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Sample records for active efflux mechanism

  1. Comparison of effects of cromakalim and pinacidil on mechanical activity and 86Rb efflux in dog coronary arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Masuzawa, K.; Asano, M.; Matsuda, T.; Imaizumi, Y.; Watanabe, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Effects of two K+ channel openers, cromakalim and pinacidil, on mechanical activity and on 86Rb efflux were compared in strips of dog coronary arteries. Cromakalim and pinacidil produced the relaxation in 20.9 mM K(+)-contracted strips with a pD2 of 6.53 and 5.95, respectively. In 65.9 mM K(+)-contracted strips, high concentrations of pinacidil, but not cromakalim, produced relaxation. Ca+(+)-induced contractions in 80 mM K(+)-depolarized strips were also inhibited by pinacidil but not by cromakalim. Glibenclamide, a blocker of ATP-regulated K+ (KATP) channels, competitively antagonized the relaxant responses to cromakalim with a pA2 value of 7.62. However, the antagonism by glibenclamide of the relaxant responses to pinacidil was not a typical competitive type, suggesting the contribution of other effects than the KATP channel opening activity to the relaxant effects of pinacidil. In resting strips preloaded with 86Rb, cromakalim and pinacidil increased the basal 86Rb efflux in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in the 86Rb efflux induced by cromakalim was greater than that by pinacidil. When the effects of cromakalim and pinacidil on the 86Rb efflux were determined in the 20.9 or 65.9 mM K(+)-contracted strips, both drugs increased the 86Rb efflux. Under the same conditions nifedipine, a Ca(+)+ channel blocker, produced the relaxation that is accompanied by the decrease in 86Rb efflux. The increase in the 86Rb efflux induced by cromakalim was much greater than that by pinacidil.

  2. Involvement of Antibiotic Efflux Machinery in Glutathione-Mediated Decreased Ciprofloxacin Activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Manish; Subramanian, Mahesh; Kumar, Ranjeet; Jass, Jana; Jawali, Narendra

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed the contribution of different efflux components to glutathione-mediated abrogation of ciprofloxacin's activity in Escherichia coli and the underlying potential mechanism(s) behind this phenomenon. The results indicated that glutathione increased the total active efflux, thereby partially contributing to glutathione-mediated neutralization of ciprofloxacin's antibacterial action in E. coli However, the role of glutathione-mediated increased efflux becomes evident in the absence of a functional TolC-AcrAB efflux pump. PMID:27139480

  3. Enhanced Efflux Activity Facilitates Drug Tolerance in Dormant Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Yingying; Zhao, Zhilun; Li, Yingxing; Zou, Jin; Ma, Qi; Zhao, Yanna; Ke, Yuehua; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Huiyi; Baker, Matthew A.B.; Ge, Hao; Sun, Yujie; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Bai, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Natural variations in gene expression provide a mechanism for multiple phenotypes to arise in an isogenic bacterial population. In particular, a sub-group termed persisters show high tolerance to antibiotics. Previously, their formation has been attributed to cell dormancy. Here we demonstrate that bacterial persisters, under β-lactam antibiotic treatment, show less cytoplasmic drug accumulation as a result of enhanced efflux activity. Consistently, a number of multi-drug efflux genes, particularly the central component TolC, show higher expression in persisters. Time-lapse imaging and mutagenesis studies further establish a positive correlation between tolC expression and bacterial persistence. The key role of efflux systems, among multiple biological pathways involved in persister formation, indicates that persisters implement a positive defense against antibiotics prior to a passive defense via dormancy. Finally, efflux inhibitors and antibiotics together effectively attenuate persister formation, suggesting a combination strategy to target drug tolerance. PMID:27105118

  4. Recent advances toward a molecular mechanism of efflux pump inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Opperman, Timothy J.; Nguyen, Son T.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in Gram-negative pathogens, such as the Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, poses a significant threat to our ability to effectively treat infections caused by these organisms. A major component in the development of the MDR phenotype in Gram-negative bacteria is overexpression of Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND)-type efflux pumps, which actively pump antibacterial agents and biocides from the periplasm to the outside of the cell. Consequently, bacterial efflux pumps are an important target for developing novel antibacterial treatments. Potent efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) could be used as adjunctive therapies that would increase the potency of existing antibiotics and decrease the emergence of MDR bacteria. Several potent inhibitors of RND-type efflux pump have been reported in the literature, and at least three of these EPI series were optimized in a pre-clinical development program. However, none of these compounds have been tested in the clinic. One of the major hurdles to the development of EPIs has been the lack of biochemical, computational, and structural methods that could be used to guide rational drug design. Here, we review recent reports that have advanced our understanding of the mechanism of action of several potent EPIs against RND-type pumps. PMID:25999939

  5. Tigecycline Efflux as a Mechanism for Nonsusceptibility in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Anton Y; Adams, Jennifer; Paterson, David L

    2007-06-01

    Tigecycline has an extended spectrum of in vitro antimicrobial activities, including that against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter. After identifying bloodstream isolates of Acinetobacter with reduced susceptibilities to tigecycline, we performed a study to assess tigecycline efflux mediated by the resistance-nodulation-division-type transporter AdeABC. After exposure of two tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates to the efflux pump inhibitor phenyl-arginine-beta-naphthylamide (PABN), a fourfold reduction in the tigecycline MIC was observed. Both tigecycline-susceptible and -nonsusceptible isolates were found to carry the gene coding for the transmembrane component of the AdeABC pump, adeB, and the two-component regulatory system comprising adeS and adeR. Previously unreported point mutations were identified in the regulatory system in tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates. Real-time PCR identified 40-fold and 54-fold increases in adeB expression in the two tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates compared to that in a tigecycline-susceptible isolate. In vitro exposure of a tigecycline-susceptible clinical strain to tigecycline caused a rapid rise in the MIC of tigecycline from 2 microg/ml to 24 microg/ml, which was reversible with PABN. A 25-fold increase in adeB expression was observed in a comparison between this tigecycline-susceptible isolate and its isogenic tigecycline-nonsusceptible mutant. These results indicate that an efflux-based mechanism plays a role in reduced tigecycline susceptibility in Acinetobacter. PMID:17420217

  6. Tigecycline Efflux as a Mechanism for Nonsusceptibility in Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Anton Y.; Adams, Jennifer; Paterson, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Tigecycline has an extended spectrum of in vitro antimicrobial activities, including that against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter. After identifying bloodstream isolates of Acinetobacter with reduced susceptibilities to tigecycline, we performed a study to assess tigecycline efflux mediated by the resistance-nodulation-division-type transporter AdeABC. After exposure of two tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates to the efflux pump inhibitor phenyl-arginine-β-naphthylamide (PABN), a fourfold reduction in the tigecycline MIC was observed. Both tigecycline-susceptible and -nonsusceptible isolates were found to carry the gene coding for the transmembrane component of the AdeABC pump, adeB, and the two-component regulatory system comprising adeS and adeR. Previously unreported point mutations were identified in the regulatory system in tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates. Real-time PCR identified 40-fold and 54-fold increases in adeB expression in the two tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates compared to that in a tigecycline-susceptible isolate. In vitro exposure of a tigecycline-susceptible clinical strain to tigecycline caused a rapid rise in the MIC of tigecycline from 2 μg/ml to 24 μg/ml, which was reversible with PABN. A 25-fold increase in adeB expression was observed in a comparison between this tigecycline-susceptible isolate and its isogenic tigecycline-nonsusceptible mutant. These results indicate that an efflux-based mechanism plays a role in reduced tigecycline susceptibility in Acinetobacter. PMID:17420217

  7. Brain Efflux Index To Investigate the Influence of Active Efflux on Brain Distribution of Pemetrexed and Methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Agarwal, Sagar

    2013-01-01

    Antifolates, in particular methotrexate (MTX), have been widely used in the treatment of primary and secondary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Pemetrexed (PMX) is a novel antifolate that also exhibits potent antitumor activity against CNS malignancies. Studies have shown that brain distribution of both antifolates is significantly restricted, possible due to active efflux transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This study characterizes the brain-to-blood transport of PMX and MTX and examines the role of several efflux transporters in brain distribution of the antifolates by use of the intracerebral microinjection technique (brain efflux index). The results from this study show that both PMX and MTX undergo saturable efflux transport across the BBB, with elimination half-lives of approximately 39 minutes and 29 minutes, respectively. Of the various efflux transporters this study investigated, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) does not play an important role in the brain distribution of the two antifolate drugs. Interestingly, breast-cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) makes a significant contribution to the brain elimination of MTX but not PMX. In addition, the brain-to-blood transport of both antifolates was inhibited by probenecid and benzylpenicillin, suggesting the involvement of organic anion transporters in the efflux of these compounds from the brain, with organic anion transporter 3 (Oat3) being a possibility. Our results suggest that one of the underlying mechanisms behind the limited brain distribution of PMX and MTX is active efflux transport processes at the BBB, including a benzylpenicillin-sensitive transport system and/or the active transporter Bcrp. PMID:23297298

  8. Inducer expulsion in Streptococcus pyogenes: properties and mechanism of the efflux reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sutrina, S.L.; Reizer, J.; Saier, M.H Jr.

    1988-04-01

    Expulsion of preaccumulated methyl-..beta..-D-thiogalactoside-phosphate (TMG-P) from Streptococcus pyogenes is a two-step process comprising intracellular dephosphorylation of TMG-P followed by rapid efflux of the intracellularly formed free galactoside. The present study identifies the mechanism and the order and characterizes the temperature dependency of the efflux step. Unidirectional efflux of the intracellularly formed (/sup 14/C)TMG was only slightly affected when measured in the presence of unlabeled TMG (25 to 400 mM) in the extracellular medium. In contrast, pronounced inhibition of net efflux was observed in the presence of relatively low concentrations (1 to 16 mM) of extracellular (/sup 14/C)TMG. Since net efflux was nearly arrested when the external concentration of (/sup 14/C)TMG approached the intracellular concentration of this sugar, we propose that a facilitated diffusion mechanism is responsible for efflux and equilibration of TMG between the intracellular and extracellular milieus. The exit reaction was markedly dependent upon temperature, exhibited a high energy of activation (23 kcal (ca. 96 kJ) per mol), and followed first-order kinetics, indicating that the permease mediating this efflux was not saturated under the conditions of expulsion employed.

  9. Mechanism of ligand-gated potassium efflux in bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Roosild, Tarmo P.; Castronovo, Samantha; Healy, Jess; Miller, Samantha; Pliotas, Christos; Rasmussen, Tim; Bartlett, Wendy; Conway, Stuart J.; Booth, Ian R.

    2010-01-01

    Gram negative pathogens are protected against toxic electrophilic compounds by glutathione-gated potassium efflux systems (Kef) that modulate cytoplasmic pH. We have elucidated the mechanism of gating through structural and functional analysis of Escherichia coli KefC. The revealed mechanism can explain how subtle chemical differences in glutathione derivatives can produce opposite effects on channel function. Kef channels are regulated by potassium transport and NAD-binding (KTN) domains that sense both reduced glutathione, which inhibits Kef activity, and glutathione adducts that form during electrophile detoxification and activate Kef. We find that reduced glutathione stabilizes an interdomain association between two KTN folds, whereas large adducts sterically disrupt this interaction. F441 is identified as the pivotal residue discriminating between reduced glutathione and its conjugates. We demonstrate a major structural change on the binding of an activating ligand to a KTN-domain protein. Analysis of the regulatory interactions suggests strategies to disrupt pathogen potassium and pH homeostasis. PMID:21041667

  10. Active efflux of fluoroquinolones in Mycobacterium smegmatis mediated by LfrA, a multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Takiff, H E; Nikaido, H

    1996-01-01

    The lfrA gene cloned from chromosomal DNA of quinolone-resistant Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2-552 conferred low-level resistance to fluoroquinolones when present on multicopy plasmids. Sequence analysis suggested that lfrA encodes a membrane efflux pump of the major facilitator family (H. E. Takiff, M. Cimino, M. C. Musso, T. Weisbrod, R. Martinez, M. B. Delgado, L Salazar, B. R. Bloom, and W. R. Jacbos, Jr., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:362-366, 1996). In this work, we studied the role of LfrA in the accumulation of fluoroquinolones by M. smegmatis. The steady-state accumulation level of a hydrophilic quinolone, norfloxacin, by M. smegmatis harboring a plasmid carrying the lfrA gene was about 50% of that by the parent strain but was increased to the same level as that of the parent strain by addition of a proton conductor, carbonyl cyanide m-chorophenylhydrazone. Norfloxacin efflux mediated by LfrA was competed for strongly by ciprofloxacin but not by nalidixic acid. Furthermore, we showed that portions of norfloxacin accumulated by starved cells were pumped out upon reenergization of the cells, and the rates of this efflux showed evidence of saturation at higher intracellular concentrations of the drug. These results suggest that the LfrA polypeptide catalyzes the active efflux of several quinolones. PMID:8682782

  11. Conditioning of Roots with Hypoxia Increases Aluminum and Acid Stress Tolerance by Mitigating Activation of K+ Efflux Channels by ROS in Barley: Insights into Cross-Tolerance Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanling; Zhu, Min; Shabala, Lana; Zhou, Meixue; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is prevalent in soils, but Al toxicity is manifested only under acid conditions. It causes severe damages to the root system. Short-term waterlogging stress can occur simultaneously with Al toxicity in areas with high rainfall or an inappropriate irrigation pattern. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is one of the most Al-sensitive small-grained cereals. In this work, we have investigated effects of short-term treatments with hypoxia and phenolic acid (two major constraints in waterlogged soils) on root sensitivity to low-pH and Al stresses. We showed that hypoxia-primed roots maintained higher cell viability when exposed to low-pH/Al stress, in both elongation and mature root zones, and possessed superior ability to retain K(+) in response to low-pH/Al stresses. These priming effects were not related to higher H(+)-ATPase activity and better membrane potential maintenance, and could not be explained by the increased expression levels of HvHAK1, which mediates high-affinity K(+) uptake in roots. Instead, hypoxia-conditioned roots were significantly less sensitive to H2O2 treatment, indicated by the 10-fold reduction in the magnitude of K(+) efflux changes. This suggested that roots pre-treated with hypoxia desensitized reactive oxygen species (ROS)-inducible K(+) efflux channels in root epidermis, most probably via enhanced antioxidative capacity. A possible role for Ca(2+) in stress-induced ROS signaling pathways is also discussed. Overall, our results report, for the first time, the phenomenon of cross-protection between hypoxia and low-pH/Al stresses, and causally link it to the cell's ability to maintain cytosolic K(+) homeostasis. PMID:26581863

  12. Efflux as a glutaraldehyde resistance mechanism in Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Vikram, Amit; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Bibby, Kyle J

