects with dimensions less than 0.4mm, the algorithm estimation error ranged from 68% to 900% due to camera resolution limitations. It should be noted that our algorithm can still distinguish a scratch defect with a width of less than one pixel. This study also suggests active thermography can detect scratch and bubble defects regardless of the location of the illumination source.

  18. Topological structure dynamics revealing collective evolution in active nematics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xia-qing; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2013-01-01

    Topological defects frequently emerge in active matter like bacterial colonies, cytoskeleton extracts on substrates, self-propelled granular or colloidal layers and so on, but their dynamical properties and the relations to large-scale organization and fluctuations in these active systems are seldom touched. Here we reveal, through a simple model for active nematics using self-driven hard elliptic rods, that the excitation, annihilation and transportation of topological defects differ markedly from those in non-active media. These dynamical processes exhibit strong irreversibility in active nematics in the absence of detailed balance. Moreover, topological defects are the key factors in organizing large-scale dynamic structures and collective flows, resulting in multi-spatial temporal effects. These findings allow us to control the self-organization of active matter through topological structures. PMID:24346733

  19. Dynamic rupture activation of backthrust fault branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiqing; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Ampuero, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-01

    We perform dynamic rupture simulations to investigate the possible reactivation of backthrust branches triggered by ruptures along a main thrust fault. Simulations with slip-weakening fault friction and uniform initial stress show that fast propagation speed or long propagation distance of the main rupture promotes reactivation of backthrust over a range of branch angles. The latter condition may occur separately from the former if rupture speed is limited by an increasing slip-weakening distance towards the junction direction. The results suggest a trade-off between the amplitude and duration of the dynamic stress near the main rupture front for backthrust reactivation. Termination of the main rupture by a barrier can provide enhanced loading amplitude and duration along a backthrust rooted near the barrier, facilitating its reactivation especially with a high frictional resistance. The free surface and depth-dependent initial stress can have several additional effects. The sign of the triggered motion along the backthrust can be reversed from thrust to normal if a deeply nucleated main rupture breaks the free surface, while it is preserved as thrust if the main rupture is terminated by a barrier at depth. The numerical results are discussed in relation to several recent megathrust earthquakes in Sumatra, Chile, and Japan, and related topics such as branch feedbacks to the main fault. The dynamic view on backthrust fault branching provided by the study fills a gap not covered by quasi-static models or observations. A specific examined case of antithetic fault branching may be useful for indicating a barrier-like behavior along the main fault.

  20. Neural network with formed dynamics of activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dunin-Barkovskii, V.L.; Osovets, N.B.

    1995-03-01

    The problem of developing a neural network with a given pattern of the state sequence is considered. A neural network structure and an algorithm, of forming its bond matrix which lead to an approximate but robust solution of the problem are proposed and discussed. Limiting characteristics of the serviceability of the proposed structure are studied. Various methods of visualizing dynamic processes in a neural network are compared. Possible applications of the results obtained for interpretation of neurophysiological data and in neuroinformatics systems are discussed.

  1. Active cage model of glassy dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Étienne; Hayakawa, Hisao; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    We build up a phenomenological picture in terms of the effective dynamics of a tracer confined in a cage experiencing random hops to capture some characteristics of glassy systems. This minimal description exhibits scale invariance properties for the small-displacement distribution that echo experimental observations. We predict the existence of exponential tails as a crossover between two Gaussian regimes. Moreover, we demonstrate that the onset of glassy behavior is controlled only by two dimensionless numbers: the number of hops occurring during the relaxation of the particle within a local cage and the ratio of the hopping length to the cage size. PMID:27575182

  2. Activity of a social dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reia, Sandro M.; Neves, Ubiraci P. C.

    2015-10-01

    Axelrod's model was proposed to study interactions between agents and the formation of cultural domains. It presents a transition from a monocultural to a multicultural steady state which has been studied in the literature by evaluation of the relative size of the largest cluster. In this article, we propose new measurements based on the concept of activity per agent to study the Axelrod's model on the square lattice. We show that the variance of system activity can be used to indicate the critical points of the transition. Furthermore the frequency distribution of the system activity is able to show a coexistence of phases typical of a first order phase transition. Finally, we verify a power law dependence between cluster activity and cluster size for multicultural steady state configurations at the critical point.

  3. Tunable dynamics of microtubule-based active isotropic gels

    PubMed Central

    Henkin, Gil; DeCamp, Stephen J.; Chen, Daniel T. N.; Sanchez, Tim; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of an active gel of bundled microtubules (MTs) that is driven by clusters of kinesin molecular motors. Upon the addition of ATP, the coordinated action of thousands of molecular motors drives the gel to a highly dynamical turbulent-like state that persists for hours and is only limited by the stability of constituent proteins and the availability of the chemical fuel. We characterize how enhanced transport and emergent macroscopic flows of active gels depend on relevant molecular parameters, including ATP, kinesin motor and depletant concentrations, MT volume fraction, as well as the stoichiometry of the constituent motor clusters. Our results show that the dynamical and structural properties of MT-based active gels are highly tunable. They also indicate existence of an optimal concentration of molecular motors that maximize far-from-equilibrium activity of active isotropic MT gels. PMID:25332391

  4. Active Brownian Particles. From Individual to Collective Stochastic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, P.; Bär, M.; Ebeling, W.; Lindner, B.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2012-03-01

    We review theoretical models of individual motility as well as collective dynamics and pattern formation of active particles. We focus on simple models of active dynamics with a particular emphasis on nonlinear and stochastic dynamics of such self-propelled entities in the framework of statistical mechanics. Examples of such active units in complex physico-chemical and biological systems are chemically powered nano-rods, localized patterns in reaction-diffusion system, motile cells or macroscopic animals. Based on the description of individual motion of point-like active particles by stochastic differential equations, we discuss different velocity-dependent friction functions, the impact of various types of fluctuations and calculate characteristic observables such as stationary velocity distributions or diffusion coefficients. Finally, we consider not only the free and confined individual active dynamics but also different types of interaction between active particles. The resulting collective dynamical behavior of large assemblies and aggregates of active units is discussed and an overview over some recent results on spatiotemporal pattern formation in such systems is given.

  5. Study on detecting CFRP composites using pulsed infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Yan; Li, Hui-Juan; Zhao, Yue-Jin; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2011-08-01

    Composite sandwich structure has been widely used in aerospace due to its lightweight, high stiffness and strength. The quality of the structure is crucial to durability and structural integrity of the rehabilitated the structure, Delaminations, debonding and water ingressing to honeycomb are typical defects in the structure. Defects in the structure will influence the quality of product. Pulse thermography has been an effective NDE method in recent ten years. The technique uses pulse to excite the specimen, because the presence of subsurface defects reduce the diffusion rate, then temperature difference between defect area and sound area will be measured by an infrared camera. Subsurface defects become visible with time delays, it is a non-contact, quickly inspection method. Pulsed infrared thermography has been widely used in aerospace and mechanical manufacture industry because it can offer non-contact, quickly and visual examinations of defects. It is a meaningful research topic to study on quantitative testing with the structure rapidly and non-destructively. Sandwich composites with aluminum facesheet and aluminum honeycomb cores are chosen as study objectives. Some back-drilled holes with different sizes and depths in the specimen are used to simulate delaminations between plies in the strcuture .The paper presents a method for defining the boundaries, quantitatively estimating the sizes of the flaws in the CFRP using pulsed infrared thermography. Processing captured data using splinefitting, measuring the size of the defects by calculating the pixels numbers that exceed the detection threshold and computing areas of defects by binary image. Compared with the designed sizes and areas having defects, the results show that the method offers more than 90% accuracies with reference to the sizes of artificial flaws embedded in the CFRP sheet. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of using detection threshold to inspect the CFRP sheet. The curve of

  6. Thermography as a quantitative imaging method for assessing postoperative inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, J; Matzen, LH; Vaeth, M; Schou, S; Wenzel, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess differences in skin temperature between the operated and control side of the face after mandibular third molar surgery using thermography. Methods 127 patients had 1 mandibular third molar removed. Before the surgery, standardized thermograms were taken of both sides of the patient's face using a Flir ThermaCam™ E320 (Precisions Teknik AB, Halmstad, Sweden). The imaging procedure was repeated 2 days and 7 days after surgery. A region of interest including the third molar region was marked on each image. The mean temperature within each region of interest was calculated. The difference between sides and over time were assessed using paired t-tests. Results No significant difference was found between the operated side and the control side either before or 7 days after surgery (p > 0.3). The temperature of the operated side (mean: 32.39 °C, range: 28.9–35.3 °C) was higher than that of the control side (mean: 32.06 °C, range: 28.5–35.0 °C) 2 days after surgery [0.33 °C, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22–0.44 °C, p < 0.001]. No significant difference was found between the pre-operative and the 7-day post-operative temperature (p > 0.1). After 2 days, the operated side was not significantly different from the temperature pre-operatively (p = 0.12), whereas the control side had a lower temperature (0.57 °C, 95% CI: 0.29–0.86 °C, p < 0.001). Conclusions Thermography seems useful for quantitative assessment of inflammation between the intervention side and the control side after surgical removal of mandibular third molars. However, thermography cannot be used to assess absolute temperature changes due to normal variations in skin temperature over time. PMID:22752326

  7. Infrared thermography monitoring of the NaCl crystallisation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Patricia; Thomachot-Schneider, Céline; Mouhoubi, Kamel; Fronteau, Gilles; Gommeaux, Maxime; Benavente, David; Barbin, Vincent; Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we describe the growth of NaCl crystals by evaporating droplets of aqueous solution while monitoring them with infrared thermography. Over the course of the evaporation experiments, variations in the recorded signal were observed and interpreted as being the result of evaporation and crystallisation. In particular, we observed sharp and transient decreases in the thermosignal during the later stages of high-concentration drop evaporation. The number of such events per experiment, referred to as "pop-cold events", varied from 1 to over 100 and had durations from 1 to 15 s. These events are interpreted as a consequence from the top-supplied creeping (TSC) of the solution feeding the growth of efflorescence-like crystals. This phenomenon occurred when the solution was no longer macroscopically visible. In this case, efflorescence-like crystals with a spherulite shape grew around previously formed cubic crystals. Other crystal morphologies were also observed but were likely fed by mass diffusion or bottom-supplied creeping (BSC) and were not associated with "pop-cold events"; these morphologies included the cubic crystals at the centre, ring-shaped at the edge of droplets and fan-shaped crystals. After complete evaporation, an analysis of the numbers and sizes of the different types of crystals was performed using image processing. Clear differences in their sizes and distribution were observed in relation to the salt concentration. Infrared thermography permitted a level of quantification that previously was only possible using other techniques. As example, the intermittent efflorescence growth process was clearly observed and measured for the first time using infrared thermography.

  8. In-Flight Flow Visualization Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanDam, C. P.; Shiu, H. J.; Banks D. W.

    1997-01-01

    The feasibility of remote infrared thermography of aircraft surfaces during flight to visualize the extent of laminar flow on a target aircraft has been examined. In general, it was determined that such thermograms can be taken successfully using an existing airplane/thermography system (NASA Dryden's F-18 with infrared imaging pod) and that the transition pattern and, thus, the extent of laminar flow can be extracted from these thermograms. Depending on the in-flight distance between the F-18 and the target aircraft, the thermograms can have a spatial resolution of as little as 0.1 inches. The field of view provided by the present remote system is superior to that of prior stationary infrared thermography systems mounted in the fuselage or vertical tail of a subject aircraft. An additional advantage of the present experimental technique is that the target aircraft requires no or minimal modifications. An image processing procedure was developed which improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the thermograms. Problems encountered during the analog recording of the thermograms (banding of video images) made it impossible to evaluate the adequacy of the present imaging system and image processing procedure to detect transition on untreated metal surfaces. The high reflectance, high thermal difussivity, and low emittance of metal surfaces tend to degrade the images to an extent that it is very difficult to extract transition information from them. The application of a thin (0.005 inches) self-adhesive insulating film to the surface is shown to solve this problem satisfactorily. In addition to the problem of infrared based transition detection on untreated metal surfaces, future flight tests will also concentrate on the visualization of other flow phenomena such as flow separation and reattachment.

  9. Eddy current step heating thermography for quantitatively evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunze; Pan, Mengchun; Chen, Dixiang; Tian, GuiYun; Zhang, Hong

    2013-11-01

    This Letter proposed eddy current step heating thermography (ECSHT) combing eddy current excitation with SHT. It has been verified through numerical and experimental studies that the temperature-time1/2 curve can be used to detect the subsurface defects. Separation time was defined and extracted from temperature responses as characteristic feature. Experiment studies with mild steel sample were conducted, and the experimental results showed that two features representing separation time can be used to measure the defect's depth based on their linear relationships.

  10. Crack detection using pulsed eddy current stimulated thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Kostson, E.; Weekes, B.; Almond, D. P.; Wilson, J.; Tian, G. Y.

    2011-06-23

    This contribution presents results from studies investigating factors that influence the detection of surface breaking cracks using pulsed eddy current thermography. The influences of the current strength and crack orientation in both ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic metals have been investigated. It has been found that crack detection is far more sensitive to crack orientation in non-ferromagnetic metals than in ferromagnetic metals. The effects of crack size on detectability are presented for a large number of steel, nickel alloy and titanium samples. Results of studies comparing crack images obtained prior and after coating a nickel alloy sample with a thermal barrier coating are presented.

  11. Applications of infrared thermography for petrochemical process heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigle, Robert K.

    2005-03-01

    Process heaters are a critical component in the refining of crude oil. Traditional means of monitoring these high temperature vessels have frequently been more art than science, often relying on highly subjective analyses and/or frequently inaccurate thermocouple data. By utilizing an imaging radiometer specifically designed for heater inspections, valuable performance information can be obtained for operating heaters. In the hands of a knowledgeable engineering team, accurate infrared data can be utilized to significantly increase heater throughput while helping to ensure safe operation of the heater. This paper discusses the use of infrared thermography for online monitoring of operating crude heaters and the special challenges associated with this application.

  12. Visualization of In-Flight Flow Phenomena Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, D. W.; vanDam, C. P.; Shiu, H. J.; Miller, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Infrared thermography was used to obtain data on the state of the boundary layer of a natural laminar flow airfoil in supersonic flight. In addition to the laminar-to-turbulent transition boundary, the infrared camera was able to detect shock waves and present a time dependent view of the flow field. A time dependent heat transfer code was developed to predict temperature distributions on the test subject and any necessary surface treatment. A commercially available infrared camera was adapted for airborne use in this application. Readily available infrared technology has the capability to provide detailed visualization of various flow phenomena in subsonic to hypersonic flight regimes.

  13. Active longitudes: Structure, dynamics, and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, E. V.

    Greenwich data for 1879-2005 (cycles 12-23) are used to study the longitude distribution of sunspot group areas summed over a Carrington rotation s(CR) separately in the southern and northern hemispheres. The zones of active longitudes (AL) are identified, and their behaviour (location, shift, and intensity variations) is analyzed over the time interval under consideration. In particular, we have studied the active longitudes in two reference frames corresponding to the rotation periods T = 27.2753 and T = 27.00 days. The AL zones are shown to consist of a set of individual narrow sunspot formation zones rotating rigidly with the Carrington period T ˜ 27.2753 days. The lifetime of the sunspot formation zones exceeds significantly that of individual sunspots and may reach 15-20 rotations. Besides the rigidly rotating active longitudes we have revealed the active longitudes that migrate in the Carrington reference frame at different (greater and smaller than Carrington) angular velocities. Quasi-biennial oscillations (QBO) of the total sunspot areas in the northern and southern longitudinal sectors corresponding to AL zones are studied for the period 1879-2004 using the spectral and correlation analysis methods. The relationships between the antipodal, symmetric about the equator, and adjoining AL zones are analyzed.

  14. Using infrared thermography to evaluate the injuries of cold-stored guava.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Bárbara Jordana; Giarola, Tales Márcio de Oliveira; Pereira, Daniele Fernanda; Vilas Boas, Eduardo Valério de Barros; de Resende, Jaime Vilela

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to identify using the infrared (IR) thermography data the injuries of guavas during cooling and storage at different temperatures. Three experiments were performed at three different temperatures with one storage time. The first experiment was done with static air in a refrigerator at 5 °C, the second experiment was conducted in a tunnel with forced air at 10 °C, and the third experiment was conducted in an air conditioned environment at 20 °C. Mechanical injuries caused by the impact of a pendulum were induced on guava surfaces. The surface temperatures were obtained for bruised and sound tissues during cooling and storage using an Infrared (IR) camera. With thermography, it was possible to distinguish the injured tissues of the fruits that were unaffected at temperatures of 5, 10 and 20 °C in first hours of cooling. The results suggest that the storage of guava fruits at 5 °C in static air resulted in cold-induced injury, while storage at 20 °C resulted in an altered activity pattern. The stored guava fruits were analyzed for mass loss, firmness, color, total sugars, total pectin and solubility. The parameters values were lower during the forced-air cooling and storage at 5 and 10 °C. When stored at 20 °C, there was fruit maturation that caused tissue softening, which makes the fruits more susceptible to deterioration and thermographic readings showed opposite trends. PMID:27162386

  15. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    TD64, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, is one of several groups with high-fidelity fluids design and analysis expertise in the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). TD64 assists personnel working on other programs. The group participates in projects in the following areas: turbomachinery activities, nozzle activities, combustion devices, and the Columbia accident investigation.

  16. Stochastic dynamics of coupled active particles in an overdamped limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, Minjung; Lee, Kong-Ju-Bock; Park, Pyeong Jun

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a model for Brownian dynamics of coupled active particles in an overdamped limit. Our system consists of several identical active particles and one passive particle. Each active particle is elastically coupled to the passive particle and there is no direct coupling among the active particles. We investigate the dynamics of the system with respect to the number of active particles, viscous friction, and coupling between the active and passive particles. For this purpose, we consider an intracellular transport process as an application of our model and perform a Brownian dynamics simulation using realistic parameters for processive molecular motors such as kinesin-1. We determine an adequate energy conversion function for molecular motors and study the dynamics of intracellular transport by multiple motors. The results show that the average velocity of the coupled system is not affected by the number of active motors and that the stall force increases linearly as the number of motors increases. Our results are consistent with well-known experimental observations. We also examine the effects of coupling between the motors and the cargo, as well as of the spatial distribution of the motors around the cargo. Our model might provide a physical explanation of the cooperation among active motors in the cellular transport processes.

  17. Hysteretic dynamics of active particles in a periodic orienting field

    PubMed Central

    Romensky, Maksym; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Active motion of living organisms and artificial self-propelling particles has been an area of intense research at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics. Significant progress in understanding these phenomena has been related to the observation that dynamic self-organization in active systems has much in common with ordering in equilibrium condensed matter such as spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnets. The velocities of active particles may behave similar to magnetic dipoles and develop global alignment, although interactions between the individuals might be completely different. In this work, we show that the dynamics of active particles in external fields can also be described in a way that resembles equilibrium condensed matter. It follows simple general laws, which are independent of the microscopic details of the system. The dynamics is revealed through hysteresis of the mean velocity of active particles subjected to a periodic orienting field. The hysteresis is measured in computer simulations and experiments on unicellular organisms. We find that the ability of the particles to follow the field scales with the ratio of the field variation period to the particles' orientational relaxation time, which, in turn, is related to the particle self-propulsion power and the energy dissipation rate. The collective behaviour of the particles due to aligning interactions manifests itself at low frequencies via increased persistence of the swarm motion when compared with motion of an individual. By contrast, at high field frequencies, the active group fails to develop the alignment and tends to behave like a set of independent individuals even in the presence of interactions. We also report on asymptotic laws for the hysteretic dynamics of active particles, which resemble those in magnetic systems. The generality of the assumptions in the underlying model suggests that the observed laws might apply to a variety of dynamic phenomena from the motion of

  18. Hysteretic dynamics of active particles in a periodic orienting field.

    PubMed

    Romensky, Maksym; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    Active motion of living organisms and artificial self-propelling particles has been an area of intense research at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics. Significant progress in understanding these phenomena has been related to the observation that dynamic self-organization in active systems has much in common with ordering in equilibrium condensed matter such as spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnets. The velocities of active particles may behave similar to magnetic dipoles and develop global alignment, although interactions between the individuals might be completely different. In this work, we show that the dynamics of active particles in external fields can also be described in a way that resembles equilibrium condensed matter. It follows simple general laws, which are independent of the microscopic details of the system. The dynamics is revealed through hysteresis of the mean velocity of active particles subjected to a periodic orienting field. The hysteresis is measured in computer simulations and experiments on unicellular organisms. We find that the ability of the particles to follow the field scales with the ratio of the field variation period to the particles' orientational relaxation time, which, in turn, is related to the particle self-propulsion power and the energy dissipation rate. The collective behaviour of the particles due to aligning interactions manifests itself at low frequencies via increased persistence of the swarm motion when compared with motion of an individual. By contrast, at high field frequencies, the active group fails to develop the alignment and tends to behave like a set of independent individuals even in the presence of interactions. We also report on asymptotic laws for the hysteretic dynamics of active particles, which resemble those in magnetic systems. The generality of the assumptions in the underlying model suggests that the observed laws might apply to a variety of dynamic phenomena from the motion of

  19. Vehicle dynamics control using an active third-axle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Amir; Goodarzi, Avesta; Hassan Shojaeefard, Mohammad; Khajepour, Amir

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces the active third-axle system as an innovative vehicle dynamic control method. This method can be applicable for different kinds of three-axle vehicles such as buses, trucks, or even three-axle passenger cars. In this system, an actuator on the middle axle actively applies an independent force on the suspension to improve the handling characteristics, and hence, its technology is similar to slow-active suspension systems. This system can change the inherent vehicle dynamic characteristics, such as under/over steering behaviour, in the linear handling region, as well as vehicle stability in the nonlinear, limit handling region. In this paper, our main focus is to show the potential capabilities of this method in enhancing vehicle dynamic performance. For this purpose, as the first step, the proposed method in both linear and nonlinear vehicle handling regions is studied mathematically. Next, a comprehensive, nonlinear, 10 degrees of freedom vehicle model with a fuzzy control strategy is used to evaluate the effectiveness of this system. The dynamic behaviour of a vehicle, when either uncontrolled or equipped with the active third axle is then compared. Simulation results show that this active system can be considered as an innovative method for vehicle dynamic control.

  20. Identification of age degradation in EPROM chips using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Lloyd G.

    1998-03-01

    In a recent upgrade of the digital flight control computer for the F-16, there was serious consternation expressed about the quality of the soldering repair process. Dozens of circuit cards failed to function after the upgrade, even though all of these cards operated correctly before the modifications. The shop called for the use of the IR camera to assist in diagnosing and repairing these cards. What the Neural Radiant Energy Detection found was faulty and marginal chips.Of particular interest was the presence of degraded EPROM chips on the Program Memory cards. While it is known that EPROMs have a limited life cycle, the failure has been further characterized. Thermography provides a quantification of the degradation in thermal performance as the EPROMs are reused. Pristine EPROM chips have a rise rate of about 0.008 degrees C/sec. When the heat rates exceed 0.021 degrees C/sec, the EPROM chips will not accept a program. Some of the chips exhibited heat rates exceeding 0.1 degrees C/sec. Some chips with degradation of 0.018 degrees C/sec would accept a program, but fail other functional tests. What is clear from these results is that IR thermography can be used to identify degrading EPROM chips for replacement before failures become immanent.

  1. Investigation of various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Okada, Keiji; Takemura, Kei; Sato, Shigeru

    2013-10-01

    We investigated various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography for cattle clinics. The effect of various factors on the detection of surface temperature was investigated in an experimental room with a fixed ambient temperature using a square positioned on a wall. Various factors of animal objects were examined using cattle to determine the relationships among presence of hair, body surface temperature, surface temperature of the eyeball, the highest temperature of the eye circle, rectum temperature and ambient temperature. Also, the surface temperature of the flank at different time points after eating was examined. The best conditions of thermography for cattle clinics were determined and were as follows: (1) The distance between a thermal camera and an object should be fixed, and the camera should be set within a 45-degree angle with respect to the objects using the optimum focal length. (2) Factors that affect the camera temperature, such as extreme cold or heat, direct sunshine, high humidity and wind, should be avoided. (3) For the comparison of thermographs, imaging should be performed under identical conditions. If this is not achievable, hairless parts should be used. PMID:23759714

  2. Analysis of signal processing techniques in pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Fernando; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Maldague, Xavier; de Paulo Nicolau, Vicente

    2013-05-01

    Pulsed Thermography (PT) is one of the most widely used approaches for the inspection of composites materials, being its main attraction the deployment in transient regime. However, due to the physical phenomena involved during the inspection, the signals acquired by the infrared camera are nearly always affected by external reflections and local emissivity variations. Furthermore, non-uniform heating at the surface and thermal losses at the edges of the material also represent constraints in the detection capability. For this reason, the thermographics signals should be processed in order to improve - qualitatively and quantitatively - the quality of the thermal images. Signal processing constitutes an important step in the chain of thermal image analysis, especially when defects characterization is required. Several of the signals processing techniques employed nowadays are based on the one-dimensional solution of Fourier's law of heat conduction. This investigation brings into discussion the three-most used techniques based on the 1D Fourier's law: Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR), Differential Absolute Contrast (DAC) and Pulsed Phase Thermography (PPT), applied on carbon fiber laminated composites. It is of special interest to determine the detection capabilities of each technique, allowing in this way more reliable results when performing an inspection by PT.

  3. A relative-intensity two-color phosphor thermography system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merski, N. Ronald

    1991-01-01

    The NASA LaRC has developed a relative-intensity two-color phosphor thermography system. This system has become a standard technique for acquiring aerothermodynamic data in LaRC Hypersonic Facilities Complex (HFC). The relative intensity theory and its application to the LaRC phosphor thermography system is discussed along with the investment casting technique which is critical to the utilization of the phosphor method for aerothermodynamic studies. Various approaches to obtaining quantitative heat transfer data using thermographic phosphors are addressed and comparisons between thin-film data and thermographic phosphor data on an orbiter-like configuration are presented. In general, data from these two techniques are in good agreement. A discussion is given on the application of phosphors to integration heat transfer data reduction techniques (the thin film method) and preliminary heat transfer data obtained on a calibration sphere using thin-film equations are presented. Finally, plans for a new phosphor system which uses target recognition software are discussed.

  4. Robust remote monitoring of breathing function by using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carina B; Yu, Xinchi; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-08-01

    An abnormal breathing rate (BR) is one of the strongest markers of physiological distress. Moreover, it plays an important role in early detection of sudden infant death syndrome, as well as in the diagnosis of respiratory disorders. However, the current measuring modalities can cause discomfort to the patient, since attachment to the patient's body is required. This paper proposes a new approach based on infrared thermography to remotely monitor BR. This method allows to (1) detect automatically the nose, (2) track the associate region of interest (ROI), and (3) extract BR. To evaluate the performance of this method, thermal recording of 5 healthy subjects were acquired. Results were compared with BR obtained by capnography. The introduced approach demonstrated an excellent performance. ROIs were precisely segmented and tracked. Furthermore, a Bland-Altman diagram showed a good agreement between estimated BR and gold standard. The mean correlation and mean absolute BR error are 0.92 ± 0.07 and 0.53 bpm, respectively. In summary, infrared thermography seems to be a great, clinically relevant alternative to attached sensors, due to its outstanding characteristics and performance. PMID:26737233

  5. Distance makes the difference in thermography for ecological studies.

    PubMed

    Faye, E; Dangles, O; Pincebourde, S

    2016-02-01

    Surface temperature drives many ecological processes and infrared thermography is widely used by ecologists to measure the thermal heterogeneity of different species' habitats. However, the potential bias in temperature readings caused by distance between the surface to be measured and the camera is still poorly acknowledged. We examined the effect of distance from 0.3 to 80m on a variety of thermal metrics (mean temperature, standard deviation, patch richness and aggregation) under various weather conditions and for different structural complexity of the studied surface types (various surfaces with vegetation). We found that distance is a key modifier of the temperature measured by a thermal infrared camera. A non-linear relationship between distance and mean temperature, standard deviation and patch richness led to a rapid under-estimation of the thermal metrics within the first 20m and then only a slight decrease between 20 and 80m from the object. Solar radiation also enhanced the bias with increasing distance. Therefore, surface temperatures were under-estimated as distance increased and thermal mosaics were homogenized at long distances with a much stronger bias in the warmer than the colder parts of the distributions. The under-estimation of thermal metrics due to distance was explained by atmospheric composition and the pixel size effect. The structural complexity of the surface had little effect on the surface temperature bias. Finally, we provide general guidelines for ecologists to minimize inaccuracies caused by distance from the studied surface in thermography. PMID:26857971

  6. Investigation of Various Essential Factors for Optimum Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    OKADA, Keiji; TAKEMURA, Kei; SATO, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography for cattle clinics. The effect of various factors on the detection of surface temperature was investigated in an experimental room with a fixed ambient temperature using a square positioned on a wall. Various factors of animal objects were examined using cattle to determine the relationships among presence of hair, body surface temperature, surface temperature of the eyeball, the highest temperature of the eye circle, rectum temperature and ambient temperature. Also, the surface temperature of the flank at different time points after eating was examined. The best conditions of thermography for cattle clinics were determined and were as follows: (1) The distance between a thermal camera and an object should be fixed, and the camera should be set within a 45-degree angle with respect to the objects using the optimum focal length. (2) Factors that affect the camera temperature, such as extreme cold or heat, direct sunshine, high humidity and wind, should be avoided. (3) For the comparison of thermographs, imaging should be performed under identical conditions. If this is not achievable, hairless parts should be used. PMID:23759714

  7. Noninvasive diagnosis of seed viability using infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    Kranner, Ilse; Kastberger, Gerald; Hartbauer, Manfred; Pritchard, Hugh W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the noninvasive analyses of plant metabolism include stress imaging techniques, mainly developed for vegetative tissues. We explored if infrared thermography can be used to predict whether a quiescent seed will germinate or die upon water uptake. Thermal profiles of viable, aged, and dead Pisum sativum seeds were recorded, and image analysis of 22,000 images per individual seed showed that infrared thermography can detect imbibition- and germination-associated biophysical and biochemical changes. These “thermal fingerprints” vary with viability in this species and in Triticum aestivum and Brassica napus seeds. Thermogenesis of the small individual B. napus seeds was at the limit of the technology. We developed a computer model of “virtual pea seeds,” that uses Monte Carlo simulation, based on the heat production of major seed storage compounds to unravel physico-chemical processes of thermogenesis. The simulation suggests that the cooling that dominates the early thermal profiles results from the dissolution of low molecular-weight carbohydrates. Moreover, the kinetics of the production of such “cooling” compounds over the following 100 h is dependent on seed viability. We also developed a deterministic tool that predicts in the first 3 hours of water uptake, when seeds can be redried and stored again, whether or not a pea seed will germinate. We believe that the early separation of individual, ungerminated seeds (live, aged, or dead) before destructive germination assessment creates unique opportunities for integrative studies on cell death, differentiation, and development. PMID:20133712

  8. Karst Groundwater Hydrologic Analyses Based on Aerial Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren; Keith, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    On February 23, 1999, thermal imagery of Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama was collected using an airborne thermal camera. Ground resolution was I in. Approximately 40 km 2 of thermal imagery in and around Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was analyzed to determine the location of springs for groundwater monitoring. Subsequently, forty-five springs were located ranging in flow from a few ml/sec to approximately 280 liter/sec. Groundwater temperatures are usually near the mean annual surface air temperature. On thermography collected during the winter, springs show up as very warm spots. Many of the new springs were submerged in lakes, streams, or swamps; consequently, flow measurements were difficult. Without estimates of discharge, the impacts of contaminated discharge on surface streams would be difficult to evaluate. An approach to obtaining an estimate was developed using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System (CORMIX). The thermography was queried to obtain a temperature profile down the center of the surface plume. The spring discharge was modeled with CORMIX, and the flow adjusted until the surface temperature profile was matched. The presence of volatile compounds in some of the new springs also allowed MSFC to unravel the natural system of solution cavities of the karst aquifer. Sampling results also showed that two springs on either side of a large creek had the same water source so that groundwater was able to pass beneath the creek.

