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Sample records for active ebv infection

  1. Autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T cells for the treatment of persistent active EBV infection.

    PubMed

    Savoldo, Barbara; Huls, M Helen; Liu, Zhensheng; Okamura, Takayuki; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reinke, Petra; Sabat, Robert; Babel, Nina; Jones, James F; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Gee, Adrian P; Brenner, Malcolm K; Heslop, Helen E; Rooney, Cliona M

    2002-12-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (CAEBV) infection syndrome is a heterogeneous EBV-related disorder characterized by chronic fatigue, fever, lymphadenopathy, and/or hepatosplenomegaly, associated with abnormal patterns of antibody to EBV. CAEBV can range from disabling mild/moderate forms to rapidly lethal disorders. Even patients with mild/moderate disease frequently suffer adverse effects from long-term anti-inflammatory agents and have a quality of life that progressively deteriorates. It is still unknown why these individuals are unable to produce an effective immune response to control EBV, and no effective treatment is currently available. Since ex vivo-expanded EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (EBV-CTLs) can safely restore EBV-specific cellular immune responses in immunodeficient patients, we assessed the possibility that adoptive immunotherapy might also effectively treat CAEBV infection. Following stimulation with irradiated EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), EBV-CTLs were successfully generated from 8 of 8 patients with the mild/moderate form of CAEBV infection. These CTLs were predominantly CD3(+) CD8(+) cells and produced specific killing of the autologous LCLs. There were 5 patients with 1- to 12-year histories of disease who were treated with 1 to 4 injections of EBV-CTLs. Following infusion, there was resolution of fatigue and malaise, disappearance of fever, and regression of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. The pattern and titers of anti-EBV antibodies also normalized. No toxicity was observed. There were 4 patients who did not show any relapse of disease within 6 to 36 months follow-up; one patient had recurrence of fatigue and myalgia one year after CTL infusion. We suggest that adoptive immunotherapy with autologous EBV-CTLs may represent a safe and feasible alternative treatment for patients affected with mild/moderate CAEBV infection and that this approach should be evaluated in the more severe forms of the disease.

  2. Characterization of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BZLF1 gene promoter variants and comparison of cellular gene expression profiles in Japanese patients with infectious mononucleosis, chronic active EBV infection, and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Imajoh, Masayuki; Hashida, Yumiko; Murakami, Masanao; Maeda, Akihiko; Sato, Tetsuya; Fujieda, Mikiya; Wakiguchi, Hiroshi; Daibata, Masanori

    2012-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genotypes can be distinguished based on gene sequence differences in EBV nuclear antigens 2, 3A, 3B, and 3C, and the BZLF1 promoter zone (Zp). EBV subtypes and BZLF1 Zp variants were examined in Japanese patients with infectious mononucleosis, chronic active EBV infection, and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. The results of EBV typing showed that samples of infectious mononucleosis, chronic active EBV infection, and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis all belonged to EBV type 1. However, sequencing analysis of BZLF1 Zp found three polymorphic Zp variants in the same samples. The Zp-P prototype and the Zp-V3 variant were both detected in infectious mononucleosis and chronic active EBV infection. Furthermore, a novel variant previously identified in Chinese children with infectious mononucleosis, Zp-V1, was also found in 3 of 18 samples of infectious mononucleosis, where it coexisted with the Zp-P prototype. This is the first evidence that the EBV variant distribution in Japanese patients resembles that found in other Asian patients. The expression levels of 29 chronic active EBV infection-associated cellular genes were also compared in the three EBV-related disorders, using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Two upregulated genes, RIPK2 and CDH9, were identified as common specific markers for chronic active EBV infection in both in vitro and in vivo studies. RIPK2 activates apoptosis and autophagy, and could be responsible for the pathogenesis of chronic active EBV infection.

  3. Comprehensive assessment of peripheral blood TCRβ repertoire in infectious mononucleosis and chronic active EBV infection patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shenglin; Zhang, Qian; Huang, Dongli; Zhang, Wenli; Zhong, Fengluan; Feng, Jia; Chen, Xueru; Meng, Qingxiang; Chen, Xiaofan; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Hongyu

    2017-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) primary infection is usually asymptomatic, but it sometimes progresses to infectious mononucleosis (IM). Occasionally, some people develop chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) with underlying immunodeficiency, which belongs to a continuous spectrum of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders (EBV(+) LPD) with heterogeneous clinical presentations and high mortality. It has been well established that T cell-mediated immune response plays a critical role in the disease evolution of EBV infection. Recently, high-throughput sequencing of the hypervariable complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) segments of the T cell receptor (T cell receptor β (TCRβ)) has emerged as a sensitive approach to assess the T cell repertoire. In this study, we fully characterized the diversity of peripheral blood TCRβ repertoire in IM (n = 6) and CAEBV patients (n = 5) and EBV-seropositive controls (n = 5). Compared with the healthy EBV-seropositive controls, both IM and CAEBV patients demonstrate a significant decrease in peripheral blood TCRβ repertoire diversity, basically, including narrowed repertoire breadth, highly expanded clones, and skewed CDR3 length distribution. However, there is no significant difference between IM and CAEBV patients. Furthermore, we observed some disease-related preferences in TRBV/TRBJ usage and combinations, as well as lots of T cell clones shared by different groups (unique or overlapped) involved in public T cell responses, which provide more detailed insights into the divergent disease evolution.

  4. Proposed categorization of pathological states of EBV-associated T/natural killer-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) in children and young adults: overlap with chronic active EBV infection and infantile fulminant EBV T-LPD.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Koichi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Yoshino, Tadashi; Kim, Chul Woo; Ko, Young H; Lee, Seung-Suk; Peh, Suat-Cheng; Chan, John K C

    2008-04-01

    EBV-associated T/natural killer (NK)-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV-T/NK LPD) of children and young adults is generally referred to with the blanket nosological term of severe chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV). This disease is rare, associated with high morbidity and mortality, and appears to be more prevalent in East Asian countries. But because there is no grading or categorization system for CAEBV, pathologists and clinicians often disagree regarding diagnosis and therapy. EBV-T/NK LPD includes polyclonal, oligoclonal, and monoclonal proliferation of cytotoxic T and/or NK cells. Moreover, a unique disease previously described as infantile fulminant EBV-associated T-LPD has been identified and overlaps with EBV-T/NK LPD. In the present review a clinicopathological categorization of EBV-T/NK LPD is proposed, based on pathological evaluation and molecular data, as follows: (i) category A1, polymorphic LPD without clonal proliferation of EBV-infected cells; (ii) category A2, polymorphic LPD with clonality; (iii) category A3, monomorphic LPD (T-cell or NK cell lymphoma/leukemia) with clonality; and (iv) category B, monomorphic LPD (T-cell lymphoma) with clonality and fulminant course. Categories A1, A2, and A3 possibly constitute a continuous spectrum and together are equivalent to CAEBV. Category B is the exact equivalent of infantile fulminant EBV-associated T-LPD. It is expected that this categorization system will provide a guide for the better understanding of this disorder. This proposal was approved at the third meeting of the Asian Hematopathology Association (Nagoya, 2006).

  5. Quercetin-induced apoptosis prevents EBV infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minjung; Son, Myoungki; Ryu, Eunhyun; Shin, Yu Su; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kang, Byung Woog; Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung

    2015-05-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gamma-1 herpesvirus that establishes a lifelong latency in over 90% of the world's population. During latency, virus exists predominantly as a chromatin-associated, multicopy episome in the nuclei of a variety of tumor cells derived from B cells, T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and epithelial cells. Licorice is the root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis or G. glabra that has traditionally cultivated in eastern part of Asia. Licorice was reported to have anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, anti-atopic, hepatoprotective, anti-neurodegenerative, anti-tumor, anti-diabetic effects and so forth. Quercetin and isoliquiritigenin are produced from licorice and highly similar in molecular structure. They have diverse bioactive effects such as antiviral activity, anti-asthmatic activity, anti-cancer activity, anti-inflammation activity, monoamine-oxidase inhibitor, and etc. To determine anti-EBV and anti-EBVaGC (Epstein-Barr virus associated gastric carcinoma) effects of licorice, we investigated antitumor and antiviral effects of quercetin and isoliquiritigenin against EBVaGC. Although both quercetin and isoliquiritigenin are cytotoxic to SNU719 cells, quercetin induced more apoptosis in SNU719 cells than isoliquiritigenin, more completely eliminated DNMT1 and DNMT3A expressions than isoliquiritigenin, and more strongly affects the cell cycle progression of SNU719 than isoliquiritigenin. Both quercetin and isoliquiritigenin induce signal transductions to stimulate apoptosis, and induce EBV gene transcription. Quercetin enhances frequency of F promoter use, whereas isoliquiritigenin enhances frequency of Q promoter use. Quercetin reduces EBV latency, whereas isoliquiritigenin increases the latency. Quercetin increases more the EBV progeny production, and inhibits more EBV infection than isoliquiritigenin. These results indicate that quercetin could be a promising candidate for antiviral and antitumor agents against EBV and human gastric carcinoma.

  6. Quercetin-induced apoptosis prevents EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minjung; Son, Myoungki; Ryu, Eunhyun; Shin, Yu Su; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kang, Byung Woog; Sung, Gi-Ho; Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gamma-1 herpesvirus that establishes a lifelong latency in over 90% of the world's population. During latency, virus exists predominantly as a chromatin-associated, multicopy episome in the nuclei of a variety of tumor cells derived from B cells, T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and epithelial cells. Licorice is the root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis or G. glabra that has traditionally cultivated in eastern part of Asia. Licorice was reported to have anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, anti-atopic, hepatoprotective, anti-neurodegenerative, anti-tumor, anti-diabetic effects and so forth. Quercetin and isoliquiritigenin are produced from licorice and highly similar in molecular structure. They have diverse bioactive effects such as antiviral activity, anti-asthmatic activity, anti-cancer activity, anti-inflammation activity, monoamine-oxidase inhibitor, and etc. To determine anti-EBV and anti-EBVaGC (Epstein-Barr virus associated gastric carcinoma) effects of licorice, we investigated antitumor and antiviral effects of quercetin and isoliquiritigenin against EBVaGC. Although both quercetin and isoliquiritigenin are cytotoxic to SNU719 cells, quercetin induced more apoptosis in SNU719 cells than isoliquiritigenin, more completely eliminated DNMT1 and DNMT3A expressions than isoliquiritigenin, and more strongly affects the cell cycle progression of SNU719 than isoliquiritigenin. Both quercetin and isoliquiritigenin induce signal transductions to stimulate apoptosis, and induce EBV gene transcription. Quercetin enhances frequency of F promoter use, whereas isoliquiritigenin enhances frequency of Q promoter use. Quercetin reduces EBV latency, whereas isoliquiritigenin increases the latency. Quercetin increases more the EBV progeny production, and inhibits more EBV infection than isoliquiritigenin. These results indicate that quercetin could be a promising candidate for antiviral and antitumor agents against EBV and human gastric carcinoma

  7. Thymoquinone efficiently inhibits the survival of EBV-infected B cells and alters EBV gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zihlif, Malek A; Mahmoud, Ismail S; Ghanim, Majd T; Zreikat, Manar S; Alrabadi, Nasr; Imraish, Amer; Odeh, Fadwa; Abbas, Manal A; Ismail, Said I

    2013-05-01

    Epstein--Barr virus (EBV) is a human virus with oncogenic potentials that is implicated in various human diseases and malignancies. In this study, the modulator activity of the potent herbal extract drug thymoquinone on EBV was assessed in vitro. Thymoquinone was tested for cytotoxicity on human cells of lymphoblastoid cells, Raji Burkitt's lymphoma, DG-75 Burkitt's lymphoma, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and periodontal ligament fibroblast. Apoptosis induction was analyzed via TUNEL assay and activity studies of caspase-3. The effect of thymoquinone on EBV gene expression was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. We report here, for the first time, a promising selective inhibitory affect of thymoquinone on EBV-infected B cell lines in vitro, compared with lower activity on EBV negative B cell line and very low toxicity on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Moreover, the drug was found to efficiently suppress the RNA expression of EBNA2, LMP1, and EBNA1 genes. Specifically, EBNA2 expression levels were the most affected indicating that this gene might have a major contribution to thymoquinone potency against EBV infected cells. Overall, our results suggest that thymoquinone has the potential to suppress the growth of EBV-infected B cells efficiently.

  8. EBV infection of B-CLL cells in vitro potentiates their allostimulatory capacity if accompanied by acquisition of the activated phenotype.

    PubMed

    Avila-Cariño, J; Lewin, N; Yamamoto, K; Tomita, Y; Mellstedt, H; Brodin, B; Rosén, A; Klein, E

    1994-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-carrying immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) stimulate autologous T lymphocytes in vitro. This T-cell response is independent of the EBV-specific cellular memory because it also occurs in experiments with cells of seronegative individuals. The question can be posed whether the T-cell-stimulatory potential of the LCL is coupled to its immortalized state. B-CLL cells were exploited to study this question because the majority of clones, represented by different patients, can be infected with EBV but they rarely become immortalized. We have investigated the phenotypic changes and the T-cell-stimulatory capacity of EBV-infected B-CLL cells. One aliquot of CLL cells was infected with EBV, another was activated with a mixture of Staphylococcus aureus (SAC), IL-2 and the supernatant from the T-cell hybridoma MP6 (activation mixture, AcMx) and the third aliquot received both treatments. In accordance with the individual features of the clonal populations represented by each patient, the immunophenotypic changes imposed by these treatments differed. With the samples of 3 patients the allo-stimulatory potential showed the following ranking order: EBV and AcMx-treated cells > AcMx-treated > EBV-infected. An analysis of several activation-related surface markers and adhesion molecules on the cells did not reveal any association between their expression and the EBV-imposed potentiation of allostimulatory capacity. These results may be extrapolated to EBV-genome-carrying normal B cells, suggesting that they can persist in vivo only as long as they have the resting phenotype. Once they are activated, these cells may be recognized and eliminated by T lymphocytes.

  9. Targeted disruption of EBNA1 in EBV-infected cells attenuated cell growth.

    PubMed

    Noh, Ka-Won; Park, Jihyun; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-encoded nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) plays a pivotal in an EBV episome replication and persistence. Despite considerable attempts, there are no EBV drugs or vaccines. We attempted to eradicate EBV episomes by targeting EBNA1 using the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) (E1TN). E1TN-mediated transient knockout (KO) of EBNA1 reduced EBNA1 expression, and caused significant loss of EBV genomes and progressive death of EBV-infected cells. Furthermore, when a mixture of EBV-infected Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells and EBV-negative BL cells was targeted by E1TN, EBV-negative cells were counter-selected while most EBV-infected cells died, further substantiating that EBNA1 KO caused selective death of EBV-infected cells. TALEN-mediated transient targeting of EBNA1 attenuated the growth of EBV-infected cells, implicating a possible therapeutic application of E1TN for EBV-associated disorders. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(4): 226-231].

  10. Innate immune modulation in EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) belongs to the gammaherpesvirus family, members of which are oncogenic. Compared with other closely related herpesviruses, EBV has developed much more elaborate and sophisticated strategies for subverting host immune system, which may account for its high prevalence in immune competent hosts. Thus, study of EBV-specific immune dysregulation is important for understanding EBV latency and oncogenesis, and will identify potential molecular targets for immunotherapeutic interventions. Here I summarize the recent findings of individual EBV products in regulating host immune responses, with emphasis on the innate immune modulation. PMID:21429244

  11. EBV Zta protein induces the expression of interleukin-13, promoting the proliferation of EBV-infected B cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Chun; Lin, Sue-Jane; Chen, Po-Wen; Luo, Wen-Yi; Yeh, Te-Huei; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Chen, Chi-Ju

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection can modify the cytokine expression profiles of host cells and determine the fate of those cells. Of note, expression of interleukin-13 (IL-13) may be detected in EBV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma and the natural killer (NK) cells of chronic active EBV-infected patients, but its biologic role and regulatory mechanisms are not understood. Using cytokine antibody arrays, we found that IL-13 production is induced in B cells early during EBV infection. Furthermore, the EBV lytic protein, Zta (also known as the BZLF-1 product), which is a transcriptional activator, was found to induce IL-13 expression following transfection. Mechanistically, induction of IL-13 expression by Zta is mediated directly through its binding to the IL-13 promoter, via a consensus AP-1 binding site. Blockade of IL-13 by antibody neutralization showed that IL-13 is required at an early stage of EBV-induced proliferation and for long-term maintenance of the growth of EBV immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Thus, Zta-induced IL-13 production facilitates B-cell proliferation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders, such as posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) and Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:19417211

  12. EBV induces persistent NF-κB activation and contributes to survival of EBV-positive neoplastic T- or NK-cells

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Haruna; Yoshimori, Mayumi; Wang, Ludan; Saitoh, Yasunori; Uota, Shin; Yamaoka, Shoji; Koyama, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Norio; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi; Miura, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been detected in several T- and NK-cell neoplasms such as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type, aggressive NK-cell leukemia, EBV-positive peripheral T-cell lymphoma, systemic EBV-positive T-cell lymphoma of childhood, and chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV). However, how this virus contributes to lymphomagenesis in T or NK cells remains largely unknown. Here, we examined NF-κB activation in EBV-positive T or NK cell lines, SNT8, SNT15, SNT16, SNK6, and primary EBV-positive and clonally proliferating T/NK cells obtained from the peripheral blood of patients with CAEBV. Western blotting, electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and immunofluorescent staining revealed persistent NF-κB activation in EBV-infected cell lines and primary cells from patients. Furthermore, we investigated the role of EBV in infected T cells. We performed an in vitro infection assay using MOLT4 cells infected with EBV. The infection directly induced NF-κB activation, promoted survival, and inhibited etoposide-induced apoptosis in MOLT4 cells. The luciferase assay suggested that LMP1 mediated NF-κB activation in MOLT4 cells. IMD-0354, a specific inhibitor of NF-κB that suppresses NF-κB activation in cell lines, inhibited cell survival and induced apoptosis. These results indicate that EBV induces NF-κB-mediated survival signals in T and NK cells, and therefore, may contribute to the lymphomagenesis of these cells. PMID:28346502

  13. Activation of ATR-Chk1 pathway facilitates EBV-mediated transformation of primary tonsillar B-cells

    PubMed Central

    Mordasini, Vanessa; Ueda, Seigo; Aslandogmus, Roberta; Berger, Christoph; Gysin, Claudine; Hühn, Daniela; Sartori, Alessandro A

    2017-01-01

    Primary infection of the immunocompromised host with the oncovirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that targets mainly B-cells is associated with an increased risk for EBV-associated tumors. The early events subsequent to primary infection with potential for B-cell transformation are poorly studied. Here, we modeled in vitro the primary infection by using B-cells isolated from tonsils, the portal of entry of EBV, since species specificity of EBV hampers modeling in experimental animals. Increasing evidence indicates that the host DNA damage response (DDR) can influence and be influenced by EBV infection. Thus, we inoculated tonsillar B-cells (TBCs) with EBV-B95.8 and investigated cell proliferation and the DDR during the first 96 hours thereafter. We identified for the first time that EBV infection of TBCs induces a period of hyperproliferation 48-96 hours post infection characterized by the activation of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-releated (ATR) and checkpoint kinase-1 (Chk1). Whereas inhibition of Chk1 did not affect B-cell transformation, the specific inhibition of ATR robustly decreased the transformation efficiency of EBV. Our results suggest that activation of ATR is key for EBV-induced B-cell transformation. Thus, targeting the interaction between ATR/Chk1 and EBV could offer new options for the treatment of EBV-associated malignancies. PMID:28031537

  14. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in epithelial cells in vivo: rare detection of EBV replication in tongue mucosa but not in salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Frangou, Phroso; Buettner, Maike; Niedobitek, Gerald

    2005-01-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is transmitted through saliva, but the cellular source is controversial. Putative reservoirs include oral epithelium and salivary glands. Tongue mucosal samples, salivary glands, and tongue carcinomas were studied, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, for evidence of EBV infection. EBV replication was seen in 1.3% of tongue mucosal samples. No latent infection was found at this site. EBV infection was detected neither in normal salivary glands nor in tongue carcinomas. Thus, EBV replication occurs infrequently in tongue epithelial cells, and salivary glands are unlikely to harbor EBV. EBV is unlikely to be involved in the pathogenesis of tongue cancer.

  15. Simultaneous genital ulcer and meningitis: a case of EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Jairo Tavares; Lopes, Leonardo da Costa; Prokopowitsch, Aleksander Snioka

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a broad spectrum of diseases, mainly because of its genomic characteristics, which result in different latency patterns in immune cells and infective mechanisms. The patient described in this report is a previously healthy young man who presented to the emergency department with clinical features consistent with meningitis and genital ulcers, which raised concern that the herpes simplex virus was the causative agent. However, the polymerase chain reaction of cerebral spinal fluid was positive for EBV. The authors highlight the importance of this infection among the differential diagnosis of central nervous system involvement and genital ulceration. PMID:27547743

  16. EBV infection is common in gingival epithelial cells of the periodontium and worsens during chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Bugnas, Séverine; Vitale, Sébastien; Mouline, Caroline C; Khaali, Wafa; Charbit, Yves; Mahler, Patrick; Prêcheur, Isabelle; Hofman, Paul; Maryanski, Janet L; Doglio, Alain

    2013-01-01

    An amplifying role for oral epithelial cells (ECs) in Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection has been postulated to explain oral viral shedding. However, while lytic or latent EBV infections of oro/nasopharyngeal ECs are commonly detected under pathological conditions, detection of EBV-infected ECs in healthy conditions is very rare. In this study, a simple non-surgical tissue sampling procedure was used to investigate EBV infection in the periodontal epithelium that surrounds and attaches teeth to the gingiva. Surprisingly, we observed that the gingival ECs of the periodontium (pECs) are commonly infected with EBV and may serve as an important oral reservoir of latently EBV-infected cells. We also found that the basal level of epithelial EBV-infection is significantly increased in chronic periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease that undermines the integrity of tooth-supporting tissues. Moreover, the level of EBV infection was found to correlate with disease severity. In inflamed tissues, EBV-infected pECs appear to be prone to apoptosis and to produce larger amounts of CCL20, a pivotal inflammatory chemokine that controls tissue infiltration by immune cells. Our discovery that the periodontal epithelium is a major site of latent EBV infection sheds a new light on EBV persistence in healthy carriers and on the role of this ubiquitous virus in periodontitis. Moreover, the identification of this easily accessible site of latent infection may encourage new approaches to investigate and monitor other EBV-associated disorders.

  17. CUX1/Wnt signaling regulates Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition in EBV infected epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Malizia, Andrea P.; Lacey, Noreen; Walls, Dermot; Egan, Jim J.; Doran, Peter P.

    2009-07-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a refractory and lethal interstitial lung disease characterized by alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis, fibroblast proliferation and extra-cellular matrix protein deposition. EBV, localised to alveolar epithelial cells of pulmonary fibrosis patients is associated with a poor prognosis. A strategy based on microarray-differential gene expression analysis to identify molecular drivers of EBV-associated lung fibrosis was utilized. Alveolar epithelial cells were infected with EBV to identify genes whose expression was altered following TGF{beta}1-mediated lytic phase. EBV lytic reactivation by TGF{beta}1 drives a selective alteration in CUX1 variant (a) (NCBI accession number NM{sub 1}81552) expression, inducing activation of non-canonical Wnt pathway mediators, implicating it in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), the molecular event underpinning scar production in tissue fibrosis. The role of EBV in EMT can be attenuated by antiviral strategies and inhibition of Wnt signaling by using All-Trans Retinoic Acids (ATRA). Activation of non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway by EBV in epithelial cells suggests a novel mechanism of EMT via CUX1 signaling. These data present a framework for further description of the link between infectious agents and fibrosis, a significant disease burden.

  18. EBV-associated B- and T-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders following primary EBV infection in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Yin, C Cameron; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Abruzzo, Lynne V; Jones, Dan; Farhood, Anwar I; Thomazy, Vilmos A

    2005-02-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) usually are of B-cell lineage and associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). PTLDs of T-cell lineage are much less common and infrequently associated with EBV. We report a rare case of a girl in whom B-cell and T-cell PTLDs developed following 2 EBV-negative kidney transplants. Within 2 years of the second transplantation, the originally EBV-negative patient developed both an EBV-associated clonal B-cell PTLD involving lymph nodes and an EBV-positive T-cell PTLD involving bone marrow and liver. These proliferations occurred concurrently with evidence of primary EBV infection and high plasma viral load. The patient eventually died of multiorgan failure 5 years after the initial transplant (3 years after the second transplant). To our knowledge, only 4 cases of both B-cell and T-cell PTLDs have been reported. Only 2 cases have been proven to be monoclonal and EBV-associated, as in this case, the first following kidney transplantation.

  19. Generation and Analysis of Humanized Mouse Model of EBV Infection.

    PubMed

    Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The recent development of severely immunodeficient mouse strains enabled the production of new-generation humanized mice, in which major components of the human immune system are reconstituted. These new-generation humanized mice can be infected with human pathogenic viruses that do not infect regular mice and target cells of the hematoimmune system. Here we describe the method for preparing humanized mice, infecting them with EBV, and for their virological and immunological analyses. The results obtained from our own mouse models are briefly described.

  20. HPV Infection, but Not EBV or HHV-8 Infection, Is Associated with Salivary Gland Tumours.

    PubMed

    Hühns, Maja; Simm, Georg; Erbersdobler, Andreas; Zimpfer, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Benign and malignant salivary gland tumours are clinically heterogeneous and show different histology. Little is known about the role of human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in salivary gland neoplasms. We investigated the presence of the three viruses in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples in a cohort of 200 different salivary gland tumours. We performed EBV-LMP-1 and HHV-8 and p16 immunohistochemistry, a specific chip based hybridization assay for detection and typing of HPV and a chromogenic in situ hybridization for EBV analysis. Only one case, a polymorphic low-grade carcinoma, showed HHV-8 expression and one lymphoepithelial carcinoma was infected by EBV. In 17 cases (9%) moderate or strong nuclear and cytoplasmic p16 expression was detected. The HPV type was investigated in all of these cases and additionally in 8 Warthin's tumours. In 19 cases HPV type 16 was detected, mostly in Warthin's tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma NOS. We concluded that HHV-8 infection and EBV infection are not associated with salivary gland cancer, but HPV infection may play a role in these tumour entities.

  1. Combination of immunoglobulins and natural killer cells in the context of CMV and EBV infection.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, K; Lehmann, J; Krüger, D H; Martin-Parras, L; Uharek, L; Hofmann, J

    2014-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific hyperimmunoglobulin (CMV-HIG) is used to treat and prevent CMV infection in immunocompromised patients, and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody is successfully used in the treatment for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease caused by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Two immunological approaches have been suggested to further improve the control of viral reproduction in patients with active disease: first, the use of monoclonal antibodies with specificity against viral epitopes and second, coadministration of cells with the capacity to promote antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we have evaluated the effectiveness of these strategies in vitro (alone and in combination) with neutralization and cytotoxicity assays. Our results indicate that monoclonal antibodies (in particular SM5-1) can be as effective as CMV-HIG in neutralizing-cell-free CMV. Moreover, our data indicate that antibody-mediated elimination (either by moAb or by HIG) of EBV-infected cells can be significantly enhanced by NK cells. Using human NK cells that have been purified, cultured and expanded under GMP conditions, we were able to demonstrate that the combination of NK cells and antibodies could represent a feasible and highly effective clinical approach to achieve control of EBV infections. Especially in leukopenic patients with low numbers of ADCC-promoting cells, the combination of adoptively transferred NK cells and antiviral antibodies offers a promising strategy that should be tested in clinical trials.

  2. HLA-DQ β1 alleles associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infectivity and EBV gp42 binding to cells

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Wei; Gabriel, Erin; Aguilar, Fiona; Hoshino, Yo; Miyadera, Hiroko; Hess, Christoph; Hornung, Ronald L.

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects B cells and ~95% of adults are infected. EBV glycoprotein gp42 is essential for entry of virus into B cells. EBV gp42 binds to the β1 chain of HLA-DQ, -DR, and -DP on B cells, and uses these molecules for infection. To investigate if certain HLA-DQ alleles are associated with EBV seronegativity, we recruited ~3,300 healthy adult blood donors, identified 106 EBV-seronegative individuals, and randomly selected a control group of EBV-seropositive donors from the donor pool. A larger than expected proportion of EBV-seronegative subjects were HLA-DQ β1 *04/*05 and *06/*06, and to a lesser extent, *02/*03, compared with the control group, while a larger than expected portion of EBV-seropositive persons were HLA-DQ β1 *02/*02. We examined the ability of EBV gp42 to bind to different HLA-DQ molecules using human and mouse cells stably expressing these alleles. EBV gp42 bound less effectively to cells expressing HLA-DQ β1 *04/*05, *06/*06, or *03/*03 than to cells expressing HLA-DQ β1 *02/*02. These data are consistent with our observations of increased EBV seronegativity with DQ β1 *04/*05 or *06/*06 alleles. These findings emphasize the importance of a single genetic locus (HLA-DQ β1) to influence infectivity with EBV. PMID:28239644

  3. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can immortalize B-cll cells activated by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Wendel-Hansen, V; Sällström, J; De Campos-Lima, P O; Kjellström, G; Sandlund, A; Siegbahn, A; Carlsson, M; Nilsson, K; Rosén, A

    1994-03-01

    B-type of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells are inert to the potent transforming action of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The mitogenic action of Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC), MP6-thioredoxin, and interleukin 2 (IL-2), agents previously shown to induce proliferation in normal as well as in B-CLL cells, lifted this block, and EBV-positive cell lines could be established. It was not possible to establish cell lines of leukemic origin from cultures that were incubated with EBV alone or cytokine mix alone. CLL-cells infected with EBV only, expressed the viral nuclear antigen complex (EBNA), but not the viral latent membrane protein (LMP). They were not activated as measured by cell size and 3H-thymidine incorporation. In contrast, cells incubated with EBV and cytokine mix expressed both EBNA and LMP in parallel with enlargement and increased 3H-thymidine incorporation. These results emphasize that LMP expression is a prerequisite for growth transformation and immortalization and that cytokine activation signals are required for its expression in B-CLLs. Cells incubated with SAC/MP6-thioredoxin/IL-2 did not express any of the viral antigens, but were activated with regard to the mentioned parameters. Nine cell lines were established from six patients. From each of the three patients, we obtained 'twin'-pair lines: one corresponding to the malignant cell and the other to a normal B-lymphoblastoid cell. Thus, malignant and normal B-cell counterparts, from the very same donor, are at hand for comparative studies. The cell lines have been carried out for more than 12 months in culture. We conclude that B-CLL that are refractory to EBV-transformation can be rendered susceptible through in vitro cytokine activation.

  4. Reactive lymphadenopathy in Ugandan patients and its relationship to EBV and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kalungi, Sam; Wabinga, Henry; Bostad, Leif

    2009-04-01

    In Uganda, a large number of biopsied enlarged lymph nodes is diagnosed as reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH) not indicative of a specific etiologic agent. The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of RLH in lymph node biopsies in Ugandan patients and their possible association with HIV and EBV infection. Ninety biopsies were retrieved and included in the study. The predominant RLH type was follicular, found in 45 (50.0%) of the cases. Positive staining for LMP-1 was found in six cases (6.7%), EBNA-1 in 36 cases (40.0%) and HIV1-p24 in 15 cases (16.7%), respectively. A combination of EBV and HIV positivity was found in 46 (52.2%) of the cases. EBV infection was associated with hyperplastic germinal centers (p<0.01). HIV1-p24 positive staining was associated with follicle fragmentation (p<0.01) but not hyperplastic GC (p=0.08). In conclusion, RLH in Ugandan patients is frequently associated with EBV and HIV infection. The histologic features of the lymph nodes are not specific for any individual infection, but a high number of EBV-positive cases are associated with hyperplastic GC, and follicular fragmentation is characteristic of HIV infection.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). X. Incidence of EBV antibodies in patients with malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Baetoniu, A; Pătraşcu, I V; Tache, M

    1989-01-01

    Serum samples from 31 patients with various types of malignancies, 18 patients with different viral infections and 6 healthy subjects as controls, were tested by indirect immunofluorescence (IF) method for antibodies against viral capsid antigens (VCA) and the presence of active EBV infection. EBV antibodies anti-VCA were detected in 19 patients with tumors, in 8 patients with viral infections and in 2 healthy subjects. EBV active infection was found out in 9/19, 3/8 and 0/2 EBV anti-VCA positive patients with malignancies, different viral infections and healthy subjects respectively.

  6. EBV Lymphoproliferative Disease after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Rouce, Rayne H; Louis, Chrystal U; Heslop, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW EBV reactivation can cause significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT). Delays in reconstitution of EBV-specific T lymphocyte activity can lead to life-threatening EBV lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-PTLD). This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of EBV viremia and PTLD. RECENT FINDINGS During the past decade, early detection strategies, such as serial measurement of EBV-DNA load, have helped to identify high-risk patients and to diagnose early lymphoproliferation. The most significant advances have come in the form of innovative treatment options, including manipulation of the balance between outgrowing EBV-infected B cells and the EBV cytotoxic T lymphocyte (EBV-CTL) response, and targeting infected B cells with monoclonal antibodies, chemotherapy, unmanipulated donor lymphocytes, and donor or more recently third party EBV-CTLs. Defining criteria for preemptive therapy and remains a challenge. SUMMARY EBV reactivation is a significant complication after SCT. Continued improvements in risk-stratification and treatment options are required to improve the morbidity and mortality caused by EBV associated diseases. Current approaches use Rituximab to deplete B cells or adoptive transfer of EBV-CTL to reconstitute immunity. The availability of rapid EBV specific T cell products offers the possibility of improved outcomes. PMID:25159713

  7. The clinical significance of EBV DNA in the plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with or without EBV diseases.

    PubMed

    Kanakry, Jennifer A; Hegde, Aparna M; Durand, Christine M; Massie, Allan B; Greer, Amy E; Ambinder, Richard F; Valsamakis, Alexandra

    2016-04-21

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous virus that establishes a latent infection within the host and in some cases can lead to the development of EBV-associated lymphomas, lymphoproliferative disorders, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, solid tumors, and other diseases. We studied the clinical significance of detecting EBV DNA in the plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 2146 patients who had blood specimens sent to the Johns Hopkins Hospital clinical laboratory for viral quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay over a 5-year period. Within this largely immunocompromised and hospitalized cohort, 535 patients (25%) had EBV detected in plasma or PBMCs. When EBV was detected in the absence of an EBV(+)disease (n = 402), it was present only in PBMCs in 69% of cases. Immunocompromised patients were less likely to have EBV in plasma than in PBMCs in the absence of EBV(+)disease. In patients with active, systemic EBV(+)diseases (n = 105), EBV was detected in plasma in 99% of cases but detected in PBMCs in only 54%. Across a range of copy number cutoffs, EBV in plasma had higher specificity and sensitivity for EBV(+)disease as compared with EBV in PBMCs. EBV copy number in plasma distinguished untreated, EBV(+)lymphoma from EBV(+)lymphoma in remission and EBV(-)lymphoma, and also distinguished untreated, EBV(+)posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) from EBV(+)PTLD in remission and EBV(-)PTLD. EBV copy number quantification is a useful diagnostic marker across the spectrum of EBV(+)diseases, even among immunocompromised patients, with plasma specimens more indicative of EBV(+)disease than PBMCs.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gene expression in interstitial pneumonitis in Brazilian human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected children: is EBV associated or not?

    PubMed

    Toro, Adyléia A D C; Altemani, Albina M A; da Silva, Marcos T N; Morcillo, André M; Vilela, Maria Marluce S

    2010-01-01

    To gain further knowledge on the subject we evaluated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gene expression and TCD4+, TCD8+, and B lymphocyte counts in lung tissue samples from 20 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children with chronic lung disease. Twenty HIV-1 infected children with chronic pulmonary disease underwent open lung biopsy to define the diagnosis. Histological section of this material was submitted to nonisotopic in situ hybridization (ISH) using EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) 1/2 probes and TCD4+, TCD8+, and CD20+ B-cell counts by immunohistochemistry. The histology of 16 out of the 20 children (median age 53.5 months) proved to be examples of pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia/lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis (PLH/LIP) complex, 13 of which were EBER positive, but no significant association was found (Fisher exact test P = 0.439). Four patients had non-LIP diseases (3, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia; 1, diffuse advanced alveolar damage), two being EBER negative. Nineteen children showed a predominant T-CD8+ cell response (CD4+/CD8+ <1) in lung tissue. The mean TCD4+ and theTCD4/TCD8 ratio in lung tissue were significantly higher in the sections with PLH/LIP complex, but without significant difference between EBER positive and EBER negative samples. EBV gene expression was detected in the majority of the lung samples but without significant association with PLH/LIP complex or with TCD4+, TCD8+, B cells and the TCD4+/TCD8+ ratio. Regarding the pattern of lung disease in HIV-1 infected children, associated or not to EBV, the findings are of importance concerning the possible role of EBV in the pathogenesis of PLH/LIP.

  9. A major EBNA1 variant from Asian EBV isolates shows enhanced transcriptional activity compared to prototype B95.8.

    PubMed

    Do, Nguyen-Van; Ingemar, Ernberg; Phi, Phan-Thi Phi; Jenny, Almqvist; Chinh, Tran-Thi; Zeng, Yixin; Hu, Lifu

    2008-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) has an instrumental role in maintaining EBV latent infection by controlling EBV episome replication and regulating viral transcription. It is a ubiquitously expressed protein during latent viral infection and in EBV-associated tumors. The EBNA1 C-terminus interacts functionally with the Qp and Cp that control viral gene expression in latency I/II and III, respectively. EBNA1 has been classified into five subtypes due to sequence variation in the DNA-interacting C-terminus. By DNA sequence analysis of its C-terminus, we detected a main sub-variant (V-val-v1) of EBNA1 with valine located in both positions 487 and 528 from matched samples including NPC biopsies and peripheral blood taken from Vietnamese (9), Chinese (12) NPC patients and healthy donors (5). In the FR-region of oriP from nine NPC biopsies from Vietnam we also frequently found substitutions, deletions and variable numbers of repeats. Using a luciferase reporter system, EBNA1 and FR both derived from Asian isolates induced higher transcriptional activity than those from B95-8 virus.

  10. EBV associated lymphomas in 2008 WHO classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tiantian; Fu, Qianqian; Gao, Dalin; Ge, Liyan; Sun, Lin; Zhai, Qiongli

    2014-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous γ-herpes virus that asymptomatically infects more than 90% of the world's population. The exact mechanism of EBV in oncogenesis is an area of active debate. However, EBV has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several kinds of lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders, including B-, T- and NK-cell derived. Subsequent studies have proven that the EBV gene expression product plays an activating and/or promoting role on lymphomagenesis, and paves the way for novel cellular therapies of EBV-associated lymphomas. This review concentrates on the pathology, morphology, treatment and prognosis of EBV-associated lymphomas in the 2008 WHO classification of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoma tissues.

  11. Early impairment of CD8+ T cells immune response against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens associated with high level of circulating mononuclear EBV DNA load in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Legoff, Jérôme; Amiel, Corinne; Calisonni, Olivier; Fromentin, Delphine; Rajoely, Bakoliarisoa; Abuaf, Nisen; Tartour, Eric; Rozenbaum, Willy; Bélec, Laurent; Nicolas, Jean-Claude

    2004-03-01

    Immunodeficiency related to HIV may increase the incidence of EBV-associated lymphomas, by altering EBV-specific immune control and consequently favoring EBV reactivation. The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between the decrease of EBV-specific cellular immunity and the increase of EBV reactivation in a prospective cohort of 72 unselected HIV-infected individuals. EBV-specific immunity was evaluated by a highly sensitive IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay using 22 peptides mimicking latent and lytic antigens, and circulating mononuclear (PBMC) EBV DNA load was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. The mean circulating cell-associated EBV DNA load was higher in HIV-infected patients (639 copies/10(6) PBMC) than in healthy controls (21, n = 14) ( P = 0.005) and was higher in patients with CD4(+) T-cell count below 350/microL than that in patients harboring higher CD4(+) T-cell count (1112 vs. 389, P = 0.003). The mean intensity of EBV-specific cellular responses was lower in HIV-infected patients than in controls ( P = 0.001), even in patients with CD4(+) T-cell count above 350/-microL ( P = 0.007). The number of EBV peptides recognized was lower in HIV-infected patients than in controls (frequency: 0.44 vs. 0.67; P = 0.02), indicating reduced polyclonality in HIV-infected patients. The polyclonality was 1.5-fold lower in HIV-infected patients with CD4(+) T-cell count below 350/-microL ( P =0.007). For EBV load >1000 copies/10(6) PBMC, the levels of cell-associated EBV DNA and those of EBV-specific cellular immunity, either in intensity or in polyclonality, or both, were inversely correlated. These findings demonstrate early impairment of the EBV-specific cellular immune control with progressive increase of EBV reactivation in the course of HIV infection. These observations likely provide a basis for appreciating the risk to develop non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in HIV-infected individuals.

  12. Cutaneous EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Gru, Alejandro A; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2017-01-01

    This article will focus on the cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders associated with EBV, with an emphasis on the upcoming changes in the revised 4th Edition of the WHO classification of tumors of the hematopoietic system, many of which deal with cutaneous disorders derived from NK-cells or T-cells. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma usually presents in the upper aerodigestive tract, but can involve the skin secondarily. EBV-associated T- and NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in the pediatric age group include the systemic diseases, chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) and systemic EBV+ T-cell lymphoma of childhood. Hydroa vacciniforme (HV)-like LPD is a primarily cutaneous form of CAEBV and encompasses the lesions previously referred to as HV and HV-like lymphoma (HVLL). All the T/NK-cell-EBV-associated diseases occur with higher frequency in Asians, and indigenous populations from Central and South America and Mexico. Among the B-cell EBV-associated LPD two major changes have been introduced in the WHO. The previously designated EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV-DLBCL) of the elderly, has been changed to EBV-DLBCL with 'not otherwise specified' as a modifier (NOS). A new addition to the WHO system is the more recently identified EBV+ mucocutaneous ulcer, which involves skin and mucosal-associated sites.

  13. An overview of the infection of CMV, HSV 1/2 and EBV in Mexican patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Vega, Sergio; Castro-Escarpulli, Graciela; Hernández-Santos, Hector; Salinas-Lara, Citlatepetl; Palma, Icela; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Gelista-Herrera, Noemí; Rembao-Bojorquez, Daniel; Ochoa, Sara A; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Uribe-Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Arellano-Galindo, José

    2017-03-01

    Several risk factors are involved in glioblastoma, including cytomegalovirus (CMV). This research was carried out to determine the rate of CMV infection, as well as HSV 1/2 and EBV in brain tissue, in patients with glioblastomamultiforme (GBM). The tissues were tested using immunohistochemistry, PCR, in situ hybridization and real-time PCR. At least, one HHV was detected in 21/29 (72%) patients as follows: single infections with HSV-1/2 in 4/21 (19%), EBV in 6/21 (28.6%) and CMV in 1/21 (4.8%). Mixed viral infection, HSV-1/2 and EBV were detected in 4/21 patients (19%), CMV and EBV in 5/21 (23.8%), and HSV-1/2, EBV, and CMV in 1/21. The CMV viral load ranged from 3×10(2) to 4.33×10(5) genome/100ng of tissue. Genotype based on CMV gB was 3/7 where 2/3 was gB1 and 1/3 gB4. HSV, EBV and CMV were frequently found in brain tissues, more in mix in a population reported as highly seropositive.

  14. No evidence of Polyomavirus and EBV infections in Italian patients with mixed cryoglobulinemia infected chronically with HCV.

    PubMed

    Comar, Manola; Zanotta, Nunzia; Del Savio, Rossella; Vascotto, Fulvia; Calabrese, Nadia; Zorat, Francesca; Pozzato, Gabriele

    2014-04-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia is a lymphoproliferative disorder associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV). In patients chronically affected by HCV the prevalence of mixed cryoglobulinemia is variable ranging from 0% to 56%. To verify whether polyomaviruses (PyV) play a role in this disorder a total of 222 blood samples from 63 HCV chronic patients, 43 with mixed cryoglobulinemia, 59 chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 50 polytransfused patients, and 50 blood donors were evaluated for Merkel (MCPyV), BKV, JCV, and SV40. EBV was additionally included in the analysis since association with this disorder has been reported. Mixed cryoglobulinemia patients infected chronically with HCV resulted negative for both PyV and EBV. MCPyV was found in 1 subject with Merkel Cell Carcinoma, in 10% of polytransfused and in 10% of blood donors while EBV was detected in 22% of polytransfused, 10% of B-cell lymphatic leukemia patients and 4% of blood donors (P < 0.01). Taken together, the absence of PyV and EBV in HCV-mixed cryoglobulinemia patients seems to exclude a direct involvement of these viruses in the pathogenesis of this disease while the presence of MCPyV in healthy individuals, at the same rate as in polytransfused patients, may reinforce data on a minimal role of this virus in other human pathologies.

  15. Resveratrol Prevents EBV Transformation and Inhibits the Outgrowth of EBV-Immortalized Human B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, J. Luis; Takami, Akiyoshi; Trung, Ly Quoc; Kato, Shunichi; Nakao, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    Background Epstein Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disease is an increasing complication in patients with immunosuppressive conditions. Although the current therapies for this disorder are effective, they are also associated with significant toxicity. In an attempt to identify newer therapeutic agents, this study investigated the effects of Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound, on the EBV transformation of human B cells. Methodology/Principal Findings This study demonstrates that resveratrol prevents EBV transformation in human B cells. These effects are mediated by specific cytotoxic activities of resveratrol against EBV-infected B cells that are associated with the downregulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and survivin. This occurs as a consequence of the inhibition of EBV-induced NFκB and STAT-3 signaling pathways and a resveratrol-induced decrease in the expression of the oncogenic viral product LMP1 in EBV-infected B cells. In addition, resveratrol decreased the expression of miR-155 and miR-34a in EBV-infected B cells, blocked the expression of the anti-apoptotic viral gene BHRF1, and thus interrupted events that are critical for EBV transformation and the survival of EBV-transformed cells. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that resveratrol may therefore be a potentially effective therapeutic alternative for preventing EBV-associated lymphoproliferative diseases in immune compromised patients. PMID:23251493

  16. The Primate EAE Model Points at EBV-Infected B Cells as a Preferential Therapy Target in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    ‘T Hart, Bert A.; Jagessar, S. Anwar; Haanstra, Krista; Verschoor, Ernst; Laman, Jon D.; Kap, Yolanda S.

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable clinical efficacy of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis points at the critical involvement of B cells in the disease. However, the exact pathogenic contribution of B cells is poorly understood. In this publication we review new data on the role of CD20+ B cells in a unique experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a small-bodied neotropical primate. We will also discuss the relevance of these data for MS. Different from rodent EAE models, but similar to MS, disease progression in marmosets can develop independent of autoantibodies. Progressive disease is mediated by MHC class Ib (Caja-E) restricted cytotoxic T cells, which are activated by γ-herpesvirus-infected B cells and cause widespread demyelination of cortical gray matter. B-cell directed monoclonal antibody therapies (anti-CD20 versus anti-BLyS and anti-APRIL) have a variable effect on EAE progression, which we found associated with variable depletion of the Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-like γ-herpesvirus CalHV3 from lymphoid organs. These findings support an important pathogenic role of CD20+ B cell in MS, especially of the subset infected with EBV. PMID:23781220

  17. The Primate EAE Model Points at EBV-Infected B Cells as a Preferential Therapy Target in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    't Hart, Bert A; Jagessar, S Anwar; Haanstra, Krista; Verschoor, Ernst; Laman, Jon D; Kap, Yolanda S

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable clinical efficacy of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis points at the critical involvement of B cells in the disease. However, the exact pathogenic contribution of B cells is poorly understood. In this publication we review new data on the role of CD20+ B cells in a unique experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a small-bodied neotropical primate. We will also discuss the relevance of these data for MS. Different from rodent EAE models, but similar to MS, disease progression in marmosets can develop independent of autoantibodies. Progressive disease is mediated by MHC class Ib (Caja-E) restricted cytotoxic T cells, which are activated by γ-herpesvirus-infected B cells and cause widespread demyelination of cortical gray matter. B-cell directed monoclonal antibody therapies (anti-CD20 versus anti-BLyS and anti-APRIL) have a variable effect on EAE progression, which we found associated with variable depletion of the Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-like γ-herpesvirus CalHV3 from lymphoid organs. These findings support an important pathogenic role of CD20+ B cell in MS, especially of the subset infected with EBV.

  18. Oncogenic S1P signalling in EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma activates AKT and promotes cell migration through S1P receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui Min; Lo, Kwok-Wai; Wei, Wenbin; Tsao, Sai Wah; Chung, Grace Tin Yun; Ibrahim, Maha Hafez; Dawson, Christopher W; Murray, Paul G; Paterson, Ian C; Yap, Lee Fah

    2017-02-27

    Undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a cancer with high metastatic potential that is consistently associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In this study, we have investigated the functional contribution of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signalling to the pathogenesis of NPC. We show that EBV infection or ectopic expression of the EBV-encoded latent genes (EBNA1, LMP1 and LMP2A) can up-regulate sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1), the key enzyme that produces S1P, in NPC cell lines. Exogenous addition of S1P promotes the migration of NPC cells through the activation of AKT; shRNA knockdown of SPHK1 resulted in a reduction in the levels of activated AKT and inhibition of cell migration. We also show that S1P receptor 3 (S1PR3) mRNA is over-expressed in EBV-positive NPC patient-derived xenografts and a subset of primary NPC tissues, and that knockdown of S1PR3 suppressed the activation of AKT and the S1P-induced migration of NPC cells. Taken together, our data point to a central role for EBV in mediating the oncogenic effects of S1P in NPC and identify S1P signalling as a potential therapeutic target in this disease.

  19. Accumulation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BMRF1 protein EA-D during latent EBV activation of Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Raji.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Makoto; Horie, Kazutaka; Hoshikawa, Yoshiko; Nagata, Keiko; Osaki, Mistuhiko; Ito, Hisao; Sairenji, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    As a new model to elucidate molecular mechanisms in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activation, we tested the tetracycline-inducible (Tet-On)/BZLF1-oriP plasmid system in Raji cells. Cells transfected with this Tet-On plasmid did not activate EBV by doxycycline and surprisingly EBV latency was disrupted with large amounts of BMRF1 protein (EA-D) being accumulated in the cells. Brilliant EA-D fluorescence was markedly condensed in small sized cells, intra-cellular vesicles, and extra-cellular particles. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated the extra-cellular particles to be covered with a membrane. EA-D molecules of 58, 50, 48, and 44kDa were expressed in the cells. The high (58 and 50kDa) and low (48 and 44kDa) EA-D molecules appeared in the early and late stages, respectively. Low EA-D molecules were detected mostly in EA-D positive cells separated into the heaviest density layer of a discontinuous Percoll gradient. Such molecules could be created from high EA-D molecules by protein phosphatase treatment. The EA-D molecules that appeared similar were detected in EBV-activated P3HR-1 and Akata cells. Several hypotheses concerning the accumulation of EA-D molecules of various polymorphic forms and their phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in this model system are presented, with possible biological and clinical relevance.

  20. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expression by resting B cells increases proliferation following EBV infection, but the overexpression of CD81 induces the apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Daejin; Park, Sung Jae; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Yeong Seok; Park, Sae-Gwang; Choi, In-Hak; Yoon, Sung Ho; Lee, Youn Jae; Paeng, Sunghwa; Hur, Dae Young

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 protein binds to CD81, which is a component of the B cell co-stimulatory complex. The E2-CD81 interaction leads to B cell proliferation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and to the hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. Epidemiological studies have reported a high prevalence of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HCV-positive patients, suggesting a potential association between HCV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the genesis of B lymphocyte proliferative disorders. In the present study, in order to investigate the association between EBV and HCV in B cells, we created an in vitro EBV-induced B cell transformation model. CD81 was gradually overexpressed during transformation by EBV. B cells isolated from HCV-positive patients grew more rapidly and clumped together earlier than B cells isolated from healthy donors following EBV infection. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expressed by resting B cells with anti-CD81 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or HCV E2 accelerated the generation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by EBV infection. These cells proliferated prominently through the early expression of interleukin-10 and intracellular latent membrane protein (LMP)-l. By contrast, the overexpression of CD81 on EBV-transformed B cells by anti-CD81 mAb or HCV E2 protein induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. These results suggest that the engagement of CD81 expressed by B cells has differential effects on B cell fate (proliferation or apoptosis) according to EBV infection and the expression level of CD81.

  1. Methylation of Epstein-Barr virus Rta promoter in EBV primary infection, reactivation and lymphoproliferation.

    PubMed

    Germi, Raphaële; Guigue, Nicolas; Lupo, Julien; Semenova, Touyana; Grossi, Laurence; Vermeulen, Odile; Epaulard, Olivier; de Fraipont, Florence; Morand, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    During Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency, the EBV genome is largely silenced by methylation. This silencing is overturned during the switch to the lytic cycle. A key event is the production of the viral protein Zta which binds to three Zta-response elements (ZRE) from the Rta promoter (Rp), two of which (ZRE2 and ZRE3) include three CpG motifs methylated in the latent genome. The bisulphite pyrosequencing reaction was used to quantify the methylation of ZRE2, ZRE3a, and ZRE3b in EBV-positive cell lines and in ex vivo samples of EBV-related diseases, in order to assess whether the level of methylation in these ZREs could provide additional information to viral DNA load and serology in the characterization of EBV-associated diseases. In PBMC from two patients with infectious mononucleosis, over time Rp became increasingly methylated whereas EBV load decreased. In tonsil from patients with chronic tonsillitis, the methylation was less than in EBV-associated tumors, regardless of the viral load. This was even more striking when only the ZRE3a and ZRE3b were considered since some samples presented unbalanced profiles on ZRE2. EBV reactivation in cell culture showed that the reduction in the overall level of methylation was closely related to the production of unmethylated virions. Thus, an assessment of the level of methylation may help to better characterize EBV replication in PBMC and in biopsies with high EBV load, during infectious mononucleosis and EBV-associated cancers. J. Med. Virol. 88:1814-1820, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. An Epstein-Barr Virus Encoded Inhibitor of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Signaling Is an Important Determinant for Acute and Persistent EBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Makoto; Fogg, Mark H.; Orlova, Nina; Quink, Carol; Wang, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is the most common cause of Infectious Mononucleosis. Nearly all adult humans harbor life-long, persistent EBV infection which can lead to development of cancers including Hodgkin Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, and lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients. BARF1 is an EBV replication-associated, secreted protein that blocks Colony Stimulating Factor 1 (CSF-1) signaling, an innate immunity pathway not targeted by any other virus species. To evaluate effects of BARF1 in acute and persistent infection, we mutated the BARF1 homologue in the EBV-related herpesvirus, or lymphocryptovirus (LCV), naturally infecting rhesus macaques to create a recombinant rhLCV incapable of blocking CSF-1 (ΔrhBARF1). Rhesus macaques orally challenged with ΔrhBARF1 had decreased viral load indicating that CSF-1 is important for acute virus infection. Surprisingly, ΔrhBARF1 was also associated with dramatically lower virus setpoints during persistent infection. Normal acute viral load and normal viral setpoints during persistent rhLCV infection could be restored by Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced immunosuppression prior to oral inoculation with ΔrhBARF1 or infection of immunocompetent animals with a recombinant rhLCV where the rhBARF1 was repaired. These results indicate that BARF1 blockade of CSF-1 signaling is an important immune evasion strategy for efficient acute EBV infection and a significant determinant for virus setpoint during persistent EBV infection. PMID:23300447

  3. Epstein-Barr virus infection-induced inflammasome activation in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Torii, Yuka; Murata, Takayuki; Yoshiyama, Hironori; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori

    2017-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic sensors that regulate the activity of caspase-1 and the secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or interleukin-18 (IL-18) in response to foreign molecules, including viral pathogens. They are considered to be an important link between the innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the mechanism by which inflammasome activation occurs during primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection remains unknown. Human B lymphocytes and epithelial cells are major targets of EBV, although it can also infect a variety of other cell types. In this study, we found that EBV could infect primary human monocytes and the monocyte cell line, THP-1, inducing inflammasome activation. We incubated cell-free EBV with THP-1 cells or primary human monocytes, then confirmed EBV infection using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Lytic and latent EBV genes were detected by real-time RT-PCR in EBV-infected monocytes. EBV infection of THP-1 cells and primary human monocytes induced caspase-dependent IL-1β production, while EBV infection of B-cell or T-cell lines did not induce IL-1β production. To identify the sensor molecule responsible for inflammasome activation during EBV infection, we examined the mRNA and the protein levels of NLR family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3), absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2), and interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16). Increased AIM2 levels were observed in EBV-infected THP-1 cells and primary human monocytes, whereas levels of IFI16 and NLRP3 did not show remarkable change. Furthermore, knockdown of AIM2 by small interfering RNA attenuated caspase-1 activation. Taken together, our results suggest that EBV infection of human monocytes induces caspase-1-dependent IL-1β production, and that AIM2, acting as an inflammasome, is involved in this response. PMID:28369146

  4. Pim kinases are upregulated during Epstein-Barr virus infection and enhance EBNA2 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Rainio, Eeva-Marja; Ahlfors, Helena; Ruuska, Marja; Kieff, Elliott; Koskinen, Paeivi J. . E-mail: paivi.koskinen@btk.fi

    2005-03-15

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is strongly associated with B-cell proliferative diseases such as Burkitt's lymphoma. Here we show that the oncogenic serine/threonine kinases Pim-1 and Pim-2 enhance the activity of the viral transcriptional activator EBNA2. During EBV infection of primary B-lymphocytes, the mRNA expression levels of pim genes, especially of pim-2, are upregulated and remain elevated in latently infected B-cell lines. Thus, EBV-induced upregulation of Pim kinases and Pim-stimulated EBNA2 transcriptional activity may contribute to the ability of EBV to immortalize B-cells and predispose them to malignant growth.

  5. EBV-positive human sera contain antibodies against the EBV BMRF-2 protein

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianqiao; Palefsky, Joel M.; Herrera, Rossana; Sunshine, Carl; Tugizov, Sharof M.

    2009-01-01

    We previously showed that the EBV glycoprotein BMRF-2 contains a functional integrin-binding Arg–Gly–Asp (RGD) domain that plays an important role in viral infection and cell-to-cell spread of progeny virions in oral epithelial cells. In this study, we found that EBV-seropositive human sera contain antibodies against BMRF-2. The inhibitory effect of EBV-positive sera on EBV infection of oral epithelial cells was substantially reduced by pre-incubation of serum samples with the BMRF-2 RGD peptide, suggesting that anti-BMRF-2 human antibodies possess neutralizing activity. EBV-specific sera reacted strongly with the BMRF-2 extracellular domain (170-213 aa) containing the RGD motif, whereas they reacted only weakly or not at all with a mutated form of the BMRF-2 extracellular domain containing AAA instead of RGD. These data indicate that that RGD motif of BMRF-2 is part of an immunodominant antigenic determinant within the extracellular domain of BMRF-2 that may contribute to EBV neutralization during EBV reactivation. PMID:19698968

  6. Optimizing osmotic pressure removes EBV particles from B95-8 host cells while maintaining normal activity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min; Shen, Jing; Cai, Jie

    2013-03-01

    This study demonstrates the removal of virus particles from B95-8 host cells that maintain normal activity under optimal osmotic pressure. After infecting B95-8 cells with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) particles, the cells were treated with isosmotic solution [0.90% NaCl (330 mOsm/kg H(2)O)], hyposmotic solutions [0.36% NaCl (115 mOsm/kg H(2)O) and 0.27% NaCl (93 mOsm/kg H(2)O)] and distilled water. The pumping levels of virus particles were observed by inverse phase contrast microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After treatment with the hyposmotic solutions, the following results were observed: firstly, after culturing for 24 and 48 h, the B95-8 cells in the hyposmotic solutions grew as well as the cells cultured in the isosmotic solution. Secondly, the virus particles in the B95-8 host cells overflowed onto the surface of the cells, while the organelle structures remained intact. This phenomenon was repeated in the removal of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from leukomonocytes. By optimizing the osmotic pressure, the activity of the B95-8 host cells was retained and the EBV particles were transported from the cells onto the cell surface.

  7. Stable transfection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 2 in lymphoma cells containing the EBV P3HR1 genome induces expression of B-cell activation molecules CD21 and CD23.

    PubMed Central

    Cordier, M; Calender, A; Billaud, M; Zimber, U; Rousselet, G; Pavlish, O; Banchereau, J; Tursz, T; Bornkamm, G; Lenoir, G M

    1990-01-01

    A set of B-cell activation molecules, including the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) receptor CR2 (CD21) and the B-cell activation antigen CD23 (Blast2/Fc epsilon RII), is turned on by infecting EBV-negative B-lymphoma cell lines with immortalizing strains of the viruslike B95-8 (BL/B95 cells). This up regulation may represent one of the mechanisms involved in EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. The P3HR1 nonimmortalizing strain of the virus, which is deleted for the entire Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) protein open reading frame, is incapable of inducing the expression of CR2 and CD23, suggesting a crucial role for EBNA2 in the activation of these molecules. In addition, lymphoma cells containing the P3HR1 genome (BL/P3HR1 cells) do not express the viral latent membrane protein (LMP), which is regularly expressed in cells infected with immortalizing viral strains. Using electroporation, we have transfected the EBNA2 gene cloned in an episomal vector into BL/P3HR1 cells and have obtained cell clones that stably express the EBNA2 protein. In these clones, EBNA2 expression was associated with an increased amount of CR2 and CD23 steady-state RNAs. Of the three species of CD23 mRNAs described, the Fc epsilon RIIa species was preferentially expressed in these EBNA2-expressing clones. An increased cell surface expression of CR2 but not of CD23 was observed, and the soluble form of CD23 molecule (SCD23) was released. We were, however, not able to detect any expression of LMP in these cell clones. These data demonstrate that EBNA2 gene is able to complement P3HR1 virus latent functions to induce the activation of CR2 and CD23 expression, and they emphasize the role of EBNA2 protein in the modulation of cellular gene implicated in B-cell proliferation and hence in EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. Nevertheless, EBNA2 expression in BL/P3HR1 cells is not able to restore the level of CR2 and CD23 expression observed in BL/B95 cells, suggesting that other cellular or viral

  8. Inhibition of autophagy in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells enhances EBV lytic genes expression and replication

    PubMed Central

    De Leo, A; Colavita, F; Ciccosanti, F; Fimia, G M; Lieberman, P M; Mattia, E

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an important degradation system involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis, serves also to eliminate pathogens and process their fragments for presentation to the immune system. Several viruses have been shown to interact with the host autophagic machinery to suppress or make use of this cellular catabolic pathway to enhance their survival and replication. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is a γ-herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin in which establishes a predominantly latent infection. Latent EBV can periodically reactivate to produce infectious particles that allow the virus to spread and can lead to the death of the infected cell. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between autophagy and EBV reactivation in Burkitt's lymphoma cells. By monitoring autophagy markers and EBV lytic genes expression, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced in the early phases of EBV lytic activation but decreases thereafter concomitantly with increased levels of EBV lytic proteins. In a cell line defective for late antigens expression, we found an inverse correlation between EBV early antigens expression and autophagosomes formation, suggesting that early after activation, the virus is able to suppress autophagy. We report here for the first time that inhibition of autophagy by Bafilomycin A1 or shRNA knockdown of Beclin1 gene, highly incremented EBV lytic genes expression as well as intracellular viral DNA and viral progeny yield. Taken together, these findings indicate that EBV activation induces the autophagic response, which is soon inhibited by the expression of EBV early lytic products. Moreover, our findings open the possibility that pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy may be used to enhance oncolytic viral therapy of EBV-related lymphomas. PMID:26335716

  9. Detection and quantification of Epstein-Barr virus EBER1 in EBV-infected cells by fluorescent in situ hybridization and flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    A rapid and highly sensitive fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assay was developed to detect Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells in peripheral blood. Multiple fluorescein-labeled antisense oligonucleotide probes were designed to hybridize to the EBER1 transcript, which is highly expressed in latently infected cells. After a rapid (30 min) hybridization, the cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. EBER1 was detected in several positive control cell lines that have variable numbers of EBV genome copies. No EBER1 was detected in two known EBV-negative cell lines. Northern blot analyses confirmed the presence and quantity of EBER1 transcripts in each cell line. This method was used to quantify the number of EBV-infected cells in peripheral blood from a patient with chronic mononucleosis. These results indicate that EBV-infected cells can be detected at the single cell level, and that this assay can be used to quantify the number of EBV-infected cells in clinical samples.

  10. Management of HSV, VZV and EBV infections in patients with hematological malignancies and after SCT: guidelines from the Second European Conference on Infections in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, J; Reusser, P; Einsele, H; de la Camara, R; Cordonnier, C; Ward, K N; Ljungman, P; Engelhard, D

    2009-05-01

    These guidelines on the management of HSV, VZV and EBV infection in patients with hematological malignancies and after SCT were prepared by the European Conference on Infections in Leukemia following a predefined methodology. A PubMed search was conducted using the appropriate key words to identify studies pertinent to management of HSV, VZV and EBV infections. References of relevant articles and abstracts from recent hematology and SCT scientific meetings were also reviewed. Prospective and retrospective studies identified from the data sources were evaluated, and all data deemed relevant were included in this analysis. The clinical and scientific background was described and discussed, and the quality of evidence and level of recommendation were graded according to the Centers for Disease Control criteria.

  11. Effect of cell-derived growth factors and cytokines on the clonal outgrowth of EBV-infected B cells and established lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ifversen, P; Zhang, X M; Ohlin, M; Zeuthen, J; Borrebaeck, C A

    1993-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a potent inducer of polyclonal B lymphocyte proliferation and is widely used as a tool for the establishment of B cell lines producing human monoclonal antibodies. However, because of low transformability, low clonability, and the inherent instability of EBV-infected B cells, valuable antibody-producing B cells are often lost during this procedure. We have here examined various cell-derived cytokines for their ability to enhance both the cellular outgrowth of newly infected B cells and the clonability of infected B cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Our results show that the murine thymoma cell line EL-4 is superior to peripheral blood mononuclear cells in both cellular outgrowth and cloning experiments, whereas monocyte-derived factors and monocyte cell lines were less capable than peripheral blood mononuclear cells in enhancing cellular outgrowth and cloning. Furthermore, the human T cell hybridoma cell line MP6 that secretes a B cell growth and differentiation factor, recently identified as an isoform of thioredoxin, is also capable of stimulating EBV-infected B cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Co-cultivation of EBV-infected B cells with MP6 cells significantly enhanced the cloning efficiency at the 1 cell/well level. The present results also suggest that one potential role of the MP6-derived thioredoxin could be the up regulation of IL-6 receptor expression in EBV-infected B cells.