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in microbial biofilm control is biocide resistance. Phenotypic adaptations and physical protective effects have been historically thought to be the primary mechanisms for glutaraldehyde resistance in bacterial biofilms. Recent studies indicate the presence of genetic mechanisms for glutaraldehyde resistance, but very little is known about the contributory genetic factors. Here, we demonstrate that efflux pumps contribute to glutaraldehyde resistance in Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The RNA-seq data show that efflux pumps and phosphonate degradation, lipid biosynthesis, and polyamine biosynthesis metabolic pathways were induced upon glutaraldehyde exposure. Furthermore, chemical inhibition of efflux pumps potentiates glutaraldehyde activity, suggesting that efflux activity contributes to glutaraldehyde resistance. Additionally, induction of known modulators of biofilm formation, including phosphonate degradation, lipid biosynthesis, and polyamine biosynthesis, may contribute to biofilm resistance and resilience. Fundamental understanding of the genetic mechanism of biocide resistance is critical for the optimization of biocide use and development of novel disinfection strategies. Our results reveal genetic components involved in glutaraldehyde resistance and a potential strategy for improved control of biofilms. PMID:25824217

  13. Efflux as a Glutaraldehyde Resistance Mechanism in Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Vikram, Amit; Bomberger, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in microbial biofilm control is biocide resistance. Phenotypic adaptations and physical protective effects have been historically thought to be the primary mechanisms for glutaraldehyde resistance in bacterial biofilms. Recent studies indicate the presence of genetic mechanisms for glutaraldehyde resistance, but very little is known about the contributory genetic factors. Here, we demonstrate that efflux pumps contribute to glutaraldehyde resistance in Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The RNA-seq data show that efflux pumps and phosphonate degradation, lipid biosynthesis, and polyamine biosynthesis metabolic pathways were induced upon glutaraldehyde exposure. Furthermore, chemical inhibition of efflux pumps potentiates glutaraldehyde activity, suggesting that efflux activity contributes to glutaraldehyde resistance. Additionally, induction of known modulators of biofilm formation, including phosphonate degradation, lipid biosynthesis, and polyamine biosynthesis, may contribute to biofilm resistance and resilience. Fundamental understanding of the genetic mechanism of biocide resistance is critical for the optimization of biocide use and development of novel disinfection strategies. Our results reveal genetic components involved in glutaraldehyde resistance and a potential strategy for improved control of biofilms. PMID:25824217

  14. Ethidium Bromide MIC Screening for Enhanced Efflux Pump Gene Expression or Efflux Activity in Staphylococcus aureus▿

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Diixa; Kosmidis, Christos; Seo, Susan M.; Kaatz, Glenn W.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance efflux pumps contribute to antimicrobial and biocide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. The detection of strains capable of efflux is time-consuming and labor-intensive using currently available techniques. A simple and inexpensive method to identify such strains is needed. Ethidium bromide is a substrate for all but one of the characterized S. aureus multidrug-resistant (MDR) efflux pumps (NorC), leading us to examine the utility of simple broth microtiter MIC determinations using this compound in identifying efflux-proficient strains. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR identified the increased expression of one or more MDR efflux pump genes in 151/309 clinical strains (49%). Ethidium bromide MIC testing was insensitive (48%) but specific (92%) in identifying strains with gene overexpression, but it was highly sensitive (95%) and specific (99%) in identifying strains capable of ethidium efflux. The increased expression of norA with or without other genes was most commonly associated with efflux, and in the majority of cases that efflux was inhibited by reserpine. Ethidium bromide MIC testing is a simple and straightforward method to identify effluxing strains and can provide accurate predictions of efflux prevalence in large strain sets in a short period of time. PMID:20855743

  15. Ferroportin and Exocytoplasmic Ferroxidase Activity Are Required for Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cell Iron Efflux*

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ryan C.; Kosman, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism(s) of iron flux across the brain microvasculature endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the blood-brain barrier remains unknown. Although both hephaestin (Hp) and the ferrous iron permease ferroportin (Fpn) have been identified in BMVEC, their roles in iron efflux have not been examined. Using a human BMVEC line (hBMVEC), we have demonstrated that these proteins are required for iron efflux from these cells. Expression of both Hp and Fpn protein was confirmed in hBMVEC by immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence; we show that hBMVEC express soluble ceruloplasmin (Cp) transcript as well. Depletion of endogenous Hp and Cp via copper chelation leads to the reduction of hBMVEC Fpn protein levels as well as a complete inhibition of 59Fe efflux. Both hBMVEC Fpn protein and 59Fe efflux activity are restored upon incubation with 6.6 nm soluble plasma Cp. These results are independent of the source of cell iron, whether delivered as transferrin- or non-transferrin-bound 59Fe. Our results demonstrate that iron efflux from hBMVEC Fpn requires the action of an exocytoplasmic ferroxidase, which can be either endogenous Hp or extracellular Cp. PMID:23640881

  16. A Comparative Analysis of Synthetic Quorum Sensing Modulators in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: New Insights into Mechanism, Active Efflux Susceptibility, Phenotypic Response, and Next-Generation Ligand Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical signaling mechanism that allows bacterial populations to coordinate gene expression in response to social and environmental cues. Many bacterial pathogens use QS to initiate infection at high cell densities. Over the past two decades, chemical antagonists of QS in pathogenic bacteria have attracted substantial interest for use both as tools to further elucidate QS mechanisms and, with further development, potential anti-infective agents. Considerable recent research has been devoted to the design of small molecules capable of modulating the LasR QS receptor in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These molecules hold significant promise in a range of contexts; however, as most compounds have been developed independently, comparative activity data for these compounds are scarce. Moreover, the mechanisms by which the bulk of these compounds act are largely unknown. This paucity of data has stalled the choice of an optimal chemical scaffold for further advancement. Herein, we submit the best-characterized LasR modulators to standardized cell-based reporter and QS phenotypic assays in P. aeruginosa, and we report the first comprehensive set of comparative LasR activity data for these compounds. Our experiments uncovered multiple interesting mechanistic phenomena (including a potential alternative QS-modulatory ligand binding site/partner) that provide new, and unexpected, insights into the modes by which many of these LasR ligands act. The lead compounds, data trends, and mechanistic insights reported here will significantly aid the design of new small molecule QS inhibitors and activators in P. aeruginosa, and in other bacteria, with enhanced potencies and defined modes of action. PMID:26491787

  17. Some effects of way-120,491 on electrical and mechanical activity and on sup 42 K/ sup 85 Rb efflux in rat blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.; Weston, A.H. ); Oshiro, G. )

    1990-02-26

    The effects of WAY-120,491 (-)-(3A,4R-trans)-2-(2,3-dihydro-3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-6-(trifluoromethoxy)-2H-1-benzopyran-4-yl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-isoindol-1-one have been examined in vitro using portal veins and aortic segments from male Sprague-Dawley rats. In aorta, WAY-120,491 (3.3-33nM) produced a dose-dependent relaxation of 20mM KC1 contractions, an effect antagonized by glibenclamide. WAY-120,491 had no effect on tension induced by 80mM CK1. When segments of aorta were loaded with {sup 86}Rb and {sup 42}K, WAY-120,491 (330nM-33{mu}M) increased the efflux of both isotopes, an effect antagonized by glibenclamide. In portal vein, WAY 120-491 (3.3-330nM) inhibited spontaneous tension development by abolishing electrical multispike complexes. In tissues loaded with {sup 86}Rb, WAY-120,491 (330nM-33{mu}M) increased the rate of {sup 86}Rb exchange. It is concluded that these effects of WAY-120,491 in rat blood vessels are consistent with the opening of plasmalemmal K-channels and that WAY-120,491 belongs to the pharmacological grouping known as the K-channel openers.

  18. Nek7 is an essential mediator of NLRP3 activation downstream of potassium efflux

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Zeng, Melody Y.; Yang, Dahai; Motro, Benny; Núñez, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are intracellular protein complexes that drive the activation of inflammatory caspases1. To date, four inflammasomes involving NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4 and AIM2 have been described that recruit the common adaptor ASC to activate caspase-1, leading to the secretion of mature IL-1β and IL-182,3. The NLRP3 inflammasome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several acquired inflammatory diseases4,5 as well as Cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndromes (CAPS) caused by inherited NLRP3 mutations6,7. Potassium efflux is a common step that is essential for NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by multiple stimuli8,9. Despite extensive investigation, the molecular mechanism leading to NLRP3 activation in response to potassium efflux remains unknown. We report here the identification of Nek7, a member of the family of mammalian NIMA-related kinases (Neks)10, as an NLRP3-binding protein that acts downstream of potassium efflux to regulate NLRP3 oligomerization and activation. In the absence of Nek7, caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release were abrogated in response to signals that activate NLRP3, but not NLRC4 or AIM2 inflammasome. NLRP3-activating stimuli promoted the NLRP3-Nek7 interaction in a process dependent on potassium efflux. NLRP3 associated with the catalytic domain of Nek7, but the catalytic activity of Nek7 was dispensable for activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Activated macrophages formed a high-molecular-mass NLRP3-Nek7 complex, which along with ASC oligomerization and ASC speck formation were abrogated in the absence of Nek7. Nek7 was required for macrophages harboring the CAPS-associated NLRP3R258W activating mutation to activate caspase-1. Mouse chimeras reconstituted with wild-type, Nek7−/− or Nlrp3−/− hematopoietic cells revealed that Nek7 was required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation in vivo. These studies demonstrate that Nek7 is an essential protein that acts downstream of potassium efflux to mediate NLRP3 inflammasome

  19. NEK7 is an essential mediator of NLRP3 activation downstream of potassium efflux.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Zeng, Melody Y; Yang, Dahai; Motro, Benny; Núñez, Gabriel

    2016-02-18

    Inflammasomes are intracellular protein complexes that drive the activation of inflammatory caspases. So far, four inflammasomes involving NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4 and AIM2 have been described that recruit the common adaptor protein ASC to activate caspase-1, leading to the secretion of mature IL-1β and IL-18 proteins. The NLRP3 inflammasome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several acquired inflammatory diseases as well as cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndromes (CAPS) caused by inherited NLRP3 mutations. Potassium efflux is a common step that is essential for NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by many stimuli. Despite extensive investigation, the molecular mechanism leading to NLRP3 activation in response to potassium efflux remains unknown. Here we report the identification of NEK7, a member of the family of mammalian NIMA-related kinases (NEK proteins), as an NLRP3-binding protein that acts downstream of potassium efflux to regulate NLRP3 oligomerization and activation. In the absence of NEK7, caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release were abrogated in response to signals that activate NLRP3, but not NLRC4 or AIM2 inflammasomes. NLRP3-activating stimuli promoted the NLRP3-NEK7 interaction in a process that was dependent on potassium efflux. NLRP3 associated with the catalytic domain of NEK7, but the catalytic activity of NEK7 was shown to be dispensable for activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Activated macrophages formed a high-molecular-mass NLRP3-NEK7 complex, which, along with ASC oligomerization and ASC speck formation, was abrogated in the absence of NEK7. NEK7 was required for macrophages containing the CAPS-associated NLRP3(R258W) activating mutation to activate caspase-1. Mouse chimaeras reconstituted with wild-type, Nek7(-/-) or Nlrp3(-/-) haematopoietic cells showed that NEK7 was required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation in vivo. These studies demonstrate that NEK7 is an essential protein that acts downstream of potassium efflux to

  20. Efflux Pump Blockers in Gram-Negative Bacteria: The New Generation of Hydantoin Based-Modulators to Improve Antibiotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Otręebska-Machaj, Ewa; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Szymańska, Ewa; Schabikowski, Jakub; Boyer, Gérard; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Alibert, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are an increasing health problem with the shortage of new active antibiotic agents. Among effective mechanisms that contribute to the spread of MDR Gram-negative bacteria are drug efflux pumps that expel clinically important antibiotic classes out of the cell. Drug pumps are attractive targets to restore the susceptibility toward the expelled antibiotics by impairing their efflux activity. Arylhydantoin derivatives were investigated for their potentiation of activities of selected antibiotics described as efflux substrates in Enterobacter aerogenes expressing or not AcrAB pump. Several compounds increased the bacterial susceptibility toward nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol and sparfloxacin and were further pharmacomodulated to obtain a better activity against the AcrAB producing bacteria. PMID:27199950

  1. Molecular Mechanisms for Biliary Phospholipid and Drug Efflux Mediated by ABCB4 and Bile Salts

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    On the canalicular membranes of hepatocytes, several ABC transporters are responsible for the secretion of bile lipids. Among them, ABCB4, also called MDR3, is essential for the secretion of phospholipids from hepatocytes into bile. The biliary phospholipids are associated with bile salts and cholesterol in mixed micelles, thereby reducing the detergent activity and cytotoxicity of bile salts and preventing cholesterol crystallization. Mutations in the ABCB4 gene result in progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, low-phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and cholangiocarcinoma. In vivo and cell culture studies have demonstrated that the secretion of biliary phospholipids depends on both ABCB4 expression and bile salts. In the presence of bile salts, ABCB4 located in nonraft membranes mediates the efflux of phospholipids, preferentially phosphatidylcholine. Despite high homology with ABCB1, ABCB4 expression cannot confer multidrug resistance. This review summarizes our current understanding of ABCB4 functions and physiological relevance, and discusses the molecular mechanism for the ABCB4-mediated efflux of phospholipids. PMID:25133187

  2. Enhancement of antibiotic activity by efflux inhibitors against multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Tatiane; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Maschmann, Raquel; Ramos, Daniela; von Groll, Andrea; Rossetti, Maria L.; Silva, Pedro A.; Viveiros, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis continues to increase and new approaches for its treatment are necessary. The identification of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates presenting efflux as part of their resistant phenotype has a major impact in tuberculosis treatment. In this work, we used a checkerboard procedure combined with the tetrazolium microplate-based assay (TEMA) to study single combinations between antituberculosis drugs and efflux inhibitors (EIs) against multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates using the fully susceptible strain H37Rv as reference. Efflux activity was studied on a real-time basis by a fluorometric method that uses ethidium bromide as efflux substrate. Quantification of efflux pump genes mRNA transcriptional levels were performed by RT-qPCR. The fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC) indicated synergistic activity for the interactions between isoniazid, rifampicin, amikacin, ofloxacin, and ethidium bromide plus the EIs verapamil, thioridazine and chlorpromazine. The FICs ranged from 0.25, indicating a four-fold reduction on the MICs, to 0.015, 64-fold reduction. The detection of active efflux by real-time fluorometry showed that all strains presented intrinsic efflux activity that contributes to the overall resistance which can be inhibited in the presence of the EIs. The quantification of the mRNA levels of the most important efflux pump genes on these strains shows that they are intrinsically predisposed to expel toxic compounds as the exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics were not necessary to increase the pump mRNA levels when compared with the non-exposed counterpart. The results obtained in this study confirm that the intrinsic efflux activity contributes to the overall resistance in multidrug resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and that the inhibition of efflux pumps by the EIs can enhance the clinical effect of antibiotics that are their substrates. PMID:25972842

  3. Interaction of gatifloxacin with efflux transporters: a possible mechanism for drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kwatra, Deep; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to screen the interactions of fourth generation fluoroquinolone-gatifloxacin with efflux pumps i.e. P-gp, MRP2 and BCRP. Mechanism of gatifloxacin interaction with efflux transporters may explain its acquired resistance. Such clarification may lead to the development of strategies to overcome efflux and enhance its bioavailability at target site. This process will aid in the reduction of dose volume, further eliminating the chances of systemic toxicity from topical gatifloxacin eye drops. MDCK cell lines transfected with the targeted efflux transporters were used for this study. [14C] Erythromycin was selected as a model substrate for P-gp and MRP2 whereas Hoechst 33342 was employed as a substrate for BCRP. Uptake and transport studies of these substrates were performed in the presence of gatifloxacin to delineate its interaction with efflux transporters. Further the efflux ratio in the presence of gatifloxacin was calculated from bidirectional transport studies. The concentration of [14C] erythromycin and Hoechst 33342 were measured using scintillation counter and fluorescence plate reader respectively. A concentration dependent inhibition effect in the presence of gatifloxacin was revealed on [14C] erythromycin uptake. The efflux ratio (BL-AP/AP-BL) of substrates was found to approach unity at higher gatifloxacin concentrations. Increased concentration of gatifloxacin did not elevate uptake of Hoechst 33342. All these studies were validated with known inhibitors as positive control. Uptake and transport studies support the hypothesis that gatifloxacin is a substrate for P-gp, MRP2 but not for BCRP. Possible interactions of gatifloxacin with P-gp and MRP2 may be a possible mechanism for acquired resistance of gatifloxacin. This information can be further extended to design prodrugs or formulations in order to prevent development of acquired resistance and improve therapeutic efficacy with its reduction in side effects. PMID:20573570

  4. K+ efflux agonists induce NLRP3 inflammasome activation independently of Ca2+ signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Katsnelson, Michael A.; Rucker, L. Graham; Russo, Hana M.; Dubyak, George R.