  9. Use of thermography in the differential diagnosis of phylloides tumour.

    PubMed

    Pierart, J; Burmeister, R; Steinberg, J; Schalper, J; Cid, L

    1990-07-01

    Thermography can be used as a method of diagnosing breast masses. We report our results of its use in the differential diagnosis of fibroadenoma from phylloides tumours (n = 47 and 20 respectively). Thermographic resolution (Th) and the difference in temperature between the tumour and a similar zone in the contralateral breast (delta 2) were compared. Thermograms were class Th1 (with a similar thermal pattern in both breasts without hypervascularization or hot points) and Th2 (with hypervascularization or a hot area with a thermal difference with the same area in the opposite breast (delta 2) of less than 2 degrees C) in most (95.7 per cent) of the patients with fibroadenoma and were class Th5 (having one or more pathological sign) in 85 per cent of the patients with phylloides tumours. Patients with phylloides tumours had a mean delta 2 of 2.99 degrees C whereas most of the patients with a fibroadenoma showed no difference in temperature. Their mean delta 2 was 0.2 degrees C (P less than 0.0005). We conclude that thermography helps in differential diagnosis between a fibroadenoma and a phylloides tumour. PMID:2166612

  10. Computed Tomography and Thermography Increases CMC Material and Process Development Efficiency and Testing Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael; Beshears, Ron; Hufnagle, David; Walker, James; Russell, Sam; Stowell, Bob; Myers, David

    2002-01-01

    Nondestructive characterization techniques have been used to steer development and testing of CMCs. Computed tomography is used to determine the volumetric integrity of the CMC plates and components. Thermography is used to determine the near surface integrity of the CMC plates and components. For process and material development, information such as density uniformity, part delamination, and dimensional tolerance conformity is generated. The information from the thermography and computed tomography is correlated and then specimen cutting maps are superimposed on the thermography images. This enables for tighter data and potential explanation of off nominal test data. Examples of nondestructive characterization utilization to make decisions in process and material development and testing are presented.

  11. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  12. Collective dynamics of soft active particles.

    PubMed

    van Drongelen, Ruben; Pal, Anshuman; Goodrich, Carl P; Idema, Timon

    2015-03-01

    We present a model of soft active particles that leads to a rich array of collective behavior found also in dense biological swarms of bacteria and other unicellular organisms. Our model uses only local interactions, such as Vicsek-type nearest-neighbor alignment, short-range repulsion, and a local boundary term. Changing the relative strength of these interactions leads to migrating swarms, rotating swarms, and jammed swarms, as well as swarms that exhibit run-and-tumble motion, alternating between migration and either rotating or jammed states. Interestingly, although a migrating swarm moves slower than an individual particle, the diffusion constant can be up to three orders of magnitude larger, suggesting that collective motion can be highly advantageous, for example, when searching for food. PMID:25871143

  13. The dynamics and fueling of active nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, C.; Silk, J.

    1983-01-01

    It is generally believed that quasars and active galactic nuclei produce their prodigious luminosities in connection with the release of gravitational energy associated with accretion and infall of matter onto a compact central object. In the present analysis, it is assumed that the central object is a massive black hole. The fact that a black hole provides the deepest possible central potential well does imply that it is the most natural candidate for the central engine. It is also assumed that the quasar is associated with the nucleus of a conventional galaxy. A number of difficulties arise in connection with finding a suitable stellar fueling model. A simple scheme is discussed for resolving these difficulties. Attention is given to fueling in a nonaxisymmetric potential, the effects of a massive accretion disk, and the variability in the disk luminosity caused by star-disk collisions assuming that the energy deposited in the disk is radiated.

  14. Collective dynamics of soft active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Drongelen, Ruben; Pal, Anshuman; Goodrich, Carl P.; Idema, Timon

    2015-03-01

    We present a model of soft active particles that leads to a rich array of collective behavior found also in dense biological swarms of bacteria and other unicellular organisms. Our model uses only local interactions, such as Vicsek-type nearest-neighbor alignment, short-range repulsion, and a local boundary term. Changing the relative strength of these interactions leads to migrating swarms, rotating swarms, and jammed swarms, as well as swarms that exhibit run-and-tumble motion, alternating between migration and either rotating or jammed states. Interestingly, although a migrating swarm moves slower than an individual particle, the diffusion constant can be up to three orders of magnitude larger, suggesting that collective motion can be highly advantageous, for example, when searching for food.

  15. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  16. Real-time quantification of viable bacteria in liquid medium using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaimeh, Ahmad A.; Campion, Jeffrey J.; Gharaibeh, Belal Y.; Evans, Martin E.; Saito, Kozo

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying viable bacteria in liquids is important in environmental, food processing, manufacturing, and medical applications. Since vegetative bacteria generate heat as a result of biochemical reactions associated with cellular functions, thermal sensing techniques, including infrared thermography (IRT), have been used to detect viable cells in biologic samples. We developed a novel method that extends the dynamic range and improves the sensitivity of bacterial quantification by IRT. The approach uses IRT video, thermodynamics laws, and heat transfer mechanisms to directly measure, in real-time, the amount of energy lost as heat from the surface of a liquid sample containing bacteria when the specimen cools to a lower temperature over 2 min. We show that the Energy Content ( EC) of liquid media containing as few as 120 colony-forming units (CFU) of Escherichia coli per ml was significantly higher than that of sterile media ( P < 0.0001), and that EC and viable counts were strongly positively correlated ( r = 0.986) over a range of 120 to approximately 5 × 10 8 CFU/ml. Our IRT approach is a unique non-contact method that provides real-time bacterial enumeration over a wide dynamic range without the need for sample concentration, modification, or destruction. The approach could be adapted to quantify other living cells in a liquid milieu and has the potential for automation and high throughput.

  17. An Essential Viral Transcription Activator Modulates Chromatin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gibeault, Rebecca L.; Bildersheim, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Although ICP4 is the only essential transcription activator of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), its mechanisms of action are still only partially understood. We and others propose a model in which HSV-1 genomes are chromatinized as a cellular defense to inhibit HSV-1 transcription. To counteract silencing, HSV-1 would have evolved proteins that prevent or destabilize chromatinization to activate transcription. These proteins should act as HSV-1 transcription activators. We have shown that HSV-1 genomes are organized in highly dynamic nucleosomes and that histone dynamics increase in cells infected with wild type HSV-1. We now show that whereas HSV-1 mutants encoding no functional ICP0 or VP16 partially enhanced histone dynamics, mutants encoding no functional ICP4 did so only minimally. Transient expression of ICP4 was sufficient to enhance histone dynamics in the absence of other HSV-1 proteins or HSV-1 DNA. The dynamics of H3.1 were increased in cells expressing ICP4 to a greater extent than those of H3.3. The dynamics of H2B were increased in cells expressing ICP4, whereas those of canonical H2A were not. ICP4 preferentially targets silencing H3.1 and may also target the silencing H2A variants. In infected cells, histone dynamics were increased in the viral replication compartments, where ICP4 localizes. These results suggest a mechanism whereby ICP4 activates transcription by disrupting, or preventing the formation of, stable silencing nucleosomes on HSV-1 genomes. PMID:27575707

  18. Forcing it on: Cytoskeletal dynamics during lymphocyte activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2012-02-01

    Formation of the immune synapse during lymphocyte activation involves cell spreading driven by large scale physical rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton and the cell membrane. Several recent observations suggest that mechanical forces are important for efficient T cell activation. How forces arise from the dynamics of the cytoskeleton and the membrane during contact formation, and their effect on signaling activation is not well understood. We have imaged membrane topography, actin dynamics and the spatiotemporal localization of signaling clusters during the very early stages of spreading. Formation of signaling clusters was closely correlated with the movement and topography of the membrane in contact with the activating surface. Further, we observed membrane waves driven by actin polymerization originating at these signaling clusters. Actin-driven membrane protrusions likely play an important role in force generation at the immune synapse. In order to study cytoskeletal forces during T-cell activation, we studied cell spreading on elastic gels. We found that gel stiffness influences cell morphology, actin dynamics and receptor activation. Efforts to determine the quantitative relationships between cellular forces and signaling are underway. Our results suggest a role for cytoskeleton driven forces during signaling activation in lymphocytes.

  19. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-18

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  20. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  1. Dynamics of a polymer in an active and viscoelastic bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebroek, Hans; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    We study the dynamics of an ideal polymer chain in a viscoelastic medium and in the presence of active forces. The motion of the center of mass and of individual monomers is calculated. On time scales that are comparable to the persistence time of the active forces, monomers can move superdiffusively, while on larger time scales subdiffusive behavior occurs. The difference between this subdiffusion and that in the absence of active forces is quantified. We show that the polymer swells in response to active processes and determine how this swelling depends on the viscoelastic properties of the environment. Our results are compared to recent experiments on the motion of chromosomal loci in bacteria.

  2. Conditions of activity bubble uniqueness in dynamic neural fields.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, Inna; Goerick, Christian

    2005-02-01

    Dynamic neural fields (DNFs) offer a rich spectrum of dynamic properties like hysteresis, spatiotemporal information integration, and coexistence of multiple attractors. These properties make DNFs more and more popular in implementations of sensorimotor loops for autonomous systems. Applications often imply that DNFs should have only one compact region of firing neurons (activity bubble), whereas the rest of the field should not fire (e.g., if the field represents motor commands). In this article we prove the conditions of activity bubble uniqueness in the case of locally symmetric input bubbles. The qualitative condition on inhomogeneous inputs used in earlier work on DNFs is transfered to a quantitative condition of a balance between the internal dynamics and the input. The mathematical analysis is carried out for the two-dimensional case with methods that can be extended to more than two dimensions. The article concludes with an example of how our theoretical results facilitate the practical use of DNFs. PMID:15685393

  3. Endoscopic Shearography and Thermography Methods for Nondestructive Evaluation of Lined Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Matthew D.; Bullock, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this research effort was the development of methods for shearography and thermography inspection of coatings, bonds, or laminates inside rocket fuel or oxidizer tanks, fuel lines, and other closed structures. The endoscopic methods allow imaging and inspection inside cavities which are traditionally inaccessible with shearography or thermography cameras. The techniques are demonstrated and suggestions for practical application are made in this report. Drawings of the experimental setups, detailed procedures, and experimental data are included.

  4. Defect detection in pulsed thermography: a comparison of Kohonen and Perceptron neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerand, Steve; Darabi, A.; Maldague, Xavier P.

    1999-03-01

    In this paper, two neural network approaches are compared for defect detection using thermal evolution, phase and amplitude data acquired in the pulsed thermography approach with pulsed phase thermography processing. The tested approaches are based on Perceptron and Kohonen neural networks. Examples of results are presented for each technique with the three types of available data, in the case of flat-bottom holes in aluminum. Results show that the Perceptron using phase data gives better results being less influenced by disturbances.

  5. Active synchronization between two different chaotic dynamical system

    SciTech Connect

    Maheri, M.; Arifin, N. Md; Ismail, F.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper we investigate on the synchronization problem between two different chaotic dynamical system based on the Lyapunov stability theorem by using nonlinear control functions. Active control schemes are used for synchronization Liu system as drive and Rossler system as response. Numerical simulation by using Maple software are used to show effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  6. Active synchronization between two different chaotic dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheri, M.; Arifin, N. Md; Ismail, F.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we investigate on the synchronization problem between two different chaotic dynamical system based on the Lyapunov stability theorem by using nonlinear control functions. Active control schemes are used for synchronization Liu system as drive and Rossler system as response. Numerical simulation by using Maple software are used to show effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  7. Self-assembly of active colloidal molecules with dynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    Catalytically active colloids maintain non-equilibrium conditions in which they produce and deplete chemicals at their surface. While individual colloids that are symmetrically coated do not exhibit dynamical activity, the concentration fields resulting from their chemical activity decay as 1/r and produce gradients that attract or repel other colloids depending on their surface chemistry and ambient variables. This results in a non-equilibrium analogue of ionic systems, but with the remarkable novel feature of action-reaction symmetry breaking. In dilute conditions these active colloids join up to form molecules via generalized ionic bonds. Colloids are found to join up to form self-assembled molecules that could be inert or have spontaneous activity in the form of net translational velocity and spin depending on their symmetry properties and their constituents. As the interactions do not satisfy detailed-balance, it is possible to achieve structures with time dependent functionality. We study a molecule that adopts spontaneous oscillations and another that exhibits a run-and-tumble dynamics similar to bacteria. Our study shows that catalytically active colloids could be used for designing self-assembled structures that posses dynamical functionalities.

  8. Integration of ground-penetrating radar, ultrasonic tests and infrared thermography for the analysis of a precious medieval rose window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuzzo, L.; Calia, A.; Liberatore, D.; Masini, N.; Rizzo, E.

    2010-04-01

    The integration of high-resolution, non-invasive geophysical techniques (such as ground-penetrating radar or GPR) with emerging sensing techniques (acoustics, thermography) can complement limited destructive tests to provide a suitable methodology for a multi-scale assessment of the state of preservation, material and construction components of monuments. This paper presents the results of the application of GPR, infrared thermography (IRT) and ultrasonic tests to the 13th century rose window of Troia Cathedral (Apulia, Italy), affected by widespread decay and instability problems caused by the 1731 earthquake and reactivated by recent seismic activity. This integrated approach provided a wide amount of complementary information at different scales, ranging from the sub-centimetre size of the metallic joints between the various architectural elements, narrow fractures and thin mortar fillings, up to the sub-metre scale of the internal masonry structure of the circular ashlar curb linking the rose window to the façade, which was essential to understand the original building technique and to design an effective restoration strategy.

  9. Potentialities of steady-state and transient thermography in breast tumour depth detection: A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Amri, Amina; Pulko, Susan Helen; Wilkinson, Anthony James

    2016-01-01

    Breast thermography still has inherent limitations that prevent it from being fully accepted as a breast screening modality in medicine. The main challenges of breast thermography are to reduce false positive results and to increase the sensitivity of a thermogram. Further, it is still difficult to obtain information about tumour parameters such as metabolic heat, tumour depth and diameter from a thermogram. However, infrared technology and image processing have advanced significantly and recent clinical studies have shown increased sensitivity of thermography in cancer diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to study numerically the possibilities of extracting information about the tumour depth from steady state thermography and transient thermography after cold stress with no need to use any specific inversion technique. Both methods are based on the numerical solution of Pennes bioheat equation for a simple three-dimensional breast model. The effectiveness of two approaches used for depth detection from steady state thermography is assessed. The effect of breast density on the steady state thermal contrast has also been studied. The use of a cold stress test and the recording of transient contrasts during rewarming were found to be potentially suitable for tumour depth detection during the rewarming process. Sensitivity to parameters such as cold stress temperature and cooling time is investigated using the numerical model and simulation results reveal two prominent depth-related characteristic times which do not strongly depend on the temperature of the cold stress or on the cooling period. PMID:26522612

  10. AN EVALUATION OF INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY FOR DETECTION OF BUMBLEFOOT (PODODERMATITIS) IN PENGUINS.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Ann E; Torgerson-White, Lauri L; Allard, Stephanie M; Schneider, Tom

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate infrared thermography as a noninvasive screening tool for detection of pododermatitis during the developing and active stages of disease in three species of penguins: king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) , macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus), and rockhopper penguin (Eudyptes chrysocome). In total, 67 penguins were examined every 3 mo over a 15-mo period. At each exam, bumblefoot lesions were characterized and measured, and a timed series of thermal images were collected over a 4-min period. Three different methods were compared for analysis of thermograms. Feet with active lesions that compromise the surface of the foot were compared to feet with inactive lesions and no lesions. The hypothesis was that feet with active lesions would have warmer surface temperatures than the other conditions. Analysis of the data showed that although feet with active bumblefoot lesions are warmer than feet with inactive or no lesions, the variability seen in each individual penguin from one exam day to the next and the overlap seen between temperatures from each condition made thermal imaging an unreliable tool for detection of bumblefoot in the species studied. PMID:27468019

  11. Active IR-applications in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggenhauser, H.

    2002-06-01

    Applications of IR-thermography in civil engineering are not limited to the identification of heat losses in building envelopes. As it is well known from other areas of non-destructive testing, active IR-thermographic methods such as cooling down or lock-in thermography improves the results in many investigations. In civil engineering these techniques have not been used widely. Mostly thermography is used in a quasi-static manner. The interpretation of moisture measurements with thermography on surfaces can be very difficult due to several overlapping effects: emissivity changes due to composition, heat transfer through wet sections of the specimen, cooling through air flow or reflected spurious radiation sources. These effects can be reduced by selectively measuring the reflection in two wavelength windows, one on an absorption band of water and another in a reference band and then combining the results in a moisture index image. Cooling down thermography can be used to identify subsurface structural deficiencies. For building materials like concrete these measurements are performed on a much longer time scale than in flash lamp experiments. A quantitative analysis of the full cooling down process over several minutes can reliably identify defects at different depths. Experiments at BAM have shown, that active thermography is capabale of identifying structural deficiencies or moist areas in building materials much more reliable than quasi-static thermography.

  12. Dynamic neural activity during stress signals resilient coping.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajita; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Constable, R Todd; Seo, Dongju

    2016-08-01

    Active coping underlies a healthy stress response, but neural processes supporting such resilient coping are not well-known. Using a brief, sustained exposure paradigm contrasting highly stressful, threatening, and violent stimuli versus nonaversive neutral visual stimuli in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we show significant subjective, physiologic, and endocrine increases and temporally related dynamically distinct patterns of neural activation in brain circuits underlying the stress response. First, stress-specific sustained increases in the amygdala, striatum, hypothalamus, midbrain, right insula, and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) regions supported the stress processing and reactivity circuit. Second, dynamic neural activation during stress versus neutral runs, showing early increases followed by later reduced activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), left DLPFC, hippocampus, and left insula, suggested a stress adaptation response network. Finally, dynamic stress-specific mobilization of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VmPFC), marked by initial hypoactivity followed by increased VmPFC activation, pointed to the VmPFC as a key locus of the emotional and behavioral control network. Consistent with this finding, greater neural flexibility signals in the VmPFC during stress correlated with active coping ratings whereas lower dynamic activity in the VmPFC also predicted a higher level of maladaptive coping behaviors in real life, including binge alcohol intake, emotional eating, and frequency of arguments and fights. These findings demonstrate acute functional neuroplasticity during stress, with distinct and separable brain networks that underlie critical components of the stress response, and a specific role for VmPFC neuroflexibility in stress-resilient coping. PMID:27432990

  13. Dynamics of telomerase activity in response to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Puterman, E; Karan, Lori; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase activity plays an essential role in cel0l survival, by lengthening telomeres and promoting cell growth and longevity. It is now possible to quantify the low levels of telomerase activity in human leukocytes. Low basal telomerase activity has been related to chronic stress in people and to chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vitro. Here we test whether leukocyte telomerase activity changes under acute psychological stress. We exposed 44 elderly women, including 22 high stress dementia caregivers and 22 matched low stress controls, to a brief laboratory psychological stressor, while examining changes in telomerase activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). At baseline, caregivers had lower telomerase activity levels than controls, but during stress telomerase activity increased similarly in both groups. Across the entire sample, subsequent telomerase activity increased by 18% one hour after the end of the stressor (p<0.01). The increase in telomerase activity was independent of changes in numbers or percentages of monocytes, lymphocytes, and specific T cell types, although we cannot fully rule out some potential contribution from immune cell redistribution in the change in telomerase activity. Telomerase activity increases were associated with greater cortisol increases in response to the stressor. Lastly, psychological response to the tasks (greater threat perception) was also related to greater telomerase activity increases in controls. These findings uncover novel relationships of dynamic telomerase activity with exposure to an acute stressor, and with two classic aspects of the stress response -- perceived psychological stress and neuroendocrine (cortisol) responses to the stressor. PMID:20018236

  14. Modeling of the Multiparameter Inverse Task of Transient Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotnikov, Y. A.

    1998-01-01

    Transient thermography employs preheated surface temperature variations caused by delaminations, cracks, voids, corroded regions, etc. Often, it is enough to detect these changes to declare a defect in a workpiece. It is also desirable to obtain additional information about the defect from the thermal response. The planar size, depth, and thermal resistance of the detected defects are the parameters of interest. In this paper a digital image processing technique is applied to simulated thermal responses in order to obtain the geometry of the inclusion-type defects in a flat panel. A three-dimensional finite difference model in Cartesian coordinates is used for the numerical simulations. Typical physical properties of polymer graphite composites are assumed. Using different informative parameters of the thermal response for depth estimation is discussed.

  15. Real time capable infrared thermography for ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sieglin, B. Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Brucker, B.; Eich, T.; Kammerloher, L.; Martinov, S.

    2015-11-15

    Infrared (IR) thermography is widely used in fusion research to study power exhaust and incident heat load onto the plasma facing components. Due to the short pulse duration of today’s fusion experiments, IR systems have mostly been designed for off-line data analysis. For future long pulse devices (e.g., Wendelstein 7-X, ITER), a real time evaluation of the target temperature and heat flux is mandatory. This paper shows the development of a real time capable IR system for ASDEX Upgrade. A compact IR camera has been designed incorporating the necessary magnetic and electric shielding for the detector, cooler assembly. The camera communication is based on the Camera Link industry standard. The data acquisition hardware is based on National Instruments hardware, consisting of a PXIe chassis inside and a fibre optical connected industry computer outside the torus hall. Image processing and data evaluation are performed using real time LabVIEW.

  16. Aerial thermography studies of power plant heated lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2000-01-26

    Remote sensing temperature measurements of water bodies is complicated by the temperature differences between the true surface or skin water and the bulk water below. Weather conditions control the reduction of the skin temperature relative to the bulk water temperature. Typical skin temperature depressions range from a few tenths of a degree Celsius to more than one degree. In this research project, the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) used aerial thermography and surface-based meteorological and water temperature measurements to study a power plant cooling lake in South Carolina. Skin and bulk water temperatures were measured simultaneously for imagery calibration and to produce a database for modeling of skin temperature depressions as a function of weather and bulk water temperatures. This paper will present imagery that illustrates how the skin temperature depression was affected by different conditions in several locations on the lake and will present skin temperature modeling results.

  17. Temperature maps measurements on 3D surfaces with infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardone, Gennaro; Ianiro, Andrea; Dello Ioio, Gennaro; Passaro, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    The use of the infrared camera as a temperature transducer in wind tunnel applications is convenient and widespread. Nevertheless, the infrared data are available in the form of 2D images while the observed surfaces are often not planar and the reconstruction of temperature maps over them is a critical task. In this work, after recalling the principles of IR thermography, a methodology to rebuild temperature maps on the surfaces of 3D object is proposed. In particular, an optical calibration is applied to the IR camera by means of a novel target plate with control points. The proposed procedure takes also into account the directional emissivity by estimating the viewing angle. All the needed steps are described and analyzed. The advantages given by the proposed method are shown with an experiment in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  18. High speed heterodyne infrared thermography applied to thermal diffusivity identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradere, C.; Clerjaud, L.; Batsale, J. C.; Dilhaire, S.

    2011-05-01

    We have combined InfraRed thermography and thermal wave techniques to perform microscale, ultrafast (microsecond) temperature field measurements. The method is based on an IR camera coupled to a microscope and synchronized to the heat source by means of phase locked function generators. The principle is based on electronic stroboscopic sampling where the low IR camera acquisition frequency facq (25 Hz) undersamples a high frequency thermal wave. This technique permits the measurement of the emissive thermal response at a (microsecond) short time scale (microsecond) with the full frame mode of the IR camera with a spatial thermal resolution of 7 μm. Then it becomes possible to study 3D transient heat transfer in heterogeneous and high thermal conductive thin layers. Thus it is possible for the first time in our knowledge to achieve temperature field measurements in heterogeneous media within a wide range of time domains. The IR camera is now a suitable instrument for multiscale thermal analysis.

  19. Infrared-thermography imaging system multiapplications for manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Sharon A.

    1990-03-01

    Imaging systems technology has been utilized traditionally for diagnosing structural envelope or insulation problems in the general thermographic comunity. Industrially, new applications for utilizing thermal imaging technology have been developed i n pred i cti ve/preventi ye mai ntenance and prod uct moni tori ng prociures at Eastman Kodak Company, the largest photographic manufacturering producer in the world. In the manufacturing processes used at Eastman Kodak Company, new applications for thermal imaging include: (1) Fluid transfer line insulation (2) Web coating drying uniformity (3) Web slitter knives (4) Heating/cooling coils (5) Overheated tail bearings, and (6) Electrical phase imbalance. The substantial cost benefits gained from these applications of infrared thermography substantiate the practicality of this approach and indicate the desirability of researching further appl i cati ons.

  20. Standing wave in evaporating meniscus detected by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffone, Cosimo; Sefiane, Khellil; Minetti, Christophe; Mamalis, Dimitrios

    2015-07-01

    A standing wave has been detected in the evaporating meniscus formed on an organic liquid (acetone) inside a horizontally positioned capillary tube of 1 mm internal diameter. The standing wave is believed to originate from the interaction between surface tension and gravitational forces. We found that the standing wave ensues only at the upper part of the meniscus interface where gravity and surface tension act in the opposite direction. This experimental observation is similar to standing waves observed in floating zones in microgravity but different from travelling waves reported recently in volatile drops; in both cases the waves are produced by temperature differences along a liquid-vapour interface. By employing InfraRed thermography, we recorded the temperature distribution of the meniscus interface, and we found that the first characteristic frequency of the standing wave is around 0.3 Hz.

  1. Localization of wood floor structure by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochior Plescanu, C.; Klein, M.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.

    2008-03-01

    One of our industrial partners, Assek Technologie, is interested in developing a technique that would improve the drying process of wood floor in basements after flooding. In order to optimize the procedure, the floor structure and the damaged (wet) area extent must first be determined with minimum intrusion (minimum or no dismantling). The present study presents the use of infrared thermography to reveal the structure of (flooded) wood floors. The procedure involves opening holes in the floor. Injecting some hot air through those holes reveals the framing structure even if the floor is covered by vinyl or ceramic tiles. This study indicates that thermal imaging can also be used as a tool to validate the decontamination process after drying. Thermal images were obtained on small-scale models and in a demonstration room.

  2. Advanced Image Processing for Defect Visualization in Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Winfree, William P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of a defect visualization process based on pulse infrared thermography are presented. Algorithms have been developed to reduce the amount of operator participation required in the process of interpreting thermographic images. The algorithms determine the defect's depth and size from the temporal and spatial thermal distributions that exist on the surface of the investigated object following thermal excitation. A comparison of the results from thermal contrast, time derivative, and phase analysis methods for defect visualization are presented. These comparisons are based on three dimensional simulations of a test case representing a plate with multiple delaminations. Comparisons are also based on experimental data obtained from a specimen with flat bottom holes and a composite panel with delaminations.

  3. Eddy current pulsed thermography for fatigue evaluation of gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Gui Yun; Yin, Aijun; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Jishan; Shaw, Brian

    2014-02-01

    The pulsed eddy current (PEC) technique generates responses over a wide range of frequencies, containing more spectral coverage than traditional eddy current inspection. Eddy current pulsed thermography (ECPT), a newly developed non-destructive testing (NDT) technique, has advantages such as rapid inspection of a large area within a short time, high spatial resolution, high sensitivity and stand-off measurement distance. This paper investigates ECPT for the evaluation of gear fatigue tests. The paper proposes a statistical method based on single channel blind source separation to extract details of gear fatigue. The discussion of transient thermal distribution and patterns of fatigue contact surfaces as well as the non-contact surfaces have been reported. In addition, the measurement for gears with different cycles of fatigue tests by ECPTand the comparison results between ECPT with magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) have been evaluated. The comparison shows the competitive capability of ECPT in fatigue evaluation.

  4. Porosity Measurement in Laminated Composites by Thermography and FEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the correlation between the through-thickness thermal diffusivity and the porosity of composites. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to determine the transient thermal response of composites that were subjected to laser heating. A series of finite element models were built and thermal responses for isotropic and orthographic materials with various thermal diffusivities subjected to different heating conditions were investigated. Experiments were conducted to verify the models and to estimate the unknown parameters such as the amount of heat flux. The analysis and experimental results show good correlation between thermal diffusivity and porosity in the composite materials. They also show that both laser and flash heating can be used effectively to obtain thermal diffusivity. The current infrared thermography system is developed for use with flash heating. The laser heating models and the FEA results can provide useful tools to develop practical thermal diffusivity measurement scheme using laser heat.

  5. Real time capable infrared thermography for ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Sieglin, B; Faitsch, M; Herrmann, A; Brucker, B; Eich, T; Kammerloher, L; Martinov, S

    2015-11-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography is widely used in fusion research to study power exhaust and incident heat load onto the plasma facing components. Due to the short pulse duration of today's fusion experiments, IR systems have mostly been designed for off-line data analysis. For future long pulse devices (e.g., Wendelstein 7-X, ITER), a real time evaluation of the target temperature and heat flux is mandatory. This paper shows the development of a real time capable IR system for ASDEX Upgrade. A compact IR camera has been designed incorporating the necessary magnetic and electric shielding for the detector, cooler assembly. The camera communication is based on the Camera Link industry standard. The data acquisition hardware is based on National Instruments hardware, consisting of a PXIe chassis inside and a fibre optical connected industry computer outside the torus hall. Image processing and data evaluation are performed using real time LabVIEW. PMID:26628130

  6. The Study of Hypersonic Heat Transfer by Liquid Crystals Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovrizhina, V. N.; Kharitonov, A. M.; Petrov, A. P.; Schpack, S. I.; Zharkova, G. M.; Zvegintsev, V. I.

    2009-01-01

    The results of experimental application of the Liquid Crystal Thermography in short-duration facility AT-303 of ITAM Novosibirsk (Russia) are presented. Experiments were carried out at free stream Mach number M∞ ≍ 10.9, unit Reynolds number Re1≍2.9*106M-1, run duration 350 MC and temperature factor Tw/To ≍ 0.2 on a semi-spherically blunted cone. Polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC), developed at ITAM, have been used as thermosensitive coating. Transient technique and color pattern video acquisition was realized at different framing rates. It was obtained that high temperature sensitivity of PDLC allows visualize the fine features of the temperature field on the model surface. The heat flux in comparison with semi- empirical estimation are presented and discussed too.

  7. Real time capable infrared thermography for ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieglin, B.; Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Brucker, B.; Eich, T.; Kammerloher, L.; Martinov, S.

    2015-11-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography is widely used in fusion research to study power exhaust and incident heat load onto the plasma facing components. Due to the short pulse duration of today's fusion experiments, IR systems have mostly been designed for off-line data analysis. For future long pulse devices (e.g., Wendelstein 7-X, ITER), a real time evaluation of the target temperature and heat flux is mandatory. This paper shows the development of a real time capable IR system for ASDEX Upgrade. A compact IR camera has been designed incorporating the necessary magnetic and electric shielding for the detector, cooler assembly. The camera communication is based on the Camera Link industry standard. The data acquisition hardware is based on National Instruments hardware, consisting of a PXIe chassis inside and a fibre optical connected industry computer outside the torus hall. Image processing and data evaluation are performed using real time LabVIEW.

  8. Optimized laser application in dermatology using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Roderick A.; Donne, Kelvin E.; Clement, Marc; Kiernan, Michael N.

    2002-03-01

    Infrared thermography can be used to optimize the application of lasers in dermatology with particular reference to the treatment of certain skin disorders such as vascular lesions and depilation. The efficacy of treatment is dependent upon a number of factors including: Optimization and correct selection of laser parameters such as wavelength and spot size. Human factors, such as laser operator skill, patient's skin type and anatomical location. By observing the thermal effects of laser irradiation on the skins surface during treatment results in improved efficacy and minimizes the possible threshold to skin damage, reducing the possibility of burning and scarring. This is of particular significance for example, in the control of purpura for the treatment of vascular lesions. The optimization is validated with reference to a computer model that predicts various skin temperatures based on two different laser spot sizes.

  9. Application of infrared thermography in computer aided diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Oliver; Rajendra Acharya, U.; Ng, E. Y. K.; Hong, Tan Jen; Yu, Wenwei

    2014-09-01

    The invention of thermography, in the 1950s, posed a formidable problem to the research community: What is the relationship between disease and heat radiation captured with Infrared (IR) cameras? The research community responded with a continuous effort to find this crucial relationship. This effort was aided by advances in processing techniques, improved sensitivity and spatial resolution of thermal sensors. However, despite this progress fundamental issues with this imaging modality still remain. The main problem is that the link between disease and heat radiation is complex and in many cases even non-linear. Furthermore, the change in heat radiation as well as the change in radiation pattern, which indicate disease, is minute. On a technical level, this poses high requirements on image capturing and processing. On a more abstract level, these problems lead to inter-observer variability and on an even more abstract level they lead to a lack of trust in this imaging modality. In this review, we adopt the position that these problems can only be solved through a strict application of scientific principles and objective performance assessment. Computing machinery is inherently objective; this helps us to apply scientific principles in a transparent way and to assess the performance results. As a consequence, we aim to promote thermography based Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems. Another benefit of CAD systems comes from the fact that the diagnostic accuracy is linked to the capability of the computing machinery and, in general, computers become ever more potent. We predict that a pervasive application of computers and networking technology in medicine will help us to overcome the shortcomings of any single imaging modality and this will pave the way for integrated health care systems which maximize the quality of patient care.