  12. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related oral squamous cell carcinoma in Okinawa, a subtropical island, in southern Japan--simultaneously infected with human papillomavirus (HPV).

    PubMed

    Higa, Mayumi; Kinjo, Takao; Kamiyama, Kazuya; Chinen, Katsuni; Iwamasa, Teruo; Arasaki, Akira; Sunakawa, Hajime

    2003-06-01

    Up to now, many authors have reported on the EBV infection and its carcinogenic importance in undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (WHO classification, type III), but the infection of the virus in well differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma has not been well described. We introduce the EBV-related well differentiated oral squamous cell carcinomas in Okinawa, a subtropical island in the southernmost part of Japan. This study aimed to clarify the pathogenesis of this malignancy in this area by carrying out analysis of the histology and the Epstein-Barr (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. In the Department of Oral Surgery, Ryukyu University Hospital Okinawa, 188 cases of oral malignant tumours were encountered from 1996 to 2000. The histopathological examination and the sequence analysis of LMP-1 carboxy terminal region and EBNA2 region of EBV were carried out, as were the analysis of virus subtypes, A and B, BamHI-F and f, and C and D. Additionally, HPV infection in the squamous cell carcinomas were demonstrated using E6 and E7 region primer sets by PCR method. In Okinawa, 94% (177/188) of the cases were squamous cell carcinomas. A surprisingly large number of EBV (72%) and HPV (78%) infections in the oral squamous cell carcinomas were demonstrated. EBV type B virus infection was found in 36% of EBV-related oral squamous cell carcinoma in Okinawa, but in only 2-5% of the mainland cases. In both regions the incidence of the BamHI- f variant infection was very low. The infected virus in 79 out of 80 (39 Okinawan and 41 mainland) cases was BamHI- F type. In Okinawa, the numbers of C and D variants were almost equal, whereas in the mainland the D variant was rare. Further, a 30 bp deletion in LMP-1 gene was frequently demonstrated in Okinawan and mainland cases of type A virus, but not in type B virus. Lastly, single nucleotide mutations in EBNA2 region of type A virus when compared with B95-8 strain were demonstrated in Okinawan cases. The

  13. 5-hydroxymethylation of the EBV genome regulates the latent to lytic switch

    PubMed Central

    Wille, Coral K.; Nawandar, Dhananjay M.; Henning, Amanda N.; Ma, Shidong; Oetting, Kayla M.; Lee, Dennis; Lambert, Paul; Johannsen, Eric C.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2015-01-01

    Latent Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection and cellular hypermethylation are hallmarks of undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, EBV infection of normal oral epithelial cells is confined to differentiated cells and is lytic. Here we demonstrate that the EBV genome can become 5-hydroxymethylated and that this DNA modification affects EBV lytic reactivation. We show that global 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC)-modified DNA accumulates during normal epithelial-cell differentiation, whereas EBV+ NPCs have little if any 5hmC-modified DNA. Furthermore, we find that increasing cellular ten–eleven translocation (TET) activity [which converts methylated cytosine (5mC) to 5hmC] decreases methylation, and increases 5hmC modification, of lytic EBV promoters in EBV-infected cell lines containing highly methylated viral genomes. Conversely, inhibition of endogenous TET activity increases lytic EBV promoter methylation in an EBV-infected telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs) cell line where lytic viral promoters are largely unmethylated. We demonstrate that these cytosine modifications differentially affect the ability of the two EBV immediate-early proteins, BZLF1 (Z) and BRLF1 (R), to induce the lytic form of viral infection. Although methylation of lytic EBV promoters increases Z-mediated and inhibits R-mediated lytic reactivation, 5hmC modification of lytic EBV promoters has the opposite effect. We also identify a specific CpG-containing Z-binding site on the BRLF1 promoter that must be methylated for Z-mediated viral reactivation and show that TET-mediated 5hmC modification of this site in NOKs prevents Z-mediated viral reactivation. Decreased 5-hydroxymethylation of cellular and viral genes may contribute to NPC formation. PMID:26663912

  14. EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders: classification and treatment.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Antonino; Gloghini, Annunziata; Dotti, Giampietro

    2008-05-01

    Since its discovery as the first human tumor virus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the development of a wide range of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, including Burkitt's lymphoma, classic Hodgkin's lymphoma, and lymphomas arising in immunocompromised individuals (post-transplant and HIV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders). T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that have been reported to be EBV associated include a subset of peripheral T-cell lymphomas, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, extranodal nasal type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, and other rare histotypes. EBV encodes a series of products interacting with or exhibiting homology to a wide variety of antiapoptotic molecules, cytokines, and signal transducers, hence promoting EBV infection, immortalization, and transformation. However, the exact mechanism by which EBV promotes oncogenesis is an area of active debate. The focus of this review is on the pathology, diagnosis, classification, and pathogenesis of EBV-associated lymphomas. Recent advances in EBV cell-based immunotherapy, which is beginning to show promise in the treatment of EBV-related disorders, are discussed.

  15. Ligation of CD47 induces G1 arrest in EBV-transformed B cells through ROS generation, p38 MAPK/JNK activation, and Tap73 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Bang, Si Ra; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Daejin; Kim, Seonghan; Kim, Jin Kyoung; Kim, Yeong Seok; Hur, Dae Young

    2014-01-01

    CD47 is expressed in normal activated cells as well as in several tumors. It also has been implicated as having antiangiogenic and antimetastatic properties, but its roles in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells are still not fully understood. Herein, we report that EBV infection induced CD47 surface expression on B cells, and CD47 ligation with anti-CD47 mAb (B6H12) reduced cell proliferation and induced G1 arrest. CD47-induced G1 arrest was mediated through increased cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKi) and a simultaneously decreased CDK/cyclins, and p38 MAPK/JNK activation preceded binding of CDKi-CDK. Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and upregulation of both TAp73 and ER stress sensor proteins were detected after CD47 ligation, and p38 inhibitor SB203580 and JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked upregulation of TAp73 and cell cycle arrest. We investigated whether ROS generation is the initial event of CD47-mediated G1 arrest because ROS scavenger NAC effectively abrogated the majority of CD47-mediated responses but SB203580 and SP600125 did not block ROS production. Taken together, we concluded that CD47 ligation on EBV-transformed B cells led to G1 arrest by ROS generation and, subsequently, there was p38 MAPK/JNK pathway activation, ER stress triggering, and TAp73 upregulation. Our findings provide data supporting CD47 as a feasible target for EBV-associated tumor therapy.

  16. A multiplex calibrated real-time PCR assay for quantitation of DNA of EBV-1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Francesca; Cassina, Giulia; Broccolo, Francesco; Morreale, Giuseppe; Lanino, Edoardo; Di Marco, Eddi; Vardas, Efthiya; Bernasconi, Daniela; Buttò, Stefano; Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Lusso, Paolo; Malnati, Mauro S

    2011-12-01

    Accurate and highly sensitive tests for the diagnosis of active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection are essential for the clinical management of individuals infected with EBV. A calibrated quantitative real-time PCR assay for the measurement of EBV DNA of both EBV-1 and 2 subtypes was developed, combining the detection of the EBV DNA and a synthetic DNA calibrator in a multiplex PCR format. The assay displays a wide dynamic range and a high degree of accuracy even in the presence of 1μg of human genomic DNA. This assay measures with the same efficiency EBV DNA from strains prevalent in different geographic areas. The clinical sensitivity and specificity of the system were evaluated by testing 181 peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs) and plasma specimens obtained from 21 patients subjected to bone marrow transplantation, 70 HIV-seropositive subjects and 23 healthy controls. Patients affected by EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoprolipherative disorders had the highest frequency of EBV detection and the highest viral load. Persons infected with HIV had higher levels of EBV DNA load in PBMCs and a higher frequency of EBV plasma viremia compared to healthy controls. In conclusion, this new assay provides a reliable high-throughput method for the quantitation of EBV DNA in clinical samples.

  17. The EBV oncogene LMP1 protects lymphoma cells from cell death through the collagen-mediated activation of DDR1.

    PubMed

    Cader, Fathima Zumla; Vockerodt, Martina; Bose, Shikha; Nagy, Eszter; Brundler, Marie-Anne; Kearns, Pamela; Murray, Paul G

    2013-12-19

    The malignant Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells of Hodgkin lymphoma are surrounded by a tumor microenvironment that is composed of a variety of cell types, as well as noncellular components such as collagen. Although HRS cells harbor oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in approximately 50% of cases, it is not known if the tumor microenvironment contributes to EBV-driven lymphomagenesis. We show that expression of the EBV-encoded latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1) in primary human germinal center B cells, the presumed progenitors of HRS cells, upregulates discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase activated by collagen. We also show that HRS cells intimately associated with collagen frequently overexpress DDR1 and that short-term exposure to collagen is sufficient to activate DDR1 in Hodgkin lymphoma-derived cell lines. The ectopic expression of DDR1 significantly increased the survival of collagen-treated DG75 Burkitt lymphoma cells, following etoposide treatment. Conversely, knockdown of DDR1 significantly decreased the survival of collagen-treated L428 Hodgkin lymphoma cells in the absence of specific apoptotic stimulus, suggesting that DDR1 also influences baseline survival. Our results identify a hitherto unknown function for collagen in protecting Hodgkin lymphoma cells from apoptosis and suggest an important contribution of the tumor microenvironment in promoting the oncogenic effects of EBV.

  18. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in a Patient With Hodgkin lymphoma and Concurrent EBV, CMV, and Candida Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa Ali, Moaath; Ruano Mendez, Ana Lucia; Carraway, Hetty E.

    2017-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a syndrome characterized by immune activation and subsequent widespread organ damage. Patients affected by HLH commonly develop fever, cytopenias, liver damage, neurologic manifestations, and hypercytokinemia. In this case, we describe a 60-year-old male who presented with HLH and concurrent Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and Candida infections and was subsequently diagnosed with a Hodgkin lymphoma. This case highlights the importance of considering a cancer diagnosis in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with HLH. PMID:28210636

  19. The Definition of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV)’s Role in HTLV-III Infected USAF Personnel as Related to Disease Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-15

    surveillance period. Moreover, it also would be important to determine if the use of an anti-EBV chemotherapeutic agent, as acyclovir , in patients with...OHL+, or even as a result of the currently tested acyclovir -AZT combination therapy for patients with 10 progressing HIV infection (regardless of the

  20. The Definition of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV)’s Role in HTLV-III Infected USAF Personnel as Related to Disease Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-27

    oral hairy leukoplakia , may be a poor prognostic sign when found in HIV infected patients. (4) EBV related lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia may...patients tested so far preclude any analysis of interclass differences. Patients with Oral Hairy Leukoplakia (OHL). Twenty- four HIV-l infected males...1988. 4. Greenspan JS, Greenspan D, Lennette ET, et. al. Replication of Epstein-Barr virus within the epithelial cells of oral hairy " leukoplakia , an

  1. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). V. Incidence of EBV antibodies in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pătraşcu, I V; Ghenoiu, O; Tache, M

    1989-01-01

    Serum samples from 95 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 24 patients with other various rheumatic diseases, 50 patients with diabetes mellitus, 34 patients with acute viral infections, 6 patients with infectious mononucleosis, 77 patients with lymphomas and leukemia and 110 blood donors and 24 healthy subjects as normal controls, respectively, were tested by indirect immunofluorescence (IF) reaction for the presence of specific antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus determined viral capsid antigen (anti-VCA) and Epstein-Barr active viral infection. The IF test carried out in acetone-fixed smears of EB-3 cell line revealed EB antibodies anti-VCA in 83.3% of infectious mononucleosis, 61.0% lymphomas and leukemia, 58.0% diabetic patients. The frequency of anti-VCA antibodies in rheumatic patients was 31.4%, and 3.6% and 25% in sera from blood donors and healthy subjects, respectively. Incidence of active EBV infection was 5.7% of rheumatic diseases, 17.7% of acute virus infections, 50.0% of infectious mononucleosis, and 31.1% of lymphomas and leukemia patients. Active EBV infection was not found out in blood donors (0/110) and healthy subjects (0/24) groups as control. Rheumatoid arthritis with or without rheumatoid factor patients had serological evidence of active EBV infection 6/26 and 4/26 respectively.

  2. Subtractive hybridization identifies novel differentially expressed ncRNA species in EBV-infected human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Mrázek, Jan; Kreutmayer, Simone B.; Grässer, Friedrich A.; Polacek, Norbert; Hüttenhofer, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) fulfill a wide range of cellular functions from protein synthesis to regulation of gene expression. Identification of novel regulatory ncRNAs by experimental approaches commonly includes the generation of specialized cDNA libraries encoding small ncRNA species. However, such identification is severely hampered by the presence of constitutively expressed and highly abundant ‘house-keeping’ ncRNAs, such as ribosomal RNAs, small nuclear RNAs or transfer RNAs. We have developed a novel experimental strategy, designated as subtractive hybridization of ncRNA transcripts (SHORT) to specifically select and amplify novel regulatory ncRNAs, which are only expressed at certain stages or under specific growth conditions of cells. The method is based on the selective subtractive hybridization technique, formerly applied to the detection of differentially expressed mRNAs. As a model system, we applied SHORT to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infected human B cells. Thereby, we identified 21 novel as well as previously reported ncRNA species to be up-regulated during virus infection. Our method will serve as a powerful tool to identify novel functional ncRNAs acting as genetic switches in the regulation of fundamental cellular processes such as development, tissue differentiation or disease. PMID:17478510

  3. EBV Latent Membrane Protein 1 Activates Akt, NFκB, and Stat3 in B Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Shair, Kathy H. Y; Bendt, Katherine M; Edwards, Rachel H; Bedford, Elisabeth C; Nielsen, Judith N; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is the major oncoprotein of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In transgenic mice, LMP1 promotes increased lymphoma development by 12 mo of age. This study reveals that lymphoma develops in B-1a lymphocytes, a population that is associated with transformation in older mice. The lymphoma cells have deregulated cell cycle markers, and inhibitors of Akt, NFκB, and Stat3 block the enhanced viability of LMP1 transgenic lymphocytes and lymphoma cells in vitro. Lymphoma cells are independent of IL4/Stat6 signaling for survival and proliferation, but have constitutively activated Stat3 signaling. These same targets are also deregulated in wild-type B-1a lymphomas that arise spontaneously through age predisposition. These results suggest that Akt, NFκB, and Stat3 pathways may serve as effective targets in the treatment of EBV-associated B cell lymphomas. PMID:17997602

  4. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  5. Mosquito salivary gland extracts induce EBV-infected NK cell oncogenesis via CD4 T cells in patients with hypersensitivity to mosquito bites.

    PubMed

    Asada, Hideo; Saito-Katsuragi, Mamiko; Niizeki, Hironori; Yoshioka, Akira; Suguri, Setsuo; Isonokami, Masaaki; Aoki, Toshiyuki; Ishihara, Shigehiko; Tokura, Yoshiki; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Miyagawa, Sachiko

    2005-11-01

    Severe hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) is characterized by intense local skin reactions and systemic symptoms such as high fever, lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly. Patients with HMB often have natural killer (NK) cell lymphocytosis associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Here we investigated whether mosquito bites have any influence on the oncogenesis of EBV-infected NK cells. We examined six HMB patients with EBV-infected NK cell lymphocytosis. We first demonstrated that CD4+ T cells, but not NK cells, proliferated well in response to mosquito salivary gland extracts (SGE), especially to SGE of Aedes albopictus. When NK cells were cocultured with autologous CD4+ T cells stimulated by mosquito SGE, the expression of viral oncogene latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) was remarkably enhanced. Next, we stimulated mononuclear cells of the patients with mosquito SGE, and NK cell counts were monitored for 28 d. The counts changed little from initial levels in the culture with mosquito SGE, whereas they decreased steadily in the culture without the extracts. Furthermore, we detected LMP1 mRNA in the skin lesion induced by mosquito SGE. These results suggest that mosquito bites can induce expression of the viral oncogene LMP1 in NK cells via mosquito antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, which is involved in the oncogenesis of NK cells in vivo.

  6. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma with progression to a clonally related, Epstein Barr virus+, cytotoxic aggressive T-cell lymphoma: evidence for secondary EBV infection of an established malignant T-cell clone.

    PubMed

    Langer, Rupert; Geissinger, Eva; Rüdiger, Thomas; von Schilling, Christoph; Ott, German; Mandl-Weber, Sonja; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Fend, Falko

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of primary Epstein Barr virus (EBV) negative peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) NOS in a 56-year-old female who-after an initially indolent course - simultaneously developed an aggressive, EBV+ cytotoxic large T-cell lymphoma, clonally related to the primary PTCL, and an EBV+, clonal large B-cell lymphoproliferation. The initial, EBV-negative PTCL had shown some features of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and had responded well to steroid therapy. Two years later, rapidly fatal, progressive disease with multivisceral involvement developed. Histologically, extensive infiltrates of EBV+, CD8+ large cells were present, in addition to areas of the initial PTCL. Extensive comparative phenotypic and molecular analyses confirmed the presence of an identical CD8+ T-cell clone in the initial EBV-negative PTCL and the EBV+, CD8+ large cell lymphoma at the time of aggressive transformation. These results also justified the retrospective classification of PTCL, NOS for the initial lymphoma. This case shows that secondary EBV infection of an established malignant T-cell clone can occur and may contribute to aggressive transformation of PTCL.

  7. EBV LMP-1 negatively regulates expression and pro-apoptotic activity of Par-4 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeng-Woei; Liu, Po-Fan; Hsu, Lee-Ping; Chen, Peir-Rong; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Shih, Wen-Ling

    2009-07-08

    Latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is closely associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and in this study we sought to determine whether the pro-apoptotic activity of prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4) is modulated by LMP-1 in NPC cells. We found that LMP-1 diminished the pro-apoptotic activity of Par-4 and negatively regulated Par-4 protein by de novo synthesis; moreover, although LMP-1 accelerated a Par-4 activator, PKA, we demonstrated that LMP-1 also activated the PI3K/Akt pathway and increased Bcl-2 expression to suppress the activity of Par-4. Consequently, our results revealed a novel negative action of LMP-1 on the pro-apoptosis protein Par-4 by the coordination of multiple signaling pathways.

  8. Gene expression profiling reveals clear differences between EBV-positive and EBV-negative posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Morscio, J; Dierickx, D; Ferreiro, J F; Herreman, A; Van Loo, P; Bittoun, E; Verhoef, G; Matthys, P; Cools, J; Wlodarska, I; De Wolf-Peeters, C; Sagaert, X; Tousseyn, T

    2013-05-01

    Posttransplant patients are at risk of developing a potentially life-threatening posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), most often of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) morphology and associated with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinicopathological and molecular-genetic characteristics of posttransplant DLBCL and to elucidate whether EBV(+) and EBV(-) posttransplant DLBCL are biologically different. We performed gene expression profiling studies on 48 DLBCL of which 33 arose posttransplantation (PT-DLBCL; 72% EBV+) and 15 in immunocompetent hosts (IC-DLBCL; none EBV+). Unsupervised hierarchical analysis showed clustering of samples related to EBV-status rather than immune status. Except for decreased T cell signaling these cases were inseparable from EBV(-) IC-DLBCL. In contrast, a viral response signature clearly segregated EBV(+) PT-DLBCL from EBV(-) PT-DLBCL and IC-DLBCL cases that were intermixed. The broad EBV latency profile (LMP1+/EBNA2+) was expressed in 59% of EBV(+) PT-DLBCL and associated with a more elaborate inflammatory response compared to intermediate latency (LMP1+/EBNA2-). Inference analysis revealed a role for innate and tolerogenic immune responses (including VSIG4 and IDO1) in EBV(+) PT-DLBCL. In conclusion we can state that the EBV signature is the most determining factor in the pathogenesis of EBV(+) PT-DLBCL.

  9. Do EBV Encoded Small RNAs Interfere With Tumor Suppressor APC in EBV Associated Breast Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    fibroadenomas of the breast in immuno compromised patients. In all latently infected cells EBV expresses two small non-polyadenylated RNAs (EBERs).Recent studies...numbers of rapidly growing fibroadenomas of the breast in immunocompromised patients.1 Because of close association of EBV with various epithelial and...estrogen receptor negative invasive breast cancers. EBV has also been detected in large numbers of rapidly growing fibroadenomas of the breast in immuno

  10. Expression of HSV-1 receptors in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease determines susceptibility to oncolytic HSV.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-Y; Currier, M A; Hansford, L; Kaplan, D; Chiocca, E A; Uchida, H; Goins, W F; Cohen, J B; Glorioso, J C; van Kuppevelt, T H; Mo, X; Cripe, T P

    2013-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation. As PKR is a major cellular defense against Herpes simplex virus (HSV), and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) mutants have shown promising antitumor efficacy in preclinical models, we sought to determine whether EBV-LPD cells are susceptible to infection by oHSVs. We tested three primary EBV-infected lymphocyte cell cultures from neuroblastoma (NB) patients as models of naturally acquired EBV-LPD. NB12 was the most susceptible, NB122R was intermediate and NB88R2 was essentially resistant. Despite EBER expression, PKR was activated by oHSV infection. Susceptibility to oHSV correlated with the expression of the HSV receptor, nectin-1. The resistance of NB88R2 was reversed by exogenous nectin-1 expression, whereas downregulation of nectin-1 on NB12 decreased viral entry. Xenografts derived from the EBV-LPDs exhibited only mild (NB12) or no (NB88R2) response to oHSV injection, compared with a NB cell line that showed a significant response. We conclude that EBV-LPDs are relatively resistant to oHSV virotherapy, in some cases, due to low virus receptor expression but also due to intact antiviral PKR signaling.

  11. Expression of HSV-1 Receptors in EBV-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disease Determines Susceptibility to Oncolytic HSV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pin-Yi; Currier, Mark A; Hansford, Loen; Kaplan, David; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Uchida, Hiroaki; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Mo, Xiaokui; Cripe, Timothy P

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation. Because PKR is a major cellular defense against Herpes simplex virus, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) mutants have shown promising anti-tumor efficacy in preclinical models, we sought to determine whether EBV-LPD cells are susceptible to infection by oHSVs. We tested three primary EBV-infected lymphocyte cell cultures from neuroblastoma (NB) patients as models of naturally acquired EBV-LPD. NB12 was most susceptible, NB122R was intermediate, and NB88R2 was essentially resistant. Despite EBER expression, PKR was activated by oHSV infection. Susceptibility to oHSV correlated with the expression of the HSV receptor, nectin-1. The resistance of NB88R2 was reversed by exogenous nectin-1 expression, whereas down-regulation of nectin-1 on NB12 decreased viral entry. Xenografts derived from the EBV-LPDs exhibited only mild (NB12) or no (NB88R2) response to oHSV injection, compared with a neuroblastoma cell line that showed a significant response. We conclude that EBV-LPDs are relatively resistant to oHSV virotherapy, in some cases due to low virus receptor expression but also due to intact anti-viral PKR signaling. PMID:23254370

  12. A novel mouse xenotransplantation model of EBV-T/NK-LPD and the application of the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Imadome, Ken-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection (CAEBV), characterized by proliferation of EBV-infected T or NK cells, is a disease of unknown pathogenesis and requires hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for curative treatment. Here we show that intravenous injection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients with CAEBV to NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2R γ(null) (NOG) mice leads to engraftment of EBV-infected T or NK cells. Analysis of TCR repertoire identified an identical predominant EBV-infected T-cell clone both in a patient and a mouse transplanted with his PBMCs. EBV-infected T or NK cells infiltrated to most major organs including the liver, spleen, lungs, kidneys, adrenal glands, and intestine, showing histological characteristics of CAEBV. Expression of EBNA1, LMP1, and LMP2A, but not EBNA2, in these cells indicated the latency II program of EBV gene characteristic to CAEBV. High levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and RANTES were detected in the peripheral blood of these mice. EBV-containing fractions of either CD8(+), γδT, or NK cell lineages failed to engraft, once they were isolated from PBMCs ; they could engraft only when CD4(+) cell fraction was transplanted in parallel. Isolated EBV-containing CD4(+) T cells, in contrast, did engraft on their own. This is the first report of an animal model of CAEBV and suggest that EBV-infected T or NK cells in CAEBV are not truly neoplastic but are dependent on CD4(+) T cells for their proliferation in vivo.

  13. EBV-associated lymphomas in adults

    PubMed Central

    Roschewski, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous γ-herpes virus that infects most people but results in life-threatening diseases in only a small subset. Persons who are unable to maintain the virus in its latent state can develop uncontrolled EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disorders and lymphomas. EBV-associated lymphomas are well-characterized in patients with known defects in cellular immunity as occurs post-transplantation or HIV/AIDS but are increasingly recognized in patients without overt immunodeficiencies. Improved understanding of the biology of these lymphomas and the role EBV plays in lymphomagenesis offers the opportunity for improved therapies targeted at important signaling pathways and immunotherapy specific against EBV viral antigens. PMID:22409825

  14. Genetic diversity of EBV-encoded LMP1 in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study and implication for NF-Κb activation.

    PubMed

    Zuercher, Emilie; Butticaz, Christophe; Wyniger, Josiane; Martinez, Raquel; Battegay, Manuel; Boffi El Amari, Emmanuelle; Dang, Thanh; Egger, Jean-François; Fehr, Jan; Mueller-Garamvögyi, Esther; Parini, Andrea; Schaefer, Stephan C; Schoeni-Affolter, Franziska; Thurnheer, Christine; Tinguely, Marianne; Telenti, Amalio; Rothenberger, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several types of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), a multifunctional oncoprotein, is a powerful activator of the transcription factor NF-κB, a property that is essential for EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell survival. Previous studies reported LMP1 sequence variations and induction of higher NF-κB activation levels compared to the prototype B95-8 LMP1 by some variants. Here we used biopsies of EBV-associated cancers and blood of individuals included in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) to analyze LMP1 genetic diversity and impact of sequence variations on LMP1-mediated NF-κB activation potential. We found that a number of variants mediate higher NF-κB activation levels when compared to B95-8 LMP1 and mapped three single polymorphisms responsible for this phenotype: F106Y, I124V and F144I. F106Y was present in all LMP1 isolated in this study and its effect was variant dependent, suggesting that it was modulated by other polymorphisms. The two polymorphisms I124V and F144I were present in distinct phylogenetic groups and were linked with other specific polymorphisms nearby, I152L and D150A/L151I, respectively. The two sets of polymorphisms, I124V/I152L and F144I/D150A/L151I, which were markers of increased NF-κB activation in vitro, were not associated with EBV-associated HL in the SHCS. Taken together these results highlighted the importance of single polymorphisms for the modulation of LMP1 signaling activity and demonstrated that several groups of LMP1 variants, through distinct mutational paths, mediated enhanced NF-κB activation levels compared to B95-8 LMP1.

  15. Distribution and Phenotype of Epstein-Barr Virus-Infected Cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Spieker, Tilmann; Herbst, Hermann

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of colon mucosa, particularly in inflammatory bowel diseases. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are thought to differ in T-helper lymphocyte composition and cytokine secretion patterns. Some of the implicated cytokines are growth factors for EBV-infected cells. We examined colon mucosa for differences in the distribution and phenotype of EBV-infected cells. Colon tissues with Crohn’s disease (n = 31) or ulcerative colitis (n = 25) and controls (n = 60) were characterized by in situ hybridization and immunohistology for six EBV gene products as indicators of latent and replicative EBV infection. The cells were additionally phenotyped by combined detection of the EBV transcripts and B- or T-cell antigens. B lymphocytes predominated as the site of latent EBV infection in the colon and were most numerous in ulcerative colitis. In active ulcerative colitis, EBV-positive lymphocytes accumulated under and within the epithelium and displayed evidence for replicative infection. The patterns of mucosal EBV gene expression indicate local impairment of virus-specific T-cell responses in active ulcerative colitis. Detection of EBV may help to discriminate between active ulcerative colitis and other inflammatory bowel diseases. Colon mucosa is a potential site of EBV replication and may be relevant for EBV transmission. PMID:10880375

  16. EGCG debilitates the persistence of EBV latency by reducing the DNA binding potency of nuclear antigen 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ya-Lin; Tsai, Hsing-Lyn; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cell-based reporter platforms were established for screening of EBNA1 inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG acts as an inhibitor to block EBNA1 binding with the cognate oriP sequence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG debilitates EBNA1-dependent transcription enhancement and episome maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG impairs persistence of EBV latency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG is a potent anti-EBV agent for targeting the latent cascade of EBV. -- Abstract: Because the expression of EBNA1 is prevalent in all EBV-associated tumors, it has become one of the most attractive drug targets for the discovery of anti-EBV compounds. In a cell-based reporter system, EBNA1 consistently upregulated the transcription of an oriP-Luc mini-EBV episome by 6- to 8-fold. The treatment of cells with 50 {mu}M EGCG effectively blocked the binding of EBNA1 to oriP-DNA both in vivo and in vitro, which led to the abrogation of EBNA1-dependent episome maintenance and transcriptional enhancement. Importantly, the anti-EBNA1 effects caused by EGCG ultimately impaired the persistence of EBV latent infection. Our data suggest that the inhibition of EBNA1 activity by EGCG could be a promising starting point for the development of new protocols for anti-EBV therapy.

  17. Treatment with a BH3 mimetic overcomes the resistance of latency III EBV (+) cells to p53-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pujals, A; Renouf, B; Robert, A; Chelouah, S; Hollville, É; Wiels, J

    2011-01-01

    P53 inactivation is often observed in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells due to mutations in the p53 gene or overexpression of its negative regulator, murine double minute-2 (MDM2). This event is now considered an essential part of the oncogenic process. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is strongly associated with BL and is a cofactor in its development. We previously showed that nutlin-3, an antagonist of MDM2, activates the p53 pathway in BL cell lines harboring wild-type p53. However, nutlin-3 strongly induced apoptosis in EBV (−) or latency I EBV (+) cells, whereas latency III EBV (+) cells were much more resistant. We show here that this resistance to apoptosis is also observed in latency III EBV (+) lymphoblastoid cell lines. We also show that, in latency III EBV (+) cells, B-cell lymphona 2 (Bcl-2) is selectively overproduced and interacts with Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), preventing its activation. The treatment of these cells with the Bcl-2-homology domain 3 mimetic ABT-737 disrupts Bax/Bcl-2 interaction and allows Bax activation by nutlin-3. Furthermore, treatment with these two compounds strongly induces apoptosis. Thus, a combination of Mdm2 and Bcl-2 inhibitors might be a useful anti-cancer strategy for diseases linked to EBV infection. PMID:21796156

  18. Treatment with a BH3 mimetic overcomes the resistance of latency III EBV (+) cells to p53-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pujals, A; Renouf, B; Robert, A; Chelouah, S; Hollville, E; Wiels, J

    2011-07-28

    P53 inactivation is often observed in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells due to mutations in the p53 gene or overexpression of its negative regulator, murine double minute-2 (MDM2). This event is now considered an essential part of the oncogenic process. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is strongly associated with BL and is a cofactor in its development. We previously showed that nutlin-3, an antagonist of MDM2, activates the p53 pathway in BL cell lines harboring wild-type p53. However, nutlin-3 strongly induced apoptosis in EBV (-) or latency I EBV (+) cells, whereas latency III EBV (+) cells were much more resistant. We show here that this resistance to apoptosis is also observed in latency III EBV (+) lymphoblastoid cell lines. We also show that, in latency III EBV (+) cells, B-cell lymphona 2 (Bcl-2) is selectively overproduced and interacts with Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), preventing its activation. The treatment of these cells with the Bcl-2-homology domain 3 mimetic ABT-737 disrupts Bax/Bcl-2 interaction and allows Bax activation by nutlin-3. Furthermore, treatment with these two compounds strongly induces apoptosis. Thus, a combination of Mdm2 and Bcl-2 inhibitors might be a useful anti-cancer strategy for diseases linked to EBV infection.

  19. ROS and ERK1/2-mediated caspase-9 activation increases XAF1 expression in dexamethasone-induced apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Choi, Yunock; Kim, Yeong Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Daejin; Hur, Dae Young

    2013-07-01

    Dexamethasone (Dex) inhibits the growth of diverse types of cancer cells and is utilized clinically for the therapy of hematological malignancies. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of Dex action in the apoptosis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells. We showed that Dex inhibited the proliferation of EBV-transformed B cells and induced apoptosis by activating caspase-9, -3 and -8. While activation of caspase-9 was triggered as early as 2 h after Dex treatment, cleavage of caspase-8 was deferred and was found 8 h after the exposure. Dex-dependent activation of caspase-8 was blocked by the specific caspase-9 inhibitor, z-LEHD-fmk. Moreover, Dex significantly increased the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)‑associated factor 1 (XAF1) and induced the translocation of XAF1 into the cytosol. Cytosolic XAF1 with Puma induced the translocation of Bax into mitochondria. Dex led to up-regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 after the exposure. We speculated that ROS generation might be the first event of Dex-induced apoptosis because ROS inhibitor NAC abrogated ROS production and ERK1/2 activation, but PD98059 did not block ROS production. NAC and PD98059 also suppressed the translocation of XAF1, Puma and Bax into mitochondria. These results demonstrated that Dex-mediated activation of caspase-9 via ROS generation and ERK1/2 pathway activation resulted in the activation of caspase-8 and the increment of XAF1, thereby induced apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells. These findings suggest that Dex constitutes a probable therapy for EBV-associated hematological malignancies.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) load and interleukin-10 in EBV-positive and EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Muti, Giuliana; Klersy, Catherine; Baldanti, Fausto; Granata, Simonetta; Oreste, Pierluigi; Pezzetti, Laura; Gatti, Marta; Gargantini, Livio; Caramella, Marianna; Mancini, Valentina; Gerna, Guiseppe; Morra, Enrica

    2003-09-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are heterogeneous severe complications occurring in 1-10% of transplanted patients. In most cases, PTLDs are associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection but, recently, some clinical studies have reported an increasing number of EBV-negative PTLDs. Several studies have emphasized the critical role of the early identification of patients at risk for PTLD, in prompting the adoption of either pre-emptive strategies or timely treatment. To this purpose, monitoring of EBV DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is considered to be a useful test. Moreover, recently, the role of interleukin (IL)-10 in EBV-related diseases has been remarked, and high levels of IL-10 have been detected in PTLD patients. In this study, both EBV load and IL-10 were monitored in 38 PTLD patients at diagnosis and during follow-up, as well as in a control group, in order to establish the diagnostic role of the two tests, their relationship with the different PTLD subsets (EBV-positive and EBV-negative) and their behaviour during treatment. Results of our study suggest that the usefulness of IL-10 assay for early diagnosis of PTLD is similar to that of EBV load quantification, and its clinical diagnostic value is lower in EBV-negative than in EBV-positive PTLDs.

  1. ROS-mediated JNK/p38-MAPK activation regulates Bax translocation in Sorafenib-induced apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Choi, Yunock; Kim, Yeong Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Daejin; Hur, Dae Young

    2014-03-01

    Sorafenib (SRF) is a multi-kinase inhibitor that has been shown to have antitumor activity against several types of cancers, but the effect of SRF on EBV-transformed B cells is unknown. We report that SRF can induce the apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells through JNK/p38-MAPK activation. SRF triggered the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), translocation of Bax into the mitochondria, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP, and subsequent apoptosis. Moreover, we found that SRF exposure activated the phosphorylation of JNK and p38-MAPK and suppressed the phosphorylation of PI3K-p85 and Akt. N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) inhibited the activation of JNK and p38-MAPK. SP600125 and SB203580 blocked apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane disruption but did not affect ROS production after SRF treatment. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms driving SRF-mediated cell death and suggest that SRF could be a potential therapeutic drug for the treatment of EBV-related malignant diseases.

  2. HIV, EBV, and monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Mailankody, Sham; Landgren, Ola

    2013-10-24

    In this issue of Blood, Ouedraogo et al have investigated the role of HIV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication in the persistence of monoclonal gammopathy.1 It has been known for some time that patients with HIV infection have an increased incidence of monoclonal gammopathy and plasma cell dyscrasias.2,3 The exact mechanism of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with HIV infection is unknown, but in many patients the monoclonal gammopathy and other B-cell abnormalities can be reversed with antiretroviral therapy. However, a proportion of patients will have persistent monoclonal gammopathy.

  3. KSHV LANA and EBV LMP1 induce the expression of UCH-L1 following viral transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Gretchen L.; Bheda-Malge, Anjali; Wang, Ling; Shackelford, Julia; Damania, Blossom; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2014-01-05

    Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) has oncogenic properties and is highly expressed during malignancies. We recently documented that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection induces uch-l1 expression. Here we show that Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection induced UCH-L1 expression, via cooperation of KSHV Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen (LANA) and RBP-Jκ and activation of the uch-l1 promoter. UCH-L1 expression was also increased in Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL) cells co-infected with KSHV and EBV compared with PEL cells infected only with KSHV, suggesting EBV augments the effect of LANA on uch-l1. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is one of the few EBV products expressed in PEL cells. Results showed that LMP1 was sufficient to induce uch-l1 expression, and co-expression of LMP1 and LANA had an additive effect on uch-l1 expression. These results indicate that viral latency products of both human γ-herpesviruses contribute to uch-l1 expression, which may contribute to the progression of lymphoid malignancies. - Highlights: • Infection of endothelial cells with KSHV induced UCH-L1 expression. • KSHV LANA is sufficient for the induction of uch-l1. • Co-infection with KSHV and EBV (observed in some PELs) results in the additive induction of uch-l1. • EBV LMP1 also induced UCH-L1 expression. • LANA- and LMP1-mediated activation of the uch-l1 promoter is in part through RBP-Jκ.

  4. Hodgkin lymphoma and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV): no evidence to support hit-and-run mechanism in cases classified as non-EBV-associated.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Alice; Perry, Jacqueline; Freeland, June; Alexander, Freda E; Carman, William F; Shield, Lesley; Cartwright, Ray; Jarrett, Ruth F

    2003-05-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a proportion of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) cases, and this association is believed to be causal. The aetiology of cases lacking EBV in the tumour cells (EBV HRS-ve), which make up the majority of cases in western countries, is obscure. It has been suggested that EBV may also cause these tumours by using a hit-and-run mechanism. Support for this idea comes from the finding that most young adult patients, who are likely to have a good immune response to EBV, have EBV HRS-ve HL. We investigated this possibility using a combined serologic and molecular approach. Analysis of EBV seroprevalence rates in an epidemiologic study of young adult HL revealed that cases with EBV HRS-ve HL were more likely to be EBV-seronegative than controls. Furthermore, additional studies clearly showed that some HL patients have never been infected by EBV. Quantitative PCR was used to look for the presence of deleted EBV genomes in a series of adult cases with both EBV HRS+ve and HRS-ve HL. Subgenomic fragments were detected in equimolar proportions. This study, therefore, found no evidence to support the idea that a hit-and-run mechanism involving EBV plays a role in the pathogenesis of HL.

  5. Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection activates the Epstein-Barr virus replicative cycle via a CREB-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongling; Li, Ting; Zeng, Musheng; Peng, Tao

    2012-04-01

    The reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to lytic replication is important in pathogenesis and requires virus-host cellular interactions. However, the mechanism underlying the reactivation of EBV is not yet fully understood. In the present study, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was shown to induce the reactivation of latent EBV by triggering BZLF1 expression. The BZLF1 promoter (Zp) was not activated by HSV-1 essential glycoprotein-induced membrane fusion. Nevertheless, Zp was activated within 6 h post HSV-1 infection in virus entry-dependent and replication-independent manners. Using a panel of Zp deletion mutants, HSV-1 was shown to promote Zp through a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element (CRE) located in ZII. The phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding (phos-CREB) protein, the cellular transactivator that binds to CRE, also increased after HSV-1 infection. By transient transfection, cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and HSV-1 US3 protein were found to be capable of activating Zp in CREB- and CRE-dependent manners. The relationship between EBV activation and HSV-1 infection revealed a possible common mechanism that stimulated latent EBV into lytic cycles in vivo.

  6. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded protein kinase, EBV-PK, but not the thymidine kinase (EBV-TK), is required for ganciclovir and acyclovir inhibition of lytic viral production.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiao; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Fingeroth, Joyce D; Gershburg, Edward; Pagano, Joseph S; Kenney, Shannon C

    2010-05-01

    Ganciclovir (GCV) and acyclovir (ACV) are guanine nucleoside analogues that inhibit lytic herpesvirus replication. GCV and ACV must be monophosphorylated by virally encoded enzymes to be converted into nucleotides and incorporated into viral DNA. However, whether GCV and/or ACV phosphorylation in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells is mediated primarily by the EBV-encoded protein kinase (EBV-PK), the EBV-encoded thymidine kinase (EBV-TK), or both is controversial. To examine this question, we constructed EBV mutants containing stop codons in either the EBV-PK or EBV-TK open reading frame and selected for stable 293T clones latently infected with wild-type EBV or each of the mutant viruses. Cells were induced to the lytic form of viral replication with a BZLF1 expression vector in the presence and absence of various doses of GCV and ACV, and infectious viral titers were determined by a green Raji cell assay. As expected, virus production in wild-type EBV-infected 293T cells was inhibited by both GCV (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)] = 1.5 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 4.1 microM). However, the EBV-PK mutant (which replicates as well as the wild-type (WT) virus in 293T cells) was resistant to both GCV (IC(50) = 19.6 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 36.4 microM). Expression of the EBV-PK protein in trans restored GCV and ACV sensitivity in cells infected with the PK mutant virus. In contrast, in 293T cells infected with the TK mutant virus, viral replication remained sensitive to both GCV (IC(50) = 1.2 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 2.8 microM), although susceptibility to the thymine nucleoside analogue, bromodeoxyuridine, was reduced. Thus, EBV-PK but not EBV-TK mediates ACV and GCV susceptibilities.

  7. Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) confers resistance to apoptosis in EBV-positive B-lymphoma cells through up-regulation of survivin

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jie; Murakami, Masanao; Verma, Subhash C.; Cai Qiliang; Haldar, Sabyasachi; Kaul, Rajeev; Wasik, Mariusz A.; Middeldorp, Jaap; Robertson, Erle S.

    2011-02-05

    Resistance to apoptosis is an important component of the overall mechanism which drives the tumorigenic process. EBV is a ubiquitous human gamma-herpesvirus which preferentially establishes latent infection in viral infected B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is typically expressed in most forms of EBV-positive malignancies and is important for replication of the latent episome in concert with replication of the host cells. Here, we investigate the effects of EBNA1 on survivin up-regulation in EBV-infected human B-lymphoma cells. We present evidence which demonstrates that EBNA1 forms a complex with Sp1 or Sp1-like proteins bound to their cis-element at the survivin promoter. This enhances the activity of the complex and up-regulates survivin. Knockdown of survivin and EBNA1 showed enhanced apoptosis in infected cells and thus supports a role for EBNA1 in suppressing apoptosis in EBV-infected cells. Here, we suggest that EBV encoded EBNA1 can contribute to the oncogenic process by up-regulating the apoptosis suppressor protein, survivin in EBV-associated B-lymphoma cells.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus-positive cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma followed by chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection-associated T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kato, Seiichi; Miyata, Tomoko; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Shimada, Satoko; Ito, Yoshinori; Tomita, Akihiro; Elsayed, Ahmed Ali; Takahashi, Emiko; Asano, Naoko; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2013-12-01

    A 30-year-old female patient presented with intestinal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma (EBV+ CTL), which was surgically resected. Fourteen years later, she returned to our hospital with hypersensitivity to mosquito bites and was diagnosed with chronic active EBV infection-associated T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (CAEBV/TNK-LPD). She developed systemic EBV+ CTL at age 47 years during the 2.5-year clinical course of CAEBV/TNK-LPD, despite multiagent chemotherapy and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Afterward, she had a rapidly deteriorating clinical course and died at age 48 years. The immunophenotype of the EBV+ CTL was consistently a CD3, CD8, and cytotoxic molecule-positive type with the same clonality in polymerase chain reaction analysis of T-cell receptor-γ chain gene rearrangement. This is the first reported case of EBV+ CTL preceding the clinical presentation of CAEBV/TNK-LPD. The present case was unique in suggesting a close relationship between EBV+ CTL and chronic active EBV infection.

  9. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome mimicking chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Keiko; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Otsubo, Keisuke; Wakiguchi, Hiroshi; Noda, Yukihiro; Kasahara, Yoshihito; Miyawaki, Toshio

    2011-06-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) is defined as a systemic EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, and splenomegaly in apparently immunocompetent persons. Recent studies have revealed that EBV infects T or natural killer cells in most patients with CAEBV; the etiology of CAEBV, however, remains unknown. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorder (ALPS) is an inherited disorder associated with defects in apoptosis, and clinically characterized by lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hypergammaglobulinemia, and autoimmune disease. ALPS is most often associated with mutations in the FAS gene, which is an apoptosis-signaling receptor important for homeostasis of the immune system. Based on the clinical similarity between ALPS and CAEBV with respect to lymphoproliferation, we have examined the possibility of the co-occurrence of ALPS in patients with a diagnosis of CAEBV. In this study, we have identified FAS gene mutations in three Japanese patients with lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and unusual EBV infection, who were diagnosed with CAEBV. These observations, which indicate that the clinical development of ALPS may be associated with EBV infection, alert us to a potential diagnostic pitfall of CAEBV.

  10. KSHV LANA and EBV LMP1 induce the expression of UCH-L1 following viral transformation.

    PubMed

    Bentz, Gretchen L; Bheda-Malge, Anjali; Wang, Ling; Shackelford, Julia; Damania, Blossom; Pagano, Joseph S

    2014-01-05

    Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) has oncogenic properties and is highly expressed during malignancies. We recently documented that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection induces uch-l1 expression. Here we show that Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection induced UCH-L1 expression, via cooperation of KSHV Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen (LANA) and RBP-Jκ and activation of the uch-l1 promoter. UCH-L1 expression was also increased in Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL) cells co-infected with KSHV and EBV compared with PEL cells infected only with KSHV, suggesting EBV augments the effect of LANA on uch-l1. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is one of the few EBV products expressed in PEL cells. Results showed that LMP1 was sufficient to induce uch-l1 expression, and co-expression of LMP1 and LANA had an additive effect on uch-l1 expression. These results indicate that viral latency products of both human γ-herpesviruses contribute to uch-l1 expression, which may contribute to the progression of lymphoid malignancies.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). III. Incidence of EBV antibodies in patients with various tumors.

    PubMed

    Pătraşcu, I V; Andrian, T; Stoian, M; Tache, M

    1988-01-01

    Serum samples from 553 patients with various tumors, from 26 patients with different viral infections and from 78 clinically healthy subjects were tested by indirect immunofluorescence (IF) reaction for the presence of specific antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus. The test revealed antibodies to EBV in 127 patients with tumors, in 14 patients with viral infections and in 8 healthy persons.

  12. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain regulates the energy requirement for EBV-induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Zhang, Xianming; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Longnecker, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is preceded by membrane fusion, which in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is thought to be mediated by the refolding of glycoprotein B (gB) from a prefusion to a postfusion state. In our current studies, we characterized a gB C-terminal tail domain (CTD) mutant truncated at amino acid 843 (gB843). This truncation mutant is hyperfusogenic as monitored by syncytium formation and in a quantitative fusion assay and is dependent on gH/gL for fusion activity. gB843 can rescue the fusion function of other glycoprotein mutants that have null or decreased fusion activity in epithelial and B cells. In addition, gB843 requires less gp42 and gH/gL for fusion, and can function in fusion at a lower temperature than wild-type gB, indicating a lower energy requirement for fusion activation. Since a key step in fusion is the conversion of gB from a prefusion to an active postfusion state by gH/gL, gB843 may access this activated gB state more readily. Our studies indicate that the gB CTD may participate in the fusion function by maintaining gB in an inactive prefusion form prior to activation by receptor binding. Importance: Diseases resulting from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in humans range from the fairly benign disease infectious mononucleosis to life-threatening cancer. As an enveloped virus, EBV must fuse with a host cell membrane for entry and infection by using glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42. Among these glycoproteins, gB is thought to be the protein that executes fusion. To further characterize the function of the EBV gB cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain (CTD) in fusion, we used a previously constructed CTD truncation mutant and studied its fusion activity in the context of other EBV glycoprotein mutants. From these studies, we find that the gB CTD regulates fusion by altering the energy requirements for the triggering of fusion mediated by gH/gL or gp42. Overall, our studies may lead to a better understanding of EBV fusion

  13. Epstein–Barr Virus: Diseases Linked to Infection and Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem C.; Pei, Yonggang; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) was first discovered in 1964, and was the first known human tumor virus now shown to be associated with a vast number of human diseases. Numerous studies have been conducted to understand infection, propagation, and transformation in various cell types linked to human diseases. However, a comprehensive lens through which virus infection, reactivation and transformation of infected host cells can be visualized is yet to be formally established and will need much further investigation. Several human cell types infected by EBV have been linked to associated diseases. However, whether these are a direct result of EBV infection or indirectly due to contributions by additional infectious agents will need to be fully investigated. Therefore, a thorough examination of infection, reactivation, and cell transformation induced by EBV will provide a more detailed view of its contributions that drive pathogenesis. This undoubtedly expand our knowledge of the biology of EBV infection and the signaling activities of targeted cellular factors dysregulated on infection. Furthermore, these insights may lead to identification of therapeutic targets and agents for clinical interventions. Here, we review the spectrum of EBV-associated diseases, the role of the encoded latent antigens, and the switch to latency or lytic replication which occurs in EBV infected cells. Furthermore, we describe the cellular processes and critical factors which contribute to cell transformation. We also describe the fate of B-cells and epithelial cells after EBV infection and the expected consequences which contribute to establishment of viral-associated pathologies. PMID:27826287

  14. Measurement of Epstein-Barr virus DNA load using a novel quantification standard containing two EBV DNA targets and SYBR Green I dye

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection may cause serious, life-threatening complications in immunocompromised individuals. EBV DNA is often detected in EBV-associated disease states, with viral load believed to be a reflection of virus activity. Two separate real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) assays using SYBR Green I dye and a single quantification standard containing two EBV genes, Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and BamHI fragment H rightward open reading frame-1 (BHRF-1), were developed to detect and measure absolute EBV DNA load in patients with various EBV-associated diseases. EBV DNA loads and viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgG antibody titres were also quantified on a population sample. Results EBV DNA was measurable in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) whole blood, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. EBV DNA loads were detectable from 8.0 × 102 to 1.3 × 108 copies/ml in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (n = 5), 1.5 × 103 to 2.0 × 105 copies/ml in infectious mononucleosis (n = 7), 7.5 × 104 to 1.1 × 105 copies/ml in EBV-associated haemophagocytic syndrome (n = 1), 2.0 × 102 to 5.6 × 103 copies/ml in HIV-infected patients (n = 12), and 2.0 × 102 to 9.1 × 104 copies/ml in the population sample (n = 218). EBNA-1 and BHRF-1 DNA were detected in 11.0% and 21.6% of the population sample respectively. There was a modest correlation between VCA IgG antibody titre and BHRF-1 DNA load (rho = 0.13, p = 0.05) but not EBNA-1 DNA load (rho = 0.11, p = 0.11). Conclusion Two sensitive and specific real-time PCR assays using SYBR Green I dye and a single quantification standard containing two EBV DNA targets, were developed for the detection and measurement of EBV DNA load in a variety of clinical samples. These assays have application in the investigation of EBV-related illnesses in immunocompromised individuals. PMID:20860842

  15. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Limits Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Activation in B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Erik R.; Koganti, Siva; Zhi, Jizu; Megyola, Cynthia; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Tangye, Stuart G.; Farrell, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Lytic activation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is central to its life cycle and to most EBV-related diseases. However, not every EBV-infected B cell is susceptible to lytic activation. This lack of uniform susceptibility to lytic activation also directly impacts the success of viral oncolytic therapy for EBV cancers, yet determinants of susceptibility to lytic induction signals are not well understood. To determine if host factors influence susceptibility to EBV lytic activation, we developed a technique to separate lytic from refractory cells and reported that EBV lytic activation occurs preferentially in cells with lower levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Using this tool to detect single cells, we now extend the correlation between STAT3 and lytic versus refractory states to EBV-infected circulating B cells in patients with primary EBV infection, leading us to investigate whether STAT3 controls susceptibility to EBV lytic activation. In loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies in EBV-positive B lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cells, we found that the levels of functional STAT3 regulate susceptibility to EBV lytic activation. This prompted us to identify a pool of candidate cellular genes that might be regulated by STAT3 to limit EBV lytic activation. From this pool, we confirmed increases in transcript levels in refractory cells of a set of genes known to participate in transcription repression. Taken together, our findings place STAT3 at a critical crossroads between EBV latency and lytic activation, processes fundamental to EBV lymphomagenesis. PMID:23966384

  16. CD80 (B7.1) and CD86 (B7.2) induce EBV-transformed B cell apoptosis through the Fas/FasL pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Yeong Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Cho, Dae-Ho; Kim, Daejin; Hur, Dae Young

    2013-11-01

    CD80 and CD86 expression is strongly regulated in B cells and is induced by various stimuli (e.g., cytokines, ligation of MHC class II and CD40 ligand). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection activates B lymphocytes and transforms them into lymphoblastoid cells. However, the role of CD80 and CD86 in EBV infection of B cells remains unclear. Here, we observed that cross-linking of CD80 and CD86 in EBV-transformed B cells induced apoptosis through caspase-dependent release of apoptosis-related molecules, cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, because Z-VAD-fmk (N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) blocked apoptosis and disruption of mitochondria. Stimulation of CD80 and CD86 induced expression of Fas ligand (FasL) on EBV-transformed B cells and upregulated Fas and FasL expression in IM-9 cells. Apoptosis through Fas-FasL interactions was blocked by treatment of cells with ZB4, an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody. These results suggest that the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 induced by EBV infection stimulate apoptosis of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid B cells via the Fas/FasL pathway.

  17. Unveiling Another Missing Piece in EBV-Driven Lymphomagenesis: EBV-Encoded MicroRNAs Expression in EBER-Negative Burkitt Lymphoma Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mundo, Lucia; Ambrosio, Maria R.; Picciolini, Matteo; Lo Bello, Giuseppe; Gazaneo, Sara; Del Porro, Leonardo; Lazzi, Stefano; Navari, Mohsen; Onyango, Noel; Granai, Massimo; Bellan, Cristiana; De Falco, Giulia; Gibellini, Davide; Piccaluga, Pier P.; Leoncini, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a gammaherpesvirus linked to a number of lymphoid and epithelial malignancies, including Burkitt lymphoma (BL) in which its frequency ranges from 30% in sporadic cases to 100% in the endemic ones. The possible contribution of EBV to BL pathogenesis is largely unknown. It has been suggested that EBV may be associated with all of the cases, including those diagnosed as EBV negative by a mechanism of hit-and-run. Early during oncogenesis, viral genes are essential for initiating disease. Progressively, viral genome is lost to escape the immune system and host mutations accumulate in proto-oncogenic cell. The main problem with the hit-and-run hypothesis is the lack of evidence in primary tumors. The routine methods applied to detect the virus [i.e., immunohistochemistry and EBV-encoded RNAs (EBER) in situ hybridization (ISH)] have a low specificity and accuracy. The aim of this study was to identify the most suitable method to detect EBV infection in pathology samples by applying conventional and non-conventional methods (i.e., EBV-microRNAs detection and EBV viral load measurement). We investigated a total of 10 cases and we found that all the samples (n = 6) diagnosed as EBV negative by immunohistochemistry and EBER-ISH demonstrated the presence of EBV-microRNAs and EBV genome. This points at the possibility that EBV might have contributed to lymphomagenesis in all our patients, and propose microRNAs detection as the most specific and sensitive tool to recognize EBV vestiges. It is worth noting that our data would have considerable implications for EBV-related diseases control. By using anti-EBV vaccines, one could potentially prevent also some cancers less suspected of a viral origin because of viral genome loss. PMID:28298901

  18. [Pathogenesis and novel therapy for EBV-related B-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Sato, Ai; Yamakawa, Natsuko; Kotani, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a type of γ-herpes virus, is known to be a tumor virus. About 90% of adults were found to be persistently infected with EBV and this infection is responsible for Burkitt lymphoma (BL), extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), acquired Immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated lymphoma, and a portion of diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCL). EBV-positive DLBCL in the elderly, a disease recognized in Japan, is described in the WHO classification as a new category of DLBCLs. Clinical studies of DLBCLs have since accumulated. We herein describe our clinicopathological study of EBV-positive DLBCL in the elderly in the rituximab era, and review EBV-positive B cell lymphoma cases. A potentially promising novel therapy for EBV-positive B cell lymphoma, anti-PD-1 antibody, is then introduced. Finally, we briefly discuss our unpublished study of EBV-positive B cell lymphoma and its microenvironment.

  19. ASK1/JNK-mediated TAp63 activation controls the cell survival signal of baicalein-treated EBV-transformed B cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Yeong Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Yang, Jae Wook; Kim, Daejin; Hur, Dae Young

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptionally active p63 (TAp63) promotes cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis in several cancer cells. Migration inhibitory factor (MIF)/CD74 regulates B-cell survival through nuclear factor (NF)-κB-dependent TAp63 expression. In this study, we investigated how the level of TAp63 expression influences the induction of apoptosis in baicalein-treated EBV-transformed B cells. Baicalein induced the expression of TAp63 and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), as well as cytotoxicity, by disrupting the mitochondrial membrane and inhibiting the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and NF-κB. Genetic knockdown of TAp63 or ASK1 by small interfering RNA resulted in protection from apoptosis accompanied by the recovery of CD74, CD44, α4 integrin, Bcl-2, and NF-κB activation. Baicalein-induced reactive oxygen species activated the ASK1/JNK pathway with subsequent expression of TAp63. Pre-engagement with MIF/CD74 maintained the expression of CD74, CD44, and α4 integrin, as well as Syk/Src-mediated PI3K/Akt activation, in baicalein-treated EBV-transformed B cells. Meanwhile, ASK1/JNK-dependent TAp63 expression was efficiently suppressed after pre-treatment with MIF. Our results suggest that baicalein-mediated ASK1/JNK activation regulates the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway through the up-regulation of TAp63 and down-regulation of NF-κB and CD74/CD44 in B-cell malignancies.

  20. Increased expression of Toll-like receptors 7 and 9 in myasthenia gravis thymus characterized by active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Paola; Galbardi, Barbara; Franzi, Sara; Marcuzzo, Stefania; Barzago, Claudia; Bonanno, Silvia; Camera, Giorgia; Maggi, Lorenzo; Kapetis, Dimos; Andreetta, Francesca; Biasiucci, Amelia; Motta, Teresio; Giardina, Carmelo; Antozzi, Carlo; Baggi, Fulvio; Mantegazza, Renato; Bernasconi, Pia

    2016-04-01

    Considerable data implicate the thymus as the main site of autosensitization to the acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis (MG), a B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease affecting the neuromuscular junction. We recently demonstrated an active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the thymus of MG patients, suggesting that EBV might contribute to the onset or maintenance of the autoimmune response within MG thymus, because of its ability to activate and immortalize autoreactive B cells. EBV has been reported to elicit and modulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7- and TLR9-mediated innate immune responses, which are known to favor B-cell dysfunction and autoimmunity. Aim of this study was to investigate whether EBV infection is associated with altered expression of TLR7 and TLR9 in MG thymus. By real-time PCR, we found that TLR7 and TLR9 mRNA levels were significantly higher in EBV-positive MG compared to EBV-negative normal thymuses. By confocal microscopy, high expression levels of TLR7 and TLR9 proteins were observed in B cells and plasma cells of MG thymic germinal centers (GCs) and lymphoid infiltrates, where the two receptors co-localized with EBV antigens. An increased frequency of Ki67-positive proliferating B cells was found in MG thymuses, where we also detected proliferating cells expressing TLR7, TLR9 and EBV antigens, thus supporting the idea that EBV-associated TLR7/9 signaling may promote abnormal B-cell activation and proliferation. Along with B cells and plasma cells, thymic epithelium, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and macrophages exhibited enhanced TLR7 and TLR9 expression in MG thymus; TLR7 was also increased in thymic myeloid dendritic cells and its transcriptional levels positively correlated with those of interferon (IFN)-β. We suggested that TLR7/9 signaling may be involved in antiviral type I IFN production and long-term inflammation in EBV-infected MG thymuses. Our overall findings indicate that EBV-driven TLR7- and TLR9-mediated innate immune

  1. IDO metabolite produced by EBV-transformed B cells inhibits surface expression of NKG2D in NK cells via the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyunkeun; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Gabin; Kim, Yeong-Seok; Kim, Sung Mok; Kim, Daejin; Seo, Su Kil; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Cho, DaeHo; Hur, Daeyoung

    2011-05-01

    Natural Killer cells are known to play a major role in the innate immune response against viral infections and tumor cells. Several viruses, such as CMV, EBV and HIV-1, have acquired strategies to escape elimination by NK cells. In this study, we observed that EBV infection increased expression of IDO on B cells. To evaluate the function of IDO associated with EBV infection, we investigated whether EBV-induced IDO could modulate expression of NK cell-activation receptor, NKG2D. When NK cells were co-incubated with EBV transformed B cells, surface expression of NKG2D was significantly reduced in NK cells. Incubation with L-kynurenine, an IDO metabolite, down-modulated NKG2D expression in NK cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Incubation with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 also inhibited NKG2D expression in NK cells. In addition, we observed that the effect of L-kynurenine was blocked by JNK agonist, anisomycin, suggesting the involvement of the JNK pathway in the signal transduction of L-kynurenine-reduced NKG2D expression. Furthermore, IL-18 significantly reduced L-kynurenine-induced down-regulation of NKG2D expression in NK cells. Taken together, these data indicate that down-regulation of NKG2D by EBV-induced IDO metabolite provides a potential mechanism by which EBV escapes NKG2D-mediated attack by immune cells.

  2. Inflammation and epstein-barr virus infection are common features of myasthenia gravis thymus: possible roles in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Paola; Maggi, Lorenzo; Colleoni, Lara; Caldara, Rosa; Motta, Teresio; Giardina, Carmelo; Antozzi, Carlo; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato

    2011-01-01

    The thymus plays a major role in myasthenia gravis (MG). Our recent finding of a persistent Epstein-Barr (EBV) virus infection in some MG thymuses, combined with data showing that the thymus is in a proinflammatory state in most patients, supports a viral contribution to the pathogenesis of MG. Aim of this study was to gain further evidence for intrathymic chronic inflammation and EBV infection in MG patients. Transcriptional profiling by low density array and real-time PCR showed overexpression of genes involved in inflammatory and immune response in MG thymuses. Real-time PCR for EBV genome, latent (EBER1, EBNA1, LMP1) and lytic (BZLF1) transcripts, and immunohistochemistry for LMP1 and BZLF1 proteins confirmed an active intrathymic EBV infection, further supporting the hypothesis that EBV might contribute to onset or perpetuation of the autoimmune response in MG. Altogether, our results support a role of inflammation and EBV infection as pathogenic features of MG thymus.

  3. Assembly and Architecture of the EBV B Cell Entry Triggering Complex

    PubMed Central

    Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Jiang, Jiansen; Hu, Yao Xiong; Rowe, Cynthia L.; Möhl, Britta S.; Chen, Jia; Jiang, Wei; Mellins, Elizabeth D.; Longnecker, Richard; Zhou, Z. Hong; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is an enveloped double-stranded DNA virus of the gammaherpesvirinae sub-family that predominantly infects humans through epithelial cells and B cells. Three EBV glycoproteins, gH, gL and gp42, form a complex that targets EBV infection of B cells. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules expressed on B cells serve as the receptor for gp42, triggering membrane fusion and virus entry. The mechanistic role of gHgL in herpesvirus entry has been largely unresolved, but it is thought to regulate the activation of the virally-encoded gB protein, which acts as the primary fusogen. Here we study the assembly and function of the reconstituted B cell entry complex comprised of gHgL, gp42 and HLA class II. The structure from negative-stain electron microscopy provides a detailed snapshot of an intermediate state in EBV entry and highlights the potential for the triggering complex to bring the two membrane bilayers into proximity. Furthermore, gHgL interacts with a previously identified, functionally important hydrophobic pocket on gp42, defining the overall architecture of the complex and playing a critical role in membrane fusion activation. We propose a macroscopic model of the initiating events in EBV B cell fusion centered on the formation of the triggering complex in the context of both viral and host membranes. This model suggests how the triggering complex may bridge the two membrane bilayers, orienting critical regions of the N- and C- terminal ends of gHgL to promote the activation of gB and efficient membrane fusion. PMID:25144748

  4. LMP1 and LMP2A collaborate to promote Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced B cell lymphomas in a cord blood-humanized mouse model but are not essential.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Tsai, Ming-Han; Romero-Masters, James C; Ranheim, Erik A; Huebner, Shane M; Bristol, Jillian; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Kenney, Shannon C

    2017-01-11

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with B cell lymphomas in humans. The ability of EBV to convert human B cells into long-lived lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) in vitro requires the collaborative effects of EBNA2 (which hijacks notch signaling), LMP1 (which mimics CD40 signaling), and EBNA 3A/3C (which inhibit oncogene-induced senescence and apoptosis). However, we recently showed that an LMP1-deleted EBV mutant induces B cell lymphomas in a newly developed cord blood-humanized mouse model that allows EBV-infected B cells to interact with CD4 T cells (the major source of CD40 ligand). Here we examined whether the EBV LMP2A protein, which mimics constitutively active B cell receptor signaling, is required for EBV-induced lymphomas in this model. We find that deletion of LMP2A delays the onset of EBV-induced lymphomas, but does not affect the tumor phenotype or the number of tumors. Simultaneous deletion of both LMP1 and LMP2A results in fewer tumors, and a further delay in tumor onset. Nevertheless, the double LMP1/LMP2A mutant induces lymphomas in approximately half of the infected animals. These results indicate that neither LMP1 nor LMP2A is absolutely essential for the ability of EBV to induce B cell lymphomas in the cord blood-humanized mouse model, although simultaneous loss of both LMP1/LMP2A decreases the proportion of animals developing tumors and increases the time to tumor onset. Thus, either LMP1 or LMP2A expression may be sufficient to promote early-onset EBV-induced tumors in this model.