    2015-01-01

    Perturbation of intracellular ion homeostasis is a major cellular stress signal for activation of NLRP3 inflammasome signaling that results in caspase-1 mediated production of IL-1β and pyroptosis. However, the relative contributions of decreased cytosolic [K+] versus increased cytosolic [Ca2+] remain disputed and incompletely defined. We investigated roles for elevated cytosolic [Ca2+] in NLRP3 activation and downstream inflammasome signaling responses in primary murine dendritic cells and macrophages in response to two canonical NLRP3 agonists (ATP and nigericin) that facilitate primary K+ efflux by mechanistically distinct pathways or the lysosome-destabilizing agonist Leu-Leu-O-methyl ester (LLME). The study provides three major findings relevant to this unresolved area of NLRP3 regulation. First, increased cytosolic [Ca2+] was neither a necessary nor sufficient signal for the NLRP3 inflammasome cascade during activation by endogenous ATP-gated P2X7 receptor channels, the exogenous bacterial ionophore nigericin, or the lysosomotropic agent LLME. Second, agonists for three Ca2+-mobilizing G protein-coupled receptors (formyl peptide receptor/FPR; P2Y2 purinergic receptor/P2Y2R; calcium-sensing receptor/CaSR) expressed in murine dendritic cells were ineffective as activators of rapidly induced NLRP3 signaling when directly compared to the K+ efflux agonists. Third, the intracellular Ca2+ buffer, BAPTA, and the channel blocker, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), widely used reagents for disruption of Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways, strongly suppressed nigericin-induced NLRP3 inflammasome signaling via mechanisms dissociated from their canonical or expected effects on Ca2+ homeostasis. The results indicate that the ability of K+ efflux agonists to activate NLRP3 inflammasome signaling can be dissociated from changes in cytosolic [Ca2+] as a necessary or sufficient signal. PMID:25762778

  5. Both STAT3 activation and cholesterol efflux contribute to the anti-inflammatory effect of apoA-I/ABCA1 interaction in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chongren; Houston, Barbara A; Storey, Carl; LeBoeuf, Renee C

    2016-05-01

    ABCA1 exports excess cholesterol from cells to apoA-I and is essential for HDL synthesis. Genetic studies have shown that ABCA1 protects against cardiovascular disease. We have previously shown that the interaction of apoA-I with ABCA1 activates signaling molecule Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), which optimizes the cholesterol efflux activity of ABCA1. ABCA1-mediated activation of JAK2 also activates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which significantly attenuates proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. To determine the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory effects of apoA-I/ABCA1 interaction, we identified two special ABCA1 mutants, one with normal STAT3-activating capacity but lacking cholesterol efflux ability and the other with normal cholesterol efflux ability but lacking STAT3-activating capacity. We showed that activation of STAT3 by the interaction of apoA-I/ABCA1 without cholesterol efflux could significantly decrease proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. Mechanistic studies showed that the anti-inflammatory effect of the apoA-I/ABCA1/STAT3 pathway is suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 dependent. Moreover, we showed that apoA-I/ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux without STAT3 activation can also reduce proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. These findings suggest that the interaction of apoA-I/ABCA1 activates cholesterol efflux and STAT3 branch pathways to synergistically suppress inflammation in macrophages. PMID:26989082

  6. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) extracts synergistically enhance the antibacterial activity of berberine via efflux pump inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ettefagh, Keivan A; Burns, Johnna T; Junio, Hiyas A; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cech, Nadja B

    2011-05-01

    Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) is used to combat inflammation and infection. Its antibacterial activity in vitRO has been attributed to its alkaloids, the most abundant of which is berberine. The goal of these studies was to compare the composition, antibacterial activity, and efflux pump inhibitory activity of ethanolic extracts prepared from roots and aerial portions of H. canadensis. Ethanolic extracts were prepared separately from roots and aerial portions of six H. canadensis plants. Extracts were analyzed for alkaloid concentration using LC-MS and tested for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (NCTC 8325-4) and for inhibition of ethidium bromide efflux. Synergistic antibacterial activity was observed between the aerial extract (FIC 0.375) and to a lesser extent the root extract (FIC 0.750) and berberine. The aerial extract inhibited ethidium bromide efflux from wild-type S. aureus but had no effect on the expulsion of this compound from an isogenic derivative deleted for norA. Our studies indicate that the roots of H. canadensis contain higher levels of alkaloids than the aerial portions, but the aerial portions synergize with berberine more significantly than the roots. Furthermore, extracts from the aerial portions of H. canadensis contain efflux pump inhibitors, while efflux pump inhibitory activity was not observed for the root extract. The three most abundant H. canadensis alkaloids, berberine, hydrastine, and canadine, are not responsible for the efflux pump inhibitory activity of the extracts from H. canadensis aerial portions. PMID:21157683

  7. Rapid activation of catalase followed by citrate efflux effectively improves aluminum tolerance in the roots of chick pea (Cicer arietinum).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manorma; Sharma, Vinay; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath

    2016-05-01

    The present study demonstrates the comparative response of two contrasting genotypes (aluminum (Al) tolerant and Al sensitive) of chick pea (Cicer arietinum) against Al stress. The Al-tolerant genotype (RSG 974) showed lesser inhibition of root growth as well as lower oxidative damages, measured in terms of the accumulation of H2O2 and lipid peroxidation compared to the Al-sensitive genotype (RSG 945). The accumulation of Al by roots of both genotypes was almost equal at 96 and 144 h after Al treatment; however, it was higher in Al-tolerant than Al-sensitive genotype at 48 h after Al treatment. Further, the Al-mediated induction of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was significantly higher in Al-tolerant than Al-sensitive genotype. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was almost similar in both genotypes. Al treatment promptly activated catalase activity in Al-tolerant genotype, and it was remarkably higher than that of Al-sensitive genotype. As another important Al detoxification mechanism, citrate efflux was almost equal in both genotypes except at 1000 μM Al treatment for 96 and 144 h. Further, citrate carrier and anion channel inhibitor experiment confirmed the contribution of citrate efflux in conferring Al tolerance in Al-tolerant genotype. Based on the available data, the present study concludes that rapid activation of catalase (also SOD) activity followed by citrate efflux effectively improves Al tolerance in chick pea. PMID:26615604

  8. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  9. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Diana; Pires, David; Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  10. Regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux involves liver X receptor activation in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Manna, Pulak R; Sennoune, Souad R; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul; Slominski, Andrzej T; Pruitt, Kevin

    2015-08-14

    Removal of cholesterol from macrophage-derived foam cells is a critical step to the prevention of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated the functional importance of retinoids in the regulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein that predominantly mediates the intramitochondrial transport of cholesterol in target tissues. In the present study, treatment of mouse macrophages with retinoids, particularly all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and 9-cis RA, resulted in increases in cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein AI (Apo-A1). Activation of the PKA pathway by a cAMP analog, (Bu)2cAMP, markedly augmented retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux. Macrophages overexpressing hormone-sensitive lipase increased the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and concomitantly enhanced the efficacy of retinoic acid receptor and liver X receptor (LXR) ligands on StAR and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) protein levels. RAs elevated StAR promoter activity in macrophages, and an increase in StAR levels augmented cholesterol efflux to Apo-A1, suggesting retinoid-mediated efflux of cholesterol involves enhanced oxysterol production. Further studies revealed that retinoids activate the LXR regulated genes, sterol receptor-element binding protein-1c and ABCA1. These findings provide insights into the regulatory events in which retinoid signaling effectively enhances macrophage cholesterol efflux and indicate that retinoid therapy may have important implications in limiting and/or regressing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:26119689

  11. Bypassing P-Glycoprotein Drug Efflux Mechanisms: Possible Applications in Pharmacoresistant Schizophrenia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoosain, Famida G.; Choonara, Yahya E.; Tomar, Lomas K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Tyagi, Charu; du Toit, Lisa C.; Pillay, Viness

    2015-01-01

    The efficient noninvasive treatment of neurodegenerative disorders is often constrained by reduced permeation of therapeutic agents into the central nervous system (CNS). A vast majority of bioactive agents do not readily permeate into the brain tissue due to the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the associated P-glycoprotein efflux transporter. The overexpression of the MDR1 P-glycoprotein has been related to the occurrence of multidrug resistance in CNS diseases. Various research outputs have focused on overcoming the P-glycoprotein drug efflux transporter, which mainly involve its inhibition or bypassing mechanisms. Studies into neurodegenerative disorders have shown that the P-glycoprotein efflux transporter plays a vital role in the progression of schizophrenia, with a noted increase in P-glycoprotein function among schizophrenic patients, thereby reducing therapeutic outcomes. In this review, we address the hypothesis that methods employed in overcoming P-glycoprotein in cancer and other disease states at the level of the BBB and intestine may be applied to schizophrenia drug delivery system design to improve clinical efficiency of drug therapies. In addition, the current review explores polymers and drug delivery systems capable of P-gp inhibition and modulation. PMID:26491671

  12. Biochemistry of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Varela, Manuel F.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens that are multi-drug resistant compromise the effectiveness of treatment when they are the causative agents of infectious disease. These multi-drug resistance mechanisms allow bacteria to survive in the presence of clinically useful antimicrobial agents, thus reducing the efficacy of chemotherapy towards infectious disease. Importantly, active multi-drug efflux is a major mechanism for bacterial pathogen drug resistance. Therefore, because of their overwhelming presence in bacterial pathogens, these active multi-drug efflux mechanisms remain a major area of intense study, so that ultimately measures may be discovered to inhibit these active multi-drug efflux pumps. PMID:22605991

  13. Efflux pump activity in fluoroquinolone and tetracycline resistant Salmonella and E. coli implicated in reduced susceptibility to household antimicrobial cleaning agents.

    PubMed

    Thorrold, C A; Letsoalo, M E; Dusé, A G; Marais, E

    2007-02-15

    It has been shown that the inappropriate use of antimicrobial household agents selects for organisms with resistance mechanisms (e.g. efflux pumps), which could lead to the development of antibiotic resistance. The reverse hypothesis, that antibiotic-resistant organisms become tolerant to other antibacterial agents (e.g. disinfectants) due to the action of efflux pumps, has however not been extensively examined. The objective of this study was to establish whether there is a link between antibiotic resistance in potential gastrointestinal pathogens and reduced sensitivity of these organisms to commonly used household antimicrobial agents. In this study, tetracycline and ofloxacin sensitive and resistant Escherichia coli (9 strains) and Salmonella spp. (8 strains) were isolated from poultry and clinical samples. In order to assess whether these bacteria had active efflux pumps, ethidium bromide accumulation assays were performed. Extrusion of the active components of three commercial household agents (triclosan, sodium salicylate, and ortho-phenylphenol) by efflux pumps was tested using spectrophotometric accumulation assays. In order to simulate the kitchen environment, in-use disinfectant testing using the commercial household agents was performed to determine changes in their efficacy due to antibiotic resistance. Active efflux pump activity and extrusion of all three active ingredients was observed only in the antibiotic resistant organisms. The antibiotic sensitive bacteria were also more susceptible than the resistant isolates to the household antimicrobial agents at concentrations below that recommended by the manufacturer. These resistant bacteria could potentially be selected for and result in hard to treat infections. PMID:17126442

  14. Coupling of remote alternating-access transport mechanisms for protons and substrates in the multidrug efflux pump AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, Thomas; Seeger, Markus A; Anselmi, Claudio; Zhou, Wenchang; Brandstätter, Lorenz; Verrey, François; Diederichs, Kay; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Pos, Klaas M

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transporters of the RND superfamily confer multidrug resistance to pathogenic bacteria, and are essential for cholesterol metabolism and embryonic development in humans. We use high-resolution X-ray crystallography and computational methods to delineate the mechanism of the homotrimeric RND-type proton/drug antiporter AcrB, the active component of the major efflux system AcrAB-TolC in Escherichia coli, and one most complex and intriguing membrane transporters known to date. Analysis of wildtype AcrB and four functionally-inactive variants reveals an unprecedented mechanism that involves two remote alternating-access conformational cycles within each protomer, namely one for protons in the transmembrane region and another for drugs in the periplasmic domain, 50 Å apart. Each of these cycles entails two distinct types of collective motions of two structural repeats, coupled by flanking α-helices that project from the membrane. Moreover, we rationalize how the cross-talk among protomers across the trimerization interface might lead to a more kinetically efficient efflux system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03145.001 PMID:25248080

  15. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Piddock, Laura J V

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  16. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  17. The transport mechanism of bacterial Cu+-ATPases: distinct efflux rates adapted to different function.