  10. HeatWave: the next generation of thermography devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman; Vidas, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Energy sustainability is a major challenge of the 21st century. To reduce environmental impact, changes are required not only on the supply side of the energy chain by introducing renewable energy sources, but also on the demand side by reducing energy usage and improving energy efficiency. Currently, 2D thermal imaging is used for energy auditing, which measures the thermal radiation from the surfaces of objects and represents it as a set of color-mapped images that can be analysed for the purpose of energy efficiency monitoring. A limitation of such a method for energy auditing is that it lacks information on the geometry and location of objects with reference to each other, particularly across separate images. Such a limitation prevents any quantitative analysis to be done, for example, detecting any energy performance changes before and after retrofitting. To address these limitations, we have developed a next generation thermography device called Heat Wave. Heat Wave is a hand-held 3D thermography device that consists of a thermal camera, a range sensor and color camera, and can be used to generate precise 3D model of objects with augmented temperature and visible information. As an operator holding the device smoothly waves it around the objects of interest, Heat Wave can continuously track its own pose in space and integrate new information from the range and thermal and color cameras into a single, and precise 3D multi-modal model. Information from multiple viewpoints can be incorporated together to improve the accuracy, reliability and robustness of the global model. The approach also makes it possible to reduce any systematic errors associated with the estimation of surface temperature from the thermal images.

  11. Satellite Dynamic Damping via Active Force Control Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2012-07-01

    An approach that incorporates the Active Force Control (AFC) technique into a conventional Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a satellite active dynamic damping towards a full attitude control. The AFC method has been established to facilitate a robust motion control of dynamical systems in the presence of disturbances, parametric uncertainties and changes that are commonly prevalent in the real-world environment. The usefulness of the method can be extended by introducing intelligent mechanisms to approximate the mass or inertia matrix of the dynamic system to trigger the compensation effect of the controller. AFC is a technique that relies on the appropriate estimation of the inertial or mass parameters of the dynamic system and the measurements of the acceleration and force signals induced by the system if practical implementation is ever considered. In AFC, it is shown that the system subjected to a number of disturbances remains stable and robust via the compensating action of the control strategy. We demonstrate that it is possible to design a spacecraft attitude feedback controller that will ensure the system dynamics set point remains unchanged even in the presence of the disturbances provided that the actual disturbances can be modeled effectively. In order to further facilitate this analysis, a combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is proposed as a model satellite attitude control actuator. All the governing equations are established and the proposed satellite attitude control architecture is made amenable to numerical treatments. The results show that the PD-AFC attitude damping performances are superiorly better than that of the solely PD type. It is also shown that the tunings of the AFC system gains are crucial to ensure a better attitude damping performance and this process is mandatory for AFC systems. Finally, the results demonstrate an important satellite dynamic damping enhancement capability using the AFC

  12. Self-assembly of active colloidal molecules with dynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    2015-05-01

    Catalytically active colloids maintain nonequilibrium conditions in which they produce and deplete chemicals and hence effectively act as sources and sinks of molecules. While individual colloids that are symmetrically coated do not exhibit any form of dynamical activity, the concentration fields resulting from their chemical activity decay as 1 /r and produce gradients that attract or repel other colloids depending on their surface chemistry and ambient variables. This results in a nonequilibrium analog of ionic systems, but with the remarkable novel feature of action-reaction symmetry breaking. We study solutions of such chemically active colloids in dilute conditions when they join up to form molecules via generalized ionic bonds and discuss how we can achieve structures with time-dependent functionality. In particular, we study a molecule that adopts a spontaneous oscillatory pattern of conformations and another that exhibits a run-and-tumble dynamics similar to bacteria. Our study shows that catalytically active colloids could be used for designing self-assembled structures that possess dynamical functionalities that are determined by their prescribed three-dimensional structures, a strategy that follows the design principle of proteins.

  13. Framework for coordination of activities in dynamic situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Jörn; Charoy, François; El Khoury, Paul

    2013-02-01

    Recent disasters, such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005, have shown several issues for the coordination of human activities in these dynamic situations. Contemporary tools for the coordination used in the disaster response, such as e-mail, Whiteboards or phones, only allow for unstructured coordination, which can cause coordination problems. Hence, we discuss about the current information systems for coordinating the activities in a structured manner and identify their weaknesses in the context of a process modelling effort conducted together with experienced disaster managers. Afterwards, we propose a framework for coordination of activities in dynamic situations. The framework presented in this paper has been implemented as an extension to an open collaboration service. This shows how it can be used in the context of other tools required for disaster response management, such as maps, pictures or videos of the situation. The work described here is the foundation for enabling inter-organisational coordination of activities relevant in other domains, e.g. enterprise support processes, production processes or distributed software development projects. Furthermore, comments by disaster managers show that the concepts are relevant for their work. The expected impact is a more effective and efficient coordination of human activities in dynamic situations by structuring what needs to be coordinated.

  14. Defect dynamics and ordering in compressible active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Prashant; Srivastava, Pragya; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Active nematics, such as suspensions of biopolymers activated by molecular motors or bacteria swimming in passive liquid crystals, exhibit complex self-sustained flow, excitability and defect generation. Activity renders the defect themselves self-propelled particles, capable of organizing in emergent ordered structures. We have developed a minimal model of compressible active nematics on a substrate. We eliminate the flow velocity in favor of the nematic order parameter via the balance of frictional dissipation and active driving to obtain a dynamical description entirely in terms of the nematic alignment order parameter. Activity renormalizes the bend and splay elastic constants rendering them anisotropic and driving them to zero or even negative, resulting in the appearance of modulated states and defective structures. Using linear stability analysis and numerics we organize the various regimes into a phase diagram and discuss the relation to experiments. This work was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184.

  15. Interplay activity-connectivity: Dynamics in patterned neuronal cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibau, E.; Bendiksen, Ch.; Teller, S.; Amigó, N.; Soriano, J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of a neuronal tissue to efficiently process and transmit information depends on both the intrinsic dynamical properties of the neurons and the connectivity between them. One of the few experimental systems where one can vary the connectivity of a neuronal network in a control manner are neuronal cultures. Here we show that, by combining neuronal cultures with different pattering techniques, we can control and dictate the connectivity of neuronal networks. The emerging cultures are characterized by a rich spontaneous activity, but with some dynamical traits that can be ascribed to the underlying, engineered wiring architecture. Simple patterned cultures can be obtained by plating neurons onto predefined topographical molds, which guide neurons and connections through complex paths. In contrast to homogeneous cultures, characterized by an on/off behavior where all neurons fire in a short time window, patterned cultures show more complex spatio-temporal dynamics, and with varying propagation paths and velocities. Patterned cultures provide a valuable tool to understand not only the interplay activity-connectivity, but also aspects such as the emergence and maintenance of spontaneous activity, synchronization, or the presence of specific dynamic motifs.

  16. Active control rotor model testing at Princeton's Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A description of the model helicopter rotor tests currently in progress at Princeton's Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory is presented. The tests are designed to provide data for rotor dynamic modeling for use with active control system design. The model rotor to be used incoporates the capability for Individual Blade Control (IBC) or Higher Harmonic Control through the use of a standard swashplate on a three bladed hub. Sample results from the first series of tests are presented, along with the methodology used for state and parameter identification. Finally, pending experiments and possible research directions using this model and test facility are outlined.

  17. Thermal characterization of ZnBeMnSe mixed compounds by means of photopyroelectric and lock-in thermography methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzałkowski, K.; Dadarlat, D.; Streza, M.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, a thermal characterization (measurement of dynamic thermal parameters) of quaternary Zn1-x-yBexMnySe mixed crystals was carried out. The crystals under investigation were grown from the melt by the modified high-pressure Bridgman method with different Be and Mn contents. The effect of Be and Mn contents on thermal properties of Zn1-x-yBexMnySe compounds was analyzed, by using the photopyroelectric (PPE) method in the back configuration (BPPE) for thermal diffusivity measurements and the PPE technique in the front configuration for thermal effusivity investigations. Infrared lock-in thermography was used in order to validate the BPPE results. The measured thermal effusivity and diffusivity allowed the calculation of thermal conductivity of the investigated materials.

  18. Characterizing and modeling the dynamics of activity and popularity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Menghui; Gao, Liang; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2014-01-01

    Social media, regarded as two-layer networks consisting of users and items, turn out to be the most important channels for access to massive information in the era of Web 2.0. The dynamics of human activity and item popularity is a crucial issue in social media networks. In this paper, by analyzing the growth of user activity and item popularity in four empirical social media networks, i.e., Amazon, Flickr, Delicious and Wikipedia, it is found that cross links between users and items are more likely to be created by active users and to be acquired by popular items, where user activity and item popularity are measured by the number of cross links associated with users and items. This indicates that users generally trace popular items, overall. However, it is found that the inactive users more severely trace popular items than the active users. Inspired by empirical analysis, we propose an evolving model for such networks, in which the evolution is driven only by two-step random walk. Numerical experiments verified that the model can qualitatively reproduce the distributions of user activity and item popularity observed in empirical networks. These results might shed light on the understandings of micro dynamics of activity and popularity in social media networks. PMID:24586586

  19. Characterizing and Modeling the Dynamics of Activity and Popularity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Menghui; Gao, Liang; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2014-01-01

    Social media, regarded as two-layer networks consisting of users and items, turn out to be the most important channels for access to massive information in the era of Web 2.0. The dynamics of human activity and item popularity is a crucial issue in social media networks. In this paper, by analyzing the growth of user activity and item popularity in four empirical social media networks, i.e., Amazon, Flickr, Delicious and Wikipedia, it is found that cross links between users and items are more likely to be created by active users and to be acquired by popular items, where user activity and item popularity are measured by the number of cross links associated with users and items. This indicates that users generally trace popular items, overall. However, it is found that the inactive users more severely trace popular items than the active users. Inspired by empirical analysis, we propose an evolving model for such networks, in which the evolution is driven only by two-step random walk. Numerical experiments verified that the model can qualitatively reproduce the distributions of user activity and item popularity observed in empirical networks. These results might shed light on the understandings of micro dynamics of activity and popularity in social media networks. PMID:24586586

  20. Nonequilibrium dynamics of active matter with correlated noise: A dynamical renormalization group study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachan, Devin; Levine, Alex; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2014-03-01

    Biology is rife with examples of active materials - soft matter systems driven into nonequilibrium steady states by energy input at the micro scale. For example, solutions of active micron scale swimmers produce active fluids showing phenomena reminiscent of turbulent convection at low Reynolds number; cytoskeletal networks driven by endogenous molecular motors produce active solids whose mechanics and low frequency strain fluctuations depend sensitively on motor activity. One hallmark of these systems is that they are driven at the micro scale by temporally correlated forces. In this talk, we study how correlated noise at the micro scale leads to novel long wavelength and long time scale dynamics at the macro scale in a simple model system. Specifically, we study the fluctuations of a ϕ4 scalar field obeying model A dynamics and driven by noise with a finite correlation time τ. We show that the effective dynamical system at long length and time scales is driven by white noise with a renormalized amplitude and renormalized transport coefficients. We discuss the implications of this result for a broad class of active matter systems driven at the micro scale by colored noise.

  1. Dynamics and Control of a Quadrotor with Active Geometric Morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Dustin A.

    Quadrotors are manufactured in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and performance levels to fulfill a multitude of roles. Robodub Inc. has patented a morphing quadrotor which will allow active reconfiguration between various shapes for performance optimization across a wider spectrum of roles. The dynamics of the system are studied and modeled using Newtonian Mechanics. Controls are developed and simulated using both Linear Quadratic and Numerical Nonlinear Optimal control for a symmetric simplificiation of the system dynamics. Various unique vehicle capabilities are investigated, including novel single-throttle flight control using symmetric geometric morphing, as well as recovery from motor loss by reconfiguring into a trirotor configuration. The system dynamics were found to be complex and highly nonlinear. All attempted control strategies resulted in controllability, suggesting further research into each may lead to multiple viable control strategies for a physical prototype.

  2. Contribution of myosin II activity to cell spreading dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nisenholz, Noam; Paknikar, Aishwarya; Köster, Sarah; Zemel, Assaf

    2016-01-14

    Myosin II activity and actin polymerization at the leading edge of the cell are known to be essential sources of cellular stress. However, a quantitative account of their separate contributions is still lacking; so is the influence of the coupling between the two phenomena on cell spreading dynamics. We present a simple analytic elastic theory of cell spreading dynamics that quantitatively demonstrates how actin polymerization and myosin activity cooperate in the generation of cellular stress during spreading. Consistent with experiments, myosin activity is assumed to polarize in response to the stresses generated during spreading. The characteristic response time and the overall spreading time are predicted to determine different evolution profiles of cell spreading dynamics. These include, a (regular) monotonic increase of cell projected area with time, a non-monotonic (overshooting) profile with a maximum, and damped oscillatory modes. In addition, two populations of myosin II motors are distinguished based on their location in the lamella; those located above the major adhesion zone at the cell periphery are shown to facilitate spreading whereas those in deeper regions of the lamella are shown to oppose spreading. We demonstrate that the attenuation of myosin activity in the two regions may result in reciprocal effects on spreading. These findings provide important new insight into the function of myosin II motors in the course of spreading. PMID:26481613

  3. Viscoelastic and elastomeric active matter: Linear instability and nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemingway, E. J.; Cates, M. E.; Fielding, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a continuum model of active viscoelastic matter, whereby an active nematic liquid crystal is coupled to a minimal model of polymer dynamics with a viscoelastic relaxation time τC. To explore the resulting interplay between active and polymeric dynamics, we first generalize a linear stability analysis (from earlier studies without polymer) to derive criteria for the onset of spontaneous heterogeneous flows (strain rate) and/or deformations (strain). We find two modes of instability. The first is a viscous mode, associated with strain rate perturbations. It dominates for relatively small values of τC and is a simple generalization of the instability known previously without polymer. The second is an elastomeric mode, associated with strain perturbations, which dominates at large τC and persists even as τC→∞ . We explore the dynamical states to which these instabilities lead by means of direct numerical simulations. These reveal oscillatory shear-banded states in one dimension and activity-driven turbulence in two dimensions even in the elastomeric limit τC→∞ . Adding polymer can also have calming effects, increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a channel in a type of drag reduction. The effect of including strong antagonistic coupling between the nematic and polymer is examined numerically, revealing a rich array of spontaneously flowing states.

  4. Dynamics of self-propelled nanomotors in chemically active media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Snigdha; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-07-01

    Synthetic chemically powered nanomotors often rely on the environment for their fuel supply. The propulsion properties of such motors can be altered if the environment in which they move is chemically active. The dynamical properties of sphere dimer motors, composed of linked catalytic and noncatalytic monomers, are investigated in active media. Chemical reactions occur at the catalytic monomer and the reactant or product of this reaction is involved in cubic autocatalytic or linear reactions that take place in the bulk phase environment. For these reactions, as the bulk phase reaction rates increase, the motor propulsion velocity decreases. For the cubic autocatalytic reaction, this net effect arises from a competition between a reduction of the nonequilibrium concentration gradient that leads to smaller velocity and the generation of fuel in the environment that tends to increase the motor propulsion. The role played by detailed balance in determining the form of the concentration gradient in the motor vicinity in the active medium is studied. Simulations are carried out using reactive multiparticle collision dynamics and compared with theoretical models to obtain further insight into sphere dimer dynamics in active media.

  5. Distal gap junctions and active dendrites can tune network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saraga, Fernanda; Ng, Leo; Skinner, Frances K

    2006-03-01

    Gap junctions allow direct electrical communication between CNS neurons. From theoretical and modeling studies, it is well known that although gap junctions can act to synchronize network output, they can also give rise to many other dynamic patterns including antiphase and other phase-locked states. The particular network pattern that arises depends on cellular, intrinsic properties that affect firing frequencies as well as the strength and location of the gap junctions. Interneurons or GABAergic neurons in hippocampus are diverse in their cellular characteristics and have been shown to have active dendrites. Furthermore, parvalbumin-positive GABAergic neurons, also known as basket cells, can contact one another via gap junctions on their distal dendrites. Using two-cell network models, we explore how distal electrical connections affect network output. We build multi-compartment models of hippocampal basket cells using NEURON and endow them with varying amounts of active dendrites. Two-cell networks of these model cells as well as reduced versions are explored. The relationship between intrinsic frequency and the level of active dendrites allows us to define three regions based on what sort of network dynamics occur with distal gap junction coupling. Weak coupling theory is used to predict the delineation of these regions as well as examination of phase response curves and distal dendritic polarization levels. We find that a nonmonotonic dependence of network dynamic characteristics (phase lags) on gap junction conductance occurs. This suggests that distal electrical coupling and active dendrite levels can control how sensitive network dynamics are to gap junction modulation. With the extended geometry, gap junctions located at more distal locations must have larger conductances for pure synchrony to occur. Furthermore, based on simulations with heterogeneous networks, it may be that one requires active dendrites if phase-locking is to occur in networks formed

  6. Biomechanical fatigue analysis of an advanced new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy plate for bone fracture repair using conventional fatigue tests and thermography.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Zahra S; El Sawi, Ihab; Bougherara, Habiba; Zdero, Radovan

    2014-07-01

    The current study is part of an ongoing research program to develop an advanced new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy (CF/flax/epoxy) hybrid composite with a “sandwich structure” as a substitute for metallic materials for orthopedic long bone fracture plate applications. The purpose of this study was to assess the fatigue properties of this composite, since cyclic loading is one of the main types of loads carried by a femur fracture plate during normal daily activities. Conventional fatigue testing, thermographic analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the damage progress that occurred during fatigue loading. Fatigue strength obtained using thermography analysis (51% of ultimate tensile strength) was confirmed using the conventional fatigue test (50–55% of ultimate tensile strength). The dynamic modulus (E⁎) was found to stay almost constant at 47 GPa versus the number of cycles, which can be related to the contribution of both flax/epoxy and CF/epoxy laminae to the stiffness of the composite. SEM images showed solid bonding at the CF/epoxy and flax/epoxy laminae, with a crack density of only 0.48% for the plate loaded for 2 million cycles. The current composite plate showed much higher fatigue strength than the main loads experienced by a typical patient during cyclic activities; thus, it may be a potential candidate for bone fracture plate applications. Moreover, the fatigue strength from thermographic analysis was the same as that obtained by the conventional fatigue tests, thus demonstrating its potential use as an alternate tool to rapidly evaluate fatigue strength of composite biomaterials. PMID:24918250

  7. A "Kanes's Dynamics" Model for the Active Rack Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. David; Beech, Geoffrey

    1999-01-01

    Many microgravity space-science experiments require vibratory acceleration levels unachievable without active isolation. The Boeing Corporation's Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) employs a novel combination of magnetic actuation and mechanical linkages, to address these isolation requirements on the International Space Station (ISS). ARIS provides isolation at the rack (international Standard Payload Rack, or ISPR) level. Effective model-based vibration isolation requires (1) an appropriate isolation device, (2) an adequate dynamic (i.e., mathematical) model of that isolator, and (3) a suitable, corresponding controller. ARIS provides the ISS response to the first requirement. This paper presents one response to the second, in a state-space framework intended to facilitate an optimal-controls approach to the third. The authors use "Kane's Dynamics" to develop an state-space, analytical (algebraic) set of linearized equations of motion for ARIS.

  8. A "Kane's Dynamics" Model for the Active Rack Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. D.; Beech, G. S.; Rao, N. N. S.; Rupert, J. K.; Kim, Y. K.

    2001-01-01

    Many microgravity space science experiments require vibratory acceleration levels unachievable without active isolation. The Boeing Corporation's Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) employs a novel combination of magnetic actuation and mechanical linkages to address these isolation requirements on the International Space Station (ISS). ARIS provides isolation at the rack (International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR)) level. Effective model-based vibration isolation requires: (1) an appropriate isolation device, (2) an adequate dynamic (i.e., mathematical) model of that isolator, and (3) a suitable, corresponding controller. ARIS provides the ISS response to the first requirement. This paper presents one response to the second, in a state space framework intended to facilitate an optimal-controls approach to the third. The authors use "Kane's Dynamics" to develop a state-space, analytical (algebraic) set of linearized equations of motion for ARIS.

  9. Persistent Activity in Neural Networks with Dynamic Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Omri; Tsodyks, Misha

    2007-01-01

    Persistent activity states (attractors), observed in several neocortical areas after the removal of a sensory stimulus, are believed to be the neuronal basis of working memory. One of the possible mechanisms that can underlie persistent activity is recurrent excitation mediated by intracortical synaptic connections. A recent experimental study revealed that connections between pyramidal cells in prefrontal cortex exhibit various degrees of synaptic depression and facilitation. Here we analyze the effect of synaptic dynamics on the emergence and persistence of attractor states in interconnected neural networks. We show that different combinations of synaptic depression and facilitation result in qualitatively different network dynamics with respect to the emergence of the attractor states. This analysis raises the possibility that the framework of attractor neural networks can be extended to represent time-dependent stimuli. PMID:17319739

  10. The roles of vibration analysis and infrared thermography in monitoring air-handling equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurzbach, Richard N.

    2003-04-01

    Industrial and commercial building equipment maintenance has not historically been targeted for implementation of PdM programs. The focus instead has been on manufacturing, aerospace and energy industries where production interruption has significant cost implications. As cost-effectiveness becomes more pervasive in corporate culture, even office space and labor activities housed in large facilities are being scrutinized for cost-cutting measures. When the maintenance costs for these facilities are reviewed, PdM can be considered for improving the reliability of the building temperature regulation, and reduction of maintenance repair costs. An optimized program to direct maintenance resources toward a cost effective and pro-active management of the facility can result in reduced operating budgets, and greater occupant satisfaction. A large majority of the significant rotating machinery in a large building environment are belt-driven air handling units. These machines are often poorly designed or utilized within the facility. As a result, the maintenance staff typically find themselves scrambling to replace belts and bearings, going from one failure to another. Instead of the reactive-mode maintenance, some progressive and critical institutions are adopting predictive and proactive technologies of infrared thermography and vibration analysis. Together, these technologies can be used to identify design and installation problems, that when corrected, significantly reduce maintenance and increase reliability. For critical building use, such as laboratories, research facilities, and other high value non-industrial settings, the cost-benefits of more reliable machinery can contribute significantly to the operational success.

  11. Coarsening dynamics of binary liquids with active rotation.

    PubMed

    Sabrina, Syeda; Spellings, Matthew; Glotzer, Sharon C; Bishop, Kyle J M

    2015-11-21

    Active matter comprised of many self-driven units can exhibit emergent collective behaviors such as pattern formation and phase separation in both biological (e.g., mussel beds) and synthetic (e.g., colloidal swimmers) systems. While these behaviors are increasingly well understood for ensembles of linearly self-propelled "particles", less is known about the collective behaviors of active rotating particles where energy input at the particle level gives rise to rotational particle motion. A recent simulation study revealed that active rotation can induce phase separation in mixtures of counter-rotating particles in 2D. In contrast to that of linearly self-propelled particles, the phase separation of counter-rotating fluids is accompanied by steady convective flows that originate at the fluid-fluid interface. Here, we investigate the influence of these flows on the coarsening dynamics of actively rotating binary liquids using a phenomenological, hydrodynamic model that combines a Cahn-Hilliard equation for the fluid composition with a Navier-Stokes equation for the fluid velocity. The effect of active rotation is introduced though an additional force within the Navier-Stokes equations that arises due to gradients in the concentrations of clockwise and counter-clockwise rotating particles. Depending on the strength of active rotation and that of frictional interactions with the stationary surroundings, we observe and explain new dynamical behaviors such as "active coarsening" via self-generated flows as well as the emergence of self-propelled "vortex doublets". We confirm that many of the qualitative behaviors identified by the continuum model can also be found in discrete, particle-based simulations of actively rotating liquids. Our results highlight further opportunities for achieving complex dissipative structures in active materials subject to distributed actuation. PMID:26345231

  12. Global segregation of cortical activity and metastable dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Peter; Wiles, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Cortical activity exhibits persistent metastable dynamics. Assemblies of neurons transiently couple (integrate) and decouple (segregate) at multiple spatiotemporal scales; both integration and segregation are required to support metastability. Integration of distant brain regions can be achieved through long range excitatory projections, but the mechanism supporting long range segregation is not clear. We argue that the thalamocortical matrix connections, which project diffusely from the thalamus to the cortex and have long been thought to support cortical gain control, play an equally-important role in cortical segregation. We present a computational model of the diffuse thalamocortical loop, called the competitive cross-coupling (CXC) spiking network. Simulations of the model show how different levels of tonic input from the brainstem to the thalamus could control dynamical complexity in the cortex, directing transitions between sleep, wakefulness and high attention or vigilance. The model also explains how mutually-exclusive activity could arise across large portions of the cortex, such as between the default-mode and task-positive networks. It is robust to noise but does not require noise to autonomously generate metastability. We conclude that the long range segregation observed in brain activity and required for global metastable dynamics could be provided by the thalamocortical matrix, and is strongly modulated by brainstem input to the thalamus. PMID:26379514

  13. Activated wetting dynamics in the presence of mesoscopic surface disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davitt, Kristina; Pettersen, Michael; Rolley, Etienne

    2012-02-01

    Although disorder is commonly used to explain contact angle hysteresis, it is often neglected when considering wetting dynamics. When viscous forces are negligible, contact-line velocity is modelled by the Molecular Kinetic Theory [1], which predicts an activated motion driven by molecular jumps on preferential adsorption sites. We believe that in the presence of mesoscopic disorder, this model can be reinterpreted and that the activation length is no longer molecular-sized but is related to depinning events on the surface. This hypothesis is supported by a study of the wetting of cesium by liquid hydrogen in which it was shown that the activation length is of the order of the expected roughness [2]. However, no systematic study between the activation area and the length scale of the disorder has previously been made. We study wetting dynamics on metal films evaporated under different conditions, allowing us to obtain films with lateral grain sizes ranging from 10 to 200 nm. We find that the activation area deduced from wetting experiments is coherent with these sizes; however, its precise relation to the scale of disorder is not clear.[1] T.D. Blake and J.M. Haynes, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 30, 421 (1969)[2] E. Rolley and C. Guthmann, PRL 98, 166105 (2007)

  14. Active gels: dynamics of patterning and self-organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backouche, F.; Haviv, L.; Groswasser, D.; Bernheim-Groswasser, A.

    2006-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is an active gel which constantly remodels during cellular processes such as motility and division. Myosin II molecular motors are involved in this active remodeling process and therefore control the dynamic self-organization of cytoskeletal structures. Due to the complexity of in vivo systems, it is hard to investigate the role of myosin II in the reorganization process which determines the resulting cytoskeletal structures. Here we use an in vitro model system to show that myosin II actively reorganizes actin into a variety of mesoscopic patterns, but only in the presence of bundling proteins. We find that the nature of the reorganization process is complex, exhibiting patterns and dynamical phenomena not predicted by current theoretical models and not observed in corresponding passive systems (excluding motors). This system generates active networks, asters and even rings depending on motor and bundling protein concentrations. Furthermore, the motors generate the formation of the patterns, but above a critical concentration they can also disassemble them and even totally prevent the polymerization and bundling of actin filaments. These results may suggest that tuning the assembly and disassembly of cytoskeletal structures can be obtained by tuning the local myosin II concentration/activity.

  15. Trunk stiffness and dynamics during active extension exertions.

    PubMed

    Moorhouse, Kevin M; Granata, Kevin P

    2005-10-01

    Spinal stability is related to the recruitment and control of active muscle stiffness. Stochastic system identification techniques were used to calculate the effective stiffness and dynamics of the trunk during active trunk extension exertions. Twenty-one healthy adult subjects (10 males, 11 females) wore a harness with a cable attached to a servomotor such that isotonic flexion preloads of 100, 135, and 170 N were applied at the T10 level of the trunk. A pseudorandom stochastic force sequence (bandwidth 0-10 Hz, amplitude +/-30 N) was superimposed on the preload causing small amplitude trunk movements. Nonparametric impulse response functions of trunk dynamics were computed and revealed that the system exhibited underdamped second-order behavior. Second-order trunk dynamics were determined by calculating the best least-squares fit to the IRF. The quality of the model was quantified by comparing estimated and observed displacement variance accounted for (VAF), and quality of the second-order fits was calculated as a percentage and referred to as fit accuracy. Mean VAF and fit accuracy were 87.8 +/- 4.0% and 96.0 +/- 4.3%, respectively, indicating that the model accurately represented active trunk kinematic response. The accuracy of the kinematic representation was not influenced by preload or gender. Mean effective stiffness was 2.78 +/- 0.96 N/mm and increased significantly with preload (p < 0.001), but did not vary with gender (p = 0.425). Mean effective damping was 314 +/- 72 Ns/m and effective trunk mass was 37.0 +/- 9.3 kg. We conclude that stochastic system identification techniques should be used to calculate effective trunk stiffness and dynamics. PMID:16084200

  16. UV Observations of Prominence Activation and Cool Loop Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Landi, Enrico

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the thermal and dynamic properties of dynamic structures in and around a prominence channel observed on the limb on 17 April 2003. Observations were taken with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory's Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SOHO/SUMER) in lines formed at temperatures from 80,000 to 1.6 MK. The instrument was pointed to a single location and took a series of 90 s exposures. Two-dimensional context was provided by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) in the UV and EUV and the Kanzelhohe Solar Observatory in H-alpha. Two dynamic features were studied in depth: an activated prominence and repeated motions in a loop near the prominence. We calculated three-dimensional geometries and trajectories, differential emission measure, and limits on the mass, pressure, average density, and kinetic and thermal energies. These observations provide important tests for models of dynamics in prominences and cool (approx. 10(exp 5) K)loops, which will ultimately lead to a better understanding the mechanism(s) leading to energy and mass flow in these solar features.