  5. Detection of Active Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Duodenal Mucosa of Patients With Refractory Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Vittorio; Baldanti, Fausto; Lenti, Marco Vincenzo; Vanoli, Alessandro; Biagi, Federico; Gatti, Marta; Riboni, Roberta; Dallera, Elena; Paulli, Marco; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Refractory celiac disease is characterized by mucosal damage in patients with celiac disease despite a gluten-free diet. Little is known about the mechanisms that cause persistent intestinal inflammation in these patients. We performed a case-control study of 17 consecutive patients diagnosed with refractory celiac disease from 2001 through 2014 (median age, 51 y; 10 women) and 24 patients with uncomplicated celiac disease (controls) to determine whether refractory disease is associated with infection by lymphotropic oncogenic viruses. We performed real-time PCR analyses of duodenal biopsy samples from all patients to detect Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus-8, and human T-cell lymphotropic virus-I, -II, or -III. We used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses to identify infected cells and viral proteins. We did not detect human herpesvirus-8 or human T-cell lymphotropic viruses in any of the biopsy specimens. However, 12 of 17 (70.5%) biopsy specimens from patients with refractory celiac disease were positive for EBV, compared with 4 of 24 (16.6%) biopsy specimens from controls (P < .001). EBV was detected in inflammatory cells and enterocytes. An analysis of latency- and replication-associated proteins confirmed active infection. Further studies are needed to determine whether EBV infection contributes to the pathogenesis of refractory celiac disease and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma.

  6. The copy number of Epstein-Barr virus latent genome correlates with the oncogenicity by the activation level of LMP1 and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lielian; Yu, Haibo; Liu, Lingzhi; Tang, Yunlian; Wu, Hongzhuan; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Meijuan; Du, Shujuan; Zhao, Lian; Cao, Li; Li, Guiyuan; Lu, Jianhong

    2015-01-01

    A tumor model that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent infection facilitated the tumorigenicity was previously established using the Maxi-EBV system. In the present approach, EBV-lost cell clones demonstrated significantly decreased tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the LMP1 gene in Maxi-EBV genome was replaced by that of nasopharyngeal carcinoma origin. The resultant cell line, 293–1/NL showed much lower malignancy than the original 293-EBV. The result was opposite to our expectation. The change of 293 sublineage cells for EBV harboring also got similar result. To seek the underlying reason, the copy number of EBV genome in all the cell lines was detected. The result indicated that 293-EBV contained about 4.5-fold higher EBV copies than 293–1/NL did. Parallel EBV genomes led to relatively stable copies in different 293 sublineages, suggesting the viral genome structure is a factor for the sustainability of EBV's copy number. Moreover, the LMP1 transcription in high copy-containing cells showed abnormally high level. Furthermore, the main LMP1-driven pathway, transcription factor NF-κB, was highly activated in high-copy cells. Here we first manifest by experimental model that the copy number of EBV latent genome correlates with the viral pathogenesis, which depends on the activation level of LMP1 and NF-κB. Overall, both the presence and amount of EBV genome are crucial for the viral oncogenicity. PMID:26517512

  7. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) DNA in plasma is not encapsidated in patients with EBV-related malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Julie L; Fan, Hongxin; Swinnen, Lode J; Schichman, Steven A; Raab-Traub, Nancy; Covington, Mary; Elmore, Sandra; Gulley, Margaret L

    2004-06-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), a ubiquitous gamma herpes virus, infects more than 95% of the human population before adulthood. Life-long persistence, usually without adverse health consequences, relies on a balance between viral latency, viral replication, and host immune response. Patients with EBV-related disease often have high levels of EBV DNA in their plasma. This study addresses whether this circulating, cell-free EBV DNA is encapsidated in virions or exists as naked genomes. First, an assay was developed, combining DNase I and quantitative real-time PCR, to discriminate encapsidated from naked EBV DNA. EBV DNA was almost always naked in the plasma of AIDS-related lymphoma patients (n = 11) and immunosuppressed/posttransplantation patients (n = 8). In contrast, infectious mononucleosis patients (n = 30) often had a mixture of encapsidated and naked EBV DNA. These findings may be important in understanding how viral load relates to disease status and in predicting response to nucleoside analogs and other antiviral therapies.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Gregory, C.D.; Rowe, M.; Rickinson, A.B.; Wang, D.; Birkenbach, M.; Kikutani, H.; Kishimoto, T.; Kieff, E.

    1987-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of EBV-negative Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells includes some changes similar to those seen in normal B lymphocytes that have been growth transformed by EBV. The role of individual EBV genes in this process was evaluated by introducing each of the viral genes that are normally expressed in EBV growth-transformed and latently infected lymphoblasts into an EBV-negative BL cell line, using recombinant retrovirus-mediated transfer. Clones of cells were derived that stably express the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), EBNA-2, EBNA-3, EBNA-leader protein, or EBV latent membrane protein (LMP). These were compared with control clones infected with the retrovirus vector. All 10 clones converted to EBNA-2 expression differed from control clones or clones expressing other EBV proteins by growth in tight clumps and by markedly increased expression of one particular surface marker of B-cell activation, CD23. Other activation antigens were unaffected by EBNA-2 expression, as were markers already expressed on the parent BL cell line. The results indicate that EBNA-2 is a specific direct or indirect trans-activator of CD23. This establishes a link between an EBV gene and cell gene expression. Since CD23 has been implicated in the transduction of B-cell growth signals, its specific induction by EBNA-2 could be important in EBV induction of B-lymphocyte transformation.

  9. Effects of lymphocyte profile on development of EBV-induced lymphoma subtypes in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Joo, Eun Hye; Song, Kyung-A; Choi, Bongkum; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Kim, Sung Joo; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2015-10-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection causes both Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The present study reveals that EBV-induced HL and NHL are intriguingly associated with a repopulated immune cell profile in humanized mice. Newborn immunodeficient NSG mice were engrafted with human cord blood CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for a 8- or 15-wk reconstitution period (denoted (8w)hN and (15w)hN, respectively), resulting in human B-cell and T-cell predominance in peripheral blood cells, respectively. Further, novel humanized mice were established via engraftment of hCD34(+) HSCs together with nonautologous fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or MSCs expressing an active notch ligand DLK1, resulting in mice skewed with human B or T cells, respectively. After EBV infection, whereas NHL developed more frequently in B-cell-predominant humanized mice, HL was seen in T-cell-predominant mice (P = 0.0013). Whereas human splenocytes from NHL-bearing mice were positive for EBV-associated NHL markers (hBCL2(+), hCD20(+), hKi67(+), hCD20(+)/EBNA1(+), and EBER(+)) but negative for HL markers (LMP1(-), EBNA2(-), and hCD30(-)), most HL-like tumors were characterized by the presence of malignant Hodgkin's Reed-Sternberg (HRS)-like cells, lacunar RS (hCD30(+), hCD15(+), IgJ(-), EBER(+)/hCD30(+), EBNA1(+)/hCD30(+), LMP(+)/EBNA2(-), hCD68(+), hBCL2(-), hCD20(-/weak,) Phospho STAT6(+)), and mummified RS cells. This study reveals that immune cell composition plays an important role in the development of EBV-induced B-cell lymphoma.

  10. EBV-driven B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders: from biology, classification and differential diagnosis to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Ok, Chi Young; Li, Ling; Young, Ken H

    2015-01-23

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus, affecting >90% of the adult population. EBV targets B-lymphocytes and achieves latent infection in a circular episomal form. Different latency patterns are recognized based on latent gene expression pattern. Latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) mimics CD40 and, when self-aggregated, provides a proliferation signal via activating the nuclear factor-kappa B, Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways to promote cellular proliferation. LMP-1 also induces BCL-2 to escape from apoptosis and gives a signal for cell cycle progression by enhancing cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and by inhibiting p16 and p27. LMP-2A blocks the surface immunoglobulin-mediated lytic cycle reactivation. It also activates the Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway and induces Bcl-xL expression to promote B-cell survival. Recent studies have shown that ebv-microRNAs can provide extra signals for cellular proliferation, cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis. EBV is well known for association with various types of B-lymphocyte, T-lymphocyte, epithelial cell and mesenchymal cell neoplasms. B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders encompass a broad spectrum of diseases, from benign to malignant. Here we review our current understanding of EBV-induced lymphomagenesis and focus on biology, diagnosis and management of EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

  11. Early events associated with infection of Epstein-Barr virus infection of primary B-cells.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sabyasachi; Murakami, Masanao; Verma, Subhash C; Kumar, Pankaj; Yi, Fuming; Robertson, Erle S

    2009-09-28

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is closely associated with the development of a vast number of human cancers. To develop a system for monitoring early cellular and viral events associated with EBV infection a self-recombining BAC containing 172-kb of the Epstein Barr virus genome BAC-EBV designated as MD1 BAC (Chen et al., 2005, J.Virology) was used to introduce an expression cassette of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by homologous recombination, and the resultant BAC clone, BAC-GFP-EBV was transfected into the HEK 293T epithelial cell line. The resulting recombinant GFP EBV was induced to produce progeny virus by chemical inducer from the stable HEK 293T BAC GFP EBV cell line and the virus was used to immortalize human primary B-cell as monitored by green fluorescence and outgrowth of the primary B cells. The infection, B-cell activation and cell proliferation due to GFP EBV was monitored by the expression of the B-cell surface antigens CD5, CD10, CD19, CD23, CD39, CD40 , CD44 and the intercellular proliferation marker Ki-67 using Flow cytometry. The results show a dramatic increase in Ki-67 which continues to increase by 6-7 days post-infection. Likewise, CD40 signals showed a gradual increase, whereas CD23 signals were increased by 6-12 hours, maximally by 3 days and then decreased. Monitoring the viral gene expression pattern showed an early burst of lytic gene expression. This up-regulation of lytic gene expression prior to latent genes during early infection strongly suggests that EBV infects primary B-cell with an initial burst of lytic gene expression and the resulting progeny virus is competent for infecting new primary B-cells. This process may be critical for establishment of latency prior to cellular transformation. The newly infected primary B-cells can be further analyzed for investigating B cell activation due to EBV infection.

  12. Identification of Protein Kinase Inhibitors with a Selective Negative Effect on the Viability of Epstein-Barr Virus Infected B Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatidis, Vassilis; Varga, Zoltan; Waczek, Frigyes; Őrfi, Zoltán; Őrfi, László; Kéri, György; Mosialos, George

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus, which is causally associated with the development of several B lymphocytic malignancies that include Burkitt's lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, AIDS and posttransplant associated lymphomas. The transforming activity of EBV is orchestrated by several latent viral proteins that mimic and modulate cellular growth promoting and antiapoptotic signaling pathways, which involve among others the activity of protein kinases. In an effort to identify small molecule inhibitors of the growth of EBV-transformed B lymphocytes a library of 254 kinase inhibitors was screened. This effort identified two tyrosine kinase inhibitors and two MEK inhibitors that compromised preferentially the viability of EBV-infected human B lymphocytes. Our findings highlight the possible dependence of EBV-infected B lymphocytes on specific kinase-regulated pathways underlining the potential for the development of small molecule-based therapeutics that could target selectively EBV-associated human B lymphocyte malignancies. PMID:24759913

  13. Epigenetic Impact on EBV Associated B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh Roy, Shatadru; Robertson, Erle S.; Saha, Abhik

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications leading to either transcriptional repression or activation, play an indispensable role in the development of human cancers. Epidemiological study revealed that approximately 20% of all human cancers are associated with tumor viruses. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the first human tumor virus, demonstrates frequent epigenetic alterations on both viral and host genomes in associated cancers—both of epithelial and lymphoid origin. The cell type-dependent different EBV latent gene expression patterns appear to be determined by the cellular epigenetic machinery and similarly viral oncoproteins recruit epigenetic regulators in order to deregulate the cellular gene expression profile resulting in several human cancers. This review elucidates the epigenetic consequences of EBV–host interactions during development of multiple EBV-induced B-cell lymphomas, which may lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic interventions against EBV-associated B-cell lymphomas by alteration of reversible patho-epigenetic markings. PMID:27886133

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes EBV lytic replication

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gwen Marie; Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K.; Rowe, David T.; Wadowsky, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers a homeostatic cellular response in mammalian cells to ensure efficient folding, sorting, and processing of client proteins. In lytic-permissive lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), pulse exposure to the chemical ER-stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) followed by recovery resulted in the activation of the EBV immediate-early (BRLF1, BZLF1), early (BMRF1), and late (gp350) genes, gp350 surface expression, and virus release. The protein phosphatase 1 a (PP1a)–specific phosphatase inhibitor Salubrinal (SAL) synergized with TG to induce EBV lytic genes; however, TG treatment alone was sufficient to activate EBV lytic replication. SAL showed ER-stress–dependent and –independent antiviral effects, preventing virus release in human LCLs and abrogating gp350 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)–treated B95-8 cells. TG resulted in sustained BCL6 but not BLIMP1 or CD138 expression, which is consistent with maintenance of a germinal center B-cell, rather than plasma-cell, phenotype. Microarray analysis identified candidate genes governing lytic replication in LCLs undergoing ER stress. PMID:21849482

  15. Interaction of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with human B-lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, George; Klein, Eva; Kashuba, Elena

    2010-05-21

    Epstein-Barr virus, EBV, and humans have a common history that reaches back to our primate ancestors. The virus co-evolved with man and has established a largely harmless and highly complex co-existence. It is carried as silent infection by almost all human adults. A serendipitous discovery established that it is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis. Still, EBV became known first in 1964, in a rare, geographically prevalent malignant lymphoma of B-cell origin, Burkitt lymphoma BL. Its association with a malignancy prompted intensive studies and its capacity to immortalize B-lymphocytes in vitro was soon demonstrated. Consequently EBV was classified therefore as a potentially tumorigenic virus. Despite of this property however, the virus carrier state itself does not lead to malignancies because the transformed cells are recognized by the immune response. Consequently the EBV induced proliferation of EBV carrying B-lymphocytes is manifested only under immunosuppressive conditions. The expression of EBV encoded genes is regulated by the cell phenotype. The virus genome can be found in malignancies originating from cell types other than the B-lymphocyte. Even in the EBV infected B-cell, the direct transforming capacity is restricted to a defined window of differentiation. A complex interaction between virally encoded proteins and B-cell specific cellular proteins constitute the proliferation inducing program. In this short review we touch upon aspects which are the subject of our present work. We describe the mechanisms of some of the functional interactions between EBV encoded and cellular proteins that determine the phenotype of latently infected B-cells. The growth promoting EBV encoded genes are not expressed in the virus carrying BL cells. Still, EBV seems to contribute to the etiology of this tumor by modifying events that influence cell survival and proliferation. We describe a possible growth promoting mechanism in the genesis of Burkitt lymphoma

  16. Gold nano-particles (AuNPs) carrying anti-EBV-miR-BART7-3p inhibit growth of EBV-positive nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianguo; Lyu, Xiaoming; Chen, Yuxiang; Liu, Jinkun; Cai, Hongbing; Wang, Ying; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is a major etiological factor for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Several EBV-encoded BART miRNAs have been associated with viral latency, immune escape, cell survival, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we report that EBV-miR-BART7-3p, an EBV-encoded BART miRNA highly expressed in NPC, was correlated with cell-cycle progression in vitro and increased tumor formation in vivo. This viral miRNA stimulated the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway and induced c-Myc and c-Jun. Knockdown of PTEN mimicked EBV-miR-BART7-3p-induced tumorigenic phenotype. Based on these results, we conducted a therapeutic experiment by using gold nano-particles (AuNPs) carrying anti-EBV-miR-BART7-3p. Silencing of EBV-miR-BART7-3p reduced tumor growth in animal model. We conclude that EBV-miR-BART7-3p favors carcinogenesis, representing a potential target for miRNA-based therapy. PMID:25691053

  17. Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Reactivation Activates B Cells Polyclonally and Induces Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression: A Mechanism Underlying Autoimmunity and Its Contribution to Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Keiko; Kumata, Keisuke; Nakayama, Yuji; Satoh, Yukio; Sugihara, Hirotsugu; Hara, Sayuri; Matsushita, Michiko; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masako; Murakami, Ichiro; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease that results in and is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism, and the reactivation of persisting Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in B lymphocytes induces the differentiation of host B cells into plasma cells. We previously reported that some EBV-infected B cells had thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAbs) as surface immunoglobulins (Igs), and EBV reactivation induced these TRAb+EBV+ cells to produce TRAbs. EBV reactivation induces Ig production from host B cells. The purpose of the present study was to examine total Ig productions from B cell culture fluids and to detect activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and EBV latent membrane protein (LMP) 1 in culture B cells during EBV reactivation induction and then we discussed the mechanisms of EBV reactivation-induced Ig production in relation to autoimmunity. We showed that the EBV reactivation induces the production of every isotype of Ig and suggested that the Ig production was catalyzed by AID through LMP1 and NF-κB. The results that the amount of IgM was significantly larger compared with IgG suggested the polyclonal B cell activation due to LMP1. We proposed the pathway of EBV reactivation induced Ig production; B cells newly infected with EBV are activated by polyclonal B cell activation and produce Igs through plasma cell differentiation induced by EBV reactivation. LMP1-induced AID enabled B cells to undergo class-switch recombination to produce every isotype of Ig. According to this mechanism, EBV rescues autoreactive B cells to produce autoantibodies, which contribute to the development and exacerbation of autoimmune diseases.

  18. About Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Providers Laboratory Testing References & Resources About Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... Page Symptoms Transmission Diagnosis Prevention & Treatment Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), also known as human herpesvirus 4, is ...

  19. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2A contributes to anoikis resistance through ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Dai; Minamitani, Takeharu; Samanta, Mrinal

    2013-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with various malignancies, including epithelial cancers. In this study, we analyzed the effect of EBV infection on epithelial cells by using EBV-converted epithelial cells. In EBV-positive cells, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is constitutively activated. Inhibition of ERK activity leads to reduced anoikis resistance; therefore, EBV-positive cells are more resistant to anoikis, a type of apoptosis induced by cell detachment, than are EBV-negative cells. Among the viral genes expressed in EBV-positive cells, the latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) is responsible for induction of ERK-mediated anoikis resistance, although the expression level of LMP2A is much lower in EBV-positive cells than in EBV-transformed B cells. Further analysis demonstrated that LMP2A downregulation of the proanoikis mediator Bim through proteasomal degradation is dependent on the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). These findings suggest that LMP2A-mediated ERK activation is involved in the generation of EBV-associated epithelial malignancies.

  20. Atypical prediagnosis Epstein-Barr virus serology restricted to EBV-positive Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ellen T.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Lennette, Evelyne T.; Rubertone, Mark V.; Mann, Risa B.; Borowitz, Michael; Weir, Edward G.; Abbondanzo, Susan L.; Mueller, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    An altered anti–Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serologic profile preceding diagnosis is associated with an increased risk of Hodgkin lymphoma. It is unknown whether this atypical pattern predicts Hodgkin lymphoma risk further subdivided by determination of EBV in tumor cells. A nested case-control study of 128 incident Hodgkin lymphoma cases and 368 matched controls from active-duty military personnel with archived serum in the US Department of Defense Serum Repository was conducted to determine whether a panel of anti-EBV antibody titers differed in EBV+ and EBV− Hodgkin lymphoma. Among 40 EBV+ Hodgkin lymphoma cases and matched controls, statistically significant increased risks were associated with elevated anti-EBV VCA IgG antibody titers (relative risk = 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-8.7), and an anti–EBNA-1/anti–EBNA-2 antibody ratio ≤ 1.0 versus > 1.0 (relative risk = 4.7; 95% CI, 1.6-13.8). In contrast, no significant associations were found among 88 EBV− Hodgkin lymphoma cases relative to their matched controls. In case-case analysis, EBV+ disease was significantly associated with a low anti–EBNA-1/anti–EBNA-2 antibody ratio. This distinc-tive serologic response to EBV latent antigens, indicative of immune dysfunction in other clinical settings, is associated with an increased risk of developing EBV+ but not EBV− Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:22972983

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells by cross-linking of CD70 is dependent upon generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of p38 MAPK and JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Yeong Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Song, Hyunkeun; Cho, Dae-Ho; Lee, Wang Jae; Hur, Dae Young

    2010-12-15

    CD70 is expressed in normal activated immune cells as well as in several types of tumors. It has been established that anti-CD70 mAb induces complement-dependent death of CD70(+) tumor cells, but how anti-CD70 mAb affects the intrinsic signaling is poorly defined. In this report, we show that ligation of CD70 expressed on EBV-transformed B cells using anti-CD70 mAb induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent apoptosis. We observed an early expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response genes that preceded the release of apoptotic molecules from the mitochondria and the cleavage of caspases. CD70-induced apoptosis was inhibited by pretreatment with the ER stress inhibitor salubrinal, ROS quencher N-acetylcysteine, and Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA. We supposed that ROS generation might be the first event of CD70-induced apoptosis because N-acetylcysteine blocked increases of ROS and Ca(2+), but BAPTA did not block ROS generation. We also found that CD70 stimulation activated JNK and p38 MAPK. JNK inhibitor SP600125 and p38 inhibitor SB203580 effectively blocked upregulation of ER stress-related genes and cleavage of caspases. Inhibition of ROS generation completely blocked phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK and induction of ER stress-related genes. Taken together, we concluded that cross-linking of CD70 on EBV-transformed B cells triggered ER stress-mediated apoptosis via ROS generation and JNK and p38 MAPK pathway activation. Our report reveals alternate mechanisms of direct apoptosis through CD70 signaling and provides data supporting CD70 as a viable target for an Ab-based therapy against EBV-related tumors.

  2. [Detection of EBV by PCR in fresh and paraffin embedded samples of cavum tumour].

    PubMed

    Charef, S; Jrad, B Bel Hadj; Mahfouth, W; Zakhama, A; Kassab, A; Driss, N; Chouchane, L

    2006-01-01

    The nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is frequent in Tunisia. It's the second ORL cancer of men after the larynx one. To analyse the NPC characteristics in our population, we determined the frequency of EBV infection in 47 paraffin-embedded and 6 fresh NPC biopsies. We first extracted the DNA from tumoral tissus and then amplified viral sequences by PCR to detect and to type the infecting virus (EBV-A or ABV-B). Our results showed that amplifiable DNA has been obtained from 34/47 paraffin-embedded NPC biopsies while 13/47 of the others biopsies contained degraded and not amplifiable DNA. All the fresh biopsies allowed to obtain DNA with good quality. The EBV infection frequency in paraffin-embedded NPC biopsies is 35% while EBV is detected in all fresh biopsies (6/6). Our analyse also showed that the EBV-A is predominant in our population compared to EBV-B as it was shown in most countries of the world. This study clearly shows that PCR results obtained with paraffin-embedded NPC biopsies are divergeant from those obtained with fresh biopsies. Because of DNA degradation in paraffin-embedded NPC biopsies, the biology molecular results from that kind of samples is criticable. Moreover the results obtained from fresh NPC biopsies confirmed the quasi-constant association of EBV with undifferenciated carcinoma nasopharyngeal type.

  3. Role of EBNA-3 Family Proteins in EBV Associated B-cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Shaoni; Ghosh Roy, Shatadru; Bose, Priyanka; Saha, Abhik

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly ubiquitous in human population and establishes a lifelong asymptomatic infection within the infected host unless the immune system is compromised. Following initial infection in the oropharyngeal epithelial cells, EBV primarily infects naive B-lymphocytes and develops a number of B-cell lymphomas particularly in immune-deficient individuals. In vitro, EBV can also infect and subsequently transform quiescent B-lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) resembling EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disorders in which a subset of latent transcripts are detected. Genetic studies revealed that EBNA-3 family comprising of three adjacent genes in the viral genome—EBNA-3A and -3C, but not -3B, are critical for B-cell transformation. Nevertheless, all three proteins appear to significantly contribute to maintain the overall proliferation and viability of transformed cells, suggesting a critical role in lymphoma development. Apart from functioning as important viral transcriptional regulators, EBNA-3 proteins associate with many cellular proteins in different signaling networks, providing a suitable platform for lifelong survival of the virus and concurrent lymphoma development in the infected host. The chapter describes the function of each these EBV nuclear antigen 3 proteins employed by the virus as a means to understand viral pathogenesis of several EBV-associated B-cell malignancies. PMID:27092119

  4. Epstein-Barr virus and human immunodeficiency virus serological responses and viral burdens in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Sullivan, Cathal E.; Peng, RongSheng; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Sturgeon, Timothy; Jenson, Hal B.; Ling, Paul D.; Butel, J. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma is recognized as a complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Little is known regarding the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the biology of EBV in this population. To characterize the EBV- and HIV-specific serological responses together with EBV DNA levels in a cohort of HIV-infected adults treated with HAART, a study was conducted to compare EBV and HIV serologies and EBV DNA copy number (DNAemia) over a 12-month period after the commencement of HAART. All patients were seropositive for EBV at baseline. Approximately 50% of patients had detectable EBV DNA at baseline, and 27/30 had detectable EBV DNA at some point over the follow-up period of 1 year. Changes in EBV DNA copy number over time for any individual were unpredictable. Significant increases in the levels of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) and Epstein-Barr early antigen (EA) antibodies were demonstrated in the 17 patients who had a good response to HAART. Of 29 patients with paired samples tested, four-fold or greater increases in titers were detected for EA in 12/29 (41%), for EBNA in 7/29 (24%), for VCA-IgG in 4/29 (14%); four-fold decreases in titers were detected in 2/29 (7%) for EA and 12/29 (41%) for EBNA. A significant decline in the titer of anti-HIV antibodies was also demonstrated. It was concluded that patients with advanced HIV infection who respond to HAART have an increase in their EBV specific antibodies and a decrease in their HIV-specific antibodies. For the cohort overall, there was a transient increase in EBV DNA levels that had declined by 12 months. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after umbilical cord blood transplantation in adults with hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Sanz, J; Arango, M; Senent, L; Jarque, I; Montesinos, P; Sempere, A; Lorenzo, I; Martín, G; Moscardó, F; Mayordomo, E; Salavert, M; Cañigral, C; Boluda, B; Salazar, C; López-Hontangas, J L; Sanz, M A; Sanz, G F

    2014-03-01

    We analyzed the incidence, clinicopathological features, risk factors and prognosis of patients with EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV-PTLD) in 288 adults undergoing umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) at a single institution. Twelve patients developed proven EBV-PTLD at a median time of 73 days (range, 36-812). Three-year cumulative incidence (CI) of EBV-PTLD was 4.3% (95% CI: 1.9-6.7). All patients presented with extranodal involvement. Most frequently affected sites were the liver, spleen, central nervous system (CNS), Waldeyer's ring and BM in 7, 6, 4, 3 and 3 patients, respectively. One patient had polymorphic and 11 had monomorphic EBV-PTLD (7 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified, 4 plasmablastic lymphomas). We confirmed donor origin and EBV infection in all histological samples. EBV-PTLD was the cause of death in 11 patients at a median time of 23 days (range, 1-84). The 3-year CI of EBV-PTLD was 12.9% (95% CI: 3.2-22.5) and 2.6% (95% CI: 0.5-4.7) for patients receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and myeloablative conditioning, respectively (P<0.0001). In conclusion, adults with EBV-PTLD after UCBT showed frequent visceral and CNS involvement. The prognosis was poor despite routine viral monitoring and early intervention. An increased risk of EBV-PTLD was noted among recipients of RIC regimens.

  6. An EBV recombinant deleted for residues 130-159 in EBNA3C can deregulate p53/Mdm2 and Cyclin D1/CDK6 which results in apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    El-Naccache, Darine W.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a gamma herpes virus is associated with B-cell malignancies. EBNA-3C is critical for in vitro primary B-cell transformation. Interestingly, the N terminal domain of EBNA3C which contains residues 130–159, interacts with various cellular proteins, such as p53, Mdm2, CyclinD1/Cdk6 complex, and E2F1. In the current reverse genetics study, we deleted the residues 130-159 aa within EBNA3C open reading frame (ORF) by BACmid recombinant engineering methodology. Our experiments demonstrated that deletion of the 130-159 aa showed a reduction in cell proliferation. Also, this recombinant virus showed with higher infectivity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) compared to wild type EBV. PBMCs- infected with recombinant EBV deleted for 130-159 residues have differential expression patterns for the p53/Mdm2, CyclinD1/Cdk6 and pRb/E2F1 pathways compared to wild type EBV-infected PBMCs. PBMCs infected with recombinant virus showed increased apoptotic cell death which further resulted in activation of polymerase 1 (PARP1), an important contributor to apoptotic signaling. Interestingly, cells infected with this recombinant virus showed a dramatic decrease in chromosomal instability, indicated by the presence of increased multinucleation and micronucleation. In addition infection with recombinant virus have increased cells in G0/G1 phase and decreased cells in S-G2M phase when compared to wild type infected cells. Thus, these differences in signaling activities due to 29 amino acid residues of EBNA3C is of particular significance in deregulation of cell proliferation in EBV-infected cells. PMID:26908453

  7. Age-related EBV positive clonal B-cell Lymphoid proliferation (EBV+-DLBCL)

    PubMed Central

    Doukas-Alexiou, Marina; Stoufi, Eleana; Kittas, Christos; Pangalis, Gerasimos; Laskaris, George

    2017-01-01

    The Ebstein Barr virus(EBV), herpes virus 5 has been associated with lymphoproliferative disordrers. Age-related EBV+ B-LPD is defined as an EBV+ clonal B-cell lymphoid proliferation or EBV+-DLBCL developing in patients over the age of 40 years in the absence of any known immunodeficiency and without an underlying T-cell lymphoma1. We present a case of EBV+ clonal B-cell lymphoid proliferation. Key words:Oral mucosa ulcer, EBV+-DLBCL, age related. PMID:28149483

  8. The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in T Cell and NK Cell Lymphomas: Time for a Reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Gru, A. A.; Haverkos, B. H.; Freud, A. G.; Hastings, J.; Nowacki, N. B.; Barrionuevo, C.; Vigil, C. E.; Rochford, R.; Natkunam, Y.; Baiocchi, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    While Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was initially discovered and characterized as an oncogenic virus in B cell neoplasms, it also plays a complex and multifaceted role in T/NK cell lymphomas. In B cell lymphomas, EBV-encoded proteins have been shown to directly promote immortalization and proliferation through stimulation of the NF-κB pathway and increased expression of anti-apoptotic genes. In the context of mature T/NK lymphomas (MTNKL), with the possible exception on extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma (ENKTL), the virus likely plays a more diverse and nuanced role. EBV has been shown to shape the tumor microenvironment by promoting Th2-skewed T cell responses and by increasing the expression of the immune checkpoint ligand PD-L1. The type of cell infected, the amount of plasma EBV DNA, and the degree of viral lytic replication have all been proposed to have prognostic value in T/NK cell lymphomas. Latency patterns of EBV infection have been defined using EBV-infected B cell models and have not been definitively established in T/NK cell lymphomas. Identifying the expression profile of EBV lytic proteins could allow for individualized therapy with the use of antiviral medications. More work needs to be done to determine whether EBV-associated MTNKL have distinct biological and clinical features, which can be leveraged for risk stratification, disease monitoring, and therapeutic purposes. PMID:26449716

  9. BZLF1 Attenuates Transmission of Inflammatory Paracrine Senescence in Epstein-Barr Virus-Infected Cells by Downregulating Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xubing; Li, Yuqing; Yang, Mengtian; Huang, Lu; Gong, Weijie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies have shown that inflammatory responses trigger and transmit senescence to neighboring cells and activate the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection induces increased secretion of several inflammatory factors, whereas lytic infections evade the antiviral inflammatory response. However, the changes in and roles of the inflammatory microenvironment during the switch between EBV life cycles remain unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that latent EBV infection in EBV-positive cells triggers the SASP in neighboring epithelial cells. In contrast, lytic EBV infection abolishes this phenotype. BZLF1 attenuates the transmission of paracrine senescence during lytic EBV infection by downregulating tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) secretion. A mutant BZLF1 protein, BZLF1Δ207-210, that cannot inhibit TNF-α secretion while maintaining viral transcription, fails to block paracrine senescence, whereas a neutralizing antibody against TNF-α is sufficient to restore its inhibition. Furthermore, latent EBV infection induces oxidative stress in neighboring cells, while BZLF1-mediated downregulation of TNF-α reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in neighboring cells, and ROS scavengers alleviate paracrine senescence. These results suggest that lytic EBV infection attenuates the transmission of inflammatory paracrine senescence through BZLF1 downregulation of TNF-α secretion and alters the inflammatory microenvironment to allow virus propagation and persistence. IMPORTANCE The senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), an important tumorigenic process, is triggered and transmitted by inflammatory factors. The different life cycles of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in EBV-positive cells employ distinct strategies to modulate the inflammatory response and senescence. The elevation of inflammatory factors during latent EBV infection promotes the SASP in uninfected cells. In

  10. Cross-linking of B7-H1 on EBV-transformed B cells induces apoptosis through reactive oxygen species production, JNK signaling activation, and fasL expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeong Seok; Park, Ga Bin; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Song, Hyunkeun; Choi, In-Hak; Lee, Wang Jae; Hur, Dae Young

    2008-11-01

    B7-H1 is a newly identified member of the B7 family with important regulatory functions in cell-mediated immune responses, and it is expressed in human immune cells and several tumors. We first observed that expression of surface B7-H1 on B cells was increased during the immortalization process by EBV, which is strongly related to both inflammation and tumorigenesis. Cross-linking of B7-H1 on EBV-transformed B cells using anti-B7-H1 Ab (clone 130002) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial disruption, release of apoptotic proteins from mitochondria, and subsequent apoptosis. Inhibition of caspases and ROS generation recovered B7-H1-mediated apoptosis and proteolytic activities of caspase-8, -9, and -3. We observed that B7-H1 stimulation induced both transcription and translation of fasL. ZB4, an antagonistic anti-fas Ab, and NOK-1, an antagonistic anti-fasL Ab, effectively blocked apoptosis without exerting any influence on ROS generation. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely blocked the induction of fasL mRNA and protein. We found that B7-H1 stimulation activated the phosphorylation of JNK and c-jun and down-regulated ERK1/2 and p-Akt. NAC blocked the activation of JNK and down-regulation of ERK, but both z-VAD-fmk (N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone) and ZB4 did not inhibit JNK activation of B7-H1 stimulation. SP600125 blocked fasL induction and apoptosis but did not affect ROS generation after B7-H1 stimulation. Taken together, we concluded that B7-H1-mediated apoptosis on EBV-transformed B cells may be involved in the induction of fasL, which is evoked by ROS generation and JNK activation after cross-linking of B7-H1. These results provide a new concept for understanding reverse signaling through B7-H1 and another mechanism of tumor immunotherapy using anti-B7-H1.

  11. Comparison of EBV DNA viral load in whole blood, plasma, B-cells and B-cell culture supernatant.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, David Eric; Bollore, Karine; Viljoen, Johannes; Foulongne, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Cartron, Guillaume; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome quantitation in whole blood is used widely for therapeutic monitoring of EBV-associated disorders in immunosuppressed individuals and in patients with EBV-associated lymphoma. However, the most appropriate biological material to be used for EBV DNA quantitation remains a subject of debate. This study compare the detection rate and levels of EBV DNA from whole blood, plasma, enriched B-cells, and B-cell short-term culture supernatant using quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected from 33 subjects with either HIV infection or B-cell lymphoma. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 100% of enriched B-cell samples, in 82% of B-cell culture supernatants, in 57% of plasma, and 42% of whole blood samples. A significant correlation for EBV viral load was found between enriched B-cell and B-cell culture supernatant material (ρ = 0.92; P < 0.0001), but no significant correlation existed between EBV DNA levels in whole blood and enriched B-cells (ρ = -0.02; P = 0.89), whole blood and plasma (ρ = 0.24; P = 0.24), or enriched B-cells and plasma (ρ = 0.08; P = 0.77). Testing of enriched B-cells appeared to be the most sensitive method for detection of EBV DNA as well as for exploration of the cellular reservoir. Quantitation of EBV DNA in plasma and B-cell culture supernatant may be of interest to assess EBV reactivation dynamics and response to treatment as well as to decipher EBV host-pathogen interactions in various clinical scenarios.

  12. Cidofovir Activity against Poxvirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Cidofovir [(S)-1-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)cytosine, HPMPC] is an acyclic nucleoside analog approved since 1996 for clinical use in the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in AIDS patients. Cidofovir (CDV) has broad-spectrum activity against DNA viruses, including herpes-, adeno-, polyoma-, papilloma- and poxviruses. Among poxviruses, cidofovir has shown in vitro activity against orthopox [vaccinia, variola (smallpox), cowpox, monkeypox, camelpox, ectromelia], molluscipox [molluscum contagiosum] and parapox [orf] viruses. The anti-poxvirus activity of cidofovir in vivo has been shown in different models of infection when the compound was administered either intraperitoneal, intranasal (aerosolized) or topically. In humans, cidofovir has been successfully used for the treatment of recalcitrant molluscum contagiosum virus and orf virus in immunocompromised patients. CDV remains a reference compound against poxviruses and holds potential for the therapy and short-term prophylaxis of not only orthopox- but also parapox- and molluscipoxvirus infections. PMID:21994641

  13. Cidofovir Activity against Poxvirus Infections.

    PubMed

    Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert

    2010-12-01

    Cidofovir [(S)-1-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)cytosine, HPMPC] is an acyclic nucleoside analog approved since 1996 for clinical use in the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in AIDS patients. Cidofovir (CDV) has broad-spectrum activity against DNA viruses, including herpes-, adeno-, polyoma-, papilloma- and poxviruses. Among poxviruses, cidofovir has shown in vitro activity against orthopox [vaccinia, variola (smallpox), cowpox, monkeypox, camelpox, ectromelia], molluscipox [molluscum contagiosum] and parapox [orf] viruses. The anti-poxvirus activity of cidofovir in vivo has been shown in different models of infection when the compound was administered either intraperitoneal, intranasal (aerosolized) or topically. In humans, cidofovir has been successfully used for the treatment of recalcitrant molluscum contagiosum virus and orf virus in immunocompromised patients. CDV remains a reference compound against poxviruses and holds potential for the therapy and short-term prophylaxis of not only orthopox- but also parapox- and molluscipoxvirus infections.

  14. Photodynamic therapy induced production of cytokines by latent Epstein Barr virus infected epithelial tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koon, H. K.; Lo, K. W.; Lung, M. L.; Chang, C. K. C.; Wong, R. N. S.; Mak, N. K.

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a method to treat cancer or non-cancer diseases by activation of the light-sensitive photosensitizers. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the development of certain cancers such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and B cell lymphoma. This study aims to examine the effects of EBV infection on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in cells after the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM PDT treatment. Epithelial tumor cell lines HONE-1 and latent EBV-infected HONE-1 (EBV-HONE-1) cells were used in this study. Cells were treated with the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM for 24 hours before light irradiation. RT-PCR and quantitative ELISA methods were used for the evaluation of mRNA expression and production of cytokines, respectively. Results show that Zn-BC-AM PDT increases the production of IL-1a and IL-1b in EBV-HONE-1. Over a 10-fold increase in the production of IL-6 was observed in the culture supernatant of Zn-BC-AM PDT-treated HONE-1 cells. PDT-induced IL-6 production was observed in HONE-1 cells. EBV-HONE-1 has a higher background level of IL-8 production than the HONE-1. The production of IL-8 was suppressed in EBV-HONE-1cells after Zn-BC-AM PDT. Our results indicate that the response of HONE-1 cells to Zn-BC-AM PDT depends on the presence of latent EBV infection. Since IL-8 is a cytokine with angiogenic activity, Zn-BC-AM PDT may exert an anti-angiogenic effect through the suppression of IL-8 production by the EBV-infected cells.

  15. Is endemic Burkitt's lymphoma an alliance between three infections and a tumour promoter?

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, C A

    2004-12-01

    Malaria and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), recognised cofactors for endemic Burkitt's lymphoma, are ubiquitous within the lymphoma belt of Africa, and, unless other cofactors are involved, the tumour should be much more common than it is. Malaria and EBV alone cannot account for the occasional shifting foci and space-time case clusters of endemic Burkitt's lymphoma. Arboviruses and plant tumour promoters are other possible local cofactors that could explain such characteristics. The geographical and age distributions of endemic Burkitt's lymphoma parallel those of potentially oncogenic, mosquito-borne arboviruses. Arboviruses seem to be associated with case clusters of endemic Burkitt's lymphoma, and symptoms compatible with arbovirus infection have been seen immediately before the onset of the tumour. RNA and DNA viruses, including EBV, are promoted by extracts of a commonly used plant, Euphorbia tirucalli, the distribution of which coincides with the boundaries of the lymphoma belt. Extracts of E tirucalli are tumour promoters and can induce the characteristic 8;14 translocation of endemic Burkitt's lymphoma in EBV-infected cell-lines. They also activate latent EBV in infected cells, enhance EBV-mediated cell transformation, and modulate EBV-specific immunity.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus DNA is detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of EBV-seronegative infants with infectious mononucleosis-like symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Kazufumi; Saiga, Kyoko; Deguchi, Masanori; Sairenji, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from infants with infectious mononucleosis- (IM) like symptoms. Thirteen of the 17 patients did not have EBV antibodies; however, EBV DNA was detected in 8 PBMC from the 13 seronegative patients by PCR. The 4 patients were retested in 6-12 months later. Three patients were still seronegative; however EBV DNA wasnot detected. One patient seroconverted and EBV DNA could still be detected. The transcript of EBNA1 was detected in one patient, but neither EBNA2 nor LMP2A were detected in all PBMC from the 4 tested patients. Type 1 EBV DNA was detected in 5 PBMC of 7 tested patients, and type 2 EBV DNA was detected in type 1 positive PBMC of one patient as well. The IL-1 beta polymorphism that is reported to be one of the immunological factors of EBV seronegativity revealed no difference in IM-like patients. These results indicated that EBV infection occurs in EBV-seronegative IM-like infants; however, the modes of infection are clearly different from IM.

  17. EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ok, Chi Young; Papathomas, Thomas G; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Young, Ken H

    2013-07-18

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly, initially described in 2003, is a provisional entity in the 2008 World Health Organization classification system and is defined as an EBV-positive monoclonal large B-cell proliferation that occurs in patients >50 years of age and in whom there is no known immunodeficiency or history of lymphoma. These tumors are more common in Asia but also occur in North America and Europe at a low frequency. These neoplasms exhibit a morphologic continuum, from polymorphous to monomorphous, but morphologic features do not correlate with prognosis as all patients have a clinically aggressive course. Most EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly patients have an activated B-cell immunophenotype and are characterized by prominent nuclear factor-κB activation. Cytogenetic complexity is usually low. In this review, we comprehensively delineate the data emerging from analyses of EBV latency program, microRNA-mediated EBV viral oncogenesis, functional genomics of EBV and its biology, and differential diagnosis challenge for EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly. It is hoped that the improved understanding of these tumors will lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches, enhance the effectiveness of clinical trials, and improve prognosis.

  18. EBV BMRF-2 facilitates cell-to-cell spread of virus within polarized oral epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianqiao; Palefsky, Joel M.; Herrera, Rossana; Berline, Jennifer; Tugizov, Sharof M.

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BMRF-2 protein plays an important role in EBV infection of polarized oral epithelial cells by interacting with β1 and αv family integrins. Here we show that infection of polarized oral epithelial cells with B27-BMRF-2low recombinant virus, expressing a low level of BMRF-2, resulted in significantly smaller plaques compared with infection by parental B95-8 virus. BMRF-2 localized in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and basolateral sorting vesicles and was transported to the basolateral membranes of polarized epithelial cells. Mutation of the tyrosine- and dileucine-containing basolateral sorting signal, YLLV, in the cytoplasmic domain of BMRF-2 led to the failure of its accumulation in the TGN and its basolateral transport. These data show that BMRF-2 may play an important role in promoting the spread of EBV progeny virions through lateral membranes of oral epithelial cells. PMID:19394065

  19. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection of Polarized Epithelial Cells via the Basolateral Surface by Memory B Cell-Mediated Transfer Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Rowe, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) exhibits a distinct tropism for both B cells and epithelial cells. The virus persists as a latent infection of memory B cells in healthy individuals, but a role for infection of normal epithelial is also likely. Infection of B cells is initiated by the interaction of the major EBV glycoprotein gp350 with CD21 on the B cell surface. Fusion is triggered by the interaction of the EBV glycoprotein, gp42 with HLA class II, and is thereafter mediated by the core fusion complex, gH/gL/gp42. In contrast, direct infection of CD21-negative epithelial cells is inefficient, but efficient infection can be achieved by a process called transfer infection. In this study, we characterise the molecular interactions involved in the three stages of transfer infection of epithelial cells: (i) CD21-mediated co-capping of EBV and integrins on B cells, and activation of the adhesion molecules, (ii) conjugate formation between EBV-loaded B cells and epithelial cells via the capped adhesion molecules, and (iii) interaction of EBV glycoproteins with epithelial cells, with subsequent fusion and uptake of virions. Infection of epithelial cells required the EBV gH and gL glycoproteins, but not gp42. Using an in vitro model of normal polarized epithelia, we demonstrated that polarization of the EBV receptor(s) and adhesion molecules restricted transfer infection to the basolateral surface. Furthermore, the adhesions between EBV-loaded B cells and the basolateral surface of epithelial cells included CD11b on the B cell interacting with heparan sulphate moieties of CD44v3 and LEEP-CAM on epithelial cells. Consequently, transfer infection was efficiently mediated via CD11b-positive memory B cells but not by CD11b–negative naïve B cells. Together, these findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of EBV infection of normal and pre-malignant epithelial cells in vivo. PMID:21573183

  20. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  1. EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly: 2016 update on diagnosis, risk-stratification, and management.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jorge J; Beltran, Brady E; Miranda, Roberto N; Young, Ken H; Chavez, Julio C; Sotomayor, Eduardo M

    2016-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly is a provisional entity included in the 2008 WHO classification of lymphoid neoplasms. It is a disease typically seen in the elderly and thought to be associated with chronic EBV infection and severe immunosuppression with a component of immunosenescence. Recent research, however, has suggested that EBV-positive DLBCL can be seen in younger, immunocompetent patients. The diagnosis of EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly is made through a careful pathological evaluation. The differential diagnosis includes infectious mononucleosis (specifically in younger patients), lymphomatoid granulomatosis, Hodgkin lymphoma, and gray zone lymphoma, among others. Detection of EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) is considered standard for diagnosis; however, a clear cutoff for positivity has not been defined. The International Prognostic Index (IPI), and the Oyama score can be used for risk-stratification. The Oyama score includes age >70 years and presence of B symptoms. The expression of CD30 is emerging as a potential adverse, and targetable, prognostic factor. Patients with EBV-positive DLBCL should be staged and managed following similar guidelines than patients with EBV-negative DLBCL. It has been suggested, however, that EBV-positive patients have a worse prognosis than EBV-negative counterparts in the era of chemoimmunotherapy. There is an opportunity to study and develop targeted therapy in the management of patients with EBV-positive DLBCL.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA levels in palatine tonsils and autologous serum from EBV carriers.

    PubMed

    Nadal, David; Blasius, Martin; Niggli, Felix K; Meier, Gabriela; Berger, Christoph

    2002-05-01

    A real-time polymerase chain reaction was employed to detect and quantitate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in tonsils and autologous sera from EBV-seropositive children. EBV DNA was found in 95% of tonsils from 21 children and in 50% from 18 children with serum IgG titers to the virus capsid antigen (VCA) of > or =1:160 and 1:10 to 1:80, respectively (P = 0.002). Tonsils from children with titers > or =1:160 harbored more EBV DNA copies per mg tissue (mean, 1,237; range, < 2-13,998) than from children with titers 1:10 to 1:80 (mean, 23; range, < 2-226; P < 0.0001). By contrast, EBV DNA was detected only in serum from 25% of 20 children with titers > or = 1:160. Thus, ample differences in tonsillar EBV replication are mirrored inconstantly by detectable EBV in autologous serum suggesting that EBV DNA quantitation in tonsils may serve for refined monitoring of individuals at risk of EBV-associated lymphoproliferation.

  3. Cordycepin enhances Epstein-Barr virus lytic infection and Epstein-Barr virus-positive tumor treatment efficacy by doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Du, Yinping; Yu, Jieshi; Du, Li; Tang, Jun; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2016-07-01

    The consistent latent presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in tumor cells offers potential for virus-targeted therapies. The switch from the latent form of EBV to the lytic form in tumor cells can lead to tumor cell lysis. In this study, we report that a natural small molecule compound, cordycepin, can induce lytic EBV infection in tumor cells. Subsequently, we demonstrate that cordycepin can enhance EBV reactivating capacity and EBV-positive tumor cell killing ability of low dose doxorubicin. The combination of cordycepin and doxorubicin phosphorylates CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) through protein kinase C (PKC)-p38 mitogen activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK) signaling pathway, and C/EBPβ is required for the activation of lytic EBV infection. Most importantly, an in vivo experiment demonstrates that the combination of cordycepin and doxorubicin is more effective in inhibiting tumor growth in SCID mice than is doxorubicin alone. Our findings establish that cordycepin can enhance the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy for treatment of EBV-positive tumors.

  4. Acute gastritis associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection in a child

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Mok; Song, Chun Woo; Song, Kyu Sang

    2016-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) inducing a self-limiting clinical syndrome characterized by fever, sore throat, hepatosplenomegaly, and generalized lymphadenopathy. Gastrointestinal symptoms of EBV infection are nonspecific and occur rarely. EBV inducing acute gastrointestinal pathology is poorly recognized without suspicion. Careful consideration is needed to diagnose gastric involvement of EBV infection including gastric lymphoma, gastric cancer, and gastritis. A few recent cases of gastritis associated with EBV infection have been reported in adolescents and adults. However, there is no report of EBV-associated gastritis in early childhood. We experienced a rare case of 4-year-old girl with EBV gastritis confirmed by in situ hybridization. PMID:28018450

  5. Transient reduction in IgA(+) and IgG(+) memory B cell numbers in young EBV-seropositive children: the Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Diana; Jansen, Michelle A E; Bell, Andrew I; Rickinson, Alan B; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Moll, Henriette A; van Zelm, Menno C

    2017-04-01

    The EBV is known to persist in memory B cells, but it remains unclear how this affects cell numbers and humoral immunity. We here studied EBV persistence in memory B cell subsets and consequences on B cell memory in young children. EBV genome loads were quantified in 6 memory B cell subsets in EBV(+) adults. The effects of EBV infection on memory B cell numbers and vaccination responses were studied longitudinally in children within the Generation R population cohort between 14 mo and 6 yr of age. EBV genomes were more numerous in CD27(+)IgG(+), CD27(+)IgA(+), and CD27(-)IgA(+) memory B cells than in IgM-only, natural effector, and CD27(-)IgG(+) B cells. The blood counts of IgM-only, CD27(+)IgA(+), CD27(-)IgG(+), and CD27(+)IgG(+) memory B cells were significantly lower in EBV(+) children than in uninfected controls at 14 mo of age-the age when these cells peak in numbers. At 6 yr, all of these memory B cell counts had normalized, as had plasma IgG levels to previous primary measles and booster tetanus vaccinations. In conclusion, EBV persists predominantly in Ig class-switched memory B cells, even when derived from T cell-independent responses (CD27(-)IgA(+)), and EBV infection results in a transient depletion of these cells in young children.

  6. Hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor gene PRDM1/Blimp-1 supports a pathogenetic role in EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Ma, J; Nie, K; Yan, J; Liu, Y; Bacchi, C E; Queiroga, E M; Gualco, G; Sample, J T; Orazi, A; Knowles, D M; Tam, W

    2014-11-07

    PRDM1/Blimp-1 is a tumor suppressor gene in the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Its inactivation contributes to pathogenesis in this setting by impairing terminal B-cell differentiation induced by constitutive nuclear factor-κB activation. The role of PRDM1 in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lymphomagenesis is not known. Here we identified hypermethylation of the promoter region and exon 1 of PRDM1 in all six Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive BL cell lines and 12 of 23 (52%) primary EBV-positive BL or BL-related cases examined, but in none of the EBV-negative BL cell lines or primary tumors that we assessed, implying a tumor suppressor role for PRDM1 specifically in EBV-associated BL. A direct induction of PRDM1 hypermethylation by EBV is unlikely, as PRDM1 hypermethylation was not observed in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines. Treatment of EBV-positive BL cells with 5' azacytidine resulted in PRDM1 induction associated with PRDM1 demethylation, consistent with transcriptional silencing of PRDM1 as a result of DNA methylation. Overexpression of PRDM1 in EBV-positive BL cell lines resulted in cell cycle arrest. Our results expand the spectrum of lymphoid malignancies in which PRDM1 may have a tumor suppressor role and identify an epigenetic event that likely contributes to the pathogenesis of BL.

  7. Hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor gene PRDM1/Blimp-1 supports a pathogenetic role in EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, T; Ma, J; Nie, K; Yan, J; Liu, Y; Bacchi, C E; Queiroga, E M; Gualco, G; Sample, J T; Orazi, A; Knowles, D M; Tam, W

    2014-01-01

    PRDM1/Blimp-1 is a tumor suppressor gene in the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Its inactivation contributes to pathogenesis in this setting by impairing terminal B-cell differentiation induced by constitutive nuclear factor-κB activation. The role of PRDM1 in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lymphomagenesis is not known. Here we identified hypermethylation of the promoter region and exon 1 of PRDM1 in all six Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positive BL cell lines and 12 of 23 (52%) primary EBV-positive BL or BL-related cases examined, but in none of the EBV-negative BL cell lines or primary tumors that we assessed, implying a tumor suppressor role for PRDM1 specifically in EBV-associated BL. A direct induction of PRDM1 hypermethylation by EBV is unlikely, as PRDM1 hypermethylation was not observed in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines. Treatment of EBV-positive BL cells with 5′ azacytidine resulted in PRDM1 induction associated with PRDM1 demethylation, consistent with transcriptional silencing of PRDM1 as a result of DNA methylation. Overexpression of PRDM1 in EBV-positive BL cell lines resulted in cell cycle arrest. Our results expand the spectrum of lymphoid malignancies in which PRDM1 may have a tumor suppressor role and identify an epigenetic event that likely contributes to the pathogenesis of BL. PMID:25382611

  8. Studies on the induction of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA polymerase (POL) and deoxyribonuclease (DNase) by the combined action of 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and N-butyrate (SB in EBV-carrying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, L.M.; Tan, R.S.; Grill, S.; Li, J.S.; Cheng, Y.C.

    1986-03-05

    TPA and SB were found to induce EBV early antigen in EBV-carrying Raji cells, a Burkitt's Lymphoma-derived human cell line. The mode of interaction of these agents was unclear. They have examined the induction of EBV-POL and DNase activities by TPA and SB. It was found that neither agent alone could induce EBV-POL and DNase activities, even though the virus DNA could be induced by either compound alone. Induction of virus enzymes could only occur when cells were exposed to both compounds. A 2h exposure to TPA followed by 46h to SB resulted in levels of induction of EBV-POL and DNase activities comparable to those induced with simultaneous exposure to both agents for 48h. No induction of the enzymes will occur if the sequence of exposure to these agents is reversed. Phospholipase C, which increases intracellular diacylglycerol (and subsequently the activation of Protein Kinase C), and 5-Aza-deoxycytidine, a DNA hypomethylating agent, were able to partially substitute for TPA and SB, respectively. These results suggest that the mechanism of induction of EBV enzyme activities by TPA and SB could involve both Protein Kinase C activation and DNA hypomethylation. Furthermore, the synthesis of EBV DNA is not sufficient for induction of these virus enzyme activities.

  9. Functional homology of gHs and gLs from EBV-related gamma-herpesviruses for EBV-induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Omerović, Jasmina; Longnecker, Richard

    2007-08-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gamma-herpesvirus that primarily infects B lymphocytes and epithelial cells. Entry of EBV into B cells requires the viral glycoproteins gp42, gH/gL and gB, while gp42 is not necessary for infection of epithelial cells. In EBV, gH and gL form two distinct complexes, a bipartite complex that contains only gH and gL, used for infection of epithelial cells, and a tripartite complex that additionally includes gp42, used for infection of B cells. The gH/gL complex is conserved within the herpesvirus family, but its exact role in entry and mechanism of fusion is not yet known. To understand more about the functionality of EBVgH/gL, we investigated the functional homology of gHs and gLs from human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) and two primate (rhesus and marmoset) gamma-herpesviruses in EBV-mediated virus-free cell fusion assay. Overall, gHs and gLs from the more homologous primate herpesviruses were better at complementing EBV gH and gL in fusion than HHV8 gH and gL. Interestingly, marmoset gH was able to complement fusion with epithelial cells, but not B cells. Further investigation of this led to the discovery that EBVgH is the binding partner of gp42 in the tripartite complex and the absence of fusion with B cells in the presence of marmoset gH/gL is due to its inability to bind gp42.

  10. Functional homology of gHs and gLs from EBV-related {gamma}-herpesviruses for EBV-induced membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Omerovic, Jasmina; Longnecker, Richard . E-mail: r-longnecker@northwestern.edu

    2007-08-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human {gamma}-herpesvirus that primarily infects B lymphocytes and epithelial cells. Entry of EBV into B cells requires the viral glycoproteins gp42, gH/gL and gB, while gp42 is not necessary for infection of epithelial cells. In EBV, gH and gL form two distinct complexes, a bipartite complex that contains only gH and gL, used for infection of epithelial cells, and a tripartite complex that additionally includes gp42, used for infection of B cells. The gH/gL complex is conserved within the herpesvirus family, but its exact role in entry and mechanism of fusion is not yet known. To understand more about the functionality of EBVgH/gL, we investigated the functional homology of gHs and gLs from human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) and two primate (rhesus and marmoset) {gamma}-herpesviruses in EBV-mediated virus-free cell fusion assay. Overall, gHs and gLs from the more homologous primate herpesviruses were better at complementing EBV gH and gL in fusion than HHV8 gH and gL. Interestingly, marmoset gH was able to complement fusion with epithelial cells, but not B cells. Further investigation of this led to the discovery that EBVgH is the binding partner of gp42 in the tripartite complex and the absence of fusion with B cells in the presence of marmoset gH/gL is due to its inability to bind gp42.

  11. Molecular pathogenesis of EBV susceptibility in XLP as revealed by analysis of female carriers with heterozygous expression of SAP.

    PubMed

    Palendira, Umaimainthan; Low, Carol; Chan, Anna; Hislop, Andrew D; Ho, Edwin; Phan, Tri Giang; Deenick, Elissa; Cook, Matthew C; Riminton, D Sean; Choo, Sharon; Loh, Richard; Alvaro, Frank; Booth, Claire; Gaspar, H Bobby; Moretta, Alessandro; Khanna, Rajiv; Rickinson, Alan B; Tangye, Stuart G

    2011-11-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in SH2D1A which encodes SAP. SAP functions in signalling pathways elicited by the SLAM family of leukocyte receptors. A defining feature of XLP is exquisite sensitivity to infection with EBV, a B-lymphotropic virus, but not other viruses. Although previous studies have identified defects in lymphocytes from XLP patients, the unique role of SAP in controlling EBV infection remains unresolved. We describe a novel approach to this question using female XLP carriers who, due to random X-inactivation, contain both SAP(+) and SAP(-) cells. This represents the human equivalent of a mixed bone marrow chimera in mice. While memory CD8(+) T cells specific for CMV and influenza were distributed across SAP(+) and SAP(-) populations, EBV-specific cells were exclusively SAP(+). The preferential recruitment of SAP(+) cells by EBV reflected the tropism of EBV for B cells, and the requirement for SAP expression in CD8(+) T cells for them to respond to Ag-presentation by B cells, but not other cell types. The inability of SAP(-) clones to respond to Ag-presenting B cells was overcome by blocking the SLAM receptors NTB-A and 2B4, while ectopic expression of NTB-A on fibroblasts inhibited cytotoxicity of SAP(-) CD8(+) T cells, thereby demonstrating that SLAM receptors acquire inhibitory function in the absence of SAP. The innovative XLP carrier model allowed us to unravel the mechanisms underlying the unique susceptibility of XLP patients to EBV infection in the absence of a relevant animal model. We found that this reflected the nature of the Ag-presenting cell, rather than EBV itself. Our data also identified a pathological signalling pathway that could be targeted to treat patients with severe EBV infection. This system may allow the study of other human diseases where heterozygous gene expression from random X-chromosome inactivation can be exploited.

  12. Epstein-Barr Virus Interferes with the Amplification of IFNα Secretion by Activating Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 in Primary Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, François; Coulombe, François; Gaudreault, Eric; Paquet-Bouchard, Carine; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek; Gosselin, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus is recognized to cause lymphoproliferative disorders and is also associated with cancer. Evidence suggests that monocytes are likely to be involved in EBV pathogenesis, especially due to a number of cellular functions altered in EBV-infected monocytes, a process that may affect efficient host defense. Because type I interferons (IFNs) are crucial mediators of host defense against viruses, we investigated the effect of EBV infection on the IFNα pathway in primary human monocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Infection of monocytes with EBV induced IFNα secretion but inhibited the positive feedback loop for the amplification of IFNα. We showed that EBV infection induced the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) and, to a lesser extent, SOCS1, two proteins known to interfere with the amplification of IFNα secretion mediated by the JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway. EBV infection correlated with a blockage in the activation of JAK/STAT pathway members and affected the level of phosphorylated IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7). Depletion of SOCS3, but not SOCS1, by small interfering RNA (siRNA) abrogated the inhibitory effect of EBV on JAK/STAT pathway activation and significantly restored IFNα secretion. Finally, transfection of monocytes with the viral protein Zta caused the upregulation of SOCS3, an event that could not be recapitulated with mutated Zta. Conclusions/Significance We propose that EBV protein Zta activates SOCS3 protein as an immune escape mechanism that both suppresses optimal IFNα secretion by human monocytes and favors a state of type I IFN irresponsiveness in these cells. This immunomodulatory effect is important to better understand the aspects of the immune response to EBV. PMID:20689596

  13. Multiple Epstein-Barr virus infections in healthy individuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walling, Dennis M.; Brown, Abigail L.; Etienne, Wiguins; Keitel, Wendy A.; Ling, Paul D.; Butel, J. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We employed a newly developed genotyping technique with direct representational detection of LMP-1 gene sequences to study the molecular epidemiology of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in healthy individuals. Infections with up to five different EBV genotypes were found in two of nine individuals studied. These results support the hypothesis that multiple EBV infections of healthy individuals are common. The implications for the development of an EBV vaccine are discussed.

  14. Epstein-barr virus (EBV) in healthy carriers: Distribution of genotypes and 30 bp deletion in latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) oncogene.

    PubMed

    Correa, Rita Mariel; Fellner, María Dolores; Alonio, Lidia Virginia; Durand, Karina; Teyssié, Angélica R; Picconi, María Alejandra

    2004-08-01

    There are two types of Epstein Barr virus (EBV): EBV-1 and EBV-2, distinguished by genomic polymorphism in the genes encoding the nuclear antigens (EBNA-2, -3A, -3B, -3C). Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) is an EBV protein with known oncogenic properties. Different variants had been described; among them, a 30 base pair (bp) deletion (del-LMP-1) had been reported in benign and malignant pathologies, but there is little information about its frequency in healthy populations. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of the EBV genotypes and the 30 bp deletion frequency, in EBV healthy carriers from Argentina. Analysis of EBNA-3C and LMP-1 genes were done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by Southern blot hybridization on DNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from blood bank donors. EBV-1 was present in 75.9% of samples, EBV-2 in 14.6%, and co-infections with both types in 6.5%. The deleted LMP-1 variant was found in 7.4% of analyzed samples, corresponding 3.2% to deleted variant alone and 4.2% to co-infections with non-deleted form. The non-deleted variant was found in 64.6% whereas in the remaining 28%, no PCR product was detected. These results showed that EBV-1 was the more prevalent type in healthy carriers of Argentina, similar to reports from others countries. A predominance of the non-deleted LMP-1 variant was observed. The presence of co-infections with both types and variants demonstrated that healthy individuals may also harbor multiple EBV infections.

  15. Generation of EBV-specific T cells for adoptive immunotherapy: a novel protocol using formalin-fixed stimulator cells to increase biosafety.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Markus H; Brestrich, Gordon; Mittenzweig, Alexa; Roemhild, Andy; Zwinger, Sandra; Subklewe, Marion; Beier, Carola; Kurtz, Andreas; Babel, Nina; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reinke, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with in vitro generated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific T cells is a safe and effective treatment in patients with EBV-related complications after transplantation. More frequent use of EBV-specific T cells is held back by their cost and time-intensive generation under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. Currently, EBV-specific T cells are produced by repetitive stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), a protocol that requires several open GMP-handling steps. The aim of the present study was to improve T-cell generation under GMP conditions. We introduce a novel generation protocol that replaces repetitive with short-term LCL stimulation of PMBCs. Vital and formalin-fixed LCLs were used to further increase biosafety. Stimulated T cells were selected by the clinically approved cytokine secretion assay followed by nonspecific expansion. Sufficient numbers of EBV-specific T-cell lines were generated with all protocols. Specific recognition and killing of EBV-infected targets was found and was independent of the generation protocol applied. The novel protocol based on formalin-fixed cells, selection, and expansion reduced open GMP-handling steps and increased biosafety. Furthermore, fixation will allow the use of transgenic LCLs (eg, with cytomegalovirus or tumor antigens) and thereby facilitate the generation of antigen-specific T cells directed against pathogens other than EBV.

  16. Measuring Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) load: the significance and application for each EBV-associated disease.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Nishiyama, Yukihiro

    2008-01-01

    Because Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is ubiquitous and persists latently in lymphocytes, simply detecting EBV is insufficient to diagnose EBV-associated diseases. Therefore, measuring the EBV load is necessary to diagnose EBV-associated diseases and to explore EBV pathogenesis. Due to the diverse biology of EBV, the significance of measuring EBV DNA and the optimal type of specimen differ among EBV-associated diseases. Recent advances in molecular technology have enabled the EBV genome to be quantitated rapidly and accurately. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a rapid and reliable method to quantify DNA and is widely used not only as a diagnostic tool, but also as a management tool for EBV-associated diseases. However, each laboratory currently measures EBV load with its own "homebrew" system, and there is no consensus on sample type, sample preparation protocol, or assay units. The EBV real-time PCR assay system must be standardised for large-scale studies and international comparisons.