    PubMed

    Raimunda, Daniel; González-Guerrero, Manuel; Leeber, Blaise W; Argüello, José M

    2011-06-01

    Cu(+)-ATPases play a key role in bacterial Cu(+) homeostasis by participating in Cu(+) detoxification and cuproprotein assembly. Characterization of Archaeoglobus fulgidus CopA, a model protein within the subfamily of P(1B-1) type ATPases, has provided structural and mechanistic details on this group of transporters. Atomic resolution structures of cytoplasmic regulatory metal binding domains (MBDs) and catalytic actuator, phosphorylation, and nucleotide binding domains are available. These, in combination with whole protein structures resulting from cryo-electron microscopy analyses, have enabled the initial modeling of these transporters. Invariant residues in helixes 6, 7 and 8 form two transmembrane metal binding sites (TM-MBSs). These bind Cu(+) with high affinity in a trigonal planar geometry. The cytoplasmic Cu(+) chaperone CopZ transfers the metal directly to the TM-MBSs; however, loading both of the TM-MBSs requires binding of nucleotides to the enzyme. In agreement with the classical transport mechanism of P-type ATPases, occupancy of both transmembrane sites by cytoplasmic Cu(+) is a requirement for enzyme phosphorylation and subsequent transport into the periplasmic or extracellular milieus. Recent transport studies have shown that all Cu(+)-ATPases drive cytoplasmic Cu(+) efflux, albeit with quite different transport rates in tune with their various physiological roles. Archetypical Cu(+)-efflux pumps responsible for Cu(+) tolerance, like the Escherichia coli CopA, have turnover rates ten times higher than those involved in cuproprotein assembly (or alternative functions). This explains the incapability of the latter group to significantly contribute to the metal efflux required for survival in high copper environments. PMID:21210186

  18. The "racemic approach" in the evaluation of the enantiomeric NorA efflux pump inhibition activity of 2-phenylquinoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Carotti, Andrea; Ianni, Federica; Sabatini, Stefano; Di Michele, Alessandro; Sardella, Roccaldo; Kaatz, Glenn W; Lindner, Wolfgang; Cecchetti, Violetta; Natalini, Benedetto

    2016-09-10

    Among the mechanisms adopted by bacteria, efflux pumps (EPs) have been recognized as being significantly involved in contributing to resistance to commonly used antibacterial agents. However, little is known about their three-dimensional structures or the steric requirements for their inhibition. Lack of such knowledge includes NorA, one of the most studied Staphylococcus aureus EPs. In the present study, the use of two commercialized Cinchona alkaloid-based zwitterionic chiral stationary phases allowed the enantioseparation of four 2-((2-(4-propoxyphenyl)quinolin-4-yl)oxy)alkylamines 1-4 previously found to be potent S. aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors when tested as racemates. In the identified optimal polar-ionic conditions (MeOH/THF/H2O-49/49/2 (v/v/v)+25mM formic acid, 12.5mM diethylamine), repeated consecutive injections of 1 allowed the isolation of sufficient amount of its enantiomers (2.6mg and 2.8mg, for (R)-1 and (S)-1, respectively) and then to evaluate their ability to inhibit the S. aureus NorA efflux pump. The biological evaluation highlighted the main contribution of the (R)-1 enantiomer to both the EtBr efflux inhibition and synergistic effect with against SA-1199B (norA+/A116E GrlA) respect to the racemate activity. The comparison between the experimental electronic circular dichroism and the time-dependent density functional theory calculations spectra of the two isolated enantiomeric fractions allowed for all compounds a clear and easy assignment of the enantiomeric elution order. PMID:27429367

  19. An Arg-Gly-Asp peptide stimulates Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors through a novel mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K.; Duncan, R.; Hruska, K. A.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effect of a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence on 45Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors. 45Ca(2+)-loaded osteoclast precursors were treated with GRGDSP (170 microM) for 10 min after 30 min of basal perfusion with a bicarbonate-containing buffer. GRGDSP significantly increased fractional efflux of Ca2+ from treated cells compared with vehicle-treated cells (P < 0.01) or cells treated with up to 200 micrograms/ml of a control peptide containing GRGESP. The effect of RGD was sustained for 15 min after the peptide was removed from the perfusate, but control levels of Ca2+ efflux returned by 1 h. The Ca2+ efflux effect of GRGDSP was most likely due to activation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase) pump, as indicated by its inhibition with vanadate and a calmodulin antagonist, N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide, and the absence of an effect of Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibition. An inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases, N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline-sulfonamide (0.1 mM), failed to inhibit GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux. However, genistein and herbimycin A, inhibitors of protein-tyrosine kinases, blocked Ca2+ efflux stimulated by GRGDSP. The results indicate that RGD sequences of matrix proteins may stimulate Ca2+ efflux from osteoclasts through activation of protein-tyrosine kinases and suggest that GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux is mediated via the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  20. Reversal of efflux mediated antifungal resistance underlies synergistic activity of two monoterpenes with fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aijaz; Khan, Amber; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2013-01-23

    Thymol (THY) and carvacrol (CARV), the principal chemical components of thyme oil have long been known for their wide use in medicine due to antimicrobial and disinfectant properties. This study, however, draws attention to a possible synergistic antifungal effect of these monoterpenes with azole antimycotic-fluconazole. Resistance to azoles in Candida albicans involves over-expression of efflux-pump genes MDR1, CDR1, CDR2 or mutations and over-expression of target gene ERG11. The inhibition of drug efflux pumps is considered a feasible strategy to overcome clinical antifungal resistance. To put forward this approach, we investigated the combination effects of these monoterpenes and FLC against 38 clinically obtained FLC-sensitive, and eleven FLC-resistant Candida isolates. Synergism was observed with combinations of THY-FLC and CARV-FLC evaluated by checkerboard microdilution method and nature of the interactions was calculated by FICI. In addition, antifungal activity was assessed using agar-diffusion and time-kill curves. The drug efflux activity was determined using two dyes, Rhodamine6G (R6G) and fluorescent Hoechst 33342. No significant differences were observed in dye uptakes between FLC-susceptible and resistant isolates, incubated in glucose free buffer. However, a significantly higher efflux was recorded in FLC-resistant isolates when glucose was added. Both monoterpenes inhibited efflux by 70-90%, showing their high potency to block drug transporter pumps. Significant differences, in the expression levels of CDR1 and MDR1, induced by monoterpenes revealed reversal of FLC-resistance. The selectively fungicidal characteristics and ability to restore FLC susceptibility in resistant isolates signify a promising candidature of THY and CARV as antifungal agents in combinational treatments for candidiasis. PMID:23111348

  1. Correlation between AcrB trimer association affinity and efflux activity.

    PubMed

    Ye, Cui; Wang, Zhaoshuai; Lu, Wei; Zhong, Meng; Chai, Qian; Wei, Yinan

    2014-06-17

    The majority of membrane proteins function as oligomers. However, it remains largely unclear how the oligomer stability of protein complexes correlates with their function. Understanding the relationship between oligomer stability and activity is essential to protein research and to virtually all cellular processes that depend on the function of protein complexes. Proteins make lasting or transient interactions as they perform their functions. Obligate oligomeric proteins exist and function exclusively at a specific oligomeric state. Although oligomerization is clearly critical for such proteins to function, a direct correlation between oligomer affinity and biological activity has not yet been reported. Here, we used an obligate trimeric membrane transporter protein, AcrB, as a model to investigate the correlation between its relative trimer affinity and efflux activity. AcrB is a component of the major multidrug efflux system in Escherichia coli. We created six AcrB constructs with mutations at the transmembrane intersubunit interface, and we determined their activities using both a drug susceptibility assay and an ethidium bromide accumulation assay. The relative trimer affinities of these mutants in detergent micelles were obtained using blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A correlation between the relative trimer affinity and substrate efflux activity was observed, in which a threshold trimer stability was required to maintain efflux activity. The trimer affinity of the wild-type protein was approximately 3 kcal/mol more stable than the threshold value. Once the threshold was reached, an additional increase of stability in the range observed had no observable effect on protein activity. PMID:24854514

  2. Molecular docking characterizes substrate-binding sites and efflux modulation mechanisms within P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ricardo J; Ferreira, Maria-José U; dos Santos, Daniel J V A

    2013-07-22

    P-Glycoprotein (Pgp) is one of the best characterized ABC transporters, often involved in the multidrug-resistance phenotype overexpressed by several cancer cell lines. Experimental studies contributed to important knowledge concerning substrate polyspecificity, efflux mechanism, and drug-binding sites. This information is, however, scattered through different perspectives, not existing a unifying model for the knowledge available for this transporter. Using a previously refined structure of murine Pgp, three putative drug-binding sites were hereby characterized by means of molecular docking. The modulator site (M-site) is characterized by cross interactions between both Pgp halves herein defined for the first time, having an important role in impairing conformational changes leading to substrate efflux. Two other binding sites, located next to the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer, were identified as the substrate-binding H and R sites by matching docking and experimental results. A new classification model with the ability to discriminate substrates from modulators is also proposed, integrating a vast number of theoretical and experimental data. PMID:23802684

  3. Association of hp1181 and hp1184 Genes With the Active Efflux Phenotype in Multidrug-Resistant Isolates of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Falsafi, Tahereh; Ehsani, Azadeh; Attaran, Bahareh; Niknam, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Background During the last decades the rate of multidrug resistance among clinical Helicobacter pylori isolates has increased. Active pumping out of the drugs may be an important mechanism for multidrug resistance in H. pylori strains. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of two H. pylori efflux-genes, hp1181 and hp1184 with the active-efflux phenotype in MDR clinical-strains of H. pylori. Materials and Methods Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and drug accumulation for β-lactames, Tetracycline (TET), Erythromycin (ERY), Metronidazole (MTZ), Ciprofloxacin (CIP) and Ethidium Bromide (EtBr) was performed in the presence and absence of carbonyl cyanide M-Chlorophenyl Hydrazone (CCCP). Presence of hp1181 and hp1184 genes was detected by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RT-PCR was performed to compare expression of efflux genes by MDR strains, demonstrating active efflux with the strains without active efflux. Results Two- to four-fold decrease in minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and two-fold increase in accumulation were observed for EtBr in the presence of CCCP for 67% (8) of 12 MDR strains. With CCCP, two- to four-fold decrease in MIC and 1.4- to 1.8-fold increase in the accumulation of β-lactames, TET, CIP and MTZ were obtained for 42% (5) of the MDR strains. Six, five and three of the 12 MDR strains amplified hp1184, hp1181, and both of them, respectively. The RT-PCR product for expression of hp1181 by MDR strains was approximately 100 bp shorter than that of the 26695 susceptible standard strain. Conclusions Expression of the genes hp1184 and hp1181 are associated with the specific active efflux of EtBr and non-related antibiotics, respectively. For displaying these phenotypes, a post-transcriptional regulation step may be required. PMID:27303615

  4. NorA efflux pump inhibitory activity of coumarins from Mesua ferrea.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somendu K; Kumari, Neela; Pahwa, Sonika; Agrahari, Udai C; Bhutani, Kamlesh K; Jachak, Sanjay M; Nandanwar, Hemraj

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the modulator and efflux pump inhibitor activity of coumarins isolated from Mesua ferrea against clinical strains as well as NorA-over expressed strain of Staphylococcus aureus 1199B. Seven coumarins were tested for modulator activity using ethidium bromide (EtBr) as a substrate. Compounds 1, 4-7 modulated the MIC of EtBr by ≥ 2 fold against wild type clinical strains of S. aureus 1199 and S. aureus 1199B, whereas compounds 4-7 modulated the MIC of EtBr by ≥ 16 fold against MRSA 831. Compounds 1, 4-7 also reduced the MIC of norfloxacin by ≥ 8 fold against S. aureus 1199B, and 4-6 reduced the MIC of norfloxacin by ≥ 8 fold against MRSA 831 at half of their MICs. Inhibition of EtBr efflux by NorA-overproducing S. aureus 1199B and MRSA 831 confirmed the role of compounds 4-6 as NorA efflux pump inhibitors (EPI). Dose-dependent activity at sub-inhibitory concentration (6.25 μg/mL) suggested that compounds 4 and 5 are promising EPI compared to verapamil against 1199B and MRSA 831 strains. PMID:23892000

  5. Carbapenem Activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Respective Contributions of OprD and Efflux Systems

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Thilo; Michea-Hamzehpour, Mehri; Epp, Simone F.; Pechere, Jean-Claude

    1999-01-01

    While meropenem MICs were strongly influenced by the presence or absence of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump in both OprD-proficient and -deficient strain backgrounds, MICs of imipenem and of ER-35786 remained unchanged, demonstrating that meropenem is a substrate of MexAB-OprM but not imipenem and ER-35786. In vitro, all three carbapenems selected loss of OprD as a first mechanism of resistance. However, in an OprD-deficient background, meropenem was able to select MexAB-OprM overproducers as a secondary resistance mechanism, while ER-35786 selected a mutant cross-resistant to sparfloxacin and cefpirome. PMID:9925552

  6. Auxin efflux carrier activity and auxin accumulation regulate cell division and polarity in tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Petrásek, Jan; Elckner, Miroslav; Morris, David A; Zazímalová, Eva

    2002-12-01

    Division and growth of most types of in vitro-cultured plant cells require an external source of auxin. In such cultures, the ratio of external to internal auxin concentration is crucial for the regulation of the phases of the standard growth cycle. In this report the internal concentration of auxin in suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum L., strain VBI-0, was manipulated either (i) by increasing 10-fold the normal concentration of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in the external medium; or (ii) by addition 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA; an inhibitor of auxin efflux and of auxin efflux carrier traffic). Both treatments delayed the onset of cell division for 6-7 days without loss of cell viability. In both cases, cell division activity subsequently resumed coincident with a reduction in the ability of cells to accumulate [(3)H]NAA from an external medium. Following renewed cell division, a significant proportion of the NPA-treated cells but not those grown at high auxin concentration, exhibited changes in the orientation of new cell divisions and loss of polarity. We conclude that cell division, but not cell elongation, is prevented when the internal auxin concentration rises above a critical threshold value and that the directed traffic of auxin efflux carriers to the plasma membrane may regulate the orientation of cell divisions. PMID:12447544

  7. Potentiation of antibacterial activity of the MB-1 siderophore-monobactam conjugate using an efflux pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tomaras, Andrew P; Crandon, Jared L; McPherson, Craig J; Nicolau, David P

    2015-04-01

    Preliminary enthusiasm over the encouraging spectrum and in vitro activities of siderophore conjugates, such as MB-1, was recently tempered by unexpected variability in in vivo efficacy. The need for these conjugates to compete for iron with endogenously produced siderophores has exposed a significant liability for this novel antibacterial strategy. Here, we have exploited dependence on efflux for siderophore secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and provide evidence that efflux inhibition may circumvent this in vivo-relevant resistance liability. PMID:25605364

  8. Potentiation of Antibacterial Activity of the MB-1 Siderophore-Monobactam Conjugate Using an Efflux Pump Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Crandon, Jared L.; McPherson, Craig J.; Nicolau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary enthusiasm over the encouraging spectrum and in vitro activities of siderophore conjugates, such as MB-1, was recently tempered by unexpected variability in in vivo efficacy. The need for these conjugates to compete for iron with endogenously produced siderophores has exposed a significant liability for this novel antibacterial strategy. Here, we have exploited dependence on efflux for siderophore secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and provide evidence that efflux inhibition may circumvent this in vivo-relevant resistance liability. PMID:25605364

  9. Azole resistance in Candida spp. isolated from Catú Lake, Ceará, Brazil: an efflux-pump-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Brilhante, Raimunda S.N.; Paiva, Manoel A.N.; Sampaio, Célia M.S.; Castelo-Branco, Débora S.C.M.; Teixeira, Carlos E.C.; de Alencar, Lucas P.; Bandeira, Tereza J.P.G.; Monteiro, André J.; Cordeiro, Rossana A.; Pereira-Neto, Waldemiro A.; Sidrim, José J.C.; Moreira, José L.B.; Rocha, Marcos F.G.