  17. Dynamic changes during acid-induced activation of influenza hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Natalie K.; Guttman, Miklos; Ebner, Jamie L.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Influenza hemagglutinin (HA) mediates virus attachment to host cells and fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes during entry. While high-resolution structures are available for the pre-fusion HA ectodomain and the post-fusion HA2 subunit, the sequence of conformational changes during HA activation has eluded structural characterization. Here we apply hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry to examine changes in structural dynamics of the HA ectodomain at various stages of activation, as well as to compare the soluble ectodomain with intact HA on virions. At pH conditions approaching activation (pH 6.0–5.5) HA exhibits increased dynamics at the fusion peptide and neighboring regions, while the interface between receptor-binding subunits (HA1) becomes stabilized. In contrast to many activation models, these data suggest that HA responds to endosomal acidification by releasing the fusion peptide prior to HA1 uncaging and the spring-loaded refolding of HA2. This staged process may facilitate efficient HA-mediated fusion. PMID:25773144

  18. Ring closure dynamics for a chemically active polymer.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debarati; Thakur, Snigdha; Tao, Yu-Guo; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-12-21

    The principles that underlie the motion of colloidal particles in concentration gradients and the propulsion of chemically-powered synthetic nanomotors are used to design active polymer chains. The active chains contain catalytic and noncatalytic monomers, or beads, at the ends or elsewhere along the polymer chain. A chemical reaction at the catalytic bead produces a self-generated concentration gradient and the noncatalytic bead responds to this gradient by a diffusiophoretic mechanism that causes these two beads to move towards each other. Because of this chemotactic response, the dynamical properties of these active polymer chains are very different from their inactive counterparts. In particular, we show that ring closure and loop formation are much more rapid than those for inactive chains, which rely primarily on diffusion to bring distant portions of the chain in close proximity. The mechanism presented in this paper can be extended to other chemical systems which rely on diffusion to bring reagents into contact for reactions to occur. This study suggests the possibility that synthetic systems could make use of chemically-powered active motion or chemotaxis to effectively carry out complex transport tasks in reaction dynamics, much like those that molecular motors perform in biological systems. PMID:25365034

  19. NEURONAL ACTIVITY REGULATES GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTER DYNAMICS IN DEVELOPING ASTROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Benediktsson, A.M.; Marrs, G.S.; Tu, J.C.; Worley, P.F.; Rothstein, J.D.; Bergles, D.E.; Dailey, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate transporters maintain a low ambient level of glutamate in the CNS and shape the activation of glutamate receptors at synapses. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and localization of transporters near sites of glutamate release are poorly understood. Here we examined the subcellular distribution and dynamic remodeling of the predominant glutamate transporter GLT-1 (EAAT2) in developing hippocampal astrocytes. Immunolabeling revealed that endogenous GLT-1 is concentrated into discrete clusters along branches of developing astrocytes that were apposed preferentially to synapsin-1 positive synapses. GFP-GLT-1 fusion proteins expressed in astrocytes also formed distinct clusters that lined the edges of astrocyte processes, as well as the tips of filopodia and spine-like structures. Time-lapse 3D confocal imaging in tissue slices revealed that GFP-GLT-1 clusters were dynamically remodeled on a timescale of minutes. Some transporter clusters moved within developing astrocyte branches as filopodia extended and retracted, while others maintained stable positions at the tips of spine-like structures. Blockade of neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin reduced both the density and perisynaptic localization of GLT-1 clusters. Conversely, enhancement of neuronal activity increased the size of GLT-1 clusters and their proximity to synapses. Together, these findings indicate that neuronal activity influences both the organization of glutamate transporters in developing astrocyte membranes and their position relative to synapses. PMID:22052455

  20. Tracking composite material damage evolution using Bayesian filtering and flash thermography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Elizabeth D.; Holland, Steve D.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a method for tracking the condition of a composite part using Bayesian filtering of ash thermography data over the lifetime of the part. In this demonstration, composite panels were fabricated; impacted to induce subsurface delaminations; and loaded in compression over multiple time steps, causing the delaminations to grow in size. Flash thermography data was collected between each damage event to serve as a time history of the part. The ash thermography indicated some areas of damage but provided little additional information as to the exact nature or depth of the damage. Computed tomography (CT) data was also collected after each damage event and provided a high resolution volume model of damage that acted as truth. After each cycle, the condition estimate, from the ash thermography data and the Bayesian filter, was compared to 'ground truth'. The Bayesian process builds on the lifetime history of ash thermography scans and can give better estimates of material condition as compared to the most recent scan alone, which is common practice in the aerospace industry. Bayesian inference provides probabilistic estimates of damage condition that are updated as each new set of data becomes available. The method was tested on simulated data and then on an experimental data set.

  1. Multi-Dimensional Dynamics of Human Electromagnetic Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Emi; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) are invaluable neuroscientific tools for unveiling human neural dynamics in three dimensions (space, time, and frequency), which are associated with a wide variety of perceptions, cognition, and actions. MEG/EEG also provides different categories of neuronal indices including activity magnitude, connectivity, and network properties along the three dimensions. In the last 20 years, interest has increased in inter-regional connectivity and complex network properties assessed by various sophisticated scientific analyses. We herein review the definition, computation, short history, and pros and cons of connectivity and complex network (graph-theory) analyses applied to MEG/EEG signals. We briefly describe recent developments in source reconstruction algorithms essential for source-space connectivity and network analyses. Furthermore, we discuss a relatively novel approach used in MEG/EEG studies to examine the complex dynamics represented by human brain activity. The correct and effective use of these neuronal metrics provides a new insight into the multi-dimensional dynamics of the neural representations of various functions in the complex human brain. PMID:26834608

  2. Multi-Dimensional Dynamics of Human Electromagnetic Brain Activity.

    PubMed

    Kida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Emi; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) are invaluable neuroscientific tools for unveiling human neural dynamics in three dimensions (space, time, and frequency), which are associated with a wide variety of perceptions, cognition, and actions. MEG/EEG also provides different categories of neuronal indices including activity magnitude, connectivity, and network properties along the three dimensions. In the last 20 years, interest has increased in inter-regional connectivity and complex network properties assessed by various sophisticated scientific analyses. We herein review the definition, computation, short history, and pros and cons of connectivity and complex network (graph-theory) analyses applied to MEG/EEG signals. We briefly describe recent developments in source reconstruction algorithms essential for source-space connectivity and network analyses. Furthermore, we discuss a relatively novel approach used in MEG/EEG studies to examine the complex dynamics represented by human brain activity. The correct and effective use of these neuronal metrics provides a new insight into the multi-dimensional dynamics of the neural representations of various functions in the complex human brain. PMID:26834608

  3. Visual Experience Modulates Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Circuit Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lang; Fontanini, Alfredo; Maffei, Arianna

    2011-01-01

    Persistent reduction in sensory drive in early development results in multiple plastic changes of different cortical synapses. How these experience-dependent modifications affect the spatio-temporal dynamics of signal propagation in neocortical circuits is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that brief visual deprivation significantly affects the propagation of electrical signals in the primary visual cortex. The spatio-temporal spread of circuit activation upon direct stimulation of its input layer (Layer 4) is reduced, as is the activation of L2/3 – the main recipient of the output from L4. Our data suggest that the decrease in spatio-temporal activation of L2/3 depends on reduced L4 output, and is not intrinsically generated within L2/3. The data shown here suggest that changes in the synaptic components of the visual cortical circuit result not only in alteration of local integration of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, but also in a significant decrease in overall circuit activation. Furthermore, our data indicate a differential effect of visual deprivation on L4 and L2/3, suggesting that while feedforward activation of L2/3 is reduced, its activation by long range, within layer inputs is unaltered. Thus, brief visual deprivation induces experience-dependent circuit re-organization by modulating not only circuit excitability, but also the spatio-temporal patterns of cortical activation within and between layers. PMID:21743804

  4. Determination of needed parameters for measuring temperature fields in air by thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pešek, Martin; Pavelek, Milan

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this article is the parameters determination of equipment for measuring temperature fields in air using an infrared camera. This method is based on the visualization of temperature fields in an auxiliary material, which is inserted into the non-isothermal air flow. The accuracy of air temperature measurement (or of surface temperature of supplies) by this method depends especially on (except for parameters of infrared camera) the determination of the static and the dynamic qualities of auxiliary material. The emissivity of support material is the static quality and the dynamic quality is time constant. Support materials with a high emissivity and a low time constant are suitable for the measurement. The high value of emissivity results in a higher measurement sensitivity and the radiation temperature independence. In this article the emissivity of examined kinds of auxiliary materials (papers and textiles) is determined by temperature measuring of heated samples by a calibrated thermocouple and by thermography, with the emissivity setting on the camera to 1 and with the homogeneous radiation temperature. Time constants are determined by a step change of air temperature in the surrounding of auxiliary material. The time constant depends mainly on heat transfer by the convection from the air into the auxiliary material. That is why the effect of air temperature is examined in this article (or a temperature difference towards the environmental temperature) and the flow velocity on the time constant with various types of auxiliary materials. The obtained results allow to define the conditions for using the method of measurement of temperature fields in air during various heating and air conditioning applications.

  5. Dynamics of multistable states during ongoing and evoked cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2015-05-27

    Single-trial analyses of ensemble activity in alert animals demonstrate that cortical circuits dynamics evolve through temporal sequences of metastable states. Metastability has been studied for its potential role in sensory coding, memory, and decision-making. Yet, very little is known about the network mechanisms responsible for its genesis. It is often assumed that the onset of state sequences is triggered by an external stimulus. Here we show that state sequences can be observed also in the absence of overt sensory stimulation. Analysis of multielectrode recordings from the gustatory cortex of alert rats revealed ongoing sequences of states, where single neurons spontaneously attain several firing rates across different states. This single-neuron multistability represents a challenge to existing spiking network models, where typically each neuron is at most bistable. We present a recurrent spiking network model that accounts for both the spontaneous generation of state sequences and the multistability in single-neuron firing rates. Each state results from the activation of neural clusters with potentiated intracluster connections, with the firing rate in each cluster depending on the number of active clusters. Simulations show that the model's ensemble activity hops among the different states, reproducing the ongoing dynamics observed in the data. When probed with external stimuli, the model predicts the quenching of single-neuron multistability into bistability and the reduction of trial-by-trial variability. Both predictions were confirmed in the data. Together, these results provide a theoretical framework that captures both ongoing and evoked network dynamics in a single mechanistic model. PMID:26019337

  6. Interface dynamics explain assembly dependency of influenza neuraminidase catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    von Grafenstein, Susanne; Wallnoefer, Hannes G.; Kirchmair, Johannes; Fuchs, Julian E.; Huber, Roland G.; Schmidtke, Michaela; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Rollinger, Judith M.; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (iNA) is a homotetrameric surface protein of the influenza virus and an established target for antiviral drugs. In contrast to neuraminidases (NAs) of other biological systems (non-iNAs), enzymatic activity of iNA is only observed in a quaternary assembly and iNA needs the tetramerization to mediate enzymatic activity. Obviously, differences on a molecular level between iNA and non-iNAs are responsible for this intriguing observation. Comparison between protein structures and multiple sequence alignment allow the identification of differences in amino acid composition in crucial regions of the enzyme, such as next to the conserved D151 and the 150-loop. These differences in amino acid sequence and protein tetramerization are likely to alter the dynamics of the system. Therefore, we performed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate differences in the molecular flexibility of monomers, dimers, and tetramers of iNAs of subtype N1 (avian 2004, pandemic 1918 and pandemic 2009 iNA) and as comparison the non-iNA monomer from Clostridium perfringens. We show that conformational transitions of iNA are crucially influenced by its assembly state. The protein–protein interface induces a complex hydrogen-bonding network between the 110-helix and the 150-loop, which consequently stabilizes the structural arrangement of the binding site. Therefore, we claim that these altered dynamics are responsible for the dependence of iNA’s catalytic activity on the tetrameric assembly. Only the tetramerization-induced balance between stabilization and altered local flexibility in the binding site provides the appropriate arrangement of key residues for iNA’s catalytic activity. PMID:24279589

  7. Dynamics of Multistable States during Ongoing and Evoked Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucato, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Single-trial analyses of ensemble activity in alert animals demonstrate that cortical circuits dynamics evolve through temporal sequences of metastable states. Metastability has been studied for its potential role in sensory coding, memory, and decision-making. Yet, very little is known about the network mechanisms responsible for its genesis. It is often assumed that the onset of state sequences is triggered by an external stimulus. Here we show that state sequences can be observed also in the absence of overt sensory stimulation. Analysis of multielectrode recordings from the gustatory cortex of alert rats revealed ongoing sequences of states, where single neurons spontaneously attain several firing rates across different states. This single-neuron multistability represents a challenge to existing spiking network models, where typically each neuron is at most bistable. We present a recurrent spiking network model that accounts for both the spontaneous generation of state sequences and the multistability in single-neuron firing rates. Each state results from the activation of neural clusters with potentiated intracluster connections, with the firing rate in each cluster depending on the number of active clusters. Simulations show that the model's ensemble activity hops among the different states, reproducing the ongoing dynamics observed in the data. When probed with external stimuli, the model predicts the quenching of single-neuron multistability into bistability and the reduction of trial-by-trial variability. Both predictions were confirmed in the data. Together, these results provide a theoretical framework that captures both ongoing and evoked network dynamics in a single mechanistic model. PMID:26019337

  8. Achieving thermography with a thermal security camera using uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometer image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Tesdahl, Curtis; Owens, Jim; Dorn, David

    2012-06-01

    Advancements in uncooled microbolometer technology over the last several years have opened up many commercial applications which had been previously cost prohibitive. Thermal technology is no longer limited to the military and government market segments. One type of thermal sensor with low NETD which is available in the commercial market segment is the uncooled amorphous silicon (α-Si) microbolometer image sensor. Typical thermal security cameras focus on providing the best image quality by auto tonemaping (contrast enhancing) the image, which provides the best contrast depending on the temperature range of the scene. While this may provide enough information to detect objects and activities, there are further benefits of being able to estimate the actual object temperatures in a scene. This thermographic ability can provide functionality beyond typical security cameras by being able to monitor processes. Example applications of thermography[2] with thermal camera include: monitoring electrical circuits, industrial machinery, building thermal leaks, oil/gas pipelines, power substations, etc...[3][5] This paper discusses the methodology of estimating object temperatures by characterizing/calibrating different components inside a thermal camera utilizing an uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometer image sensor. Plots of system performance across camera operating temperatures will be shown.

  9. Assessment of anxiety in open field and elevated plus maze using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Lecorps, Benjamin; Rödel, Heiko G; Féron, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Due to their direct inaccessibility, affective states are classically assessed by gathering concomitant physiological and behavioral measures. Although such a dual approach to assess emotional states is frequently used in different species including humans, the invasiveness of procedures for physiological recordings particularly in smaller-sized animals strongly restricts their application. We used infrared thermography, a non-invasive method, to assess physiological arousal during open field and elevated plus maze tests in mice. By measuring changes in surface temperature indicative of the animals' emotional response, we aimed to improve the inherently limited and still controversial information provided by behavioral parameters commonly used in these tests. Our results showed significant and consistent thermal responses during both tests, in accordance with classical physiological responses occurring in stressful situations. Besides, we found correlations between these thermal responses and the occurrence of anxiety-related behaviors. Furthermore, initial temperatures measured at the start of each procedure (open field, elevated plus maze), which can be interpreted as a measure of the animals' initial physiological arousal, predicted the levels of activity and of anxiety-related behaviors displayed during the tests. Our results stress the strong link between physiological correlates of emotions and behaviors expressed during unconditioned fear tests. PMID:26884121

  10. Superfluid-like dynamics in active vortex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slomka, Jonasz; Dunkel, Jorn

    Active biological fluids exhibit rich non-equilibrium dynamics and share striking similarities with quantum fluids, from vortex formation and magnetic ordering to superfluid-like behavior. Building on universality ideas, we have recently proposed a generalization of the Navier-Stokes equations that captures qualitatively the active bulk flow structures observed in bacterial suspensions. Here, we present new numerical simulations that explicitly account for boundary and shear effects. The theory successfully reproduces recent experimental observations of bacterial suspensions, including a superfluid-like regime of nearly vanishing shear viscosity. Our simulations further predict a geometry-induced 'quantization' of viscosity and the existence of excited states capable of performing mechanical work. It is plausible that these results generalize to a broad a class of fluids that are subject to an active scale selection mechanism.

  11. CARER: Efficient Dynamic Sensing for Continuous Activity Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Au, Lawrence K.; Bui, Alex A.T.; Batalin, Maxim A.; Xu, Xiaoyu; Kaiser, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Advancement in wireless health sensor systems has triggered rapidly expanding research in continuous activity monitoring for chronic disease management or promotion and assessment of physical rehabilitation. Wireless motion sensing is increasingly important in treatments where remote collection of sensor measurements can provide an in-field objective evaluation of physical activity patterns. The well-known challenge of limited operating lifetime of energy-constrained wireless health sensor systems continues to present a primary limitation for these applications. This paper introduces CARER, a software system that supports a novel algorithm that exploits knowledge of context and dynamically schedules sensor measurement episodes within an energy consumption budget while ensuring classification accuracy. The sensor selection algorithm in the CARER system is based on Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP). The parameters for the POMDP algorithm can be obtained through standard maximum likelihood estimation. Sensor data are also collected from multiple locations of the subjects body, providing estimation of an individual's daily activity patterns. PMID:22254783

  12. Dynamical criticality in the collective activity of a neural population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Thierry

    The past decade has seen a wealth of physiological data suggesting that neural networks may behave like critical branching processes. Concurrently, the collective activity of neurons has been studied using explicit mappings to classic statistical mechanics models such as disordered Ising models, allowing for the study of their thermodynamics, but these efforts have ignored the dynamical nature of neural activity. I will show how to reconcile these two approaches by learning effective statistical mechanics models of the full history of the collective activity of a neuron population directly from physiological data, treating time as an additional dimension. Applying this technique to multi-electrode recordings from retinal ganglion cells, and studying the thermodynamics of the inferred model, reveals a peak in specific heat reminiscent of a second-order phase transition.

  13. Sensitivity evaluation of dynamic speckle activity measurements using clustering methods

    SciTech Connect

    Etchepareborda, Pablo; Federico, Alejandro; Kaufmann, Guillermo H.

    2010-07-01

    We evaluate and compare the use of competitive neural networks, self-organizing maps, the expectation-maximization algorithm, K-means, and fuzzy C-means techniques as partitional clustering methods, when the sensitivity of the activity measurement of dynamic speckle images needs to be improved. The temporal history of the acquired intensity generated by each pixel is analyzed in a wavelet decomposition framework, and it is shown that the mean energy of its corresponding wavelet coefficients provides a suited feature space for clustering purposes. The sensitivity obtained by using the evaluated clustering techniques is also compared with the well-known methods of Konishi-Fujii, weighted generalized differences, and wavelet entropy. The performance of the partitional clustering approach is evaluated using simulated dynamic speckle patterns and also experimental data.

  14. Physical interpretation and separation of eddy current pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Aijun; Gao, Bin; Yun Tian, Gui; Woo, W. L.; Li, Kongjing

    2013-02-01

    Eddy current pulsed thermography (ECPT) applies induction heating and a thermal camera for non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E). Because of the variation in resultant surface heat distribution, the physical mechanism that corresponds to the general behavior of ECPT can be divided into an accumulation of Joule heating via eddy current and heat diffusion. However, throughout the literature, the heating mechanisms of ECPT are not given in detail in the above two thermal phenomena and they are difficult to be separated. Nevertheless, once these two physical parameters are separated, they can be directly used to detect anomalies and predict the variation in material properties such as electrical conductivity, magnetic permeability and microstructure. This paper reports physical interpretation of these two physical phenomena that can be found in different time responses given the ECPT image sequences. Based on the phenomenon and their behaviors, the paper proposes a statistical method based on single channel blind source separation to decompose the two physical phenomena using different stages of eddy current and thermal propagation from the ECPT images. Links between mathematical models and physical models have been discussed and verified. This fundamental understanding of transient eddy current distribution and heating propagation can be applied to the development of feature extraction and pattern recognition for the quantitative analysis of ECPT measurement images and defect characterization.

  15. Mechanisms and Models for Crack Detection with Induction Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrana, J.; Goldammer, M.; Baumann, J.; Rothenfusser, M.; Arnold, W.

    2008-02-01

    Induction thermography is a non-contacting, non-destructive evaluation method with a wide range of applications. A deeper understanding of the detectability of cracks requires fundamental knowledge about the induced current density distribution in the component under test. A calculation of the current distribution provides information how much current is flowing at which location of the component, how a crack disturbs the current density, how much heat is produced at which location of the component, and how the heat diffuses to the surface. The heating process depends on the type of crack. On the one hand there are cracks which can be detected mainly by direct observation of the heating process due to an increased current density, and on the other hand there are cracks which can be detected mainly because of a modification of the heat diffusion. This paper presents an analytical model for the calculation of the current distribution, including the back-flow current along with finite-element calculations. Furthermore, two new crack models are presented for a better description of real cracks.

  16. Use of modern infrared thermography for wildlife population surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Dale L.; Underwood, H. Brian; Porter, William F.

    1995-03-01

    A commercially available thermal-infrared scanning system was used to survey populations of several wildlife species. The system's ability to detect species of different sizes in varying habitats relative to conventional survey methods, to differentiate between species in the same habitat, and the influence of environtmental factors on operational aspects of employing this technology in the field were evaluated. Total costs for the surveys were approximately 0.36/ha. There were marked discrepancies in the counts of untrained observers and those from trained analysis. Computer-assisted analysis of infrared imagery recorded 52% fewer deer than were estimated from drive counts, and densities of moose were five times those estimated from conventional aerial methods. By flying concentric circles and using telephoto, detailed counts of turkeys and deer were possible. With the aid of computer-assisted analysis, infrared thermography may become a useful wildlife population survey tool. More research is needed to verify the actual efficiency of detection by combining aerial scans with ground truthing for a variely of species and habitals.

  17. Automated diagnosis of dry eye using infrared thermography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, U. Rajendra; Tan, Jen Hong; Koh, Joel E. W.; Sudarshan, Vidya K.; Yeo, Sharon; Too, Cheah Loon; Chua, Chua Kuang; Ng, E. Y. K.; Tong, Louis

    2015-07-01

    Dry Eye (DE) is a condition of either decreased tear production or increased tear film evaporation. Prolonged DE damages the cornea causing the corneal scarring, thinning and perforation. There is no single uniform diagnosis test available to date; combinations of diagnostic tests are to be performed to diagnose DE. The current diagnostic methods available are subjective, uncomfortable and invasive. Hence in this paper, we have developed an efficient, fast and non-invasive technique for the automated identification of normal and DE classes using infrared thermography images. The features are extracted from nonlinear method called Higher Order Spectra (HOS). Features are ranked using t-test ranking strategy. These ranked features are fed to various classifiers namely, K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Nave Bayesian Classifier (NBC), Decision Tree (DT), Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN), and Support Vector Machine (SVM) to select the best classifier using minimum number of features. Our proposed system is able to identify the DE and normal classes automatically with classification accuracy of 99.8%, sensitivity of 99.8%, and specificity if 99.8% for left eye using PNN and KNN classifiers. And we have reported classification accuracy of 99.8%, sensitivity of 99.9%, and specificity if 99.4% for right eye using SVM classifier with polynomial order 2 kernel.

  18. Study Methods to Characterize and Implement Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    1998-01-01

    The limits and conditions under which an infrared thermographic nondestructive evaluation can be utilized to assess the quality of aerospace hardware is demonstrated in this research effort. The primary focus of this work is on applying thermography to the inspection of advanced composite structures such as would be found in the International Space Station Instrumentation Racks, Space Shuttle Cargo Bay Doors, Bantam RP-1 tank or RSRM Nose Cone. Here, the detection of delamination, disbond, inclusion and porosity type defects are of primary interest. In addition to composites, an extensive research effort has been initiated to determine how well a thermographic evaluation can detect leaks and disbonds in pressurized metallic systems "i.e. the Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzles". In either case, research into developing practical inspection procedures was conducted and thermographic inspections were performed on a myriad of test samples, subscale demonstration articles and "simulated" flight hardware. All test samples were fabricated as close to their respective structural counterparts as possible except with intentional defects for NDE qualification. As an added benefit of this effort to create simulated defects, methods were devised for defect fabrication that may be useful in future NDE qualification ventures.

  19. International standards for pandemic screening using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, D. D.; Ring, E. F.; Mercer, J. B.; Snell, J.; Osborn, D.; Hedley-Whyte, J.

    2010-03-01

    The threat of a virulent strain of influenza, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), tuberculosis, H1N1/A virus (swine flu) and possible mutations are a constant threat to global health. Implementation of pandemic infrared thermographic screening is based on the detection of febrile temperatures (inner canthus of the eyes) that are correlated with an infectious disease. Previous attempts at pandemic thermal screening have experienced problems (e.g. SARS outbreak, Singapore 2003) associated with the deployment plan, implementation and operation of the screening thermograph. Since this outbreak, the International Electrotechnical Commission has developed international standards that set minimum requirements for thermographic system fever screening and procedures that insure reliable and reproducible measurements. These requirements are published in IEC 80601-2-59:2008, Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-59: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of screening thermographs for human febrile temperature screening. The International Organization for Standardization has developed ISO/TR 13154:2009, Medical Electrical Equipment - which provides deployment, implementation and operational guidelines for identifying febrile humans using a screening thermograph. These new standards includes recommendations for camera calibrations, use of black body radiators, view field, focus, pixels within measurement site, image positioning, and deployment locations. Many current uses of thermographic screening at airports do not take into account critical issues addressed in the new standard, and are operating below the necessary effectiveness and efficiency. These documents, related thermal research, implications for epidemiology screening, and the future impact on medical thermography are discussed.

  20. Monitoring Sintering Burn-Through Point Using Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Molleda, Julio; Garcia, Daniel F.; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2013-01-01

    Sintering is a complex industrial process that applies heat to fine particles of iron ore and other materials to produce sinter, a solidified porous material used in blast furnaces. The sintering process needs to be carefully adjusted, so that the combustion zone reaches the bottom of the material just before the discharge end. This is known as the burn-through point. Many different parameters need to be finely tuned, including the speed and the quantities of the materials mixed. However, in order to achieve good results, sintering control requires precise feedback to adjust these parameters. This work presents a sensor to monitor the sintering burn-through point based on infrared thermography. The proposed procedure is based on the acquisition of infrared images at the end of the sintering process. At this position, infrared images contain the cross-section temperatures of the mixture. The objective of this work is to process this information to extract relevant features about the sintering process. The proposed procedure is based on four steps: key frame detection, region of interest detection, segmentation and feature extraction. The results indicate that the proposed procedure is very robust and reliable, providing features that can be used effectively to control the sintering process. PMID:23939585

  1. Measuring and Estimating Normalized Contrast in Infrared Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared flash thermography (IRFT) is used to detect void-like flaws in a test object. The IRFT technique involves heating up the part surface using a flash of flash lamps. The post-flash evolution of the part surface temperature is sensed by an IR camera in terms of pixel intensity of image pixels. The IR technique involves recording of the IR video image data and analysis of the data using the normalized pixel intensity and temperature contrast analysis method for characterization of void-like flaws for depth and width. This work introduces a new definition of the normalized IR pixel intensity contrast and normalized surface temperature contrast. A procedure is provided to compute the pixel intensity contrast from the camera pixel intensity evolution data. The pixel intensity contrast and the corresponding surface temperature contrast differ but are related. This work provides a method to estimate the temperature evolution and the normalized temperature contrast from the measured pixel intensity evolution data and some additional measurements during data acquisition.

  2. On Field Inspection of Composite Pipes Using Pulsed Phase Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, M. P. V.; Almeida, R. M.; Rebello, J. M. A.; Soares, S. D.

    2010-02-01

    The pulsed phase thermography (PPT) is becoming a valuable tool on the detection and dimensioning of defects on composite materials. However, the most of the works that adopt the PPT needs very sophisticated equipment to thermal excitation of the specimen and data acquisition. This work uses the concepts of the PPT to inspect sections of fiberglass reinforced epoxy pipes used on adhesively bonded joints applied on the oil industry on extraction and transportation of fluids, using low cost and simple equipment to thermal excitation. A MatLab routine to data processing was used intending to achieve a fast and reliable non-destructive method to be performed on field. Amplitude and phase images are generated from the infrared images without any pre-processing technique revealing simulated defects that were impossible to be detected on the original data. A study of how deep the thermal wave can reach along the thickness of this kind of material is also performed trying to estipulate the limits of the technique aiming on the detection of problems on adhesive layers using two heat sources: halogen lamp and industrial air blower. Results support the possibility of implementing a reliable and low cost method of inspection on field to various values of pipe thicknesses found on plants of the oil industry.

  3. Infrared thermography based studies on mobile phone induced heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Soumya, C.; Jayakumar, T.; Philip, John

    2015-07-01

    Here, we report the skin temperature rise due to the absorption of radio frequency (RF) energy from three handheld mobile phones using infrared thermography technique. Experiments are performed under two different conditions, viz. when the mobile phones are placed in soft touch with the skin surface and away from the skin surface. Additionally, the temperature rise of mobile phones during charging, operation and simultaneous charging and talking are monitored under different exposure conditions. It is observed that the temperature of the cheek and ear regions monotonically increased with time during the usage of mobile phones and the magnitude of the temperature rise is higher for the mobile phone with higher specific absorption rate. The increase in skin temperature is higher when the mobile phones are in contact with the skin surface due to the combined effect of absorption of RF electromagnetic power and conductive heat transfer. The increase in the skin temperature in non-contact mode is found to be within the safety limit of 1 °C. The measured temperature rise is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The empirical equation obtained from the temperature rise on the cheek region of the subjects correlates well with the specific absorption rate of the mobile phones. Our study suggests that the use of mobile phones in non-contact mode can significantly lower the skin temperature rise during its use and hence, is safer compared to the contact mode.

  4. Pulse Phase Thermography for Defect Detection and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinetti, Sergio; Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Winfree, William P.; Braggiotti, Alberto

    1999-01-01

    Pulse Phase Thermography (PPT) has been reported as a novel powerful technique of the thermal NDE. It employs application of the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) to thermal images obtained following flash heating of the front surface of a specimen. The computed phasegrams are excellent for defect visualization in a wide range of materials. This is in part due to their low sensitivity to uneven heating. This work is an attempt to analyze advantages and limitations of PPT. Results of application of the DFT to simulated temperature decays are presented. The temperature evolution on a surface has been simulated based on an analytical solution of the one-dimensional heat diffusion problem. A more sophisticated study has been done for different sizes of defects using numerical solution of the three-dimensional mathematical model. Capabilities of PPT for in-depth scanning and for monitoring of the material loss are discussed. The recommendations for the practical application of the PPT are presented. Experimental results obtained following these recommendations are reported.

  5. Pulsed phase thermography for defect detection of honeycomb structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Feng, Lichun; Li, Yanhong; Zhang, Cunlin

    2009-07-01

    Pulse Phase Thermography (PPT) has been reported as a powerful technique of the thermal NDE. In this paper, the authors show that the original phase-images of two kinds of honeycomb structure defects by PPT based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) for the signal of temperature-time of each pixel. One is the artificial defects in honeycomb structure core under surface skin, and the defects can be identified easily. The other is disbonding defect between surface skin and core, and the difference is apparent compared with bonding and no-bonding between surface skin and core. To improve the signal to noise ratio for defect inspection of honeycomb structure, the temperature decay curve of each pixel is smoothed by moving average filter and then fitted by exponential function. After FFT on the fitted data of temperature, the fitted phase-images of two kinds of honeycomb structure defects are given. Compared with the original thermal-images of PT and original phase-images, the calculated phase-images are much more improved. Another advantage is the data could be represented by coefficients of fitting functions, and the storage of data could be greatly reduced. At last, the calculation process of temperature decay curve and analysis of the influence caused by increasing sampling time and frequency are given.

  6. Application Of Thermography In The Builing Trade - Possibilities And Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specht, Herbert E.

    1983-11-01

    During recent years civil application of thermography in Germany has experienced a remarkable development in general but especially in the building trade. On the one hand there was an increase of user-oriented know-how,and on the other hand a growing public knowledge and acceptance mainly induced by a lot of governmental and commercial publications on energy conservation. From a practical viewpoint a description of interesting possibilities but also narrow limitations of four present-day application areas is given : 1. scanning of buildings from inside and outside - for fault analysis and all kinds of expertises including popular energy conservation consulting 2. mapping of plastered half-timbered houses (constructed in 13.-17. century, plastered in some parts of germany in 18. and 19. century) - for renovation and re-establishment of original historical shape 3. visualization of reinforcement in concrete for careful hole-drilling In large structures f.i. nuclear power plants according to safety regulations 4. localization of leakages in floor heating and tap water systems - for cost effective repair and status reports, mainly by order of insurance-companies.

  7. Aerial Thermography - Cartographic Presentation Of Thermographic Data For Building Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    1989-03-01

    When using aerial thermography to indicate energy-related conditions of buildings in a large investigation area the question arises how to store and present the final product of classified, energy-related data. A full scale study of 7000 buildings demonstrated the need fur computerbased systems and cartographic methods to store, to arrange and to illustrate thermograpic data. A data base was created including aerial thermograpic data, technical data on the buildings and information on energy consumption of each building. The data base consisted of 100 variables. The key-code for the data base was the real estate name and number. The position of each building was given in terms of coordinates of the real estate. The main purpose of the study was to create an energy-related data base to be used for assigning a priority to measurements within the local energy conservation program. The thermographic data was collected with a longwave airborne infrared line-scanner (3-14 um). The technical data on the buildings and their energy consumption were gathered from existing data bases and from field investigations. Thermograpic data, technical data of the buildings and information on energy consumption was classified and different symbols were used to identify the classes presented on thematic maps. Results from this study implies that computerbased cartography is a favorable method to present and illustrate thermographic information on buildings in large investigation areas. The paper deals mainly with the aspect of carthography for presentation of thermographic and energy-related data.

  8. Surface temperatures of insulated glazing units: Infrared thermography laboratory measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, B.T.; Tuerler, D.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-12-01

    Data are presented for the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm-side surface of seven different insulated glazing units. Surface temperatures are measured using infrared thermography and an external referencing technique. This technique allows detailed mapping of surface temperatures that is non-intrusive. The glazings were placed between warm and cold environmental chambers that were operated at conditions corresponding to standard design conditions for winter heating. The temperatures conditions are 2 1.1{degrees}C (70{degrees}F) and -17.8{degrees}C (0{degrees}F) on the warm and cold sides, respectively. Film coefficients varied somewhat with average conditions of about 7.6 W/m{sup 2}{circ}K (1.34 Btu/h-ft{sup 2}{circ}{degrees}F) for the warm-side and 28.9 W/m{sup 2}{circ}K (5.1 Btu/h{circ}ft{sup 2}{circ}{degrees}F) for the cold-side. Surface temperature data are plotted for the vertical distribution along the centerline of the IG and for the horizontal distribution along the centerline. This paper is part of larger collaborative effort that studied the same set of glazings.