  17. Higher methylation intensity induced by EBV LMP1 via NF-κB/DNMT3b signaling contributes to silencing of PTEN gene.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Chen, Yuxiang; Gong, Pinggui; Cai, Longmei; Lyu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Qiang; Wang, Jianguo; Lu, Juan; Yao, Kaitai; Liu, Kunping; Li, Jinbang; Li, Xin

    2016-06-28

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a major tumor suppressor and usually silenced via the deletion, insertion and mutation. We previously discovered its inactivation via aberrant CpG island methylation. Here, we provide further evidence that EBV latent membrane protein 1(LMP1) can induce a higher intensity of DNA methylation at PTEN CpG islands, inactivating PTEN at the cellular and molecular level. Initially, increased methylation intensity of PTEN CpG islands was observed in EBV-infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells, accompanied by decreased PTEN expression. In NPC tissue samples showing the methylation at PTEN promoter, LMP1 was highly expressed in higher methylation intensity group relative to lower intensity group, and DNA methyltransferase 3b (DNMT3b) expression was positively correlated with LMP1 expression. Moreover, transfection of LMP1 gene into EBV-negative NPC cells demonstrated that LMP1 up-regulated DNMT3b expression, leading to a higher intensity of PTEN CpG island methylation. Mechanistically, computational prediction and luciferase reporter assay identified a functional NF-κB binding site on DNMT3b promoter and the mutated NF-κB binding site abolished LMP1-mediated DNMT3b activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation displayed that NF-κB p65 subunit constitutively bound to DNMT3b promoter, supporting the activation of DNMT3b by EBV LMP1 via NF-κB signaling. Furthermore, the expression level of DNMT3b was observed to be increased in the nuclei of LMP1-expressing NPC cells, and a NF-κB inhibitor, PDTC, counteracted LMP1-mediated DNMT3b overexpression. Thus, this study first reports that LMP1-mediated NF-κB can up-regulate DNMT3b transcription, thereby leading to relatively higher methylation intensity at PTEN CpG islands, and ultimately silencing major tumor suppressor PTEN.

  18. Amphipathic DNA polymers exhibit antiviral activity against systemic Murine Cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Phosphorothioated oligonucleotides (PS-ONs) have a sequence-independent, broad spectrum antiviral activity as amphipathic polymers (APs) and exhibit potent in vitro antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of herpesviruses: HSV-1, HSV-2, HCMV, VZV, EBV, and HHV-6A/B, and in vivo activity in a murine microbiocide model of genital HSV-2 infection. The activity of these agents against animal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in vitro and in vivo was therefore investigated. Results In vitro, a 40 mer degenerate AP (REP 9) inhibited both murine CMV (MCMV) and guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) with an IC50 of 0.045 μM and 0.16 μM, respectively, and a 40 mer poly C AP (REP 9C) inhibited MCMV with an IC50 of 0.05 μM. Addition of REP 9 to plaque assays during the first two hours of infection inhibited 78% of plaque formation whereas addition of REP 9 after 10 hours of infection did not significantly reduce the number of plaques, indicating that REP 9 antiviral activity against MCMV occurs at early times after infection. In a murine model of CMV infection, systemic treatment for 5 days significantly reduced virus replication in the spleens and livers of infected mice compared to saline-treated control mice. REP 9 and REP 9C were administered intraperitoneally for 5 consecutive days at 10 mg/kg, starting 2 days prior to MCMV infection. Splenomegaly was observed in infected mice treated with REP 9 but not in control mice or in REP 9 treated, uninfected mice, consistent with mild CpG-like activity. When REP 9C (which lacks CpG motifs) was compared to REP 9, it exhibited comparable antiviral activity as REP 9 but was not associated with splenomegaly. This suggests that the direct antiviral activity of APs is the predominant therapeutic mechanism in vivo. Moreover, REP 9C, which is acid stable, was effective when administered orally in combination with known permeation enhancers. Conclusion These studies indicate that APs exhibit potent, well tolerated antiviral activity

  19. Sequence variation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BZLF1 gene in EBV-associated gastric carcinomas and nasopharyngeal carcinomas in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bing; Tang, Xiuming; Jia, Yuping; Wang, Yun; Chao, Yan; Zhao, Chengquan

    2011-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BZLF1 gene can trigger EBV from latent infection to lytic replicative phase. The functions of BZLF1 are well known, while little is known about its gene polymorphism. In order to elucidate the sequence variations of BZLF1 and its association with malignancies, we analyzed BZLF1 gene in 24 EBV-associated gastric carcinomas, 41 nasopharyngeal carcinomas and 24 throat washing samples from healthy donors in Northern China using PCR-direct sequencing method. Three types and 8 subtypes of BZLF1 were identified. A dominant type BZLF1-A was found in 67 of 89 (75.3%) isolates. Type BZLF1-B was characterized by a common Ala deletion at residue 127, which was detected in 21 of 89 isolates (23.6%). Type BZLF1-C contained only one isolate (GC103), which had the same sequence with the prototype B95-8. Among 3 functional domains of BZLF1 protein, the transactivation domain had most mutations, followed by the bZIP domains (the DNA binding domain and dimerization domain). No prevalence of any subtypes or mutations in the functional domains among three specimen groups was found (P > 0.05). Our study indicates that BZLF1 subtypes and amino acid changes in functional domains are not preferentially associated with EBV-associated gastric carcinomas or nasopharyngeal carcinomas in Northern China. BZLF1 gene variations are geographically restricted rather than tumor-specific polymorphisms.

  20. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  1. Viral induction and targeted inhibition of galectin-1 in EBV+ posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Jing; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Rodig, Scott J; Green, Michael R; O'Donnell, Evan; Currie, Treeve; Armant, Myriam; Takeyama, Kunihiko; Monti, Stefano; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Ritz, Jerome; Kutok, Jeffery L; Shipp, Margaret A

    2011-04-21

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are potentially fatal, EBV-driven B-cell malignancies that develop in immunocompromised solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell recipients. In PTLD, the expression of EBV proteins, including latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and LMP2A, viral immune evasion strategies, and impaired host immune surveillance foster the proliferation of EBV-transformed B cells. Current PTLD treatment strategies include reduction of immunosuppression, which increases the risk of graft rejection, anti-CD20 treatment, combination chemotherapy, and administration of EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells. In the present study, we report that EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid B-cell lines (LCLs) and primary PTLDs overexpress galectin-1 (Gal1), a carbohydrate-binding lectin that induces tolerogenic dendritic cells and triggers the selective apoptosis of CD4(+) Th1 and Th17 cells and cytotoxic T cells. In transcriptional reporter assays, LMP2A and LMP1 each increased Gal1-driven luciferase expression, and the combination of LMP2A and LMP1 was additive. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of LMP2A decreased Gal1 protein abundance in EBV-transformed LCLs. Gal1 expression in LCLs was dependent on both activating protein 1 (AP-1) and PI3K. A newly developed neutralizing Gal1 mAb selectively inhibited Gal1-mediated apoptosis of EBV-specific CD8(+) T cells. Given the tolerogenic and immunosuppressive function of Gal1, antibody-mediated Gal1 neutralization may represent a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for PTLD and other Gal1-expressing tumors.

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-BamHI-A Rightward Transcript (BART)-6 and Cellular MicroRNA-142 Synergistically Compromise Immune Defense of Host Cells in EBV-Positive Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ling; Bu, Yunwen; Liang, Yanyan; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Haiguo; Li, Shumei

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was designed to explore the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of cellular miRNAs and EBV miRNA upon the expression of targets such as PTEN, and their involvement in the pathogenesis of Burkitt lymphoma. Material/Methods In this study, we examined several differentially expressed cellular miRNAs in EBV-positive versus EBV-negative Burkett lymphoma tissue samples, and confirmed PTEN as targets of cellular miR-142 by using a bioinformatics tool, luciferase reporter system, oligo transfection, real-time PCR, and Western blot analysis. Results We further confirmed the binding site of miR-142 in the 3′UTR of the target genes, and established the negative regulatory relationship between miRNA and mRNAs with luciferase activity assay. To verify the regulatory relationship between the miRNAs and PTEN, we evaluated the expression of PTEN in the tissue samples, and found that PTEN was downregulated in EBV- positive Burkett lymphoma. Additionally, lymphoma cells were transfected with EBV-BART-6-3p and miR-142 and we found that EBV-BART-6-3p and miR-142 synergistically reduced expression of IL-6R and PTEN. Furthermore, we also examined viability of the cells in each treatment group, and showed that EBV-BART-6-3p and miR-142 synergistically promoted proliferation of the cells. Conclusions These findings improve our knowledge about the role of miR-142/EBV-BART-6-3p and their target, PTEN, in the development of Burkett lymphoma; they could be novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of EBV-positive Burkett lymphoma. PMID:27796281

  3. Reed-Sternberg cells and "bystander" lymphocytes in lymph nodes affected by Hodgkin's disease are infected with different strains of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Meggetto, F; Brousset, P; Selves, J; Delsol, G; Mariame, B

    1997-01-01

    In most cases of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated Hodgkin's disease (HD), EBV-positive Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells and rare EBV-positive reservoir lymphocytes coexist in lymph nodes. Here we show that, in two cases of EBV-associated HD, strains infecting RS cells and reservoir lymphocytes of the same patient have different BNLF-1 genes. This suggests that RS cells and reservoir lymphocytes of the same patient are infected by different EBV strains. PMID:9032398

  4. Chronic Physical Stress Does Not Interact with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-Encoded Dutpase to Alter the Sickness Response

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Abi Salloum, Bachir; Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Williams, Marshall; Reader, Brenda; Glaser, Ronald; Sheridan, John; Nelson, Randy J.

    2016-01-01

    Most adult humans have been infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which is thought to contribute to the development of chronic fatigue syndrome. Stress is known to influence the immune system and can exacerbate the sickness response. Although a role for psychological stress in the sickness response, particularly in combination with EBV-encoded deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) has been established, and the role of physical stressors in these interactions remains unspecified. In this study, we seek to determine the interaction of chronic physical (swim) stress and EBV-encoded dUTPase injection. We hypothesize that a chronic physical stressor will exacerbate the sickness response following EBV-encoded dUTPase injection. To test this hypothesis mice receive daily injections of EBV-encoded dUTPase or vehicle and are subjected to 15 min of swim stress each day for 14 days or left unmanipulated. On the final evening of injections mice undergo behavioral testing. EBV-encoded dUTPase injection alone produces some sickness behaviors. The physical swimming stress does not alter the sickness response. PMID:27175311

  5. Reduced Transplacental Transfer of a Subset of Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific Antibodies to Neonates of Mothers Infected with Plasmodium falciparum Malaria during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ogolla, Sidney; Daud, Ibrahim I; Asito, Amolo S; Sumba, Odada P; Ouma, Collins; Vulule, John; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Dent, Arlene E; Mehta, Saurabh; Rochford, Rosemary

    2015-11-01

    Over 35% of children in a region of malaria endemicity are infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) by 6 months of age. This susceptibility may be linked to impaired transplacental transfer of antibodies. In this study, we determined the effect of malaria exposure during pregnancy on the transfer of EBV-specific maternal antibodies in a region of western Kenya that experiences endemic malaria. Pregnant mothers were recruited and followed up until delivery to determine levels of neonatal malaria exposure. Levels of EBV lytic (viral capsid antigen [VCA], Z transcriptional activator [Zta], and early diffuse antigen complex [EAd]) and EBV latent (EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1]) and tetanus-specific IgG antibodies were measured in 70 paired maternal and cord blood samples using a Luminex-bead-based assay. A high proportion (63%) of the infants were exposed to malaria in utero. Levels of EBV- and tetanus-specific antibodies were similar in malaria-infected mothers and in mothers who had no detectable malaria infection. Malaria-exposed neonates had significantly lower levels of anti-EBNA1, anti-Zta, and anti-EAd antibodies than were seen in their mothers. In utero malaria exposure resulted in significant reductions in transplacental transfer of anti-VCA-p18 and anti-EBNA1 antibodies of 13% and 22%, respectively. Neonates received significantly low levels of anti-Zta and anti-EAd antibodies irrespective of malaria exposure levels. In multivariate analysis, in utero malaria exposure was associated with a significant reduction in the transfer of anti-VCA-p18 and anti-EBNA1 antibodies to the neonates (P = 0.0234 and P = 0.0017, respectively). Malaria during pregnancy results in differential levels of transfer of EBV-specific antibodies from the mother to the fetus. The impaired transplacental transfer of some antibodies may lead to the malaria-exposed neonates being susceptible to early EBV infection.

  6. Reduced Transplacental Transfer of a Subset of Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific Antibodies to Neonates of Mothers Infected with Plasmodium falciparum Malaria during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ogolla, Sidney; Daud, Ibrahim I.; Asito, Amolo S.; Sumba, Odada P.; Ouma, Collins; Vulule, John; Middeldorp, Jaap M.; Dent, Arlene E.; Mehta, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Over 35% of children in a region of malaria endemicity are infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) by 6 months of age. This susceptibility may be linked to impaired transplacental transfer of antibodies. In this study, we determined the effect of malaria exposure during pregnancy on the transfer of EBV-specific maternal antibodies in a region of western Kenya that experiences endemic malaria. Pregnant mothers were recruited and followed up until delivery to determine levels of neonatal malaria exposure. Levels of EBV lytic (viral capsid antigen [VCA], Z transcriptional activator [Zta], and early diffuse antigen complex [EAd]) and EBV latent (EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1]) and tetanus-specific IgG antibodies were measured in 70 paired maternal and cord blood samples using a Luminex-bead-based assay. A high proportion (63%) of the infants were exposed to malaria in utero. Levels of EBV- and tetanus-specific antibodies were similar in malaria-infected mothers and in mothers who had no detectable malaria infection. Malaria-exposed neonates had significantly lower levels of anti-EBNA1, anti-Zta, and anti-EAd antibodies than were seen in their mothers. In utero malaria exposure resulted in significant reductions in transplacental transfer of anti-VCA-p18 and anti-EBNA1 antibodies of 13% and 22%, respectively. Neonates received significantly low levels of anti-Zta and anti-EAd antibodies irrespective of malaria exposure levels. In multivariate analysis, in utero malaria exposure was associated with a significant reduction in the transfer of anti-VCA-p18 and anti-EBNA1 antibodies to the neonates (P = 0.0234 and P = 0.0017, respectively). Malaria during pregnancy results in differential levels of transfer of EBV-specific antibodies from the mother to the fetus. The impaired transplacental transfer of some antibodies may lead to the malaria-exposed neonates being susceptible to early EBV infection. PMID:26376931

  7. Sumoylation of the Epstein-Barr Virus BZLF1 Protein Inhibits Its Transcriptional Activity and Is Regulated by the Virus-Encoded Protein Kinase▿

    PubMed Central

    Hagemeier, Stacy R.; Dickerson, Sarah J.; Meng, Qiao; Yu, Xianming; Mertz, Janet E.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2010-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immediate-early protein BZLF1 (Z) mediates the switch between latent and lytic EBV infection. Z not only activates early lytic viral gene transcription but also plays a direct role in lytic viral genome replication. Although a small fraction of Z is known to be sumoylated, the effects of this posttranslational modification on various different Z functions have not been well defined. In this report, we show that only the lysine at amino acid residue 12 is required for the sumoylation of Z, and that Z can be sumoylated by SUMO isoforms 1, 2, and 3. We also demonstrate that the sumo-defective Z mutants ZK12A and ZK12R have enhanced transcriptional activity. The sumoylated and nonsumoylated forms of Z were found to have a similar cellular location, both being localized primarily within the nuclear matrix. The Z sumo-defective mutants were, however, partially defective for disrupting promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies compared to the ability of wild-type Z. In addition, we show that lytic viral genome replication does not require the sumoylation of Z, although a Z mutant altered at both amino acids 12 and 13 is replication defective. Furthermore, we show that the sumoylation of Z is greatly increased (from less than 1 to about 11%) in lytically induced 293 cells infected with an EBV mutant virus deleted for the EBV-encoded protein kinase (EBV-PK) compared to that of 293 cells infected with wild-type EBV, and that the overexpression of EBV-PK leads to the reduced sumoylation of Z in EBV-negative cells. Our results suggest that the sumoylation of Z helps to promote viral latency, and that EBV-PK inhibits Z sumoylation during viral reactivation. PMID:20181712

  8. Maintenance of the EBV-specific CD8+ TCRαβ repertoire in immunosuppressed lung transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi HO; Bird, Nicola L; Grant, Emma J; Miles, John J; Thomas, Paul G; Kotsimbos, Tom C; Mifsud, Nicole A; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is one of the most common viruses in humans, capable of causing life-threatening infections and cancers in immunocompromised individuals. Although CD8+ T cells provide key protection against EBV, the persistence and dynamics of specific T-cell receptor (TCR) clones during immunosuppression in transplant patients is largely unknown. For the first time, we used a novel single-cell TCRαβ multiplex-nested reverse transcriptase PCR to dissect TCRαβ clonal diversity within GLCTLVAML (GLC)-specific CD8+ T cells in healthy individuals and immunocompromised lung transplant recipients. The GLC peptide presented by HLA-A*02:01 is one of the most immunogenic T-cell targets from the EBV proteome. We found that the GLC-specific TCRαβ repertoire was heavily biased toward TRAV5 and encompassed five classes of public TCRαβs, suggesting that these clonotypes are preferentially utilized following infection. We identified that a common TRAV5 was diversely paired with different TRAJ and TRBV/TRBJ genes, in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, with an average of 12 different TCRαβ clonotypes/donor. Moreover, pre-transplant GLC-specific TCRαβ repertoires were relatively stable over 1 year post transplant under immunosuppression in the absence or presence of EBV reactivation. In addition, we provide the first evidence of early GLC-specific CD8+ T cells at 87 days post transplant, which preceded clinical EBV detection at 242 days in an EBV-seronegative patient receiving a lung allograft from an EBV-seropositive donor. This was associated with a relatively stable TCRαβ repertoire after CD8+ T-cell expansion. Our findings provide insights into the composition and temporal dynamics of the EBV-specific TCRαβ repertoire in immunocompromised transplant patients and suggest that the early detection of EBV-specific T cells might be a predictor of ensuing EBV blood viremia. PMID:27507557

  9. HHV8/EBV Coinfection Lymphoproliferative Disorder: Rare Entity with a Favorable Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Chelly, Beya; Kilani, Houda; Charfi, Lamia; Douggaz, Amel; Chatti, Samia; Chelbi, Emna

    2017-01-01

    HHV8/EBV-associated germinotropic lymphoproliferative disorder (GLD) is a challenging diagnosis given its rarity, the particular clinical presentation, and the lack of expression of markers usually used in establishing hematopoietic lineage. We report a new case of HHV8/EBV GLD in an immunocompetent 78-year-old woman. The diagnosis was made in an incidentally discovered lymphadenopathy. Histological examination showed a nodular lymphoid proliferation centered by aggregates of atypical plasmablastic cells admixed with small lymphoid cells. Tumor cells were strongly positive with EMA, HHV8, LMP1, CD38, CD138, and kappa light chains. They were negative with common lymphoma-associated markers (CD20, CD3, CD15, CD30, CD10, and bcl2). In situ hybridization confirmed the monotypic kappa light chains and the EBV infection (EBER+). A polyclonal pattern of Ig gene rearrangement was detected by PCR analysis. In the adjacent lymph node parenchyma, some germinal centers mimicked Castleman disease. In this case, the differential diagnosis was discussed with an early stage of large B-cell lymphoma arising in HHV8-associated multicentric Castleman disease. The clinical presentation, the immunophenotype, and the molecular results helped to make the accurate diagnosis. Through the review of the nine previously reported cases in literature, we discuss the clinical and pathologic features and the differential diagnosis of HHV8/EBV GLD. PMID:28280640

  10. Comparison of the artus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) PCR kit and the Abbott RealTime EBV assay for measuring plasma EBV DNA loads in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Vinuesa, Víctor; Solano, Carlos; Giménez, Estela; Navarro, David

    2017-02-24

    The ability of the artus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) PCR kit and the Abbott RealTime EBV PCR assay to detect and quantify plasma EBV DNAemia was compared. The agreement between these assays was 95.8%. The EBV DNA loads measured by the two assays significantly correlated (P=< 0.0001).

  11. Expression of the epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated genes EVER1 and EVER2 is activated by exogenous DNA and inhibited by LMP1 oncoprotein from Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Frecha, Cecilia; Chevalier, Sébastien A; van Uden, Patrick; Rubio, Ivonne; Siouda, Maha; Saidj, Djamel; Cohen, Camille; Lomonte, Patrick; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo

    2015-01-15

    EVER1 and EVER2 are mutated in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients, who are susceptible to human betapapillomavirus (HPV) infection. It is unknown whether their products control the infection of other viruses. Here, we show that the expression of both genes in B cells is activated immediately after Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, whereas at later stages, it is strongly repressed via activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway by latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1). Ectopic expression of EVER1 impairs the ability of EBV to infect B cells.

  12. A workflow for in silico design of hIL-10 and ebvIL-10 inhibitors using well-known miniprotein scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Dueñas, Salvador; Aguila, Sergio A; Pimienta, Genaro

    2017-04-01

    The over-expression of immune-suppressors such as IL-10 is a crucial landmark in both tumor progression, and latent viral and parasite infection. IL-10 is a multifunctional protein. Besides its immune-cell suppressive function, it also promotes B-cell tumorigenesis of lymphomas and melanoma. Human pathogens like unicellular parasites and viruses that remain latent inside B cells promote the over-expression of hIL-10 upon infection, which inhibits cell-mediated immune surveillance, and at the same time mediates B cell proliferation. The B-cell specific oncogenic latent virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encodes a viral homologue of hIL-10 (ebvIL-10), expressed during lytic viral proliferation. Once expressed, ebvIL-10 inhibits cell-mediated immune surveillance, assuring EBV re-infection. During long-term latency, EBV-infected B cells over-express hIL-10 to assure B-cell proliferation, occasionally inducing EBV-mediated lymphomas. The amino acid sequences of hIL-10 and ebvIL-10 are more than 80% identical and thus have a very similar tridimensional structure. Based on their published crystallographic structures bound to their human receptor IL10R1, we report a structure-based design of hIL-10 and ebvIL-10 inhibitors based on 3 loops from IL10R1 that establish specific hydrogen bonds with the two IL10s. We have grafted these loops onto a permissible loop in three well-known miniprotein scaffolds-the Conus snail toxin MVIIA, the plant-derived trypsin inhibitor EETI, and the human appetite modulator AgRP. Our computational workflow described in detail below was invigorated by the negative and positive controls implemented, and therefore paves the way for future in vitro and in vivo validation assays of the IL-10 inhibitors engineered.

  13. Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV) Related Acute Liver Failure: A Case Series from the US Acute Liver Failure Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Mellinger, Jessica L.; Rossaro, Lorenzo; Naugler, Willscott E.; Nadig, Satish N.; Appelman, Henry; Lee, William M.; Fontana, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare clinical syndrome associated with a high case fatality rate. Asymptomatic primary infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is common in the general population while acute hepatitis and jaundice are much less common and ALF has been rarely reported. We reviewed the presenting features as well as clinical outcomes amongst consecutive adults with EBV-related ALF. Methods Amongst the 1,887 adult ALF patients enrolled into the US ALF Study Group from January 1998 to February 2012, there were four patients (0.21 %) with EBV-related ALF. Diagnostic criteria for acute EBV infection included compatible serologies and/or the detection of EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) in liver tissue. Results Median patient age was 30 years (range 18–44); 75 % were male, and only 25 % were immunosuppressed. The median presenting ALT was 504 IU/mL (range 156–4,920), median Alk P was 431 (range 136–1,009), and median bilirubin was 17 mg/dL (range 13–22.1). Liver biopsy findings ranged from cholestasis to submassive necrosis with EBER + staining in two of the three samples tested. Although all of the patients were treated with an antiviral agent, two died of ALF, one underwent liver transplantation (LT) and one survived with supportive care and is well at 5 years. A review of the literature identified four additional LT recipients with favorable long-term outcomes. Conclusion Primary EBV infection accounts for <1 % of consecutive adult ALF cases but is associated with a high case fatality rate. LT is associated with favorable short- and long-term outcomes. PMID:24464209

  14. Unusual Indolent Course of a Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Natural Killer Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Farsi, Khalil; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Hadabbi, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell lymphoproliferative disorders are uncommon and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays an important aetiological role in their pathogenesis. We report a 20-year-old male with a chronic active EBV infection associated with a NK cell lymphoproliferative disorder which had an unusual indolent course. He presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in December 2011 with a history of intermittent fever and coughing. Examinations revealed generalised lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis, transaminitis, diffuse bilateral lung infiltrates and bone marrow lymphocyte involvement. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test revealed a high EBV viral load in the peripheral blood cells. The patient received a course of piperacillin-tazobactam for Klebsiella pneumoniae, but no active treatment for the lymphoproliferative disorder. However, his lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase and liver enzymes dropped spontaneously. In addition, EBV PCR copies fluctuated and then decreased significantly. He remained clinically asymptomatic over the following four years. PMID:27226916

  15. The expression of EBV-encoded LMP1 in young patients with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; He, Xiaojie; Liao, Wang; Yi, Zhuwen; Yang, Huilan; Xiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    One of the major disease manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is lupus nephritis (LN), and the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation was associated with the induction of SLE, with EBV-encoded latent membrane protein1 (LMP1) plays a vital role in this process. Although it was reported that LN was associated with LMP1, most of these results are from patients with ages differed greatly (range, 10-56 years). Given the increased prevalence of EBV infection in young patients, we focused on the association of LN and LMP1 expression in the renal tissues of young patients (range, 6-16 years) in this study. We found that the positive rate of LMP1 in the renal tissues was significantly higher in patients with LN compared with control (P<0.001), which is consistent with the previous reports. The positive rates of LMP1 were similar between the patients of initial onset and relapse, and there was no detectable difference between the patients with and without concurrent infection (P>0.05). However, we reported for the first time about the positive correlation of LMP1 with classification of LN. The proportion of young patients positive for anti‑Sm antibody was significantly higher in the LMP1 positive group compared with the LMP1 negative control (P>0.05). These results indicate that EBV infection in the renal of young patients may lead to the increased severity of LN, and the expression of anti-Sm is likely contributed to this process.

  16. Comparison of the prognostic impact of serum anti-EBV antibody and plasma EBV DNA assays in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Twu, C.-W.; Wang, W.-Y.; Liang, W.-M.; Jan, J.-S.; Jiang, R.-S.; Chao, Jeffrey; Jin, Y.-T.; Lin, J.-C. . E-mail: jclin@vghtc.gov.tw

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has been proven as an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated cancer. Serum anti-EBV antibodies and plasma EBV DNA have been investigated as surrogate markers for NPC. A comparison of the prognostic impacts of both assays has never been reported. Methods and Materials: Paired serum and plasma samples from 114 previously untreated NPC patients were collected and subjected to an immunofluorescence assay for immunoglobulin (Ig)A and IgG antibodies against the viral capsid antigen (VCA) and a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for EBV DNA measurement. The effects of both assays on patient prognosis were thoroughly investigated. Results: Relapsed patients had significantly higher pretreatment EBV DNA concentration than patients without relapse (p 0.0006). No associations of VCA-IgA (p = 0.9669) or VCA-IgG (p = 0.6125) were observed between patients with and without relapse. The 4-year overall survival (60.3% vs. 93.1%, p < 0.0001) and relapse-free survival rates (54.4% vs. 77.9%, p = 0.0009) were significantly lower in patients with higher pretreatment EBV DNA load than in those with lower EBV DNA load. Patients with persistently detectable EBV DNA after treatment had significantly worse 4-year overall (30.8% vs. 84.6%, p < 0.0001) and relapse-free survival rates (15.4% vs. 74.0%, p < 0.0001) than those with undetectable EBV DNA. The VCA-IgA and VCA-IgG titer could not predict survivals (all p > 0.1). Cox multivariate analyses also showed the same results. Conclusion: Plasma EBV DNA is superior to serum EBV VCA antibodies in prognostic predictions for NPC.

  17. Synergistic activation of cells by Epstein-Barr virus and B-cell growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hutt-Fletcher, L M

    1987-01-01

    Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is initiated by virus binding to the C3dg-C3d receptor CR2. Several workers have implicated this receptor in the control of B-cell activation by examining the effects of antibodies to CR2 and isolated C3d on B-cell proliferation and differentiation. We report here on the activating effects of irradiated EBV, which retains its capacity to bind to CR2 but loses its ability to function as a T-independent B-cell activator. EBV synergized with B-cell growth factor in the induction of uptake of tritiated thymidine by T cell-depleted leukocytes from seronegative donors but did not induce secretion of immunoglobulin. Synergism could be inhibited with an anti-viral antibody that inhibited binding of EBV to CR2. No similar synergism was found between EBV and recombinant interleukin 2, interleukin 1 alpha, or gamma interferon or with the lipid A fraction of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. EBV may thus initiate B-cell activation as it binds to CR2. Infectious virus may, under normal circumstances, induce the cell to make those growth factors necessary to support B-cell proliferation; the difficulty of transforming cells with transfected EBV DNA may in part reflect the absence of an activation event provided by intact virus as it attaches to CR2. The synergism of EBV and B-cell growth factor more clearly distinguishes the effects of B-cell growth factor from those of interleukin 1 and interleukin 2 in other models of B-cell activation. Thus, this may be a useful model for further delineation of unique effects of B-cell growth factor on B-cell function. PMID:3027404

  18. Activity of andrographolide against chikungunya virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Wintachai, Phitchayapak; Kaur, Parveen; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Ramphan, Suwipa; Kuadkitkan, Atichat; Wikan, Nitwara; Ubol, Sukathida; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Smith, Duncan R.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has recently engendered large epidemics around the world. There is no specific antiviral for treatment of patients infected with CHIKV, and development of compounds with significant anti-CHIKV activity that can be further developed to a practical therapy is urgently required. Andrographolide is derived from Andrographis paniculata, a herb traditionally used to treat a number of conditions including infections. This study sought to determine the potential of andrographolide as an inhibitor of CHIKV infection. Andrographolide showed good inhibition of CHIKV infection and reduced virus production by approximately 3log10 with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 77 μM without cytotoxicity. Time-of-addition and RNA transfection studies showed that andrographolide affected CHIKV replication and the activity of andrographolide was shown to be cell type independent. This study suggests that andrographolide has the potential to be developed further as an anti-CHIKV therapeutic agent. PMID:26384169

  19. EBNA2 and activated Notch induce expression of BATF.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Lisa M; Deppmann, Christopher D; Erickson, Kimberly D; Coffin, William F; Thornton, Tina M; Humphrey, Sean E; Martin, Jennifer M; Taparowsky, Elizabeth J

    2003-05-01

    The immortalization of human B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) requires the virus-encoded transactivator EBNA2 and the products of both viral and cellular genes which serve as EBNA2 targets. In this study, we identified BATF as a cellular gene that is up-regulated dramatically within 24 h following the infection of established and primary human B cells with EBV. The transactivation of BATF is mediated by EBNA2 in a B-cell-specific manner and is duplicated in non-EBV-infected B cells by the expression of mammalian Notch proteins. In contrast to other target genes activated by EBNA2, the BATF gene encodes a member of the AP-1 family of transcription factors that functions as a negative regulator of AP-1 activity and as an antagonist of cell growth. A potential role for BATF in promoting EBV latency is supported by studies in which BATF was shown to negatively impact the expression of a BZLF1 reporter gene and to reduce the frequency of lytic replication in latently infected cells. The identification of BATF as a cellular target of EBV provides important new information on how programs of viral and cellular gene expression may be coordinated to promote viral latency and control lytic-cycle entry.

  20. Human papillomavirus infections in nonsexually active perinatally HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-02-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy.

  1. CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Responses to Latent Antigen EBNA-1 and Lytic Antigen BZLF-1 during Persistent Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Leskowitz, R. M.; Zhou, X. Y.; Villinger, F.; Fogg, M. H.; Kaur, A.; Lieberman, P. M.; Wang, F.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leads to lifelong viral persistence through its latency in B cells. EBV-specific T cells control reactivations and prevent the development of EBV-associated malignancies in most healthy carriers, but infection can sometimes cause chronic disease and malignant transformation. Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) is the only viral protein consistently expressed during all forms of latency and in all EBV-associated malignancies and is a promising target for a therapeutic vaccine. Here, we studied the EBNA-1-specific immune response using the EBV-homologous rhesus lymphocryptovirus (rhLCV) infection in rhesus macaques. We assessed the frequency, phenotype, and cytokine production profiles of rhLCV EBNA-1 (rhEBNA-1)-specific T cells in 15 rhesus macaques and compared them to the lytic antigen of rhLCV BZLF-1 (rhBZLF-1). We were able to detect rhEBNA-1-specific CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells in 14 of the 15 animals screened. In comparison, all 15 animals had detectable rhBZLF-1 responses. Most peptide-specific CD4+ T cells exhibited a resting phenotype of central memory (TCM), while peptide-specific CD8+ T cells showed a more activated phenotype, belonging mainly to the effector cell subset. By comparing our results to the human EBV immune response, we demonstrate that the rhLCV model is a valid system for studying chronic EBV infection and for the preclinical development of therapeutic vaccines. PMID:23698300

  2. DNA Damage Signaling Is Induced in the Absence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic DNA Replication and in Response to Expression of ZEBRA.

    PubMed

    Wang'ondu, Ruth; Teal, Stuart; Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV), like other oncogenic viruses, modulates the activity of cellular DNA damage responses (DDR) during its life cycle. Our aim was to characterize the role of early lytic proteins and viral lytic DNA replication in activation of DNA damage signaling during the EBV lytic cycle. Our data challenge the prevalent hypothesis that activation of DDR pathways during the EBV lytic cycle occurs solely in response to large amounts of exogenous double stranded DNA products generated during lytic viral DNA replication. In immunofluorescence or immunoblot assays, DDR activation markers, specifically phosphorylated ATM (pATM), H2AX (γH2AX), or 53BP1 (p53BP1), were induced in the presence or absence of viral DNA amplification or replication compartments during the EBV lytic cycle. In assays with an ATM inhibitor and DNA damaging reagents in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, γH2AX induction was necessary for optimal expression of early EBV genes, but not sufficient for lytic reactivation. Studies in lytically reactivated EBV-positive cells in which early EBV proteins, BGLF4, BGLF5, or BALF2, were not expressed showed that these proteins were not necessary for DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle. Expression of ZEBRA, a viral protein that is necessary for EBV entry into the lytic phase, induced pATM foci and γH2AX independent of other EBV gene products. ZEBRA mutants deficient in DNA binding, Z(R183E) and Z(S186E), did not induce foci of pATM. ZEBRA co-localized with HP1β, a heterochromatin associated protein involved in DNA damage signaling. We propose a model of DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle in which ZEBRA induces ATM kinase phosphorylation, in a DNA binding dependent manner, to modulate gene expression. ATM and H2AX phosphorylation induced prior to EBV replication may be critical for creating a microenvironment of viral and cellular gene expression that enables lytic cycle progression.

  3. Identification of distinct subgroups of EBV-positive post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Morscio, Julie; Finalet Ferreiro, Julio; Vander Borght, Sara; Bittoun, Emilie; Gheysens, Olivier; Dierickx, Daan; Verhoef, Gregor; Wlodarska, Iwona; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder is an aggressive complication of transplantation, most frequently of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma morphology and associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection/reactivation. In this study the microenvironment of EBV(+) (n=23) and EBV(-) (n=9) post-transplant non-germinal center B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was characterized. Of EBV(+) cases somatic hypermutation analysis, gene expression profiling, and extensive phenotyping were performed. Our results demonstrated variable cytotoxic T-cell infiltration and significantly increased CD163(+) M2 macrophage infiltration in EBV(+) compared with EBV(-) post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. On the basis of IgM staining and hypermutation analysis, two EBV(+) post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma subgroups were identified: IgM(+) tumors lacking somatic hypermutations and IgM(-) tumors harboring somatic hypermutations. IgM(-) tumors arose late following transplantation (median interval: 16 months), mainly in kidney recipients. IgM(+) tumors on the other hand arose early (median interval: 3 months, P-value=0.0032), almost exclusively following stem cell transplantation and were associated with worse outcome (median survival 1 month for IgM(+) versus 41 months for IgM(-) tumors, log-rank/Wilcoxon P-value 0.07/0.04). Notably, IgM(+) tumors were characterized by plasma cell features (monotypic kappa/lambda expression, high MUM1 expression, and partial CD138 expression) and a high proliferation index. Consistent with the plasma cell phenotype, unfolded protein response signaling was upregulated. In contrast, IgM(-) EBV(+) post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma did not express kappa, lambda, IgD, or CD138 and expressed limited MUM1. In these tumors T-cell signaling was enhanced associated with increased T-cell infiltration compared with IgM(+) cases. Overall, our results allow further molecular classification of EBV(+) post-transplant diffuse

  4. Genome-wide analysis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) isolated from EBV-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Yang, Wenjun; Pan, Yaqi; Ji, Jiafu; Lu, Zheming; Ke, Yang

    2016-01-26

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is linked to the development of a variety of malignancies, including EBV-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC). In this study, EBVaGC was detected in 15 (7.3%) of 206 GC cases. To identify the EBV genomic variation, EBV genomic sequences isolated from 9 EBVaGC biopsy specimens were successfully retrieved, designated EBVaGC1 to EBVaGC9. By comparative analysis of these strains with another 6 completely sequenced EBV strains, EBV-wild type, B95-8, AG876, GD1, GD2, and HKNPC1, it was demonstrated that EBVaGC1 to 9 were most closely related to the GD1 strain. Phylogenetic analysis of the GC biopsy specimen-derived EBV (GC-EBV) genomes was subsequently performed to assess their genomic diversity and it exhibited the greatest divergence from the type 2 strain, AG876. Compared with the reference EBV strain GD1, they harbored 961 variations in total, including 919 substitutions, 23 insertions, and 19 deletions. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density varied substantially across all known open reading frames and was highest in latency-associated genes. Moreover, we identified 2 interstrain recombinants at the EBNA1 locus, which provided a further mechanism for the generation of diversity. Some T-cell epitope sequences in EBNA1 and LMP2A genes showed extensive variation across strains, which implied their importance in the development of vaccines and T-cell therapy. In conclusion, we reported the first genome-wide view of sequence variation of EBV isolated from primary EBVaGC biopsy specimens, which might serve as an effective method for further understanding the genomic variations contribute to EBVaGC carcinogenesis and treatment.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) isolated from EBV-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjun; Pan, Yaqi; Ji, Jiafu; Ke, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is linked to the development of a variety of malignancies, including EBV-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC). In this study, EBVaGC was detected in 15 (7.3%) of 206 GC cases. To identify the EBV genomic variation, EBV genomic sequences isolated from 9 EBVaGC biopsy specimens were successfully retrieved, designated EBVaGC1 to EBVaGC9. By comparative analysis of these strains with another 6 completely sequenced EBV strains, EBV-wild type, B95–8, AG876, GD1, GD2, and HKNPC1, it was demonstrated that EBVaGC1 to 9 were most closely related to the GD1 strain. Phylogenetic analysis of the GC biopsy specimen-derived EBV (GC-EBV) genomes was subsequently performed to assess their genomic diversity and it exhibited the greatest divergence from the type 2 strain, AG876. Compared with the reference EBV strain GD1, they harbored 961 variations in total, including 919 substitutions, 23 insertions, and 19 deletions. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density varied substantially across all known open reading frames and was highest in latency-associated genes. Moreover, we identified 2 interstrain recombinants at the EBNA1 locus, which provided a further mechanism for the generation of diversity. Some T-cell epitope sequences in EBNA1 and LMP2A genes showed extensive variation across strains, which implied their importance in the development of vaccines and T-cell therapy. In conclusion, we reported the first genome-wide view of sequence variation of EBV isolated from primary EBVaGC biopsy specimens, which might serve as an effective method for further understanding the genomic variations contribute to EBVaGC carcinogenesis and treatment. PMID:26716899

  6. Do EBV Encoded Small RNAs Interfere with Tumor Suppressor APC in EBV Associated Breast Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    estrogen negative invasive breast cancers and in large numbers of rapidly growing fibroadenomas of the breast in immunocompromised patients.1-3 One...growing fibroadenomas of the breast in immuno-compromised patients. EBV is associated with variety of malignant diseases including Burkitt’s Lymphoma (BL...Tseng MD, Gutsch DE, et al. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus in rapidly growing fibroadenomas of the breast in immunosuppressed hosts. Modern Pathology

  7. The latent origin of replication of Epstein-Barr virus directs viral genomes to active regions of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Manuel J; Ott, Elisabeth; Papior, Peer; Schepers, Aloys

    2010-03-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus efficiently infects human B cells. The EBV genome is maintained extrachromosomally and replicates synchronously with the host's chromosomes. The latent origin of replication (oriP) guarantees plasmid stability by mediating two basic functions: replication and segregation of the viral genome. While the segregation process of EBV genomes is well understood, little is known about its chromatin association and nuclear distribution during interphase. Here, we analyzed the nuclear localization of EBV genomes and the role of functional oriP domains FR and DS for basic functions such as the transformation of primary cells, their role in targeting EBV genomes to distinct nuclear regions, and their association with epigenetic domains. Fluorescence in situ hybridization visualized the localization of extrachromosomal EBV genomes in the regions adjacent to chromatin-dense territories called the perichromatin. Further, immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated a preference of the viral genome for histone 3 lysine 4-trimethylated (H3K4me3) and histone 3 lysine 9-acetylated (H3K9ac) nuclear regions. To determine the role of FR and DS for establishment and subnuclear localization of EBV genomes, we transformed primary human B lymphocytes with recombinant mini-EBV genomes containing different oriP mutants. The loss of DS results in a slightly increased association in H3K27me3 domains. This study demonstrates that EBV genomes or oriP-based extrachromosomal vector systems are integrated into the higher order nuclear organization. We found that viral genomes are not randomly distributed in the nucleus. FR but not DS is crucial for the localization of EBV in perichromatic regions that are enriched for H3K4me3 and H3K9ac, which are hallmarks of transcriptionally active regions.

  8. Increased EBV Shedding in Astronaut Saliva During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Stowe, R. P.; Phillips, T.; Lugg, D. J.; Mehta, S. K.

    2003-01-01

    Shedding of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) by astronauts before, during, and after space shuttle missions was quantified. Of 1398 saliva specimens from 32 astronauts, 314 (23%) were positive for EBV DNA by PCR analysis. Of the saliva specimens collected before flight, 29% were positive for EBV DNA and of those collected during or after flight, 16% were EBV-positive. The number of EBV DNA copies from samples taken during the flight was 417+/-31, significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the number of copies from the preflight (40+/-1.7) and postflight (44+/-5) phases. Eighteen control subjects shed EBV DNA with a frequency of 3.7% and a copy number of 40+/-2 per ml saliva. Ten days before flight and on landing day, antibody titers to EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than baseline levels. On landing day, urinary level of cortiso1 and catecholamines, and plasma levels of substance P and other neuropeptides, were increased over their preflight value. Results suggested that stress associated with spaceflight decreases cellular immunity and thereby leads to increased viral reactivation.

  9. Evaluation of the risk of lymphomagenesis in xenografts by the PCR-based detection of EBV BamHI W region in patient cancer specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mukohyama, Junko; Iwakiri, Dai; Zen, Yoh; Mukohara, Toru; Minami, Hironobu; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Shimono, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDXs) is hampered by lymphomagenesis mostly caused by the latently-infected Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) contained in patient cancer tissues. However, the character of patient tissues that result in lymphomagenesis after xenotransplantation is not elucidated. In this study, we analyzed the patient colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues and the PDXs established by their xenotransplantation. We found that 2 of 9 (22%) PDX tumors were EBV-associated human diffuse large B cell lymphoma which was formed by clonal proliferation of human B-cell lymphocytes, were strongly positive for EBER-ISH, and were classified as type III latency. Expression of EBV genes and RNAs, such as EBNAs, LMP1, EBER and EBV-associated microRNAs in patient CRC tissues were unlikely to be associated with lymphomagenesis in PDXs. In contrast, the positive PCR-based amplification of BamHI W region, a major internal repeat in EBV genome, in the patient CRC tissues was correlated with lymphomagenesis in PDXs. These results suggest that the detection of the EBV BamHI W region in the patient surgical specimens will be an effective way to predict the risk of lymphomagenesis in PDXs before xenotransplantation. PMID:27367028

  10. EBV-associated hepatic smooth muscle tumor of uncertain biologic behavior after heart transplantation in a pediatric patient: case report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Chintalapati, Suneetha; Dietz, Robin; Raza, Adnan S.; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumor (EBV-SMT) is a rare neoplasm recognized in immunocompromised patients. There are less than 30 cases of EBV-SMT reported in pediatric population following solid organ transplantation. Herein, we report a case of an 8-year-old female who was incidentally noted to have multiple lesions in the liver 8 years after heart transplantation. The tumor was composed of a cellular proliferation of spindle-shaped cells with low mitotic activity. The diagnosis of EBV-SMT was confirmed by in situ hybridization for EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) transcripts. Multiple additional lesions were detected by whole body positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan 4 months after the initial finding of the hepatic lesions. Immunosuppression was switched to a mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor. We conclude that EBV-SMT should be included in the differential diagnoses in post-transplantation patients and further investigations should be performed to evaluate additional lesions. PMID:28280632

  11. Diagnostic values for the viral load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Michio; Kawada, Jun-ichi; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease (CAEBV) is a distinct EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease with a poor prognosis. Although the viral load in blood samples has been widely used for diagnosing CAEBV, well-defined viral load thresholds to guide clinicians are currently lacking. The aim of the present study was to determine standardized diagnostic values for EBV load in blood samples of CAEBV patients using the World Health Organization international standard for reporting. Levels of EBV DNA in 103 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and 95 plasma/serum samples from 107 cases with CAEBV were quantified and expressed in international units. Receiver operating characteristic curves were analyzed to assess the most appropriate cut-off values for levels of EBV DNA to distinguish CAEBV from EBV-associated infectious mononucleosis (IM) and controls with past EBV infection. Levels of EBV DNA in PBMCs were significantly higher in the CAEBV group (median, 10(4.2) IU/μgDNA) compared to the IM (median, 10(2.1) IU/μgDNA) and control groups. An inconsistent qualitative result was seen in 13 of 86 CAEBV patients; in these, EBV-DNA was positive in PBMCs, but negative in plasma. Diagnostic cut-off values for viral load in PBMCs from CAEBV patients, as compared to those of healthy controls and IM patients, were 10(2.0) IU/μgDNA and 10(3.2) IU/μgDNA, respectively. For diagnostic purposes, the viral load of PBMCs was better than of plasma/serum. A diagnostic cut-off EBV load for CAEBV may be useful for the management of CAEBV patients.

  12. Human natural killer cells prevent infectious mononucleosis features by targeting lytic Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chijioke, Obinna; Müller, Anne; Feederle, Regina; Barros, Mario Henrique M; Krieg, Carsten; Emmel, Vanessa; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Leung, Carol S; Antsiferova, Olga; Landtwing, Vanessa; Bossart, Walter; Moretta, Alessandro; Hassan, Rocio; Boyman, Onur; Niedobitek, Gerald; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Capaul, Riccarda; Münz, Christian

    2013-12-26

    Primary infection with the human oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can result in infectious mononucleosis (IM), a self-limiting disease caused by massive lymphocyte expansion that predisposes for the development of distinct EBV-associated lymphomas. Why some individuals experience this symptomatic primary EBV infection, whereas the majority acquires the virus asymptomatically, remains unclear. Using a mouse model with reconstituted human immune system components, we show that depletion of human natural killer (NK) cells enhances IM symptoms and promotes EBV-associated tumorigenesis mainly because of a loss of immune control over lytic EBV infection. These data suggest that failure of innate immune control by human NK cells augments symptomatic lytic EBV infection, which drives lymphocyte expansion and predisposes for EBV-associated malignancies.

  13. Coxsackie Myocarditis and Hepatitis with Reactivated Epstein-Bar Virus (EBV): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Atti, Varunsiri; Anderson, Nathan M.; Day, Mathew B.

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 57 Final Diagnosis: Coxsackie myocarditis and hepatitis Symptoms: Fever • headache • general malaise • sob. Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Echocardiography • cardiac MRI Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Myocarditis, defined as inflammation of myocardial tissue of the heart, is an uncommon cardiac presentation and is due to a variety of causes. It affects 1% of the US population, 50% of which is caused by coxsackie B virus. Cardiac tissue is the prime target, and destruction of myocardium results in cardiac failure with fluid overload. Case Report: Our patient was a 57-year-old woman with fever, headache, neck pain, and generalized malaise. Her white blood cell count was 13×103 cells/mm3. Interestingly, lumbar puncture ruled out meningitis. An echocardiogram to evaluate elevated troponin revealed an ejection fraction of 30% with severe left ventricular global hypokinesis without valvular vegetations consistent with new-onset systolic heart failure. Cardiac MRI showed a small pericardial effusion with bilateral pleural effusion. As she continued to be febrile, a viral panel was ordered, revealing coxsackie B4 antibody titer of 1: 640 (reference: >1: 32 indicates recent infection) with positive Epstein-Barr virus deoxyribonucleic acid by PCR, consistent with viral myocarditis. Conclusions: Coxsackie B virus myocarditis is rarely recognized and reported by the general internist in clinical practice, so we would like present our experience with an interesting clinical presentation of the viral prodrome. An estimated 95% people in the US are infected with Epstein-Barr virus by adulthood, but it remains dormant in memory B lymphocytes. Recirculation of these B cells in lymphoid tissue stimulated by antigens, which in our case is coxsackie B virus; they differentiate into plasma cells, and the production of Z Epstein-Barr replication activator protein (ZEBRA) increases viral replication, thus explaining the

  14. Successful Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation for an Adult Case of Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Saburi, Masuho; Ogata, Masao; Satou, Takako; Yoshida, Natsumi; Nagamatsu, Kentaro; Nashimoto, Yuko; Moroga, Yui; Takano, Kuniko; Kohno, Kazuhiro; Shirao, Kuniaki

    2016-01-01

    A 41-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (CAEBV) was diagnosed based on the findings of elevated EBV antibody titers and positive EBV-DNA in the peripheral blood, and cord blood stem cell transplantation (CBT) was performed. The EBV-DNA levels in the blood fell below the limit of detection. His lymphoma relapsed on Day 165 with the appearance of eruptions, which disappeared after the withdrawal of tacrolimus. One year after transplantation, there were no signs of recurrence. This encouraging result suggests that CBT should be considered for adult cases of CAEBV with aggressive clinical manifestations. PMID:27904117

  15. Lack of association between EBV and breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Perrigoue, Jacqueline G; den Boon, Johan A; Friedl, Andreas; Newton, Michael A; Ahlquist, Paul; Sugden, Bill

    2005-04-01

    Multiple conflicting findings have been presented which indicate that EBV may be found in anywhere from 0% to 51% of breast carcinomas. When EBV has been found causally associated with other human cancers, its DNA and one or more of its viral products have been detected in most tumor cells of a given biopsy. To test whether EBV has such an association with breast cancer, we measured the number of viral DNA molecules per cell in matched normal and tumor biopsies from 45 patients using real-time quantitative PCR. In no case could EBV DNA consistently be detected, with either of two different probes, at levels above 0.1 molecules per cell in two sections of the tumor samples. These levels of detection match those detected in EBV-negative cell lines and therefore likely represent noise in the assays. Equally importantly, the distribution of these low signals was the same between tumors and their matched normal controls. We conclude that EBV does not contribute to the development of breast cancers as it does to epithelial cancers such as nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas or to Burkitt's and Hodgkin's lymphomas.

  16. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome and Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphoma: An Adjunctive Diagnostic Role for Monitoring EBV Viremia?

    PubMed

    Pace, Romina; Vinh, Donald C

    2013-01-01

    Background. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a genetic disorder of lymphocyte homeostasis due to defects in FAS-mediated apoptosis. ALPS is characterized by childhood onset of chronic lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, autoimmunity, an expanded population of double-negative T cells (DNTCs), and an increased risk of lymphoma. This propensity for lymphoma in ALPS is not well understood. It is possible that lymphomagenesis in some of these patients may result from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection exploiting the defective T-cell surveillance resulting from impaired FAS-mediated apoptosis. Case Presentation. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of lymphoma in a patient with ALPS that was clinically heralded by progressively increasing EBV viremia. We discuss its practical implications and the possible immune pathways involved in the increased risk for EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders in ALPS patients. Conclusion. In patients with ALPS, distinguishing chronic lymphadenopathy from emerging lymphoma is difficult, with few practical recommendations available. This case illustrates that, at least for some patients, monitoring for progressively increasing EBV viremia may be useful.

  17. Evaluation of EBV transformation of human memory B-cells isolated by FACS and MACS techniques.

    PubMed

    Sadreddini, Sanam; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Younesi, Vahid; Pourlak, Tala; Afkham, Amir; Shokri, Fazel; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have been performed to develop effective neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can efficiently immortalize B-cells to establish lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and so it has been used extensively for transformation of B-cells to produce and secrete immunoglobulin. The present study addressed the effect of TLR7/8 agonist (R848), feeder cells layer and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) cell separation methods on the transformation efficiency of antibody-producing memory B-cells. For these studies, the antigen used for analyses of antibody formation was the tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) derived from Clostridium tetani. The results here showed that employing an HFFF.PI6 feeder cell layer, R848 agonist and FACS-mediated purification of memory B-cells led to increased transformation efficiency. Altogether, the effects of the R848 and the feeder cells provided an efficient method for EBV transformation of human B-cells. Moreover, there was an advantage in using FACS sorting of B-cells over the MACS method in the context of EBV transformation and immortalization of precursors of antigen-specific B-cells.

  18. Seroepidemiology of EBV and interpretation of the "isolated VCA IgG" pattern.

    PubMed

    De Paschale, Massimo; Agrappi, Carlo; Manco, Maria Teresa; Mirri, Paola; Viganò, Egidio Franco; Clerici, Pierangelo

    2009-02-01

    The presence of VCA IgG in the absence of VCA IgM and EBNA-1 IgG antibodies makes classifying EBV infection more difficult as this serological picture can be seen in the case of past infection with EBNA-1 IgG loss or non-appearance, or acute infections with the early disappearance or delayed onset of VCA IgM. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of this pattern in 2,422 outpatients with suspected EBV infection examined in 2005-2006, and to interpret its significance by means of immunoblotting. One hundred and seventy-seven (7.3%) of the patients were VCA IgG-positive, VCA IgM-negative and EBNA-1 IgG-negative, 15 of whom (8.5%) presented with heterophile antibodies. Analysis by age class showed that the prevalence of isolated VCA IgG ranged from 4.5% in the subjects aged 1-10 years to 9% in those aged >60 years. Immunoblotting allowed 18.9% of the cases to be classified as acute and 81.1% as past infections, the latter being observed in about 37% of the patients aged less than 10 years and in 100% of those aged >30 years. Therefore, in our case series, the presence of isolated VCA IgG was associated usually with past infection, particularly among adults. In children aged less than 10 years, it was associated mainly with acute infection but as past infection may be present in about one-third of such children, this possibility should not be overlooked.

  19. The EBV Latent Antigen 3C Inhibits Apoptosis through Targeted Regulation of Interferon Regulatory Factors 4 and 8

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Lu, Jie; Cai, Qiliang; Saha, Abhik; Jha, Hem Chandra; Dzeng, Richard Kuo; Robertson, Erle S.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is linked to a broad spectrum of B-cell malignancies. EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is an encoded latent antigen required for growth transformation of primary human B-lymphocytes. Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) and 8 (IRF8) are transcription factors of the IRF family that regulate diverse functions in B cell development. IRF4 is an oncoprotein with anti-apoptotic properties and IRF8 functions as a regulator of apoptosis and tumor suppressor in many hematopoietic malignancies. We now demonstrate that EBNA3C can contribute to B-cell transformation by modulating the molecular interplay between cellular IRF4 and IRF8. We show that EBNA3C physically interacts with IRF4 and IRF8 with its N-terminal domain in vitro and forms a molecular complex in cells. We identified the Spi-1/B motif of IRF4 as critical for EBNA3C interaction. We also demonstrated that EBNA3C can stabilize IRF4, which leads to downregulation of IRF8 by enhancing its proteasome-mediated degradation. Further, si-RNA mediated knock-down of endogenous IRF4 results in a substantial reduction in proliferation of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), as well as augmentation of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. IRF4 knockdown also showed reduced expression of its targeted downstream signalling proteins which include CDK6, Cyclin B1 and c-Myc all critical for cell proliferation. These studies provide novel insights into the contribution of EBNA3C to EBV-mediated B-cell transformation through regulation of IRF4 and IRF8 and add another molecular link to the mechanisms by which EBV dysregulates cellular activities, increasing the potential for therapeutic intervention against EBV-associated cancers. PMID:23658517

  20. High Levels of EBV-Encoded RNA 1 (EBER1) Trigger Interferon and Inflammation-Related Genes in Keratinocytes Expressing HPV16 E6/E7

    PubMed Central

    Aromseree, Sirinart; Middeldorp, Jaap M.; Pientong, Chamsai; van Eijndhoven, Monique; Ramayanti, Octavia; Lougheed, Sinéad M.; Pegtel, D. Michiel; Steenbergen, Renske D. M.; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2017-01-01

    Different types of cells infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can release exosomes containing viral components that functionally affect neighboring cells. Previously, we found that EBV was localized mostly in infiltrating lymphocytes within the stromal layer of cervical lesions. In this study, we aimed to determine effects of exosome-transferred EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) on keratinocytes expressing human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6/E7 (DonorI-HPV16 HFKs). Lipid transfection of in vitro-transcribed EBER1 molecules (ivt EBER1) into DonorI-HPV16 HFKs caused strong induction of interferon (IFN)-related genes and interleukin 6 (IL-6). To gain insights into the physiological situation, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs), low passage DonorI-HPV16 HFKs and primary keratinocytes were used as recipient cells for internalization of exosomes from wild-type EBV (wt EBV) or B95-8 EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). qRT-PCR was used to determine the expression of EBER1, HPV16 E6/E7, IFN-related genes and IL-6 in recipient cells. The secretion of inflammatory cytokines was investigated using cytometric bead array. Wt EBV-modified exosomes induced both IFN-related genes and IL-6 upon uptake into moDCs, while exosomes from B95-8 EBV LCLs induced only IL-6 in moDCs. Internalization of EBV–modified exosomes was demonstrated in DonorI-HPV16 HFKs, yielding only EBER1 but not EBER2. However, EBER1 transferred by exosomes did not induce IFN-related genes or IL-6 expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion in DonorI-HPV16 HFKs and primary keratinocytes. EBER1 copy numbers in exosomes from wt EBV-infected LCLs were 10-fold higher than in exosomes from B95-8 LCLs (equal cell equivalent), whereas ivt EBER1 was used at approximately 100-fold higher concentration than in exosomes. These results demonstrated that the induction of IFN-related genes and IL-6 by EBER1 depends on quantity of EBER1 and type of recipient cells. High levels of EBER1 in cervical cells or

  1. Alternatively activated macrophages in infection and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather, DeLisa; Cihakova, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play an important role in activation of the immune response and wound healing. Pathogens that require T helper-type 2 (Th2) responses for effective clearance, such as parasitic worms, are strong inducers of alternatively activated or M2 macrophages. However, infections such as bacteria and viruses that require Th1-type responses may induce M2 as a strategy to evade the immune system. M2 are particularly efficient at scavenging self tissues following injury through receptors like the mannose receptor and scavenger receptor-A. Thus, M2 may increase autoimmune disease by presenting self tissue to T cells. M2 may also exacerbate immune complex (IC)-mediated pathology and fibrosis, a hallmark of autoimmune disease in women, due to the release of profibrotic factors such as interleukin (IL)-1β, transforming growth factor-β, fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinases. We have found that M2 comprise anywhere from 30% to 70% of the infiltrate during acute viral or experimental autoimmune myocarditis, and shifts in M2 populations correlate with increased IC-deposition, fibrosis and chronic autoimmune pathology. Thus, women may be at an increased risk of M2-mediated autoimmunity due to estrogen’s ability to increase Th2 responses. PMID:19819674

  2. Human Herpesvirus 8 LANA Interacts with Proteins of the mSin3 Corepressor Complex and Negatively Regulates Epstein-Barr Virus Gene Expression in Dually Infected PEL Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krithivas, Anita; Young, David B.; Liao, Gangling; Greene, Deborah; Hayward, S. Diane

    2000-01-01

    The human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is expressed in all latently HHV-8 infected cells and in HHV-8-associated tumors, including primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). To better understand the contribution of LANA to tumorigenesis and to the PEL phenotype, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen which identified the corepressor protein SAP30 as a LANA binding protein. SAP30 is a constituent of a large multicomponent complex that brings histone deacetylases to the promoter. Glutathione S-transferase affinity assays confirmed interaction between LANA and SAP30 and also demonstrated interactions between LANA and two other members of the corepressor complex, mSin3A and CIR. The corepressors bound to the amino-terminal 340-amino-acid domain of LANA. In transient expression assays, this same domain of LANA mediated repression when targeted to a 5×Gal4tk-CAT reporter as a GAL4-LANA fusion. PEL cells have the unusual feature that they are frequently dually infected with both HHV-8 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We found that EBV EBNA-1 expression is downregulated in PEL cells at both the RNA and protein levels. In transient expression assays, LANA repressed activated expression from the EBV Qp and Cp latency promoters. Reduction of endogenous Qp activity could also be demonstrated in EBV-infected Rael cells transfected with a LANA expression plasmid. In contrast to the effect of LANA on EBV latency promoters, LANA activated expression from its own promoter. The data indicate that LANA can mediate transcriptional repression through recruitment of an mSin3 corepressor complex and further that LANA-mediated repression is likely to contribute to the low level of EBV latency gene expression seen in dually infected PEL cells. PMID:11000236

  3. Regulated expression of the feline panleukopenia virus P38 promoter on extrachromosomal FPV/EBV chimeric plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, D L; Carlson, J O

    1989-01-01

    Feline panleukopenia virus/Epstein-Barr virus (FPV/EBV) chimeric expression plasmids were constructed to study regulation of the structural protein gene of the parvovirus, FPV, in a homologous cell culture system. Detection and quantitation of activity from the native FPV promoter, P38, was facilitated by fusing the Escherichia coli lacZ gene with the FPV structural protein gene. Feline cell lines which stably maintained these plasmids extrachromosomally were established. Constitutive beta-galactosidase activity was low but increased up to 40-fold after infection with FPV. Expression of beta-galactosidase was only detected when the FPV/lacZ gene was oriented in the same transcriptional direction as the Epstein-Barr virus gene coding for EBNA-1. When a small open reading frame upstream of the FPV/lacZ initiation codon was deleted, beta-galactosidase expression increased another 4.7- to 26-fold. These changes in beta-galactosidase activity indicate that expression of the FPV structural protein gene is regulated both transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally. Images PMID:2542586

  4. HLA-A*02:07 is a protective allele for EBV negative and a susceptibility allele for EBV positive classical Hodgkin lymphoma in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Hepkema, Bouke; Nolte, Ilja; Kushekhar, Kushi; Jongsma, Theo; Veenstra, Rianne; Poppema, Sibrand; Gao, Zifen; Visser, Lydia; Diepstra, Arjan; van den Berg, Anke

    2012-01-01

    HLA-A2 protects from EBV+ classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) in Western Europe, but it is unknown whether this protective effect also exists in the Chinese population. We investigated the association of HLA-A2 and specific common and well documented HLA-A2 subtypes with EBV stratified cHL patients (n = 161) from the northern part of China. Quantitative-PCR and sequence-based subtyping was performed to identify HLA-A2 positive samples and their subtypes. 67 (42%) of the cHL patients were EBV+. There were no significant differences in percentages of HLA-A2 positivity between cHL and controls (65% vs 66%) and between EBV+ and EBV- cHL patients (70% vs 61%). The frequency distribution of HLA-A2 subtypes was significantly different between EBV stratified cHL subgroups and controls. This difference was most striking for the HLA-A*02:07 type with a frequency of 38% in EBV+ cHL, 8% in EBV- cHL and 20% in controls. Significant differences were also observed for the HLA-A*02:07, HLA-A2 (non-02:07) and the A2-negative typings between EBV+ cHL vs controls (p = 0.028), EBV- cHL vs controls (p = 0.045) and EBV+ vs EBV- cHL cases (p = 2×10(-5)). In conclusion, HLA-A*02:07 is a predisposing allele for EBV+ cHL and a protective allele for EBV- cHL in the northern Chinese population.

  5. Clinicopathologic and molecular features of 122 Brazilian cases of nodal and extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, with EBV subtyping analysis.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Domeny-Duarte, Pollyanna; Chioato, Lucimara; Barber, Glen; Natkunam, Yasodha; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2011-08-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (NK/TCL) is more prevalent in Asia and in some areas of South and Central America, but it is rarely seen in the United States and Europe. In this study, a series of 122 cases of NK/TCL from Brazil was analyzed with respect to clinicopathologic features. Clinical characteristics and geographic distribution were evaluated in 97 cases of nasal/nasopharyngeal region and 23 cases in extranasal sites including 6 nodal cases. Clinical staging and follow-up information was available in a subset of 21 patients. All cases harbored Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), 95% and 85% expressed cytoplasmic CD3 and CD56, respectively, and all cases were positive for at least 1 marker for cytotoxic granules. The global distribution of EBV subtypes showed predominance of strain subtype A, 89%, and subtype B, 11%. No dual infections were detected. TCR-γ TCR-gene rearrangement was observed in 7 cases; all of them extranodal. Three of TCR-γ(+) cases showed EBV subtype A. Two TCR-γ(+)/CD56(+) cases showed EBV subtype B. Geographic distribution of NK/TCL showed higher frequency in the southeast and northeast regions of Brazil. Striking differences among geographic regions were seen with the vast majority of EBV subtype B (86%) occurring in the south and southeast regions.

  6. Relationship between disease activity and infection in patients with spondyloarthropathies

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, A; Pacheco-Tena, C; Vazquez-Mellado, J; Burgos-Vargas, R

    2004-01-01

    Methods: A cross sectional study of 95 non-selected patients with SpA (62 men; mean age 26.4 years), who were examined for signs and symptoms of infection and their association with disease activity. 52 had ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 32 undifferentiated SpA (uSpA), 6 chronic reactive arthritis (ReA), and 5 psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Categorical data were analysed by χ2 or Fisher's tests. Results: 53 (56%) patients had infections: 41 (43%) upper respiratory tract (URT), 34 (36%) enteric, and 20 (21%) genitourinary infections. More infections occurred in HLA-B27 positive patients as a whole (39 v 5; p = 0.003) and in uSpA (12 v 2; p = 0.005). In AS and uSpA, infections occurred in ∼50%. 30/39 (77%) patients with active disease (group A) and 23/56 (41%) (group B) (p = 0.001) had infection. There were more enteric infections in group A (47%; p<0.001) and more URT infections in group B (52%; p = NS). 22/30 (73%) patients attributed disease activity to infection. Conclusion: Enteric, and less commonly, URT infections in Mexican patients with SpA, particularly those who were HLA-B27 positive, seem to have a role in the active phase of AS and uSpA. PMID:15361397

  7. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections.

    PubMed

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Moore, Michael D; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Dustin, Lynn B; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B; Screaton, Gavin R; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-06-23

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation-driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation-is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology.