    2016-01-01

    Since, there is no study reporting the mechanism of azole resistance among yeasts isolated from aquatic environments; the present study aims to investigate the occurrence of antifungal resistance among yeasts isolated from an aquatic environment, and assess the efflux-pump activity of the azole-resistant strains to better understand the mechanism of resistance for this group of drugs. For this purpose, monthly water and sediment samples were collected from Catú Lake, Ceará, Brazil, from March 2011 to February 2012. The obtained yeasts were identified based on morphological and biochemical characteristics. Of the 46 isolates, 37 were Candida spp., 4 were Trichosporon asahii, 3 were Cryptococcus laurentii, 1 Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and 1 was Kodamaea ohmeri. These isolates were subjected to broth microdilution assay with amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole, according to the methodology standardized by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole were 0.03125–2 μg/mL, 0.0625 to ≥16 μg/mL, and 0.5 to ≥64 μg/mL, respectively, and 13 resistant azole-resistant Candida isolates were detected. A reduction in the azole MICs leading to the phenotypical reversal of the azole resistance was observed upon addition of efflux-pump inhibitors. These findings suggest that the azole resistance among environmental Candida spp. is most likely associated with the overexpression of efflux-pumps. PMID:26887224

  10. SLC30A10 Is a Cell Surface-Localized Manganese Efflux Transporter, and Parkinsonism-Causing Mutations Block Its Intracellular Trafficking and Efflux Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leyva-Illades, Dinorah; Chen, Pan; Zogzas, Charles E.; Hutchens, Steven; Mercado, Jonathan M.; Swaim, Caleb D.; Morrisett, Richard A.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal, but elevated cellular levels are toxic and may lead to the development of an irreversible parkinsonian-like syndrome that has no treatment. Mn-induced parkinsonism generally occurs as a result of exposure to elevated Mn levels in occupational or environmental settings. Additionally, patients with compromised liver function attributable to diseases, such as cirrhosis, fail to excrete Mn and may develop Mn-induced parkinsonism in the absence of exposure to elevated Mn. Recently, a new form of familial parkinsonism was reported to occur as a result of mutations in SLC30A10. The cellular function of SLC30A10 and the mechanisms by which mutations in this protein cause parkinsonism are unclear. Here, using a combination of mechanistic and functional studies in cell culture, Caenorhabditis elegans, and primary midbrain neurons, we show that SLC30A10 is a cell surface-localized Mn efflux transporter that reduces cellular Mn levels and protects against Mn-induced toxicity. Importantly, mutations in SLC30A10 that cause familial parkinsonism blocked the ability of the transporter to traffic to the cell surface and to mediate Mn efflux. Although expression of disease-causing SLC30A10 mutations were not deleterious by themselves, neurons and worms expressing these mutants exhibited enhanced sensitivity to Mn toxicity. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms involved in the onset of a familial form of parkinsonism and highlight the possibility of using enhanced Mn efflux as a therapeutic strategy for the potential management of Mn-induced parkinsonism, including that occurring as a result of mutations in SLC30A10. PMID:25319704

  11. Confinement-Induced Drug-Tolerance in Mycobacteria Mediated by an Efflux Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Luthuli, Brilliant B.; Purdy, Georgiana E.; Balagaddé, Frederick K.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the world’s deadliest curable disease, responsible for an estimated 1.5 million deaths annually. A considerable challenge in controlling this disease is the prolonged multidrug chemotherapy (6 to 9 months) required to overcome drug-tolerant mycobacteria that persist in human tissues, although the same drugs can sterilize genetically identical mycobacteria growing in axenic culture within days. An essential component of TB infection involves intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria that multiply within macrophages and are significantly more tolerant to antibiotics compared to extracellular mycobacteria. To investigate this aspect of human TB, we created a physical cell culture system that mimics confinement of replicating mycobacteria, such as in a macrophage during infection. Using this system, we uncovered an epigenetic drug-tolerance phenotype that appears when mycobacteria are cultured in space-confined bioreactors and disappears in larger volume growth contexts. Efflux mechanisms that are induced in space-confined growth environments contribute to this drug-tolerance phenotype. Therefore, macrophage-induced drug tolerance by mycobacteria may be an effect of confined growth among other macrophage-specific mechanisms. PMID:26295942

  12. In vitro transport activity of the fully assembled MexAB-OprM efflux pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verchère, Alice; Dezi, Manuela; Adrien, Vladimir; Broutin, Isabelle; Picard, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and many bacteria responsible for human infections have now developed a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms. For instance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a disease-causing Gram-negative bacteria, is now resistant to almost every class of antibiotics. Much of this resistance is attributable to multidrug efflux pumps, which are tripartite membrane protein complexes that span both membranes and actively expel antibiotics. Here we report an in vitro procedure to monitor transport by the tripartite MexAB-OprM pump. By combining proteoliposomes containing the MexAB and OprM portions of the complex, we are able to assay energy-dependent substrate translocation in a system that mimics the dual-membrane architecture of Gram-negative bacteria. This assay facilitates the study of pump transport dynamics and could be used to screen pump inhibitors with potential clinical use in restoring therapeutic activity of old antibiotics.

  13. Inhibition of topoisomerase I activity and efflux drug transporters' expression by xanthohumol. from hops.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Jung Sun; Lee, Ik-Soo; Kang, Bok Yun

    2007-11-01

    Xanthohumol (XN) and its related compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against four different human cancer cell lines, A549 (lung), SK-OV-3 (ovarian), SK-MEL-2 (melanoma), and HCT-15 (colon) using a sulforhodamine B assay. XN showed the most active cytotoxicity against the human cancer cell lines. Isoxanthohumol, 8-prenylnaringenin, and xanthohumol 4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside showed comparable cytotoxicity and (2S)-5-methoxy-8-prenylnaringenin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside was the least cytotoxic compound. The anticancer properties of XN, the most active cytotoxic compound, were further investigated. XN showed an inhibitory effect on the activity of DNA topoisomerase I (topo I), which was measured from the relaxation of supercoiled DNA. The inhibition of topo I by XN might explain the cytotoxicity against the human cancer cell lines. Moreover, the expression of the drug efflux genes was investigated to predict the drug resistance. XN clearly decreased the mRNA levels of ABCB1 (MDR1), ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCC2 (MRP2), and ABCC3 (MRP3). These results suggest that XN has anticancer properties by inhibiting the topo I activity and it might be used in conjunction with other anticancer chemotherapeutic agents to reduce the drug resistance inhibiting the efflux drug transporters. PMID:18087812

  14. Effects of aging on agonist-activated sup 86 Rb efflux in arteries of Fischer 344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, R.H.; Tulenko, T.N. )

    1989-08-01

    Segments of thoracic aorta (DTA), tail artery (TA), and mesenteric artery branches (MAB) were obtained from male Fischer 344 rats at ages of 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, and 30 mo and were used to determine the effects of aging on agonist-activated {sup 86}Rb (and {sup 42}K) efflux. At all three arterial sites, basal efflux decreased during development (1-6 mo), but no further changes were observed with aging (6-30 mo). The initial efflux response to 10 microM norepinephrine (NE) in the presence of 1 microM propranolol exhibited either no change (DTA) or an increase (TA and MAB) during development (1-6 mo), but all three sites showed a large decrease during aging (6-30 mo). Changes in the steady-state response to NE paralleled changes in the basal efflux at all ages and arterial sites. The initial efflux response to 75 mM K+-physiological salt solution (PSS) for the DTA in the presence of 1 microM phentolamine and 1 microM propranolol decreased during development followed by an increase during aging, whereas for the TA and MAB, there were no significant changes with age. The steady-state efflux response to K+ decreased during development at all three sites but was increased only for the DTA during aging. The steady-state efflux response to K+ was not altered for the TA and MAB during aging. Efflux responses using {sup 42}K were qualitatively similar, but rate constants were quantitatively larger than those with {sup 86}Rb at all three arterial sites and at all ages.

  15. Efflux pump inhibitors: targeting mycobacterial efflux systems to enhance TB therapy.

    PubMed

    Pule, Caroline M; Sampson, Samantha L; Warren, Robin M; Black, Philippa A; van Helden, Paul D; Victor, Tommie C; Louw, Gail E

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance continues to plague TB control, with a global increase in the prevalence of MDR-TB. This acts as a gateway to XDR-TB and thus emphasizes the urgency for drug development and optimal treatment options. Bedaquiline is the first new anti-TB drug approved by the FDA in 40 years and has been shown to be an effective treatment option for MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Bedaquiline has also recently been included in clinical trials for new regimens with the aim of improving and shortening treatment periods. Alarmingly, efflux-mediated bedaquiline resistance, as well as efflux-mediated cross-resistance to clofazimine, has been identified in treatment failures. This mechanism of resistance results in efflux of a variety of anti-TB drugs from the bacterial cell, thereby decreasing the intracellular drug concentration. In doing so, the bacillus is able to render the antibiotic treatment ineffective. Recent studies have explored strategies to reverse the resistance phenotype conferred by efflux pump activation. It was observed that the addition of efflux pump inhibitors partially restored drug susceptibility in vitro and in vivo. This has significant clinical implications, especially in MDR-TB management where treatment options are extremely limited. This review aims to highlight the current efflux pump inhibitors effective against M. tuberculosis, the effect of efflux pump inhibitors on mycobacterial growth and the clinical promise of treatment with efflux pump inhibitors and standard anti-TB therapy. PMID:26472768

  16. Molecular Mechanism of MBX2319 Inhibition of Escherichia coli AcrB Multidrug Efflux Pump and Comparison with Other Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Vargiu, Attilio V.; Ruggerone, Paolo; Opperman, Timothy J.; Nguyen, Son T.

    2014-01-01

    Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation division (RND) superfamily, such as AcrB, make a major contribution to multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. The development of inhibitors of the RND pumps would improve the efficacy of current and next-generation antibiotics. To date, however, only one inhibitor has been cocrystallized with AcrB. Thus, in silico structure-based analysis is essential for elucidating the interaction between other inhibitors and the efflux pumps. In this work, we used computer docking and molecular dynamics simulations to study the interaction between AcrB and the compound MBX2319, a novel pyranopyridine efflux pump inhibitor with potent activity against RND efflux pumps of Enterobacteriaceae species, as well as other known inhibitors (D13-9001, 1-[1-naphthylmethyl]-piperazine, and phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide) and the binding of doxorubicin to the efflux-defective F610A variant of AcrB. We also analyzed the binding of a substrate, minocycline, for comparison. Our results show that MBX2319 binds very tightly to the lower part of the distal pocket in the B protomer of AcrB, strongly interacting with the phenylalanines lining the hydrophobic trap, where the hydrophobic portion of D13-9001 was found to bind by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, MBX2319 binds to AcrB in a manner that is similar to the way in which doxorubicin binds to the F610A variant of AcrB. In contrast, 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine and phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide appear to bind to somewhat different areas of the distal pocket in the B protomer of AcrB than does MBX2319. However, all inhibitors (except D13-9001) appear to distort the structure of the distal pocket, impairing the proper binding of substrates. PMID:25114133

  17. Structural Elements in the Transmembrane and Cytoplasmic Domains of the Metal Transporter SLC30A10 Are Required for Its Manganese Efflux Activity.

    PubMed

    Zogzas, Charles E; Aschner, Michael; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra

    2016-07-29

    Homozygous mutations in SLC30A10 lead to the development of familial manganese-induced parkinsonism. We previously demonstrated that SLC30A10 is a cell surface-localized manganese efflux transporter, and parkinsonism-causing mutations block its trafficking and efflux activity. Interestingly, other transporters in the SLC30 family mediate zinc efflux. Determining the mechanisms that allow SLC30A10 to transport manganese, which are unclear, is essential to understand its role in parkinsonism. Here, we generated a predicted structure of SLC30A10, based on the structure of the bacterial zinc transporter YiiP, and performed functional studies. In YiiP, side chains of residues Asp-45 and Asp-49 in the second and His-153 and Asp-157 in the fifth transmembrane segments coordinate zinc and are required for transport. In SLC30A10, the corresponding residues are Asn-43 and Asp-47 in the second and His-244 and Asp-248 in the fifth transmembrane segments. Surprisingly, although alanine substitution of Asp-248 abolished manganese efflux, that of Asn-43 and Asp-47 did not. Instead, side chains of charged or polar residues adjacent to Asp-248 in the first (Glu-25) or fourth (Asn-127) transmembrane segments were required. Further analyses revealed that residues His-333 and His-350 in the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain were required for full activity. However, the C-terminal domain failed to transfer manganese transport capability to a related zinc transporter. Overall, our results indicate that residues in the transmembrane and C-terminal domains together confer optimal manganese transport capability to SLC30A10 and suggest that the mechanism of ion coordination in the transmembrane domain of SLC30A10 may be substantially different from that in YiiP/other SLC30 proteins. PMID:27307044

  18. Altered agonist-activated sup 86 Rb+ efflux from arteries in canine renal hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, R.H.; Bagshaw, R.J. )

    1989-07-01

    Basal rate constants for {sup 86}Rb+ efflux from renal arteries of renal hypertensive dogs were lower than those of control animals whereas no differences were found for coronary arteries. Norepinephrine produced parallel increases in efflux rate constants for hypertensive and control renal arteries, but serotonin produced smaller responses in hypertensive compared to control coronary arteries.