  9. Structural activation pathways from dynamic olfactory receptor-odorant interactions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Peter C; Singer, Michael S; Crasto, Chiquito J

    2005-11-01

    We have simulated an odor ligand's dynamic behavior in the binding region of an olfactory receptor (OR). Our short timescale computational studies (up to 200 ps) have helped identify unprecedented postdocking ligand behavior of ligands. From in vacuo molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between models of rat OR I7 and 10 aldehyde ligands, we have identified a dissociative pathway along which the ligand exits and enters the OR-binding pocket--a transit event. The ligand's transit through the receptor's binding region may mark the beginning of a signal transduction cascade leading to odor recognition. We have graphically traced the rotameric changes in key OR amino acid side chains during the transit. Our results have helped substantiate or refute previously held notions of amino acid contribution to ligand stability in the binding pocket. Our observations of ligand activity when compared to those of experimental (electroolfactogram response) OR-activation studies provide a view to predicting the stability of ligands in the binding pocket as a precursor to OR activation by the ligand. PMID:16243965

  10. Dynamical activities of primary somatosensory cortices studied by magnetoencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, Kuniharu

    2009-11-01

    A blind identification method of transfer functions in feedback systems is introduced for examination of dynamical activities of cortices by magnetoencephalography study. Somatosensory activities are examined in 5 Hz periodical median nerve stimulus. In the present paper, we will try two careful preprocessing procedures for the identification method to obtain impulse responses between primary somatosensory cortices. Time series data of the somatosensory evoked field are obtained by using a blind source separation of the T/k type (fractional) decorrelation method. Time series data of current dipoles of primary somatosensory cortices are transformed from the time series data of the somatosensory evoked field by the inverse problem. Fluctuations of current dipoles of them are obtained after elimination of deterministic periodical evoked waveforms. An identification method based on feedback system theory is used for estimation of transfer functions in a feedback model from obtained fluctuations of currents dipoles of primary somatosensory cortices. Dynamical activities between them are presented by Bode diagrams of transfer functions and their impulse responses: the time delay of about 30 ms via corpus callosum is found in the impulse response of identified transfer function.

  11. An undergraduate laboratory activity on molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Spitznagel, Benjamin; Pritchett, Paige R; Messina, Troy C; Goadrich, Mark; Rodriguez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Vision and Change [AAAS, 2011] outlines a blueprint for modernizing biology education by addressing conceptual understanding of key concepts, such as the relationship between structure and function. The document also highlights skills necessary for student success in 21st century Biology, such as the use of modeling and simulation. Here we describe a laboratory activity that allows students to investigate the dynamic nature of protein structure and function through the use of a modeling technique known as molecular dynamics (MD). The activity takes place over two lab periods that are 3 hr each. The first lab period unpacks the basic approach behind MD simulations, beginning with the kinematic equations that all bioscience students learn in an introductory physics course. During this period students are taught rudimentary programming skills in Python while guided through simple modeling exercises that lead up to the simulation of the motion of a single atom. In the second lab period students extend concepts learned in the first period to develop skills in the use of expert MD software. Here students simulate and analyze changes in protein conformation resulting from temperature change, solvation, and phosphorylation. The article will describe how these activities can be carried out using free software packages, including Abalone and VMD/NAMD. PMID:26751047

  12. Dynamics of an overdamped active nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, Elias; Baskaran, Aparna

    2015-03-01

    A continuum model for the dynamics of an overdamped (often termed ``dry'') active nematic liquid crystal will be presented here. This talk will focus on how such a model can be used to describe the formation and self-propulsion of defects which has been seen in active liquid crystals in experiments and simulations. We will start with a general model which shows phase-separations and structure formation near the critical density (for the isotropic-nematic phase transition), and show how this model can be extended to describe extensile active nematics which are deeper within the ordered phase. The spontaneous formation of defects occurs when the contribution of the extensile stresses, to the dynamics of the order parameter, gives rise to a bend instability. This leads to a steady state of defect formation and annihilation, and the self-propulsion of defects, as is seen in experiments and simulation. This work was supported through the NSF (NSF-DMR-1149266), Brandeis-MRSEC through the NSF (DMR-0820492), and the HPC cluster at Brandeis which provided computing time. EFP also acknowledges support through (NIH-5T32EB009419) and IGERT (DGE-1068620).

  13. Sequential activation of metabolic pathways: a dynamic optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, Diego A; Ingalls, Brian P; Middleton, Richard H; Kalamatianos, Dimitrios

    2009-11-01

    The regulation of cellular metabolism facilitates robust cellular operation in the face of changing external conditions. The cellular response to this varying environment may include the activation or inactivation of appropriate metabolic pathways. Experimental and numerical observations of sequential timing in pathway activation have been reported in the literature. It has been argued that such patterns can be rationalized by means of an underlying optimal metabolic design. In this paper we pose a dynamic optimization problem that accounts for time-resource minimization in pathway activation under constrained total enzyme abundance. The optimized variables are time-dependent enzyme concentrations that drive the pathway to a steady state characterized by a prescribed metabolic flux. The problem formulation addresses unbranched pathways with irreversible kinetics. Neither specific reaction kinetics nor fixed pathway length are assumed.In the optimal solution, each enzyme follows a switching profile between zero and maximum concentration, following a temporal sequence that matches the pathway topology. This result provides an analytic justification of the sequential activation previously described in the literature. In contrast with the existent numerical approaches, the activation sequence is proven to be optimal for a generic class of monomolecular kinetics. This class includes, but is not limited to, Mass Action, Michaelis-Menten, Hill, and some Power-law models. This suggests that sequential enzyme expression may be a common feature of metabolic regulation, as it is a robust property of optimal pathway activation. PMID:19412635

  14. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  15. Thermophysical analysis of II-VI semiconductors by PPE calorimetry and lock-in thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Streza, M.; Dadarlat, D.; Strzałkowski, K.

    2013-11-13

    An accurate determination of thermophysical properties such as thermal diffusivity, thermal effusivity and thermal conductivity is extremely important for characterization and quality assurance of semiconductors. Thermal diffusivity and effusivity of some binary semiconductors have been investigated. Two experimental techniques were used: a contact technique (PPE calorimetry) and a non contact technique (lock-in thermography). When working with PPE, in the back (BPPE) configuration and in the thermally thick regim of the pyroelectric sensor, we can get the thermal diffusivity of the sample by performing a scanning of the excitation frequency of radiation. Thermal effusivity is obtained in front configuration (sensor directly irradiated and sample in back position) by performing a thickness scan of a coupling fluid. By using the lock-in thermography technique, the thermal diffusivity of the sample is obtained from the phase image. The results obtained by the two techniques are in good agreement. Nevertheless, for the determination of thermal diffusivity, lock-in thermography is preferred.

  16. Low-velocity impact damage characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zheng-wei; Zhang, Jin-yu; Tao, Sheng-jie

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) after low-velocity impact is detected using infrared thermography, and different damages in the impacted composites are analyzed in the thermal maps. The thermal conductivity under pulse stimulation, frictional heating and thermal conductivity under ultrasonic stimulation of CFRP containing low-velocity impact damage are simulated using numerical simulation method. Then, the specimens successively exposed to the low-velocity impact are respectively detected using the pulse infrared thermography and ultrasonic infrared thermography. Through the numerical simulation and experimental investigation, the results obtained show that the combination of the above two detection methods can greatly improve the capability for detecting and evaluating the impact damage in CFRP. Different damages correspond to different infrared thermal images. The delamination damage, matrix cracking and fiber breakage are characterized as the block-shape hot spot, line-shape hot spot,

  17. Damage Detection in Rotorcraft Composite Structures Using Thermography and Laser-Based Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    New rotorcraft structural composite designs incorporate lower structural weight, reduced manufacturing complexity, and improved threat protection. These new structural concepts require nondestructive evaluation inspection technologies that can potentially be field-portable and able to inspect complex geometries for damage or structural defects. Two candidate technologies were considered: Thermography and Laser-Based Ultrasound (Laser UT). Thermography and Laser UT have the advantage of being non-contact inspection methods, with Thermography being a full-field imaging method and Laser UT a point scanning technique. These techniques were used to inspect composite samples that contained both embedded flaws and impact damage of various size and shape. Results showed that the inspection techniques were able to detect both embedded and impact damage with varying degrees of success.

  18. Evaluation of paint coating thickness variations based on pulsed Infrared thermography laser technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezghani, S.; Perrin, E.; Vrabie, V.; Bodnar, J. L.; Marthe, J.; Cauwe, B.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a pulsed Infrared thermography technique using a homogeneous heat provided by a laser source is used for the non-destructive evaluation of paint coating thickness variations. Firstly, numerical simulations of the thermal response of a paint coated sample are performed. By analyzing the thermal responses as a function of thermal properties and thickness of both coating and substrate layers, optimal excitation parameters of the heating source are determined. Two characteristic parameters were studied with respect to the paint coating layer thickness variations. Results obtained using an experimental test bench based on the pulsed Infrared thermography laser technique are compared with those given by a classical Eddy current technique for paint coating variations from 5 to 130 μm. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this approach and suggest that the pulsed Infrared thermography technique presents good perspectives to characterize the heterogeneity of paint coating on large scale samples with other heating sources.

  19. Nde of Advanced Automotive Composite Materials that Apply Ultrasound Infrared Thermography Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung-Hyun; Park, Soo-Keun; Kim, Jae-Yeol

    The infrared thermographic nondestructive inspection technique is a quality inspection and stability assessment method used to diagnose the physical characteristics and defects by detecting the infrared ray radiated from the object without destructing it. Recently, the nondestructive inspection and assessment that use the ultrasound-infrared thermography technique are widely adopted in diverse areas. The ultrasound-infrared thermography technique uses the phenomenon that the ultrasound wave incidence to an object with cracks or defects on its mating surface generates local heat on the surface. The car industry increasingly uses composite materials for their lightweight, strength, and environmental resistance. In this study, the car piston passed through the ultrasound-infrared thermography technique for nondestructive testing, among the composite material car parts. This study also examined the effects of the frequency and power to optimize the nondestructive inspection.

  20. Thermography for estimating near-surface soil moisture under developing crop canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J. L.; Moore, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Previous investigations of thermal infrared techniques using remote sensors (thermography) for estimating soil water content have been limited primarily to bare soil. Ground-based and aircraft investigations were conducted to evaluate the potential for extending the thermography approach to developing crop canopies. A significant exponential relationship was found between the volumetric soil water content in the 0-4 cm soil layer and the diurnal difference between surface soil temperature measured at 0230 and 1330 LST (satellite overpass times of NASA's Heat Capacity Mapping Mission - HCMM). Surface soil temperatures were estimated using minimum air temperature, percent cover of the canopy and remote measurements of canopy temperature. Results of the investigation demonstrated that thermography can potentially be used to estimate soil temperature and soil moisture throughout a complete growing season for a number of different crops and soils.

  1. Dynamic regulation of Polycomb group activity during plant development.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2012-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes play important roles in phase transitions and cell fate determination in plants and animals, by epigenetically repressing sets of genes that promote either proliferation or differentiation. The continuous differentiation of new organs in plants, such as leaves or flowers, requires a highly dynamic PcG function, which can be induced, modulated, or repressed when necessary. In this review, we discuss the recent advance in understanding PcG function in plants and focus on the diverse molecular mechanisms that have been described to regulate and counteract PcG activity in Arabidopsis. PMID:22999383

  2. Adsorption dynamics of trichlorofluoromethane in activated carbon fiber beds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Xin; Hu, Jiaqi; Wei, Chaohai; Bi, Hsiaotao T

    2011-02-28

    Adsorption on carbon fixed-beds is considered as an inexpensive and highly effective way for controlling chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) emissions. In the present work, a dynamic model under constant-pattern wave conditions has been developed to predict the breakthrough behavior of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) adsorption in a fixed bed packed with activated carbon fibers (ACFs). The adsorption of CFC-11 vapor onto viscose-based ACFs was performed in a fixed bed at different test conditions. The results showed that, in a deep bed (>120 mm), the analytical model based on the external mass transfer with the Langmuir isotherm could describe the adsorption dynamics well. The model parameters, the characteristic breakthrough time and the film mass-transfer coefficients are related to such operating parameters as the superficial gas velocity, feed concentration and bed height. It was found from the breakthrough dynamics that the mass transfer from the fluid phase to the fiber surface dominated the CFC-11 adsorption onto ACFs in fixed beds. PMID:21216098

  3. Calibration and Evaluation of Ultrasound Thermography Using Infrared Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Deng, Cheri X

    2016-02-01

    Real-time monitoring of the spatiotemporal evolution of tissue temperature is important to ensure safe and effective treatment in thermal therapies including hyperthermia and thermal ablation. Ultrasound thermography has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for temperature measurement, and accurate calibration of the temperature-dependent ultrasound signal changes against temperature is required. Here we report a method that uses infrared thermography for calibration and validation of ultrasound thermography. Using phantoms and cardiac tissue specimens subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound heating, we simultaneously acquired ultrasound and infrared imaging data from the same surface plane of a sample. The commonly used echo time shift-based method was chosen to compute ultrasound thermometry. We first correlated the ultrasound echo time shifts with infrared-measured temperatures for material-dependent calibration and found that the calibration coefficient was positive for fat-mimicking phantom (1.49 ± 0.27) but negative for tissue-mimicking phantom (-0.59 ± 0.08) and cardiac tissue (-0.69 ± 0.18°C-mm/ns). We then obtained the estimation error of the ultrasound thermometry by comparing against the infrared-measured temperature and revealed that the error increased with decreased size of the heated region. Consistent with previous findings, the echo time shifts were no longer linearly dependent on temperature beyond 45°C-50°C in cardiac tissues. Unlike previous studies in which thermocouples or water bath techniques were used to evaluate the performance of ultrasound thermography, our results indicate that high-resolution infrared thermography is a useful tool that can be applied to evaluate and understand the limitations of ultrasound thermography methods. PMID:26547634

  4. Broken Detailed Balance of Filament Dynamics in Active Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladrow, J.; Fakhri, N.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Schmidt, C. F.; Broedersz, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Myosin motor proteins drive vigorous steady-state fluctuations in the actin cytoskeleton of cells. Endogenous embedded semiflexible filaments such as microtubules, or added filaments such as single-walled carbon nanotubes are used as novel tools to noninvasively track equilibrium and nonequilibrium fluctuations in such biopolymer networks. Here, we analytically calculate shape fluctuations of semiflexible probe filaments in a viscoelastic environment, driven out of equilibrium by motor activity. Transverse bending fluctuations of the probe filaments can be decomposed into dynamic normal modes. We find that these modes no longer evolve independently under nonequilibrium driving. This effective mode coupling results in nonzero circulatory currents in a conformational phase space, reflecting a violation of detailed balance. We present predictions for the characteristic frequencies associated with these currents and investigate how the temporal signatures of motor activity determine mode correlations, which we find to be consistent with recent experiments on microtubules embedded in cytoskeletal networks.

  5. Broken Detailed Balance of Filament Dynamics in Active Networks.

    PubMed

    Gladrow, J; Fakhri, N; MacKintosh, F C; Schmidt, C F; Broedersz, C P

    2016-06-17

    Myosin motor proteins drive vigorous steady-state fluctuations in the actin cytoskeleton of cells. Endogenous embedded semiflexible filaments such as microtubules, or added filaments such as single-walled carbon nanotubes are used as novel tools to noninvasively track equilibrium and nonequilibrium fluctuations in such biopolymer networks. Here, we analytically calculate shape fluctuations of semiflexible probe filaments in a viscoelastic environment, driven out of equilibrium by motor activity. Transverse bending fluctuations of the probe filaments can be decomposed into dynamic normal modes. We find that these modes no longer evolve independently under nonequilibrium driving. This effective mode coupling results in nonzero circulatory currents in a conformational phase space, reflecting a violation of detailed balance. We present predictions for the characteristic frequencies associated with these currents and investigate how the temporal signatures of motor activity determine mode correlations, which we find to be consistent with recent experiments on microtubules embedded in cytoskeletal networks. PMID:27367410

  6. Laser lock-in thermography for thermal contact characterisation of surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerok, A.; Jaubert, F.; Fomichev, S. V.; Thro, P.-Y.; Courtois, X.; Grisolia, C.

    2012-11-01

    Lock-in thermography was applied to determine the thermal contact conductance of a W-layer (140 μm) on a CFC-substrate. A lock-in thermography system together with a pulse repetition rate Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 1-500 Hz pulse repetition rate) for layer heating was applied for phase shift measurements on the W-layer. A numerical model for direct phase shift calculations was developed and applied to rapid determination of the Fourier amplitudes and phases of the temperature. Thermal conductance coefficients were obtained by comparing the experimental and simulation phase shifts.

  7. Emissivity-corrected power loss calibration for lock-in thermography measurements on silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasemann, Martin; Walter, Benjamin; Meinhardt, Christoph; Ebser, Jan; Kwapil, Wolfram; Warta, Wilhelm

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes power loss calibration procedures with implemented emissivity correction. The determination of our emissivity correction matrix does neither rely on blackbody reference measurements nor on the knowledge of any sample temperatures. To describe the emissivity-corrected power calibration procedures in detail, we review the theory behind lock-in thermography and show experimentally that the lock-in signal is proportional to the power dissipation in the solar cell. Experiments show the successful application of our emissivity correction procedure, which significantly improves the informative value of lock-in thermography images and the reliability of the conclusions drawn from these images.

  8. Characterization of uncertainties when measuring metal cutting temperatures using infrared radiation thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitenton, Eric P.

    2009-05-01

    There are many error sources when using infrared radiation thermography to measure the temperature distribution of the tool, workpiece, and chip during metal cutting. It is important to understand how these error sources affect the measurement uncertainty. Some are familiar to anyone performing thermography measurements, such as uncertainties in the basic camera calibration. However, metal cutting presents unique measurement challenges due to factors such as the high magnification required, high surface speeds, polarization effects, micro-blackbody effects, and changing emissivity as chips form. This paper presents highlights of the current state of efforts at NIST to catalog and characterize error sources and the resulting uncertainties.

  9. Inductive pulsed phase thermography for reducing or enlarging the effect of surface emissivity variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruizhen; He, Yunze; Gao, Bin; Tian, Gui Yun

    2014-11-01

    Emissivity variation introduces illusory temperature inhomogeneity and results in false alarms in infrared thermography, thus, it is important to separate the influence of surface emissivity variation. This letter experimentally demonstrates the advantages of phase information to reduce or enlarge the effect of surface emissivity variation with inductive pulsed phase thermography, where inductive excitation is emissivity-independent and avoids the effect of emissivity variation in heating process. The directly heated area and the indirectly heated area are divided in the phasegrams. The emissivity variation is removed or enlarged perfectly at the specific frequency and defect detectability is improved remarkably.

  10. Measurement of Crystallization Temperature Using Thermography for Thin Film Amorphous Alloy Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Seiichi; Aono, Yuko; Sakurai, Junpei; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2009-03-01

    This report describes a new non-contact measurement method for the crystallization temperature (Tx) of a thin film amorphous alloy. The thermal emissivity of the amorphous alloy sample is predicted to be modified when it crystallizes. It was attempted to relate this modification to changes in the apparent temperature by thermography. Thin film amorphous alloys of Pt67Si33 and Pt73Si27 were sputtered onto an Al2O3 substrate and then heated at 20 K/min in vacuum, and the film temperature was monitored by thermography. The Tx indicated by the proposed method coincided with the temperature measured by conventional differential scanning calorimeter within 8 K.

  11. Non-destructive Testing by Infrared Thermography Under Random Excitation and ARMA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, J. L.; Nicolas, J. L.; Candoré, J. C.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Photothermal thermography is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method, which has many applications in the field of control and characterization of thin materials. This technique is usually implemented under CW or flash excitation. Such excitations are not adapted for control of fragile materials or for multi-frequency analysis. To allow these analyses, in this article, the use of a new control mode is proposed: infrared thermography under random excitation and auto regressive moving average analysis. First, the principle of this NDT method is presented. Then, the method is shown to permit detection, with low energy constraints, of detachments situated in mural paintings.

  12. Combination Of Thermography And Pressure Tests To Combat Air Leakage Problems In Building Enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruin, W. G.

    1987-05-01

    Uncontrolled air leakage in a building enclosure is the main component of space heating and cooling costs. In Atlantic Canada, Public Works Canada has combined thermography and pressure testing to identify design and construction problems in new construction and to identify specific areas of air leakage in existing housing stock. A study case shows how thermography and pressure testing has been utilized to locate and compare specific areas of air leakage in a residence before and after air sealing. The study provides both quantitative and qualitative evidence of how air sealing increases the air tightness in building enclosures.

  13. Application of Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (ACAT) for Inspection of Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Pergantis, Charles; Flanagan, David; Deschepper, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The application of a noncontact air coupled acoustic heating technique is investigated for the inspection of advanced honeycomb composite structures. A weakness in the out of plane stiffness of the structure, caused by a delamination or core damage, allows for the coupling of acoustic energy and thus this area will have a higher temperature than the surrounding area. Air coupled acoustic thermography (ACAT) measurements were made on composite sandwich structures with damage and were compared to conventional flash thermography. A vibrating plate model is presented to predict the optimal acoustic source frequency. Improvements to the measurement technique are also discussed.

  14. a Dynamical Model of Muscle Activation, Fatigue and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing Z.; Yue, Guang H.; Brown, Robert W.

    2001-04-01

    A dynamical model on muscle activation, fatigue, and recovery was developed to provide a theoretical framework for explaining the force produced by muscle(s) during the process of getting activated and fatigued. By simplifying the fatigue effect and the recovery effect as two phenomenological parameters (F, R), we developed a set of dynamical equations to describe the behavior of muscle(s) as a group of motor units under an external drive, e.g., voluntary brain effort. This model provides a macroscopic view for understanding the biophysical mechanisms of voluntary drive, fatigue effect, and recovery in stimulating, limiting and modulating the force output from muscle(s). Agreement between the experimental data and the predicted forces is excellent. This model may also generate new possibilities in clinical and engineering applications. The parameters introduced by this model can serve as good indicators of physical conditions, and may be useful for quantitative diagnosis of certain diseases related to muscles, especially symptoms of fatigue. Inference from the model can clarify a long-debating question regarding the maximal possibility of muscle force production. It can also be used as guideline for simulating real muscle in muscle engineering or design of human-mimic robot.

  15. Molecular Dynamics of "Fuzzy" Transcriptional Activator-Coactivator Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Natalie S; Weinzierl, Robert O J

    2016-05-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (ADs) are generally thought to be intrinsically unstructured, but capable of adopting limited secondary structure upon interaction with a coactivator surface. The indeterminate nature of this interface made it hitherto difficult to study structure/function relationships of such contacts. Here we used atomistic accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations to study the conformational changes of the GCN4 AD and variants thereof, either free in solution, or bound to the GAL11 coactivator surface. We show that the AD-coactivator interactions are highly dynamic while obeying distinct rules. The data provide insights into the constant and variable aspects of orientation of ADs relative to the coactivator, changes in secondary structure and energetic contributions stabilizing the various conformers at different time points. We also demonstrate that a prediction of α-helical propensity correlates directly with the experimentally measured transactivation potential of a large set of mutagenized ADs. The link between α-helical propensity and the stimulatory activity of ADs has fundamental practical and theoretical implications concerning the recruitment of ADs to coactivators. PMID:27175900

  16. Dynamic positioning system based on active disturbance rejection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhengling; Guo, Chen; Fan, Yunsheng

    2015-08-01

    A dynamically positioned vessel, by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the certifying class societies (DNV, ABS, LR, etc.), is defined as a vessel that maintains its position and heading (fixed location or pre-determined track) exclusively by means of active thrusters. The development of control technology promotes the upgrading of dynamic positioning (DP) systems. Today there are two different DP systems solutions available on the market: DP system based on PID regulator and that based on model-based control. Both systems have limited disturbance rejection capability due to their design principle. In this paper, a new DP system solution is proposed based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) technology. This technology is composed of Tracking-Differentiator (TD), Extended State Observer (ESO) and Nonlinear Feedback Combination. On one hand, both TD and ESO can act as filters and can be used in place of conventional filters; on the other hand, the total disturbance of the system can be estimated and compensated by ESO, which therefore enhances the system's disturbance rejection capability. This technology's advantages over other methods lie in two aspects: 1) This method itself can not only achieve control objectives but also filter noisy measurements without other specialized filters; 2) This method offers a new useful approach to suppress the ocean disturbance. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Molecular Dynamics of "Fuzzy" Transcriptional Activator-Coactivator Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Natalie S.; Weinzierl, Robert O. J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (ADs) are generally thought to be intrinsically unstructured, but capable of adopting limited secondary structure upon interaction with a coactivator surface. The indeterminate nature of this interface made it hitherto difficult to study structure/function relationships of such contacts. Here we used atomistic accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations to study the conformational changes of the GCN4 AD and variants thereof, either free in solution, or bound to the GAL11 coactivator surface. We show that the AD-coactivator interactions are highly dynamic while obeying distinct rules. The data provide insights into the constant and variable aspects of orientation of ADs relative to the coactivator, changes in secondary structure and energetic contributions stabilizing the various conformers at different time points. We also demonstrate that a prediction of α-helical propensity correlates directly with the experimentally measured transactivation potential of a large set of mutagenized ADs. The link between α-helical propensity and the stimulatory activity of ADs has fundamental practical and theoretical implications concerning the recruitment of ADs to coactivators. PMID:27175900

  18. Dynamics of Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    2000-01-01

    A series of active flow control experiments were recently conducted at high Reynolds numbers on a generic separated configuration. The model simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick Glauert-Goldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. The main motivation for the experiments is to generate a comprehensive data base for validation of unsteady numerical simulation as a first step in the development of a CFD design tool, without which it would not be possible to effectively utilize the great potential of unsteady flow control. This paper focuses on the dynamics of several key features of the baseline as well as the controlled flow. It was found that the thickness of the upstream boundary layer has a negligible effect on the flow dynamics. It is speculated that separation is caused mainly by the highly convex surface while viscous effects are less important. The two-dimensional separated flow contains unsteady waves centered on a reduced frequency of 0.8, while in the three dimensional separated flow, frequencies around a reduced frequency of 0.3 and 1 are active. Several scenarios of resonant wave interaction take place at the separated shear-layer and in the pressure recovery region. The unstable reduced frequency bands for periodic excitation are centered on 1.5 and 5, but these reduced frequencies are based on the length of the baseline bubble that shortens due to the excitation. The conventional swept wing-scaling works well for the coherent wave features. Reproduction of these dynamic effects by a numerical simulation would provide benchmark validation.

  19. Quantifying unsteadiness and dynamics of pulsatory volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, L.; Pioli, L.; Bonadonna, C.; Connor, C. B.; Andronico, D.; Harris, A. J. L.; Ripepe, M.

    2016-06-01

    Pulsatory eruptions are marked by a sequence of explosions which can be separated by time intervals ranging from a few seconds to several hours. The quantification of the periodicities associated with these eruptions is essential not only for the comprehension of the mechanisms controlling explosivity, but also for classification purposes. We focus on the dynamics of pulsatory activity and quantify unsteadiness based on the distribution of the repose time intervals between single explosive events in relation to magma properties and eruptive styles. A broad range of pulsatory eruption styles are considered, including Strombolian, violent Strombolian and Vulcanian explosions. We find a general relationship between the median of the observed repose times in eruptive sequences and the viscosity of magma given by η ≈ 100 ṡtmedian. This relationship applies to the complete range of magma viscosities considered in our study (102 to 109 Pa s) regardless of the eruption length, eruptive style and associated plume heights, suggesting that viscosity is the main magma property controlling eruption periodicity. Furthermore, the analysis of the explosive sequences in terms of failure time through statistical survival analysis provides further information: dynamics of pulsatory activity can be successfully described in terms of frequency and regularity of the explosions, quantified based on the log-logistic distribution. A linear relationship is identified between the log-logistic parameters, μ and s. This relationship is useful for quantifying differences among eruptive styles from very frequent and regular mafic events (Strombolian activity) to more sporadic and irregular Vulcanian explosions in silicic systems. The time scale controlled by the parameter μ, as a function of the median of the distribution, can be therefore correlated with the viscosity of magmas; while the complexity of the erupting system, including magma rise rate, degassing and fragmentation efficiency

  20. Long Hole Film Cooling Dataset for CFD Development . Part 1; Infrared Thermography and Thermocouple Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Thurman, Douglas; Poinsatte, Phillip; Ameri, Ali; Eichele, Peter; Knight, James

    2013-01-01

    An experiment investigating flow and heat transfer of long (length to diameter ratio of 18) cylindrical film cooling holes has been completed. In this paper, the thermal field in the flow and on the surface of the film cooled flat plate is presented for nominal freestream turbulence intensities of 1.5 and 8 percent. The holes are inclined at 30deg above the downstream direction, injecting chilled air of density ratio 1.0 onto the surface of a flat plate. The diameter of the hole is 0.75 in. (0.01905 m) with center to center spacing (pitch) of 3 hole diameters. Coolant was injected into the mainstream flow at nominal blowing ratios of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0. The Reynolds number of the freestream was approximately 11,000 based on hole diameter. Thermocouple surveys were used to characterize the thermal field. Infrared thermography was used to determine the adiabatic film effectiveness on the plate. Hotwire anemometry was used to provide flowfield physics and turbulence measurements. The results are compared to existing data in the literature. The aim of this work is to produce a benchmark dataset for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) development to eliminate the effects of hole length to diameter ratio and to improve resolution in the near-hole region. In this report, a Time-Filtered Navier Stokes (TFNS), also known as Partially Resolved Navier Stokes (PRNS), method that was implemented in the Glenn-HT code is used to model coolant-mainstream interaction. This method is a high fidelity unsteady method that aims to represent large scale flow features and mixing more accurately.

  1. Regional Skin Temperature Response to Moderate Aerobic Exercise Measured by Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Alex de Andrade; Amorim, Paulo Roberto dos Santos; Brito, Ciro José; Sillero-Quintana, Manuel; Bouzas Marins, João Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infrared thermography (IRT) does not require contact with the skin, and it is a convenient, reliable and non-invasive technique that can be used for monitoring the skin temperature (TSK). Objectives: The aim of this study was to monitor the variations in the regional TSK during exercise on 28 regions of interest (ROIs) (forehead, face, chest, abdomen, back, lumbar, anterior and posterior neck, and posterior and anterior views of the right and left hands, forearms, upper arms, thighs, and legs) with IRT. Patients and Methods: 12 physically active young males were monitored with IRT during the following three phases: a) 30 minutes before exercise b) while performing one hour of moderate intensity exercise on a treadmill at 60% of the VO2max, and c) 60 minutes after exercise. Results: During pre-exercise, all TSK reached a steady-state (P ≤ 0.05), which ensured adequate thermal stabilisation. At the beginning of exercise, there was a significant reduction in the TSK in most ROIs after 10 minutes of activity, except for the lower limbs (legs and thighs). After one hour of recovery, in the anterior view of the hands and thighs and in the posterior view of the legs, there were significant increases in the TSK compared to pre-exercise. Conclusions: There were significant distinctions in the skin temperature distribution during exercise according to the activity of the area under consideration during exercise, which may be important in the development of physiological models and heat flux analyses for different purposes. PMID:27217931

  2. Using aerial infrared thermography to detect utility theft of service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Gregory R.; Lucas, R. Gillem

    2012-06-01

    Natural gas and electric utility companies, public utility commissions, consumer advocacy groups, city governments, state governments and the federal government United States continue to turn a blind eye towards utility energy theft of service which we conservatively estimate is in excess of 10 billion a year. Why? Many in the United States have exhausted their unemployment benefits. The amounts for federal funding for low income heating assistance programs (LIHEAP) funds were cut by nearly 40% for 2012 to 3.02 billion. "At peak funding ($5.1 billion in 2009), the program was national in scale but still only had enough resources to support roughly 1/4 of the eligible households.i" Contributions to charities are down and the number of families below the poverty line who are unable to pay to heat their houses continues to rise. Many of the less fortunate in our society now consider theft and fraud to be an attractive option for their supply of natural gas and/or electricity. A record high mild winter in 2011-2012 coupled with 10-year low natural gas prices temporarily obscured the need for low income heating assistance programs (LIHEAPs) from the news and federal budgets, but cold winters will return. The proliferation of smart meters and automated meter infrastructures across our nation can do little to detect energy theft because the thieves can simply by-pass the meters, jumper around the meters and/or steal meters from abandoned houses and use them. Many utility systems were never set-up to stop these types of theft. Even with low-cost per identified thief method using aerial infrared thermography, utilities continue to ignore theft detection.