  8. EBV-induced human CD8(+) NKT cells synergise CD4(+) NKT cells suppressing EBV-associated tumours upon induction of Th1-bias.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Li, Li; Zhou, Rui; Xiao, Ruijing; Wang, Yujuan; Ji, Xiang; Wu, Mengjun; Wang, Lan; Huang, Wei; Zheng, Xiaoling; Tan, Xinti; Chen, Lang; Xiong, Tao; Xiong, Jie; Jin, Youxin; Tan, Jinquan; He, Yuling

    2009-10-01

    CD8(+) natural killer T (NKT) cells from EBV-associated tumour patients are quantitatively and functionally impaired. EBV-induced CD8(+) NKT cells drive syngeneic T cells into a Th1-bias response to suppress EBV-associated malignancies. IL-4-biased CD4(+) NKT cells do not affect either syngeneic T cell cytotoxicity or Th cytokine secretion. Circulating mDC1 cells from patients with EBV-associated malignancies impair the production of IFN-gamma by CD8(+) NKT cells. In this study, we have established a human-thymus-SCID chimaera model to further investigate the underlying mechanism of EBV-induced CD8(+) NKT cells in suppressing EBV-associated malignancies. In the human-thymus-SCID chimera, EBV-induced CD8(+) NKT cells suppress EBV-associated malignancies in a manner dependent on the Th1-bias response and syngeneic CD3(+) T cells. However, adoptive transfer with CD4(+) NKT cells alone inhibits T cell immunity. Interestingly, CD4(+) NKT cells themselves secrete high levels of IL-2, enhancing the persistence of adoptively transferred CD8(+) NKT cells and T cells, thereby leading to a more pronounced T cell anti-tumour response in chimaeras co-transferred with CD4(+) and CD8(+) NKT cells. Thus, immune reconstitution with EBV-induced CD4(+) and CD8(+) NKT cells synergistically enhances T cell tumour immunity, providing a potential prophylactic and therapeutic treatment for EBV-associated malignancies.

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-Allergic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of eBV, a Newly Developed Derivative of Bee Venom, through Modulation of IRF3 Signaling Pathway in a Carrageenan-Induced Edema Model

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hwa-Jin; Lee, Jinho; Shin, Joon-Shik; Kim, Me-riong; Koh, Wonil; Kim, Min-Jeong; Lee, Jae-woong; Kim, Eun Jee; Lee, In-Hee; Kim, Won Kyung; Lee, Yoon Jae; Lee, Sang Kook

    2016-01-01

    Background Bee venom (BV), a type of toxin extracted from honeybees (Apis mellifera), has been empirically and widely used to treat inflammatory diseases throughout Asia. Essential BV (eBV) was developed by removing phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and histamine to lower occurrence of allergic reaction. This study investigated the anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory activities of eBV in vitro and in vivo and its underlying mechanism of action. Methods The anti-inflammatory potential of eBV was assessed in vivo using a carrageenan-induced paw edema model. To further investigate the mechanism by which eBV exerts anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects, compound 48/80-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells were studied in vitro. Results Release of β-hexosaminidase and histamine was increased by eBV in a dose-dependent manner, but these levels were lower in eBV compared to original BV at the same concentration. In addition, eBV suppressed compound 48/80-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in RBL-2H3 cells. eBV was also shown to suppress nitric oxide (NO) production by down-regulating mRNA expression and subsequent protein expression of inflammatory mediators in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells. Phosphorylation of activators and signal transducers of transcription 1/interferon regulatory factor 3 (STAT1/IRF3) was attenuated by eBV treatment. eBV significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced acute edema in vivo. Serum levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), TNF-α, and IL-1β were also down-regulated by eBV. Conclusions These results demonstrate that eBV inhibits allergic and inflammatory response by reducing inflammatory mediator production via regulation of the STAT1/IRF3 signaling pathway, suggesting that eBV is a feasible candidate for regulation of allergic-inflammatory response in complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:27930719

  10. Pregnancy outcome in serologically indicated active Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    PubMed

    Tadmor, O P; Shaia, M; Rosenman, H; Livshin, Y; Choukroun, C; Barr, I; Diamant, Y Z

    1993-05-01

    A serological test for chlamydial infection was administered to 281 Jerusalem women in order to determine the rate and influence of Chlamydia on pregnancy outcome. Serological indication of active infection was present in 7.8% of the tested women, while 15.3% were shown to be positive for Chlamydia. Among the ultraorthodox subpopulation of Mea Shearim, serological indication of active infection was present among 5.9% of the women, and 12.3% of this population tested positive. In comparison, women from the secular subpopulation had 12.7% serological indication of active infection and 22.95% tested positive (P < 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between pregnancy duration, birthweight, incidence of premature uterine contractions, premature rupture of membranes, and postpartum febrile morbidity in the infected and noninfected groups. Women with a previous history of induced abortions showed a significantly higher evidence of past Chlamydia infection (9.3%) when compared with the women who did not have an infection (1.4%) (P < 0.006). Among the ultraorthodox women with positive or active infection, 41% had suffered at least one spontaneous abortion, as compared with 25% of the religious women who had no serological evidence of infection.

  11. Reproduction of epstein-barr virus infection and pathogenesis in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi

    2014-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is etiologically associated with a variety of diseases including lymphoproliferative diseases, lymphomas, carcinomas, and autoimmune diseases. Humans are the only natural host of EBV and limited species of new-world monkeys can be infected with the virus in experimental conditions. Small animal models of EBV infection, required for evaluation of novel therapies and vaccines for EBV-associated diseases, have not been available. Recently the development of severely immunodeficient mouse strains enabled production of humanized mice in which human immune system components are reconstituted and express their normal functions. Humanized mice can serve as infection models for human-specific viruses such as EBV that target cells of the immune system. This review summarizes recent studies by the author's group addressing reproduction of EBV infection and pathogenesis in humanized mice.

  12. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection in inflammatory bowel disease: Need for mucosal viral load measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Racca, Francesca; Paolucci, Stefania; Campanini, Giulia; Pozzi, Lodovica; Betti, Elena; Riboni, Roberta; Vanoli, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the best diagnostic technique and risk factors of the human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: A cohort of 40 IBD patients (17 refractory) and 40 controls underwent peripheral blood and endoscopic colonic mucosal sample harvest. Viral infection was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and correlations with clinical and endoscopic indexes of activity, and risk factors were investigated. RESULTS: All refractory patients carried detectable levels of HCMV and/or EBV mucosal load as compared to 13/23 (56.5%) non-refractory and 13/40 (32.5%) controls. The median DNA value was significantly higher in refractory (HCMV 286 and EBV 5.440 copies/105 cells) than in non-refractory (HCMV 0 and EBV 6 copies/105 cells; P < 0.05 and < 0.001) IBD patients and controls (HCMV and EBV 0 copies/105 cells; P < 0.001 for both). Refractory patients showed DNA peak values ≥ 103 copies/105 cells in diseased mucosa in comparison to non-diseased mucosa (P < 0.0121 for HCMV and < 0.0004 for EBV), while non-refractory patients and controls invariably displayed levels below this threshold, thus allowing us to differentiate viral colitis from mucosal infection. Moreover, the mucosal load positively correlated with the values found in the peripheral blood, whilst no correlation with the number of positive cells at immunohistochemistry was found. Steroid use was identified as a significant risk factor for both HCMV (P = 0.018) and EBV (P = 0.002) colitis. Finally, a course of specific antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was successful in all refractory patients with HCMV colitis, whilst refractory patients with EBV colitis did not show any improvement despite steroid tapering and discontinuation of the other medications. CONCLUSION: Viral colitis appeared to contribute to mucosal lesions in refractory IBD, and its correct diagnosis and management require

  13. Microglial activation induces neuronal death in Chandipura virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Abhishek Kumar; Ghosh, Sourish; Pradhan, Sreeparna; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Neurotropic viruses induce neurodegeneration either directly by activating host death domains or indirectly through host immune response pathways. Chandipura Virus (CHPV) belonging to family Rhabdoviridae is ranked among the emerging pathogens of the Indian subcontinent. Previously we have reported that CHPV induces neurodegeneration albeit the root cause of this degeneration is still an open question. In this study we explored the role of microglia following CHPV infection. Phenotypic analysis of microglia through lectin and Iba-1 staining indicated cells were in an activated state post CHPV infection in cortical region of the infected mouse brain. Cytokine Bead Array (CBA) analysis revealed comparatively higher cytokine and chemokine levels in the same region. Increased level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), Nitric Oxide (NO) and Reactive Oxygen species (ROS) in CHPV infected mouse brain indicated a strong inflammatory response to CHPV infection. Hence it was hypothesized through our analyses that this inflammatory response may stimulate the neuronal death following CHPV infection. In order to validate our hypothesis supernatant from CHPV infected microglial culture was used to infect neuronal cell line and primary neurons. This study confirmed the bystander killing of neurons due to activation of microglia post CHPV infection. PMID:26931456

  14. Proteoglycan expression correlates with the phenotype of malignant and non-malignant EBV-positive B-cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tsidulko, Alexandra Y.; Matskova, Liudmila; Astakhova, Lidiia A.; Ernberg, Ingemar; Grigorieva, Elvira V.

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of proteoglycans (PGs) in EBV-host interactions and lymphomagenesis remains poorly investigated. In this study, expression of major proteoglycans (syndecan-1, glypican-1, perlecan, versican, brevican, aggrecan, NG2, serglycin, decorin, biglycan, lumican, CD44), heparan sulphate (HS) metabolic system (EXT1/2, NDST1/2, GLCE, HS2ST1, HS3ST1/2, HS6ST1/2, SULF1/2, HPSE) and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (collagen 1A1, fibronectin, elastin) in primary B cells and EBV carrying cell lines with different phenotypes, patterns of EBV-host cell interaction and viral latency stages (type I-III) was investigated. Primary B cells expressed a wide repertoire of PGs (dominated by serglycin and CD44) and ECM components. Lymphoblastoid EBV+ B cell lines (LCLs) showed specific PG expression with down-regulation of CD44 and ECM components and up-regulation of serglycin and perlecan/HSPG2. For Burkitt's lymphoma cells (BL), serglycin was down-regulated in BL type III cells and perlecan in type I BL cells. The biosynthetic machinery for HS was active in all cell lines, with some tendency to be down-regulated in BL cells. 5′-aza-dC and/or Trichostatin A resulted in transcriptional upregulation of the genes, suggesting that low expression of ECM components, proteoglycan core proteins and HS biosynthetic system is due to epigenetic suppression in type I cells. Taken together, our data show that proteoglycans are expressed in primary B lymphocytes whereas they are not or only partly expressed in EBV-carrying cell lines, depending on their latency type program. PMID:26527314

  15. Host genetics of Epstein–Barr virus infection, latency and disease

    PubMed Central

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J; Kellam, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infects 95% of the adult population and is the cause of infectious mononucleosis. It is also associated with 1% of cancers worldwide, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and Burkitt's lymphoma. Human and cancer genetic studies are now major forces determining gene variants associated with many cancers, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Host genetics is also important in infectious disease; however, there have been no large-scale efforts towards understanding the contribution that human genetic variation plays in primary EBV infection and latency. This review covers 25 years of studies into host genetic susceptibility to EBV infection and disease, from candidate gene studies, to the first genome-wide association study of EBV antibody response, and an EBV-status stratified genome-wide association study of Hodgkin's lymphoma. Although many genes are implicated in EBV-related disease, studies are often small, not replicated or followed up in a different disease. Larger, appropriately powered genomic studies to understand the host response to EBV will be needed to move our understanding of the biology of EBV infection beyond the handful of genes currently identified. Fifty years since the discovery of EBV and its identification as a human oncogenic virus, a glimpse of the future is shown by the first whole-genome and whole-exome studies, revealing new human genes at the heart of the host–EBV interaction. © 2014 The Authors. Reviews in Medical Virology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25430668

  16. EBV-positive mucocutaneous ulcer in organ transplant recipients: a localized indolent posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Hart, Melissa; Thakral, Beenu; Yohe, Sophia; Balfour, Henry H; Singh, Charanjeet; Spears, Michael; McKenna, Robert W

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive mucocutaneous ulcer (EBV MCU) is a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder occurring in elderly or iatrogenic immunocompromised patients. It has not been reported in solid organ transplant recipients. We observed 7 patients with EBV MCU in a cohort of 70 transplant recipients with EBV posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Transplants included: 5 renal, 1 heart, and 1 lung. Median patient age was 61; 5 were male. EBV MCU was observed in oral mucosa in 4 and gastrointestinal tract in 3. Duration of immunosuppressive therapy before EBV MCU was 0.6 to 13 years. Ulcers were undermined by inflammatory cells and polymorphic or monomorphic large cell lymphoproliferation. Reed-Sternberg-like cells were present in 5/7. Large B cells were CD20, CD30, and EBV-encoded RNA positive in all cases. Diagnosis in 3 recent patients was EBV MCU; 4 patients diagnosed before familiarity with EBV MCU were classified as monomorphic large cell (n=3) and polymorphic (n=1) PTLD. None of the patients had EBV DNA in their blood (<1000 copies/mL) at diagnosis or follow-up versus 35/44 transplant patients with systemic PTLD (P<0.001). All lesions resolved with reduced immunosuppression (7/7), change in immunosuppression (2/7), and rituximab (3/7). Five patients are living: 4 healthy, 1 awaiting second renal transplant. Two patients died 3 and 5 years after resolution of EBV MCU. No patient recurred with EBV MCU or other PTLDs. EBV MCU mimics more aggressive categories of PTLD but lacks EBV DNA in blood, which may be a useful distinguishing feature. Lesions are likely to resolve with conservative management. Awareness of EBV MCU in the posttransplant setting is necessary for appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Lack of evidence for Epstein-Barr virus infection in myasthenia gravis thymus.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Mandy; Höls, Ann-Kathrin; Liersch, Britta; Leistner, Rasmus; Gellert, Klaus; Schalke, Berthold; Marx, Alexander; Niedobitek, Gerald

    2011-09-01

    A role for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in myasthenia gravis pathogenesis has been suggested recently. Using in situ hybridization for the detection of the EBV-encoded RNAs and EBNA1-specific immunohistochemistry, we found no latently infected cells in a series of thymus specimens from patients with myasthenia gravis showing lymphofollicular thymitis. In addition, using immunohistochemistry and an antibody specific for the viral immediate early protein BZLF1, no evidence of lytic EBV infection was seen in these cases. Our results therefore do not support a direct role of thymic EBV infection in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis.

  18. Partial Least Squares Based Gene Expression Analysis in EBV- Positive and EBV-Negative Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sa; Zhang, Xin; Li, Zhi-Ming; Shi, Yan-Xia; Huang, Jia-Jia; Xia, Yi; Yang, Hang; Jiang, Wen-Qi

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a common complication of therapeutic immunosuppression after organ transplantation. Gene expression profile facilitates the identification of biological difference between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive and negative PTLDs. Previous studies mainly implemented variance/regression analysis without considering unaccounted array specific factors. The aim of this study is to investigate the gene expression difference between EBV positive and negative PTLDs through partial least squares (PLS) based analysis. With a microarray data set from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, we performed PLS based analysis. We acquired 1188 differentially expressed genes. Pathway and Gene Ontology enrichment analysis identified significantly over-representation of dysregulated genes in immune response and cancer related biological processes. Network analysis identified three hub genes with degrees higher than 15, including CREBBP, ATXN1, and PML. Proteins encoded by CREBBP and PML have been reported to be interact with EBV before. Our findings shed light on expression distinction of EBV positive and negative PTLDs with the hope to offer theoretical support for future therapeutic study.

  19. Defective T-cell control of Epstein–Barr virus infection in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pender, Michael P; Csurhes, Peter A; Burrows, Jacqueline M; Burrows, Scott R

    2017-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Defective elimination of EBV-infected B cells by CD8+ T cells might cause MS by allowing EBV-infected autoreactive B cells to accumulate in the brain. Here we undertake a comprehensive analysis of the T-cell response to EBV in MS, using flow cytometry and intracellular IFN-γ staining to measure T-cell responses to EBV-infected autologous lymphoblastoid cell lines and pools of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-class-I-restricted peptides from EBV lytic or latent proteins and cytomegalovirus (CMV), in 95 patients and 56 EBV-seropositive healthy subjects. In 20 HLA-A2+ healthy subjects and 20 HLA-A2+ patients we also analysed CD8+ T cells specific for individual peptides, measured by binding to HLA-peptide complexes and production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2. We found a decreased CD8+ T-cell response to EBV lytic, but not CMV lytic, antigens at the onset of MS and at all subsequent disease stages. CD8+ T cells directed against EBV latent antigens were increased but had reduced cytokine polyfunctionality indicating T-cell exhaustion. During attacks the EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell populations expanded, with increased functionality of latent-specific CD8+ T cells. With increasing disease duration, EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells progressively declined, consistent with T-cell exhaustion. The anti-EBNA1 IgG titre correlated inversely with the EBV-specific CD8+ T-cell frequency. We postulate that defective CD8+ T-cell control of EBV reactivation leads to an expanded population of latently infected cells, including autoreactive B cells. PMID:28197337

  20. Assessment of immunological changes in Epstein-Barr virus co-infection in Egyptian chronic HCV patients.

    PubMed

    Shoman, Sahar; Nabil, Mohamed; Tabl, Ashraf; Ghanem, Hussam; Kafrawy, Sherif El

    2014-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays a major role in liver pathology. Similar to other members of the herpesvirus family, EBV establishes a persistent infection in more than 90% of adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of EBV and chronic hepatitis C co-infection (HCV) on biochemical and immunological responses in patients. The study was conducted in 62 patients and 33 apparently healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups: group I, consisting of 31 patients with chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), group II, consisting of eight patients with EBV infection and without HCV infection and group III, consisting of 23 patients with EBV and chronic HCV. The percentage of CD3⁺ cells, helper CD4⁺ cells and CD19⁺ B-cells was measured by flow cytometry. Human interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-15 levels were measured by an ELISA. The levels of liver alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase enzymes were higher in EBV/HCV patients compared to that in EBV and HCV mono-infected patients. EBV/HCV patients had significantly reduced percentages of CD3⁺ and CD4⁺ cells compared to EBV patients. Serum IFN-γ levels were significantly reduced in EBV/HCV patients (3.86 pg/mL) compared to CHC patients (6.76 pg/mL) and normal controls (4.69 pg/mL). A significant increase in serum IL-15 levels was observed in EBV/HCV patients (67.7 pg/mL) compared to EBV patients (29.3 pg/mL). Taken together, these observations suggest that HCV and EBV co-infection can potentiate immune response dampening in patients.

  1. Reactive oxygen species and p38 MAPK regulate Bax translocation and calcium redistribution in salubrinal-induced apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Yeong Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Song, Hyunkeun; Kim, Seonghan; Cho, Dae-Ho; Hur, Dae Young

    2011-12-27

    Salubrinal is a specific eIF2α phosphatase inhibitor that inhibits ER stress-mediated apoptosis. However, maintaining hyper-phosphorylated eIF2α state with high doses of salubrinal treatment promotes apoptosis in some cancer cells. In this report, we found that salubrinal induced apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells. Notably, salubrinal induced ROS generation and p38 MPAK activation, which then induced expression of FasL. Moreover, salubrinal subsequently led to activation of caspases, calcium redistribution, Bax translocation, cytochrome c release, and apoptosis. These findings suggest that salubrinal may be a novel therapeutic approach for EBV-associated malignant diseases.

  2. Pyrimidinergic Receptor Activation Controls Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Souza, Aline Cristina Abreu; Marinho, Ygor; Correa, Gladys; Santoro, Giani França; Coutinho, Claudia Mara Lara Melo; Vommaro, Rossiane Claudia; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is highly prevalent worldwide and may have serious clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients. T. gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects almost any cell type in mammalian hosts, including immune cells. The immune cells express purinergic P2 receptors in their membrane – subdivided into P2Y and P2X subfamilies - whose activation is important for infection control. Here, we examined the effect of treatment with UTP and UDP in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with T. gondii tachyzoites. Treatment with these nucleotides reduced parasitic load by 90%, but did not increase the levels of the inflammatory mediators NO and ROS, nor did it modulate host cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. On the other hand, UTP and UDP treatments induced early egress of tachyzoites from infected macrophages, in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as shown by scanning electron microscopy analysis, and videomicroscopy. In subsequent infections, prematurely egressed parasites had reduced infectivity, and could neither replicate nor inhibit the fusion of lysosomes to the parasitophorous vacuole. The use of selective agonists and antagonists of the receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2Y4 and P2Y6 showed that premature parasite egress may be mediated by the activation of these receptor subtypes. Our results suggest that the activity of P2Y host cell receptors controls T. gondii infection in macrophages, highlighting the importance of pyrimidinergic signaling for innate immune system response against infection. Finally the P2Y receptors should be considered as new target for the development of drugs against T. gondii infection. PMID:26192447

  3. Hemophagocytic syndromes and infection.

    PubMed Central

    Fisman, D. N.

    2000-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an unusual syndrome characterized by fever, splenomegaly, jaundice, and the pathologic finding of hemophagocytosis (phagocytosis by macrophages of erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and their precursors) in bone marrow and other tissues. HLH may be diagnosed in association with malignant, genetic, or autoimmune diseases but is also prominently linked with Epstein-Barr (EBV) virus infection. Hyperproduction of cytokines, including interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, by EBV- infected T lymphocytes may play a role in the pathogenesis of HLH. EBV-associated HLH may mimic T-cell lymphoma and is treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy, while hemophagocytic syndromes associated with nonviral pathogens often respond to treatment of the underlying infection. PMID:11076718

  4. Active cytomegalovirus infection in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Shereen F; Shehata, Iman H; Abdel Aziz, Ghada A; Kamal, Mahmoud M

    2005-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex immunologic skin disorder that is expressed when genetically predisposed individuals are exposed to certain environmental stimuli. Inspite of the high prevalence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and its potent immunomodulatory activities, the relation of CMV to AD is still poorly understood and is still to be clarified. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of active CMV infection in patients with AD and its possible etiologic role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Also, we tried to find if a relation between active CMV infection and disease severity exists. The present study was carried on 31 patients with AD with various degrees of disease severity. Ten apparently healthy subjects were enrolled in the study as a control group. Anti CMV IgG antibodies were estimated by quantitative enzyme immunoassay to discriminate between recent CMV infection and CMV reactivation. Active CMV infection was diagnosed by using nested PCR to detect CMV DNA in the sera of the studied subjects. The detection rate of CMV genome was higher in patients with AD in comparison to the control group. Cytomegalovirus genome was detected in the sera of 52% (16/31) of patients with AD (87.5% of them were seropositive for anti-CMV IgG antibodies). On the other hand no CMV DNA was detected in any of the serum samples of the control subjects. The difference was statistically significant. No significant relation was found between active CMV infection and disease severity. Also, no significant statistical difference was found between the two studied groups as regards the prevalence of latent CMV infection. In addition, no significant difference was detected between anti-CMV IgG antibody levels in all seropositive subjects. Our results denote that active subclinical CMV infection is more frequent in patients with AD and may have possible immunomodulatory role in the etiopathogenesis of AD but it is not related to disease severity.

  5. Epigenetic Regulation of EBV and KSHV Latency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Horng-Shen; Lu, Fang; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The gammaherpesviruses are unique for their capacity to establish a variety of gene expression programs during latent and lytic infection. This capacity enables the virus to control host-cell proliferation, prevent programmed cell death, elude immune cell detection, and ultimately adapt to a wide range of environmental and developmental changes in the host cell. This remarkable plasticity of gene expression results from the combined functionalities of viral and host factors that biochemically remodel and epigenetically modify the viral chromosome. These epigenetic modifications range from primary DNA methylations, to chromatin protein post-translational modifications, to higher-order chromosome conformations. In addition, gammaherpesviruses have acquired specialized tools to modulate the epigenetic processes that promote viral genome propagation and host-cell survival. PMID:23601957

  6. Mayaro virus infection cycle relies on casein kinase 2 activity.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Madalena M S; Lima, Carla S; Silva-Neto, Mário A C; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2002-09-06

    Replication of Mayaro virus in Vero cells induces dramatic cytopathic effects and cell death. In this study, we have evaluated the role of casein kinase 2 (CK2) during Mayaro virus infection cycle. We found that CK2 was activated during the initial stages of infection ( approximately 36% after 4h). This activation was further confirmed when the enzyme was partially purified from the cellular lysate either by Mono Q 5/5Hr column or heparin-agarose column. Using this later column, we found that the elution profile of CK2 activity from infected cells was different from that obtained for control cell enzyme, suggesting a structural modification of CK2 after infection. Treatment of infected cells with a cell-permeable inhibitor of CK2, dichloro-1-(beta-D-ribofuranosyl)benzimidazole (DRB), abolished the cytopathic effect in a dose-dependent manner. Together this set of data demonstrates for the first time that CK2 activity in host cells is required in Mayaro virus infection cycle.

  7. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis.

  8. Acute lymphoid changes and ongoing immune activation in SIV infection.

    PubMed

    Popov, J; McGraw, T; Hofmann, B; Vowels, B; Shum, A; Nishanian, P; Fahey, J L

    1992-01-01

    Two features of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection are emphasized: a transitory decrease in CD4 T cells in the first 2 weeks of infection followed by CD8 T-cell rise, and immune cell activation occurring by 4 weeks and persisting throughout the illness. The short-term changes included a fall in CD4 T cells by 2 weeks with partial recovery by 4 weeks and a CD8 rise that starts at 2 weeks. Subsequent characterization of CD4 T cells showed reduced expression of HLA-DR and CD25 (IL-2 receptor alpha chain) antigens later in SIV infection. Immune cell activation is evident in increased serum levels of neopterin and soluble CD8 antigen. Serum beta 2-microglobulin changes are less marked. Activation of CD8 T cells is reflected by increased percentages of cells expressing HLA-DR antigen. The B-cell numbers increased late in the course of SIV infection. Increased expression of the CD78 (Leu 21) activation phenotype was also seen in some monkeys. The immune activation changes (serum neopterin levels) induced by SIV infection in rhesus macaques appear to be associated with duration of illness, although the number of monkeys observed until death were too few for conclusive data. Thus, immune activation as well as T-cell deficiency may reflect significant immunopathogenic processes in SIV-induced disease.

  9. The company malaria keeps: how co-infection with Epstein-Barr virus leads to endemic Burkitt lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Moormann, Ann M.; Snider, Cynthia J.; Chelimo, Kiprotich

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Co-infection with Plasmodium falciparum (Pf-) malaria and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are implicated in the etiology of endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL), the most prevalent pediatric cancer in equatorial Africa. Although the causal association between EBV and eBL has been established, Pf-malaria’s role is not as clearly defined. This review focuses on how malaria may disrupt EBV persistence and immunity. Recent findings Two mutually-compatible theories have been proposed. One suggests that Pf-malaria induces polyclonal B-cell expansion and lytic EBV reactivation, leading to the expansion of latently infected B-cells and the likelihood of c-myc translocation; a hallmark of BL tumors. The other advocates that EBV-specific T-cell immunity is impaired during Pf-malaria co-infection, either as a cause or consequence of enhanced EBV replication, leading to loss of viral control. Advancements in our ability to query the complexity of human responses to infectious diseases have stimulated interest in eBL pathogenesis. Summary EBV is necessary but not sufficient to cause eBL. A more dynamic model encompasses incremental contributions from both chronic and acute Pf-malaria leading to alterations in EBV persistence and EBV-specific immunity that culminate in eBL. A better understanding of how Pf-malaria modifies EBV infections in children may allow us to anticipate reductions in eBL incidence coinciding with malaria control programs. PMID:21885920

  10. Small Molecule Growth Inhibitors of Human Oncogenic Gammaherpesvirus Infected B-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dzeng, Richard K.; Jha, Hem Chandra; Lu, Jie; Saha, Abhik; Banerjee, Sagarika; Robertson, Erle S.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are two human gammaherpesviruses associated with a broad spectrum of B-cell lymphomas, most acutely in immuno-compromised populations. However, there are no drugs which specifically target KSHV or EBV-associated lymphomas. To identify small molecules which selectively inhibit the growth of EBV or KSHV-associated B-cell lines, we performed a fluorescence based high-throughput screen on multiple stable GFP expressing virus-infected or uninfected B-cell lines. We identified 40 initial compounds with selective growth inhibition and subsequently determined the 50% growth inhibitory concentrations (GI50) for each drug. We further examined compounds with higher specificity to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms using transcription factor analysis, as well as a sh-RNA based knockdown strategy. Our data identified ten compounds with relatively high efficacy for growth inhibition. Two novel small molecules, NSC#10010 and NSC#65381 were potent growth inhibitors for gammaherpesvirus-associated B-lymphomas through activation of both the NF-κB and c-Myc- mediated signaling pathways. These drugs can serve as potential lead compounds to expand the current therapeutic window against EBV or KSHV associated human B-cell malignancies. PMID:25306391

  11. Platelet activation determines the severity of thrombocytopenia in dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Amrita; Nandi, Dipika; Batra, Harish; Singhal, Rashi; Annarapu, Gowtham K.; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Seth, Tulika; Dar, Lalit; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Vikram, Naval K.; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2017-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common in patients with dengue virus (DENV) infections. With a focus on understanding the possible mechanism of thrombocytopenia in DENV infections we described a direct correlation between activation and depletion of platelets in patients. Our data showed a sharp decrease in platelet counts at day 4 of fever in patients. The high DENV genome copies in platelets correlated directly with the elevated platelet activation along with increased binding of complement factor C3 and IgG on their surface at day 4. Recovery in platelet count was observed on day 10 through day 6 and 8 with simultaneous decrease in platelet activation markers. Further, our in vitro data supported the above observations describing a concentration-dependent increase in platelet activation by DENV serotype-2. The high copy number of DENV2 genome in the platelet pellet correlated directly with platelet activation, microparticle generation and clot formation. Furthermore the DENV2-activated platelets were phagocytosed in large numbers by the monocytes. The DENV2-mediated lysis and clearance of platelets were abrogated in presence of platelet activation inhibitor, prostacyclin. These observations collectively suggest that platelet activation status is an important determinant of thrombocytopenia in dengue infections. A careful strategy of inactivation of platelets may rescue them from rapid destruction during DENV infections. PMID:28139770

  12. The Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein gp150 Forms an Immune-Evasive Glycan Shield at the Surface of Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gram, Anna M.; Oosenbrug, Timo; Lindenbergh, Marthe F. S.; Büll, Christian; Comvalius, Anouskha; Dickson, Kathryn J. I.; Wiegant, Joop; Vrolijk, Hans; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Wolterbeek, Ron; Adema, Gosse J.; Griffioen, Marieke; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Tscharke, David C.; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M.; Ressing, Maaike E.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays a key role in host control of viral infection. This is exemplified by life-threatening reactivations of e.g. herpesviruses in individuals with impaired T-cell and/or iNKT cell responses. To allow lifelong persistence and virus production in the face of primed immunity, herpesviruses exploit immune evasion strategies. These include a reduction in viral antigen expression during latency and a number of escape mechanisms that target antigen presentation pathways. Given the plethora of foreign antigens expressed in virus-producing cells, herpesviruses are conceivably most vulnerable to elimination by cell-mediated immunity during the replicative phase of infection. Here, we show that a prototypic herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), encodes a novel, broadly acting immunoevasin, gp150, that is expressed during the late phase of viral replication. In particular, EBV gp150 inhibits antigen presentation by HLA class I, HLA class II, and the non-classical, lipid-presenting CD1d molecules. The mechanism of gp150-mediated T-cell escape does not depend on degradation of the antigen-presenting molecules nor does it require gp150’s cytoplasmic tail. Through its abundant glycosylation, gp150 creates a shield that impedes surface presentation of antigen. This is an unprecedented immune evasion mechanism for herpesviruses. In view of its likely broader target range, gp150 could additionally have an impact beyond escape of T cell activation. Importantly, B cells infected with a gp150-null mutant EBV displayed rescued levels of surface antigen presentation by HLA class I, HLA class II, and CD1d, supporting an important role for iNKT cells next to classical T cells in fighting EBV infection. At the same time, our results indicate that EBV gp150 prolongs the timespan for producing viral offspring at the most vulnerable stage of the viral life cycle. PMID:27077376

  13. A case of acute acalculous cholecystitis complicated by primary Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kenichi; Shono, Miki; Goji, Aya; Matsuura, Sato; Inoue, Miki; Kawahito, Masami; Mori, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is a rare complication of infectious mononucleosis (IM). An immunocompetent 6-year-old Japanese girl complained of epigastralgia during the course of IM. Ultrasonography (US) revealed a markedly thickened and sonolucent gallbladder wall. No gallstones were apparent. Antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) confirmed primary EBV infection. Cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin M showed a false-positive result in the acute phase, probably due to cross-reaction to EBV nuclear antigen. We diagnosed her as AAC related with primary EBV infection. She recovered completely by conservative treatment. US should be performed in consideration of the possibility of AAC when a patient with IM complains of epigastralgia.

  14. Associations between EBV and CMV Seropositivity, Early Exposures, and Gut Microbiota in a Prospective Birth Cohort: A 10-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Queiroz, Claudia; Johansson, Maria A.; Persson, Jan-Olov; Jörtsö, Evelina; Kjerstadius, Torbjörn; Nilsson, Caroline; Saghafian-Hedengren, Shanie; Sverremark-Ekström, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Early-life infections with persistent Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) are delayed in affluent countries, probably due to alterations in early environmental exposures, such as maternal age, siblings, and day-care attendance. We have previously reported that the timing of EBV and CMV contraction is related both to allergic sensitization and changes in functional competence of immune cells, while the presence/absence of lactobacilli [Lactobacillus (L.) casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus] or Staphylococcus (S.) aureus in feces is related to the risk for allergy. Here, we used the same prospective longitudinal birth cohort of children to investigate early-life environmental exposures and their influence on EBV and CMV contraction over time. Since gut microbes also belong to this category of early exposures, we investigated their association with herpesvirus contraction. Our results show that these two viruses are acquired with different kinetics and that EBV and CMV seroprevalence at 10 years of age was 47 and 57%, respectively. We also observed that a delayed EBV or CMV infection was associated with older maternal age [time ratio (TR) 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07–1.21, Padj < 0.001 and TR 1.09, CI 1.03–1.16, Padj = 0.008, respectively]. Further, we present the novel finding that S. aureus colonization reduced the time to CMV acquisition (TR 0.21, CI 0.06–0.78, Padj = 0.02). Together, these findings suggest that there is a relationship between timing of herpesvirus acquisition and early-life immune modulating exposures, which interestingly also includes the early infant gut microbiota. PMID:27630978

  15. Immune parameters differentiating active from latent tuberculosis infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Jung, Young Won; Jeong, Ina; Joh, Joon-Sung; Sim, Soo Yeon; Choi, Boram; Jee, Hyeon-Gun; Lim, Dong-Gyun

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis remains a highly prevalent infectious disease worldwide. Identification of the immune parameters that differentiate active disease from latent infection will facilitate the development of efficient control measures as well as new diagnostic modalities for tuberculosis. Here, we investigated the cytokine production profiles of monocytes and CD4(+) T lymphocytes upon encountering mycobacterial antigens. In addition, cytokines and lipid mediators with immune-modulating activities were examined in plasma samples ex vivo. Comparison of these parameters in active tuberculosis patients and healthy subjects with latent infection revealed that, active tuberculosis was associated with diminished Th1-type cytokine secretion from CD4(+) T cells and less augmented inflammatory cytokine secretion from monocytes induced by IFN-γ than that in latent tuberculosis infection. In addition, a higher plasma concentration of lipoxin A4 and lower ratio of prostaglandin E2 to lipoxin A4 were observed in active cases than in latent infections. These findings have implications for preparing new therapeutic strategies and for differential diagnosis of the two types of tuberculosis infection.

  16. Reactivity with A monoclonal antibody to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 defines a subset of aggressive breast cancers in the absence of the EBV genome.

    PubMed

    Murray, Paul G; Lissauer, David; Junying, Jia; Davies, Gillian; Moore, Sukhjinder; Bell, Andrew; Timms, Judith; Rowlands, David; McConkey, Christopher; Reynolds, Gary M; Ghataura, Suk; England, David; Caroll, Rebecca; Young, Lawrence S

    2003-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that common breast cancers are associated with EBV. We used a highly sensitive quantitative real-time PCR method to screen whole tumor sections of breast cancers for the presence of the EBV genome. EBV DNA was detected in 19 of 92 (21%) tumors, but viral load was very low in positive samples (mean = 1.1 copy EBV/1000 cells, maximum = 7.1 copies EBV/1000 cells). Importantly, quantitative real-time PCR failed to detect the EBV genome in microdissected tumor cells from any case. Using a monoclonal antibody (2B4-1) reactive against the EBV nuclear antigen-1, we noted strong staining of tumor nuclei in a proportion of those breast cancers that had tested negative for the presence of the EBV genome. Because nuclear staining with the 2B4-1 antibody was previously observed more frequently in poor prognosis breast cancers, we examined a larger series of breast cancers with complete clinical follow-up. Strong punctate staining of tumor cell nuclei was observed in 47 of 153 (31%) breast cancers; 2B4-1-positive tumors were significantly more likely to be ER-negative (P < 0.0001), to be of higher grade (P = 0.001) and larger (P = 0.03), to involve more regional lymph nodes (P = 0.01), and to have higher Nottingham Prognostic Index scores (P = 0.0003). Conclusions are: (a) EBV can be regularly detected in whole sections of breast cancers but viral copy number is very low; (b) in these cases, tumor cells do not harbor virus; and (c) reactivity with the monoclonal antibody 2B4-1 is detectable in the absence of the EBV genome and is strongly associated with ER-negative breast tumors and with prognostically unfavorable disease. Additional studies should be directed to the identification of this protein and to elucidation of its role in breast cancer.

  17. EBV-positive low-grade marginal zone lymphoma in the breast with massive amyloid deposition arising in a heart transplant patient: A report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Nassif, Samer; Ozdemirli, Metin

    2013-09-01

    According to the 2008 World Health Organization classification, low-grade lymphomas arising in transplant recipients are not considered as specific types of PTLD. Most such cases are not associated with EBV infections, although rare reports of post-transplant marginal zone lymphoma have been described. We describe the case of an 18-yr-old female with history of heart transplant who developed a breast mass, but was otherwise completely asymptomatic. Surgical excision of the mass and histopathologic examination showed a low-grade B-cell lymphoma most consistent with marginal zone lymphoma with massive amyloid deposition; furthermore, numerous tumor cells were positive for EBV by in situ hybridization for EBV-encoded RNA. The patient was treated with reduction in immunosuppression, and no additional lesions developed. This case describes an atypical presentation of post-transplant low-grade B-cell lymphoma, unusual in its location, histopathologic features, and association with EBV, thereby adding to the rare previous accounts of such an entity, suggesting the need to include post-transplant marginal zone lymphomas in the current classification of PTLD, and helping in determining the optimal treatment modalities for such tumors.

  18. B7-H4 reverse signaling induces the apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells through Fas ligand up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyunkeun; Park, Gabin; Kim, Yeong-Seok; Hur, Indo; Kim, Hyunjin; Ryu, Jeoung Whan; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Cho, Dae-Ho; Choi, In-Hak; Lee, Wang Jae; Hur, Dae Young

    2008-08-08

    B7-H4 has an inhibitory effect on immune responses via the down-regulation of T cell-mediated immunity, but how the engagement of B7-H4 molecules by counter molecules affects the signaling mechanism of the B7-H4-expressing cells is poorly defined. In this study, we found that B7-H4 expression was enhanced on B cells infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and that triggering of these molecules induced apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells. Engagement of B7-H4 initially increased intracellular level of ROS, which then induced the expression of FasL. Engagement of B7-H4 subsequently provoked Fas-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis in association with cytochrome c and AIF, and EndoG was released from the mitochondria on EBV-transformed B cells. These results suggest that B7-H4 may be a potential therapeutic target for EBV involved malignancy diseases.

  19. Multiple host kinases contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Roppenser, Bernhard; Kwon, Hyunwoo; Canadien, Veronica; Xu, Risheng; Devreotes, Peter N; Grinstein, Sergio; Brumell, John H

    2013-01-01

    SopB is a type 3 secreted effector with phosphatase activity that Salmonella employs to manipulate host cellular processes, allowing the bacteria to establish their intracellular niche. One important function of SopB is activation of the pro-survival kinase Akt/protein kinase B in the infected host cell. Here, we examine the mechanism of Akt activation by SopB during Salmonella infection. We show that SopB-mediated Akt activation is only partially sensitive to PI3-kinase inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin in HeLa cells, suggesting that Class I PI3-kinases play only a minor role in this process. However, depletion of PI(3,4) P2/PI(3-5) P3 by expression of the phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase PTEN inhibits Akt activation during Salmonella invasion. Therefore, production of PI(3,4) P2/PI(3-5) P3 appears to be a necessary event for Akt activation by SopB and suggests that non-canonical kinases mediate production of these phosphoinositides during Salmonella infection. We report that Class II PI3-kinase beta isoform, IPMK and other kinases identified from a kinase screen all contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection. In addition, the kinases required for SopB-mediated activation of Akt vary depending on the type of infected host cell. Together, our data suggest that Salmonella has evolved to use a single effector, SopB, to manipulate a remarkably large repertoire of host kinases to activate Akt for the purpose of optimizing bacterial replication in its host.

  20. Antitumour activity of Bauhinia variegata on Dalton's ascitic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rajkapoor, B; Jayakar, B; Murugesh, N

    2003-11-01

    The antitumour activity of the ethanol extract of Bauhinia variegata (EBV) has been evaluated against Dalton's ascitic lymphoma (DAL) in Swiss albino mice. A significant enhancement of mean survival time of EBV-treated tumour bearing mice was found with respect to control group. EBV treatment was found to enhance peritoneal cell counts. After 14 days of inoculation, EBV is able to reverse the changes in the haemotological parameters, protein and PCV consequent to tumour inoculation.

  1. Rapid Inflammasome Activation following Mucosal SIV Infection of Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barouch, Dan H; Ghneim, Khader; Bosche, William J; Li, Yuan; Berkemeier, Brian; Hull, Michael; Bhattacharyya, Sanghamitra; Cameron, Mark; Liu, Jinyan; Smith, Kaitlin; Borducchi, Erica; Cabral, Crystal; Peter, Lauren; Brinkman, Amanda; Shetty, Mayuri; Li, Hualin; Gittens, Courtney; Baker, Chantelle; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G; Colantonio, Arnaud; Kang, Hyung-Joo; Li, Wenjun; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Piatak, Michael; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2016-04-21

    The earliest events following mucosal HIV-1 infection, prior to measurable viremia, remain poorly understood. Here, by detailed necropsy studies, we show that the virus can rapidly disseminate following mucosal SIV infection of rhesus monkeys and trigger components of the inflammasome, both at the site of inoculation and at early sites of distal virus spread. By 24 hr following inoculation, a proinflammatory signature that lacked antiviral restriction factors was observed in viral RNA-positive tissues. The early innate response included expression of NLRX1, which inhibits antiviral responses, and activation of the TGF-β pathway, which negatively regulates adaptive immune responses. These data suggest a model in which the virus triggers specific host mechanisms that suppress the generation of antiviral innate and adaptive immune responses in the first few days of infection, thus facilitating its own replication. These findings have important implications for the development of vaccines and other strategies to prevent infection.

  2. Epstein–Barr virus infection transforms CD25+ B cells into antibody-secreting cells in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Brisslert, Mikael; Rehnberg, Maria; Bokarewa, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection may initiate production of autoantibodies and development of cancer and autoimmune diseases. Here we outline phenotypic and functional changes in B cells of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) related to EBV infection. The B-cell phenotype was analysed in blood and bone marrow (BM) of RA patients who had EBV transcripts in BM (EBV+, n = 13) and in EBV− (n = 22) patients with RA. The functional effect of EBV was studied in the sorted CD25+ and CD25− peripheral B cells of RA patients (n = 18) and healthy controls (n = 9). Rituximab treatment results in enrichment of CD25+ B cells in peripheral blood (PB) of EBV+ RA patients. The CD25+ B-cell subset displayed a more mature phenotype accumulating IgG-expressing cells. It was also enriched with CD27+ and CD95+ cells in PB and BM. EBV stimulation of the sorted CD25+ B cells in vitro induced a polyclonal IgG and IgM secretion in RA patients, while CD25+ B cells of healthy subjects did not respond to EBV stimulation. CD25+ B cells were enriched in PB and synovial fluid of RA patients. EBV infection affects the B-cell phenotype in RA patients by increasing the CD25+ subset and by inducing their immunoglobulin production. These findings clearly link CD25+ B cells to the EBV-dependent sequence of reactions in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:23844744

  3. Combined immunodeficiency with life-threatening EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in patients lacking functional CD27.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Elisabeth; Daschkey, Svenja; Choo, Sharon; Gombert, Michael; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Ginzel, Sebastian; Schwendinger, Martina; Haas, Oskar A; Fritsch, Gerhard; Pickl, Winfried F; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Borkhardt, Arndt; Boztug, Kaan; Bienemann, Kirsten; Seidel, Markus G

    2013-03-01

    CD27, a tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, interacts with CD70 and influences T-, B- and NK-cell functions. Disturbance of this axis impairs immunity and memory generation against viruses including Epstein Barr virus (EBV), influenza, and others. CD27 is commonly used as marker of memory B cells for the classification of B-cell deficiencies including common variable immune deficiency. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping including expression analysis of CD27 on lymphoid cells was followed by capillary sequencing of CD27 in index patients, their parents, and non-affected siblings. More comprehensive genetic analysis employed single nucleotide polymorphism-based homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing. Analysis of exome sequencing data was performed at two centers using slightly different data analysis pipelines, each based on the Genome Analysis ToolKit Best Practice version 3 recommendations. A comprehensive clinical characterization was correlated to genotype. We report the simultaneous confirmation of human CD27 deficiency in 3 independent families (8 patients) due to a homozygous mutation (p. Cys53Tyr) revealed by whole exome sequencing, leading to disruption of an evolutionarily conserved cystein knot motif of the transmembrane receptor. Phenotypes varied from asymptomatic memory B-cell deficiency (n=3) to EBV-associated hemophagocytosis and lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD; n=3) and malignant lymphoma (n=2; +1 after LPD). Following EBV infection, hypogammaglobulinemia developed in at least 3 of the affected individuals, while specific anti-viral and anti-polysaccharide antibodies and EBV-specific T-cell responses were detectable. In severely affected patients, numbers of iNKT cells and NK-cell function were reduced. Two of 8 patients died, 2 others underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation successfully, and one received anti-CD20 (rituximab) therapy repeatedly. Since homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing did not reveal

  4. LL-37 Immunomodulatory Activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H.; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  5. Macaque homologs of EBV and KSHV show uniquely different associations with simian AIDS-related lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Bruce, A Gregory; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Barcy, Serge; Bakke, Angela M; Lewis, Patrick; Tsai, Che-Chung; Murnane, Robert D; Rose, Timothy M

    2012-01-01

    Two gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (Lymphocryptovirus genus) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) (Rhadinovirus genus) have been implicated in the etiology of AIDS-associated lymphomas. Homologs of these viruses have been identified in macaques and other non-human primates. In order to assess the association of these viruses with non-human primate disease, archived lymphoma samples were screened for the presence of macaque lymphocryptovirus (LCV) homologs of EBV, and macaque rhadinoviruses belonging to the RV1 lineage of KSHV homologs or the more distant RV2 lineage of Old World primate rhadinoviruses. Viral loads were determined by QPCR and infected cells were identified by immunolabeling for different viral proteins. The lymphomas segregated into three groups. The first group (n = 6) was associated with SIV/SHIV infections, contained high levels of LCV (1-25 genomes/cell) and expressed the B-cell antigens CD20 or BLA.36. A strong EBNA-2 signal was detected in the nuclei of the neoplastic cells in one of the LCV-high lymphomas, indicative of a type III latency stage. None of the lymphomas in this group stained for the LCV viral capsid antigen (VCA) lytic marker. The second group (n = 5) was associated with D-type simian retrovirus-2 (SRV-2) infections, contained high levels of RV2 rhadinovirus (9-790 genomes/cell) and expressed the CD3 T-cell marker. The third group (n = 3) was associated with SIV/SHIV infections, contained high levels of RV2 rhadinovirus (2-260 genomes/cell) and was negative for both CD20 and CD3. In both the CD3-positive and CD3/CD20-negative lymphomas, the neoplastic cells stained strongly for markers of RV2 lytic replication. None of the lymphomas had detectable levels of retroperitoneal fibromatosis herpesvirus (RFHV), the macaque RV1 homolog of KSHV. Our data suggest etiological roles for both lymphocryptoviruses and RV2 rhadinoviruses in the development of simian AIDS-associated lymphomas and indicate that the

  6. Disseminated rhodococcus equi infection in HIV infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodococcus equi (R.equi) is an acid fast, GRAM + coccobacillus, which is widespread in the soil and causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections in immunocompromised people. In the context of HIV infection, R.equi infection (rhodococcosis) is regarded as an opportunistic disease, and its outcome is influenced by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Case presentation We report two cases of HIV-related rhodococcosis that disseminated despite suppressive HAART and anti-rhodococcal treatment; in both cases there was no immunological recovery, with CD4+ cells count below 200/μL. In the first case, pulmonary rhodococcosis presented 6 months after initiation of HAART, and was followed by an extracerebral intracranial and a cerebral rhodococcal abscess 1 and 8 months, respectively, after onset of pulmonary infection. The second case was characterized by a protracted course with spread of infection to various organs, including subcutaneous tissue, skin, colon and other intra-abdominal tissues, and central nervous system; the spread started 4 years after clinical resolution of a first pulmonary manifestation and progressed over a period of 2 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the importance of an effective immune recovery, despite fully suppressive HAART, along with anti-rhodococcal therapy, in order to clear rhodococcal infection. PMID:22168333

  7. LAG3 expression in active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bonnie L; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A; Kaushal, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus-induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4(+) T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response.

  8. The impact of HLA class I and EBV latency-II antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells on the pathogenesis of EBV(+) Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jones, K; Wockner, L; Brennan, R M; Keane, C; Chattopadhyay, P K; Roederer, M; Price, D A; Cole, D K; Hassan, B; Beck, K; Gottlieb, D; Ritchie, D S; Seymour, J F; Vari, F; Crooks, P; Burrows, S R; Gandhi, M K

    2016-02-01

    In 40% of cases of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency-II antigens [EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)/latent membrane protein (LMP)1/LMP2A] are present (EBV(+) cHL) in the malignant cells and antigen presentation is intact. Previous studies have shown consistently that HLA-A*02 is protective in EBV(+) cHL, yet its role in disease pathogenesis is unknown. To explore the basis for this observation, gene expression was assessed in 33 cHL nodes. Interestingly, CD8 and LMP2A expression were correlated strongly and, for a given LMP2A level, CD8 was elevated markedly in HLA-A*02(-) versus HLA-A*02(+) EBV(+) cHL patients, suggesting that LMP2A-specific CD8(+) T cell anti-tumoral immunity may be relatively ineffective in HLA-A*02(-) EBV(+) cHL. To ascertain the impact of HLA class I on EBV latency antigen-specific immunodominance, we used a stepwise functional T cell approach. In newly diagnosed EBV(+) cHL, the magnitude of ex-vivo LMP1/2A-specific CD8(+) T cell responses was elevated in HLA-A*02(+) patients. Furthermore, in a controlled in-vitro assay, LMP2A-specific CD8(+) T cells from healthy HLA-A*02 heterozygotes expanded to a greater extent with HLA-A*02-restricted compared to non-HLA-A*02-restricted cell lines. In an extensive analysis of HLA class I-restricted immunity, immunodominant EBNA3A/3B/3C-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were stimulated by numerous HLA class I molecules, whereas the subdominant LMP1/2A-specific responses were confined largely to HLA-A*02. Our results demonstrate that HLA-A*02 mediates a modest, but none the less stronger, EBV-specific CD8(+) T cell response than non-HLA-A*02 alleles, an effect confined to EBV latency-II antigens. Thus, the protective effect of HLA-A*02 against EBV(+) cHL is not a surrogate association, but reflects the impact of HLA class I on EBV latency-II antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell hierarchies.

  9. Neuropathogenesis of Chikungunya infection: astrogliosis and innate immune activation.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Fiona M; Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; Purcell, Olivia M; Didier, Peter J; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Weaver, Scott C; Roy, Chad J; MacLean, Andrew G

    2016-04-01

    Chikungunya, "that which bends up" in the Makonde dialect, is an emerging global health threat, with increasing incidence of neurological complications. Until 2013, Chikungunya infection had been largely restricted to East Africa and the Indian Ocean, with cases within the USA reported to be from foreign travel. However, in 2014, over 1 million suspected cases were reported in the Americas, and a recently infected human could serve as an unwitting reservoir for the virus resulting in an epidemic in the continental USA. Chikungunya infection is increasingly being associated with neurological sequelae. In this study, we sought to understand the role of astrocytes in the neuropathogenesis of Chikungunya infection. Even after virus has been cleared form the circulation, astrocytes were activated with regard to TLR2 expression. In addition, white matter astrocytes were hypertrophic, with increased arbor volume in gray matter astrocytes. Combined, these would alter the number and distribution of synapses that each astrocyte would be capable of forming. These results provide the first evidence that Chikungunya infection induces morphometric and innate immune activation of astrocytes in vivo. Perturbed glia-neuron signaling could be a major driving factor in the development of Chikungunya-associated neuropathology.

  10. Antibodies to Lytic Infection Proteins in Lymphocryptovirus-Infected Rhesus Macaques: a Model for Humoral Immune Responses to Epstein-Barr Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, Nina; Fogg, Mark H.; Carville, Angela; Wang, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Humoral immune responses to rhesus lymphocryptovirus (rhLCV) lytic infection proteins were evaluated in the rhesus macaque animal model for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. We found a hierarchy of humoral responses to 14 rhLCV lytic infection proteins in naturally infected rhesus macaques, with (i) widespread and robust responses to four glycoproteins expressed as late proteins, (ii) frequent but less robust responses to a subset of early proteins, and (iii) low-level responses to immediate-early proteins. This hierarchy of humoral responses was similar to that reported for EBV-infected humans, with the notable exception of the response to rhBARF1. Serum antibodies to rhBARF1 were frequently detected in healthy rhLCV-infected macaques, but in humans, anti-BARF1 antibodies have been reported primarily in patients with EBV-positive nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The macaque data accurately predicted that serum antibodies against BARF1 are a normal response to EBV infection when human serum samples are analyzed. The rhesus macaque animal provides a unique perspective on humoral responses to EBV infection in humans and can be a valuable model for EBV vaccine development. PMID:21734064

  11. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: from activation to deactivation?

    PubMed

    Herbein, Georges; Varin, Audrey

    2010-04-09

    Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1) induced in particular by IFN-gamma display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2) induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM). Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  12. RNase L Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome During Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Arindam; Banerjee, Shuvojit; Franchi, Luigi; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Núñez, Gabriel; Silverman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The NLRP3 inflammasome assembles in response to danger signals, triggering self-cleavage of procaspase-1 and production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. Although virus infection activates the NLRP3 inflammasome, the underlying events remain incompletely understood. We report that virus activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome involves the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase (OAS)/RNase L system, a component of the interferon-induced antiviral response that senses double stranded RNA and activates endoribonuclease RNase L to cleave viral and cellular RNAs. The absence of RNase L reduces IL-1β production in influenza A virus-infected mice. RNA cleavage products generated by RNase L enhance IL-1β production but require the presence of 2′,3′-cyclic phosphorylated termini characteristic of RNase L activity. Additionally, these cleavage products stimulate NLRP3 complex formation with the DExD/H-box helicase, DHX33, and mitochondrial adapter protein, MAVS, which are each required for effective NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Thus, RNA cleavage events catalyzed by RNase L are required for optimal inflammasome activation during viral infections. PMID:25816776

  13. DOCK 8 Deficiency, EBV+ Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis, and Intrafamilial Variation in Presentation.

    PubMed

    Dimitriades, Victoria R; Devlin, Vincent; Pittaluga, Stefania; Su, Helen C; Holland, Steven M; Wilson, Wyndham; Dunleavy, Kieron; Shah, Nirali N; Freeman, Alexandra F

    2017-01-01

    Dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) deficiency is an autosomal recessive, combined immunodeficiency within the spectrum of hyper-IgE syndromes. Epstein-Barr virus-positive lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG) (EBV + LYG) is a rare diagnosis and a previously unreported presentation of DOCK8 deficiency. A 10-year-old girl was initially evaluated for mild eczema and recurrent sinopulmonary infections. She had normal immunoglobulins with elevated IgE, poor polysaccharide response with low switched memory B cells, low CD4 count, and normal mitogen and antigen responses. Despite clinical improvement following immunoglobulin replacement, a prolonged cough prompted a CT scan, which showed nodules. Biopsy identified a Grade 2 EBV + LYG. Due to an inadequate response with chemotherapy, further workup for primary immunodeficiency was performed. With her symptoms of eczema and IgE elevation, along with her brother's history of recurrent sinopulmonary infections and warts, targeted sequencing of DOCK8 was performed revealing compound heterozygous mutations for the two siblings. Both patients were successfully transplanted with resolution of the LYG and warts, respectively. This is the first reported case of LYG in DOCK8 deficiency. The EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease along with the infection history in the brother led to the diagnosis of DOCK8 deficiency and curative hematopoietic stem cell transplants.

  14. DOCK 8 Deficiency, EBV+ Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis, and Intrafamilial Variation in Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriades, Victoria R.; Devlin, Vincent; Pittaluga, Stefania; Su, Helen C.; Holland, Steven M.; Wilson, Wyndham; Dunleavy, Kieron; Shah, Nirali N.; Freeman, Alexandra F.

    2017-01-01

    Dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) deficiency is an autosomal recessive, combined immunodeficiency within the spectrum of hyper-IgE syndromes. Epstein–Barr virus-positive lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG) (EBV + LYG) is a rare diagnosis and a previously unreported presentation of DOCK8 deficiency. A 10-year-old girl was initially evaluated for mild eczema and recurrent sinopulmonary infections. She had normal immunoglobulins with elevated IgE, poor polysaccharide response with low switched memory B cells, low CD4 count, and normal mitogen and antigen responses. Despite clinical improvement following immunoglobulin replacement, a prolonged cough prompted a CT scan, which showed nodules. Biopsy identified a Grade 2 EBV + LYG. Due to an inadequate response with chemotherapy, further workup for primary immunodeficiency was performed. With her symptoms of eczema and IgE elevation, along with her brother’s history of recurrent sinopulmonary infections and warts, targeted sequencing of DOCK8 was performed revealing compound heterozygous mutations for the two siblings. Both patients were successfully transplanted with resolution of the LYG and warts, respectively. This is the first reported case of LYG in DOCK8 deficiency. The EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease along with the infection history in the brother led to the diagnosis of DOCK8 deficiency and curative hematopoietic stem cell transplants. PMID:28293550

  15. Activated mouse eosinophils protect against lethal respiratory virus infection.

    PubMed

    Percopo, Caroline M; Dyer, Kimberly D; Ochkur, Sergei I; Luo, Janice L; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Lee, James J; Lee, Nancy A; Domachowske, Joseph B; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2014-01-30

    Eosinophils are recruited to the airways as a prominent feature of the asthmatic inflammatory response where they are broadly perceived as promoting pathophysiology. Respiratory virus infections exacerbate established asthma; however, the role of eosinophils and the nature of their interactions with respiratory viruses remain uncertain. To explore these questions, we established acute infection with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), in 3 distinct mouse models of Th2 cytokine-driven asthmatic inflammation. We found that eosinophils recruited to the airways of otherwise naïve mice in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but not ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, are activated by and degranulate specifically in response to PVM infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated eosinophils from both Aspergillus antigen and cytokine-driven asthma models are profoundly antiviral and promote survival in response to an otherwise lethal PVM infection. Thus, although activated eosinophils within a Th2-polarized inflammatory response may have pathophysiologic features, they are also efficient and effective mediators of antiviral host defense.

  16. Marine peptides and their anti-infective activities.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee Kyoung; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-01-16

    Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present.

  17. Marine Peptides and Their Anti-Infective Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Kyoung; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present. PMID:25603351

  18. Development of EBV-encoded small RNA targeted PCR to classify EBV positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewang; Park, Min; Lee, Min Ho; Woo, Hyun Jun; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Yang, Ji Yeong; Eom, Yong-Bin; Kim, Sa-Hyun; Yoo, Changyoung; Kim, Jong-Bae

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly has been included in the 2008 WHO classification of lymphoma as a new provisional entity. EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly is newly classified due to the main occurrence usually in patients of older than 50-year-old. This study was performed in 91 DLBCL patients from January 2002 to December 2012 in Catholic university of St. Vincent Hospital. Age distribution of the patients was 14~87-year-old. Specimens were collected from lymph nodes (n = 45) and extra-lymph nodes (n = 46). EBV encoded small RNA1 in situ hybridization (EBER1-ISH) known as a standard method for the diagnosis of DLBCL. In this study, nested PCR of DNA polymerase gene and EBER PCR were conducted to detect EBV. Presence of EBV was indicated in 3 samples (3.30%) by EBER-ISH, 26 samples (28.57%) by nPCR, and 3 samples (3.30%) by EBER PCR. The concordant results were obtained from EBER1-ISH and EBER PCR. Two samples were classified as EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly among 91 DLBCL patients. Previously, the incidence rate of DLBCL of the elderly in Asia has been reported as 5~11%, but the result in this study showed a slightly lower incidence rate. To our knowledge, this is the first report on EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly in Suwon area, Korea. EBER1-ISH and EBER PCR developed in this study may be helpful in classification of EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly in future.

  19. Analysis of the cross-talk of Epstein–Barr virus-infected B cells with T cells in the marmoset

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Jordon; van Driel, Nikki; Eggen, Bart JL; Paul, Chaitali; ‘t Hart, Bert A; Laman, Jon D; Kap, Yolanda S

    2017-01-01

    Despite the well-known association of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), a lymphocryptovirus (LCV), with multiple sclerosis, a clear pathogenic role for disease progression has not been established. The translationally relevant experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in marmoset monkeys revealed that LCV-infected B cells have a central pathogenic role in the activation of T cells that drive EAE progression. We hypothesized that LCV-infected B cells induce T-cell functions relevant for EAE progression. In the current study, we examined the ex vivo cross-talk between lymph node mononuclear cells (MNCs) from EAE marmosets and (semi-) autologous EBV-infected B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs). Results presented here demonstrate that infection with EBV B95-8 has a strong impact on gene expression profile of marmoset B cells, particularly those involved with antigen processing and presentation or co-stimulation to T cells. At the cellular level, we observed that MNC co-culture with B-LCLs induced decrease of CCR7 expression on T cells from EAE responder marmosets, but not in EAE monkeys without clinically evident disease. B-LCL interaction with T cells also resulted in significant loss of CD27 expression and reduced expression of IL-23R and CCR6, which coincided with enhanced IL-17A production. These results highlight the profound impact that EBV-infected B-LCL cells can have on second and third co-stimulatory signals involved in (autoreactive) T-cell activation. PMID:28243437

  20. Immune Activation and Cardiovascular Disease in Chronic HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Longenecker, Chris T.; Sullivan, Claire; Baker, Jason V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe the potential contribution of immune activation in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated cardiovascular disease (CVD)—a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV positive persons with access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings We review recent literature that suggests abnormalities in both adaptive and innate immunity contributes to CVD risk among persons with HIV infection. In particular, potentially atherogenic T-cell mechanisms include persistent high-level T-cell activation (and associated pro-inflammatory mechanisms), as well as the presence of co-pathogens (e.g., CMV) providing an ongoing stimulus for cytotoxic T-cell responses. More recent data has then emphasized the potential impact of monocyte/macrophage-mediated inflammation and injury within atherosclerotic lesions. The pathology driving innate immune activation many not fully reverse with ART treatment, highlighting the need for interventions that target inflammation as a CVD prevention strategy. Summary Premature CVD among persons with HIV infection is due, in part, to persistent abnormalities in immune activation and systemic inflammation despite viral suppression. Prevention strategies for persons with HIV infection include those that target traditional CVD risk factors as well as newer candidate treatments with potential immunomodulatory benefits. PMID:26599166

  1. Detection of EBV in reactive and neoplastic lymphoproliferations in adults-when and how?

    PubMed

    Stuhlmann-Laeisz, Christiane; Oschlies, Ilske; Klapper, Wolfram

    2014-12-01

    Lymphoproliferations associated with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in adult patients pose a diagnostic challenge for pathologists for several reasons. First, the EBV lymphoproliferations represent a clinically and histologically very broad spectrum ranging from self-limiting lymphoproliferations to manifest malignant lymphomas. Second, the classification of these diseases is not solely based on histopathology but rather requires a synopsis of clinical as well as pathological features. And third, a resource-efficient diagnostic procedure demands a deliberate strategy for selecting the tissue specimens that are to be tested for EBV. We describe how the clinical context and histological features may indicate to histopathologists which lymphatic tissues should be tested for the presence of EBV and how these features guide the classification. We provide recommendations as to which biopsy specimens should be investigated for EBV and which methods for detecting viral association are appropriate.

  2. Gelsolin activity controls efficient early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 entry into target lymphocytes requires the activity of actin adaptors that stabilize and reorganize cortical F-actin, like moesin and filamin-A. These alterations are necessary for the redistribution of CD4-CXCR4/CCR5 to one pole of the cell, a process that increases the probability of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-CD4/co-receptor interactions and that generates the tension at the plasma membrane necessary to potentiate fusion pore formation, thereby favouring early HIV-1 infection. However, it remains unclear whether the dynamic processing of F-actin and the amount of cortical actin available during the initial virus-cell contact are required to such events. Results Here we show that gelsolin restructures cortical F-actin during HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated signalling, without affecting cell-surface expression of receptors or viral co-receptor signalling. Remarkably, efficient HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and infection of permissive lymphocytes were impaired when gelsolin was either overexpressed or silenced, which led to a loss or gain of cortical actin, respectively. Indeed, HIV-1 Env-gp120-induced F-actin reorganization and viral receptor capping were impaired under these experimental conditions. Moreover, gelsolin knockdown promoted HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated aberrant pseudopodia formation. These perturbed-actin events are responsible for the inhibition of early HIV-1 infection. Conclusions For the first time we provide evidence that through its severing of cortical actin, and by controlling the amount of actin available for reorganization during HIV-1 Env-mediated viral fusion, entry and infection, gelsolin can constitute a barrier that restricts HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes in a pre-fusion step. These findings provide important insights into the complex molecular and actin-associated dynamics events that underlie early viral infection. Thus, we propose that gelsolin is a new factor that can limit HIV-1 infection acting at a pre-fusion step

  3. Clinicopathologic spectrum and EBV status of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding-Bao; Song, Qiu-Jing; Chen, Yun-Xin; Chen, Yu-Hong; Shen, Dan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are serious, life-threatening complications of solid-organ transplantation (SOT) and bone marrow transplantation, and are associated with high mortality. PTLDs represent a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative diseases, which show a spectrum of clinical, morphologic, and molecular genetic features ranging from reactive polyclonal lesions to frank lymphomas. We describe clinicopathologic features of 17 cases of PTLD after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), which were analyzed by in situ hybridization for EBV and a panel of antibodies directed against numerous antigens, including CD20, PAX5, CD3, bcl-6, CD10, MUM-1/IRF4, CD138, Kappa, Lambda, CD30, CD15, and Ki67. The cases included 13 males and 4 females with a median age of 31 years (range 9-49 years) and the PTLDs developed 1.5-19 months post-transplant (mean 4.7 months). The histological types indicated five cases of early lesions, two of plasmacytic hyperplasia and three of infectious mononucleosis-like PTLD. Eight cases were polymorphic PTLD, and four were monomorphic PTLD, including three of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, and one of plasmablastic lymphoma. Foci and sheets of necrosis were observed in five cases. The infected ratio of EBV was 88.2 %. Some cases were treated by reduction of immunosuppression, antiviral therapy, donor lymphocyte infusion, or anti-CD20 monoclonal rituximab. Eight cases died. The first half year after allo-HSCT is very important for the development of PTLD. The diagnosis of PTLD relies on morphology and immunohistochemistry, and EBV plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PTLD. The prognosis of PTLD is poor, and, notably, PTLD after allo-HSCT exhibits some features different from those of PTLD after SOT.