  19. The effects of the putative potassium channel activator WAY-120,491 on 86Rb efflux from the rabbit aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Lodge, N.J.; Cohen, R.B.; Havens, C.N.; Colatsky, T.J. )

    1991-02-01

    WAY-120,491 ((-)-(3S-trans)-2-(3,4-dihydro-3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-6-(trifluoromet hox y)- 2H-1-benzopyran-4-yl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-isoindol-1-one) is a novel antihypertensive agent. We have investigated the effects of this compound on contractile force and 86Rb efflux, using the rabbit aorta, in order to assess its K channel activator properties. K channel blockers and ionic conditions thought to modulate specific K channel types have been used to provide insight into the K channel(s) affected by this compound. WAY-120,491 evoked relaxation of precontracted rabbit aortic rings and increased the rate of 86Rb efflux from strips of rabbit aorta; both effects occurring in a concentration-dependent manner. The WAY-120,491 (1 microM)-induced 86Rb efflux was inhibited by tetraethylammonium (IC50 = 0.38 mM), indicating that the increased efflux was mediated by K channels. Glyburide completely blocked the WAY-120,491 (1 microM)-evoked 86Rb efflux with 50% block occurring at a concentration of 0.48 microM. Glyburide also antagonized the WAY-120,491-induced relaxation of aortic rings. Omission of Ca from the solution bathing the aorta did not inhibit the WAY-120,491 induced 86Rb efflux but rather caused an augmentation of the response. It is concluded that WAY-120,491 may be classified as a K channel opener. Furthermore, the K channel upon which WAY-120,491 acts exhibits some characteristics normally associated with the ATP regulated K channel although the involvement of other K channel types has not been ruled out.

  20. Bioluminescent imaging of ABCG2 efflux activity at the blood-placenta barrier.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jeyan S; Wei, Bih-Rong; Madigan, James P; Simpson, R Mark; Hall, Matthew D; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Physiologic barriers such as the blood placenta barrier (BPB) and the blood brain barrier protect the underlying parenchyma from pathogens and toxins. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane proteins found at these barriers, and function to efflux xenobiotics and maintain chemical homeostasis. Despite the plethora of ex vivo and in vitro data showing the function and expression of ABC transporters, no imaging modality exists to study ABC transporter activity in vivo at the BPB. In the present study, we show that in vitro models of the placenta possess ABCG2 activity and can specifically transport D-luciferin, the endogenous substrate of firefly luciferase. To test ABCG2 transport activity at the BPB, we devised a breeding strategy to generate a bioluminescent pregnant mouse model to demonstrate transporter function in vivo. We found that coadministering the ABCG2 inhibitors Ko143 and gefitinib with D-luciferin increased bioluminescent signal from fetuses and placentae, whereas the control P-gp inhibitor DCPQ had no effect. We believe that our bioluminescent pregnant mouse model will facilitate greater understanding of the BPB and ABCG2 activity in health and disease. PMID:26853103

  1. Bioluminescent imaging of ABCG2 efflux activity at the blood-placenta barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jeyan S.; Wei, Bih-Rong; Madigan, James P.; Simpson, R. Mark; Hall, Matthew D.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Physiologic barriers such as the blood placenta barrier (BPB) and the blood brain barrier protect the underlying parenchyma from pathogens and toxins. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane proteins found at these barriers, and function to efflux xenobiotics and maintain chemical homeostasis. Despite the plethora of ex vivo and in vitro data showing the function and expression of ABC transporters, no imaging modality exists to study ABC transporter activity in vivo at the BPB. In the present study, we show that in vitro models of the placenta possess ABCG2 activity and can specifically transport D-luciferin, the endogenous substrate of firefly luciferase. To test ABCG2 transport activity at the BPB, we devised a breeding strategy to generate a bioluminescent pregnant mouse model to demonstrate transporter function in vivo. We found that coadministering the ABCG2 inhibitors Ko143 and gefitinib with D-luciferin increased bioluminescent signal from fetuses and placentae, whereas the control P-gp inhibitor DCPQ had no effect. We believe that our bioluminescent pregnant mouse model will facilitate greater understanding of the BPB and ABCG2 activity in health and disease. PMID:26853103

  2. Multidrug efflux transporter activity in sea urchin embryos:Does localization provide a diffusive advantage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xianfeng; Setayeshgar, Sima; Cole, Bryan; Hamdoun, Amro; Epel, David

    2008-03-01

    Experiments have shown upregulation of multidrug efflux transporter activity approximately 30 min after fertilization in the sea urchin embryo [1]. These ATP-hydrolyzing transporter proteins pump moderately hydrophobic molecules out of the cell and represent the cell's first line of defense againstexogenous toxins. It has also been shown that transporters are moved in vesicles along microfilaments and localized to tips of microvilli prior to activation. We have constructed a geometrically realistic model of the embryo, including microvilli, to explore the functional role of this localization in the efficient elimination of toxins from the standpoint of diffusion. We compute diffusion of toxins in extracellular, membrane and intracellular spaces coupled with transporter activity, using experimentally derived values for physical parameters. For transporters uniformly distributed along microvilli and tip-localized transporters we compare regions in parameter space where each distribution provides diffusive advantage, and comment on the physically expected conditions. [1] A. M. Hamdoun, G. N. Cherr, T. A. Roepke and D. Epel, Developmental Biology 276 452 (2004).

  3. Evidence for non-diffusive transport as an important mechanism determining the soil CO2 efflux in a temperate grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Marilyn; Vicca, Sara; Bahn, Michael; Schmitt, Michael; Janssens, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    Research on soil respiration has largely focused on the emission of CO2 from soils and far less on the production and subsequent transport of CO2 from soil to atmosphere. The limited knowledge of CO2 transport through the soil, restricts our understanding of the various abiotic and biotic processes underlying emissions of CO2 from terrestrial ecosystems. Soil CO2 efflux is most often measured using soil chambers, but since the early 2000s, solid-state CO2 sensors that measure soil CO2 concentrations at different depths, are becoming more popular. From these continuous high-frequency measurements of the CO2 gradient, the flux can easily be calculated in a very cost-efficient way with minimal disturbance of the natural conditions. This so-called flux-gradient method is based on Fick's law, assuming diffusion to be the only transport mechanism. To test to what extend diffusion is indeed the governing transport process, we compared the CO2 efflux from chamber measurements with the CO2 efflux calculated from soil CO2 concentration profiles for a grassland site in the Austrian Alps. The four commonly used models for diffusivity that we tested, all underestimated the soil chamber effluxes and their amplitudes. What is more, we observed that transport rates correlated well with irradiation (PAR) and -below a certain soil moisture content- with wind speed. Indeed, correlation coefficients of the fits of observed transport rate versus PAR were consistently positive, and those of observed transport rate versus wind speed were positive on days that were not extremely wet (soil water content below 33%). Also, we found that the coupling of transport rate and PAR became stronger as wind speed increased. Our results suggest that non-diffusive bulk air transport mechanisms, such as advective mass transport and pressure pumping, could considerably contribute to soil CO2 transport at this site. We therefore emphasize the importance of investigating alternative transport processes

  4. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of non-linear brain distribution of morphine: influence of active saturable influx and P-glycoprotein mediated efflux

    PubMed Central

    Groenendaal, D; Freijer, J; de Mik, D; Bouw, M R; Danhof, M; de Lange, E C M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Biophase equilibration must be considered to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) correlations of opioids. The objective was to characterise in a quantitative manner the non-linear distribution kinetics of morphine in brain. Experimental approach: Male rats received a 10-min infusion of 4 mg kg−1 of morphine, combined with a continuous infusion of the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibitor GF120918 or vehicle, or 40 mg kg−1 morphine alone. Unbound extracellular fluid (ECF) concentrations obtained by intracerebral microdialysis and total blood concentrations were analysed using a population modelling approach. Key results: Blood pharmacokinetics of morphine was best described with a three-compartment model and was not influenced by GF120918. Non-linear distribution kinetics in brain ECF was observed with increasing dose. A one compartment distribution model was developed, with separate expressions for passive diffusion, active saturable influx and active efflux by Pgp. The passive diffusion rate constant was 0.0014 min−1. The active efflux rate constant decreased from 0.0195 min−1 to 0.0113 min−1 in the presence of GF120918. The active influx was insensitive to GF120918 and had a maximum transport (Nmax/Vecf) of 0.66 ng min−1 ml−1 and was saturated at low concentrations of morphine (C50=9.9 ng ml−1). Conclusions and implications: Brain distribution of morphine is determined by three factors: limited passive diffusion; active efflux, reduced by 42% by Pgp inhibition; low capacity active uptake. This implies blood concentration-dependency and sensitivity to drug-drug interactions. These factors should be taken into account in further investigations on PK-PD correlations of morphine. PMID:17471182

  5. Antimicrobial and Efflux Pump Inhibitory Activity of Caffeoylquinic Acids from Artemisia absinthium against Gram-Positive Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fiamegos, Yiannis C.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Exarchou, Vassiliki; Han, Haley; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.; Vervoort, Jacques; Lewis, Kim; Hamblin, Michael R.; Tegos, George P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Traditional antibiotics are increasingly suffering from the emergence of multidrug resistance amongst pathogenic bacteria leading to a range of novel approaches to control microbial infections being investigated as potential alternative treatments. One plausible antimicrobial alternative could be the combination of conventional antimicrobial agents/antibiotics with small molecules which block multidrug efflux systems known as efflux pump inhibitors. Bioassay-driven purification and structural determination of compounds from plant sources have yielded a number of pump inhibitors which acted against gram positive bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we report the identification and characterization of 4′,5′-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid (4′,5′-ODCQA) from Artemisia absinthium as a pump inhibitor with a potential of targeting efflux systems in a wide panel of Gram-positive human pathogenic bacteria. Separation and identification of phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, 3′,5′-ODCQA, 4′,5′-ODCQA) was based on hyphenated chromatographic techniques such as liquid chromatography with post column solid-phase extraction coupled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. Microbial susceptibility testing and potentiation of well know pump substrates revealed at least two active compounds; chlorogenic acid with weak antimicrobial activity and 4′,5′-ODCQA with pump inhibitory activity whereas 3′,5′-ODCQA was ineffective. These intitial findings were further validated with checkerboard, berberine accumulation efflux assays using efflux-related phenotypes and clinical isolates as well as molecular modeling methodology. Conclusions/Significance These techniques facilitated the direct analysis of the active components from plant extracts, as well as dramatically reduced the time needed to analyze the compounds, without the need for prior isolation. The calculated energetics of the docking poses supported the

  6. Structure-Activity Relationships of a Novel Pyranopyridine Series of Gram-negative Bacterial Efflux Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Son T.; Kwasny, Steven M.; Ding, Xiaoyuan; Cardinale, Steven C.; McCarthy, Courtney T.; Kim, Hong-Suk; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Peet, Norton P.; Williams, John D.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Opperman, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we described a novel pyranopyridine inhibitor (MBX2319) of RND-type efflux pumps of the Enterobacteriaceae. MBX2319 (3,3-dimethyl-5-cyano-8-morpholino-6-(phenethylthio)-3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrano[3,4-c]pyridine) is structurally distinct from other known Gram-negative efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs), such as 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine (NMP), phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide (PAβN), D13-9001, and the pyridopyrimidine derivatives. Here, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 60 new analogs of MBX2319 that were designed to probe the structure activity relationships (SARs) of the pyranopyridine scaffold. The results of these studies produced a molecular activity map of the scaffold, which identifies regions that are critical to efflux inhibitory activities and those that can be modified to improve potency, metabolic stability and solubility. Several compounds, such as 22d–f, 22i and 22k, are significantly more effective than MBX2319 at potentiating the antibacterial activity of levofloxacin and piperacillin against Escherichia coli. PMID:25818767

  7. Motesanib (AMG706), a potent multikinase inhibitor, antagonizes multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux activity of the ABCB1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Patel, Atish; Kumar, Priyank; Shukla, Suneet; Fung, King Leung; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells often become resistant to chemotherapy through a phenomenon known as multidrug resistance (MDR). Several factors are responsible for the development of MDR, preeminent among them being the accelerated drug efflux mediated by overexpression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Some small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were recently reported to modulate the activity of ABC transporters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if motesanib, a multikinase inhibitor, could reverse ABCB1-mediated MDR. The results showed that motesanib significantly sensitized both ABCB1-transfected and drug-selected cell lines overexpressing this transporter to its substrate anticancer drugs. Motesanib significantly increased the accumulation of [3H]-paclitaxel in ABCB1 overexpressing cells by blocking the efflux function of ABCB1 transporter. In contrast, no significant change in the expression levels and localization pattern of ABCB1 was observed when ABCB1 overexpressing cells were exposed to 3 µM motesanib for 72 h. Moreover, motesanib stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCB1 in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. Consistent with these findings, the docking studies indicated favorable binding of motesanib within the transmembrane region of homology modeled human ABCB1. Here, we report for the first time, motesanib, at clinically achievable plasma concentrations, antagonizes MDR by inhibiting the efflux activity of the ABCB1 transporter. These findings may be useful for cancer combination therapy with TKIs in the clinic. PMID:24937702

  8. Motesanib (AMG706), a potent multikinase inhibitor, antagonizes multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux activity of the ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Patel, Atish; Kumar, Priyank; Shukla, Suneet; Fung, King Leung; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Talele, Tanaji T; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-08-15

    Cancer cells often become resistant to chemotherapy through a phenomenon known as multidrug resistance (MDR). Several factors are responsible for the development of MDR, preeminent among them being the accelerated drug efflux mediated by overexpression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Some small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were recently reported to modulate the activity of ABC transporters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if motesanib, a multikinase inhibitor, could reverse ABCB1-mediated MDR. The results showed that motesanib significantly sensitized both ABCB1-transfected and drug-selected cell lines overexpressing this transporter to its substrate anticancer drugs. Motesanib significantly increased the accumulation of [(3)H]-paclitaxel in ABCB1 overexpressing cells by blocking the efflux function of ABCB1 transporter. In contrast, no significant change in the expression levels and localization pattern of ABCB1 was observed when ABCB1 overexpressing cells were exposed to 3μM motesanib for 72h. Moreover, motesanib stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCB1 in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. Consistent with these findings, the docking studies indicated favorable binding of motesanib within the transmembrane region of homology modeled human ABCB1. Here, we report for the first time, motesanib, at clinically achievable plasma concentrations, antagonizes MDR by inhibiting the efflux activity of the ABCB1 transporter. These findings may be useful for cancer combination therapy with TKIs in the clinic. PMID:24937702

  9. Quercetin increases macrophage cholesterol efflux to inhibit foam cell formation through activating PPARγ-ABCA1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liqiang; Li, En; Wang, Feng; Wang, Tao; Qin, Zhiping; Niu, Shaohui; Qiu, Chunguang

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages could induce the formation of foam cells and increase the risk of developing atherosclerosis. We wonder if quercetin, one of flavonoids with anti-inflammation functions in different cell types, could elevate the development of foam cells formation in atherosclerosis. We treated foam cells derived from oxLDL induced THP-1 cells with quercetin, and evaluated the foam cells formation, cholesterol content and apoptosis of the cells. We found that quercetin induced the expression of ABCA1 in differentiated THP-1 cells, and increased the cholesterol efflux from THP-1 cell derived foam cells. Eventually, cholesterol level and the formation of foam cell derived from THP-1 cells decreased after quercetin treatment. In addition, quercetin activated PPARγ-LXRα pathway to upregulate ABCA1 expression through increasing protein level of PPARγ and its transcriptional activity. Inhibition of PPARγ activity by siRNA knockdown or the addition of chemical inhibitor, GW9662, abolished quercetin induced ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux in THP-1 derived macrophages. Our data demonstrated that quercetin increased cholesterol efflux from macrophages through upregulating the expressions of PPARγ and ABCA1. Taken together, increasing uptake of quercetin or quercetin-rich foods would be an effective way to lower the risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:26617799