  3. Muscle metaboreflex activation during dynamic exercise vasoconstricts ischemic active skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasdeep; Machado, Tiago M; Alvarez, Alberto; Krishnan, Abhinav C; Hanna, Hanna W; Altamimi, Yasir H; Senador, Danielle; Spranger, Marty D; O'Leary, Donal S

    2015-12-15

    Metabolite accumulation due to ischemia of active skeletal muscle stimulates group III/IV chemosensitive afferents eliciting reflex increases in arterial blood pressure and sympathetic activity, termed the muscle metaboreflex. We and others have previously demonstrated sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction of coronary, renal, and forelimb vasculatures with muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA). Whether MMA elicits vasoconstriction of the ischemic muscle from which it originates is unknown. We hypothesized that the vasodilation in active skeletal muscle with imposed ischemia becomes progressively restrained by the increasing sympathetic vasoconstriction during MMA. We activated the metaboreflex during mild dynamic exercise in chronically instrumented canines via graded reductions in hindlimb blood flow (HLBF) before and after α1-adrenergic blockade [prazosin (50 μg/kg)], β-adrenergic blockade [propranolol (2 mg/kg)], and α1 + β-blockade. Hindlimb resistance was calculated as femoral arterial pressure/HLBF. During mild exercise, HLBF must be reduced below a threshold level before the reflex is activated. With initial reductions in HLBF, vasodilation occurred with the imposed ischemia. Once the muscle metaboreflex was elicited, hindlimb resistance increased. This increase in hindlimb resistance was abolished by α1-adrenergic blockade and exacerbated after β-adrenergic blockade. We conclude that metaboreflex activation during submaximal dynamic exercise causes sympathetically mediated α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in ischemic skeletal muscle. This limits the ability of the reflex to improve blood flow to the muscle. PMID:26475591

  4. An acetylcholine-activated microcircuit drives temporal dynamics of cortical activity

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Mriganka

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic modulation of cortex powerfully influences information processing and brain states, causing robust desynchronization of local field potentials and strong decorrelation of responses between neurons. Here we show that intracortical cholinergic inputs to mouse visual cortex specifically and differentially drive a defined cortical microcircuit: they facilitate somatostatin-expressing (SOM) inhibitory neurons that in turn inhibit parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory neurons and pyramidal neurons. Selective optogenetic inhibition of SOM responses blocks desynchronization and decorrelation, demonstrating that direct cholinergic activation of SOM neurons is necessary for this phenomenon. Optogenetic inhibition of vasoactive intestinal peptide-expressing neurons does not block desynchronization, despite these neurons being activated at high levels of cholinergic drive. Direct optogenetic SOM activation, independent of cholinergic modulation, is sufficient to induce desynchronization. Together, these findings demonstrate a mechanistic basis for temporal structure in cortical populations, and the crucial role of neuromodulatory drive to specific inhibitory-excitatory circuits in actively shaping the dynamics of neuronal activity. PMID:25915477

  5. An acetylcholine-activated microcircuit drives temporal dynamics of cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Naiyan; Sugihara, Hiroki; Sur, Mriganka

    2015-06-01

    Cholinergic modulation of cortex powerfully influences information processing and brain states, causing robust desynchronization of local field potentials and strong decorrelation of responses between neurons. We found that intracortical cholinergic inputs to mouse visual cortex specifically and differentially drive a defined cortical microcircuit: they facilitate somatostatin-expressing (SOM) inhibitory neurons that in turn inhibit parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory neurons and pyramidal neurons. Selective optogenetic inhibition of SOM responses blocked desynchronization and decorrelation, demonstrating that direct cholinergic activation of SOM neurons is necessary for this phenomenon. Optogenetic inhibition of vasoactive intestinal peptide-expressing neurons did not block desynchronization, despite these neurons being activated at high levels of cholinergic drive. Direct optogenetic SOM activation, independent of cholinergic modulation, was sufficient to induce desynchronization. Together, these findings demonstrate a mechanistic basis for temporal structure in cortical populations and the crucial role of neuromodulatory drive in specific inhibitory-excitatory circuits in actively shaping the dynamics of neuronal activity. PMID:25915477

  6. Restricted dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in activated carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Saha, Dipendu; Gallego, Nidia C; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bhat, Vinay V

    2012-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was used for characterization of dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in narrow nanopores of two activated carbon materials: PFAC (derived from polyfurfuryl alcohol) and UMC (ultramicroporous carbon). Fast, but incomplete ortho-para conversion was observed at 10 K, suggesting that scattering originates from the fraction of unconverted ortho isomer which is rotation-hindered because of confinement in nanopores. Hydrogen molecules entrapped in narrow nanopores (<7 ) were immobile below 22-25 K. Mobility increased rapidly with temperature above this threshold, which is 8 K higher than the melting point of bulk hydrogen. Diffusion obeyed fixed-jump length mechanism, indistinguishable between 2D and 3D processes. Thermal activation of diffusion was characterized between ~22 and 37 K, and structure-dependent differences were found between the two carbons. Activation energy of diffusion was higher than that of bulk solid hydrogen. Classical notions of liquid and solid do not longer apply for H2 confined in narrow nanopores.

  7. A nonlinear dynamical analogue model of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Baker, D. N.; Roberts, D. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Buechner, J.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction within the framework of deterministic nonlinear dynamics. An earlier dripping faucet analog model of the low-dimensional solar wind-magnetosphere system is reviewed, and a plasma physical counterpart to that model is constructed. A Faraday loop in the magnetotail is considered, and the relationship of electric potentials on the loop to changes in the magnetic flux threading the loop is developed. This approach leads to a model of geomagnetic activity which is similar to the earlier mechanical model but described in terms of the geometry and plasma contents of the magnetotail. The model is characterized as an elementary time-dependent global convection model. The convection evolves within a magnetotail shape that varies in a prescribed manner in response to the dynamical evolution of the convection. The result is a nonlinear model capable of exhibiting a transition from regular to chaotic loading and unloading. The model's behavior under steady loading and also some elementary forms of time-dependent loading is discussed.

  8. Low-dimensional dynamics of resting-state cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Mehrkanoon, Saeid; Breakspear, Michael; Boonstra, Tjeerd W

    2014-05-01

    Endogenous brain activity supports spontaneous human thought and shapes perception and behavior. Connectivity-based analyses of endogenous, or resting-state, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data have revealed the existence of a small number of robust networks which have a rich spatial structure. Yet the temporal information within fMRI data is limited, motivating the complementary analysis of electrophysiological recordings such as electroencephalography (EEG). Here we provide a novel method based on multivariate time-frequency interdependence to reconstruct the principal resting-state network dynamics in human EEG data. The stability of network expression across subjects is assessed using resampling techniques. We report the presence of seven robust networks, with distinct topographic organizations and high frequency (∼ 5-45 Hz) fingerprints, nested within slow temporal sequences that build up and decay over several orders of magnitude. Interestingly, all seven networks are expressed concurrently during these slow dynamics, although there is a temporal asymmetry in the pattern of their formation and dissolution. These analyses uncover the complex temporal character of endogenous cortical fluctuations and, in particular, offer an opportunity to reconstruct the low dimensional linear subspace in which they unfold. PMID:24104726

  9. Activating Basic Category Exemplars in Sentence Contexts: A Dynamical Account

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Lewis P.; Tuller, Betty; Scott Kelso, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of context on the processing of category names embedded in sentences. The investigation focuses on the nature of information available immediately after such a word is heard as well as on the dynamics of adaptation to context. An on-line method (Cross Modal Lexical Priming) was used to trace how this process unfolds in time. We found that the information available immediately after a category word is presented is not altered by the sentence context in which the word is immersed. Rather, the structure of availability of particular exemplars of the category resembles the typicality structure of a conceptual representation. The adaptation to context occurs later (between 300 and 450 ms after the category word) and takes the form of a rapid reorganization of the structure rather than a gradual activation of a contextually relevant exemplar. We claim that such data is best accounted for in a dynamical framework, where a coherent global structure emerges through locally guided self-organization. PMID:18046650

  10. Non-linear dynamics of the complement system activation.

    PubMed

    Korotaevskiy, Andrey A; Hanin, Leonid G; Khanin, Mikhail A

    2009-12-01

    The complement system (CS) plays a prominent role in the immune defense. The goal of this work is to study the dynamics of activation of the classic and alternative CS pathways based on the method of mathematical modeling. The principal difficulty that hinders modeling effort is the absence of the measured values of kinetic constants of many biochemical reactions forming the CS. To surmount this difficulty, an optimization procedure consisting of constrained minimization of the total protein consumption by the CS was designed. The constraints made use of published data on the in vitro kinetics of elimination of the Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria by the CS. Special features of the problem at hand called for a significant modification of the general constrained optimization procedure to include a mathematical model of the bactericidal effect of the CS in the iterative setting. Determination of the unknown kinetic constants of biochemical reactions forming the CS led to a fully specified mathematical model of the dynamics of cell killing induced by the CS. On the basis of the model, effects of the initial concentrations of complements and their inhibitors on the bactericidal action of the CS were studied. Proteins playing a critical role in the regulation of the bactericidal action of the CS were identified. Results obtained in this work serve as an important stepping stone for the study of functioning of the CS as a whole as well as for developing methods for control of pathogenic processes. PMID:19854207

  11. Dynamical Theory of Activated Processes in Globular Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northrup, Scott H.; Pear, Michael R.; Lee, Chyuan-Yih; McCammon, J. Andrew; Karplus, Martin

    1982-07-01

    A methos is described for calculating the reaction rate in globular proteins of activated processes such as ligand binding or enzymatic catalysis. The method is based on the determination of the probability that the system is in the transition state and of the magnitude of the reactive flux for transition-state systems. An ``umbrella sampling'' simulation procedure is outlined for evaluating the transition-state probability. The reactive flux is obtained from an approach described previously for calculating the dynamics of transition-state trajectories. An application to the rotational isomerization of an aromatic ring in the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor is presented. The results demonstrate the feasibility of calculating rate constants for reactions in proteins and point to the importance of solvent effects for reactions that occur near the protein surface.

  12. Active microrheology of Brownian suspensions via Accelerated Stokesian Dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Henry; Su, Yu; Gu, Kevin; Hoh, Nicholas; Zia, Roseanna

    2015-11-01

    The non-equilibrium rheological response of colloidal suspensions is studied via active microrheology utilizing Accelerated Stokesian Dynamics simulations. In our recent work, we derived the theory for micro-diffusivity and suspension stress in dilute suspensions of hydrodynamically interacting colloids. This work revealed that force-induced diffusion is anisotropic, with qualitative differences between diffusion along the line of the external force and that transverse to it, and connected these effects to the role of hydrodynamic, interparticle, and Brownian forces. This work also revealed that these forces play a similar qualitative role in the anisotropy of the stress and in the evolution of the non-equilibrium osmotic pressure. Here, we show that theoretical predictions hold for suspensions ranging from dilute to near maximum packing, and for a range of flow strengths from near-equilibrium to the pure-hydrodynamic limit.

  13. Dynamic recruitment of active proteasomes into polyglutamine initiated inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Schipper-Krom, Sabine; Juenemann, Katrin; Jansen, Anne H; Wiemhoefer, Anne; van den Nieuwendijk, Rianne; Smith, Donna L; Hink, Mark A; Bates, Gillian P; Overkleeft, Hermen; Ovaa, Huib; Reits, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease are hallmarked by neuronal intracellular inclusion body formation. Whether proteasomes are irreversibly recruited into inclusion bodies in these protein misfolding disorders is a controversial subject. In addition, it has been proposed that the proteasomes may become clogged by the aggregated protein fragments, leading to impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we show by fluorescence pulse-chase experiments in living cells that proteasomes are dynamically and reversibly recruited into inclusion bodies. As these recruited proteasomes remain catalytically active and accessible to substrates, our results challenge the concept of proteasome sequestration and impairment in Huntington's disease, and support the reported absence of proteasome impairment in mouse models of Huntington's disease. PMID:24291262

  14. Role of colored noise in active dynamical theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachan, Devin; Levine, Alex

    2015-03-01

    The noise driving many dynamical systems is temporally correlated, or colored. Biological motor proteins, for example, generate processive stresses in biopolymer networks, and it would be incorrect to model this forcing as uncorrelated white noise. To gain insight into the role of the noise spectrum, we study a phi⌃4 theory in the presence of active colored noise with renormalization group techniques. Using a frequency shell integration scheme, we perform an epsilon expansion around d =8 for power law noise of the form 1/f⌃2 and find frequency and wavevector dependent corrections to the transport coefficients. The power law noise assumption is, of course, an approximation: all physical processes possess a small frequency cutoff. We study the effect of this cutoff and find a change in scaling behavior as the system transitions from a power law divergent regime to one dominated by white noise.

  15. Dynamical theory of activated processes in globular proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Northrup, S H; Pear, M R; Lee, C Y; McCammon, J A; Karplus, M

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for calculating the reaction rate in globular proteins of activated processes such as ligand binding or enzymatic catalysis. The method is based on the determination of the probability that the system is in the transition state and of the magnitude of the reactive flux for transition-state systems. An "umbrella sampling" simulation procedure is outlined for evaluating the transition-state probability. The reactive flux is obtained from an approach described previously for calculating the dynamics of transition-state trajectories. An application to the rotational isomerization of an aromatic ring in the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor is presented. The results demonstrate the feasibility of calculating rate constants for reactions in proteins and point to the importance of solvent effects for reactions that occur near the protein surface. PMID:6955788

  16. Modelling of piezoelectric actuator dynamics for active structural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.; Chung, Walter H.; Von Flotow, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    The paper models the effects of dynamic coupling between a structure and an electrical network through the piezoelectric effect. The coupled equations of motion of an arbitrary elastic structure with piezoelectric elements and passive electronics are derived. State space models are developed for three important cases: direct voltage driven electrodes, direct charge driven electrodes, and an indirect drive case where the piezoelectric electrodes are connected to an arbitrary electrical circuit with embedded voltage and current sources. The equations are applied to the case of a cantilevered beam with surface mounted piezoceramics and indirect voltage and current drive. The theoretical derivations are validated experimentally on an actively controlled cantilevered beam test article with indirect voltage drive.

  17. Dynamic activation model for a glutamatergic neurovascular unit.

    PubMed

    Calvetti, Daniela; Somersalo, Erkki

    2011-04-01

    This article considers a dynamic spatially lumped model for brain energy metabolism and proposes to use the results of a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) based flux balance analysis to estimate the kinetic model parameters. By treating steady state reaction fluxes and transport rates as random variables we are able to propagate the uncertainty in the steady state configurations to the predictions of the dynamic model, whose responses are no longer individual but ensembles of time courses. The kinetic model consists of five compartments and is governed by kinetic mass balance equations with Michaelis-Menten type expressions for reaction rates and transports between the compartments. The neuronal activation is implemented in terms of the effect of neuronal activity on parameters controlling the blood flow and neurotransmitter transport, and a feedback mechanism coupling the glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft and the ATP hydrolysis, thus accounting for the energetic cost of the membrane potential restoration in the postsynaptic neurons. The changes in capillary volume follow the balloon model developed for BOLD MRI. The model follows the time course of the saturation levels of the blood hemoglobin, which link metabolism and BOLD FMRI signal. Analysis of the model predictions suggest that stoichiometry alone is not enough to determine glucose partitioning between neuron and astrocyte. Lactate exchange between neuron and astrocyte is supported by the model predictions, but the uncertainty on the direction and rate is rather elevated. By and large, the model suggests that astrocyte produces and effluxes lactate, while neuron may switch from using to producing lactate. The level of ATP hydrolysis in astrocyte is substantially higher than strictly required for neurotransmitter cycling, in agreement with the literature. PMID:21176783

  18. Brain activity correlates with emotional perception induced by dynamic avatars.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Hagar; Christensen, Andrea; Flash, Tamar; Giese, Martin A; Malach, Rafael

    2015-11-15

    An accurate judgment of the emotional state of others is a prerequisite for successful social interaction and hence survival. Thus, it is not surprising that we are highly skilled at recognizing the emotions of others. Here we aimed to examine the neuronal correlates of emotion recognition from gait. To this end we created highly controlled dynamic body-movement stimuli based on real human motion-capture data (Roether et al., 2009). These animated avatars displayed gait in four emotional (happy, angry, fearful, and sad) and speed-matched neutral styles. For each emotional gait and its equivalent neutral gait, avatars were displayed at five morphing levels between the two. Subjects underwent fMRI scanning while classifying the emotions and the emotional intensity levels expressed by the avatars. Our results revealed robust brain selectivity to emotional compared to neutral gait stimuli in brain regions which are involved in emotion and biological motion processing, such as the extrastriate body area (EBA), fusiform body area (FBA), superior temporal sulcus (STS), and the amygdala (AMG). Brain activity in the amygdala reflected emotional awareness: for visually identical stimuli it showed amplified stronger response when the stimulus was perceived as emotional. Notably, in avatars gradually morphed along an emotional expression axis there was a parametric correlation between amygdala activity and emotional intensity. This study extends the mapping of emotional decoding in the human brain to the domain of highly controlled dynamic biological motion. Our results highlight an extensive level of brain processing of emotional information related to body language, which relies mostly on body kinematics. PMID:26220746

  19. A new measurement method of coatings thickness based on lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Yu; Meng, Xiang-bin; Ma, Yong-chao

    2016-05-01

    Coatings have been widely used in modern industry and it plays an important role. Coatings thickness is directly related to the performance of the functional coatings, therefore, rapid and accurate coatings thickness inspection has great significance. Existing coatings thickness measurement method is difficult to achieve fast and accurate on-site non-destructive coatings inspection due to cost, accuracy, destruction during inspection and other reasons. This paper starts from the introduction of the principle of lock-in thermography, and then performs an in-depth study on the application of lock-in thermography in coatings inspection through numerical modeling and analysis. The numerical analysis helps explore the relationship between coatings thickness and phase, and the relationship lays the foundation for accurate calculation of coatings thickness. The author sets up a lock-in thermography inspection system and uses thermal barrier coatings specimens to conduct an experiment. The specimen coatings thickness is measured and calibrated to verify the quantitative inspection. Experiment results show that the lock-in thermography method can perform fast coatings inspection and the inspection accuracy is about 95%. Therefore, the method can meet the field testing requirements for engineering projects.

  20. Using radiation thermography and thermometry to evaluate crop water stress in soybean and cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of digital infrared thermography and thermometry to investigate unapparent but important field conditions (poor drainage, non-uniform irrigation, soil variability, or biotic infestations) offers a producer improved management tools to avoid yield declines or to deal with variability in crop ...

  1. Risks of online advertisement of direct-to-consumer thermography for breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Lovett, Kimberly M; Liang, Bryan A

    2011-12-01

    Direct-to-consumer online advertising for thermography as a sole agent with which to diagnose breast cancer is misleading and exploits women who are seeking preventive health care for breast cancer. Regulatory action should be taken against companies who continue to mislead the public to ensure patient safety and evidence-based public health information. PMID:22216479

  2. A comparative evaluation of a case of cystosarcoma phylloides: ultrasound, xeroradiography and thermography.

    PubMed

    Jellins, J; Hughes, C; Ryan, J; Reeve, T; Kossoff, G

    1977-09-01

    The results of xeroradiography, thermography, and ultrasonic gray scale echography in a case of cystosarcoma phylloides are presented. Echography better described the lesion than the other techniques. Gray scale echography displays the infrastructure of the breast tissues and differentiates between types of soft tissue. PMID:196315

  3. ACTIVE MEDIA: Dynamics of growth of inhomogeneities in the active medium of a liquid laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barikhin, B. A.; Ivanov, A. Yu; Kudryavkin, E. V.; Nedolugov, V. I.

    1991-07-01

    Fast cinematography of holograms and of shadow and interference patterns was combined with an acoustic method in a study of the dynamics of growth of inhomogeneities in the active medium of a coaxially pumped dye laser. The main mechanism of the formation of these inhomogeneities was related to acoustic waves created by the deformation of the walls of a dye cell created by electrical pulses applied to the pump flashlamp. Multipulse operation of this laser could be achieved and the off-duty factor could be reduced if the active medium was excited by the strongest possible pump pulses.

  4. HBT-EP Program: Active MHD Mode Dynamics and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, G. A.; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A. H.; Byrne, P. J.; Donald, G. V.; Hughes, P. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.; Hansen, C. J.

    2015-11-01

    The HBT-EP active mode control research program aims to: (i) quantify external kink dynamics and multimode response to magnetic perturbations, (ii) understand the relationship between control coil configuration, conducting and ferritic wall effects, and active feedback control, and (iii) explore advanced feedback algorithms. Biorthogonal decomposition is used to observe multiple simultaneous resistive wall modes (RWM). A 512 core GPU-based low latency (14 μs) MIMO control system uses 96 inputs and 64 outputs for Adaptive Control of RWMs. An in-vessel adjustable ferritic wall is used to study ferritic RWMs with increased growth rates, RMP response, and disruptivity. A biased electrode in the plasma is used to control the rotation of external kinks and evaluate error fields. A Thomson scattering diagnostic measures Te and ne at 3 spatial points, soon to be extended to 10 points. A quasi-linear sharp-boundary model of the plasma's multimode response to error fields is developed to determine harmful error field structures and associated NTV and resonant torques. Upcoming machine upgrades will allow measurements and control of scrape-off-layer currents, and control of kink modes using optical diagnostics. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  5. Dynamics of biomembranes with active multiple-state inclusions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2010-03-01

    Nonequilibrium dynamics of biomembranes with active multiple-state inclusions is considered. The inclusions represent protein molecules which perform cyclic internal conformational motions driven by the energy brought with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ligands. As protein conformations cyclically change, this induces hydrodynamical flows and also directly affects the local curvature of a membrane. On the other hand, variations in the local curvature of the membrane modify the transition rates between conformational states in a protein, leading to a feedback in the considered system. Moreover, active inclusions can move diffusively through the membrane so that their surface concentration varies. The kinetic description of this system is constructed and the stability of the uniform stationary state is analytically investigated. We show that, as the rate of supply of chemical energy is increased above a certain threshold, this uniform state becomes unstable and stationary or traveling waves spontaneously develop in the system. Such waves are accompanied by periodic spatial variations of the membrane curvature and the inclusion density. For typical parameter values, their characteristic wavelengths are of the order of hundreds of nanometers. For traveling waves, the characteristic frequency is of the order of a thousand Hz or less. The predicted instabilities are possible only if at least three internal inclusion states are present. PMID:20365764

  6. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress.

    PubMed

    De, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response. PMID:18851081

  7. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  8. Energetic costs of mange in wolves estimated from infrared thermography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Paul C.; Almberg, Emily S.; Haase, Catherine G; Hudson, Peter J.; Maloney, Shane K; Metz, Matthew C; Munn, Adam J; Nugent, Paul; Putzeys, Olivier; Stahler, Daniel R.; Stewart, Anya C; Smith, Doug W.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites, by definition, extract energy from their hosts and thus affect trophic and food web dynamics even when the parasite may have limited effects on host population size. We studied the energetic costs of mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) in wolves (Canis lupus) using thermal cameras to estimate heat losses associated with compromised insulation during the winter. We combined the field data of known, naturally infected wolves with data set on captive wolves with shaved patches of fur as a positive control to simulate mange-induced hair loss. We predict that during the winter in Montana, more severe mange infection increases heat loss by around 5.2 to 12 MJ per night (1240 to 2850 kcal, or a 65% to 78% increase) for small and large wolves, respectively accounting for wind effects. To maintain body temperature would require a significant proportion of a healthy wolf's total daily energy demands (18-22 MJ/day). We also predict how these thermal costs may increase in colder climates by comparing our predictions in Bozeman, Montana to those from a place with lower ambient temperatures (Fairbanks, Alaska). Contrary to our expectations, the 14°C differential between these regions was not as important as the potential differences in wind speed. These large increases in energetic demands can be mitigated by either increasing consumption rates or decreasing other energy demands. Data from GPS-collared wolves indicated that healthy wolves move, on average, 17 km per day, which was reduced by 1.5, 1.8 and 6.5 km for light, medium, and severe hair loss. In addition, the wolf with the most hair loss was less active at night and more active during the day, which is the converse of the movement patterns of healthy wolves. At the individual level mange infections create significant energy demands and altered behavioral patterns, this may have cascading effects on prey consumption rates, food web dynamics, predator-prey interactions, and scavenger communities.

  9. Focal plane array based infrared thermography in fine physical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainer, Boris G.

    2008-03-01

    By two examples of dissimilar physical phenomena causing thermophysical effects, the unique capabilities of one of the up-to-date methods of experimental physics—focal plane array (FPA) based infrared (IR) thermography (IRT), are demonstrated distinctly. Experimenters inexperienced in IRT can grasp how this method provides a means for combining real-time visualization with quantitative analysis. A narrow-band short-wavelength IR camera was used in the experiments. It is discussed and stated that IRT is best matched and suited to the next two test conditions—when a heated specimen is thin and when heat is generated in the immediate region of a surface of a solid. The first prerequisite is realized in the search for directional patterns of combined low-power radiation sources with the use of the IRT-aided method. The second one is realized in studies of water vapour adsorption on uneven (irregular) surfaces of solid materials. With multiple swatches taken from a set of different fabrics and used as experimental samples, a sharp distinction between adsorptivities of their surfaces is strikingly illustrated by IRT time-domain measurements exhibiting the associated thermal effect ranging within an order of magnitude. It is justified that the described IRT-aided test can find practical implementation at least in the light industry. Emissivities of different fabrics are evaluated experimentally with the described reflection method based on the narrow spectral range of IRT. On the basis of direct IR observations, attention is paid to the need for close control over the surface temperature increase while the adsorption isotherms are being measured. Sensitivity of the FPA-based IRT method, as applied to examine the kinetics of initial stages of adsorption of gaseous molecules on the solid surface, is evaluated analytically and quantitatively. The relationship between the amount of adsorbate and the measurable excess of adsorbent temperature is found. It is discovered

  10. CURVATURE EFFECT QUANTIFICATION FOR IN-VIVO IR THERMOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tze-Yuan; Deng, Daxiang; Herman, Cila

    2012-01-01

    Medical Infrared (IR) Imaging has become an important diagnostic tool over recent years. However, one underlying problem in medical diagnostics is associated with accurate quantification of body surface temperatures. This problem is caused by the artifacts induced by the curvature of objects, which leads to inaccurate temperature mapping and biased diagnostic results. Therefore, in our study, an experiment-based analysis is conducted to address the curvature effects toward the 3D temperature reconstruction of the IR thermography image. For quantification purposes, an isothermal copper plate with flat surface, and a cylindrical metal container filled with water are imaged. For the flat surface, the tilting angle measured from camera axis was varied incrementally from 0° to 60 °, such that the effects of surface viewing angle and travel distance on the measured temperature can be explored. On the cylindrical curved surface, the points viewed from 0° to 90° with respect to the camera axis are simultaneously imaged at different temperature levels. The experimental data obtained for the flat surface indicate that both viewing angle and distance effects become noticeable for angles over 40 °. The travel distance contributes a minor change when compared with viewing angle. The experimental results from the curved surface indicate that the curvature effect becomes pronounced when the viewing angle is larger than 60 °. The measurement error on the curved surface is compared with the simulation using the non-dielectric model, and the normalized temperature difference relative to 0° viewing angle was analyzed at six temperature levels. These results indicate that the linear formula associated with directional emissivity is a reasonable approximation for the measurement error, and the normalized error curves change consistently with viewing angle at various temperatures. Therefore, the analysis in this study implies that the directional emissivity based on the non

  11. Characterization of an infrared detector for high frame rate thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruehmann, R. K.; Crump, D. A.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    The use of a commercially available photodetector based infrared thermography system, operating in the 2-5 µm range, for high frame rate imaging of temperature evolutions in solid materials is investigated. Infrared photodetectors provide a very fast and precise means of obtaining temperature evolutions over a wide range of science and engineering applications. A typical indium antimonide detector will have a thermal resolution of around 4 mK for room temperature measurements, with a noise threshold around 15 to 20 mK. However the precision of the measurement is dependent on the integration time (akin to exposure time in conventional photography). For temperature evolutions that occur at a moderate rate the integration time can be relatively long, enabling a large signal to noise ratio. A matter of increasing importance in engineering is the behaviour of materials at high strain rates, such as those experienced in impact, shock and ballistic loading. The rapid strain evolution in the material is usually accompanied by a temperature change. The temperature change will affect the material constitutive properties and hence it is important to capture both the temperature and the strain evolutions to provide a proper constitutive law for the material behaviour. The present paper concentrates on the capture of the temperature evolutions, which occur at such rates that rule out the use of contact sensors such as thermocouples and electrical resistance thermometers, as their response times are too slow. Furthermore it is desirable to have an indication of the temperature distribution over a test specimen, hence the full-field approach of IRT is investigated. The paper explores the many hitherto unaddressed challenges of IRT when employed at high speed. Firstly the images must be captured at high speeds, which means reduced integration times and hence a reduction in the signal to noise ratio. Furthermore, to achieve the high image capture rates the detector array must be

  12. Spatiotemporal dynamics of large-scale brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, Jeremy

    Understanding the dynamics of large-scale brain activity is a tough challenge. One reason for this is the presence of an incredible amount of complexity arising from having roughly 100 billion neurons connected via 100 trillion synapses. Because of the extremely high number of degrees of freedom in the nervous system, the question of how the brain manages to properly function and remain stable, yet also be adaptable, must be posed. Neuroscientists have identified many ways the nervous system makes this possible, of which synaptic plasticity is possibly the most notable one. On the other hand, it is vital to understand how the nervous system also loses stability, resulting in neuropathological diseases such as epilepsy, a disease which affects 1% of the population. In the following work, we seek to answer some of these questions from two different perspectives. The first uses mean-field theory applied to neuronal populations, where the variables of interest are the percentages of active excitatory and inhibitory neurons in a network, to consider how the nervous system responds to external stimuli, self-organizes and generates epileptiform activity. The second method uses statistical field theory, in the framework of single neurons on a lattice, to study the concept of criticality, an idea borrowed from physics which posits that in some regime the brain operates in a collectively stable or marginally stable manner. This will be examined in two different neuronal networks with self-organized criticality serving as the overarching theme for the union of both perspectives. One of the biggest problems in neuroscience is the question of to what extent certain details are significant to the functioning of the brain. These details give rise to various spatiotemporal properties that at the smallest of scales explain the interaction of single neurons and synapses and at the largest of scales describe, for example, behaviors and sensations. In what follows, we will shed some

  13. Spatially resolved determination of the short-circuit current density of silicon solar cells via lock-in thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Fertig, Fabian Greulich, Johannes; Rein, Stefan

    2014-05-19

    We present a spatially resolved method to determine the short-circuit current density of crystalline silicon solar cells by means of lock-in thermography. The method utilizes the property of crystalline silicon solar cells that the short-circuit current does not differ significantly from the illuminated current under moderate reverse bias. Since lock-in thermography images locally dissipated power density, this information is exploited to extract values of spatially resolved current density under short-circuit conditions. In order to obtain an accurate result, one or two illuminated lock-in thermography images and one dark lock-in thermography image need to be recorded. The method can be simplified in a way that only one image is required to generate a meaningful short-circuit current density map. The proposed method is theoretically motivated, and experimentally validated for monochromatic illumination in comparison to the reference method of light-beam induced current.