  4. Activity of terbinafine in experimental fungal infections of laboratory animals.

    PubMed Central

    Petranyi, G; Meingassner, J G; Mieth, H

    1987-01-01

    The allylamine derivative terbinafine is the first antifungal agent with primary fungicidal properties against dermatophytes which acts systemically after oral application as well as locally after topical application. Comparative oral studies carried out with griseofulvin and ketoconazole in model infections such as guinea pig trichophytosis and microsporosis revealed terbinafine to be superior to the reference compounds both clinically and mycologically. An excellent antimycotic activity of terbinafine was also demonstrable after topical treatment of guinea pig dermatophytoses caused by Trichophyton mentagrophytes or Microsporum canis. Results of comparative chemotherapeutic studies carried out with econazole and tolnaftate demonstrated superior efficacy of terbinafine in the treatment of both trichophytosis and microsporosis. Skin infections of guinea pigs caused by Candida albicans and vaginal candidiasis in rats proved to be responsive to a topical application of terbinafine also. However, the reference compounds, clotrimazole and miconazole, exhibited activity superior to that of terbinafine in both models. PMID:3435103

  5. Tonsillar CD56brightNKG2A+ NK cells restrict primary Epstein-Barr virus infection in B cells via IFN-γ

    PubMed Central

    Jud, Aurelia; Kotur, Monika; Berger, Christoph; Gysin, Claudine

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute the first line of defense against viruses and cancers cells. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) was the first human virus to be directly implicated in carcinogenesis, and EBV infection is associated with a broad spectrum of B cell lymphomas. How NK cells restrict EBV-associated oncogenesis is not understood. Here, we investigated the efficacies and mechanisms of distinct NK cell subsets from tonsils, the portal of entry of EBV, in limiting EBV infection in naïve, germinal center-associated and memory B cells. We found that CD56bright and NKG2A expression sufficiently characterizes the potent anti-EBV capacity of tonsillar NK cells. We observed restriction of EBV infection in B cells as early as 18 hours after infection. The restriction was most efficient in naïve B cells and germinal center-associated B cells, the B cell subsets that exhibited highest susceptibility to EBV infection in vitro. IFN-γ release by and partially NKp44 engagement of CD56bright and NKG2A positive NK cells mediated the restriction that eventually inhibited B-cell transformation. Thus, harnessing CD56brightNKG2A+ NK cell function might be promising to improve treatment strategies that target EBV-associated B cell lymphomas. PMID:28008151

  6. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-08-06

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated).

  7. Unusual Presentation of Gianotti-Crosti Syndrome due to Epstein-Barr Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Al Dhaheri, Hind Saif; Al Kaabi, Amani; Kara Hamo, Yasmin; Al Kaabi, Aysha; Al Kaabi, Salwa; Al Tatari, Hossam

    2016-01-01

    Gianotti-Crosti syndrome (GCS) is viral exanthema of childhood. It typically presents with a symmetric erythematous papular and papulovesicular eruption. It has been classically associated with hepatitis B virus, as well as rarely with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We report a case of GCS related to EBV infection without the classical systemic symptoms in a five-year-old male patient.

  8. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis secondary to Epstein Barr virus and Leishmania co-infection in a toddler

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Pinilla, N; Baro-Fernández, M; González-Granado, LI

    2015-01-01

    This is the report of an EBV + Leishmanial co-infection. The patient developed hemophagocytic syndrome (HLH) and was treated with the standard HLH-2004 protocol. However, PCR in bone marrow discovered this secondary cause for HLH. In endemic countries, visceral leishmaniasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis even in EBV-related HLH, as chemotherapy toxicity may be avoided. PMID:25511219

  9. A Rare Case of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Associated with Parvovirus B19 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Asad-Ur-Rahman, FNU; Abusaada, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare but life-threatening syndrome resulting from excessive immune activation. Secondarily, HLH is often associated with autoimmune disease, infection, and malignancy. The most common infectious trigger is Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. HLH is rarely triggered by parvovirus B19. We discuss a case of a 62-year-old male who presented with multi-organ failure with presumed septic shock who eventually was diagnosed with HLH, with positive parvovirus B19 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Prompt treatment with dexamethasone resulted in significant clinical resolution. PMID:28018767

  10. Human Ebola virus infection results in substantial immune activation.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Anita K; Akondy, Rama S; Davis, Carl W; Ellebedy, Ali H; Mehta, Aneesh K; Kraft, Colleen S; Lyon, G Marshall; Ribner, Bruce S; Varkey, Jay; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Campbell, Shelley; Ströher, Ute; Damon, Inger; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Ahmed, Rafi

    2015-04-14

    Four Ebola patients received care at Emory University Hospital, presenting a unique opportunity to examine the cellular immune responses during acute Ebola virus infection. We found striking activation of both B and T cells in all four patients. Plasmablast frequencies were 10-50% of B cells, compared with less than 1% in healthy individuals. Many of these proliferating plasmablasts were IgG-positive, and this finding coincided with the presence of Ebola virus-specific IgG in the serum. Activated CD4 T cells ranged from 5 to 30%, compared with 1-2% in healthy controls. The most pronounced responses were seen in CD8 T cells, with over 50% of the CD8 T cells expressing markers of activation and proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that all four patients developed robust immune responses during the acute phase of Ebola virus infection, a finding that would not have been predicted based on our current assumptions about the highly immunosuppressive nature of Ebola virus. Also, quite surprisingly, we found sustained immune activation after the virus was cleared from the plasma, observed most strikingly in the persistence of activated CD8 T cells, even 1 mo after the patients' discharge from the hospital. These results suggest continued antigen stimulation after resolution of the disease. From these convalescent time points, we identified CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses to several Ebola virus proteins, most notably the viral nucleoprotein. Knowledge of the viral proteins targeted by T cells during natural infection should be useful in designing vaccines against Ebola virus.

  11. Antiviral activity of lanatoside C against dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yan Yi; Chen, Karen Caiyun; Chen, Huixin; Seng, Eng Khuan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-11-01

    Dengue infection poses a serious threat globally due to its recent rapid spread and rise in incidence. Currently, there is no approved vaccine or effective antiviral drug for dengue virus infection. In response to the urgent need for the development of an effective antiviral for dengue virus, the US Drug Collection library was screened in this study to identify compounds with anti-dengue activities. Lanatoside C, an FDA approved cardiac glycoside was identified as a candidate anti-dengue compound. Our data revealed that lanatoside C has an IC50 of 0.19μM for dengue virus infection in HuH-7 cells. Dose-dependent reduction in dengue viral RNA and viral proteins synthesis were also observed upon treatment with increasing concentrations of lanatoside C. Time of addition study indicated that lanatoside C inhibits the early processes of the dengue virus replication cycle. Furthermore, lanatoside C can effectively inhibit all four serotypes of dengue virus, flavivirus Kunjin, alphavirus Chikungunya and Sindbis virus as well as the human enterovirus 71. These findings suggest that lanatoside C possesses broad spectrum antiviral activity against several groups of positive-sense RNA viruses.

  12. The identification of upregulated ebv-mir-BHRF1-2-5p targeting MALT1 and ebv-miR-BHRF1-3 in the circulation of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifei; He, Dandan; Liang, Hongwei; Yang, Dan; Yue, Hui; Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Rui; Li, Bing; Yang, Hongxia; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Yao; Duan, Yuxiao; Zhang, ChenYu; Chen, Xi; Fu, Jin

    2017-03-02

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a well-documented etiologic factor for multiple sclerosis (MS). EBV encodes at least 44 microRNAs (miRNAs) that are readily detectable in the circulation of human. Previous studies have demonstrated that EBV-encoded miRNAs regulate host immune response and may serve as biomarkers for EBV-associated diseases. However, the roles of EBV miRNAs in MS are still unkown. To fill the gap, we conducted a comprehensive profiling of 44 mature EBV miRNAs in 30 relapse-remitting MS (RRMS) patients at relapse and 30 matched healthy controls. Expression levels of ebv-miR-BHRF1-2-5p and ebv-miR-BHRF1-3 were significantly elevated in the circulation and positively correlated with expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores of MS patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses confirmed that the expression of these two miRNAs clearly distinguished MS patients from healthy controls. Luciferase assays revealed that ebv-miR-BHRF1-2-5p may directly target MALT1 (mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma transport protein 1), a key regulator of immune homeostasis. In conclusion, we described the expression of EBV miRNAs in MS and preliminarily validated the potential target genes of significantly altered EBV miRNAs. The findings may pave the way for prospective study about the pathogenesis of MS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Enhances NK Cell Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tschan-Plessl, Astrid; Stern, Martin; Schmied, Laurent; Retière, Christelle; Hirsch, Hans H.; Garzoni, Christian; van Delden, Christian; Boggian, Katia; Mueller, Nicolas J.; Berger, Christoph; Villard, Jean; Manuel, Oriol; Meylan, Pascal; Terszowski, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Background Occurring frequently after solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication remains a relevant cause of mortality and morbidity in affected patients. Despite these adverse effects, an increased alloreactivity of natural killer (NK) cells after CMV infection has been assumed, but the underlying physiopathological mechanisms have remained elusive. Methods We used serial analyses of NK cells before and after CMV infection in kidney transplant recipients as an in vivo model for CMV primary infection to explore the imprint of CMV infection using every patient as their own control: We analyzed NK cell phenotype and function in 47 CMV seronegative recipients of CMV seropositive kidney grafts, who developed CMV primary infection posttransplant. Seronegative recipients of seronegative kidney grafts served as controls. Results We observed a significant increase of NKG2C expressing NK cells after CMV infection (mean increase, 17.5%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 10.2-24.9, P < 0.001), whereas cluster of differentiation (CD)57 expressing cells decreased (mean decrease, 14.1%; 95% CI, 8.0-20.2; P < 0.001). Analysis of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) expression showed an increase of cells expressing KIR2DL1 as their only inhibitory KIR in patients carrying the cognate ligand HLA-C2 (mean increase, 10.0%; 95% CI, 1.7-18.3; P = 0.018). In C2-negative individuals, KIR2DL1 expression decreased (mean decrease, 3.9%; 95% CI, 1.6-6.2; P = 0.001). As for activating KIR, there was no conclusive change pattern. Most importantly, we observed a significantly higher NK cell degranulation and IFNγ production in response to different target cells (target K562, CD107a: mean increase, 9.9%; 95% CI, 4.8-15.0; P < 0.001; IFNγ: mean increase, 6.6%; 95% CI, 1.6-11.1; P < 0.001; target MRC-5, CD107a: mean increase, 6.9%; 95% CI, 0.7-13.1; P = 0.03; IFNγ: mean increase, 4.8%; 95% CI, 1.7-7.8; P = 0.002). Conclusions We report

  14. Adenovirus-Based Vaccines against Rhesus Lymphocryptovirus EBNA-1 Induce Expansion of Specific CD8+ and CD4+ T Cells in Persistently Infected Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Leskowitz, R.; Fogg, M. H.; Zhou, X. Y.; Kaur, A.; Silveira, E. L. V.; Villinger, F.; Lieberman, P. M.; Wang, F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The impact of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) on human health is substantial, but vaccines that prevent primary EBV infections or treat EBV-associated diseases are not yet available. The Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) is an important target for vaccination because it is the only protein expressed in all EBV-associated malignancies. We have designed and tested two therapeutic EBV vaccines that target the rhesus (rh) lymphocryptovirus (LCV) EBNA-1 to determine if ongoing T cell responses during persistent rhLCV infection in rhesus macaques can be expanded upon vaccination. Vaccines were based on two serotypes of E1-deleted simian adenovirus and were administered in a prime-boost regimen. To further modulate the response, rhEBNA-1 was fused to herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D (HSV-gD), which acts to block an inhibitory signaling pathway during T cell activation. We found that vaccines expressing rhEBNA-1 with or without functional HSV-gD led to expansion of rhEBNA-1-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells in 33% and 83% of the vaccinated animals, respectively. Additional animals developed significant changes within T cell subsets without changes in total numbers. Vaccination did not increase T cell responses to rhBZLF-1, an immediate early lytic phase antigen of rhLCV, thus indicating that increases of rhEBNA-1-specific responses were a direct result of vaccination. Vaccine-induced rhEBNA-1-specific T cells were highly functional and produced various combinations of cytokines as well as the cytolytic molecule granzyme B. These results serve as an important proof of principle that functional EBNA-1-specific T cells can be expanded by vaccination. IMPORTANCE EBV is a common human pathogen that establishes a persistent infection through latency in B cells, where it occasionally reactivates. EBV infection is typically benign and is well controlled by the host adaptive immune system; however, it is considered carcinogenic due to its strong association with lymphoid

  15. Replication of Human Herpesviruses Is Associated with Higher HIV DNA Levels during Antiretroviral Therapy Started at Early Phases of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christy M.; Var, Susanna R.; Oliveira, Michelli F.; Lada, Steven M.; Vargas, Milenka V.; Little, Susan J.; Richman, Douglas D.; Strain, Matthew C.; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Smith, Davey M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Asymptomatic replication of human herpesviruses (HHV) is frequent in HIV-infected men and is associated with increased T-cell activation and HIV disease progression. We hypothesized that the presence of replication of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (the most frequently detected HHV) might influence HIV DNA decay during antiretroviral therapy (ART). We investigated 607 peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples from 107 CMV-seropositive, HIV-infected men who have sex with men, who started ART within a median of 3 months from their estimated date of infection (EDI) and were monitored for a median of 19 months thereafter. Levels of HIV, CMV, and EBV DNA and cellular HIV RNA were measured by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for each time point. Using a general linear mixed-effect regression model, we evaluated associations between the presence of detectable CMV DNA and EBV DNA levels and HIV DNA decay and cellular HIV RNA levels, while adjusting for peak HIV RNA, nadir CD4+ count, CD4/CD8 ratio, CMV IgG levels, time from EDI to ART initiation, time from ART initiation to virologic suppression, detectable CMV DNA pre-ART, and age. The presence of intermittent CMV DNA in PBMC during ART was significantly associated with slower decay of HIV DNA (P = 0.011) but not with increased cellular HIV RNA transcription or more detectable 2-long terminal repeat circles. Higher levels of EBV DNA were also associated with higher levels of HIV DNA (P < 0.001) and increased unspliced cellular HIV RNA transcription (P = 0.010). These observations suggest that replication of HHV may help maintain a larger HIV DNA reservoir, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. IMPORTANCE Over three-fourths of HIV-infected men have at least one actively replicating human herpesvirus (HHV) in their mucosal secretions at any one time. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are the most common, and although it is often asymptomatic, such CMV and EBV

  16. High Prevalence of Multiple Human Herpesviruses in Saliva from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Persons in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Craig S.; Berger, Joseph R.; Mootoor, Yunanan; Avdiushko, Sergei A.; Zhu, Hua; Kryscio, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with an increased risk for human herpesviruses (HHVs) and their related diseases. Methods for limiting the transmission of HHVs require a better understanding of the prevalence and infectiousness of oral HHVs in HIV-infected patients. We performed quantitative PCR to investigate the prevalence, quantity, risk, and correlates of salivary HHVs from 58 HIV-seropositive individuals in a case control study. HHVs were significantly more prevalent in the salivas of HIV-seropositive persons than in those of the controls (odds ratios [ORs], 4.2 to 26.2; P ≤ 0.008). In HIV-infected patients, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were detected in 90%, 57%, 31% and 16% of samples, respectively, compared with 48%, 24%, 2%, and 2%, respectively, of samples from controls. Multiple HHVs were observed in 71% of HIV-seropositive persons and only 16% of controls (OR, 13.0; 95% confidence interval, 5.29 to 32.56). HIV-positive patients had significantly higher EBV loads than HIV-negative persons (P < 0.0001). HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts above 200 cells/μl had increased probability for having HHV-8 in saliva (P = 0.009) compared with patients whose counts were less than 200. In contrast, HSV-1, EBV, and CMV were detected more often when CD4 counts were low. High salivary HHV loads were detected for those (n = 7) with oral lesions. These findings suggest that saliva is a potential risk factor for the acquisition of multiple HHVs, and several host factors may function to accelerate HHV reactivation or replication in patients with HIV infection. PMID:16825357

  17. HLA expression and HLA type associations in relation to EBV status in Hispanic Hodgkin lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Luke B.; Veenstra, Rianne N.; Loo, Eric Y.; Hwang, Amie E.; Siddiqi, Imran N.; Visser, Lydia; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Nolte, Ilja M.; van den Berg, Anke; Cozen, Wendy; Diepstra, Arjan

    2017-01-01

    A proportion of classical Hodgkin lymphomas harbor the Epstein Barr virus (EBV). We previously demonstrated that associations between Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) alleles and susceptibility to EBV+ classical Hodgkin lymphoma differ between European and Chinese populations. Data on Hispanic populations is missing. Here we examined the association between HLA type, tumor cell HLA expression and other characteristics in Hispanic Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Hispanic Hodgkin lymphoma patients diagnosed at the Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center from 2000–2012 were included (n = 65). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue was analyzed for EBV by in situ hybridization and for HLA class I and class II expression by immunohistochemistry. HLA typing was performed by HLA-A specific quantitative PCR of genomic DNA from tissue. Thirty patients (46%) had EBV+ tumors. Expression of HLA class I (p = 0.0006) was significantly associated with EBV+ tumor status in Hispanic patients, similar to Europeans and Chinese. A positive association between HLA class II expression and EBV+ tumor status, as present in large studies in Europeans, was not found (p = 0.06). The prevalences of the specific European HLA-A*01 risk and European HLA-A*02 protective types were not significantly associated with EBV+ tumors among these Hispanic patients, however numbers were too low to draw firm conclusions. The HLA-A*02:07 allele, that is associated with EBV+ Hodgkin lymphoma in Chinese, was absent. In conclusion, the association between EBV positivity in tumor cells and HLA class I expression appears to be consistent across different populations. Larger studies in Hispanics are needed to evaluate HLA allele susceptibility associations. PMID:28334025

  18. Subunit-selective proteasome activity profiling uncovers uncoupled proteasome subunit activities during bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Misas-Villamil, Johana C; van der Burgh, Aranka M; Grosse-Holz, Friederike; Bach-Pages, Marcel; Kovács, Judit; Kaschani, Farnusch; Schilasky, Sören; Emon, Asif Emran Khan; Ruben, Mark; Kaiser, Markus; Overkleeft, Hermen S; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2017-01-24

    The proteasome is a nuclear - cytoplasmic proteolytic complex involved in nearly all regulatory pathways in plant cells. The three different catalytic activities of the proteasome can have different functions but tools to monitor and control these subunits selectively are not yet available in plant science. Here, we introduce subunit-selective inhibitors and dual-color fluorescent activity-based probes for studying two of the three active catalytic subunits of the plant proteasome. We validate these tools in two model plants and use this to study the proteasome during plant-microbe interactions. Our data reveals that Nicotiana benthamiana incorporates two different paralogs of each catalytic subunit into active proteasomes. Interestingly, both β1 and β5 activities are significantly increased upon infection with pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 lacking hopQ1-1 (PtoDC3000(ΔhQ)) whilst the activity profile of the β1 subunit changes. Infection with wild-type PtoDC3000 causes proteasome activities that range from strongly induced β1 and β5 activities to strongly suppressed β5 activities, revealing that β1 and β5 activities can be uncoupled during bacterial infection. These selective probes and inhibitors are now available to the plant science community and can be widely and easily applied to study the activity and role of the different catalytic subunits of the proteasome in different plant species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. A possible link between the Epstein-Barr virus infection and autoimmune thyroid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Michalski, Marek; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), also known as human herpesvirus 4, is a member of the Herpesviridae virus family. EBV infection can cause infectious mononucleosis (IM) in the lytic phase of EBV’s life cycle. Past EBV infection is associated with lymphomas, and may also result in certain allergic and autoimmune diseases. Although potential mechanisms of autoimmune diseases have not been clearly elucidated, both genetic and environmental factors, such as infectious agents, are considered to be responsible for their development. In addition, EBV modifies the host immune response. The worldwide prevalence of autoimmune diseases shows how common this pathogen is. Normally, the virus stays in the body and remains dormant throughout life. However, this is not always the case, and a serious EBV-related illness may develop later in life. This explains the chronic course of autoimmune diseases that is often accompanied by exacerbations of symptoms. Based on the present studies, EBV infection can cause autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjögren’s syndrome, and autoimmune hepatitis. The EBV has also been reported in patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders. Although EBV is not the only agent responsible for the development of autoimmune thyroid diseases, it can be considered a contributory factor. PMID:27833448

  20. Human Papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus co-infection in Cervical Carcinoma in Algerian women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that the implication of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the carcinogenesis and prognosis of cervical cancer is well established, the impact of a co-infection with high risk HPV (HR-HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is still not fully understood. Methods Fifty eight randomly selected cases of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the uterine cervix, 14 normal cervices specimens, 21 CIN-2/3 and 16 CIN-1 cases were examined for EBV and HPV infections. Detection of HR-HPV specific sequences was carried out by PCR amplification using consensus primers of Manos and by Digene Hybrid Capture. The presence of EBV was revealed by amplifying a 660 bp specific EBV sequence of BALF1. mRNA expression of LMP-1 in one hand and protein levels of BARF-1, LMP-1 and EBNA-1 in the other hand were assessed by RT-PCR and immunoblotting and/or immunohischemistry respectively. Results HR-HPV infection was found in patients with SCC (88%), low-grade (75%) and high grade (95%) lesions compared to only 14% of normal cervix cases. However, 69%, 12.5%, 38.1%, and 14% of SCC, CIN-1, CIN-2/3 and normal cervix tissues, respectively, were EBV infected. The highest co-infection (HR-HPV and EBV) was found in squamous cell carcinoma cases (67%). The latter cases showed 27% and 29% expression of EBV BARF-1 and LMP-1 oncogenes respectively. Conclusion The high rate of HR-HPV and EBV co-infection in SCC suggests that EBV infection is incriminated in cervical cancer progression. This could be taken into account as bad prognosis in this type of cancer. However, the mode of action in dual infection in cervical oncogenesis needs further investigation. PMID:24252325

  1. Leishmania Infantum and Epstein-Barr Virus Co-Infection in a Patient with Hemophagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Gaifer, Zied; Boulassel, Mohamed-Rachid

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a rare case of a 27- year old previously healthy male presenting with high grade fever, pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, high levels of ferritin and triglyceride, suggesting a diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) syndrome. Other investigations showed a positive Leishmania infantum serology and high Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viremia. The diagnosis of a visceral leishmaniasis was confirmed by bone morrow biopsy, which showed Leishman-Donovan bodies and evidence of HLH. The patient received liposomal amphotericin B and he had a complete resolution of his symptoms and clearance of EBV viremia. This case of HLH associated with visceral leishmaniasis and EBV co-infection raises the question about the significance of EBV in patients with HLH. The treatment of actual etiological agent can lead to complete cure while using current recommend chemotherapy for HLH-related EBV in a patient with hidden infection may have deleterious effects. PMID:28191297

  2. Virus and Autoantigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells Are Key Effectors in a SCID Mouse Model of EBV-Associated Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Linnerbauer, Stefanie; Behrends, Uta; Adhikary, Dinesh; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Mautner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cell line (lymphoblastoid cell lines; LCL)-stimulated T-cell preparations have been successfully used to treat EBV-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) in transplant recipients, but function and specificity of the CD4+ component are still poorly defined. Here, we assessed the tumor-protective potential of different CD4+ T-cell specificities in a PTLD-SCID mouse model. Injection of different virus-specific CD4+ T-cell clones showed that single specificities were capable of prolonging mouse survival and that the degree of tumor protection directly correlated with recognition of target cells in vitro. Surprisingly, some CD4+ T-cell clones promoted tumor development, suggesting that besides antigen recognition, still elusive functional differences exist among virus-specific T cells. Of several EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell clones tested, those directed against virion antigens proved most tumor-protective. However, enriching these specificities in LCL-stimulated preparations conferred no additional survival benefit. Instead, CD4+ T cells specific for unknown, probably self-antigens were identified as principal antitumoral effectors in LCL-stimulated T-cell lines. These results indicate that virion and still unidentified cellular antigens are crucial targets of the CD4+ T-cell response in this preclinical PTLD-model and that enriching the corresponding T-cell specificities in therapeutic preparations may enhance their clinical efficacy. Moreover, the expression in several EBV-negative B-cell lymphoma cell lines implies that these putative autoantigen(s) might also qualify as targets for T-cell-based immunotherapy of virus-negative B cell malignancies. PMID:24853673

  3. Mitral valve repair for active culture positive infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Doukas, G; Oc, M; Alexiou, C; Sosnowski, A W; Samani, N J; Spyt, T J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical and echocardiographic outcome after mitral valve (MV) repair for active culture positive infective MV endocarditis. Patients and methods Between 1996 and 2004, 36 patients (mean (SD) age 53 (18) years) with positive blood culture up to three weeks before surgery (or positive culture of material removed at operation) and intraoperative evidence of endocarditis underwent MV repair. Staphylococci and streptococci were the most common pathogens. All patients had moderate or severe mitral regurgitation (MR). Mean New York Heart Association (NYHA) class was 2.3 (1.0). Follow up was complete (mean 38 (19) months). Results Operative mortality was 2.8% (one patient). At follow up, endocarditis has not recurred. One patient developed severe recurrent MR and underwent valve replacement and one patient had moderate MR. There were two late deaths, both non‐cardiac. Kaplan‐Meier five year freedom from recurrent moderate to severe MR, freedom from repeat operation, and survival were 94 (4)%, 97 (3)%, and 93 (5)%, respectively. At the most recent review the mean NYHA class was 1.17 (0.3) (p < 0.0001). At the latest echocardiographic evaluation, left atrial diameters, left ventricular end diastolic diameter, and MV diameter were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) compared with preoperative values. Conclusions MV repair for active culture positive endocarditis is associated with low operative mortality and provides satisfactory freedom from recurrent infection, freedom from repeat operation, and survival. Hence, every effort should be made to repair infected MVs and valves should be replaced only when repair is not possible. PMID:15951395

  4. Antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus against microbial flora of cervicovaginal infections

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Subramanyam; Shouri, Raju Naidu Devanaboyaina; Wudayagiri, Rajendra; Valluru, Lokanatha

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the probiotic nature of Lactobacillus in preventing cervical pathogens by studying the effectiveness of antimicrobial activity against vaginal pathogens. Methods Lactobacilli were isolated from healthy vaginal swabs on selective media and different pathogenic bacteria were isolated by using different selective media. The Lactobacillus strains were tested for the production of hydrogen peroxide and antimicrobial compounds along with probiotic properties. Results Of the 10 isolated Lactobacillus strains, strain 1, 3 and 6 are high hydrogen peroxide producers and the rest were low producers. Results of pH and amines tests indicated that pH increased with fishy odour in the vaginal fluids of cervicovaginal infection patients when compared with vaginal fluids of healthy persons. The isolates were found to be facultative anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, non-capsule forming and catalase-negative bacilli. The results of antimicrobial activity of compounds indicated that 280 and 140 µg/mL was the minimum concentration to inhibit the growth of both pathogens and test organisms respectively. Conclusions The results demonstrated that Lactobacillus producing antimicrobial compounds inhibits the growth of cervical pathogens, revealing that the hypothesis of preventing vaginal infection by administering probiotic organisms has a great appeal to patients, which colonize the vagina to help, restore and maintain healthy vagina.

  5. Spacecraft Environment May Reduce Resistance To Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Ott, C. Mark; Castro, V. A.; Leal, Melanie; Mehta, Satish K.

    2006-01-01

    Living and working in a spacecraft exposes the crew to a unique environment. This environment includes microgravity, increased radiation, chemical and biological contamination, and a variety of stressors. Disturbances in this balance are often manifested by diminished immunity in astronauts/cosmonauts. Reactivation of Epstein- Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) has been used as an indicator of immune status. Reactivation of EBV and VZV were detected and quantified in saliva. CMV was measured in urine. The DNA was extracted using a Qiagen Inc. kit and viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based assay with Taqman 7700 (PE Biosystems). Patterns of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation in 32 astronauts and 18 healthy age-matched control subjects were characterized by quantifying EBV shedding. Saliva samples were collected before, during, and after 10 space shuttle missions of 5 to 14 d duration. Of 1398 saliva specimens from 32 astronauts, 314 (23%) were positive for EBV DNA. Examination by flight phase showed that 29% of the saliva specimens collected from 28 astronauts before flight were positive for EBV DNA, as were 16% of those collected from 25 astronauts during flight and 16% of those collected after flight from 23 astronauts. The mean number of EBV copies/mL from samples taken during the flights was 417, ten-fold greater (p < 0.05) than the copies from the preflight (40) and post flight (44) phases. In contrast, the control subjects shed EBV DNA with a frequency of 3.7% and mean EBV copies of 40 per mL of saliva. Ten days before flight and on landing day, titers of antibody to EBV viral capsid antigen were significantly (p < 0.05) greater than baseline levels. Increases in the number of viral copies and in the amount of EBV-specific antibody were consistent with EBV reactivation before, during, and after space flight. Similarly, CMV and VZV reactivation increased in response to space flight

  6. Multiple HLA class I and II associations in classical Hodgkin lymphoma and EBV status defined subgroups.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Kushekhar, Kushi; Nolte, Ilja; Kooistra, Wierd; Visser, Lydia; Bouwman, Ilby; Kouprie, Niels; Veenstra, Rianne; van Imhoff, Gustaaf; Olver, Bianca; Houlston, Richard S; Poppema, Sibrand; Diepstra, Arjan; Hepkema, Bouke; van den Berg, Anke

    2011-11-10

    The pathogenesis of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) involves environmental and genetic factors. To explore the role of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, we performed a case-control genotyping study in 338 Dutch cHL patients and more than 5000 controls using a PCR-based sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe hybridization approach. HLA-A68 and HLA-DR11 (5) were significantly increased in the cHL patient population compared with the controls. Three class II associations were observed in the EBV(-) cHL population with an increase of HLA-DR15 (2) and a decrease of HLA-DR4 and HLA-DR7. Allele frequencies of HLA-A1, HLA-B37, and HLA-DR10 were significantly increased in the EBV(+) cHL population; these alleles are in strong linkage disequilibrium and form a common haplotype in whites. The allele frequency of HLA-A2 was significantly decreased in the EBV(+) cHL population. Sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe analysis revealed significant differences between EBV(+) and EBV(-) cHL patients for 19 probes that discriminate between HLA-A*01 and HLA-A*02. In conclusion, the HLA-A1 and HLA-A2 antigens and not specific single nucleotide variants shared by multiple alleles are responsible for the association with EBV(+) cHL. Furthermore, several new protective and predisposing HLA class I and II associations for the EBV(+), the EBV(-), and the entire cHL population were identified.

  7. Changing patterns in the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)and Hodgkin lymphoma association in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Dhiab, Myriam Ben; Ziadi, Sonia; Saad, Hanene; Louhichi, Teheni; Trimeche, Mounir

    2016-09-01

    We compared the features of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) association in Tunisia in two periods of time, 1991-2001 (111 cases) and 2002-2012 (122 cases). The investigation of the EBV status by EBER in situ hybridization showed a significant decrease in the prevalence of EBV-positive HL from 69.3 % for the period 1991-2001 to 40.1 % for the 2002-2012 period (p = 0.00001). EBV positivity has decreased in all age groups but was more pronounced among young patients, in the 15-24-year age group (46.1 vs 10.3 %, p = 0.003), in the 25-34-year age group (56.2 vs 25 %, p = 0.04), and among children (88.4 vs 59.2 %, p = 0.01). This decrease in EBV-positive HL over time contrasted with a remarkable increase in EBV-negative HL in young adults aged 15-34 years (51.2 vs 83 %; p = 0.001), especially among women (59.1 vs 91.2 %; p = 0.01). The decrease in EBV-positive HL over time concerns particularly the nodular sclerosis histological subtype (69.2 vs 31.6 %, p = 0.000001). These results indicate that the epidemiology of HL and its association with EBV are changing over time, with a trend toward a Western profile, and point toward the emergence of other environmental causative factors, especially among young women, which remain to be identified.

  8. EBV-associated lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the pancreas: Case report with targeted sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Samdani, Rashmi T; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; O'Reilly, Eileen; DeMatteo, Ronald; Sigel, Carlie S

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas are distinctive epithelial derived malignant neoplasms that have a syncytial growth pattern and lymphoid stroma. The majority of tumors with this appearance are Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-associated. We report a patient with a clinical presentation concerning for lymphoma who was diagnosed with an EBV-associated pancreatic carcinoma with a lymphoepithelioma-like pattern. Targeted sequencing analysis showed a molecular profile distinct from conventional ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas.

  9. Persistent Infection Drives the Development of CD8+ T Cells Specific for Late Lytic Infection Antigens in Lymphocryptovirus-Infected Macaques and Epstein-Barr Virus-Infected Humans▿

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, Nina; Wang, Fred; Fogg, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the CD8+ T cell repertoire against lytic infection antigens in rhesus macaques persistently infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related lymphocryptovirus (rhLCV). CD8+ T cells specific for late (L) antigens were detected at rates comparable to those for early antigens and were associated with increasing duration of infection. L antigen-specific CD8+ T cells were also readily detected in adult, EBV-positive humans. Thus, viral major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) immune evasion genes expressed during lytic LCV infection do not prevent L-specific CD8+ T cell development over time during persistent infection. PMID:21917961

  10. EBV-associated, extranodal NK-cell lymphoma, nasal type of the breast, after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Lawrence; Draoua, Hediya Y; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Bhagat, Govind; Alobeid, Bachir

    2004-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are predominantly Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferations. PTLDs of T-cell lineage are rare, mostly reported after renal transplantation and show less frequent association with EBV. NK-cell lymphomas after transplantation (NK-cell PTLDs) are very rare; only five cases are reported so far in the English literature, all developed after renal transplantation. We describe a case of EBV-associated, extranodal NK-cell lymphoma of nasal type, involving the breast in a cardiac allograft recipient 5 years after transplantation. The neoplastic cells are positive for CD2, cytoplasmic CD3, CD7, CD43, CD56, TIA-1 and p53; and negative for surface CD3 and CD57. Analysis of T-cell receptor beta and gamma genes fails to show clonal rearrangement. EBV studies show clonal episomal integration of EBV and latency II pattern (EBER-1+, LMP-1+, EBNA-1+, EBNA-2-). In conclusion, NK-cell PTLDs are rare complications that arise relatively late after solid organ transplantation, show strong association with EBV, and can follow an aggressive clinical course. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first reported case of NK-cell PTLD after cardiac transplantation and the unifying clinical and diagnostic features of NK-cell PTLDs occurring after solid organ transplantation.

  11. EBV and human microRNAs co-target oncogenic and apoptotic viral and human genes during latency

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Kasandra J; Rabinowitz, Gabrielle S; Yario, Therese A; Luna, Joseph M; Darnell, Robert B; Steitz, Joan A

    2012-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) controls gene expression to transform human B cells and maintain viral latency. High-throughput sequencing and crosslinking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP) identified mRNA targets of 44 EBV and 310 human microRNAs (miRNAs) in Jijoye (Latency III) EBV-transformed B cells. While 25% of total cellular miRNAs are viral, only three viral mRNAs, all latent transcripts, are targeted. Thus, miRNAs do not control the latent/lytic switch by targeting EBV lytic genes. Unexpectedly, 90% of the 1664 human 3′-untranslated regions targeted by the 12 most abundant EBV miRNAs are also targeted by human miRNAs via distinct binding sites. Half of these are targets of the oncogenic miR-17∼92 miRNA cluster and associated families, including mRNAs that regulate transcription, apoptosis, Wnt signalling, and the cell cycle. Reporter assays confirmed the functionality of several EBV and miR-17 family miRNA-binding sites in EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), EBV BHRF1, and host CAPRIN2 mRNAs. Our extensive list of EBV and human miRNA targets implicates miRNAs in the control of EBV latency and illuminates viral miRNA function in general. PMID:22473208

  12. Eugenol nanocapsule for enhanced therapeutic activity against periodontal infections.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Kannissery; Aji Alex, M R; Singh, Manisha; Dang, Shweta; Ansari, Shahid H; Ali, Javed

    2016-01-01

    Eugenol is a godsend to dental care due to its analgesic, local anesthetic, and anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. The aim of the present research work was to prepare, characterize and evaluate eugenol-loaded nanocapsules (NCs) against periodontal infections. Eugenol-loaded polycaprolactone (PCL) NCs were prepared by solvent displacement method. The nanometric size of the prepared NCs was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The in vitro drug release was found to follow a biphasic pattern and followed Michaelis-Menten like model. The percentage cell viability values near to 100 in the cell viability assay indicated that the NCs are not cytotoxic. In the in vivo studies, the eugenol NC group displayed significant difference in the continuity of epithelium of the interdental papilla in comparison to the untreated, pure eugenol and placebo groups. The in vivo performance of the eugenol-loaded NCs using ligature-induced periodontitis model in rats indicated that eugenol-loaded NCs could prevent septal bone resorption in periodontitis. On the basis of our research findings it could be concluded that eugenol-loaded PCL NCs could serve as a novel colloidal drug delivery system for enhanced therapeutic activity of eugenol in the treatment of periodontal infections.

  13. Molecular Evidence for Rhesus Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Epithelial Cells in Immunosuppressed Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kutok, Jeffery L.; Klumpp, Sherry; Simon, Meredith; MacKey, John J.; Nguyen, Vuong; Middeldorp, Jaap M.; Aster, Jon C.; Wang, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human oncogenic herpesvirus associated with epithelial cell and B-cell malignancies. EBV infection of B lymphocytes is essential for acute and persistent EBV infection in humans; however, the role of epithelial cell infection in the normal EBV life cycle remains controversial. The rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) is an EBV-related herpesvirus that naturally infects rhesus macaques and can be used experimentally to model persistent B-cell infection and B-cell lymphomagenesis. We now show that the rhesus LCV can infect epithelial cells in immunosuppressed rhesus macaques and can induce epithelial cell lesions resembling oral hairy leukoplakia in AIDS patients. Electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and DNA-RNA in situ hybridization were used to identify the presence of a lytic rhesus LCV infection in these proliferative, hyperkeratotic, or parakeratotic epithelial cell lesions. These studies demonstrate that the rhesus LCV has tropism for epithelial cells, in addition to B cells, and is a relevant animal model system for studying the role of epithelial cell infection in EBV pathogenesis. PMID:15016868

  14. Antiviral Activity of HPMPC (Cidofovir) Against ORF Virus Infected Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Scagliarini, A.; McInnes, C.J.; Gallina, L.; Dal, Pozzo F.; Scagliarini, L.; Snoeck, R.; Prosperi, S.; Sales, J.; Gilray, J.A.; Nettleton, P.F.

    2007-01-01

    (S)-9-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]-2,6-diaminopurine (HPMPC, cidofovir, CDV, Vistide®) is an acyclic nucleoside analogue with a potent and selective activity against a broad spectrum of DNA viruses including the poxviruses. In this study we present the results of different treatment regimens in lambs experimentally infected with orf virus with different cidofovir formulations prepared in Beeler basis and Unguentum M. Our results show that choice of excipient, concentration of cidofovir and treatment regimen were all important to the clinical outcome of the therapy. Whilst one particular regimen appeared to exacerbate the lesion, treatment with 1% w/v cidofovir cream, prepared in Beeler Basis, for 4 consecutive days did result in milder lesions that resolved more quickly than untreated lesions. Furthermore the scabs of the treated animals contained significantly lower amounts of viable virus meaning there should be less contamination of the environment with virus than would normally occur. PMID:17049627

  15. Methotrexate-Related Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disorder—So-Called “Hodgkin-Like Lesion”—of the Oral Cavity in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yuji; Tanaka, Akio; Shigematu, Hisao; Kojima, Masaru; Sakashita, Hideaki; Kusama, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    Patients affected by autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, dermatomyositis) who are treated with methotrexate (MTX) sometimes develop lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). In approximately 40% of reported cases, the affected sites have been extranodal, and have included the gastrointestinal tract, skin, lung, kidney, and soft tissues. However, MTX-associated LPD (MTX-LPD) is extremely rare in the oral cavity. Here we report a 69-year-old Japanese woman with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who developed MTX-LPD resembling Hodgkin’s disease—so-called “Hodgkin-like lesion”—in the left upper jaw. Histopathologically, large atypical lymphoid cells including Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells were found to have infiltrated into granulation tissue in the ulcerative oral mucosa. Immunohistochemistry showed that the large atypical cells were positive for CD20, CD30 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-latent infection membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) and negative for CD15. EBV was detected by in situ hybridization (ISH) with EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for LMP-1 and EBNA-2 in material taken from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimen. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MTX-related EBV-associated LPD (MTX-EBVLPD), “Hodgkin-like lesion”, of the oral cavity in a patient with RA. PMID:20676828

  16. Age-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders: comparison with EBV-positive classic Hodgkin lymphoma in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Asano, Naoko; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Tamaru, Jun-Ichi; Oyama, Takashi; Ishida, Fumihiro; Ohshima, Koichi; Yoshino, Tadashi; Nakamura, Naoya; Mori, Shigeo; Yoshie, Osamu; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Morishima, Yasuo; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2009-03-19

    Age-related Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (aEBVLPD) is a disease group characterized by EBV-associated large B-cell lymphoma in elderly without predisposing immunodeficiency. In nearly one- third of cases, aEBVLPD occurs as a polymorphous subtype with reactive cell-rich components, bearing a morphologic similarity to classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). The aim of this study was to clarify clinicopathologic differences between the polymorphic subtype of aEBVLPD (n = 34) and EBV(+) cHL (n = 108) in patients aged 50 years or older. Results showed that aEBVLPD was more closely associated with aggressive clinical parameters than cHL, with a higher age at onset (71 vs 63 years); lower male predominance (male-female ratio, 1.4 vs 3.3); and a higher rate of involvement of the skin (18% vs 2%), gastrointestinal tract (15% vs 4%), and lung (12% vs 2%). aEBVLPD was histopathologically characterized by a higher ratio of geographic necrosis, greater increase (> 30%) in cytotoxic T cells among background lymphocytes, higher positivity for CD20 and EBNA2, and absence of CD15 expression. As predicted by the clinical profile, aEBVLPD had a significantly poorer prognosis than EBV(+) cHL (P < .001). The polymorphous subtype of aEBVLPD constitutes an aggressive group with an immune response distinct from EBV(+) cHL, and requires the development of innovative therapeutic strategies.

  17. Effect of material deprivation on Epstein–Barr virus infection in Hodgkin's disease in the West Midlands

    PubMed Central

    Flavell, K; Constandinou, C; Lowe, D; Scott, K; Newey, C; Evans, D; Dutton, A; Simmons, S; Smith, R; Crocker, J; Young, L S; Murray, P

    1999-01-01

    We have used Townsend scores from postcode data to compare levels of material deprivation and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positivity for 223 patients diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease (HD) in the period 1981–1997. The presence of EBV in HD tumours was determined using in situ hybridization to target the abundantly expressed EBV early RNAs. EBV was detected in the malignant Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg cells in 47/223 HD cases (21%). There was found to be a tendency for higher Townsend scores (indicative of higher levels of material deprivation) in EBV-positive HD patients, but this association was not statistically significant. When various subgroups of patients from the study were examined separately the indication of higher Townsend scores in EBV-positive patients was found to be more marked for patients with mixed cellularity disease (P= 0.09) and for females (P= 0.03). The results of this study suggest that differences in the level of material deprivation are important in determining the likelihood of EBV-positive HD in the UK, particularly for certain subgroups of patients. It is not known what specific socioeconomic factors are responsible for these differences, although alterations in the timing or rate of primary EBV infection, or decline in the level of EBV-specific immunity, may be important. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408873

  18. Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    standing, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections. Key Words: musculoskeletal infection, biofilm , bacteria, biomaterial (J Orthop Trauma...form a biofilm , or slime layer.1 The recurrence of infections is often the result of microbial biofilm formation on the implant, enabling the persistence...Klebsiella pneumoniae). Staphylococcus species is by far the most studied pathogen in musculoskeletal infections and can produce a multilayered biofilm

  19. Sleep and fatigue in mice infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68.

    PubMed

    Olivadoti, Melissa D; Weinberg, Jason B; Toth, Linda A; Opp, Mark R

    2011-05-01

    Fatigue, a common symptom of many acute and chronic medical conditions, reduces both quality of life and workplace productivity and can be disabling. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that underlie fatigue can be difficult to study in human populations due to the patient heterogeneity, the variety of underlying causes and potential triggering events, and an inability to collect samples that may be essential to elucidation of mechanisms (e.g., brain). Although the etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) remains elusive, some studies have implicated viral infections, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human gammaherpesvirus, as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of CFS. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (γHV68) is a mouse pathogen that shares many similarities with human γHVs, including EBV. In this study, we use γHV68-infected C57BL/6J mice as a model system for studying the impact of chronic viral infection on sleep-wake behavior, activity patterns, and body temperature profiles. Our data show that γHV68 alters sleep, activity, and temperature in a manner suggestive of fatigue. In mice infected with the highest dose used in this study (40,000plaque forming units), food intake, body weight, wheel running, body temperature, and sleep were normal until approximately 7days after infection. These parameters were significantly altered during days 7 through 11, returned to baseline levels at day 12 after infection, and remained within the normal range for the remainder of the 30-day period after inoculation. At that time, both infected and uninfected mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and their responses monitored. Uninfected mice given LPS developed a modest and transient febrile response during the initial light phase (hours 12 through 24) after injection. In contrast, infected mice developed changes in core body temperatures that persisted for at least 5days. Infected mice showed an initial hypothermia that lasted for approximately 12h

  20. Infection and Cervical Neoplasia: Facts and Fiction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daraji, Wael I; Smith, John HF

    2009-01-01

    Whilst there is strong evidence that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the principal aetiological agent in cervical neoplasia, some other sexually transmitted agents may either contribute or protect against cervical carcinogenesis, such as the herpes virus family (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Chlamydia trachomatis (CT). Epidemiological studies suggest that HSV may have a role in cervical neoplasia, but there is no clear supportive experimental evidence. Serological studies have also failed to reveal a difference in the prevalence of antibodies to CMV and EBV between patients with cervical cancer and controls. However, longitudinal seroepidemiological studies have provided evidence that CT is an independent risk factor for the development of cervical squamous carcinoma and this association is serotype specific. The increased risk of cervical neoplasia in patients infected with HIV has been recognised for over a decade and HIV may interact with HPV either by alternating HPV gene transcription or by immunosuppression. Finally extensive experimental and limited epidemiological evidence suggests that adeno-associated viruses (AAV) may have antioncogenic activity in man and may protect against the development of cervical cancer. At present the mechanism of this action is unclear but may relate to AAV-induced regulation of HPV gene expression and the HPV life cycle. In this review we summarize the current literature relating to the associations and mechanisms of cervical carcinogenesis by each of these infectious microorganisms. PMID:18830380

  1. Glycolytic control of vacuolar-type ATPase activity: a mechanism to regulate influenza viral infection.

    PubMed

    Kohio, Hinissan P; Adamson, Amy L

    2013-09-01

    As new influenza virus strains emerge, finding new mechanisms to control infection is imperative. In this study, we found that we could control influenza infection of mammalian cells by altering the level of glucose given to cells. Higher glucose concentrations induced a dose-specific increase in influenza infection. Linking influenza virus infection with glycolysis, we found that viral replication was significantly reduced after cells were treated with glycolytic inhibitors. Addition of extracellular ATP after glycolytic inhibition restored influenza infection. We also determined that higher levels of glucose promoted the assembly of the vacuolar-type ATPase within cells, and increased vacuolar-type ATPase proton-transport activity. The increase of viral infection via high glucose levels could be reversed by inhibition of the proton pump, linking glucose metabolism, vacuolar-type ATPase activity, and influenza viral infection. Taken together, we propose that altering glucose metabolism may be a potential new approach to inhibit influenza viral infection.

  2. Berberine induces mitochondrial apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells through p53-mediated regulation of XAF1 and GADD45α.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Park, Sang Hyun; Kim, Daejin; Kim, Yeong Seok; Yoon, Sung Ho; Hur, Dae Young

    2016-07-01

    Berberine exhibits antiproliferative or cytotoxic effects against various cancers. ROS and wild-type p53 play a critical role in berberine-induced cytotoxic effects. In this study, we investigated the correlation between XAF1 and functional p53 in EBV-transformed B cells or cancerous B cells after treatment with berberine. Berberine decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis through a mitochondria-dependent pathway in EBV-transformed B cells and cancerous B cells, but not in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Activated p53 and its downstream targets XAF1 and GADD45α interacted with PUMA, Bax, and Bim in mitochondria after treatment with berberine. Blocking phosphorylation of p38/JNK MAPK and treatment with PFT-α, a selective p53 inhibitor, effectively prevented apoptosis and the upregulation of phosphorylated p53, XAF1, and GADD45α. NAC, a ROS scavenger, also suppressed berberine-induced mitochondria disruption and the whole apoptotic process via restoration of p53-related proteins and proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. Taken together, our results suggest that ROS generation might be a predisposing event in berberine-induced mitochondrial apoptosis in EBV-transformed B cells through the upregulation of XAF1 and GADD45α expression by MAPK and functional p53.

  3. The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of Epstein-Barr virus LMP2A is essential for blocking BCR-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Fruehling, S; Longnecker, R

    1997-09-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) blocks B-cell receptor (BCR) signal transduction in EBV-immortalized B lymphocytes in vitro. The cytoplasmic amino-terminal domain of LMP2A contains an immunoreceptor tyrosine activation motif (ITAM). ITAMs consist of paired tyrosine and leucine residues and play a central role in signal transduction of the BCR and the T-cell receptor (TCR). To investigate the importance of the LMP2A ITAM, two EBV recombinants were constructed, each containing a tyrosine-to-phenylalanine point mutation at amino acid 74 or 85 within the ITAM of LMP2A. Tyrosine phosphorylation, calcium mobilization, and induction of BZLF1 expression were no longer blocked in the LMP2A ITAM mutant LCLs following BCR cross-linking. In addition, the Syk protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) was unable to bind LMP2A in unstimulated LCLs infected with either of the LMP2A ITAM mutants. Analysis of Syk phosphorylation before and after BCR cross-linking in the LMP2A mutant ITAM LCLs compared with wild-type EBV LCLs indicates a specific role of the LMP2A ITAM on the LMP2A-mediated negative effect on the Syk PTK. These data indicate the importance of the LMP2A ITAM motif in the LMP2A-mediated block on BCR signal transduction and position the role of the Syk PTK as being central to the function of LMP2A.

  4. EBV-associated polymorphic posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder presenting as gingival ulcers.

    PubMed

    León, Jorge Esquiche; Takahama Júnior, Ademar; Vassallo, José; Soares, Fernando Augusto; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte

    2011-04-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) present a wide clinicopathological spectrum, varying from the usual Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven infectious mononucleosis-type polyclonal proliferations to EBV-positive or EBV-negative proliferations indistinguishable from overt lymphomas that occur in immunocompetent individuals. PTLDs characteristically have a predilection for extranodal sites and association with EBV.These disorders are usually B-cell type, although T-cell and rare cases involving both T- and B-cell types have also been described. The initial treatment consists in decreasing the immnosupressive therapy, usually with favorable results. The authors report on a rare case of a 19-year-old girl, with post-renal transplantation EBV-associated polymorphic lymphoproliferative gingival ulcerated lesions. To the best of their knowledge, this is the first case described in the English-language literature of polymorphic PTLD involving both B-cell and T-cell lineages, with an unusual immunoprofile affecting the mouth. The authors warn that this condition could be easily misdiagnosed as malignant lymphoma if not properly recognized.

  5. Short-term inhibition of TERT induces telomere length-independent cell cycle arrest and apoptotic response in EBV-immortalized and transformed B cells

    PubMed Central

    Celeghin, Andrea; Giunco, Silvia; Freguja, Riccardo; Zangrossi, Manuela; Nalio, Silvia; Dolcetti, Riccardo; De Rossi, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Besides its canonical role in stabilizing telomeres, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) may promote tumorigenesis through extra-telomeric functions. The possible therapeutic effects of BIBR1532 (BIBR), a powerful TERT inhibitor, have been evaluated in different cellular backgrounds, but no data are currently available regarding Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-driven B-cell malignancies. Our aim was to characterize the biological effects of TERT inhibition by BIBR on EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and fully transformed Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines. We found that BIBR selectively inhibits telomerase activity in TERT-positive 4134/Late and 4134/TERT+ LCLs and EBV-negative BL41 and EBV-positive BL41/B95.8 BL cell lines. TERT inhibition led to decreased cell proliferation, accumulation of cells in the S-phase and ultimately to increased apoptosis, compared with mock-treated control cells. All these effects occurred within 72 h and were not observed in BIBR-treated TERT-negative 4134/TERT- and U2OS cells. The cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, consequent upon short-term TERT inhibition, were associated with and likely dependent on the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR), highlighted by the increased levels of γH2AX and activation of ATM and ATR pathways. Analyses of the mean and range of telomere lengths and telomere dysfunction-induced foci indicated that DDR after short-term TERT inhibition was not related to telomere dysfunction, thus suggesting that TERT, besides stabilizing telomere, may protect DNA via telomere-independent mechanisms. Notably, TERT-positive LCLs treated with BIBR in combination with fludarabine or cyclophosphamide showed a significant increase in the number of apoptotic cells with respect to those treated with chemotherapeutic agents alone. In conclusion, TERT inhibition impairs cell cycle progression and enhances the pro-apoptotic effects of chemotherapeutic agents in TERT-positive cells. These results support new

  6. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection.

    PubMed

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-03-31

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells.

  7. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection

    PubMed Central

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells. PMID:27031961

  8. EBV, HCMV, HHV6, and HHV7 screening in bone marrow samples from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morales-Sánchez, A; Pompa-Mera, E N; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, A; Alvarez-Rodríguez, F J; Bekker-Méndez, V C; Flores-Chapa, J de Diego; Flores-Lujano, J; Jiménez-Hernández, E; Peñaloza-González, J G; Rodríguez-Zepeda, M C; Torres-Nava, J R; Velázquez-Aviña, M M; Amador-Sánchez, R; Alvarado-Ibarra, M; Reyes-Zepeda, N; Espinosa-Elizondo, R M; Pérez-Saldivar, M L; Núñez-Enríquez, J C; Mejía-Aranguré, J M; Fuentes-Pananá, E M

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in childhood worldwide and Mexico has reported one of the highest incidence rates. An infectious etiology has been suggested and supported by epidemiological evidences; however, the identity of the involved agent(s) is not known. We considered that early transmitted lymphotropic herpes viruses were good candidates, since transforming mechanisms have been described for them and some are already associated with human cancers. In this study we interrogated the direct role of EBV, HCMV, HHV6, and HHV7 human herpes viruses in childhood ALL. Viral genomes were screened in 70 bone marrow samples from ALL patients through standard and a more sensitive nested PCR. Positive samples were detected only by nested PCR indicating a low level of infection. Our result argues that viral genomes were not present in all leukemic cells, and, hence, infection most likely was not part of the initial genetic lesions leading to ALL. The high statistical power of the study suggested that these agents are not involved in the genesis of ALL in Mexican children. Additional analysis showed that detected infections or coinfections were not associated with prognosis.

  9. EBV, HCMV, HHV6, and HHV7 Screening in Bone Marrow Samples from Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Sánchez, A.; Pompa-Mera, E. N.; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, A.; Alvarez-Rodríguez, F. J.; Bekker-Méndez, V. C.; Flores-Chapa, J. de Diego; Flores-Lujano, J.; Jiménez-Hernández, E.; Peñaloza-González, J. G.; Rodríguez-Zepeda, M. C.; Torres-Nava, J. R.; Velázquez-Aviña, M. M.; Amador-Sánchez, R.; Alvarado-Ibarra, M.; Reyes-Zepeda, N.; Espinosa-Elizondo, R. M.; Pérez-Saldivar, M. L.; Núñez-Enríquez, J. C.; Mejía-Aranguré, J. M.; Fuentes-Pananá, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in childhood worldwide and Mexico has reported one of the highest incidence rates. An infectious etiology has been suggested and supported by epidemiological evidences; however, the identity of the involved agent(s) is not known. We considered that early transmitted lymphotropic herpes viruses were good candidates, since transforming mechanisms have been described for them and some are already associated with human cancers. In this study we interrogated the direct role of EBV, HCMV, HHV6, and HHV7 human herpes viruses in childhood ALL. Viral genomes were screened in 70 bone marrow samples from ALL patients through standard and a more sensitive nested PCR. Positive samples were detected only by nested PCR indicating a low level of infection. Our result argues that viral genomes were not present in all leukemic cells, and, hence, infection most likely was not part of the initial genetic lesions leading to ALL. The high statistical power of the study suggested that these agents are not involved in the genesis of ALL in Mexican children. Additional analysis showed that detected infections or coinfections were not associated with prognosis. PMID:25309913

  10. Efficacy and safety of valganciclovir in liver-transplanted children infected with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Hierro, Loreto; Díez-Dorado, Ruth; Díaz, Carmen; De la Vega, Angela; Frauca, Esteban; Camarena, Carmen; Muñoz-Bartolo, Gema; González de Zárate, Ana; López Santamaría, Manuel; Jara, Paloma

    2008-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection after liver transplantation (LT) is associated with increased risk of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Lowering immunosuppression is the current method to prevent PTLD in LT children with a high viral load. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of valganciclovir (VGCV) in children with EBV infection after LT. Forty-seven children showing detectable EBV-DNA (72% asymptomatic) were treated with VGCV (520 mg/sqm twice daily) with no immunosuppression decrease (except in 4 cases). VGCV treatment started 17 months (median) after the onset of EBV infection. A 30-day treatment applied to 26 patients led to undetectable EBV-DNA in 11/32 courses (34.3%), with 82% relapsing. A long VGCV treatment (median: 8 months) achieved undetectable EBV-DNA in 20/42 (47.6%), 60% of whom maintained response off therapy. There were no new PTLD cases. Symptoms worsened in 1 (2.1%) in whom PTLD was suspected but not confirmed in liver and jejunum biopsies. Factors associated with achievement of undetectable EBV-DNA were a longer time from LT and a lower rate of intervening infections in comparison with nonresponders. The safety profile for VGCV was excellent. Graft rejection occurred in 6%. In conclusion, in 47 LT children with a sustained increased EBV load treated with VGCV and unchanged immunosuppression, PTLD was suspected in 1 child (2.1%). A viral load decrease could be achieved as EBV-DNA was undetectable in 47% of patients under prolonged treatment.

  11. Recent Advances on the Possible Neuroprotective Activities of Epstein-Barr Virus Oncogene BARF1 Protein in Chronic Inflammatory Disorders of Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, Alicia; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Khanna, Rajiv; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases in which cells of the central nervous system (CNS) are lost or damaged are rapidly increasing in frequency, and there is neither effective treatment nor cure to impede or arrest their destructive course. The Epstein-Barr virus is a human gamma-herpesvirus that infects more than 90% of the human population worldwide and persisting for the lifetime of the host. It is associated with numerous epithelial cancers, principally undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric carcinoma. Individuals with a history of symptomatic primary EBV infection, called infectious mononucleosis, carry a moderately higher risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). It is not known how EBV infection potentially promotes autoimmunity and central nervous system (CNS) tissue damage in MS. Recently it has been found that EBV isolates from different geographic regions have highly conserved BARF1 epitopes. BARF1 protein has the neuroprotective and mitogenic activity, thus may be useful to combat and overcome neurodegenerative disease. BARF1 protein therapy can potentially be used to enhance the neuroprotective activities by combinational treatment with anti-inflammatory antagonists and neuroprotectors in neural disorders. PMID:21358976

  12. Ataxia and Encephalitis in a Young Adult with EBV Mononucleosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Rashid S.; Hussain, Naaz A.

    2013-01-01

    Neurological manifestations of mononucleosis are extremely rare, occurring in about 1% of all cases. However, when they occur, appropriate treatment must be undertaken to ensure appropriate symptomatic management and reduce morbidity. We present the case of a 25-year-old graduate student with weeklong complaints of fever, sore throat, fatigue, nausea, and “dizziness.” She later developed increased sleep requirements, ataxia, vertigo, and nystagmus with a positive EBV IgM titer confirming acute infectious mononucleosis. The patient was clinically diagnosed with EBV-associated cerebellitis and encephalitis, displaying neurological and psychiatric impairment commonly seen in postconcussion syndrome. MRI showed no acute changes. She was started on valacyclovir and a prednisone taper, recovering by the end of twelve weeks. Though corticosteroids and acyclovir are not recommended therapy in patients presenting with EBV-associated ataxia, clinicians may want to keep a low threshold to start these medications in case more serious neurological sequelae develop. PMID:23781357

  13. Role of mTOR inhibitors for the control of viral infection in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio; Royuela, Ana; Fernández, Ana M; Herrero, Ignacio; Delgado, Juan F; Solé, Amparo; Guirado, Lluis; Serrano, Trinidad; de la Torre-Cisneros, Julián; Moreno, Asunción; Cordero, Elisa; Gallego, Roberto; Lumbreras, Carlos; Aguado, José M

    2016-12-01

    Appropriate post-transplant immunosuppressive regimens that avoid acute rejection, while reducing risk of viral reactivation, have been sought, but remain a chimera. Recent evidence suggesting potential regulatory and antiviral effects of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) is of great interest. Although the concept of an immunosuppressive drug with antiviral properties is not new, little effort has been made to put the evidence together to assess the management of immunosuppressive therapy in the presence of a viral infection. This review was developed to gather the evidence on antiviral activity of the mTORi against the viruses that most commonly reactivate in adult solid organ recipients: cytomegalovirus (CMV), polyomavirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8), and hepatitis C virus (HCV). A rapid review methodology and evaluation of quality and consistency of evidence based on the GRADE system was used. The existing literature was variable in nature, although indicating a potential advantage of mTORi in CMV, polyomavirus, and HHV8 infection, and a most doubtful relation with EBV and HCV infection. Several recommendations about the management of these infections are presented that can change certain current patterns of immunosuppression and help to improve the prognosis of the direct and indirect effects of viral infection in solid organ recipients.

  14. Glycolytic control of vacuolar-type ATPase activity: A mechanism to regulate influenza viral infection

    SciTech Connect

    Kohio, Hinissan P.; Adamson, Amy L.

    2013-09-15

    As new influenza virus strains emerge, finding new mechanisms to control infection is imperative. In this study, we found that we could control influenza infection of mammalian cells by altering the level of glucose given to cells. Higher glucose concentrations induced a dose-specific increase in influenza infection. Linking influenza virus infection with glycolysis, we found that viral replication was significantly reduced after cells were treated with glycolytic inhibitors. Addition of extracellular ATP after glycolytic inhibition restored influenza infection. We also determined that higher levels of glucose promoted the assembly of the vacuolar-type ATPase within cells, and increased vacuolar-type ATPase proton-transport activity. The increase of viral infection via high glucose levels could be reversed by inhibition of the proton pump, linking glucose metabolism, vacuolar-type ATPase activity, and influenza viral infection. Taken together, we propose that altering glucose metabolism may be a potential new approach to inhibit influenza viral infection. - Highlights: • Increased glucose levels increase Influenza A viral infection of MDCK cells. • Inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase inhibited Influenza A viral infection. • Inhibition of hexokinase induced disassembly the V-ATPase. • Disassembly of the V-ATPase and Influenza A infection was bypassed with ATP. • The state of V-ATPase assembly correlated with Influenza A infection of cells.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus BamHI W repeat number limits EBNA2/EBNA-LP coexpression in newly infected B cells and the efficiency of B-cell transformation: a rationale for the multiple W repeats in wild-type virus strains.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Rosemary J; Kao, Kuan-Yu; Nagra, Jasdeep K; Rickinson, Alan B

    2011-12-01

    The genome of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a gammaherpesvirus with potent B-cell growth-transforming ability, contains multiple copies of a 3-kb BamHI W repeat sequence; each repeat carries (i) a promoter (Wp) that initiates transformation by driving EBNA-LP and EBNA2 expression and (ii) the W1W2 exons encoding the functionally active repeat domain of EBNA-LP. The W repeat copy number of a virus therefore influences two potential determinants of its transforming ability: the number of available Wp copies and the maximum size of the encoded EBNA-LP. Here, using recombinant EBVs, we show that optimal B-cell transformation requires a minimum of 5 W repeats (5W); the levels of transforming ability fall progressively with viruses carrying 4, 3, and 2 W repeats, as do the levels of Wp-initiated transcripts expressed early postinfection (p.i.), while viruses with 1 copy of the wild-type W repeat (1W) and 0W are completely nontransforming. We therefore suggest that genetic analyses of EBV transforming function should ensure that wild-type and mutant strains have equal numbers (ideally at least 5) of W copies if the analysis is not to be compromised. Attempts to enhance the transforming function of low-W-copy-number viruses, via the activity of helper EBV strains or by gene repair, suggested that the critical defect is not related to EBNA-LP size but to the failure to achieve sufficiently strong coexpression of EBNA-LP and EBNA2 early postinfection. We further show by the results of ex vivo assays that EBV strains in the blood of infected individuals typically have a mean of 5 to 8 W copies, consistent with the view that evolution has selected for viruses with an optimal transforming function.