  10. Multidrug Efflux Systems in Microaerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zeling; Yan, Aixin

    2015-01-01

    Active drug efflux constitutes an important mechanism of antibiotic and multidrug resistance in bacteria. Understanding the distribution, expression, and physiological functions of multidrug efflux pumps, especially under physiologically and clinically relevant conditions of the pathogens, is the key to combat drug resistance. In animal hosts, most wounded, infected and inflamed tissues display low oxygen tensions. In this article, we summarize research development on multidrug efflux pumps in the medicinally relevant microaerobic and anaerobic pathogens and their implications in the effort to combat drug-resistant infections. PMID:27025630

  11. Metal-induced conformational changes in ZneB suggest an active role of membrane fusion proteins in efflux resistance systems.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Fabien; Lee, John K; O'Connell, Joseph D; Miercke, Larry J W; Verschueren, Koen H; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Bauvois, Cédric; Govaerts, Cédric; Robbins, Rebecca A; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Stroud, Robert M; Vandenbussche, Guy

    2010-06-15

    Resistance nodulation cell division (RND)-based efflux complexes mediate multidrug and heavy-metal resistance in many Gram-negative bacteria. Efflux of toxic compounds is driven by membrane proton/substrate antiporters (RND protein) in the plasma membrane, linked by a membrane fusion protein (MFP) to an outer-membrane protein. The three-component complex forms an efflux system that spans the entire cell envelope. The MFP is required for the assembly of this complex and is proposed to play an important active role in substrate efflux. To better understand the role of MFPs in RND-driven efflux systems, we chose ZneB, the MFP component of the ZneCAB heavy-metal efflux system from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. ZneB is shown to be highly specific for Zn(2+) alone. The crystal structure of ZneB to 2.8 A resolution defines the basis for metal ion binding in the coordination site at a flexible interface between the beta-barrel and membrane proximal domains. The conformational differences observed between the crystal structures of metal-bound and apo forms are monitored in solution by spectroscopy and chromatography. The structural rearrangements between the two states suggest an active role in substrate efflux through metal binding and release. PMID:20534468

  12. ACTIVE EFFLUX OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS BY PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA S12 IS INDUCED BY SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of the membrane-associated organic solvent efflux system SrpABC of Pseudomonas putida S12 was examined by cloning a 312-bp DNA fragment, containing the srp promoter, in the broad-host-range reporter vector pKRZ-1. Compounds that are capable of inducing expression of the...

  13. Bacterial multidrug efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Delmar, Jared A; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by bacteria are a leading cause of death worldwide. Although antibiotics remain a key clinical therapy, their effectiveness has been severely compromised by the development of drug resistance in bacterial pathogens. Multidrug efflux transporters--a common and powerful resistance mechanism--are capable of extruding a number of structurally unrelated antimicrobials from the bacterial cell, including antibiotics and toxic heavy metal ions, facilitating their survival in noxious environments. Transporters of the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) superfamily typically assemble as tripartite efflux complexes spanning the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope. In Escherichia coli, the CusCFBA complex, which mediates resistance to copper(I) and silver(I) ions, is the only known RND transporter specific to heavy metals. Here, we describe the current knowledge of individual pump components of the Cus system, a paradigm for efflux machinery, and speculate on how RND pumps assemble to fight diverse antimicrobials. PMID:24702006

  14. Neutrophil IL-1β processing induced by pneumolysin is mediated by the NLRP3/ASC inflammasome and caspase-1 activation, and is dependent on K+ efflux

    PubMed Central

    Karmakar, Mausita; Katsnelson, Michael; Malak, Hesham A.; Greene, Neil G.; Howell, Scott J.; Hise, Amy G.; Camilli, Andrew; Kadioglu, Aras; Dubyak, George R.; Pearlman, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Although neutrophils are the most abundant cells in acute infection and inflammation, relatively little attention has been paid to their role in inflammasome formation and IL-1β processing. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism by which neutrophils process IL-1β in response to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Using a murine model of S. pneumoniae corneal infection, we demonstrated a requirement for IL-1β in bacterial clearance, and showed that NLRP3, ASC and caspase-1 are essential for IL-1β production and bacterial killing in the cornea. Neutrophils in infected corneas had multiple specks with enzymatically active caspase-1 (FLICA-660+), and bone marrow neutrophils stimulated with heat killed S. pneumoniae (signal 1) and pneumolysin (signal 2) exhibited multiple specks after staining with FLICA-660, NLRP3 or ASC. High molecular weight ASC complexes were also detected, consistent with oligomer formation. Pneumolysin induced K+ efflux in neutrophils, and blocking K+ efflux inhibited caspase-1 activation and IL-1β processing; however, neutrophils did not undergo pyroptosis, indicating that K+ efflux and IL-1β processing is not a consequence of cell death. There was also no role for lysosomal destabilization or neutrophil elastase in pneumolysin mediated IL-1β processing in neutrophils. Together, these findings demonstrate an essential role for neutrophil derived IL-1β in S. pneumoniae infection, and elucidate the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in neutrophil cleavage and secretion of mature IL-1β. Given the ubiquitous presence of neutrophils in acute bacterial and fungal infections, these findings will have implications for other microbial diseases. PMID:25609842

  15. Co-treatment with grapefruit juice inhibits while chronic administration activates intestinal P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux.

    PubMed

    Panchagnula, R; Bansal, T; Varma, M V S; Kaul, C L

    2005-12-01

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated efflux is recognized as a significant biochemical barrier affecting oral absorption for a number of drugs. Various conflicting reports have been published regarding the effects of grapefruit juice (GFJ) on P-gp-mediated drug efflux, in which GFJ has been shown both to inhibit and activate it. Hence, the present study adopted a two-way approach, involving both co-treatment and chronic administration. Bi-directional transport of paclitaxel (PCL) was carried out in the absence and presence of GFJ extract, in rat everted ileum sac. Further, the effect of chronic administration of GFJ to rats was characterized by permeability studies with indinavir (INDI). Co-treatment of GFJ extract at 100% concentration reduced the asymmetric transport of PCL (efflux ratio = 20.8) by increasing absorptive (A --> B) transport by 921% and reducing secretory (B --> A) transport by 41%. Further, GFJ showed a concentration dependent effect on PCL permeability. Imipramine, a passive permeability marker with absorptive permeability of 15.33 +/- 4.26 x 10(-6) cm/s showed no asymmetric transport and also no significant (P < 0.05) change in permeability in the presence of GFJ. Chronic administration of GFJ resulted in a significant decrease in absorptive transport of indinavir, which was even greater than that produced by rifampicin pretreatment. No change in permeability of propranolol, a passive permeability marker, was observed. Further, the decrease in absorptive transport of INDI was reversed by the P-gp inhibitor verapamil. In conclusion, GFJ extract inhibited P-gp-mediated efflux in co-treatment, whereas chronic administration led to increased levels of P-gp expression, thus having a profound effect on intestinal absorption and GFJ-drug interactions in vivo. PMID:16398269

  16. Substrate-Dependent Activation of the Vibrio cholerae vexAB RND Efflux System Requires vexR

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Dawn L.; Ante, Vanessa M.; Bina, X. Renee; Howard, Mondraya F.; Bina, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae encodes six resistance-nodulation-division (RND) efflux systems which function in antimicrobial resistance, virulence factor production, and intestinal colonization. Among the six RND efflux systems, VexAB exhibited broad substrate specificity and played a predominant role in intrinsic antimicrobial resistance. The VexAB system was encoded in an apparent three gene operon that included vexR; which encodes an uncharacterized TetR family regulator. In this work we examined the role of vexR in vexRAB expression. We found that VexR bound to the vexRAB promoter and vexR deletion resulted in decreased vexRAB expression and increased susceptibility to VexAB antimicrobial substrates. Substrate-dependent induction of vexRAB was dependent on vexR and episomal vexR expression provided a growth advantage in the presence of the VexAB substrate deoxycholate. The expression of vexRAB increased, in a vexR-dependent manner, in response to the loss of RND efflux activity. This suggested that VexAB may function to export intracellular metabolites. Support for this hypothesis was provided by data showing that vexRAB was upregulated in several metabolic mutants including tryptophan biosynthetic mutants that were predicted to accumulate indole. In addition, vexRAB was found to be upregulated in response to exogenous indole and to contribute to indole resistance. The collective results indicate that vexR is required for vexRAB expression in response to VexAB substrates and that the VexAB RND efflux system modulates the intracellular levels of metabolites that could otherwise accumulate to toxic levels. PMID:25695834

  17. Substrate-dependent activation of the Vibrio cholerae vexAB RND efflux system requires vexR.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Dawn L; Ante, Vanessa M; Bina, X Renee; Howard, Mondraya F; Bina, James E

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae encodes six resistance-nodulation-division (RND) efflux systems which function in antimicrobial resistance, virulence factor production, and intestinal colonization. Among the six RND efflux systems, VexAB exhibited broad substrate specificity and played a predominant role in intrinsic antimicrobial resistance. The VexAB system was encoded in an apparent three gene operon that included vexR; which encodes an uncharacterized TetR family regulator. In this work we examined the role of vexR in vexRAB expression. We found that VexR bound to the vexRAB promoter and vexR deletion resulted in decreased vexRAB expression and increased susceptibility to VexAB antimicrobial substrates. Substrate-dependent induction of vexRAB was dependent on vexR and episomal vexR expression provided a growth advantage in the presence of the VexAB substrate deoxycholate. The expression of vexRAB increased, in a vexR-dependent manner, in response to the loss of RND efflux activity. This suggested that VexAB may function to export intracellular metabolites. Support for this hypothesis was provided by data showing that vexRAB was upregulated in several metabolic mutants including tryptophan biosynthetic mutants that were predicted to accumulate indole. In addition, vexRAB was found to be upregulated in response to exogenous indole and to contribute to indole resistance. The collective results indicate that vexR is required for vexRAB expression in response to VexAB substrates and that the VexAB RND efflux system modulates the intracellular levels of metabolites that could otherwise accumulate to toxic levels. PMID:25695834

  18. Mycorrhiza-induced lower oxidative burst is related with higher antioxidant enzyme activities, net H2O2 effluxes, and Ca2+ influxes in trifoliate orange roots under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ying-Ning; Huang, Yong-Ming; Wu, Qiang-Sheng; He, Xin-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Mechanisms of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM)-induced lower oxidative burst of host plants under drought stress (DS) are not elucidated. A noninvasive microtest technology (NMT) was used to investigate the effects of Funneliformis mosseae on net fluxes of root hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and calcium ions (Ca2+) in 5-month-old Poncirus trifoliata, in combination with catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities as well as tissue superoxide radical (O2•-) and H2O2 concentrations under DS and well-watered (WW) conditions. A 2-month DS (55% maximum water holding capacity of growth substrates) significantly inhibited AM fungal root colonization, while AM symbiosis significantly increased plant biomass production, irrespective of water status. F. mosseae inoculation generally increased SOD and CAT activity but decreased O2•- and H2O2 concentrations in leaves and roots under WW and DS. Compared with non-AM seedlings, roots of AM seedlings had significantly higher net H2O2 effluxes and net Ca2+ influxes, especially in the meristem zone, but lower net H2O2 efflux in the elongation zone. Net Ca2+ influxes into roots were significantly positively correlated with root net H2O2 effluxes but negatively with root H2O2 concentrations. Results from this study suggest that AM-induced lower oxidative burst is related with higher antioxidant enzyme activities, root net H2O2 effluxes, and Ca2+ influxes under WW and DS. PMID:25085218

  19. TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB Pathway, Reactive Oxygen Species, Potassium Efflux Activates NLRP3/ASC Inflammasome during Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mgbemena, Victoria; Tsai, Su-Yu; Chang, Te-Hung; Berton, Michael T.; Morris, Ian R.; Allen, Irving C.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.; Bose, Santanu

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) constitute highly pathogenic virus that cause severe respiratory diseases in newborn, children, elderly and immuno-compromised individuals. Airway inflammation is a critical regulator of disease outcome in RSV infected hosts. Although “controlled” inflammation is required for virus clearance, aberrant and exaggerated inflammation during RSV infection results in development of inflammatory diseases like pneumonia and bronchiolitis. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays an important role in inflammation by orchestrating the pro-inflammatory response. IL-1β is synthesized as an immature pro-IL-1β form. It is cleaved by activated caspase-1 to yield mature IL-1β that is secreted extracellularly. Activation of caspase-1 is mediated by a multi-protein complex known as the inflammasome. Although RSV infection results in IL-1β release, the mechanism is unknown. Here in, we have characterized the mechanism of IL-1β secretion following RSV infection. Our study revealed that NLRP3/ASC inflammasome activation is crucial for IL-1β production during RSV infection. Further studies illustrated that prior to inflammasome formation; the “first signal” constitutes activation of toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2)/MyD88/NF-κB pathway. TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB signaling is required for pro-IL-1β and NLRP3 gene expression during RSV infection. Following expression of these genes, two “second signals” are essential for triggering inflammasome activation. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and potassium (K+) efflux due to stimulation of ATP-sensitive ion channel promote inflammasome activation following RSV infection. Thus, our studies have underscored the requirement of TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway (first signal) and ROS/potassium efflux (second signal) for NLRP3/ASC inflammasome formation, leading to caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1β release during RSV infection. PMID:22295065

  20. Alternative to antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Effects of Glycyrrhiza glabra on membrane permeability and inhibition of efflux activity and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its in vitro time-kill activity.