  14. Skin vasomotor hemiparesis followed by overactivity: characteristic thermography findings in a patient with Horner syndrome due to spinal cord infarction.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    We present a 21-year-old female with Horner syndrome due to spinal cord infarction. In this patient, infrared thermography revealed a hemibody skin temperature increase followed by excessive focal decreases, indicating skin vasomotor hemiparesis and overactivity. PMID:26811085

  15. Finite element modeling of haptic thermography: A novel approach for brain tumor detection during minimally invasive neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Goughari, Moslem; Mojra, Afsaneh

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative Thermal Imaging (ITI) is a novel neuroimaging method that can potentially locate tissue abnormalities and hence improves surgeon's diagnostic ability. In the present study, thermography technique coupled with artificial tactile sensing method called "haptic thermography" is utilized to investigate the presence of an abnormal object as a tumor with an elevated temperature relative to the normal tissue in the brain. The brain tissue is characterized as a hyper-viscoelastic material to be descriptive of mechanical behavior of the brain tissue during tactile palpation. Based on a finite element approach, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data of a patient diagnosed to have a brain tumor is utilized to simulate and analyze the capability of haptic thermography in detection and localization of brain tumor. Steady-state thermal results prove that temperature distribution is an appropriate outcome of haptic thermography for the superficial tumors while heat flux distribution can be used as an extra thermal result for deeply located tumors. PMID:26590456

  16. Active electrostatic control of liquid bridge dynamics and stability.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, David B; Wei, Wei; Marston, Philip L

    2004-11-01

    Stabilization of cylindrical liquid bridges beyond the Rayleigh-Plateau limit has been demonstrated in both Plateau-tank experiments and in short-duration low gravity on NASA KC-135 aircraft using an active electrostatic control method. The method controls the (2,0) capillary mode using an optical modal-amplitude detector and mode-coupled electrostatic feedback stress. The application of mode-coupled stresses to a liquid bridge is also a very useful way to study mode dynamics. A pure (2,0)-mode oscillation can be excited by periodic forcing and then the forcing can be turned off to allow for a free decay from which the frequency and damping of the mode is measured. This can be done in the presence or absence of feedback control. Mode-coupled feedback stress applied in proportion to modal amplitude with appropriate gain leads to stiffening of the mode allowing for stabilization beyond the Rayleigh-Plateau limit. If the opposite sign of gain is applied the mode frequency is reduced. It has also been demonstrated that, by applying feedback in proportion to the modal velocity, the damping of the mode can be increased or decreased depending on the velocity gain. Thus, both the mode frequency and damping can be independently controlled at the same time and this has been demonstrated in Plateau-tank experiments. The International Space Station (ISS) has its own modes of oscillation, some of which are in a low frequency range comparable to the (2,0)-mode frequency of typical liquid bridges. In the event that a vibration mode of the ISS were close to the frequency of a capillary mode it would be possible, with active electrostatic control, to shift the capillary-mode frequency away from that of the disturbance and simultaneously add artificial damping to further reduce the effect of the g-jitter. In principle, this method could be applied to any fluid configuration with a free surface. PMID:15644377

  17. Dynamic hyperinflation during activities of daily living in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cláudia S; Nogueira, Fabiana R; Porto, Elias F; Gazzotti, Mariana R; Nascimento, Oliver A; Camelier, Aquiles; Jardim, José R

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether some activities of daily living (ADLs) usually related to dyspnea sensation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are associated with dynamic lung hyperinflation (DH) and whether the use of simple energy conservation techniques (ECTs) might reduce this possible hyperinflation. Eighteen patients (mean age: 65.8 ± 9.8 years) with moderate-to-severe COPD performed six ADLs (walking on a treadmill, storing pots, walking 56 meters carrying a 5-kilogram weight, climbing stairs, simulating taking a shower, and putting on shoes) and had their inspiratory capacity (IC) measured before and after each task. The patients were moderately obstructed with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1): 1.4 ± 0.4 L (50% ± 12.4); FEV1/forced vital capacity: 0.4 ± 8.1; residual volume/total lung capacity: 52.7 ± 10.2, and a reduction in IC was seen after all six activities (p < 0.05): (1) going upstairs, 170 mL; (2) walking 56 meters carrying 5 kilogram weight, 150 mL; (3) walking on a treadmill without and with ECT, respectively, 230 mL and 235 mL; (4) storing pots without and with ECT, respectively, 170 mL and 128 mL; (5) taking a shower without and with ECT, respectively, 172 mL and 118 mL; and (6) putting on shoes without and with ECT, respectively, 210 mL and 78 mL). Patients with moderate to severe COPD develop DH after performing common ADLs involving the upper and lower limbs. Simple ECTs may avoid DH in some of these ADLs. PMID:25896955

  18. Dynamics of Permanent-Magnet Biased Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukata, Satoru; Yutani, Kazuyuki

    1996-01-01

    Active magnetic radial bearings are constructed with a combination of permanent magnets to provide bias forces and electromagnets to generate control forces for the reduction of cost and the operating energy consumption. Ring-shaped permanent magnets with axial magnetization are attached to a shaft and share their magnet stators with the electromagnets. The magnet cores are made of solid iron for simplicity. A simplified magnetic circuit of the combined magnet system is analyzed with linear circuit theory by approximating the characteristics of permanent magnets with a linear relation. A linearized dynamical model of the control force is presented with the first-order approximation of the effects of eddy currents. Frequency responses of the rotor motion to disturbance inputs and the motion for impulsive forces are tested in the non-rotating state. The frequency responses are compared with numerical results. The decay of rotor speed due to magnetic braking is examined. The experimental results and the presented linearized model are similar to those of the all-electromagnetic design.

  19. The Role of Infrared Thermography as a Non-Invasive Tool for the Detection of Lameness in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Alsaaod, Maher; Schaefer, Allan L.; Büscher, Wolfgang; Steiner, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The use of infrared thermography for the identification of lameness in cattle has increased in recent years largely because of its non-invasive properties, ease of automation and continued cost reductions. Thermography can be used to identify and determine thermal abnormalities in animals by characterizing an increase or decrease in the surface temperature of their skin. The variation in superficial thermal patterns resulting from changes in blood flow in particular can be used to detect inflammation or injury associated with conditions such as foot lesions. Thermography has been used not only as a diagnostic tool, but also to evaluate routine farm management. Since 2000, 14 peer reviewed papers which discuss the assessment of thermography to identify and manage lameness in cattle have been published. There was a large difference in thermography performance in these reported studies. However, thermography was demonstrated to have utility for the detection of contralateral temperature difference and maximum foot temperature on areas of interest. Also apparent in these publications was that a controlled environment is an important issue that should be considered before image scanning. PMID:26094632

  20. The effect of cadence on timing of muscle activation and mechanical output in cycling: on the activation dynamics hypothesis.

    PubMed

    McGhie, David; Ettema, Gertjan

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the activation dynamics hypothesis, which states that, in cycling, the pattern between muscle activity and crank position shifts in regard to its angle in the crank cycle with increasing cadence to maintain invariant positioning of the mechanical output. We measured surface EMG of six muscles, and by means of force measurements at the crank and inverse dynamics calculated hip, knee, and ankle joint dynamics during cycling at five cadences (60-100 rpm) at 75% of maximal power in trained cyclists. The joint dynamics (net muscle moment and power) showed a consistent positive phase shift with increasing cadence. The phase shift in muscle activation patterns was highly variable amongst subjects and was, on average, close to zero. Our results are in contradiction with the activation dynamics hypothesis. PMID:20594872

  1. Dynamic properties of biologically active synthetic heparin-like hexasaccharides.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Jesús; Hricovíni, Milos; Gairi, Margarida; Guerrini, Marco; de Paz, José Luis; Ojeda, Rafael; Martín-Lomas, Manuel; Nieto, Pedro M

    2005-10-01

    A complete study of the dynamics of two synthetic heparin-like hexasaccharides, D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-1-->iPr (1) and -->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHAc-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-1-->iPr (2), has been performed using 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation parameters, T1, T2, and heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effect (NOEs). Compound 1 is constituted from sequences corresponding to the major polysaccharide heparin region, while compound 2 contains a sequence never found in natural heparin. They differ from each other only in sulphation patterns, and are capable of stimulating fibroblast growth factors (FGFs)-1 induced mitogenesis. Both oligosaccharides exhibit a remarkable anisotropic overall motion in solution as revealed by their anisotropic ratios (tau /tau||), 4.0 and 3.0 respectively. This is a characteristic behaviour of natural glycosaminoglycans (GAG) which has also been observed for the antithrombin (AT) binding pentasaccharide D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcA-beta-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-(3,6-SO4)-alpha-(1-->4)-L-IdoA-2-SO4-alpha-(1-->4)-D-GlcNHSO3-6-SO4-alpha-1-->Me (3) (Hricovíni, M., Guerrini, M., Torri, G., Piani, S., and Ungarelli, F. (1995) Conformational analysis of heparin epoxide in aqueous solution. An NMR relaxation study. Carbohydr. Res., 277, 11-23). The motional properties observed for 1 and 2 provide additional support to the suitability of these compounds as heparin models in agreement with previous structural (de Paz, J.L., Angulo, J., Lassaletta, J.M., Nieto, P.M., Redondo-Horcajo, M., Lozano, R.M., Jiménez-Gallego, G., and Martín-Lomas, M. (2001) The activation of fibroblast growth factors by heparin: synthesis, structure and biological activity of heparin-like oligosaccharides. Chembiochem, 2, 673-685; Ojeda, R

  2. Depth-Penetrating Luminescence Thermography of Thermal- Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    A thermographic method has been developed for measuring temperatures at predetermined depths within dielectric material layers . especially thermal-barrier coatings. This method will help satisfy a need for noncontact measurement of through-the-thickness temperature gradients for evaluating the effectiveness of thermal- barrier coatings designed to prevent overheating of turbine blades, combustor liners, and other engine parts. Heretofore, thermography has been limited to measurement of surface and near-surface temperatures. In the thermographic method that is the immediate predecessor of the present method, a thermographic phosphor is applied to the outer surface of a thermal barrier coating, luminescence in the phosphor is excited by illuminating the phosphor at a suitable wavelength, and either the time dependence of the intensity of luminescence or the intensities of luminescence spectral lines is measured. Then an emissivity-independent surface-temperature value is computed by use of either the known temperature dependence of the luminescence decay time or the known temperature dependence of ratios between intensities of selected luminescence spectral lines. Until now, depth-penetrating measurements have not been possible because light of the wavelengths needed to excite phosphors could not penetrate thermal-barrier coating materials to useful depths. In the present method as in the method described above, one exploits the temperature dependence of luminescence decay time. In this case, the phosphor is incorporated into the thermal-barrier coat at the depth at which temperature is to be measured. To be suitable for use in this method, a phosphor must (1) exhibit a temperature dependence of luminescence decay time in the desired range, (2) be thermochemically compatible with the thermal-barrier coating, and (3) exhibit at least a minor excitation spectral peak and an emission spectral peak, both peaks being at wavelengths at which the thermal-barrier coating is

  3. Reduction and Analysis of Phosphor Thermography Data With the IHEAT Software Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merski, N. Ronald

    1998-01-01

    Detailed aeroheating information is critical to the successful design of a thermal protection system (TPS) for an aerospace vehicle. This report describes NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC) two-color relative-intensity phosphor thermography method and the IHEAT software package which is used for the efficient data reduction and analysis of the phosphor image data. Development of theory is provided for a new weighted two-color relative-intensity fluorescence theory for quantitatively determining surface temperatures on hypersonic wind tunnel models; an improved application of the one-dimensional conduction theory for use in determining global heating mappings; and extrapolation of wind tunnel data to flight surface temperatures. The phosphor methodology at LaRC is presented including descriptions of phosphor model fabrication, test facilities and phosphor video acquisition systems. A discussion of the calibration procedures, data reduction and data analysis is given. Estimates of the total uncertainties (with a 95% confidence level) associated with the phosphor technique are shown to be approximately 8 to 10 percent in the Langley's 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and 7 to 10 percent in the 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. A comparison with thin-film measurements using two-inch radius hemispheres shows the phosphor data to be within 7 percent of thin-film measurements and to agree even better with predictions via a LATCH computational fluid dynamics solution (CFD). Good agreement between phosphor data and LAURA CFD computations on the forebody of a vertical takeoff/vertical lander configuration at four angles of attack is also shown. In addition, a comparison is given between Mach 6 phosphor data and laminar and turbulent solutions generated using the LAURA, GASP and LATCH CFD codes. Finally, the extrapolation method developed in this report is applied to the X-34 configuration with good agreement between the phosphor extrapolation and LAURA flight surface temperature predictions

  4. Evaluation of the diagnostic power of thermography in breast cancer using Bayesian network classifiers.

    PubMed

    Nicandro, Cruz-Ramírez; Efrén, Mezura-Montes; María Yaneli, Ameca-Alducin; Enrique, Martín-Del-Campo-Mena; Héctor Gabriel, Acosta-Mesa; Nancy, Pérez-Castro; Alejandro, Guerra-Hernández; Guillermo de Jesús, Hoyos-Rivera; Rocío Erandi, Barrientos-Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. There are a number of techniques used for diagnosing this disease: mammography, ultrasound, and biopsy, among others. Each of these has well-known advantages and disadvantages. A relatively new method, based on the temperature a tumor may produce, has recently been explored: thermography. In this paper, we will evaluate the diagnostic power of thermography in breast cancer using Bayesian network classifiers. We will show how the information provided by the thermal image can be used in order to characterize patients suspected of having cancer. Our main contribution is the proposal of a score, based on the aforementioned information, that could help distinguish sick patients from healthy ones. Our main results suggest the potential of this technique in such a goal but also show its main limitations that have to be overcome to consider it as an effective diagnosis complementary tool. PMID:23762182

  5. Evaluation of the Diagnostic Power of Thermography in Breast Cancer Using Bayesian Network Classifiers

    PubMed Central

    Nicandro, Cruz-Ramírez; Efrén, Mezura-Montes; María Yaneli, Ameca-Alducin; Enrique, Martín-Del-Campo-Mena; Héctor Gabriel, Acosta-Mesa; Nancy, Pérez-Castro; Alejandro, Guerra-Hernández; Guillermo de Jesús, Hoyos-Rivera; Rocío Erandi, Barrientos-Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. There are a number of techniques used for diagnosing this disease: mammography, ultrasound, and biopsy, among others. Each of these has well-known advantages and disadvantages. A relatively new method, based on the temperature a tumor may produce, has recently been explored: thermography. In this paper, we will evaluate the diagnostic power of thermography in breast cancer using Bayesian network classifiers. We will show how the information provided by the thermal image can be used in order to characterize patients suspected of having cancer. Our main contribution is the proposal of a score, based on the aforementioned information, that could help distinguish sick patients from healthy ones. Our main results suggest the potential of this technique in such a goal but also show its main limitations that have to be overcome to consider it as an effective diagnosis complementary tool. PMID:23762182

  6. Is it possible to revive the flagging interest in thermography for neurology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stulin, Igor D.

    1993-11-01

    The paper describes the results of twenty-years of experience in applying thermography (thermal imaging) in routine and urgent neurology, based on the study of more than ten thousand patients. Stress is laid on the fact that thermography is of great significance for diagnosing dextrocerebral hemorrhagic insult with a manifestation of pronounced hemihypothermia in the paralyzed limbs, identifying paraorbital hyperthermia on the side of rhinogenous cerebral abscess, for instrumental registration of transitory heat-up of the nasolabial region in the case of patients suffering from hypertensive nasal bleeding. Much attention is given to diagnosis of intra- and extracerebral phlebopathy in urgent neurology -- early diagnosis of iatrogenic catheterization phlebitis, interference with the venous return in the paralyzed lower limb. The novelty here is the employment of telethermography for complex diagnosis of cerebral death.

  7. Visualizing and measuring the temperature field produced by medical diagnostic ultrasound using thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachutka, J.; Grec, P.; Mornstein, V.; Caruana, C. J.

    2008-11-01

    The heating of tissues by diagnostic ultrasound can pose a significant hazard particularly in the imaging of the unborn child. The demonstration of the temperature field in tissue is therefore an important objective in the teaching of biomedical physics to healthcare professionals. The temperature field in a soft tissue model was made visible and measured using thermography. Temperature data from the images were used to investigate the dependence of temperature increase within the model on ultrasound exposure time and distance from the transducer. The experiment will be used within a multi-professional biomedical physics teaching laboratory for enhancing learning regarding the principles of thermography and the thermal effects of ultrasound to medical and healthcare students and also for demonstrating the quantitative use of thermographic imaging to students of biophysics, medical physics and medical technology.

  8. Modeling of the ITER-like wide-angle infrared thermography view of JET.

    PubMed

    Aumeunier, M-H; Firdaouss, M; Travère, J-M; Loarer, T; Gauthier, E; Martin, V; Chabaud, D; Humbert, E

    2012-10-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography systems are mandatory to ensure safe plasma operation in fusion devices. However, IR measurements are made much more complicated in metallic environment because of the spurious contributions of the reflected fluxes. This paper presents a full predictive photonic simulation able to assess accurately the surface temperature measurement with classical IR thermography from a given plasma scenario and by taking into account the optical properties of PFCs materials. This simulation has been carried out the ITER-like wide angle infrared camera view of JET in comparing with experimental data. The consequences and the effects of the low emissivity and the bidirectional reflectivity distribution function used in the model for the metallic PFCs on the contribution of the reflected flux in the analysis are discussed. PMID:23130792

  9. Modeling of the ITER-like wide-angle infrared thermography view of JET

    SciTech Connect

    Aumeunier, M.-H.; Firdaouss, M.; Travere, J.-M.; Loarer, T.; Gauthier, E.; Martin, V.; Chabaud, D.; Humbert, E.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-15

    Infrared (IR) thermography systems are mandatory to ensure safe plasma operation in fusion devices. However, IR measurements are made much more complicated in metallic environment because of the spurious contributions of the reflected fluxes. This paper presents a full predictive photonic simulation able to assess accurately the surface temperature measurement with classical IR thermography from a given plasma scenario and by taking into account the optical properties of PFCs materials. This simulation has been carried out the ITER-like wide angle infrared camera view of JET in comparing with experimental data. The consequences and the effects of the low emissivity and the bidirectional reflectivity distribution function used in the model for the metallic PFCs on the contribution of the reflected flux in the analysis are discussed.

  10. Modeling of the ITER-like wide-angle infrared thermography view of JETa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumeunier, M.-H.; Firdaouss, M.; Travère, J.-M.; Loarer, T.; Gauthier, E.; Martin, V.; Chabaud, D.; Humbert, E.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography systems are mandatory to ensure safe plasma operation in fusion devices. However, IR measurements are made much more complicated in metallic environment because of the spurious contributions of the reflected fluxes. This paper presents a full predictive photonic simulation able to assess accurately the surface temperature measurement with classical IR thermography from a given plasma scenario and by taking into account the optical properties of PFCs materials. This simulation has been carried out the ITER-like wide angle infrared camera view of JET in comparing with experimental data. The consequences and the effects of the low emissivity and the bidirectional reflectivity distribution function used in the model for the metallic PFCs on the contribution of the reflected flux in the analysis are discussed.

  11. Field test of infrared thermography applied to biogas controlling in landfill sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madruga, Francisco J.; Muñoz, Jaime M.; González, Daniel A.; Tejero, Juan I.; Cobo, Adolfo; Gil, José L.; Conde, Olga M.; López-Higuera, Jose M.

    2007-04-01

    The gases accumulated inside the landfill as result of the fermentation of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) known as biogas, are taking into consideration all possible uses as direct transformation into electricity. The system for collecting, regulating and controlling the biogas must include all the necessary safety features where the biogas leakage presents a high impact. Infrared thermography can be use to detect gas leakages due to the differences in temperature between the gas and the immediate surroundings. This method is able to monitor a wide area of landfill sites, quickly. This technology will not be effective if the differences in temperature are not better than five degrees. This paper describes a field test conducted to study the limitations of the infrared thermography caused by weather conditions and the moment of day or/and season when the thermal images was captured. Pipelines, borders, cells, covers, slopes and leakage (hot spots) are studied and optimum conditions are defined.

  12. Electromagnetic Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation: Physics-based Modeling and Pattern Mining

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Tian, Gui Yun

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic mechanism of Joule heating and thermal conduction on conductive material characterization broadens their scope for implementation in real thermography based Nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) systems by imparting sensitivity, conformability and allowing fast and imaging detection, which is necessary for efficiency. The issue of automatic material evaluation has not been fully addressed by researchers and it marks a crucial first step to analyzing the structural health of the material, which in turn sheds light on understanding the production of the defects mechanisms. In this study, we bridge the gap between the physics world and mathematical modeling world. We generate physics-mathematical modeling and mining route in the spatial-, time-, frequency-, and sparse-pattern domains. This is a significant step towards realizing the deeper insight in electromagnetic thermography (EMT) and automatic defect identification. This renders the EMT a promising candidate for the highly efficient and yet flexible NDT&E. PMID:27158061

  13. Assessment of techniques of massage and pumping in the treatment of breast engorgement by thermography

    PubMed Central

    Heberle, Anita Batista dos Santos; de Moura, Marcos Antônio Muniz; de Souza, Mauren Abreu; Nohama, Percy

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate techniques of massage and pumping in the treatment of postpartum breast engorgement through thermography. Method the study was conducted in the Human Milk Bank of a hospital in Curitiba, Brazil. We randomly selected 16 lactating women with engorgement with the classification lobar, ampullary and glandular, moderate and intense. We compared the differential patterns of temperature, before and after the treatment by means of massage and pumping. Results we found a negative gradient of 0.3°C of temperature between the pre- and post-treatment in the experimental group. Breasts with intense engorgement were 0.7°C warmer when compared with moderate engorgement. Conclusion massage and electromechanical pumping were superior to manual methods when evaluated by thermography. REBEC: U1111-1136-9027. PMID:26107836

  14. Inspection of Impact Damage in Honeycomb Composite by Espi, Thermography and Ultrasonic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Manyong; Park, Jeonghak; Kim, Wontae; Kang, Kisoo

    Honeycomb composites are now fairly widely used in civilian and military aircraft structures. Common defects found in these materials are delaminations by impact damage and their presence will lead to structural weaknesses which could lead failure of the airframe structures. It is important to develop effective non-destructive testing procedures to identify these defects and increase the safety of aircraft travel. This paper describes the detection technique of impact damage defect using thermography and ESPI. The results obtained with the two techniques are compared with ultrasonic C-scan testing. The investigation shows that both imaging NDT methods are able to identify the presence of artificial defect and impact damage. The adoption of the thermography allowed significant advantages in inspection condition, and gives smaller error in quantitative estimation of defects.

  15. Quantitative analysis of pulse thermography data for degradation assessment of historical buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, Rosa; Piegari, Ester; Mancini, Cecilia; Chiapparino, Antonella

    2015-06-01

    In the last decades, infrared thermography has been successfully applied to various materials and structures for the assessment of their state of conservation and planning suitable restoration works. To this aim, mathematical models are required to characterize thermal anomaly sources, such as detachments, water infiltration and material decomposition processes. In this paper, an algorithm based on the conservative finite difference method is used to analyse pulse thermography data acquired on an ancient building in the Pompeii archaeological site (Naples, Italy). The numerical study is applied to both broad and narrow elongated thermal anomalies. In particular, from the comparison between simulated and experimental thermal decays, the plaster thickness was characterized in terms of thermal properties and areas of possible future detachments, and moisture infiltration depths were identified.

  16. Electromagnetic Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation: Physics-based Modeling and Pattern Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Tian, Gui Yun

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic mechanism of Joule heating and thermal conduction on conductive material characterization broadens their scope for implementation in real thermography based Nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) systems by imparting sensitivity, conformability and allowing fast and imaging detection, which is necessary for efficiency. The issue of automatic material evaluation has not been fully addressed by researchers and it marks a crucial first step to analyzing the structural health of the material, which in turn sheds light on understanding the production of the defects mechanisms. In this study, we bridge the gap between the physics world and mathematical modeling world. We generate physics-mathematical modeling and mining route in the spatial-, time-, frequency-, and sparse-pattern domains. This is a significant step towards realizing the deeper insight in electromagnetic thermography (EMT) and automatic defect identification. This renders the EMT a promising candidate for the highly efficient and yet flexible NDT&E.

  17. Infrared thermography and ultrasonics to evaluate composite materials for aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardi, S.; Boffa, N. D.; Carlomagno, G. M.; Maio, L.; Meola, C.; Ricci, F.

    2015-11-01

    The attention of this paper is focused on the suitability of two techniques: infrared thermography and ultrasonics to evaluate impact damaged carbon/epoxy specimens. The obtained results are compared by highlighting advantages and disadvantages of each technique, as well their limits in view of an integrated use. In this context, a crucial task may be to assess the extension of delamination caused by an impact event, which may ask one to guess between sound and damaged materials at the edge of the instrument background noise. To help fixing this problem, results obtained with either lock-in thermography, or an ultrasonic phased array system, are analysed with the aid of thermographic data collected during impact tests.

  18. Electromagnetic Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation: Physics-based Modeling and Pattern Mining.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Tian, Gui Yun

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic mechanism of Joule heating and thermal conduction on conductive material characterization broadens their scope for implementation in real thermography based Nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) systems by imparting sensitivity, conformability and allowing fast and imaging detection, which is necessary for efficiency. The issue of automatic material evaluation has not been fully addressed by researchers and it marks a crucial first step to analyzing the structural health of the material, which in turn sheds light on understanding the production of the defects mechanisms. In this study, we bridge the gap between the physics world and mathematical modeling world. We generate physics-mathematical modeling and mining route in the spatial-, time-, frequency-, and sparse-pattern domains. This is a significant step towards realizing the deeper insight in electromagnetic thermography (EMT) and automatic defect identification. This renders the EMT a promising candidate for the highly efficient and yet flexible NDT&E. PMID:27158061

  19. Cooling analysis of welded materials for crack detection using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Martin, M.; Lagüela, S.; González-Aguilera, D.; Arias, P.

    2014-11-01

    Infrared thermography offers a wide range of possibilities for the detection of flaws in welding, being the main difference among them the thermal excitation of the material. This paper analyzes the application of an inexpensive and versatile thermographic test to the detection of subsurface cracks in welding. The procedure begins with the thermal excitation of the material, following with the monitoring of the cooling process with IRT (InfraRed Thermography). The result is a sequence of frames that enables the extraction of thermal data, useful for the study of the cooling tendencies in the defect and the non-defect zone. Then, each image is subjected to a contour lines algorithm towards the definition of the morphology of the detected defects. This combination of data acquisition and processing allows the differentiation between two types of cracks: toe crack and subsuperficial crack, as defined in the quality standards.

  20. Quantitative detection of defects based on Markov-PCA-BP algorithm using pulsed infrared thermography technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qingju; Dai, Jingmin; Liu, Junyan; Liu, Chunsheng; Liu, Yuanlin; Ren, Chunping

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative detection of debonding defects' diameter and depth in TBCs has been carried out using pulsed infrared thermography technology. By combining principal component analysis with neural network theory, the Markov-PCA-BP algorithm was proposed. The principle and realization process of the proposed algorithm was described. In the prediction model, the principal components which can reflect most characteristics of the thermal wave signal were set as the input, and the defect depth and diameter was set as the output. The experimental data from pulsed infrared thermography tests of TBCs with flat bottom hole defects was selected as the training and testing sample. Markov-PCA-BP predictive system was arrived, based on which both the defect depth and diameter were identified accurately, which proved the effectiveness of the proposed method for quantitative detection of debonding defects in TBCs.

  1. Ultraviolet excitation for thermography inspection of surface cracks in welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnemalm, Anna; Broberg, Patrik; Henrikson, Per

    2014-10-01

    Infrared thermography is a non-contact and full field inspection method which has proven to be suitable for automatic surface crack detection. For automatic analysis of the inspection results, a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is required. In this paper an alternative excitation method, using ultraviolet (UV) illumination, is presented and evaluated. Artificial surface defects, so-called notches, in a titanium plate are detected both in the weld seam and in the heat affected zone. Notches with a size from 80 μm in width and 250 μm in length are detected. The SNR using UV illumination is compared with that using flash lamp excitation. The results show that UV illumination using a mercury lamp is a good alternative as excitation source for thermography when detecting surface cracks. To validate the excitation method, results from real surface cracks are included.

  2. Low-Altitude and Land-Based Infrared Thermography to Identify Types of Groundwater Discharge in NWT Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, B.; Mochnacz, N. J.

    2009-05-01

    In tributaries of the Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, groundwater discharge provides critical fish habitat for Dolly Varden and bull trout populations by maintaining base flows, creating thermal refugia in winter, and providing stable riverbed temperatures for spawning. Where temperature contrasts exist between surface water and groundwater, infrared thermography can use heat as a tracer to locate groundwater discharge areas. Thermal images acquired from satellites and high altitude airplanes tend to be expensive, lack the resolution necessary to identify small discharge locations, and do not allow real time decisions to investigate and ground truth identified temperature anomalies. Therefore, a system was developed using a handheld FLIR ThermaCam P25 infrared camera, visual video camera, infrared video capture system, and GPS in a low flying helicopter and on the ground. The advantage of the system was its ability to inexpensively and efficiently characterize several kilometer long reaches of river and identify springs and seeps on a sub-meter scale and in real time. The different types of groundwater discharge that can occur in these streams include: deep geothermally heated groundwater; shallow groundwater; and active zone water, but differentiating them can be difficult because observed thermal anomalies can be non-unique functions of the initial groundwater temperature, magnitude of discharge, air and surface water temperatures, and temporal variations. Work performed in March and September easily detected spring and seeps of deep groundwater (8 to 13 ° C) at Smith Creek, Gibson Creek, Gayna River, and Little Fish Creek. Shallow groundwater discharge was detected (1 to 3 ° C) at White Sand Creek, Canyon Creek, and Fish Creek, but was more difficult to identify. Subtle variations from surrounding temperatures (<1 ° C) at some sites suggested seeps from the hyporheic zone or possibly the active zone. The limitations of infrared

  3. Dynamics of thermographic skin temperature response during squat exercise at two different speeds.

    PubMed

    Formenti, Damiano; Ludwig, Nicola; Trecroci, Athos; Gargano, Marco; Michielon, Giovanni; Caumo, Andrea; Alberti, Giampietro

    2016-07-01

    Low intensity resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation has been shown to create blood flow restriction within muscles that may affect thermoregulation through the skin. We aimed to investigate the influence of two speeds of exercise execution on skin temperature dynamics using infrared thermography. Thirteen active males performed randomly two sessions of squat exercise (normal speed, 1s eccentric/1s concentric phase, 1s; slow speed, 5s eccentric/5s concentric phase, 5s), using ~50% of 1 maximal repetition. Thermal images of ST above muscles quadriceps were recorded at a rate of 0.05Hz before the exercise (to determine basal ST) and for 480s following the initiation of the exercise (to determine the nonsteady-state time course of ST). Results showed that ST changed more slowly during the 5s exercise (p=0.002), whereas the delta (with respect to basal) excursions were similar for the two exercises (p>0.05). In summary, our data provided a detailed nonsteady-state portrait of ST changes following squat exercises executed at two different speeds. These results lay the basis for further investigations entailing the joint use of infrared thermography and Doppler flowmetry to study the events taking place both at the skin and the muscle level during exercises executed at slow speed. PMID:27264889

  4. Near-infrared thermography using a charge-coupled device camera: Application to microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssieux, D.; Thiery, L.; Cretin, B.

    2007-03-01

    Using near-infrared thermography microscopy and a low-cost charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, we have designed a system which is able to deliver quantitative submicronic thermal images. Using a theoretical model based on Planck's law and CCD sensor properties allowed us to determine a minimal theoretical detection temperature and an optimal temperature sensitivity of our system. In order to validate this method, we show a good relationship between a theoretical study and a thermal measurement of a microsample.

  5. Endoscopic Shearography and Thermography Methods for Nondestructive Evaluation of Lined Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Lansing, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this research effort was the development of methods for shearographic and thermographic inspection of coatings, bonds, or laminates inside rocket fuel or oxidizer tanks, fuel lines, and other closed structures. The endoscopic methods allow imaging and inspection inside cavities that are traditionally inaccessible with shearography or thermography cameras. The techniques are demonstrated and suggestions for practical application are made in this report. Drawings of the experimental setups, detailed procedures, and experimental data are included.