  16. Host shutoff is a conserved phenotype of gammaherpesvirus infection and is orchestrated exclusively from the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Sergio; Richner, Justin M; Clyde, Karen; Lee, Yeon J; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2009-09-01

    Lytic infection with the two human gammaherpesviruses, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), leads to significant depletion of the cellular transcriptome. This host shutoff phenotype is driven by the conserved herpesviral alkaline exonuclease, termed SOX in KSHV and BGLF5 in EBV, which in gammaherpesviruses has evolved the genetically separable ability to target cellular mRNA. We now show that host shutoff is also a prominent consequence of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection, which is widely used as a model system to study pathogenesis of these viruses in vivo. The effector of MHV68-induced host shutoff is its SOX homolog, here termed muSOX. There is remarkable functional conservation of muSOX host shutoff activities with those of KSHV SOX, including the recently described ability of SOX to induce mRNA hyperadenylation in the nucleus as well as cause nuclear relocalization of the poly(A) binding protein. SOX and muSOX localize to both the nucleus and cytoplasm of infected cells. Using spatially restricted variants of these proteins, we go on to demonstrate that all known host shutoff-related activities of SOX and muSOX are orchestrated exclusively from the cytoplasm. These results have important mechanistic implications for how SOX and muSOX target nascent cellular transcripts in the nucleus. Furthermore, our findings establish MHV68 as a new, genetically tractable model to study host shutoff.

  17. Activation and Exhaustion of Adaptive Immune Cells in Hepatitis B Infection.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Dimpu; Borkakoty, Biswajyoti; Biswas, Dipankar; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2015-09-01

    In hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, the immune reaction is responsible for viral clearance and preventing their spread within the host. However, the immune system is dysfunctional in patients with chronic HBV infection, leading to an inadequate immune response against the virus. A major factor contributing to inefficient immune function is the phenomenon of immune exhaustion. Hence, understanding immune activation and exhaustion during HBV infection is important, as it would provide insight in developing immunotherapy to control chronic HBV infection. The aim of this review is to highlight the existing information on immune effector functions and immune exhaustion in response to HBV infection.

  18. [Clinical polymorphism in Epstein-Barr virus infection].

    PubMed

    Martínez Aguilar, N E; Guido Bayardo, R; Vargas Camaño, M E; Compañ Gonález, D; Ramírez Ojeda, H

    1997-01-01

    Several diseases was associated with Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection. In the next three cases, the clinical course was unusual . Case I: Polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia, female 47 years old, she had systemic lupus erythematosus and clinical data of infectious mononucleosis but she evolved to a polyclonal gammopathy with IgM predominantly against EBV. Case II: Demyelinating encephalitis, male, 32 years old with central neurological alterations, IgM antibodies against EBV and demyelinating lesion in magnetic resonance image in brain steam. Case III. Villous leukoplakia, male, 40 years old developed right tonsil tumor. He had IgM antibodies against EBV. The antiviral and immunomodulator treatment (specific for each case) done a satisfactory clinical response in the three patients.

  19. Gastritis associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hisamatsu, Akari; Nagai, Takayuki; Okawara, Hitoshi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tasaki, Takako; Nakagawa, Yoshifumi; Hashinaga, Masahiko; Kai, Shunichi; Yokoyama, Shigeo; Murakami, Kazunari; Fujioka, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is a self-limiting clinical syndrome caused by primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. EBV-associated gastritis, however, has rarely been documented. We report a case of a 17-year-old woman who presented with fever, sore throat, and epigastric pain. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse granular mucosae and elevated lesions in the stomach. Histologically, the biopsied mucosa was infiltrated by numerous atypical lymphocytes. From clinical, histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and in situ hybridization analyses, we diagnosed EBV-associated gastritis. Her symptoms spontaneously resolved, and follow-up endoscopy revealed improvement and no atypical lymphocytes. To prevent misdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment, the possibility of EBV-associated gastritis should be considered.

  20. Age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders: diagnostic approach to a newly recognized clinicopathological entity.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Yoshie; Asano, Naoko; Kojima, Masaru; Morishima, Satoko; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Oyama, Takashi; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2009-12-01

    EBV is prevalent among healthy individuals, and is implicated in numerous reactive and neoplastic processes in the immune system. The authors originally identified a series of senile or age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) bearing a resemblance to immunodeficiency-associated ones, which may be associated with immune senescence in the elderly and which are now incorporated into the 2008 World Health Organization lymphoma classification as EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly. This newly described disease is pathologically characterized by a proliferation of atypical large B cells including Reed-Sternberg-like cells with reactive components, which pose a diagnostic problem for pathologists. Clinically, this disease may present with lymphadenopathy, and is often extranodal, frequently involving the skin, gastrointestinal tract, or lung. Onset is usually after the age of 50; the median patient age is 70-79 years, and incidence continues to increase with age, providing additional support to the nosological term of EBV+ DLBCL of the elderly. These patients have a worse prognosis than those with EBV-negative DLBCL or EBV+ classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL). The aim of the present review was to summarize the clinicopathological profile of age-related EBV+ LPD and EBV+ Hodgkin lymphoma to facilitate diagnostic approach.

  1. Performance of the Real-Q EBV Quantification Kit for Epstein-Barr Virus DNA Quantification in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Hee Jae; Park, Jong Eun; Kim, Ji-Youn; Yun, Sun Ae; Lee, Myoung-Keun; Lee, Nam Yong; Kim, Jong-Won

    2017-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in standardized and quantitative Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA testing for the management of EBV disease. We evaluated the performance of the Real-Q EBV Quantification Kit (BioSewoom, Korea) in whole blood (WB). Nucleic acid extraction and real-time PCR were performed by using the MagNA Pure 96 (Roche Diagnostics, Germany) and 7500 Fast real-time PCR system (Applied Biosystems, USA), respectively. Assay sensitivity, linearity, and conversion factor were determined by using the World Health Organization international standard diluted in EBV-negative WB. We used 81 WB clinical specimens to compare performance of the Real-Q EBV Quantification Kit and artus EBV RG PCR Kit (Qiagen, Germany). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) for the Real-Q kit were 453 and 750 IU/mL, respectively. The conversion factor from EBV genomic copies to IU was 0.62. The linear range of the assay was from 750 to 106 IU/mL. Viral load values measured with the Real-Q assay were on average 0.54 log10 copies/mL higher than those measured with the artus assay. The Real-Q assay offered good analytical performance for EBV DNA quantification in WB. PMID:28029001

  2. Performance of the Real-Q EBV Quantification Kit for Epstein-Barr Virus DNA Quantification in Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Huh, Hee Jae; Park, Jong Eun; Kim, Ji Youn; Yun, Sun Ae; Lee, Myoung Keun; Lee, Nam Yong; Kim, Jong Won; Ki, Chang Seok

    2017-03-01

    There has been increasing interest in standardized and quantitative Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA testing for the management of EBV disease. We evaluated the performance of the Real-Q EBV Quantification Kit (BioSewoom, Korea) in whole blood (WB). Nucleic acid extraction and real-time PCR were performed by using the MagNA Pure 96 (Roche Diagnostics, Germany) and 7500 Fast real-time PCR system (Applied Biosystems, USA), respectively. Assay sensitivity, linearity, and conversion factor were determined by using the World Health Organization international standard diluted in EBV-negative WB. We used 81 WB clinical specimens to compare performance of the Real-Q EBV Quantification Kit and artus EBV RG PCR Kit (Qiagen, Germany). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) for the Real-Q kit were 453 and 750 IU/mL, respectively. The conversion factor from EBV genomic copies to IU was 0.62. The linear range of the assay was from 750 to 10⁶ IU/mL. Viral load values measured with the Real-Q assay were on average 0.54 log₁₀ copies/mL higher than those measured with the artus assay. The Real-Q assay offered good analytical performance for EBV DNA quantification in WB.

  3. Sequence analysis of EBV immune evasion gene BNLF2a in EBV associated tumors and healthy individuals from nasopharyngeal carcinoma endemic and non-endemic regions of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Wang, Xiaofeng; Shu, Jun; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Sun, Zhifu; Luo, Bing

    2015-11-01

    BNLF2a is an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immune evasion gene. Its protein is located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, and can inhibit the antigen transporting function of TAP, thereby perturbing the immune response to EBV in lytic and prelatent phase. In order to explore whether the polymorphism of BNLF2a gene has a role in different types of EBV associated tumors, we conducted complete sequencing of the gene BNLF2a in 408 cases of EBV positive tumors (76 lymphomas, 45 gastric carcinomas, and 85 nasopharyngeal carcinomas in northern China and 27 lymphomas, 30 gastric carcinomas, and 57 nasopharyngeal carcinomas in southern China) and throat washings from healthy individuals (39 in northern China and 49 in southern China). Two main variant types of BNLF2a were identified. Type BNLF2a-A, which was similar to B95-8, was dominant in all sub-populations (66.7-100%) in this study. Type BNLF2a-B was characterized by the mutations at position 8 and 40. The variation patterns of BNLF2a were significantly different between samples from northern and southern China (P < 0.05), and between the tumors and healthy donor samples from the northern China (P < 0.0167). Type BNLF2a-B was more frequent in healthy donors of northern China (33.3%), and the proportion of this type was higher in the northern than in the southern NPCs. These data demonstrate that the BNLF2a gene is highly conserved, and its polymorphism is geographically restricted. Type BNLF2a-B is more prevalent in northern China and may be less tumor transformative.

  4. Difference Between Latent TB Infection and Active TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... person with infectious TB coughs or sneezes, droplet nuclei containing M. tuberculosis are expelled into the air. If another person inhales air containing these droplet nuclei, he or she may become infected. However, not ...

  5. Expression of B7 (CD80) and CD40 antigens and the CD40 ligand in Hodgkin's disease is independent of latent Epstein—Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Murray, P G; Oates, J; Reynolds, G M; Crocker, J; Young, L S

    1995-01-01

    Aim—To examine the expression of CD40 and B7 (CD80) antigens and the CD40 ligand in Hodgkin's disease. Methods—Antigen and ligand expression was studied in 17 cases of Hodgkin's disease using immunohistochemistry. The study included 11 cases of Hodgkin's disease in which latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection could be demonstrated within tumour cells by in situ hybridisation for the EBV encoded early RNAs (EBERs). Results—In all cases, irrespective of EBV status, Reed-Sternberg cells and their variants (HRS cells) showed strong expression of both B7 and CD40 antigens. CD40 ligand expression was not shown in HRS cells but was confined to a subset of small lymphocytes some of which were seen to be in intimate contact with HRS cells. Paraffin wax sections from a further 60 cases of Hodgkin's disease were examined for CD40 and EBER expression alone. The CD40 antigen was identified in HRS cells in all of these cases irrespective of EBER expression. Conclusions—As CD40 and B7 expression are features of professional antigen presenting cells, these results provide further evidence that HRS cells may have antigen presenting properties and that this may contribute to the characteristic recruitment and activation of non-malignant lymphocytes which is a feature of Hodgkin's disease. The ability of HRS cells to activate Th cells may in turn contribute to their own survival through the induction of the gp39/CD40 pathway. Images PMID:16695980

  6. West Nile virus infection does not induce PKR activation in rodent cells.

    PubMed

    Elbahesh, H; Scherbik, S V; Brinton, M A

    2011-12-05

    dsRNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) is activated by viral dsRNAs and phosphorylates eIF2a reducing translation of host and viral mRNA. Although infection with a chimeric West Nile virus (WNV) efficiently induced PKR and eIF2a phosphorylation, infections with natural lineage 1 or 2 strains did not. Investigation of the mechanism of suppression showed that among the cellular PKR inhibitor proteins tested, only Nck, known to interact with inactive PKR, colocalized and co-immunoprecipitated with PKR in WNV-infected cells and PKR phosphorylation did not increase in infected Nck1,2-/- cells. Several WNV stem-loop RNAs efficiently activated PKR in vitro but not in infected cells. WNV infection did not interfere with intracellular PKR activation by poly(I:C) and similar virus yields were produced by control and PKR-/- cells. The results indicate that PKR phosphorylation is not actively suppressed in WNV-infected cells but that PKR is not activated by the viral dsRNA in infected cells.

  7. Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... 23(4):251-69. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) guideline. Back to Top Administration ... : Hospital Scope | Glossary | References | Site Map | Credits Freedom of ...

  8. Intrathymic Epstein-Barr virus infection is not a prominent feature of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Kakalacheva, Kristina; Maurer, Michael A; Tackenberg, Björn; Münz, Christian; Willcox, Nick; Lünemann, Jan D

    2011-09-01

    Lymph node-type T- and B-cell infiltrates with germinal centers are characteristic features of the hyperplastic thymus in early onset myasthenia gravis (EOMG).Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection confers survival advantages on B cells, and has recently been implicated in tertiary lymphoid tissue formation in EOMG. We evaluated the frequency of intrathymic EBV-infected B-lineage cells and antiviral immune responses in treatment-naive patients with EOMG. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to quantify the content of genomic EBV DNA (BamHI-W repeat region) in thymic cell suspensions. Serial paraffin sections of EOMG thymi were analyzed for the presence of EBV-encoded RNA by in situ hybridization and for viral gene expression by immunohistochemistry. Humoral and cellular immune responses to viral antigens were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and flow cytometry-based intracellular cytokine staining. We detected minimal levels of viral DNA-corresponding to single viral genomes-in only 6 of 16 hyperplastic EOMG thymi, indicating extreme rarity of viral copy numbers in the investigated thymic samples. That was confirmed by similar rarity of EBV-encoded RNA and viral proteins identified in thymic sections. Furthermore, EBV-specific T- and B-cell responses were unchanged in patients with EOMG. These findings do not support an etiologic role for EBV in the initiation of EOMG.

  9. A microRNA signature profile in EBV+ diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Tathiana Azevedo; Evangelista, Adriane Feijo; Campos, Antonio Hugo Froes; Poles, Wagner Augusto; Borges, Natalia Morais; Camillo, Claudia Malheiros Coutinho; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Vassallo, Jose; Paes, Roberto Pinto; Zerbini, Maria Claudia; Scapulatempo, Cristovam; Alves, Antonio Correa

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no characteristic microRNA (miRNA) expression pattern in Epstein-Barr virus+ diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly (EBV+DLBCLe). This study aims to characterize a signature profile and identify miRNAs that can be used as biomarkers and alternative therapeutic targets for EBV+DLBCLe. Seventy-one DLBCL patients aged 50 years and older were included and four EBV+ and four EBV– samples were analyzed in two miRNA array platforms (pilot study). A larger multicenter cohort (29 EBV+DLBCLe and 65 EBV–DLBCL patients) was used to validate the results by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the pilot study, 9% of DLBCL were EBV+DLBCLe by in situ hybridization. In multicenter study, EBV+DLBCLe group showed a predominance of non-germinal center B-cell origin. Overall survival duration of EBV+DLBCLe was significantly inferior to that of EBV–DLBCL patients. We found 10 deregulated miRNAs in the two groups, but only seven were statistically different. We confirmed overexpression of hsa-miR-126, hsa-miR-146a, hsa-miR-146b, hsa-miR-150, and hsa-miR-222 and underexpression of hsa-miR-151 in EBV+DLBCLe cases compared to EBV–DLBCL cases. Hsa-miR-146b and hsa-miR-222 showed high specificity for identifying EBV+DLBCLe. The present study proposed a miRNA signature for EBV+DLBCLe and our findings suggest that hsa-miR-146b and hsa-miR-222 could be biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:25544772

  10. Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis: A Rare Presentation of Primary Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Adults—Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Karadeniz, Asli; Kaya, Fatih Oner

    2017-01-01

    Primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is almost always a self-limited disease characterized by sore throat, fever, and lymphadenopathy. Hepatic involvement is usually characterized by mild elevations of aminotransferases and resolves spontaneously. Although isolated gallbladder wall thickness has been reported in these patients, acute acalculous cholecystitis is an atypical presentation of primary EBV infection. We presented a young women admitted with a 10-day history of fever, nausea, malaise who had jaundice and right upper quadrant tenderness on the physical examination. Based on diagnostic laboratory tests and abdominal ultrasonographic findings, cholestasis and acute acalculous cholecystitis were diagnosed. Serology performed for EBV revealed the acute EBV infection. Symptoms and clinical course gradually improved with the conservative therapy, and at the 1-month follow-up laboratory findings were normal. We reviewed 16 adult cases with EBV-associated AAC in the literature. Classic symptoms of EBV infection were not predominant and all cases experienced gastrointestinal symptoms. Only one patient underwent surgery and all other patients recovered with conservative therapy. The development of AAC should be kept in mind in patients with cholestatic hepatitis due to EBV infection to avoid unnecessary surgical therapy and overuse of antibiotics. PMID:28194287

  11. E-ADA activity in serum of lambs experimentally infected with Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Fausto, Guilherme C; Grando, Thirssa H; Cadore, Carlos A; Pimentel, Victor C; Jaques, Jeandre A; Schetinger, Maria R C; Monteiro, Silvia G; Leal, Marta L R

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate adenosine deaminase (E-ADA) activity in sera of lambs experimentally infected with Haemonchus contortus. We used 12 lambs divided into 2 groups; Group A had 5 healthy, non-infected animals (control) and Group B had 7 healthy animals infected with H. contortus . Lambs were infected orally with 500 larvae (L3) per animal every 2 days, for a period of 20 days, and later the infection was confirmed by examination of feces (eggs per gram [EPG] via fecal egg count). Blood collection was performed at days 0, 20, 40, 60, and 80 post-infection (PI) for analysis of E-ADA activity. Animals in Group A showed negative EPG throughout the experiment unlike those from Group B that had elevated EPG counts. E-ADA activity was reduced in the serum of animals infected with H. contortus when compared to non-infected controls at days 20, 40, 60, and 80 PI. Therefore, it is concluded that infection with H. contortus influences the E-ADA activity in lambs.

  12. Gastric carcinoma: monoclonal epithelial malignant cells expressing Epstein-Barr virus latent infection protein.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, S; Koizumi, S; Sugiura, M; Tokunaga, M; Uemura, Y; Yamamoto, N; Tanaka, S; Sato, E; Osato, T

    1994-01-01

    In 1000 primary gastric carcinomas, 70 (7.0%) contained Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomic sequences detected by PCR and Southern blots. The positive tumors comprised 8 of 9 (89%) undifferentiated lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas, 27 of 476 (5.7%) poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, and 35 of 515 (6.8%) moderately to well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. In situ EBV-encoded small RNA 1 hybridization and hematoxylin/eosin staining in adjacent sections showed that the EBV was present in every carcinoma cell but was not significantly present in lymphoid stroma and in normal mucosa. Two-color immunofluorescence and hematoxylin/eosin staining in parallel sections revealed that every keratin-positive epithelial malignant cell expressed EBV-determined nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) but did not significantly express CD45+ infiltrating leukocytes. A single fused terminal fragment was detected in each of the EBNA1-expressing tumors, thereby suggesting that the EBV-carrying gastric carcinomas represent clonal proliferation of cells infected with EBV. The carcinoma cells had exclusively EBNA1 but not EBNA2, -3A, -3B, and -3C; leader protein; and latent membrane protein 1 because of methylation. The patients with EBV-carrying gastric carcinoma had elevated serum EBV-specific antibodies. The EBV-specific cellular immunity was not significantly reduced; however, the cytotoxic T-cell target antigens were not expressed. These findings strongly suggest a causal relation between a significant proportion of gastric carcinoma and EBV, and the virus-carrying carcinoma cells may evade immune surveillance. Images PMID:8090780

  13. Effects of immunomodulators on functional activity of innate immunity cells infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Plekhova, N G; Kondrashova, N M; Somova, L M; Drobot, E I; Lyapun, I N

    2015-02-01

    Low activity of bactericidal enzymes was found in innate immunity cells infected with S. pneumonia. The death of these cells was fastened under these conditions. On the contrary, treatment with antibiotic maxifloxacin was followed by an increase in activity of bactericidal enzymes in phagocytes and induced their death via necrosis. Analysis of the therapeutic properties of immunomodulators tinrostim and licopid in combination with maxifloxacin showed that these combinations correct functional activity of cells infected with S. pneumonia.

  14. Salamanders increase their feeding activity when infected with the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Hess, Alexandra; McAllister, Caroline; DeMarchi, Joseph; Zidek, Makenzie; Murone, Julie; Venesky, Matthew D

    2015-10-27

    Immune function is a costly line of defense against parasitism. When infected with a parasite, hosts frequently lose mass due to these costs. However, some infected hosts (e.g. highly resistant individuals) can clear infections with seemingly little fitness losses, but few studies have tested how resistant hosts mitigate these costly immune defenses. We explored this topic using eastern red-backed salamanders Plethodon cinereus and the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Bd is generally lethal for amphibians, and stereotypical symptoms of infection include loss in mass and deficits in feeding. However, individuals of P. cinereus can clear their Bd infections with seemingly few fitness costs. We conducted an experiment in which we repeatedly observed the feeding activity of Bd-infected and non-infected salamanders. We found that Bd-infected salamanders generally increased their feeding activity compared to non-infected salamanders. The fact that we did not observe any differences in mass change between the treatments suggests that increased feeding might help Bd-infected salamanders minimize the costs of an effective immune response.

  15. Glucocorticoids activate Epstein Barr Virus lytic replication through the upregulation of immediate early BZLF1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eric V.; Webster Marketon, Jeanette I.; Chen, Min; Lo, Kwok Wai; Kim, Seung-jae; Glaser, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Psychological stress-associated immune dysregulation has been shown to disrupt the steady state expression and reactivate latent herpes viruses. One such virus is the Epstein Barr virus (EBV), which is associated with several human malignancies. EBV infects >90% of people living in North America and persists for life in latently infected cells. Although several studies have shown that glucocorticoids (GCs) can directly induce reactivation of the latent virus, the mechanism of stress hormone involvement in the control of EBV gene expression is not well understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that GCs can induce the latent EBV genome to lytically replicate through the induction of the EBV immediate early gene BZLF1 which encodes the lytic transactivator protein ZEBRA. We show a dose-dependent upregulation of BZLF1 mRNA expression by hydrocortisone (HC) and dexamethasone (Dex) in Daudi cells, an EBV genome positive Burkitt’s lymphoma cell line, and Dex-induction of the early gene products BLLF3 (encoding for the EBV dUTPase) and BALF5 (encoding for the EBV DNA polymerase). We show that Daudi cells express glucocorticoid receptors (GR) that mediate Dex-dependent upregulation of BZLF1 mRNA levels. This effect was inhibited by both the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486 and by cycloheximide. The results suggest that GCs, in addition to inducing stress-related immune dysregulation, can mediate latent EBV reactivation through the induction of the BZLF1 gene. PMID:20466055

  16. Tetherin/BST-2 promotes dendritic cell activation and function during acute retrovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sam X.; Barrett, Bradley S.; Guo, Kejun; Kassiotis, George; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Gibbert, Kathrin; Santiago, Mario L.

    2016-01-01

    Tetherin/BST-2 is a host restriction factor that inhibits retrovirus release from infected cells in vitro by tethering nascent virions to the plasma membrane. However, contradictory data exists on whether Tetherin inhibits acute retrovirus infection in vivo. Previously, we reported that Tetherin-mediated inhibition of Friend retrovirus (FV) replication at 2 weeks post-infection correlated with stronger natural killer, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. Here, we further investigated the role of Tetherin in counteracting retrovirus replication in vivo. FV infection levels were similar between wild-type (WT) and Tetherin KO mice at 3 to 7 days post-infection despite removal of a potent restriction factor, Apobec3/Rfv3. However, during this phase of acute infection, Tetherin enhanced myeloid dendritic cell (DC) function. DCs from infected, but not uninfected, WT mice expressed significantly higher MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecule CD80 compared to Tetherin KO DCs. Tetherin-associated DC activation during acute FV infection correlated with stronger NK cell responses. Furthermore, Tetherin+ DCs from FV-infected mice more strongly stimulated FV-specific CD4+ T cells ex vivo compared to Tetherin KO DCs. The results link the antiretroviral and immunomodulatory activity of Tetherin in vivo to improved DC activation and MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:26846717

  17. HGF Secreted by Activated Kupffer Cells Induces Apoptosis of Plasmodium-Infected Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Lígia Antunes; Rodo, Joana; Rodrigues-Duarte, Lurdes; de Moraes, Luciana Vieira; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Malaria liver stage infection is an obligatory parasite development step and represents a population bottleneck in Plasmodium infections, providing an advantageous target for blocking parasite cycle progression. Parasite development inside hepatocytes implies a gross cellular insult evoking innate host responses to counteract intra-hepatocytic infection. Using primary hepatocyte cultures, we investigated the role of Kupffer cell-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in malaria liver stage infection. We found that Kupffer cells from Plasmodium-infected livers produced high levels of HGF, which trigger apoptosis of infected hepatocytes through a mitochondrial-independent apoptosis pathway. HGF action in infected hepatocyte primary cultures results in a potent reduction of parasite yield by specifically sensitizing hepatocytes carrying established parasite exo-erythrocytic forms to undergo apoptosis. This apoptosis mechanism is distinct from cell death that is spontaneously induced in infected cultures and is governed by Fas signaling modulation through a mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway. This work indicates that HGF and Fas signaling pathways are part of an orchestrated host apoptosis response that occurs during malaria liver stage infection, decreasing the success of infection of individual hepatocytes. Our results raise the hypothesis that paracrine signals derived from Kupffer cell activation are implicated in directing death of hepatocytes infected with the malaria parasite. PMID:28220125

  18. In situ localization of ATPase activity in cells of plants infected by maize dwarf mosaic potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Das, P; Hari, V

    1994-01-01

    Cells of healthy maize plants as well as those infected by maize dwarf mosaic potyvirus were examined by electron microscopy for the location of ATPase activity. In healthy and virus infected plants, ATPase activity was found in plasma membranes, chloroplast thylakoid membranes, nuclear membranes and in mitochondria. In virus-infected cells, ATPase activity was also observed in cytoplasmic vesicles which were found in close proximity to the virus-specific cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (CI), at the ends of the arms of the CI and in plasmodesmata.

  19. Activation of Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 Is a General Phenomenon in Infections with Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Werth, Nadine; Beerlage, Christiane; Rosenberger, Christian; Yazdi, Amir S.; Edelmann, Markus; Amr, Amro; Bernhardt, Wanja; von Eiff, Christof; Becker, Karsten; Schäfer, Andrea; Peschel, Andreas; Kempf, Volkhard A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1 is the key transcriptional factor involved in the adaptation process of cells and organisms to hypoxia. Recent findings suggest that HIF-1 plays also a crucial role in inflammatory and infectious diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings Using patient skin biopsies, cell culture and murine infection models, HIF-1 activation was determined by immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and reporter gene assays and was linked to cellular oxygen consumption. The course of a S. aureus peritonitis was determined upon pharmacological HIF-1 inhibition. Activation of HIF-1 was detectable (i) in all ex vivo in biopsies of patients suffering from skin infections, (ii) in vitro using cell culture infection models and (iii) in vivo using murine intravenous and peritoneal S. aureus infection models. HIF-1 activation by human pathogens was induced by oxygen-dependent mechanisms. Small colony variants (SCVs) of S. aureus known to cause chronic infections did not result in cellular hypoxia nor in HIF-1 activation. Pharmaceutical inhibition of HIF-1 activation resulted in increased survival rates of mice suffering from a S. aureus peritonitis. Conclusions/Significance Activation of HIF-1 is a general phenomenon in infections with human pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa. HIF-1-regulated pathways might be an attractive target to modulate the course of life-threatening infections. PMID:20644645

  20. Circulating B-lymphocytes as potential biomarkers of tuberculosis infection activity.

    PubMed

    Sebina, Ismail; Biraro, Irene A; Dockrell, Hazel M; Elliott, Alison M; Cose, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Accurate biomarkers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection activity would significantly improve early diagnosis, treatment and management of M. tuberculosis infection. We hypothesised that circulating B-lymphocytes may be useful biomarkers of tuberculosis (TB) infection status in highly TB-endemic settings. Ex-vivo and in-vitro mycobacteria-specific B-cell ELISPOT assays were used to examine the plasmablast (PB) and memory B-cell (MBC) responses in the peripheral blood of adult, healthy, community controls (n = 151) and of active TB patients (n = 48) living in Uganda. Frequencies of mycobacteria-specific PBs were markedly higher in active TB patients compared to healthy controls, and, conversely, MBCs were markedly higher in the healthy controls compared to active TB patients. In addition, the community controls with evidence of latent TB infection had higher peripheral blood PB and MBC responses than those without evidence of TB infection. These data demonstrate that peripheral blood B-cell responses are differentially modulated during latent and active M. tuberculosis infection, and suggest that the PB to MBC ratio may be a useful biomarker of TB infection activity.

  1. Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is characterized by B-cell inflammation and EBV-induced protein 2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, Kathryn E.; Norton, James E.; Suh, Lydia; Zhong, Qiu; Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Simon, Patrick; Kern, Robert C.; Conley, David B.; Chandra, Rakesh K.; Tan, Bruce K.; Peters, Anju T.; Grammer, Leslie C.; Harris, Kathleen E.; Carter, Roderick G.; Kato, Atsushi; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the high prevalence and morbidity of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), little is known about the mechanisms that underlie its pathogenesis. Recent studies have suggested that B cells might play an important role in CRS. Objective We sought to thoroughly characterize B lineage cells within sinus tissues of patients with CRS and healthy control subjects and to determine whether levels of EBV-induced protein 2, which is known to play an important role in the development of B-cell responses, were increased in patients with CRS. Methods Cells isolated from sinus tissues of patients with CRS and healthy control subjects were characterized by means of flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Local production of antibodies was measured in tissue extracts, nasal lavage fluid, and sera by using multiplex bead arrays and ELISA. Quantitative RT-PCR, ELISA, and Western blotting were used to assess gene and protein expression from tissue extracts. Results Nasal polyps (NPs) from patients with CRS had increased levels of both B cells and plasma cells compared with uncinate tissue from healthy control subjects (P < .05). NPs also contained significantly increased levels of several antibody isotypes compared with normal uncinate tissue (P < .05), but no differences in circulating antibody levels were found. Interestingly, levels of EBV-induced protein 2 were also increased in NPs (P < .05) and were positively correlated with expression of plasma cell markers (CD138 and B lymphocyte–induced maturation protein) in sinus tissue. Conclusion B cells and plasma cells are enriched in NPs, actively produce antibodies locally, and might contribute to chronic inflammation in patients with CRS. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie this excessive local B-cell response might provide novel insights for the development of improved therapeutic strategies. PMID:23473835

  2. In vivo imaging of alphaherpesvirus infection reveals synchronized activity dependent on axonal sorting of viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Granstedt, Andrea E; Bosse, Jens B; Thiberge, Stephan Y; Enquist, Lynn W

    2013-09-10

    A clinical hallmark of human alphaherpesvirus infections is peripheral pain or itching. Pseudorabies virus (PRV), a broad host range alphaherpesvirus, causes violent pruritus in many different animals, but the mechanism is unknown. Previous in vitro studies have shown that infected, cultured peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibited aberrant electrical activity after PRV infection due to the action of viral membrane fusion proteins, yet it is unclear if such activity occurs in infected PNS ganglia in living animals and if it correlates with disease symptoms. Using two-photon microscopy, we imaged autonomic ganglia in living mice infected with PRV strains expressing GCaMP3, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, and used the changes in calcium flux to monitor the activity of many neurons simultaneously with single-cell resolution. Infection with virulent PRV caused these PNS neurons to fire synchronously and cyclically in highly correlated patterns among infected neurons. This activity persisted even when we severed the presynaptic axons, showing that infection-induced firing is independent of input from presynaptic brainstem neurons. This activity was not observed after infections with an attenuated PRV recombinant used for circuit tracing or with PRV mutants lacking either viral glycoprotein B, required for membrane fusion, or viral membrane protein Us9, required for sorting virions and viral glycoproteins into axons. We propose that the viral fusion proteins produced by virulent PRV infection induce electrical coupling in unmyelinated axons in vivo. This action would then give rise to the synchronous and cyclical activity in the ganglia and contribute to the characteristic peripheral neuropathy.

  3. Genetic variants in EBV reactivation-related genes and the risk and survival of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zheng-Zheng; Tang, Lu-Ying; Lin, Ying; Su, Feng-Xi; Xie, Xiao-Ming; Su, Xue-Fen; Ren, Ze-Fang

    2016-06-01

    Tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) and activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) have been suggested to involve in the reactivation of EBV which has implications in the development and progression of breast cancer. Therefore, the polymorphisms of TSG101 and ATF2 may associate with breast cancer risk and prognosis. A case-control study with 1551 breast cancer cases and 1605 age-matched controls were conducted in Guangzhou, China. We have also successfully followed up 1168 cases until December 31, 2014. The variant allele of TSG101 rs2292179 was associated with a non-significant reduced risk of breast cancer, particularly among women with BMI < 24 (kg/m(2)) (P for interaction <0.05). For ATF2 rs3845744, the variant allele was also associated with a significantly reduced breast cancer risk [odds ratio (OR) (95 % confidence interval (CI)) 0.86 (0.74∼1.00)], and the association occurred among only postmenopausal women [OR (95 % CI) 0.69 (0.54∼0.88)] (P for interaction <0.05). Breast cancer risk was further reduced with the increasing numbers of the variant G alleles of the two polymorphisms (P for trend <0.05). We did not find an overall association of the two loci with breast cancer prognosis, while the hazard ratios of the two loci (AG/GG vs. AA) were significantly higher among postmenopausal women than premenopausal women (P = 0.046, 0.016 for TSG101 rs2292179 and ATF2 rs3845744, respectively). In summary, the variant alleles of TSG101 rs2292179 and ATF2 rs3845744 were associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer, particularly for subjects with BMI <24 (kg/m(2)) and postmenopausal women, respectively. The two SNPs and menopausal status may have a significant interaction on breast cancer progression.

  4. Targeting type I interferon-mediated activation restores immune function in chronic HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Anjie; Rezek, Valerie; Youn, Cindy; Lam, Brianna; Chang, Nelson; Rick, Jonathan; Carrillo, Mayra; Martin, Heather; Kasparian, Saro; Syed, Philip; Rice, Nicholas; Brooks, David G; Kitchen, Scott G

    2017-01-03

    Chronic immune activation, immunosuppression, and T cell exhaustion are hallmarks of HIV infection, yet the mechanisms driving these processes are unclear. Chronic activation can be a driving force in immune exhaustion, and type I interferons (IFN-I) are emerging as critical components underlying ongoing activation in HIV infection. Here, we have tested the effect of blocking IFN-I signaling on T cell responses and virus replication in a murine model of chronic HIV infection. Using HIV-infected humanized mice, we demonstrated that in vivo blockade of IFN-I signaling during chronic HIV infection diminished HIV-driven immune activation, decreased T cell exhaustion marker expression, restored HIV-specific CD8 T cell function, and led to decreased viral replication. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) in combination with IFN-I blockade accelerated viral suppression, further decreased viral loads, and reduced the persistently infected HIV reservoir compared with ART treatment alone. Our data suggest that blocking IFN-I signaling in conjunction with ART treatment can restore immune function and may reduce viral reservoirs during chronic HIV infection, providing validation for IFN-I blockade as a potential therapy for HIV infection.

  5. Syphilis superinfection activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus I in latently infected rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, C. K.; Hughes, M. A.; Hsu, P. L.; Mahoney, S.; Duvic, M.; Sell, S.

    1991-01-01

    Superinfection of latently human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected rabbits with either Treponema pallidum or Shope fibroma virus (SFV) activates HIV expression. In addition, HIV-infected rabbits demonstrate prolonged cutaneous lesions (chancres) after intracutaneous challenge with T. pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis. Rabbits were infected by intravenous inoculation of 3 x 10(7) human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type III (HTLV-III)/B10 (HIV-1)-infected H9 (human) cells. Five weeks after initial infection, integrated HIV-1-specific DNA sequences were detected in the DNA of the peripheral blood lymphocytes of only one of eight rabbits using polymerase chain reactions (PCR); human DNA could not be detected at this time. Furthermore HIV infection could not be demonstrated by either seroconversion or PCR during the next 6 months. All HIV-infected rabbits remained clinically healthy and had normal white blood cell counts. Six months after HIV infection, four HIV-infected and two noninfected controls were superinfected with 10(6) T. pallidum in eight skin sites in the shaved skin of the back, and four infected and two control animals were challenged with an intradermal injection with SFV. After infection with either syphilis or SFV, the DNA from the white blood cells of all eight HIV-infected rabbits contained HIV sequences, and HIV sequences were demonstrated in dermal mononuclear cells of the syphilitic lesions by in situ hybridization. The SFV-induced tumors were rejected normally in the HIV-infected rabbits, but four of the four rabbits challenged with T. pallidum had delayed development of cutaneous lesions and three of four demonstrated larger and more prolonged lesions. White blood counts, mitogen responses, and interleukin-2 production remained within normal limits, and seroconversion for HIV was not detected. Three of four rabbits in a second group, challenged with T. pallidum 4 months after HIV-inoculation, also had delayed healing of syphilitic

  6. Modeling HLA associations with EBV-positive and -negative Hodgkin lymphoma suggests distinct mechanisms in disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul C D; McAulay, Karen A; Montgomery, Dorothy; Lake, Annette; Shield, Lesley; Gallagher, Alice; Little, Ann-Margaret; Shah, Anila; Marsh, Steven G E; Taylor, G Malcolm; Jarrett, Ruth F

    2015-09-01

    HLA genotyping and genome wide association studies provide strong evidence for associations between Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) alleles and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Analysis of these associations is complicated by the extensive linkage disequilibrium within the major histocompatibility region and recent data suggesting that associations with EBV-positive and EBV-negative cHL are largely distinct. To distinguish independent and therefore potentially causal associations from associations confounded by linkage disequilibrium, we applied a variable selection regression modeling procedure to directly typed HLA class I and II genes and selected SNPs from EBV-stratified patient subgroups. In final models, HLA-A*01:01 and B*37:01 were associated with an increased risk of EBV-positive cHL whereas DRB1*15:01 and DPB1*01:01 were associated with decreased risk. Effects were independent of a prior history of infectious mononucleosis. For EBV-negative cHL the class II SNP rs6903608 remained the strongest predictor of disease risk after adjusting for the effects of common HLA alleles. Associations with "all cHL" and differences by case EBV status reflected the subgroup analysis. In conclusion, this study extends previous findings by identifying novel HLA associations with EBV-stratified subgroups of cHL, highlighting those alleles likely to be biologically relevant and strengthening evidence implicating genetic variation associated with the SNP rs6903608.

  7. Behçet's disease diagnosed after acute HIV infection: viral replication activating underlying autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Clay; Kinney, Rebecca; Gilles, Ryan; Blue, Sky

    2015-05-01

    Behçet's disease is an autoimmune systemic vasculitis that can occur after exposure to infectious agents. Behçet's disease also has been associated with HIV infection, including de novo development of this condition during chronic HIV infection and resolution of Behçet's disease symptoms following initiation of antiretroviral therapy. We describe a patient who presented with systemic vasculitis with skin and mucous membrane ulcerations in the setting of acute HIV infection, who was eventually diagnosed with Behçet's disease, demonstrating a possible link between acute HIV infection, immune activation and development of autoimmunity.

  8. Infection,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-16

    inapparent infection. A refeeding program may thus become complicated by the sudden appearance of a life-threatening infectious illness (3). (3) The...Beisel, W. R. 23 Unusually low serum concentrations of inorganic phosphate have been reported in patients with gram-negative sepsis and in Reye’s syndrome ...infection should be corrected by a well-managed program of convalescent-period refeeding . This aspect of nutritional support is too often ignored. On the

  9. Adenosine deaminase activity in serum, erythrocytes and lymphocytes of rats infected with Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Alexandre A; Pimentel, Victor C; da Silva, Aleksandro S; de Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Souza, Viviane C G; Wolkmer, Patrícia; Rezer, João F P; Badke, Manoel R T; Leal, Daniela B R; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Monteiro, Silvia G; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2012-04-01

    Leptospirosis is a systemic disease of humans and domestic animals, mainly dogs, cattle and swine. The course of human leptospirosis varies from mild to severe fatal forms and the most severe form of human leptospirosis is principally caused by Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae (L. icterohaemorrhagiae). The enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays an important role in the production and differentiation of blood cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of ADA in serum, erythrocytes and lymphocytes of rats infected with L. icterohaemorrhagiae, as compared with non-infected rats. Twenty-four adult rats, divided into two uniform groups (A and B) were used for the enzymatic assays. The animals in Group B were inoculated intraperitoneally with 2×10(8) leptospires/rat, and the rodents in Group A (control) were not-inoculated. Blood collection was performed on days 5 and 15 post-infection (PI) and the blood used to assess the ADA activity. The infection by L.icterohaemorrhagiae altered erythrocyte count, hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit, causing a decrease in all these parameters on day 15 PI. Lymphocytes decreased significantly on day 15 PI, and ADA activity in serum was inhibited in infected rats on days 5 and 15 PI and its activity in erythrocytes were increased on day 5 PI. On day 5 PI, we found an increase in ADA activity in erythrocytes of infected rats. No correlation was observed between hematocrit and erythrocyte ADA activity on days 5 and 15 PI. The ADA activity was inhibited in rats infected on day 15 PI. A positive correlation (r(2)=60) was also observed between the number of lymphocytes and ADA activity in lymphocytes on day 15 PI (P<0.05). In conclusion, our results showed that the ADA activity is altered in serum, lymphocytes and erythrocytes in experimental infection by L.icterohaemorrhagiae in rats, concomitantly with hematological parameters.

  10. Human lymphokine-activated killer cells are cytotoxic against cells infected with Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine whether human lymphokine- activated killer (LAK) cells are cytotoxic against cells infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Nylon wool nonadherent (NWNA) peripheral blood lymphocytes, as well as purified natural killer cell (NK) (CD3- CD16+ CD56+) and T (CD3+ CD16- CD56-) cells obtained from five healthy T. gondii seronegative volunteers exhibited minimal cytotoxic activity against T. gondii-infected cells. When standard LAK (S-LAK) cell preparations were induced by incubation of NWNA cells with recombinant interleukin 2, induction of remarkable cytotoxic activity against T. gondii-infected cells. When standard in LAK cell preparations from each of the volunteers. The phenotype of the LAK precursor and effector cells varied depending on the target cell used. Whereas the precursor and the effector cells of most of the LAK activity against K562 and Daudi cells were cells with NK phenotype, when T. gondii-infected cells were used as targets, both cells with NK and T cell phenotypes were precursors and effectors of the lysis. When cytotoxic activity of S-LAK cells was compared with the activity of adherent LAK (A-LAK) cells, A- LAK cells displayed higher cytotoxic activity against T. gondii- infected cells, as well as against K562 and Daudi cells. Cold target inhibition experiments suggested that there is a subset of LAK effector cells capable of lysing both T. gondii-infected cells and Daudi cells, whereas other subsets preferentially or exclusively lyse one of these target cells. PMID:1460415

  11. From Wasting to Obesity: The Contribution of Nutritional Status to Immune Activation in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Koethe, John R; Heimburger, Douglas C; PrayGod, George; Filteau, Suzanne

    2016-10-01

    The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on innate and adaptive immune activation occurs in the context of host factors, which serve to augment or dampen the physiologic response to the virus. Independent of HIV infection, nutritional status, particularly body composition, affects innate immune activation through a variety of conditions, including reduced mucosal barrier defenses and microbiome dysbiosis in malnutrition and the proinflammatory contribution of adipocytes and stromal vascular cells in obesity. Similarly, T-cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine expression are reduced in the setting of malnutrition and increased in obesity, potentially due to adipokine regulatory mechanisms restraining energy-avid adaptive immunity in times of starvation and exerting a paradoxical effect in overnutrition. The response to HIV infection is situated within these complex interactions between host nutritional health and immunologic function, which contribute to the varied phenotypes of immune activation among HIV-infected patients across a spectrum from malnutrition to obesity.

  12. Effects of malaria (Plasmodium relicturm) on activity budgets of experimentally-infected juvenile Apapane (Himatione sanquinea)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yorinks, N.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2000-01-01

    We used behavioral, physiological, and parasitological measures to document effects of acute malarial infections on activity budgets of experimentally infected juvenile Apapane (Himatione sanguinea). Five of eight birds died within 20 to 32 days after exposure to a single infective mosquito bite. Infected Apapane devoted less time to locomotory activities involving flight, walking or hopping, and stationary activities such as singing, preening, feeding, and probing. The amount of time spent sitting was positively correlated with parasitemia and increased dramatically after infection and between treatment and control groups. Birds that succumbed to infection experienced a significant loss of body mass and subcutaneous fat, whereas surviving Apapane were better able to maintain body condition and fat levels. When rechallenged with the parasite five months after initial infection, surviving birds experienced no increase in parasitemia, indicating that they had become immune to reinfection. Regardless of the outcome, infected birds experienced acute illness that would have left them unable to forage or to escape from predators in the wild.

  13. Unusual Presentation of Gianotti-Crosti Syndrome due to Epstein-Barr Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Al Dhaheri, Hind Saif; Al Kaabi, Amani; Kara Hamo, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    Gianotti-Crosti syndrome (GCS) is viral exanthema of childhood. It typically presents with a symmetric erythematous papular and papulovesicular eruption. It has been classically associated with hepatitis B virus, as well as rarely with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We report a case of GCS related to EBV infection without the classical systemic symptoms in a five-year-old male patient. PMID:28050291

  14. Demonstration of the serum antibody to Epstein-Barr virus specific DNA polymerased (EBV-DP) from patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, R.S.; Li, J.S.; Grill, S.; Nutter, L.M.; Cheng, Y.C.

    1986-03-05

    Raji cells, an EBV genome carrying and nonproducer cell line, treated with tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and n-butyrate could induce a special DNA polymerase which has properties that are similar to the EBV-DP induced by TPA in P/sub 3/HR-I cells, an EBV producer cell line. Since EBV was found to have a strong association with NPC, and antibodies against EBV proteins or enzymes were found in high levels in sera from these patients, the possible presence of serum antibody against EBV-DP was examined. The serum titer of antibody to EBV-DP was found to have 190 +/- 84 units/ml serum (mean +/- S.D.) in 48 sera from patients with NPC. The titer in 52 healthy donors was 31.4 +/- 28 unit/ml serum (p < 0.01). The antibody was found to be associated with the IgG but not the IgA fraction. The antibody titers against EBV-DP were not correlated with the titer against EBV-DNase or VCA-IgA. Whether the antibody observed is against an EBV-DP core protein or its stimulating protein, as demonstrated by this laboratory previously, is still being investigated. This study demonstrated the high frequency and high titer of antibody against EBV-DP in serum from patients with NPC, and suggested the potential of utilizing this antibody titer to compliment other methods for the early diagnosis or prognosis of NPC.

  15. Assessing the Macro-Level Correlates of Malware Infections Using a Routine Activities Framework.

    PubMed

    Holt, Thomas J; Burruss, George W; Bossler, Adam M

    2016-12-01

    The ability to gain unauthorized access to computer systems to engage in espionage and data theft poses a massive threat to individuals worldwide. There has been minimal focus, however, on the role of malicious software, or malware, which can automate this process. This study examined the macro-correlates of malware infection at the national level by using an open repository of known malware infections and utilizing a routine activities framework. Negative inflated binomial models for counts indicated that nations with greater technological infrastructure, more political freedoms, and with less organized crime financial impact were more likely to report malware infections. The number of Computer Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) in a nation was not significantly related with reported malware infection. The implications of the study for the understanding of malware infection, routine activity theory, and target-hardening strategies are discussed.

  16. Immune activation and induction of memory: lessons learned from controlled human malaria infection with Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Scholzen, Anja; Sauerwein, Robert W

    2016-02-01

    Controlled human malaria infections (CHMIs) are a powerful tool to assess the efficacy of drugs and/or vaccine candidates, but also to study anti-malarial immune responses at well-defined time points after infection. In this review, we discuss the insights that CHMI trials have provided into early immune activation and regulation during acute infection, and the capacity to induce and maintain immunological memory. Importantly, these studies show that a single infection is sufficient to induce long-lasting parasite-specific T- and B-cell memory responses, and suggest that blood-stage induced regulatory responses can limit inflammation both in ongoing and potentially future infections. As future perspective of investigation in CHMIs, we discuss the role of innate cell subsets, the interplay between innate and adaptive immune activation and the potential modulation of these responses after natural pre-exposure.

  17. Intestinal autophagy activity is essential for host defense against Salmonella typhimurium infection in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Curt, Alexander; Zhang, Jiuli; Minnerly, Justin; Jia, Kailiang

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella typhimurium infects both intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that is present in all eukaryotes. Autophagy has been reported to limit the Salmonella replication in Caenorhabditis elegans and in mammals. However, it is unknown whether intestinal autophagy activity plays a role in host defense against Salmonella infection in C. elegans. In this study, we inhibited the autophagy gene bec-1 in different C. elegans tissues and examined the survival of these animals following Salmonella infection. Here we show that inhibition of the bec-1 gene in the intestine but not in other tissues confers susceptibility to Salmonella infection, which is consistent with recent studies in mice showing that autophagy is involved in clearance of Salmonella in the intestinal epithelial cells. Therefore, the intestinal autophagy activity is essential for host defense against Salmonella infection from C. elegans to mice, perhaps also in humans.

  18. The Relationship between Active Trachoma and Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis Infection before and after Mass Antibiotic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ramadhani, Athumani M.; Derrick, Tamsyn; Macleod, David; Holland, Martin J.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trachoma is a blinding disease, initiated in early childhood by repeated conjunctival infection with the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. The population prevalence of the clinical signs of active trachoma; ‘‘follicular conjunctivitis” (TF) and/or ‘‘intense papillary inflammation” (TI), guide programmatic decisions regarding the initiation and cessation of mass drug administration (MDA). However, the persistence of TF following resolution of infection at both the individual and population level raises concerns over the suitability of this clinical sign as a marker for C. trachomatis infection. Methodology/Principle Findings We systematically reviewed the literature for population-based studies and those including randomly selected individuals, which reported the prevalence of the clinical signs of active trachoma and ocular C. trachomatis infection by nucleic acid amplification test. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the relationship between active trachoma and C. trachomatis infection before and after MDA. TF and C. trachomatis infection were strongly correlated prior to MDA (r = 0.92, 95%CI 0.83 to 0.96, p<0.0001); the relationship was similar when the analysis was limited to children. A moderate correlation was found between TI and prevalence of infection. Following MDA, the relationship between TF and infection prevalence was weaker (r = 0.60, 95%CI 0.25 to 0.81, p = 0.003) and there was no correlation between TI and C. trachomatis infection. Conclusions/Significance Prior to MDA, TF is a good indicator of the community prevalence of C. trachomatis infection. Following MDA, the prevalence of TF tends to overestimate the underlying infection prevalence. In order to prevent unnecessary additional rounds of MDA and to accurately ascertain when elimination goals have been reached, a cost-effective test for C. trachomatis that can be administered in low-resource settings remains desirable. PMID:27783678

  19. Exome and genome sequencing of nasopharynx cancer identifies NF-κB pathway activating mutations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yvonne Y; Chung, Grace T. Y.; Lui, Vivian W. Y.; To, Ka-Fai; Ma, Brigette B. Y.; Chow, Chit; Woo, John K, S.; Yip, Kevin Y.; Seo, Jeongsun; Hui, Edwin P.; Mak, Michael K. F.; Rusan, Maria; Chau, Nicole G.; Or, Yvonne Y. Y.; Law, Marcus H. N.; Law, Peggy P. Y.; Liu, Zoey W. Y.; Ngan, Hoi-Lam; Hau, Pok-Man; Verhoeft, Krista R.; Poon, Peony H. Y.; Yoo, Seong-Keun; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Lee, Sau-Dan; Lun, Samantha W. M.; Jia, Lin; Chan, Anthony W. H.; Chan, Jason Y. K.; Lai, Paul B. S.; Fung, Choi-Yi; Hung, Suet-Ting; Wang, Lin; Chang, Ann Margaret V.; Chiosea, Simion I.; Hedberg, Matthew L.; Tsao, Sai-Wah; van Hasselt, Andrew C.; Chan, Anthony T. C.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Lo, Kwok-Wai

    2017-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an aggressive head and neck cancer characterized by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and dense lymphocyte infiltration. The scarcity of NPC genomic data hinders the understanding of NPC biology, disease progression and rational therapy design. Here we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 111 micro-dissected EBV-positive NPCs, with 15 cases subjected to further whole-genome sequencing (WGS), to determine its mutational landscape. We identified enrichment for genomic aberrations of multiple negative regulators of the NF-κB pathway, including CYLD, TRAF3, NFKBIA and NLRC5, in a total of 41% of cases. Functional analysis confirmed inactivating CYLD mutations as drivers for NPC cell growth. The EBV oncoprotein latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) functions to constitutively activate NF-κB signalling, and we observed mutual exclusivity among tumours with somatic NF-κB pathway aberrations and LMP1-overexpression, suggesting that NF-κB activation is selected for by both somatic and viral events during NPC pathogenesis. PMID:28098136

  20. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity reduces rotavirus infection at a postbinding step.

    PubMed

    Rossen, John W A; Bouma, Janneke; Raatgeep, Rolien H C; Büller, Hans A; Einerhand, Alexandra W C

    2004-09-01

    Elevated levels of prostaglandins (PGs), products of cyclooxygenases (COXs), are found in the plasma and stool of rotavirus-infected children. We sought to determine the role of COXs, PGs, and the signal transduction pathways involved in rotavirus infection to elucidate possible new targets for antiviral therapy. Human intestinal Caco-2 cells were infected with human rotavirus Wa or simian rotavirus SA-11. COX-2 mRNA expression and secreted PGE2 levels were determined at different time points postinfection, and the effect of COX inhibitors on rotavirus infection was studied by an immunofluorescence assay (IFA). To reveal the signal transduction pathways involved, the effect of MEK, protein kinase A (PKA), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and NF-kappaB inhibitors on rotavirus infection was analyzed. In infected Caco-2 cells, increased COX-2 mRNA expression and secreted PGE2 levels were detected. Indomethacin (inhibiting both COX-1 and COX-2) and specific COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors reduced rotavirus infection by 85 and 50%, respectively, as measured by an IFA. Indomethacin reduced virus infection at a postbinding step early in the infection cycle, inhibiting virus protein synthesis. Indomethacin did not seem to affect viral RNA synthesis. Inhibitors of MEK, PKA, p38 MAPK, and NF-kappaB decreased rotavirus infection by at least 40%. PGE2 counteracted the effect of the COX and PKA inhibitors but not of the MEK, p38 MAPK, and NF-kappaB inhibitors. Conclusively, COXs and PGE2 are important mediators of rotavirus infection at a postbinding step. The ERK1/2 pathway mediated by PKA is involved in COX induction by rotavirus infection. MAPK and NF-kappaB pathways are involved in rotavirus infection but in a PGE2-independent manner. This report offers new perspectives in the search for therapeutic agents in treatment of severe rotavirus-mediated diarrhea in children.

  1. Rift Valley fever virus infection induces activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Ermler, Megan E; Traylor, Zachary; Patel, Krupen; Schattgen, Stefan A; Vanaja, Sivapriya K; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Hise, Amy G

    2014-01-20

    Inflammasome activation is gaining recognition as an important mechanism for protection during viral infection. Here, we investigate whether Rift Valley fever virus, a negative-strand RNA virus, can induce inflammasome responses and IL-1β processing in immune cells. We have determined that RVFV induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation in murine dendritic cells, and that this process is dependent upon ASC and caspase-1. Furthermore, absence of the cellular RNA helicase adaptor protein MAVS/IPS-1 significantly reduces extracellular IL-1β during infection. Finally, direct imaging using confocal microscopy shows that the MAVS protein co-localizes with NLRP3 in the cytoplasm of RVFV infected cells.

  2. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus genome and latent infection gene expression in normal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; de Rivera, Michelle Wendoline Garcia-Niño; Hoshino, Miyako; Sakashita, Hideaki; Yamada, Tsutomu; Inoue, Harumi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Nozaki, Tadashige; González-López, Blanca Silvia; Ide, Fumio; Kusama, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    A relationship between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and cancer of lymphoid and epithelial tissues such as Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma, and oral cancer has been reported. EBV is transmitted orally and infects B cells and epithelial cells. However, it has remained uncertain whether EBV plays a role in carcinogenesis of oral mucosal tissue. In the present study, we detected the EBV genome and latent EBV gene expression in normal mucosal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to clarify whether EBV is involved in carcinogenesis of the oral cavity. We examined 333 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples (morphologically normal oral mucosa 30 samples, gingivitis 32, tonsillitis 17, oral epithelial dysplasia 83, OSCC 150, and NPC 21). EBV latent infection genes (EBNA-2, LMP-1) were detected not only in OSCC (50.2 %, 10.7 %) but also in severe epithelial dysplasia (66.7 %, 44.4 %), mild to moderate epithelial dysplasia (43.1 %, 18.5 %), gingivitis (78.1 %, 21.9 %), and normal mucosa (83.3 %, 23.3 %). Furthermore, the intensity of EBV latent infection gene expression (EBER, LMP-1) was significantly higher in severe epithelial dysplasia (94.4 %, 72.2 %) than in OSCC (34.7 %, 38.7 %). These results suggest that EBV latent infection genes and their increased expression in severe epithelial dysplasia might play an important role in the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence in the oral cavity.

  3. Diagnostic moléculaire du Cytomégalovirus (CMV), de l’herpès virus humain de type 6 (HHV6) et d’Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) par PCR en temps réel chez les femmes enceintes VIH séropositives et séronégatives à Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouedraogo, Alice Rogomenoma; Kabre, Madeleine; Bisseye, Cyrille; Zohoncon, Théodora Mahoukèdè; Asshi, Maleki; Soubeiga, Serge Théophile; Diarra, Birama; Traore, Lassina; Djigma, Florencia Wendkuuni; Ouermi, Djénéba; Pietra, Virginio; Barro, Nicolas; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Les herpès virus EBV, CMV et HHV-6 sont des virus qui évoluent sous le modèle pandémique et sont responsables d’infections congénitales pouvant provoquer des séquelles graves chez les nouveau-nés. L’objectif de cette étude était de déterminer les prévalences de CMV, EBV et HHV-6 chez les femmes enceintes VIH(+) et VIH(-) à Ouagadougou. Méthodes Dans cette étude 200 échantillons de plasma sanguin de femmes enceintes dont 100 femmes VIH(+) et 100 femmes VIH(-) ont été diagnostiqués par PCR multiplex en temps réel pour les trois infections (EBV, CMV et HHV-6). Résultats Sur l’ensemble des 200 échantillons analysés, 18 (9,0%) étaient positifs à au moins un des trois virus, 12 (6,0%) étaient positifs au EBV, 13 (6,5%) au CMV et 12 (6,0%) positifs au HHV-6. Parmi les 18 cas d’infections, nous avons trouvé 10 cas (55,6%) de coïnfections dont 90,0% (9/10) d’infection multiple EBV/CMV/HHV6 et 10,0% de coinfection EBV/HHV6. Le taux d’infection HHVs était plus élevé chez les femmes VIH(-) que celles VIH(+) (12,0% versus 6,0%). Parmi les VIH(+), la PCR a révélé 7,1% (soit 6/85) d’infection HHVs chez celles qui n’étaient pas sous ARV contre 0% chez celles sous ARV. Conclusion Les herpès virus sont fréquents chez les femmes enceintes au Burkina Faso et pourraient constituer une menace chez ces dernières à cause des complications et des risques d’infection pour le nouveau-né. PMID:27800078

  4. Anti-infection activity of nanostructured titanium percutaneous implants with a postoperative infection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jing; Li, Yiting; Liu, Zhiyuan; Qu, Shuxin; Lu, Xiong; Wang, Jianxin; Duan, Ke; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2015-07-01

    The titanium percutaneous implants were widely used in clinic; however, they have an increased risk of infection since they breach the skin barrier. Lack of complete skin integration with the implants can cause infection and implant removal. In this work, three titania nanotubes (TNT) with different diameters, 50 nm (TNT-50), 100 nm (TNT-100) and 150 nm (TNT-150) arrays were prepared on titanium surfaces by anodization, pure titanium (pTi) was used as control. Samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle analysis. The antibacterial efficiency of TNT was evaluated in vitro against Staphylococcus aureus under the visible light. The results indicated that TNT-100 had the highest antibacterial efficiency under the visible light. Subsequently, TNT implants and pTi implants were placed subcutaneously to the dorsum of New Zealand White rabbits, 108 CFU S. aureus was inoculated into the implant sites 4 h after surgery. The TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha were determined using enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA). TNT implants revealed less inflammatory factor release than pTi implants with or without injected S. aureus liquid. According to the histological results, the TNT implants displayed excellent tissue integration. Whereas, pTi implants were surrounded with fibrotic capsule, and the skin tissue was almost separated from the implant surface. Therefore, the TNT significantly inhibited the infection risk and enhanced tissue integration of the percutaneous implants compared to pTi. The immersion test in the culture medium suggested that one of causes be probably more proteins adsorbed on TNT than on pTi.

  5. Chlamydia trachomatis infection in sexually active adolescents: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Chacko, M R; Lovchik, J C

    1984-06-01

    The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection was studied in a sexually active urban Baltimore adolescent population. Possible risk factors such as age, past history of sexually transmitted disease, number of sexual partners, contact with sexually transmitted disease, oral contraceptive use, and concomitant gonococcal infection were also evaluated. The prevalence of chlamydial infection in the 280 adolescents studied was 26%: 35% in male adolescents, 27% in pregnant female adolescents, and 23% in nonpregnant female adolescents. Chlamydia was almost three times as prevalent as gonorrhea in the same population. Age, past history of sexually transmitted disease, oral contraceptive use, and concomitant gonorrhea were not significantly associated with chlamydial infection. However, multiple current sexual partners, contact with sexually transmitted disease, genitourinary symptoms, and cervical ectopy were significantly associated with chlamydial infection. Testing for chlamydial infection in sexually active urban teenagers is recommended for those with genitourinary symptoms, those with cervical ectopy, or those who are contacts of persons with sexually transmitted disease. Considering the reservoir of infection in the asymptomatic female adolescents, screening for chlamydial infections in family planning clinics warrants consideration.

  6. Activity-based profiling of the proteasome pathway during hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nasheri, Neda; Ning, Zhibin; Figeys, Daniel; Yao, Shao; Goto, Natalie K; Pezacki, John Paul

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection often leads to chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of the HCV proteins is controlled by ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent proteasome pathways. Many viruses modulate proteasome function for their propagation. To examine the interrelationship between HCV and the proteasome pathways we employed a quantitative activity-based protein profiling method. Using this approach we were able to quantify the changes in the activity of several proteasome subunits and found that proteasome activity is drastically reduced by HCV replication. The results imply a link between the direct downregulation of the activity of this pathway and chronic HCV infection.

  7. Identification of GLA/SE as an effective adjuvant for the induction of robust humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to EBV-gp350 in mice and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Heeke, Darren S; Lin, Rui; Rao, Eileen; Woo, Jennifer C; McCarthy, Michael P; Marshall, Jason D

    2016-05-17

    Childhood infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is often asymptomatic and may result in mild flu-like symptoms, but exposure during adolescence and young adulthood can lead to acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM) with a pathology characterized by swollen lymph nodes, sore throat, and severe fatigue lasting weeks or months. A vaccine targeting the envelope glycoprotein gp350 adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide complexed with the TLR4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) achieved a 78% reduction in AIM incidence in a small phase II trial of college-age individuals, but development of this vaccine was halted by the manufacturer. Here, we report the evaluation in mice and rabbits of an EBV-gp350 vaccine combined with an adjuvant composed of the synthetic TLR4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) integrated into stable emulsion (SE). In mice, GLA/SE-adjuvanted gp350 generated high IgG titers (both IgG1 and IgG2a/c subtypes), elevated EBV-neutralizing antibody titers, and robust poly-functional anti-gp350 CD4(+) T cell responses. In addition, GLA/SE routinely demonstrated superior performance over aluminum hydroxide in all immunological readouts, including induction of durable neutralizing antibody titers out to at least 1 year post-vaccination. Both components of the GLA/SE adjuvant were found to be required to get optimal responses in both arms of the immune response: specifically, SE for neutralizing antibodies and GLA for induction of T cell responses. Furthermore, this vaccine also elicited high neutralizing antibody titers in a second species, rabbit. These promising results suggest that clinical development of a vaccine comprised of EBV-gp350 plus GLA/SE has the potential to prevent AIM in post-adolescents.

  8. Bacterial skin infections, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    From 2000 through 2012, health care records of the Military Health System documented 998,671 incident cases of bacterial skin infections among active component members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Most cases (97.3%) were identified from records of outpatient medical encounters rather than hospitalizations. Cellulitis accounted for half (50.9%) of all cases of bacterial skin infection but 96 percent of associated hospital bed days. Of all cases, 42.3 percent were "other" skin infections (i.e., folliculitis, impetigo, pyoderma, pyogenic granuloma, other and unspecified infections). The remainder were attributable to carbuncles/furuncles (6.6%) and erysipelas (0.1%). Rates of infection were higher among female service members except for "other" skin infections. In general, the highest rates were associated with youth, recruit trainee status, and junior enlisted rank; however, rates of erysipelas were highest among those 50 years and older. Annual incidence rates of all bacterial skin infections have increased greatly since 2000. During the entire period, such infections required more than 1.4 million health care encounters and 94,000 hospital bed-days (equivalent to 257 years of lost duty time). The prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of bacterial skin infections, particularly in high risk settings, deserve continued emphasis.

  9. Adenosine deaminase activity in serum and lymphocytes of rats infected with Sporothrix schenckii.

    PubMed

    Castro, Verônica S P; Pimentel, Victor C; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Thomé, Gustavo R; Wolkmer, Patrícia; Castro, Jorge L C; Costa, Márcio M; da Silva, Cássia B; Oliveira, Daniele C; Alves, Sydney H; Schetinger, Maria R C; Lopes, Sonia T A; Mazzanti, Cinthia M

    2012-07-01

    Sporotrichosis is a fungal infection of subcutaneous or chronic evolution, inflammatory lesions characterized by their pyogranulomatous aspect, caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a "key" enzyme in the purine metabolism, promoting the deamination of adenosine, an important anti-inflammatory molecule. The increase in ADA activity has been demonstrated in several inflammatory conditions; however, there are no data in the literature associated with this fungal infection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the activity of serum ADA (S-ADA) and lymphocytes (L-ADA) of rats infected with S. schenckii. We used seventy-eight rats divided into two groups. In the first experiment, rats were infected subcutaneously and in the second experiment, infected intraperitoneally. Blood samples for hematologic evaluation and activities of S-ADA and L-ADA were performed at days 15, 30, and 40 post-infection (PI) to assess disease progression. In the second experiment, it was observed an acute decrease in activity of S-ADA and L-ADA (P < 0.05), suggesting a compensatory mechanism in an attempt to protect the host from excessive tissue damage. With chronicity of disease the rats in the first and second experiment at 30 days PI showed an increased activity of L-ADA (P < 0.05), promoting an inflammatory response in an attempt to combat the spread of the agent. Thus, it is suggested that infection with S. schenckii alters the activities of S-ADA in experimentally infected rats, demonstrating the involvement of this enzyme in the pathogenesis of sporotrichosis.

  10. Autophagy activated by Toxoplasma gondii infection in turn facilitates Toxoplasma gondii proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dongmei; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Jun; Wen, He; Pan, Jiwen; Zhang, Shouzhu; Fang, Yong; Li, Xiuyi; Cai, Yu; Wang, Xuelong; Wang, Shiping

    2014-06-01

    Autophagy was found to play an antimicrobial or antiparasitic role in the activation of host cells to defend against intracellular pathogens, at the same time, pathogens could compete with host cell and take advantage of autophagy to provide access for its proliferation, but there are few articles for studying the outcome of this competition between host cell and pathogens. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between autophagy activated by Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) and proliferation of T. gondii affected by autophagy in vitro. Firstly, human embryonic fibroblasts (HEF) cells were infected with T. gondii for different times. The monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, acridine orange (AO) staining, punctuate GFP-LC3 distribution, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) assays were conducted, and the results were consistent in showing that gondii infection could induce autophagy. Secondly, HEF cells were infected with T. gondii and treated with autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or inducer lithium chloride for different times. Giemsa staining was conducted, and the results exhibited that T. gondii infection-induced autophagy could in turn promote T. gondii proliferation. Simultaneously, the results of Giemsa staining also revealed that autophagy inhibitor could reduce the number of each cell infected with T. gondii and inhibit T. gondii proliferation. In contrast, autophagy inducer could increase the number of each cell infected with T. gondii and encourage T. gondii proliferation. Therefore, our study suggests that T. gondii infection could activate autophagy, and this autophagy could in turn facilitate T. gondii proliferation in HEF cells for limiting nutrients.

  11. Long term results of mechanical prostheses for treatment of active infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, J; Tornos, M; Permanyer-Miralda, G; Almirante, B; Murtra, M; Soler-Soler, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To analyse the long term results of mechanical prostheses for treating active infective endocarditis.
DESIGN—Prospective cohort study of a consecutive series of patients diagnosed with infective endocarditis and operated on in the active phase of the infection for insertion of a mechanical prosthesis.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre in a metropolitan area.
RESULTS—Between 1975 and 1997, 637 cases of infective endocarditis were diagnosed in the centre. Of these, 436 were left sided (with overall mortality of 20.3%). Surgical treatment in the active phase of the infection was needed in 141 patients (72% native, 28% prosthetic infective endocarditis). Mechanical prostheses were used in 131 patients. Operative mortality was 30.5% (40 patients). Ninety one survivors were followed up prospectively for (mean (SD)) 5.4 (4.5) years. Thirteen patients developed prosthetic valve dysfunction. Nine patients suffered reinfection: four of these (4%) were early and five were late. The median time from surgery for late reinfection was 1.4 years. During follow up, 12 patients died. Excluding operative mortality, actuarial survival was 86.6% at five years and 83.7% at 10 years; actuarial survival free from death, reoperation, and reinfection was 73.1% at five years and 59.8% at 10 years.
CONCLUSIONS—In patients surviving acute infective endocarditis and receiving mechanical prostheses, the rate of early reinfection compares well with reported results of homografts. In addition, prosthesis dysfunction rate is low and long term survival is good. These data should prove useful for comparison with long term studies, when available, using other types of valve surgery in active infective endocarditis.


Keywords: infective endocarditis; surgery; mechanical prosthesis PMID:11410564

  12. NKG2A-Expressing Natural Killer Cells Dominate the Response to Autologous Lymphoblastoid Cells Infected with Epstein–Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, Olivia; Strauss-Albee, Dara Marie; Zhao, Nancy Q.; Haggadone, Mikel D.; Pelpola, Judith Shanika; Krams, Sheri M.; Martinez, Olivia M.; Blish, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a human γ-herpesvirus that establishes latency and lifelong infection in host B cells while achieving a balance with the host immune response. When the immune system is perturbed through immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, however, these latently infected B cells can give rise to aggressive B cell lymphomas. Natural killer (NK) cells are regarded as critical in the early immune response to viral infection, but their role in controlling expansion of infected B cells is not understood. Here, we report that NK cells from healthy human donors display increased killing of autologous B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) harboring latent EBV compared to primary B cells. Coculture of NK cells with autologous EBV+ LCL identifies an NK cell population that produces IFNγ and mobilizes the cytotoxic granule protein CD107a. Multi-parameter flow cytometry and Boolean analysis reveal that these functional cells are enriched for expression of the NK cell receptor NKG2A. Further, NKG2A+ NK cells more efficiently lyse autologous LCL than do NKG2A− NK cells. More specifically, NKG2A+2B4+CD16−CD57−NKG2C−NKG2D+ cells constitute the predominant NK cell population that responds to latently infected autologous EBV+ B cells. Thus, a subset of NK cells is enhanced for the ability to recognize and eliminate autologous, EBV-infected transformed cells, laying the groundwork for harnessing this subset for therapeutic use in EBV+ malignancies. PMID:28018364

  13. New BZLF1 sequence variations in EBV-associated undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma in southern China.

    PubMed

    Ji, Kun-Mei; Li, Chun-Lin; Meng, Guang; Han, Ai-Dong; Wu, Xu-Li

    2008-01-01

    The viral lytic gene BZLF1 triggers replication of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which is commonly found in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Here, RT-PCR revealed five new BZLF1 variants in 8 of 12 NPC and 4 of 12 non-NPC nasopharyngeal biopsies from an NPC-endemic area in southern China. The deduced peptide sequence of the dominant BZLF1 variant differed by 11 amino acids from that of the prototypical strain B95.8 (V01555). Anti-ZEBRA antibody levels were higher in NPC than that in non-NPC patients (P < 0.001). These findings demonstrated a dominant BZLF1 variant in southern Chinese EBV-associated NPC and non-NPC patients.

  14. Presence of Epstein–Barr virus-infected B lymphocytes with thyrotropin receptor antibodies on their surface in Graves’ disease patients and in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Keiko; Higaki, Katsumi; Nakayama, Yuji; Miyauchi, Hiromi; Kiritani, Yui; Kanai, Kyosuke; Matsushita, Michiko; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Sugihara, Hirotsugu; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masako; Murakami, Ichiro; Nanba, Eiji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Graves’ disease is an autoimmune hyperthyroidism caused by thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAbs). Because Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) persists in B cells and is occasionally reactivated, we hypothesized that EBV contributes to TRAbs production in Graves’ disease patients by stimulating the TRAbs-producing B cells. In order for EBV to stimulate antibody-producing cells, EBV must be present in those cells but that have not yet been observed. We examined whether EBV-infected (EBV(+)) B cells with TRAbs on their surface (TRAbs(+)) as membrane immunoglobulin were present in peripheral blood of Graves’ disease patients. We analyzed cultured or non-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 13 patients and 11 healthy controls by flow-cytometry and confocal laser microscopy, and confirmed all cultured PBMCs from 8 patients really had TRAbs(+) EBV(+) double positive cells. We unexpectedly detected TRAbs(+) cells in all healthy controls, and TRAbs(+) EBV(+) double positive cells in all cultured PBMC from eight healthy controls. The frequency of TRAbs(+) cells in cultured PBMCs was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p = 0.021). In this study, we indicated the presence of EBV-infected B lymphocytes with TRAbs on their surface, a possible player of the production of excessive TRAbs, the causative autoantibody for Graves’ disease. This is a basic evidence for our hypothesis that EBV contributes to TRAbs production in Graves’ disease patients. Our results further suggest that healthy controls have the potential for TRAbs production. This gives us an important insight into the pathogenesis of Graves’ disease. PMID:24467196

  15. Presence of Epstein-Barr virus-infected B lymphocytes with thyrotropin receptor antibodies on their surface in Graves' disease patients and in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Keiko; Higaki, Katsumi; Nakayama, Yuji; Miyauchi, Hiromi; Kiritani, Yui; Kanai, Kyosuke; Matsushita, Michiko; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Sugihara, Hirotsugu; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masako; Murakami, Ichiro; Nanba, Eiji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune hyperthyroidism caused by thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAbs). Because Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) persists in B cells and is occasionally reactivated, we hypothesized that EBV contributes to TRAbs production in Graves' disease patients by stimulating the TRAbs-producing B cells. In order for EBV to stimulate antibody-producing cells, EBV must be present in those cells but that have not yet been observed. We examined whether EBV-infected (EBV(+)) B cells with TRAbs on their surface (TRAbs(+)) as membrane immunoglobulin were present in peripheral blood of Graves' disease patients. We analyzed cultured or non-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 13 patients and 11 healthy controls by flow-cytometry and confocal laser microscopy, and confirmed all cultured PBMCs from 8 patients really had TRAbs(+) EBV(+) double positive cells. We unexpectedly detected TRAbs(+) cells in all healthy controls, and TRAbs(+) EBV(+) double positive cells in all cultured PBMC from eight healthy controls. The frequency of TRAbs(+) cells in cultured PBMCs was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p = 0.021). In this study, we indicated the presence of EBV-infected B lymphocytes with TRAbs on their surface, a possible player of the production of excessive TRAbs, the causative autoantibody for Graves' disease. This is a basic evidence for our hypothesis that EBV contributes to TRAbs production in Graves' disease patients. Our results further suggest that healthy controls have the potential for TRAbs production. This gives us an important insight into the pathogenesis of Graves' disease.

  16. Viral infections associated with haemophagocytic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maakaroun, Nadine Rouphael; Moanna, Abeer; Jacob, Jesse T; Albrecht, Helmut

    2010-03-01

    Haemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) or haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare disease caused by a dysfunction of cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. This T cell/NK cell dysregulation causes an aberrant cytokine release, resulting in proliferation/activation of histiocytes with subsequent haemophagocytosis. Histiocytic infiltration of the reticuloendothelial system results in hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and pancytopenia ultimately leading to multiple organ dysfunctions. Common clinical features include high fevers despite broad spectrum antimicrobials, maculopapular rash, neurological symptoms, coagulopathy and abnormal liver function tests. Haemophagocytic syndrome can be either primary, i.e. due to an underlying genetic defect or secondary, associated with malignancies, autoimmune diseases (also called macrophage activation syndrome) or infections. Infectious triggers are most commonly due to viral infections mainly of the herpes group, with EBV being the most common cause. HPS can be fatal if untreated. Early recognition of the clinical presentation and laboratory abnormalities associated with HPS and prompt initiation of treatment can be life saving. HPS triggered by viral infections generally does not respond to specific antiviral therapy but may be treated with immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory agents and, in refractory cases, with bone marrow transplantation.

  17. HIV-1 integration landscape during latent and active infection

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Lillian; Silva, Israel T.; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Rosales, Rafael A.; Parrish, Erica H.; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Czartoski, Julie L.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Lehmann, Clara; Klein, Florian; Caskey, Marina; Walker, Bruce D.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Jankovic, Mila; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The barrier to curing HIV-1 is thought to reside primarily in CD4+ T cells containing silent proviruses. To characterize these latently infected cells, we studied the integration profile of HIV-1 in viremic progressors, individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy, and viremic controllers. Clonally expanded T cells represented the majority of all integrations and increased during therapy. However, none of the 75 expanded T cell clones assayed contained intact virus. In contrast, the cells bearing single integration events decreased in frequency over time on therapy, and the surviving cells were enriched for HIV-1 integration in silent regions of the genome. Finally, there was a strong preference for integration into, or in close proximity to Alu repeats, which were also enriched in local hotspots for integration. The data indicate that dividing clonally expanded T cells contain defective proviruses, and that the replication competent reservoir is primarily found in CD4+ T cells that remain relatively quiescent. PMID:25635456

  18. Human parainfluenza virus infection of the airway epithelium: viral hemagglutinin-neuraminidase regulates fusion protein activation and modulates infectivity.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Laura M; Porotto, Matteo; Yokoyama, Christine C; Palmer, Samantha G; Mungall, Bruce A; Greengard, Olga; Niewiesk, Stefan; Moscona, Anne

    2009-07-01

    Three discrete activities of the paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein, receptor binding, receptor cleaving (neuraminidase), and triggering of the fusion protein, each affect the promotion of viral fusion and entry. For human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), the effects of specific mutations that alter these functions of the receptor-binding protein have been well characterized using cultured monolayer cells, which have identified steps that are potentially relevant to pathogenesis. In the present study, proposed mechanisms that are relevant to pathogenesis were tested in natural host cell cultures, a model of the human airway epithelium (HAE) in which primary HAE cells are cultured at an air-liquid interface and retain functional properties. Infection of HAE cells with wild-type HPIV3 and variant viruses closely reflects that seen in an animal model, the cotton rat, suggesting that HAE cells provide an ideal system for assessing the interplay of host cell and viral factors in pathogenesis and for screening for inhibitory molecules that would be effective in vivo. Both HN's receptor avidity and the function and timing of F activation by HN require a critical balance for the establishment of ongoing infection in the HAE, and these HN functions independently modulate the production of active virions. Alterations in HN's F-triggering function lead to the release of noninfectious viral particles and a failure of the virus to spread. The finding that the dysregulation of F triggering prohibits successful infection in HAE cells suggests that antiviral strategies targeted to HN's F-triggering activity may have promise in vivo.

  19. Immune activation in the central nervous system throughout the course of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Robust and dynamic innate and adaptive responses characterize the acute central nervous system (CNS) response to HIV and other viral infections. In a state of chronic infection or viral latency, persistent immune activation associates with pathology in the CNS. Understanding this process is critical, since immune-mediated pathology in non-renewable CNS cells may result in long-term neurologic sequelae for HIV infected individuals. Recent findings In humans, immune activation is reduced by suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but persists at abnormally elevated levels on treatment. CNS immune activation is initiated in acute infection and progressively increases until cART is started. Newly identified characteristics of the CNS immune surveillance network include features of homeostasis and function of brain microglial cells, lymphatic drainage from CNS to cervical lymph nodes, and cells in cerebrospinal fluid associated with neurocognitive impairment. Summary More research is required to determine whether early intervention to reduce infection limits the immunopathology established by sustained immune responses that ultimately fail to resolve infection, and to unravel mechanisms of persistent immune activation during treated HIV so that strategies can be developed to therapeutically protect the brain. PMID:26760827

  20. Human serum antibodies against EBV latent membrane protein 1 cross-react with α-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Madison T.; Ganesh, Munisha S.; Middeldorp, Jaap M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the epitope on α-synuclein (α-syn) to which antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) bind and to determine whether antibodies targeting this mimicry domain are present in human sera. Methods: Reactivity of the α-syn-cross-reacting anti-LMP1 monoclonal antibody CS1-4 to a synthetic peptide containing the putative mimicry domain was compared to those in which this domain was mutated and to murine and rat α-syn (which differ from human α-syn at this site) in Western blots. Using ELISA, sera from EBV+ (n = 4) and EBV− (n = 12) donors as well as those with infectious mononucleosis (IM; n = 120), and Hodgkin disease (HD; n = 33) were interrogated for antibody reactivity to synthetic peptides corresponding to regions of α-syn and LMP1 containing the mimicry domain. Results: CS1-4 showed strong reactivity to wild-type human α-syn, but not to the mutant peptides or rodent α-syn. Control EBV− and EBV+ sera showed no reactivity to α-syn or LMP1 peptides. However, a significant proportion of IM and HD sera contained immunoglobulin M (IgM) (59% and 70%, in IM and HD, respectively), immunoglobulin G (IgG) (40% and 48%), and immunoglobulin A (IgA) (28% and 36%) antibodies to both peptides, as well as a significant correlation in the titers of IgM (ρ = 0.606 and 0.664, for IM and HD, respectively), IgG (0.526 and 0.836), and IgA (0.569 and 0.728) antibodies targeting LMP1 and α-syn peptides. Conclusions: Anti-EBV-LMP1 antibodies cross-reacting with a defined epitope in α-syn are present in human patients. These findings may have implications for the pathogenesis of synucleinopathies. PMID:27218119

  1. Adult-onset Still's disease revealed by perimyocarditis and a concomitant reactivation of an EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Meckenstock, Roderich; Therby, Audrey; Gibault-Genty, Geraldine; Khau, David; Monnier, Sebastien; Greder-Belan, Alix

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 17-year-old patient presenting perimyocarditis as the initial manifestation of the adult-onset Still's disease. Corticotherapy was rapidly successful but induced major acute hepatitis in relation with Epstein-Barr virus reactivation. After 1 year, even if the global outcome is favourable, a slightly lowered ejection fraction still persists. Former case reports and differential diagnosis with reactive haemophagocytic syndrome would be discussed. PMID:23166163

  2. Clinical utility of biomarkers of endothelial activation and coagulation for prognosis in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Susan M; Mwilu, Regina; Liles, W Conrad

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: HIV infection is associated with vascular dysfunction and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Our objective was to review the evidence regarding the clinical utility of endothelial activation and coagulation biomarkers for the prognosis of HIV-infected patients. Methods: We searched PubMed and Embase for publications using the keywords “HIV” or “HIV infection” and “endothelium” or “coagulation”. We reviewed reference lists and hand-searched for additional relevant articles. All clinical studies that enrolled non-pregnant, HIV-infected adults, measured biomarkers reflecting endothelial activation or coagulation, and prospectively evaluated their associations with vascular dysfunction or clinical outcomes were included. Results: Seventeen studies were identified that fulfilled the inclusion criteria, of which 11 investigated endothelial activation biomarkers and 12 investigated coagulation biomarkers. Biomarkers and outcomes varied widely across studies. Overall, published studies support an association between P-selectin and venous thromboembolism in HIV-infected patients, an association between tissue-type plasminogen activator and death, and associations between D-dimer and several clinical outcomes, including venous thromboembolism, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. Conclusions: Several studies have demonstrated associations between biomarkers of endothelial activation and coagulation and clinically important outcomes in HIV-1 infection. Additional large-scale prospective investigations to determine the utility of endothelial activation and coagulation biomarkers for risk stratification and prediction of adverse outcomes are clearly warranted. PMID:23732995

  3. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4(+) T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4(+) T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the "Shock and Kill" strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells.

  4. Nuclease activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 promotes intracellular infection of amoebal host cells.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Felizza F; Mallama, Celeste A; Fairbairn, Stephanie G; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts.

  5. Nuclease Activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 Promotes Intracellular Infection of Amoebal Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Felizza F.; Mallama, Celeste A.; Fairbairn, Stephanie G.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts. PMID:25547789

  6. Risk factors for multiple sclerosis and associations with anti-EBV antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Mouhieddine, Tarek H; Darwish, Hala; Fawaz, Lama; Yamout, Bassem; Tamim, Hani; Khoury, Samia J

    2015-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelination of the central nervous system. We investigated the prevalence of EBV seropositivity and other known risk factors for MS (age, smoking, low vitamin D) and their effect on anti-EBV antibody titers. We retrospectively studied 249 MS patients receiving care at the American University of Beirut Medical Center and 230 controls, during 2010-2014. EBV seropositivity was higher in MS patients compared to controls for both anti-VCA (99.5%; 97.2%) and anti-EBNA-1 (96.3%; 89.4%), and the titers were significantly higher in MS patients. MS patients had a significantly lower vitamin D level (15.5 ± 8.3 ng/ml) compared to controls (20.4 ± 11.3 ng/ml). The proportion of heavy smokers and overweight individuals was significantly higher in MS patients. Lebanese MS patients have risk factors similar to those in western countries. Older age and female gender were associated with a higher anti-VCA titer and male gender with a higher anti-EBNA-1.

  7. HHV-8 and EBV-positive intravascular lymphoma: an unusual presentation of extracavitary primary effusion lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Shirley, Courtney M.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Kasamon, Yvette L.; Taube, Janis M.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular lymphomas are rare and aggressive hematolymphoid tumors. Here we describe a human herpesvirus type-8/Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (HHV-8/KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive intravascular lymphoma. The patient was a 59 year-old HIV-positive man who presented with diarrhea, abdominal pain, fevers, night sweats, and weight loss. Radiographic studies of the abdomen and pelvis revealed numerous subcentimeter nodules within the subcutaneous fat that lacked connection to the skin. An excisional biopsy demonstrated large atypical cells within vessels in the deep subcutaneous fat, and many of the vessels contained extensive organizing thrombi. The atypical cells lacked strong expression of most B-cell markers but were positive for MUM-1 and showed partial expression of several T-cell markers. An immunohistochemical stain for HHV-8 and an in situ hybridization for EBV were both positive in the neoplastic cells. The disease had a rapidly progressive and fatal course. This lymphoma appears to represent an entirely intravascular form of primary effusion lymphoma, and highlights the propensity for HHV-8 and EBV-positive lymphoid neoplasms to show aberrant expression of T-cell markers, illustrates the utility of skin biopsies for the diagnosis of intravascular lymphoma, and suggests that biopsies to evaluate for intravascular lymphoma should be relatively deep and include subcutaneous fat. PMID:24525514

  8. EBV noncoding RNA binds nascent RNA to drive host PAX5 to viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nara; Moss, Walter N.; Yario, Therese A.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary EBER2 is an abundant nuclear noncoding RNA expressed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Probing its possible chromatin localization by CHART revealed EBER2’s presence at the terminal repeats (TRs) of the latent EBV genome, overlapping previously identified binding sites for the B-cell transcription factor PAX5. EBER2 interacts with and is required for PAX5 localization to the TRs. EBER2 knockdown phenocopies PAX5 depletion in upregulating the expression of LMP2A/B and LMP1, genes nearest the TRs. Knockdown of EBER2 also decreases EBV lytic replication, underscoring the essential role of the TRs in viral replication. Recruitment of the EBER2-PAX5 complex is mediated by base-pairing between EBER2 and nascent transcripts from the TR locus. The interaction is evolutionarily conserved in the related primate herpesvirus CeHV15 despite great sequence divergence. Using base-pairing with nascent RNA to guide an interacting transcription factor to its DNA target site is a previously undescribed function for a trans-acting noncoding RNA. PMID:25662012

  9. Bacterial Manipulation of NK Cell Regulatory Activity Increases Susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Brandon S.; Schmidt, Rebecca L.; Jamieson, Amanda; Merkel, Patricia; Knight, Vijaya; Cole, Caroline M.; Raulet, David H.; Lenz, Laurel L.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells produce interferon (IFN)-γ and thus have been suggested to promote type I immunity during bacterial infections. Yet, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and some other pathogens encode proteins that cause increased NK cell activation. Here, we show that stimulation of NK cell activation increases susceptibility during Lm infection despite and independent from robust NK cell production of IFNγ. The increased susceptibility correlated with IL-10 production by responding NK cells. NK cells produced IL-10 as their IFNγ production waned and the Lm virulence protein p60 promoted induction of IL-10 production by mouse and human NK cells. NK cells consequently exerted regulatory effects to suppress accumulation and activation of inflammatory myeloid cells. Our results reveal new dimensions of the role played by NK cells during Lm infection and demonstrate the ability of this bacterial pathogen to exploit the induction of regulatory NK cell activity to increase host susceptibility. PMID:27295349

  10. Thrombin activation and liver inflammation in advanced hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    González-Reimers, Emilio; Quintero-Platt, Geraldine; Martín-González, Candelaria; Pérez-Hernández, Onán; Romero-Acevedo, Lucía; Santolaria-Fernández, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with increased thrombotic risk. Several mechanisms are involved including direct endothelial damage by the HCV virus, with activation of tissue factor, altered fibrinolysis and increased platelet aggregation and activation. In advanced stages, chronic HCV infection may evolve to liver cirrhosis, a condition in which alterations in the portal microcirculation may also ultimately lead to thrombin activation, platelet aggregation, and clot formation. Therefore in advanced HCV liver disease there is an increased prevalence of thrombotic phenomena in portal vein radicles. Increased thrombin formation may activate hepatic stellate cells and promote liver fibrosis. In addition, ischemic changes derived from vascular occlusion by microthrombi favor the so called parenchymal extinction, a process that promotes collapse of hepatocytes and the formation of gross fibrous tracts. These reasons may explain why advanced HCV infection may evolve more rapidly to end-stage liver disease than other forms of cirrhosis. PMID:27182154

  11. Tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles show antiviral activity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Gniadek, Marianna; Baska, Piotr; Nowakowska, Julita; Sokolowska, Justyna; Nowak, Zuzanna; Donten, Mikolaj; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jaroslaw; Krzyzowska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between silver nanoparticles and herpesviruses is attracting great interest due to their antiviral activity and possibility to use as microbicides for oral and anogenital herpes. In this work, we demonstrate that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles sized 13 nm, 33 nm and 46 nm are capable of reducing HSV-2 infectivity both in vitro and in vivo. The antiviral activity of tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles was size-related, required direct interaction and blocked virus attachment, penetration and further spread. All tested tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles reduced both infection and inflammatory reaction in the mouse model of HSV-2 infection when used at infection or for a post-infection treatment. Smaller-sized nanoparticles induced production of cytokines and chemokines important for anti-viral response. The corresponding control buffers with tannic acid showed inferior antiviral effects in vitro and were ineffective in blocking in vivo infection. Our results show that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles are good candidates for microbicides used in treatment of herpesvirus infections.

  12. Low Dose BCG Infection as a Model for Macrophage Activation Maintaining Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Vesin, Dominique; Martinvalet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine against tuberculosis, is ingested by macrophages promoting the development of effector functions including cell death and microbicidal mechanisms. Despite accumulating reports on M. tuberculosis, mechanisms of BCG/macrophage interaction remain relatively undefined. In vivo, few bacilli are sufficient to establish a mycobacterial infection; however, in vitro studies systematically use high mycobacterium doses. In this study, we analyze macrophage/BCG interactions and microenvironment upon infection with low BCG doses and propose an in vitro model to study cell activation without affecting viability. We show that RAW macrophages infected with BCG at MOI 1 activated higher and sustained levels of proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors while MOI 0.1 was more efficient for early stimulation of IL-1β, MCP-1, and KC. Both BCG infection doses induced iNOS and NO in a dose-dependent manner and maintained nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Microenvironment generated by MOI 1 induced macrophage proliferation but not MOI 0.1 infection. In conclusion, BCG infection at low dose is an efficient in vitro model to study macrophage/BCG interactions that maintains macrophage viability and mitochondrial structures. This represents a novel model that can be applied to BCG research fields including mycobacterial infections, cancer immunotherapy, and prevention of autoimmunity and allergies. PMID:27833923

  13. Low Dose BCG Infection as a Model for Macrophage Activation Maintaining Cell Viability.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Vesin, Dominique; Martinvalet, Denis; Garcia, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the current vaccine against tuberculosis, is ingested by macrophages promoting the development of effector functions including cell death and microbicidal mechanisms. Despite accumulating reports on M. tuberculosis, mechanisms of BCG/macrophage interaction remain relatively undefined. In vivo, few bacilli are sufficient to establish a mycobacterial infection; however, in vitro studies systematically use high mycobacterium doses. In this study, we analyze macrophage/BCG interactions and microenvironment upon infection with low BCG doses and propose an in vitro model to study cell activation without affecting viability. We show that RAW macrophages infected with BCG at MOI 1 activated higher and sustained levels of proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors while MOI 0.1 was more efficient for early stimulation of IL-1β, MCP-1, and KC. Both BCG infection doses induced iNOS and NO in a dose-dependent manner and maintained nuclear and mitochondrial structures. Microenvironment generated by MOI 1 induced macrophage proliferation but not MOI 0.1 infection. In conclusion, BCG infection at low dose is an efficient in vitro model to study macrophage/BCG interactions that maintains macrophage viability and mitochondrial structures. This represents a novel model that can be applied to BCG research fields including mycobacterial infections, cancer immunotherapy, and prevention of autoimmunity and allergies.

  14. Tannic Acid Modified Silver Nanoparticles Show Antiviral Activity in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Gniadek, Marianna; Baska, Piotr; Nowakowska, Julita; Sokolowska, Justyna; Nowak, Zuzanna; Donten, Mikolaj; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jaroslaw; Krzyzowska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between silver nanoparticles and herpesviruses is attracting great interest due to their antiviral activity and possibility to use as microbicides for oral and anogenital herpes. In this work, we demonstrate that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles sized 13 nm, 33 nm and 46 nm are capable of reducing HSV-2 infectivity both in vitro and in vivo. The antiviral activity of tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles was size-related, required direct interaction and blocked virus attachment, penetration and further spread. All tested tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles reduced both infection and inflammatory reaction in the mouse model of HSV-2 infection when used at infection or for a post-infection treatment. Smaller-sized nanoparticles induced production of cytokines and chemokines important for anti-viral response. The corresponding control buffers with tannic acid showed inferior antiviral effects in vitro and were ineffective in blocking in vivo infection. Our results show that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles are good candidates for microbicides used in treatment of herpesvirus infections. PMID:25117537

  15. Effects of pseudorabies virus infection upon cytotoxicity and antiviral activities of porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, G; Pijoan, C; Molitor, T

    1992-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) infected with Pseudorabies virus (PRV) were compared to noninfected AM for cytotoxicity against foreign or transformed cells and production of interferon (IFN). Five PRV strains were used to infect AM including strains that are known to be highly virulent for pigs, i.e. strain 4892 and strain S-62 as well as strains that are regarded as mild or nonvirulent, i.e. BUK and Bartha. The multiplicity of infection ranged from 0.005 to 0.05 TCID50/cell. The target cells in the cytotoxicity assays were either chicken red blood cells, PRV-infected vero cells, or human myeloblastoma cells (K562 cell line). For the production of IFN, AM cultures were treated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) diluted in tissue culture media at a concentration of 5 micrograms/10(6) cells. Culture supernatants were collected at various times poststimulation and tested for antiviral activity using the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus replication inhibition test. Swine AM were able to lyse chicken red blood cells in an antibody-independent way but not in an antibody-dependent way, whereas lysis of PRV-infected vero cells was accomplished both ways. The cytotoxicity against chicken red blood cells was reduced in the PRV-infected AM as compared to noninfected cells, particularly in AM infected with virulent PRV strains. Specific 51Cr release values for AM infected with S-62 and 4892 strains were 14 and 19, while the noninfected AM had values of 36. Similarly, in the antibody-dependent cytotoxicity assay against PRV-infected vero cells there was no activity of AM against K562 cells. The production of IFN was readily stimulated with Poly I:C. The optimal time for supernatant collection was between 12 and 16 h poststimulation. The antiviral activity was abrogated by treatment of the supernatant with antiserum against human leukocyte IFN; it was therefore considered to be due to interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) released from the macrophages. The antiviral activity present in

  16. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  17. Brain-encysting trematodes and altered monoamine activity in naturally infected killifish Fundulus parvipinnis.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J C; Øverli, Ø

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents novel evidence to address mechanisms by which trematode parasites effect behavioural changes in naturally infected fish hosts. California killifish Fundulus parvipinnis infected with the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis display conspicuous swimming behaviours that render them 30 times more likely to be eaten by birds, the parasite's final host. Prevalence of E. californiensis reaches nearly 100% in most F. parvipinnis populations, with parasite biomass constituting almost 2% of F. parvipinnis biomass in some locations. Despite having thousands of cysts on their brains, infected fish grow and mature at rates comparable to those of uninfected populations. The lack of general pathology combined with the specificity of the altered behaviours suggests that the behavioural changes are due to parasite manipulation. The monoamine neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine, which control locomotion and social behaviour in fishes and other vertebrates, were examined to explore the underlying mechanisms of this behaviour modification. Whereas previous studies were similarly conducted with experimentally infected fish, in this study, brain dopaminergic and serotonergic activity were analysed in naturally infected fish to assess how E. californiensis may alter F. parvipinnis monoamines in a naturally occurring system. A parasite density-associated decrease in serotonergic activity occurred in the hippocampus of naturally infected fish, as well as a decrease in dopaminergic activity in the raphe nuclei, suggesting that E. californiensis inhibits serotonin and dopamine signaling in naturally infected F. parvipinnis. The neurochemical profile of infected fish is consistent with the hypothesis that E. californiensis affects brain monoaminergic systems in order to induce impulse-driven, active, and aggressive behaviour in its hosts.

  18. PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase is necessary for lipogenic activation during HCMV infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjun; Pierciey, Francis J; Maguire, Tobi G; Alwine, James C

    2013-01-01

    PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum (ER) kinase (PERK) is an ER-associated stress sensor protein which phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) to induce translation attenuation in response to ER stress. PERK is also a regulator of lipogenesis during adipocyte differentiation through activation of the cleavage of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1), resulting in the upregulation of lipogenic enzymes. Our recent studies have shown that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in human fibroblasts (HF) induces adipocyte-like lipogenesis through the activation of SREBP1. Here, we report that PERK expression is highly increased in HCMV-infected cells and is necessary for HCMV growth. Depletion of PERK, using short hairpin RNA (shRNA), resulted in attenuation of HCMV growth, inhibition of lipid synthesis and reduction of lipogenic gene expression. Examination of the cleavage of SREBP proteins showed PERK depletion inhibited the cleavage of SREBP1, but not SREBP2, in HCMV-infected cells, suggesting different cleavage regulatory mechanisms for SREBP1 and 2. Further studies showed that the depletion of SREBP1, but not SREBP2, reduced lipid synthesis in HCMV infection, suggesting that activation of SREBP1 is sufficient to induce lipogenesis in HCMV infection. The reduction of lipid synthesis by PERK depletion can be partially restored by expressing a Flag-tagged nuclear form of SREBP1a. Our studies also suggest that the induction of PERK in HCMV-infected cells stimulates SREBP1 cleavage by reducing levels of Insig1 (Insulin inducible gene 1) protein; this occurs independent of the phosphorylation of eIF2α. Introduction of an exogenous Insig1-Myc into HCMV infected cells significantly reduced HCMV growth and lipid synthesis. Our data demonstrate that the induction of PERK during HCMV infection is necessary for full activation of lipogenesis; this effect appears to be mediated by limiting the levels of Insig1 thus freeing SREBP1-SCAP complexes for

  19. Memory CD8(+) T cells elicited by HIV-1 lipopeptide vaccines display similar phenotypic profiles but differences in term of magnitude and multifunctionality compared with FLU- or EBV-specific memory T cells in humans.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Suzanne; Charmeteau, Benedicte; Surenaud, Mathieu; Salmon, Dominique; Launay, Odile; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Hosmalin, Anne; Gahery, Hanne

    2014-01-16

    Differentiation marker, multifunctionality and magnitude analyses of specific-CD8(+) memory T cells are crucial to improve development of HIV vaccines designed to generate cell-mediated immunity. Therefore, we fully characterized the HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses induced in volunteers vaccinated with HIV lipopeptide vaccines for phenotypic markers, tetramer staining, cytokine secretion, and cytotoxic activities. The frequency of ex vivo CD8(+) T cells elicited by lipopeptide vaccines is very rare and central-memory phenotype and functions of these cells were been shown to be important in AIDS immunity. So, we expanded them using specific peptides to compare the memory T cell responses induced in volunteers by HIV vaccines with responses to influenza (FLU) or Epstein Barr virus (EBV). By analyzing the differentiation state of IFN-γ-secreting CD8(+) T cells, we found a CCR7(-)CD45RA(-)CD28(+int)/CD28(-) profile (>85%) belonging to a subset of intermediate-differentiated effector T cells for HIV, FLU, and EBV. We then assessed the quality of the response by measuring various T cell functions. The percentage of single IFN-γ T cell producers in response to HIV was 62% of the total of secreting T cells compared with 35% for FLU and EBV, dual and triple (IFN-γ/IL-2/CD107a) T cell producers could also be detected but at lower levels (8% compared with 37%). Finally, HIV-specific T cells secreted IFN-γ and TNF-α, but not the dual combination like FLU- and EBV-specific T cells. Thus, we found that the functional profile and magnitude of expanded HIV-specific CD8(+) T precursors were more limited than those of to FLU- and EBV-specific CD8(+) T cells. These data show that CD8(+) T cells induced by these HIV vaccines have a similar differentiation profile to FLU and EBV CD8(+) T cells, but that the vaccine potency to induce multifunctional T cells needs to be increased in order to improve vaccination strategies.

  20. Gene expression analysis during acute hepatitis C virus infection associates dendritic cell activation with viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Aintzane; Riezu-Boj, Jose-Ignacio; Larrea, Esther; Villanueva, Lorea; Lasarte, Juan Jose; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Fisicaro, Paola; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Missale, Gabriele; Ferrari, Carlo; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Prieto, Jesús; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Viral clearance during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the induction of potent antiviral T-cell responses. Since dendritic cells (DC) are essential in the activation of primary T-cell responses, gene expression was analyzed in DC from patients during acute HCV infection. By using microarrays, gene expression was compared in resting and activated peripheral blood plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid (mDC) DC from acute HCV resolving patients (AR) and from patients who become chronically infected (ANR), as well as in healthy individuals (CTRL) and chronically-infected patients (CHR). For pDC, a high number of upregulated genes was found in AR patients, irrespective of DC stimulation. However, for mDC, most evident differences were detected after DC stimulation, again corresponding to upregulated genes in AR patients. Divergent behavior of ANR was also observed when analyzing DC from CTRL and CHR, with ANR patients clustering again apart from these groups. These differences corresponded to metabolism-associated genes and genes belonging to pathways relevant for DC activation and cytokine responses. Thus, upregulation of relevant genes in DC during acute HCV infection may determine viral clearance, suggesting that dysfunctional DC may be responsible for the lack of efficient T-cell responses which lead to chronic HCV infection.

  1. IL-15 promotes activation and expansion of CD8+ T cells in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Freeman, Michael L.; Mudd, Joseph C.; Shive, Carey L.; Reynaldi, Arnold; Estes, Jacob D.; Deleage, Claire; Lucero, Carissa; Anderson, Jodi; Schacker, Timothy W.; Davenport, Miles P.; McCune, Joseph M.; Hunt, Peter W.; Lee, Sulggi A.; Debernardo, Robert L.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Canaday, David H.; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Sieg, Scott F.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-1–infected patients, increased numbers of circulating CD8+ T cells are linked to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Here, we identified a bystander mechanism that promotes CD8 T cell activation and expansion in untreated HIV-1–infected patients. Compared with healthy controls, untreated HIV-1–infected patients have an increased population of proliferating, granzyme B+, CD8+ T cells in circulation. Vβ expression and deep sequencing of CDR3 revealed that in untreated HIV-1 infection, cycling memory CD8 T cells possess a broad T cell repertoire that reflects the repertoire of the resting population. This suggests that cycling is driven by bystander activation, rather than specific antigen exposure. Treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with IL-15 induced a cycling, granzyme B+ phenotype in CD8+ T cells. Moreover, elevated IL-15 expression in the lymph nodes of untreated HIV-1–infected patients correlated with circulating CD8+ T cell counts and was normalized in these patients following antiretroviral therapy. Together, these results suggest that IL-15 drives bystander activation of CD8+ T cells, which predicts disease progression in untreated HIV-1–infected patients and suggests that elevated IL-15 may also drive CD8+ T cell expansion that is linked to increased morbidity and mortality in treated patients. PMID:27322062

  2. Enterococcus faecalis infection activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling to block apoptotic cell death in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun; Shankar, Nathan

    2014-12-01

    Apoptosis is an intrinsic immune defense mechanism in the host response to microbial infection. Not surprisingly, many pathogens have evolved various strategies to manipulate this important pathway to benefit their own survival and dissemination in the host during infection. To our knowledge, no attempts have been made to explore the host cell survival signals modulated by the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis. Here, we show for the first time that during early stages of infection, internalized enterococci can prevent host cell (RAW264.7 cells, primary macrophages, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts [MEFs]) apoptosis induced by a wide spectrum of proapoptotic stimuli. Activation of caspase 3 and cleavage of the caspase 3 substrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase were inhibited in E. faecalis-infected cells, indicating that E. faecalis protects macrophages from apoptosis by inhibiting caspase 3 activation. This antiapoptotic activity in E. faecalis-infected cells was dependent on the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway, which resulted in the increased expression of the antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2 and decreased expression of the proapoptotic factor Bax. Further analysis revealed that active E. faecalis physiology was important for inhibition of host cell apoptosis, and this feature seemed to be a strain-independent trait among E. faecalis isolates. Employing a mouse peritonitis model, we also determined that cells collected from the peritoneal lavage fluid of E. faecalis-infected mice showed reduced levels of apoptosis compared to cells from uninfected mice. These results show early modulation of apoptosis during infection and have important implications for enterococcal pathogenesis.

  3. The Role of Latently Infected B Cells in CNS Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana Citlali; Horwitz, Marc Steven

    2015-01-01

    The onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, it is believed that previous infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) may contribute in the development of MS. EBV has been associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematous, and cancers like Burkitt’s lymphoma. EBV establishes a life-long latency in B cells with occasional reactivation of the virus throughout the individual’s life. The role played by B cells in MS pathology has been largely studied, yet is not clearly understood. In MS patients, Rituximab, a novel treatment that targets CD20+ B cells, has proven to have successful results in diminishing the number of relapses in remitting relapsing MS; however, the mechanism of how this drug acts has not been clearly established. In this review, we analyze the evidence of how B cells latently infected with EBV might be altering the immune system response and helping in the development of MS. We will also discuss how animal models, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (γHV-68), can be used as powerful tools in the study of the relationship between EBV, MS, and B cells. PMID:26579121

  4. The Role of Platelet-Activating Factor in Chronic Inflammation, Immune Activation, and Comorbidities Associated with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Papakonstantinou, Vasiliki; Detopoulou, Paraskevi; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Chini, Maria; Lazanas, Marios C.; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of highly effective antiretroviral therapy, cardiovascular disease has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among people with treated HIV-1, but the pathogenesis is unclear. Platelet-activating factor is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that has immunomodulatory effects and a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and cardiovascular disease. Limited scientific evidence suggests that the platelet-activating factor pathway may be a mechanistic link between HIV-1 infection, systemic inflammation, and immune activation that contribute to pathogenesis of chronic HIV-related comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. In this review, we examine the mechanisms by which the cross-talk between HIV-1, immune dysregulation, inflammation, and perturbations in the platelet-activating factor pathway may directly affect HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. Understanding the role of platelet-activating factor in HIV-1 infection may pave the way for further studies to explore therapeutic interventions, such as diet, that can modify platelet-activating factor activity and use of platelet-activating factor inhibitors that might improve the prognosis of HIV-1 infected patients. PMID:26616844

  5. Pythium infection activates conserved plant defense responses in mosses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The moss Physcomitrella patens (P. patens) is a useful model to study abiotic stress responses since it is highly tolerant to drought, salt and osmotic stress. However, little is known about the defense mechanisms activated in this moss after pathogen assault. Here the induction of defense responses...

  6. Dynamics of lung macrophage activation in response to helminth infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of our understanding of the development and phenotype of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) has been obtained from studies investigating the response of bone marrow- and peritoneal-derived cells to IL-4 or IL-13 stimulation. Comparatively little is known about the development of the AAM...

  7. Activation and Recruitment of Regulatory T Cells via Chemokine Receptor Activation in Trichinella spiralis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jeong-Bin; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-01-01

    As most infections by the helminth parasite elicit the recruitment of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T (Treg) cells, many scientists have suggested that these cells could be used for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammation and associated diseases. In order to investigate the distribution and alteration of activated Treg cells, we compared the expression levels of Treg cell activation markers in the ileum and gastrocnemius tissues 1, 2, and 4 weeks after infection. The number of Treg cells was monitored using GFP-coded Foxp3 transgenic mice. In mice at 1 week after Trichinella spiralis infection, the number of activated Treg cells was higher than in the control group. In mice at 2 weeks after infection, there was a significant increase in the number of cells expressing Foxp3 and CTLA-4 when compared to the control group and mice at 1 week after infection. At 4 weeks after infection, T. spiralis was easily identifiable in nurse cells in mouse muscles. In the intestine, the expression of Gzmb and Klrg1 decreased over time and that of Capg remained unchanged for the first and second week, then decreased in the 4th week. However, in the muscles, the expression of most chemokine genes was increased due to T. spiralis infection, in particular the expression levels of Gzmb, OX40, and CTLA-4 increased until week 4. In addition, increased gene expression of all chemokine receptors in muscle, CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR9, and CCR10, was observed up until the 4th week. In conclusion, various chemokine receptors showed increased expressions combined with recruitment of Treg cells in the muscle tissue. PMID:27180574

  8. Exosomes Derived from HIV-1-infected Cells Contain Trans-activation Response Element RNA*

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 104–106 copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 103 copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS. PMID:23661700

  9. Exosomes derived from HIV-1-infected cells contain trans-activation response element RNA.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-07-05

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 10(4)-10(6) copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 10(3) copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS.

  10. A Lipoxygenase Pathway Is Activated in Rice after Infection with the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe grisea.

    PubMed

    Ohta, H; Shida, K; Peng, Y L; Furusawa, I; Shishiyama, J; Aibara, S; Morita, Y

    1991-09-01

    Lipoxygenase (LOX) and lipid hydroperoxide-decomposing activity (LHDA) markedly increased in the fifth leaves of rice (Oryza sativa cv Aichiasahi) after infection with the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe grisea. The increases in the enzyme activities were significantly higher in response to infection with an incompatible strain (race 131) compared with infection with a compatible strain (race 007) of the fungus. Using ion-exchange chromatography, we isolated three LOX activities (leaf LOX-1, -2, -3) from both uninoculated and infected leaves. The activity of leaf LOX-3, in particular, increased in the incompatible race-infected leaves. The leaf LOX-3 had a pH optimum of 5.0 and produced preferentially 13-l-hydroperoxy-9,11 (Z,E)-octadecadienoic acid (13-HPODD) from linoleic acid. 13-HPODD and 13-l-hydroxy-9,11 (Z,E)-octadecadienoic acid, one of the reaction products from 13-HPODD by LHDA, were highly inhibitory to the germination of conidia of the fungus. The present study provides correlative evidence for important roles of LOX and LHDA in the resistance response of rice against the blast fungus.

  11. Cell death, BAX activation, and HMGB1 release during infection with Chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Jungas, Thomas; Verbeke, Philippe; Darville, Toni; Ojcius, David M

    2004-11-01

    Infection by a number of Chlamydia species leads to resistance of the host cell to apoptosis, followed by induction of host-cell death. In a population of infected cells that displays protection against staurosporine-induced apoptosis among the adherent cells, we find that cells that had been recovered from the supernatant share characteristics of both apoptosis and necrosis, as assayed by the propidium iodide (PI)-annexin V double-labeling technique. Cell death was observed in both an epithelial cell line and primary fibroblasts, although the primary cells had a higher propensity to die through apoptosis than the immortalized cell line. Staurosporine-mediated activation of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member, BAX, was inhibited in the epithelial cell line infected for 32 h with the lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV/L2) but not the murine pneumonitis (MoPn) strain of C. trachomatis, but inhibition of staurosporine-mediated BAX activation disappeared after 48 h of infection with the LGV/L2 strain. Conversely, infection with MoPn (C. muridarum) but not LGV/L2 led to BAX activation after 72 h, as previously reported for shorter (48 h) infection with the guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) serovar of C. psittaci (C. caviae). These results suggest that the ability to inhibit staurosporine-mediated BAX activation or to activate BAX due to the infection itself may vary as a function of the chlamydial strain. Interestingly, both the epithelial cells and the fibroblasts also released high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) during infection, although much less HMGB1 was released from fibroblasts, consistent with the higher level of apoptosis observed in the primary cells. HMGB1 is released preferentially by necrotic or permeabilized viable cells, but not apoptotic cells. In the extracellular space, HMGB1 promotes inflammation through interaction with specific cell-surface receptors. Higher levels of HMGB1 were also measured in the genital-tract secretions of mice

  12. The plasmid replicon of EBV consists of multiple cis-acting elements that facilitate DNA synthesis by the cell and a viral maintenance element.

    PubMed Central

    Aiyar, A; Tyree, C; Sugden, B

    1998-01-01

    Plasmids containing oriP, the plasmid origin of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are replicated stably in human cells that express a single viral trans-acting factor, EBNA-1. Unlike plasmids of other viruses, but akin to human chromosomes, oriP plasmids are synthesized once per cell cycle, and are partitioned faithfully to daughter cells during mitosis. Although EBNA-1 binds multiple sites within oriP, its role in DNA synthesis and partitioning has been obscure. EBNA-1 lacks enzymatic activities that are present in the origin-binding proteins of other mammalian viruses, and does not interact with human cellular proteins that provide equivalent enzymatic functions. We demonstrate that plasmids with oriP or its constituent elements are synthesized efficiently in human cells in the absence of EBNA-1. Further, we show that human cells rapidly eliminate or destroy newly synthesized plasmids, and that both EBNA-1 and the family of repeats of oriP are required for oriP plasmids to escape this catastrophic loss. These findings indicate that EBV's plasmid replicon consists of genetic elements with distinct functions, multiple cis-acting elements that facilitate DNA synthesis and viral cis/trans elements that permit retention of replicated DNA in daughter cells. They also explain historical failures to identify mammalian origins of DNA synthesis as autonomously replicating sequences. PMID:9799247

  13. Cytokine profile and natural killer cell activity in Listeria monocytogenes infected mice treated orally with Petiveria alliacea extract.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, M L; Quadros, M R; Santos, L M

    2000-08-01

    In this work, we investigated the effects of Petiveria alliacea extract on the production of Th1-type and Th2-type cytokines and on NK cells activity in normal and Listeria monocytogenes infected mice. Our results demonstrated that in normal/non-infected mice P. alliacea administration led to increased levels of Interleukin-2 (IL-2). The infection alone enhanced INF-gamma levels and NK cell activity at 48 and 72 hours of infection. The treatment with five consecutive doses of 1000 mg/kg/day of P. alliacea extract, given previously to infection, led to further increases in IL-2 levels, in relation to normal/non-infected/P. alliacea treated controls, and in INF-gamma levels at 72 h of infection, compared to infected mice. On the other hand, the production of IL-4 and IL-10 were not altered either by the infection or by the treatment with P. alliacea extract. NK cells activity increased at 48 h and 72 h following the inoculation of the bacteria. When mice were treated with P. alliacea previously to infection, NK activity was higher than that observed at 48 h, 72 h and 120 h of infection in the infected animal. Based on these findings we suggest that P. alliacea up-regulates anti-bacterial immune response by enhancing both Th1 function and the activity of NK cells.

  14. Systemic activation of the immune system in HIV infection: The role of the immune complexes (hypothesis).

    PubMed

    Korolevskaya, Larisa B; Shmagel, Konstantin V; Shmagel, Nadezhda G; Saidakova, Evgeniya V

    2016-03-01

    Currently, immune activation is proven to be the basis for the HIV infection pathogenesis and a strong predictor of the disease progression. Among the causes of systemic immune activation the virus and its products, related infectious agents, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and regulatory CD4+ T cells' decrease are considered. Recently microbial translocation (bacterial products yield into the bloodstream as a result of the gastrointestinal tract mucosal barrier integrity damage) became the most popular hypothesis. Previously, we have found an association between immune complexes present in the bloodstream of HIV infected patients and the T cell activation. On this basis, we propose a significantly modified hypothesis of immune activation in HIV infection. It is based on the immune complexes' participation in the immunocompetent cells' activation. Immune complexes are continuously formed in the chronic phase of the infection. Together with TLR-ligands (viral antigens, bacterial products coming from the damaged gut) present in the bloodstream they interact with macrophages. As a result macrophages are transformed into the type II activated forms. These macrophages block IL-12 production and start synthesizing IL-10. High level of this cytokine slows down the development of the full-scale Th1-response. The anti-viral reactions are shifted towards the serogenesis. Newly synthesized antibodies' binding to viral antigens leads to continuous formation of the immune complexes capable of interacting with antigen-presenting cells.

  15. An anti-infective synthetic peptide with dual antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities

    PubMed Central

    Silva, O. N.; de la Fuente-Núñez, C.; Haney, E. F.; Fensterseifer, I. C. M.; Ribeiro, S. M.; Porto, W. F.; Brown, P.; Faria-Junior, C.; Rezende, T. M. B.; Moreno, S. E.; Lu, T. K.; Hancock, R. E. W.; Franco, O. L.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infections are predicted to kill 10 million people per year by 2050, costing the global economy $100 trillion. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop alternative technologies. We have engineered a synthetic peptide called clavanin-MO, derived from a marine tunicate antimicrobial peptide, which exhibits potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties both in vitro and in vivo. The peptide effectively killed a panel of representative bacterial strains, including multidrug-resistant hospital isolates. Antimicrobial activity of the peptide was demonstrated in animal models, reducing bacterial counts by six orders of magnitude, and contributing to infection clearance. In addition, clavanin-MO was capable of modulating innate immunity by stimulating leukocyte recruitment to the site of infection, and production of immune mediators GM-CSF, IFN-γ and MCP-1, while suppressing an excessive and potentially harmful inflammatory response by increasing synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and repressing the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12 and TNF-α. Finally, treatment with the peptide protected mice against otherwise lethal infections caused by both Gram-negative and -positive drug-resistant strains. The peptide presented here directly kills bacteria and further helps resolve infections through its immune modulatory properties. Peptide anti-infective therapeutics with combined antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties represent a new approach to treat antibiotic-resistant infections. PMID:27804992

  16. Lysozyme Activity in the Plasma of Rodents Infected With Their Homologous Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Maraghi, S; Molyneux, DH; Wallbanks, KR

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study the concentration of lysozyme in blood plasma of Microtus agrestis, Clethrinomys glareolus, Apodemus sylvaticus, BK rats and outbred white mice before and after infection with culture forms of Trypanosoma microti, T, evotomys, T. grosi, T. lewisi and T. musculi respectively was measured. Methods Blood samples of rodents, Microtus agrestis, Clethrionomys glareolus, Apodemus sylvaticus, BK rats and outbred mice infected with T. microti, T. evotomys, T. grosi, T. lewisi and T. musculi respectively were collected in heparinized micro- tubes immediately before inoculation and 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 96 and more than 400 days after intra- perituneal inoculation with 5×105of their homologous trypanosome parasites of which more than half were metacyclic trypomastigote in 0.2 ml of culture medium. Micro- tubes were centrifuged and plasma samples were separated and the lysozyme activity was measured by the agar method. Results Levels of lysozyme rose rapidly three to six days after the inoculation to ten to twenty than their pre- infection levels. They then gradually decreased, although after more than one year they were still two to ten folds higher than controls. The highest level measured occurred in rats infected with T. lewisi and the lowest in A. sylvaticus infected with T. grosi. After one year the highest concentration of lysozyme was in mice infected with T. musculi and lowest in A. sylvaticus. Conclusion Persistent enhanced lysozyme levels may prevent re- infection with trypanosomes. PMID:23323096

  17. Cerebrovascular disease in HIV-infected individuals in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Belinda; Cysique, Lucette A; Markus, Romesh; Brew, Bruce J

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-infected individuals mostly in developed countries has dramatically improved their prognosis. In such advantaged regions of the world, therefore, many patients are now transitioning from middle into older age, with altered patterns of disease. While previously a rare complication of HIV infection, cerebrovascular disease (particularly that associated with atherosclerosis) is becoming relatively more important in this treated group of individuals. This review summarises the evidence regarding the shifting epidemiology of cerebrovascular diseases affecting HIV-infected individuals. While outlining the association between HIV infection and AIDS and cerebrovascular disease, as well as opportunistic diseases and HIV-associated vasculopathies, the current evidence supporting an increase in atherosclerotic disease in treated HIV-infected individuals is emphasised and a management approach to ischaemic stroke in HIV-infected individuals is presented. Evidence supporting the important role of HAART and HIV infection itself in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic disease is discussed, together with preventative approaches to this increasingly important disease process as the population ages. Finally, a discussion regarding the significant association between cerebrovascular disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder is presented, together with possible mechanisms behind this relationship.

  18. Antibody-Mediated Elimination of the Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Ehrlichia chaffeensis during Active Infection

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Gary M.; Yager, Eric; Shilo, Konstantin; Volk, Erin; Reilly, Andrew; Chu, Frederick K.

    2000-01-01

    It is generally accepted that cellular, but not humoral immunity, plays an important role in host defense against intracellular bacteria. However, studies of some of these pathogens have provided evidence that antibodies can provide immunity if present during the initiation of infection. Here, we examined immunity against infection by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Studies with mice have demonstrated that immunocompetent strains are resistant to persistent infection but that SCID mice become persistently and fatally infected. Transfer of immune serum or antibodies obtained from immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice to C57BL/6 scid mice provided significant although transient protection from infection. Bacterial clearance was observed when administration occurred at the time of inoculation or well after infection was established. The effect was dose dependent, occurred within 2 days, and persisted for as long as 2 weeks. Weekly serum administration prolonged the survival of susceptible mice. Although cellular immunity is required for complete bacterial clearance, the data show that antibodies can play a significant role in the elimination of this obligate intracellular bacterium during active infection and thus challenge the paradigm that humoral responses are unimportant for immunity to such organisms. PMID:10722619

  19. Small-molecule inhibitors of lethal factor protease activity protect against anthrax infection.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Crown, Devorah; Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Kim, Seongjin; Johnson, Alan; Leysath, Clinton; Leppla, Stephen H

    2013-09-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, manifests its pathogenesis through the action of two secreted toxins. The bipartite lethal and edema toxins, a combination of lethal factor or edema factor with the protein protective antigen, are important virulence factors for this bacterium. We previously developed small-molecule inhibitors of lethal factor proteolytic activity (LFIs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy in a rat lethal toxin challenge model. In this work, we show that these LFIs protect against lethality caused by anthrax infection in mice when combined with subprotective doses of either antibiotics or neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that target edema factor. Significantly, these inhibitors provided protection against lethal infection when administered as a monotherapy. As little as two doses (10 mg/kg) administered at 2 h and 8 h after spore infection was sufficient to provide a significant survival benefit in infected mice. Administration of LFIs early in the infection was found to inhibit dissemination of vegetative bacteria to the organs in the first 32 h following infection. In addition, neutralizing antibodies against edema factor also inhibited bacterial dissemination with similar efficacy. Together, our findings confirm the important roles that both anthrax toxins play in establishing anthrax infection and demonstrate the potential for small-molecule therapeutics targeting these proteins.

  20. PKR Activation Favors Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus Replication in Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gamil, Amr A.A.; Xu, Cheng; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR) is a Type I interferon (IFN) stimulated gene that has important biological and immunological functions. In viral infections, in general, PKR inhibits or promotes viral replication, but PKR-IPNV interaction has not been previously studied. We investigated the involvement of PKR during infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) infection using a custom-made rabbit antiserum and the PKR inhibitor C16. Reactivity of the antiserum to PKR in CHSE-214 cells was confirmed after IFNα treatment giving an increased protein level. IPNV infection alone did not give increased PKR levels by Western blot, while pre-treatment with PKR inhibitor before IPNV infection gave decreased eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (eIF2α) phosphorylation. This suggests that PKR, despite not being upregulated, is involved in eIF2α phosphorylation during IPNV infection. PKR inhibitor pre-treatment resulted in decreased virus titers, extra- and intracellularly, concomitant with reduction of cells with compromised membranes in IPNV-permissive cell lines. These findings suggest that IPNV uses PKR activation to promote virus replication in infected cells. PMID:27338445

  1. Quiescent hematopoietic stem cells are activated by IFNγ in response to chronic infection

    PubMed Central

    Baldridge, Megan T.; King, Katherine Y.; Boles, Nathan C.; Weksberg, David C.; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Lymphocytes and neutrophils are rapidly depleted by systemic infection1. Progenitor cells of the hematopoietic system, such as common myeloid progenitors (CMPs) and common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs), increase the production of immune cells to restore and maintain homeostasis during chronic infection, but the contribution of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to this process is largely unknown2. Using an in vivo mouse model of Mycobacterium avium infection, we show that an increased proportion of long-term repopulating HSCs (LT-HSCs) proliferate during M. avium infection, and that this response requires interferon-gamma (IFNγ) but not interferon-alpha (IFNα) signaling. Thus, the hematopoietic response to chronic bacterial infection involves the activation not only of intermediate blood progenitors but of LT-HSCs as well. IFNγ is sufficient to promote LT-HSC proliferation in vivo; furthermore, HSCs from mice deficient in IFNγ have a lower proliferative rate, indicating that baseline IFNγ tone regulates HSC activity. These findings are the first to implicate IFNγ both as a regulator of HSCs during homeostasis and under conditions of infectious stress. Our studies contribute to a deeper understanding of hematologic responses in patients with chronic infections such as HIV/AIDS or tuberculosis3-5. PMID:20535209

  2. Peptide mimics selected from immune sera using phage display technology can replace native antigens in the diagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Casey, J L; Coley, A M; Parisi, K; Foley, M

    2009-02-01

    There is an expanding area of small molecule discovery, especially in the area of peptide mimetics. Peptide sequences can be used to substitute for the entire native antigen for use in diagnostic assays. Our approach is to select peptides that mimic epitopes of the natural immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that may be recognised by antibodies typically produced after infection with EBV. We screened a random peptide library on sera from rabbits immunised with a crude preparation of EBV and serum antibodies from a patient with a high titer of EBV antibodies. We selected four peptides (Eb1-4) with the highest relative binding affinity with immune rabbit sera and a single peptide with high affinity to human serum antibodies. The peptides were coupled to the carrier molecule BSA and the recognition of the peptides by IgM antibodies in clinical samples after infection with EBV was measured. The sensitivities were Eb1 94%, Eb2, 3, 4 88%, H1 81% and all had 100% specificity. This study illustrates that the phage display approach to select epitope mimics can be applied to polyclonal antibodies and peptides that represent several diagnostically important epitopes can be selected simultaneously. This panel of EBV peptides representing a wide coverage of immunodominant epitopes could replace crude antigen preparations currently used for capture in commercial diagnostic tests for EBV.

  3. Peptide mimics selected from immune sera using phage display technology can replace native antigens in the diagnosis of Epstein–Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Casey, J.L.; Coley, A.M.; Parisi, K.; Foley, M.

    2009-01-01

    There is an expanding area of small molecule discovery, especially in the area of peptide mimetics. Peptide sequences can be used to substitute for the entire native antigen for use in diagnostic assays. Our approach is to select peptides that mimic epitopes of the natural immune response to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) that may be recognised by antibodies typically produced after infection with EBV. We screened a random peptide library on sera from rabbits immunised with a crude preparation of EBV and serum antibodies from a patient with a high titer of EBV antibodies. We selected four peptides (Eb1–4) with the highest relative binding affinity with immune rabbit sera and a single peptide with high affinity to human serum antibodies. The peptides were coupled to the carrier molecule BSA and the recognition of the peptides by IgM antibodies in clinical samples after infection with EBV was measured. The sensitivities were Eb1 94%, Eb2, 3, 4 88%, H1 81% and all had 100% specificity. This study illustrates that the phage display approach to select epitope mimics can be applied to polyclonal antibodies and peptides that represent several diagnostically important epitopes can be selected simultaneously. This panel of EBV peptides representing a wide coverage of immunodominant epitopes could replace crude antigen preparations currently used for capture in commercial diagnostic tests for EBV. PMID:19073711

  4. Functional Activity of Monocytes and Macrophages in HTLV-1 Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Camila F.; Souza, Anselmo S.; Diniz, Angela G.; Carvalho, Natália B.; Santos, Silvane B.; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2014-01-01

    The Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infects predominantly T cells, inducing proliferation and lymphocyte activation. Additionally, HTLV-1 infected subjects are more susceptible to other infections caused by other intracellular agents. Monocytes/macrophages are important cells in the defense against intracellular pathogens. Our aims were to determine the frequency of monocytes subsets, expression of co-stimulatory molecules in these cells and to evaluate microbicidal ability and cytokine and chemokine production by macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. Participants were 23 HTLV-1 carriers (HC), 22 HAM/TSP patients and 22 healthy subjects (HS) not infected with HTLV-1. The frequencies of monocyte subsets and expression of co-stimulatory molecules were determined by flow cytometry. Macrophages were infected with L. braziliensis or stimulated with LPS. Microbicidal activity of macrophages was determined by optic microscopy. Cytokines/chemokines from macrophage supernatants were measured by ELISA. HAM/TSP patients showed an increase frequency of intermediate monocytes, but expression of co-stimulatory molecules was similar between the groups. Macrophages from HTLV-1 infected individuals were infected with L. braziliensis at the same ratio than macrophages from HS, and all the groups had the same ability to kill Leishmania parasites. However, macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects produced more CXCL9 and CCL5, and less IL-10 than cells from HS. While there was no correlation between IFN-γ and cytokine/chemokine production by macrophages, there was a correlation between proviral load and TNF and CXCL10. These data showed a dissociation between the inflammatory response and microbicidal ability of macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. While macrophages ability to kill an intracellular pathogen did not differ among HTLV-1 infected subjects, these cells secreted high amount of chemokines even in unstimulated cultures. Moreover the increasing

  5. Drugs designed to inhibit human p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation treat Toxoplasma gondii and Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuang; Daniel, Benjamin J; Brumlik, Michael J; Burow, Matthew E; Zou, Weiping; Khan, Imtiaz A; Wadsworth, Scott; Siekierka, John; Curiel, Tyler J

    2007-12-01

    We recently showed that the pyridinylimidazoles SB203580 and SB202190, drugs designed to block human p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation, also inhibited replication of the medically important intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii in cultured human fibroblasts through a direct effect on the parasite. We now show that additional pyridinylimidazole and imidazopyrimidine p38 MAPK inhibitors inhibit intracellular T. gondii replication in vitro and protect mice against fatal T. gondii infection. Mice surviving infection following treatment with p38 MAPK inhibitors were resistant to subsequent T. gondii challenge, demonstrating induction of protective immunity. Thus, drugs originally developed to block human p38 MAPK activation are useful for treating T. gondii infection without inducing significant immunosuppression. MAPK inhibitors combined with either of the approved anti-Toxoplasma drugs sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine resulted in improved survival among mice challenged with a fatal T. gondii inoculum. A MAPK inhibitor also treated mice infected with the Microsporidium parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi, suggesting that MAPK inhibitors represent a novel class of agents that may have a broad spectrum of antiparasitic activity. Preliminary studies implicate a T. gondii MAPK homologue as the target of drug action, suggesting possibilities for more-selective agents.

  6. Bacterial Infection of Fly Ovaries Reduces Egg Production and Induces Local Hemocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Stephanie M.; Schneider, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Morbidity, the state of being diseased, is an important aspect of pathogenesis that has gone relatively unstudied in fruit flies. Our interest is in characterizing how bacterial pathogenesis affects various physiologies of the fly. We chose to examine the fly ovary because we found bacterial infection had a striking effect on fly reproduction. We observed decreased egg laying after bacterial infection that correlated with increased bacterial virulence. We also found that bacteria colonized the ovary in a previously undescribed manner; bacteria were found in the posterior of the ovary, adjacent to the lateral oviduct. This l