  6. Study on flaw detectability of NDT induction thermography technique for laminated CFRP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kien Bui, Huu; Wasselynck, Guillaume; Trichet, Didier; Berthiau, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Using a 3D finite elements simulation tool, a study on the flaw detection capacity of the non destructive testing (NDT) induction thermography (IT) technique for laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) composites is presented. Delamination and fiber rupture flaw occurring at the elementary-ply scale are considered. In order to reduce the impact of measurement noise on the flaw detectability, several signal processing techniques are proposed. Contribution to the topical issue "Numelec 2015 - Elected submissions", edited by Adel Razek

  7. Infrared dermal thermography on diabetic feet soles to predict ulcerations: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Klein, Marvin E.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bus, Sicco A.; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication for patients with diabetes mellitus. If not adequately treated, these ulcers may lead to foot infection, and ultimately to lower extremity amputation, which imposes a major burden to society and great loss in health-related quality of life for patients. Early identification and subsequent preventive treatment have proven useful to limit the incidence of foot ulcers and lower extremity amputation. Thus, the development of new diagnosis tools has become an attractive option. The ultimate objective of our project is to develop an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system for frequent examination on patients' feet, to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration. Inflammation in diabetic feet can be an early and predictive warning sign for ulceration, and temperature has been proven to be a vicarious marker for inflammation. Studies have indicated that infrared dermal thermography of foot soles can be one of the important parameters for assessing the risk of diabetic foot ulceration. This paper covers the feasibility study of using an infrared camera, FLIR SC305, in our setup, to acquire the spatial thermal distribution on the feet soles. With the obtained thermal images, automated detection through image analysis was performed to identify the abnormal increased/decreased temperature and assess the risk for ulceration. The thermography for feet soles of patients with diagnosed diabetic foot complications were acquired before the ordinary foot examinations. Assessment from clinicians and thermography were compared and follow-up measurements were performed to investigate the prediction. A preliminary case study will be presented, indicating that dermal thermography in our proposed setup can be a screening modality to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration.

  8. A combined approach for using thermography for the detection of diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Bob

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents work done to develop an early diagnosis and monitoring method-encompassing thermography for the detection of Diabetes Mellitus. The early detection method involves fusion of images from infrared cameras, ultrasound devices, a 3D camera and a dermatascope. The project is to develop a novel system that could be easily used by physicians to allow for early intervention, and the paper highlights the approach taken by the Skindetector project.

  9. Detection and Characterization of Boundary-Layer Transition in Flight at Supersonic Conditions Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared thermography is a powerful tool for investigating fluid mechanics on flight vehicles. (Can be used to visualize and characterize transition, shock impingement, separation etc.). Updated onboard F-15 based system was used to visualize supersonic boundary layer transition test article. (Tollmien-Schlichting and cross-flow dominant flow fields). Digital Recording improves image quality and analysis capability. (Allows accurate quantitative (temperature) measurements, Greater enhancement through image processing allows analysis of smaller scale phenomena).

  10. Infrared thermography for true temperature measurement of the main board in personal computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Behnia, Masud; Morrison, Graham

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents a way to measure the true temperature of the electronic devices without disturbing their normal operating conditions, which involved with estimating target emissivity, background temperature correctly and choosing infrared transparent material and its transmission estimation. The temperature distributions of the main board in personal computer were measured by the method presented here with infrared thermography in several different running conditions. The measurement errors and their possible remedies are also discussed.

  11. Transmission thermography for inspecting the busbar insulation layer in thermonuclear experimental reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dapeng; Zhang, Guang; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-11-01

    In Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, Superconducting Busbar is used for current transmission between magnet coils and current leads. The work temperature of the Busbar is about 4K because of liquid helium via inside. The large temperature grad from 300K to 4K could lead to the defects and damages occur on the insulation layer, which is made of glass fiber and polyimide and has a big different thermal expansion coefficient compared with the metal inner cylinder. This paper aims at developing an infrared transmission non-destructive evaluation (NDE) method for inspecting the insulation layer of Superconducting Busbar; theoretical model of transient heat conduction under a continuous inner heat source for cylindrical structure is described in the paper; a Busbar specimen which is designed with three delamination defects of different depths is heated inside by pouring hot water and monitored by an infrared detector located outside. Results demonstrate excellent detection performance for delamination defects in the insulation layer by using transmission thermography, all of the three defects of different depths can be visualized clearly in the thermal images, and the deeper defect has a better signal contrast, which is also shown in the temperature difference between defects and sound area vs. time curves. The results of light pulse thermography is also shown as a comparison, and it is found that the thermal images obtained by the transmission thermography has a much better signal contrast than that of the pulse thermography. In order to verify the experiments, finite element method is applied to simulate the heat conduction in the Busbar under the continuous inside heating, and it is found that the simulated temperature vs. time and simulated temperature difference vs. time curves are basically coincident with the experimental results. In addition, the possibility of in-service inspection for Busbar insulation layer in ITER item is discussed.

  12. Artificial disbonds for calibration of transient thermography inspection of thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptaszek, Grzegorz; Cawley, Peter; Almond, Darryl; Pickering, Simon

    2012-05-01

    Transient thermography is commonly used for the detection of disbonds in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). As for other NDT techniques, reference test specimens are required for calibration, but unfortunately, real disbonds are very difficult to use because it is difficult to control their size, and larger ones tend to spall. Flat bottomed holes are commonly used, but these over-estimate the thermal contrast obtained for a defect of a given diameter. This paper quantifies the difference, and proposes an artificial disbond.

  13. Coupling IR Thermography and BIA to analyse body reaction after one acupuncture session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquemal, M.

    2013-04-01

    Coupling both thermography and bio-Impedance, some biophysical acupuncture mechanisms are statically studied on a small population of 18 subjects. Results show that a possible way of understanding acupuncture, in an electrical way, should be to consider ionic flux redistribution between vascular and extra cell compartments. This is a two steps mechanism. The first one is starting with needles insertion and the second one is lasting with more intensity after removing them from skin.

  14. Usefulness of high-resolution thermography in fault diagnosis of fluid power components and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietola, Matti; Varrio, Jukka P.

    1996-03-01

    Infrared thermography has been used routinely in industrial applications for quite a long time. For example, the condition of electric power lines, district heating networks, electric circuits and components, heat exchangers, pipes and its insulations, cooling towers, and various machines and motors is monitored using infrared imaging techniques. Also the usage of this technology in predictive maintenance has proved successful, mainly because of effective computers and tailored softwares available. However, the usage of thermal sensing technique in fluid power systems and components (or other automation systems in fact) is not as common. One apparent reason is that a fluid power circuit is not (and nor is a hydraulic component) an easy object of making thermal image analyses. Especially the high flow speed, fast pressure changes and fast movements make the diagnosis complex and difficult. Also the number of people whose knowledge is good both in thermography and fluid power systems is not significant. In this paper a preliminary study of how thermography could be used in the condition monitoring, fault diagnosis and predictive maintenance of fluid power components and systems is presented. The shortages and limitations of thermal imaging in the condition monitoring of fluid power are also discussed. Among many other cases the following is discussed: (1) pressure valves (leakage, wrong settings), (2) check valves (leakage); (3) cylinders (leakage and other damages); (4) directional valves and valve assemblies; (5) pumps and motors (leakage in piston or control plate, bearings). The biggest advantage of using thermography in the predictive maintenance and fault diagnosis of fluid power components and systems could be achieved in the process industry and perhaps in the commissioning of fluid power systems in the industry. In the industry the predictive maintenance of fluid power with the aid of an infrared camera could be done as part of a condition monitoring of

  15. Advances in the Use of Thermography to Inspect Composite Tanks for Liquid Fuel Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Matthew D.; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Jones, Clyde S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of advances in the use of thermography to inspect composite tanks for liquid fuel propulsion systems. Details are given on the thermographic inspection system, thermographic analysis method (includes scan and defect map, method of inspection, and inclusions, ply wrinkle, and delamination defects), graphite composite cryogenic feedline (including method, image map, and deep/shallow inclusions and resin rich area defects), and material degradation nondestructive evaluation.

  16. Neonatal infrared thermography imaging: Analysis of heat flux during different clinical scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Abbas K.; Heimann, Konrad; Blazek, Vladimir; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2012-11-01

    IntroductionAn accurate skin temperature measurement of Neonatal Infrared Thermography (NIRT) imaging requires an appropriate calibration process for compensation of external effects (e.g. variation of environmental temperature, variable air velocity or humidity). Although modern infrared cameras can perform such calibration, an additional compensation is required for highly accurate thermography. This compensation which corrects any temperature drift should occur during the NIRT imaging process. We introduce a compensation technique which is based on modeling the physical interactions within the measurement scene and derived the detected temperature signal of the object. Materials and methodsIn this work such compensation was performed for different NIRT imaging application in neonatology (e.g. convective incubators, kangaroo mother care (KMC), and an open radiant warmer). The spatially distributed temperatures of 12 preterm infants (average gestation age 31 weeks) were measured under these different infant care arrangements (i.e. closed care system like a convective incubator, and open care system like kangaroo mother care, and open radiant warmer). ResultsAs errors in measurement of temperature were anticipated, a novel compensation method derived from infrared thermography of the neonate's skin was developed. Moreover, the differences in temperature recording for the 12 preterm infants varied from subject to subject. This variation could be arising from individual experimental setting applied to the same region of interest over the neonate's body. The experimental results for the model-based corrections is verified over the selected patient group. ConclusionThe proposed technique relies on applying model-based correction to the measured temperature and reducing extraneous errors during NIRT. This application specific method is based on different heat flux compartments present in neonatal thermography scene. Furthermore, these results are considered to be

  17. Controlled activation of protein rotational dynamics using smart hydrogel tethering.

    PubMed

    Beech, Brenda M; Xiong, Yijia; Boschek, Curt B; Baird, Cheryl L; Bigelow, Diana J; McAteer, Kathleen; Squier, Thomas C

    2014-09-24

    Stimulus-responsive hydrogel materials that stabilize and control protein dynamics have the potential to enable a range of applications that take advantage of the inherent specificity and catalytic efficiencies of proteins. Here we describe the modular construction of a hydrogel using an engineered calmodulin (CaM) within a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) matrix that involves the reversible tethering of proteins through an engineered CaM-binding sequence. For these measurements, maltose binding protein (MBP) was isotopically labeled with (13)C and (15)N, permitting dynamic structural measurements using TROSY-HSQC NMR spectroscopy. The protein dynamics is suppressed upon initial formation of hydrogels, with a concomitant increase in protein stability. Relaxation of the hydrogel matrix following transient heating results in enhanced protein dynamics and resolution of substrate-induced large-amplitude domain rearrangements. PMID:25190510

  18. Scanning induction thermography (SIT) for imaging damages in carbon-fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. Renil; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-03-01

    Scanning Induction Thermography (SIT) combines both Eddy Current Technique (ECT) and Thermographic Non-Destructive Techniques (TNDT) [1],[2]. This NDT technique has been earlier demonstrated for metallic components for the detection of cracks, corrosion, etc.[3]-[9] Even though Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) has a relatively less electrical conductivity compared to metals, it was observed that sufficient heat could be generated using induction heating that can be used for nondestructive evaluation using the Induction Thermography technique. Also, measurable temperatures could be achieved using relatively less currents, when compared to metals. In Scanning Induction Thermography (SIT) technique, the induction coil moves over the sample at optimal speeds and the temperature developed in the sample due to Joule heating effects is captured as a function of time and distance using an IR camera in the form of video images. A new algorithm is also presented for the analysis of the video images for improved analysis of the data obtained. Several CFRP components were evaluated for detection of impact damage and delaminations using the SIT technique.

  19. Automated transient thermography for the inspection of CFRP structures: experimental results and developed procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakeas, P.; Avdelidis, N. P.; Hrissagis, K.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Koui, M.; Maldague, X.

    2011-05-01

    In thermography surveys, the inspector uses the camera to acquire images from the examined part. Common problems are the lack of repeatability when trying to repeat the scanning process, the need to carry the equipment during scanning, and long setting-up time. The aim of this paper is to present transient thermography results on CFRP plates for assessing different types of fabricated defects (impact damage, inclusions for delaminations, etc), as well as and to discuss and present a prototype robotic scanner to apply non destructive testing (thermographic scanning) on materials and structures. Currently, the scanning process is not automatic. The equipment to be developed, will be able to perform thermal NDT scanning on structures, create the appropriate scanning conditions (material thermal excitation), and ensure precision and tracking of scanning process. A thermographic camera that will be used for the image acquisition of the non destructive inspection, will be installed on a x, y, z, linear manipulator's end effector and would be surrounded by excitation sources (optical lamps), required for the application of transient thermography. In this work various CFRP samples of different shape, thickness and geometry were investigated using two different thermographic systems in order to compare and evaluate their effectiveness concerning the internal defect detectability under different testing conditions.

  20. A novel and simple method for identifying the lung intersegmental plane using thermography.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kei; Kanzaki, Masato; Mitsuboshi, Shota; Maeda, Hideyuki; Kikkawa, Takuma; Isaka, Tamami; Murasugi, Masahide; Onuki, Takamasa

    2016-07-01

    Identifying the intersegmental plane is very important for successful lung segmentectomy. Although several methods are available, they require specialized skills and pose a potential risk of losing sight of the correct intersegmental planes. Therefore, easier and more reliable methods are required. In this study, we hypothesized that surface temperatures of resecting segments or lobes decrease because of blood flow suppression after the ligation of target arteries and veins, and intersegmental planes can be visualized using a thermography. To test this hypothesis, we performed six lung resections (two lobectomies and four segmentectomies) on three pigs and, using a handheld thermography, we monitored the lung surface temperatures to identify intersegmental planes. We demonstrated that thermal imaging sharply demarcated intersegmental planes soon after the ligation of vessels in all procedures. Compared with other methods, thermography requires no special technical skills, drug injection and lung inflation. Therefore, we believe that the thermographic method described in this study will be a powerful option to identify intersegmental planes during anatomical lung segmentectomy. PMID:27030684

  1. Application of Infrared Thermography as a Diagnostic Tool of Knee Osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, Ahlem; Bouzid, Mohamed Amine; Pron, Hervé; Taiar, Redha; Polidori, Guillaume

    This paper aimed to study the feasibility of application of infrared thermography to detect osteoarthritis of the knee and to compare the distribution of skin temperature between participants with osteoarthritis and those without pathology. All tests were conducted at LACM (Laboratory of Mechanical Stresses Analysis) and the gymnasium of the University of Reims Champagne Ardennes. IR thermography was performed using an IR camera. Ten participants with knee osteoarthritis and 12 reference healthy participants without OA participated in this study. Questionnaires were also used. The participants with osteoarthritis of the knee were selected on clinical examination and a series of radiographs. The level of pain was recorded by using a simple verbal scale (0-4). Infrared thermography reveals relevant disease by highlighting asymmetrical behavior in thermal color maps of both knees. Moreover, a linear evolution of skin temperature in the knee area versus time has been found whatever the participant group is in the first stage following a given effort. Results clearly show that the temperature can be regarded as a key parameter for evaluating pain. Thermal images of the knee were taken with an infrared camera. The study shows that with the advantage of being noninvasive and easily repeatable, IRT appears to be a useful tool to detect quantifiable patterns of surface temperatures and predict the singular thermal behavior of this pathology. It also seems that this non-intrusive technique enables to detect the early clinical manifestations of knee OA.

  2. Infrared Thermography to Evaluate Heat Tolerance in Different Genetic Groups of Lambs

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Concepta; Bianchini, Eliandra; Paim, Tiago do Prado; de Lima, Flavia Gontijo; Braccini Neto, José; Castanheira, Marlos; Esteves, Geisa Isilda Ferreira; Cardoso, Caio Cesar; Dalcin, Vanessa Calderaro

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress is considered a limiting factor for sheep production. We used information from physiological characteristics linked to heat tolerance to determine whether infrared thermography temperatures were able to separate groups of animals and determine the most important variables in this differentiation. Forty-eight four-month-old male lambs from eight genetic groups were used. Physiological (rectal temperature–RT, heart rate–HR, respiratory rate–RR) and blood traits, infrared thermography temperatures, heat tolerance indices, body measurements, weight and carcass traits were measured. Statistical analyses included variance, correlations, factor, discrimination and regression. Observing the correlations between physiological characteristics (RT, RR and HR) with temperatures measured by infrared thermography, regions for further studies should include the mean temperature of flank, nose and rump. Results show that there are strong relationships between thermograph measurements and RR, RT and HR in lambs, which are suggested to be directly correlated with heat tolerance capacity of the different genetic groups evaluated in this study. The assessment of body surface temperature measured by the thermograph could be used as a noninvasive tool to assess heat tolerance of the animals. PMID:26193274

  3. Application of infrared lock-in thermography for the quantitative evaluation of bruises on pears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ghiseok; Kim, Geon-Hee; Park, Jongmin; Kim, Dae-Yong; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2014-03-01

    An infrared lock-in thermography technique was adjusted for the detection of early bruises on pears. This mechanical damage is usually difficult to detect in the early stage after harvested using conventional visual sorting or CCD sensor-based imaging processing methods. We measured the thermal emission signals from pears using a highly sensitive mid-infrared thermal camera. These images were post-processed using a lock-in method that utilized the periodic thermal energy input to the pear. By applying the lock-in method to infrared thermography, the detection sensitivity and signal to noise ratio were enhanced because of the phase-sensitive narrow-band filtering effect. It was also found that the phase information of thermal emission from pears provides good metrics with which to identify quantitative information about both damage size and damage depth for pears. Additionally, a photothermal model was implemented to investigate the behavior of thermal waves on pears under convective conditions. Theoretical results were compared to experimental results. These results suggested that the proposed lock-in thermography technique and resultant phase information can be used to detect mechanical damage to fruit, especially in the early stage of bruising.

  4. X-33 Experimental Aeroheating at Mach 6 Using Phosphor Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Liechty, Derek S.; Hamilton, H. Harris, II; Merski, N. Ronald

    1999-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) technology program is to mature and demonstrate essential, cost effective technologies for next generation launch systems. The X-33 flight vehicle presently being developed by Lockheed Martin is an experimental Single Stage to Orbit (SSTO) demonstrator that seeks to validate critical technologies and insure applicability to a full scale RLV. As with the design of any hypersonic vehicle, the aeroheating environment is an important issue and one of the key technologies being demonstrated on X-33 is an advanced metallic Thermal Protection System (TPS). As part of the development of this TPS system, the X-33 aeroheating environment is being defined through conceptual analysis, ground based testing, and computational fluid dynamics. This report provides an overview of the hypersonic aeroheating wind tunnel program conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center in support of the ground based testing activities. Global surface heat transfer images, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on 0.013 scale (10-in.) ceramic models of the proposed X-33 configuration in Mach 6 air. The test parametrics include angles of attack from -5 to 40 degs, unit Reynolds numbers from 1x106 to 8x106/ft, and body flap deflections of 0, 10, and 20 deg. Experimental and computational results indicate the presence of shock/shock interactions that produced localized heating on the deflected flaps and boundary layer transition on the canted fins. Comparisons of the experimental data to laminar and turbulent predictions were performed. Laminar windward heating data from the wind tunnel was extrapolated to flight surface temperatures and generally compared to within 50 deg F of flight prediction along the centerline. When coupled with the phosphor technique, this rapid extrapolation method would serve as an invaluable TPS design tool.

  5. Dynamic peripheral visual performance relates to alpha activity in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenya; Migotina, Daria; Wan, Feng; Lou, Chin Ian; Rodrigues, João; Semedo, João; Vai, Mang I; Pereira, Jose Gomes; Melicio, Fernando; Da Rosa, Agostinho C

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the relationship between the alpha activity and the central visual ability, in which the visual ability is usually assessed through static stimuli. Besides static circumstance, however in the real environment there are often dynamic changes and the peripheral visual ability in a dynamic environment (i.e., dynamic peripheral visual ability) is important for all people. So far, no work has reported whether there is a relationship between the dynamic peripheral visual ability and the alpha activity. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate their relationship. Sixty-two soccer players performed a newly designed peripheral vision task in which the visual stimuli were dynamic, while their EEG signals were recorded from Cz, O1, and O2 locations. The relationship between the dynamic peripheral visual performance and the alpha activity was examined by the percentage-bend correlation test. The results indicated no significant correlation between the dynamic peripheral visual performance and the alpha amplitudes in the eyes-open and eyes-closed resting condition. However, it was not the case for the alpha activity during the peripheral vision task: the dynamic peripheral visual performance showed significant positive inter-individual correlations with the amplitudes in the alpha band (8-12 Hz) and the individual alpha band (IAB) during the peripheral vision task. A potential application of this finding is to improve the dynamic peripheral visual performance by up-regulating alpha activity using neuromodulation techniques. PMID:25426058

  6. FPA-based infrared thermography as applied to the study of cutaneous perspiration and stimulated vascular response in humans.

    PubMed

    Vainer, Boris G

    2005-12-01

    This review gives an overview of focal plane array (FPA)-based infrared (IR) thermography as a powerful research method in the field of physiology and medicine. Comparison of the gained results with the data previously obtained by other authors with other research tools is given. Outer thermoregulatory manifestations displayed by the human organism subjected to whole-body heating (sauna bath) and physical loads (exercise bicycling) are quantitatively analysed. Some details of human body emotional sweating (psycho-physiological effect) are reported. Particular attention is paid to studying active sweat glands as individual objects. All experimental data were obtained with the help of a high-sensitivity (0.03 degrees C) fast 128 x 128 InAs IR detector-based thermal imaging system operating in the short-wave spectral region (2.5 to 3 microm) and perfectly suiting medical purposes. It is shown that IR thermography makes it possible to overcome limitations inherent to contact measuring means that were traditionally used before in thermal studies. It is also shown that heterogeneous thermograms displayed by organisms with disturbed inner equilibrium can be quantitatively analysed in terms of statistical parameters of related surface-temperature histograms, such as the mean temperature and the standard deviation of temperature (SDT). The increase and the decrease in SDT turned out to be typical of prolonged physical load and subsequent relaxation, and of external whole-body heating, respectively. Explanation of this result based on a hypothesis advanced within the context of the doctrine of human-organism evolution is given. Skin-temperature distribution function accompanying the relaxed organism in normality was found to closely resemble normal-distribution function. Symmetry break down and variation of the shape of this characteristic may serve as an indicator of homeostasis shift and can be used as a quantitative criterion for the latter. A new phenomenon, stable

  7. Simulating ensembles of nonlinear continuous time dynamical systems via active ultra wideband wireless network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Alexander S.; Yemelyanov, Ruslan Yu.; Gerasimov, Mark Yu.; Itskov, Vadim V.

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with a new multi-element processor platform assigned for modelling the behaviour of interacting dynamical systems, i.e., active wireless network. Experimentally, this ensemble is implemented in an active network, the active nodes of which include direct chaotic transceivers and special actuator boards containing microcontrollers for modelling the dynamical systems and an information display unit (colored LEDs). The modelling technique and experimental results are described and analyzed.

  8. Collective Stop-and-Go Dynamics of Active Bacteria Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenšek, Daniel; Pleiner, Harald; Brand, Helmut R.

    2013-11-01

    We set up a macroscopic model of bacterial growth and transport based on a dynamic preferred direction—the collective velocity of the bacteria. This collective velocity is subject to the isotropic-nematic transition modeling the density-controlled transformation between immotile and motile bacterial states. The choice of the dynamic preferred direction introduces a distinctive coupling of orientational ordering and transport not encountered otherwise. The approach can also be applied to other systems spontaneously switching between individual (disordered) and collective (ordered) behavior and/or collectively responding to density variations, e.g., bird flocks, fish schools, etc. We observe a characteristic and robust stop-and-go behavior. The inclusion of chirality results in a complex pulsating dynamics.

  9. Active Control of Solar Array Dynamics During Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Brant A.; Woo, Nelson; Kraft, Thomas G.; Blandino, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent NASA mission plans require spacecraft to undergo potentially significant maneuvers (or dynamic loading events) with large solar arrays deployed. Therefore there is an increased need to understand and possibly control the nonlinear dynamics in the spacecraft system during such maneuvers. The development of a nonlinear controller is described. The utility of using a nonlinear controller to reduce forces and motion in a solar array wing during a loading event is demonstrated. The result is dramatic reductions in system forces and motion during a 10 second loading event. A motion curve derived from the simulation with the closed loop controller is used to obtain similar benefits with a simpler motion control approach.

  10. Destination state screening of active spaces in spin dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzystyniak, M.; Edwards, Luke J.; Kuprov, Ilya

    2011-06-01

    We propose a novel avenue for state space reduction in time domain Liouville space spin dynamics simulations, using detectability as a selection criterion - only those states that evolve into or affect other detectable states are kept in the simulation. This basis reduction procedure (referred to as destination state screening) is formally exact and can be applied on top of the existing state space restriction techniques. As demonstrated below, in many cases this results in further reduction of matrix dimension, leading to considerable acceleration of many spin dynamics simulation types. Destination state screening is implemented in the latest version of the Spinach library (http://spindynamics.org).

  11. Short-circuit current density imaging of crystalline silicon solar cells via lock-in thermography: Robustness and simplifications

    SciTech Connect

    Fertig, Fabian Greulich, Johannes; Rein, Stefan

    2014-11-14

    Spatially resolved determination of solar cell parameters is beneficial for loss analysis and optimization of conversion efficiency. One key parameter that has been challenging to access by an imaging technique on solar cell level is short-circuit current density. This work discusses the robustness of a recently suggested approach to determine short-circuit current density spatially resolved based on a series of lock-in thermography images and options for a simplified image acquisition procedure. For an accurate result, one or two emissivity-corrected illuminated lock-in thermography images and one dark lock-in thermography image have to be recorded. The dark lock-in thermography image can be omitted if local shunts are negligible. Furthermore, it is shown that omitting the correction of lock-in thermography images for local emissivity variations only leads to minor distortions for standard silicon solar cells. Hence, adequate acquisition of one image only is sufficient to generate a meaningful map of short-circuit current density. Beyond that, this work illustrates the underlying physics of the recently proposed method and demonstrates its robustness concerning varying excitation conditions and locally increased series resistance. Experimentally gained short-circuit current density images are validated for monochromatic illumination in comparison to the reference method of light-beam induced current.

  12. Short-circuit current density imaging of crystalline silicon solar cells via lock-in thermography: Robustness and simplifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertig, Fabian; Greulich, Johannes; Rein, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Spatially resolved determination of solar cell parameters is beneficial for loss analysis and optimization of conversion efficiency. One key parameter that has been challenging to access by an imaging technique on solar cell level is short-circuit current density. This work discusses the robustness of a recently suggested approach to determine short-circuit current density spatially resolved based on a series of lock-in thermography images and options for a simplified image acquisition procedure. For an accurate result, one or two emissivity-corrected illuminated lock-in thermography images and one dark lock-in thermography image have to be recorded. The dark lock-in thermography image can be omitted if local shunts are negligible. Furthermore, it is shown that omitting the correction of lock-in thermography images for local emissivity variations only leads to minor distortions for standard silicon solar cells. Hence, adequate acquisition of one image only is sufficient to generate a meaningful map of short-circuit current density. Beyond that, this work illustrates the underlying physics of the recently proposed method and demonstrates its robustness concerning varying excitation conditions and locally increased series resistance. Experimentally gained short-circuit current density images are validated for monochromatic illumination in comparison to the reference method of light-beam induced current.

  13. Activating Basic Category Exemplars in Sentence Contexts: A Dynamical Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raczaszek-Leonardi, Joanna; Shapiro, Lewis P.; Tuller, Betty; Kelso, J. A. Scott

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of context on the processing of category names embedded in sentences. The investigation focuses on the nature of information available immediately after such a word is heard as well as on the dynamics of adaptation to context. An on-line method (Cross Modal Lexical Priming) was used to trace how this process…

  14. Is the South Pacific helium-3 plume dynamically active?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stommel, Henry

    1982-11-01

    It is suggested that the hydrothermal vents of the South Pacific Rise produce a beta-governed circulation at mid-depth, and that perhaps the associated plume of excess 3He (Lupton and Craig [1]) points westward because of the dynamics of this circulation rather than as a passive tracer.

  15. Repeatable mechanochemical activation of dynamic covalent bonds in thermoplastic elastomers.

    PubMed

    Imato, Keiichi; Kanehara, Takeshi; Nojima, Shiki; Ohishi, Tomoyuki; Higaki, Yuji; Takahara, Atsushi; Otsuka, Hideyuki

    2016-08-18

    Repeated mechanical scission and recombination of dynamic covalent bonds incorporated in segmented polyurethane elastomers are demonstrated by utilizing a diarylbibenzofuranone-based mechanophore and by the design of the segmented polymer structures. The repeated mechanochemical reactions can accompany clear colouration and simultaneous fading. PMID:27424868

  16. Emissivity calibration for temperature measurement using infrared thermography in orthogonal cutting of 316L and 100Cr6 grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiorgue, Frédéric; Brosse, Alexandre; Rech, Joël; Hamdi, Hédi; Bergheau, Jean Michel

    2011-01-01

    Material removal operations such as turning or grinding are prone to generate very high temperatures at the tool/chip and tool/workpiece interfaces. These phenomena are involved in studies concerning tools or workpieces, and their estimation is a key point for predicting damages. Temperature elevation is the main cause in workpieces worsening because it generates residual stresses and metallurgical modifications. It is also linked to the tools wear because of the thermal fatigue phenomena and the thermally activated diffusion process. In this paper, a first attempt to measure the temperature fields during 316L orthogonal cutting and 100Cr6 grinding is presented and can be divided in three parts. In the first part the physics of temperature measurement using infrared thermography are presented. Then, the calibration of the infrared camera is realized and allows to obtain of the emissivity curves of 316L and 100Cr6 steels. To do so, an experimental device has been set up to reproduce the luminance recording conditions encountered during the machining operations. The last step is the computation of all the experimental data to obtain the temperature fields from the recorded luminance and the 316L and 100Cr6 emissivity curve. At last, temperature level measured is compared to those presented in the bibliography.

  17. Activity of nodes reshapes the critical threshold of spreading dynamics in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen; Zhou, Li-xin; Fan, Chong-jun; Huo, Liang-an; Tian, Zhan-wei

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate spreading dynamics on complex networks with active nodes based on SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Removed) model. Different from previous studies, each node of the network rotates between active state and inactive state according to certain probabilities. An active susceptible node can be infected by all its infected neighbors, while an inactive susceptible node can only be infected by its active infected neighbors. By means of ​mean-field approach and numerical simulations, we explore the critical phenomenon by the combined effects of activity rate and infection rate on spreading dynamics. We show that the critical threshold of infection rate is increased by node activity, and node activity also shows a critical phenomenon given certain infection rate. On the whole, there exists a critical curve consists of pairs of critical activity rate and infection rate. We also analyze theoretically the impact of activity rate and infection rate on the final size of spreading dynamics, which is verified by numerical simulations. This work complements our understanding of spreading dynamics with active nodes and may be used to develop more feasible and more economical methods to control spreading dynamics.

  18. Lexical Activation in Bilinguals' Speech Production Is Dynamic: How Language Ambiguous Words Can Affect Cross-Language Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermans, Daan; Ormel, E.; van Besselaar, Ria; van Hell, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Is the bilingual language production system a dynamic system that can operate in different language activation states? Three experiments investigated to what extent cross-language phonological co-activation effects in language production are sensitive to the composition of the stimulus list. L1 Dutch-L2 English bilinguals decided whether or not a…

  19. Linear Superposition and Prediction of Bacterial Promoter Activity Dynamics in Complex Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Daphna; Dekel, Erez; Hausser, Jean; Bren, Anat; Aidelberg, Guy; Szekely, Pablo; Alon, Uri

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria often face complex environments. We asked how gene expression in complex conditions relates to expression in simpler conditions. To address this, we obtained accurate promoter activity dynamical measurements on 94 genes in E. coli in environments made up of all possible combinations of four nutrients and stresses. We find that the dynamics across conditions is well described by two principal component curves specific to each promoter. As a result, the promoter activity dynamics in a combination of conditions is a weighted average of the dynamics in each condition alone. The weights tend to sum up to approximately one. This weighted-average property, called linear superposition, allows predicting the promoter activity dynamics in a combination of conditions based on measurements of pairs of conditions. If these findings apply more generally, they can vastly reduce the number of experiments needed to understand how E. coli responds to the combinatorially huge space of possible environments. PMID:24809350

  20. Dynamics and Instabilities of an overdamped active nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, Elias; Baskaran, Aparna

    Active nematics have been studied extensively in the context of suspensions of active particles, with a Stokes equation describing the flow of the surrounding fluid. Here we will present a continuum model of an overdamped (often termed 'dry') active nematic, where activity enters through self-induced flows. These flows represent the ability of the internal forces to convect, shear, or rotate the nematic order. The self-induced shear gives rise to an instability in the homogeneous ordered state which is analogous to that seen in active suspensions. The self-induced rotation gives rise to a new instability. A phase diagram from this model will be presented, and the phenomenology will be compared with what is seen in experimental and simulated active systems. We would like to acknowledge Grant support through NSF (NSF-DMR-1149266), (DMR-0820492), (NIH-5T32EB009419) and IGERT (DGE-1068620).