    PubMed

    Chakotiya, Ankita Singh; Tanwar, Ankit; Narula, Alka; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-09-01

    The multi-drug resistance offered by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics can be attributed towards its propensity to develop biofilm, modification in cell membrane and to efflux antibacterial drugs. The present study explored the activity of Glycyrrhiza glabra and one of its pure compounds, glycyrrhizic acid against P. aeruginosa and their mechanism of action in terms of the effect on membrane permeability, efflux activity, and biofilm formation were determined. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined by using broth dilution technique. The minimum bactericidal concentrations were assessed on agar plate. The MIC of the extract and glycyrrhizic acid was found to be 200 and 100 μg ml(-1), respectively. The MBC was found to be 800 and 400 μg ml(-1) in the case of extract and glycyrrhizic acid, respectively. Time -dependent killing efficacy was also estimated. Flowcytometric analysis with staining methods was used to determine the effect of extract and glycyrrhizic acid at 2 × MIC on different physiological parameters and compared it with the standard (antibiotic). The growth of P. aeruginosa was significantly inhibited by extract and the pure compound. The herbal extract and the glycyrrhic acid were also found to effective in targeting the physiological parameters of the bacteria that involve cell membrane permeabilization, efflux activity, and biofilm formation. This study reports the antipseudomonal action of Glycyrrhiza glabra and one of its compound and provides insight into their mode of action. PMID:27392698

  1. MpeR regulates the mtr efflux locus in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and modulates antimicrobial resistance by an iron-responsive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mercante, Alexandra Dubon; Jackson, Lydgia; Johnson, Paul J T; Stringer, Virginia A; Dyer, David W; Shafer, William M

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that the MpeR transcriptional regulator produced by Neisseria gonorrhoeae represses the expression of mtrF, which encodes a putative inner membrane protein (MtrF). MtrF works as an accessory protein with the Mtr efflux pump, helping gonococci to resist high levels of diverse hydrophobic antimicrobials. Regulation of mpeR has been reported to occur by an iron-dependent mechanism involving Fur (ferric uptake regulator). Collectively, these observations suggest the presence of an interconnected regulatory system in gonococci that modulates the expression of efflux pump protein-encoding genes in an iron-responsive manner. Herein, we describe this connection and report that levels of gonococcal resistance to a substrate of the mtrCDE-encoded efflux pump can be modulated by MpeR and the availability of free iron. Using microarray analysis, we found that the mtrR gene, which encodes a direct repressor (MtrR) of mtrCDE, is an MpeR-repressed determinant in the late logarithmic phase of growth when free iron levels would be reduced due to bacterial consumption. This repression was enhanced under conditions of iron limitation and resulted in increased expression of the mtrCDE efflux pump operon. Furthermore, as judged by DNA-binding analysis, MpeR-mediated repression of mtrR was direct. Collectively, our results indicate that both genetic and physiologic parameters (e.g., iron availability) can influence the expression of the mtr efflux system and modulate levels of gonococcal susceptibility to efflux pump substrates. PMID:22214775

  2. Ventral Tegmental Area Neurotensin Signaling Links the Lateral Hypothalamus to Locomotor Activity and Striatal Dopamine Efflux in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Christa M.; Wong, Jenny-Marie T.; Leinninger, Gina M.; Allison, Margaret B.; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Kasper, Chelsea L.; Gonzalez, Ian E.; Mackenzie, Alexander; Jones, Justin C.

    2015-01-01

    Projections from the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) innervate components of the mesolimbic dopamine (MLDA) system, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc), to modulate motivation appropriately for physiologic state. Neurotensin (NT)-containing LHA neurons respond to multiple homeostatic challenges and project to the VTA, suggesting that these neurons could link such signals to MLDA function. Indeed, we found that pharmacogenetic activation of LHA NT neurons promoted prolonged DA-dependent locomotor activity and NAc DA efflux, suggesting the importance of VTA neurotransmitter release by LHA NT neurons for the control of MLDA function. Using a microdialysis-mass spectrometry technique that we developed to detect endogenous NT in extracellular fluid in the mouse brain, we found that activation of LHA NT cells acutely increased the extracellular concentration of NT (a known activator of VTA DA cells) in the VTA. In contrast to the prolonged elevation of extracellular NAc DA, however, VTA NT concentrations rapidly returned to baseline. Intra-VTA infusion of NT receptor antagonist abrogated the ability of LHA NT cells to increase extracellular DA in the NAc, demonstrating that VTA NT promotes NAc DA release. Thus, transient LHA-derived NT release in the VTA couples LHA signaling to prolonged changes in DA efflux and MLDA function. PMID:25734363

  3. Commensal Bacteria-Induced Inflammasome Activation in Mouse and Human Macrophages Is Dependent on Potassium Efflux but Does Not Require Phagocytosis or Bacterial Viability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejie; Shanmugam, Nanda Kumar N; Pazos, Michael A; Hurley, Bryan P; Cherayil, Bobby J

    2016-01-01

    Gut commensal bacteria contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, in part by activating the inflammasome and inducing secretion of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß). Although much has been learned about inflammasome activation by bacterial pathogens, little is known about how commensals carry out this process. Accordingly, we investigated the mechanism of inflammasome activation by representative commensal bacteria, the Gram-positive Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis and the Gram-negative Bacteroides fragilis. B. infantis and B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion by primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages after overnight incubation. IL-1ß secretion also occurred in response to heat-killed bacteria and was only partly reduced when phagocytosis was inhibited with cytochalasin D. Similar results were obtained with a wild-type immortalized mouse macrophage cell line but neither B. infantis nor B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion in a mouse macrophage line lacking the nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. IL-1ß secretion in response to B. infantis and B. fragilis was significantly reduced when the wild-type macrophage line was treated with inhibitors of potassium efflux, either increased extracellular potassium concentrations or the channel blocker ruthenium red. Both live and heat-killed B. infantis and B. fragilis also induced IL-1ß secretion by human macrophages (differentiated THP-1 cells or primary monocyte-derived macrophages) after 4 hours of infection, and the secretion was inhibited by raised extracellular potassium and ruthenium red but not by cytochalasin D. Taken together, our findings indicate that the commensal bacteria B. infantis and B. fragilis activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages by a mechanism that involves potassium efflux and that does not require bacterial viability or phagocytosis. PMID:27505062

  4. Commensal Bacteria-Induced Inflammasome Activation in Mouse and Human Macrophages Is Dependent on Potassium Efflux but Does Not Require Phagocytosis or Bacterial Viability

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kejie; Shanmugam, Nanda Kumar N.; Pazos, Michael A.; Hurley, Bryan P.; Cherayil, Bobby J.

    2016-01-01

    Gut commensal bacteria contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, in part by activating the inflammasome and inducing secretion of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß). Although much has been learned about inflammasome activation by bacterial pathogens, little is known about how commensals carry out this process. Accordingly, we investigated the mechanism of inflammasome activation by representative commensal bacteria, the Gram-positive Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis and the Gram-negative Bacteroides fragilis. B. infantis and B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion by primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages after overnight incubation. IL-1ß secretion also occurred in response to heat-killed bacteria and was only partly reduced when phagocytosis was inhibited with cytochalasin D. Similar results were obtained with a wild-type immortalized mouse macrophage cell line but neither B. infantis nor B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion in a mouse macrophage line lacking the nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. IL-1ß secretion in response to B. infantis and B. fragilis was significantly reduced when the wild-type macrophage line was treated with inhibitors of potassium efflux, either increased extracellular potassium concentrations or the channel blocker ruthenium red. Both live and heat-killed B. infantis and B. fragilis also induced IL-1ß secretion by human macrophages (differentiated THP-1 cells or primary monocyte-derived macrophages) after 4 hours of infection, and the secretion was inhibited by raised extracellular potassium and ruthenium red but not by cytochalasin D. Taken together, our findings indicate that the commensal bacteria B. infantis and B. fragilis activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages by a mechanism that involves potassium efflux and that does not require bacterial viability or phagocytosis. PMID:27505062

  5. The Influence of Efflux Pump Inhibitors on the Activity of Non-Antibiotic NSAIDS against Gram-Negative Rods

    PubMed Central

    Laudy, Agnieszka E.; Mrowka, Agnieszka; Krajewska, Joanna; Tyski, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Most patients with bacterial infections suffer from fever and various pains that require complex treatments with antibiotics, antipyretics, and analgaesics. The most common drugs used to relieve these symptoms are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are not typically considered antibiotics. Here, we investigate the effects of NSAIDs on bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics and the modulation of bacterial efflux pumps. Methodology The activity of 12 NSAID active substances, paracetamol (acetaminophen), and eight relevant medicinal products was analyzed with or without pump inhibitors against 89 strains of Gram-negative rods by determining the MICs. Furthermore, the effects of NSAIDs on the susceptibility of clinical strains to antimicrobial agents with or without PAβN (Phe-Arg-β-naphtylamide) were measured. Results The MICs of diclofenac, mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, in the presence of PAβN, were significantly (≥4-fold) reduced, decreasing to 25–1600 mg/L, against the majority of the studied strains. In the case of acetylsalicylic acid only for 5 and 7 out of 12 strains of P. mirabilis and E. coli, respectively, a 4-fold increase in susceptibility in the presence of PAβN was observed. The presence of Aspirin resulted in a 4-fold increase in the MIC of ofloxacin against only two strains of E. coli among 48 tested clinical strains, which included species such as E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, and S. maltophilia. Besides, the medicinal products containing the following NSAIDs, diclofenac, mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, did not cause the decrease of clinical strains’ susceptibility to antibiotics. Conclusions The effects of PAβN on the susceptibility of bacteria to NSAIDs indicate that some NSAIDs are substrates for efflux pumps in Gram-negative rods. Morever, Aspirin probably induced efflux-mediated resistance to fluoroquinolones in a few E. coli strains. PMID:26771525

  6. An efflux transporter PbrA and a phosphatase PbrB cooperate in a lead-resistance mechanism in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hynninen, Anu; Touzé, Thierry; Pitkänen, Leena; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Virta, Marko

    2009-10-01

    The gene cluster pbrTRABCD from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is thought to encode a unique, specific resistance mechanism for lead. However, the exact functions of these genes are unknown. In this study we examine the metal specificity and functions of pbrABCD by expressing these genes in different combinations and comparing their ability to restore Pb(2+), Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) resistance in a metal-sensitive C. metallidurans strain DN440. We show that lead resistance in C. metallidurans is achieved through the cooperation of the Zn/Cd/Pb-translocating ATPase PbrA and the undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase PbrB. While PbrA non-specifically exported Pb(2+), Zn(2+) and Cd(2+), a specific increase in lead resistance was observed when PbrA and PbrB were coexpressed. As a model of action for PbrA and PbrB we propose a mechanism where Pb(2+) is exported from the cytoplasm by PbrA and then sequestered as a phosphate salt with the inorganic phosphate produced by PbrB. Similar operons containing genes for heavy metal translocating ATPases and phosphatases were found in several different bacterial species, suggesting that lead detoxification through active efflux and sequestration is a common lead-resistance mechanism. PMID:19737357

  7. Efflux systems in bacterial pathogens: an opportunity for therapeutic intervention? An industry view.

    PubMed

    Lynch, A Simon

    2006-03-30

    The efflux systems of bacteria protect cells from antibiotics and biocides by actively transporting compounds out of the cytoplasm and/or periplasm and thereby limit their steady-state accumulation at their site(s) of action. The impact of efflux systems on the efficacy of antibiotics used in human medicine and animal husbandry is becoming increasingly apparent from the characterization of drug-resistant strains with altered drug efflux properties. In most instances, efflux-mediated antibiotic resistance arises from mutational events that result in their elevated expression and, in the case of efflux pumps with broad substrate specificity, can confer multi-drug resistance (MDR) to structurally unrelated antibiotics. Knowledge of the role of efflux systems in conferring antibiotic resistance has now been successfully exploited in the pharmaceutical industry and contributed, in part, to the development of new members of the macrolide and tetracycline classes of antibiotics that circumvent the efflux-based resistance mechanisms that have limited the clinical utility of their progenitors. The therapeutic utility of compounds that inhibit bacterial drug efflux pumps and therein potentiate the activity of a co-administered antibiotic agent remains to be validated in the clinical setting, but the approach holds promise for the future in improving the efficacy and/or extending the clinical utility of existing antibiotics. This review discusses the potential of further exploiting the knowledge of efflux-mediated antibiotic resistance in bacteria toward the discovery and development of new chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:16290174

  8. Auxin efflux by PIN-FORMED proteins is activated by two different protein kinases, D6 PROTEIN KINASE and PINOID

    PubMed Central

    Zourelidou, Melina; Absmanner, Birgit; Weller, Benjamin; Barbosa, Inês CR; Willige, Björn C; Fastner, Astrid; Streit, Verena; Port, Sarah A; Colcombet, Jean; de la Fuente van Bentem, Sergio; Hirt, Heribert; Kuster, Bernhard; Schulze, Waltraud X; Hammes, Ulrich Z; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The development and morphology of vascular plants is critically determined by synthesis and proper distribution of the phytohormone auxin. The directed cell-to-cell distribution of auxin is achieved through a system of auxin influx and efflux transporters. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are proposed auxin efflux transporters, and auxin fluxes can seemingly be predicted based on the—in many cells—asymmetric plasma membrane distribution of PINs. Here, we show in a heterologous Xenopus oocyte system as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems that PIN-mediated auxin transport is directly activated by D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) and PINOID (PID)/WAG kinases of the Arabidopsis AGCVIII kinase family. At the same time, we reveal that D6PKs and PID have differential phosphosite preferences. Our study suggests that PIN activation by protein kinases is a crucial component of auxin transport control that must be taken into account to understand auxin distribution within the plant. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02860.001 PMID:24948515

  9. Auxin efflux by PIN-FORMED proteins is activated by two different protein kinases, D6 PROTEIN KINASE and PINOID.

    PubMed

    Zourelidou, Melina; Absmanner, Birgit; Weller, Benjamin; Barbosa, Inês C R; Willige, Björn C; Fastner, Astrid; Streit, Verena; Port, Sarah A; Colcombet, Jean; de la Fuente van Bentem, Sergio; Hirt, Heribert; Kuster, Bernhard; Schulze, Waltraud X; Hammes, Ulrich Z; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The development and morphology of vascular plants is critically determined by synthesis and proper distribution of the phytohormone auxin. The directed cell-to-cell distribution of auxin is achieved through a system of auxin influx and efflux transporters. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are proposed auxin efflux transporters, and auxin fluxes can seemingly be predicted based on the--in many cells--asymmetric plasma membrane distribution of PINs. Here, we show in a heterologous Xenopus oocyte system as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems that PIN-mediated auxin transport is directly activated by D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) and PINOID (PID)/WAG kinases of the Arabidopsis AGCVIII kinase family. At the same time, we reveal that D6PKs and PID have differential phosphosite preferences. Our study suggests that PIN activation by protein kinases is a crucial component of auxin transport control that must be taken into account to understand auxin distribution within the plant. PMID:24948515

  10. Nrf2 activation ameliorates cytotoxic effects of arsenic trioxide in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells through increased glutathione levels and arsenic efflux from cells.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Shoichi; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Koike, Shin; Yuan, Bo; Takagi, Norio; Ogasawara, Yuki

    2016-08-15

    Carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene isolated from Rosmarinus officinalis, has been shown to activate nuclear transcription factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which plays a central role in cytoprotective responses to oxidative and electrophilic stress. Recently, the Nrf2-Kelch ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) pathway has been associated with cancer drug resistance attributable to modulation of the expression and activation of antioxidant and detoxification enzymes. However, the exact mechanisms by which Nrf2 activation results in chemoresistance are insufficiently understood to date. This study investigated the mechanisms by which the cytotoxic effects of arsenic trioxide (ATO), an anticancer drug, were decreased in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells treated with CA, a typical activator of Nrf2 used to stimulate the Nrf2/Keap1 system. Our findings suggest that arsenic is non-enzymatically incorporated into NB4 cells and forms complexes that are dependent on intracellular glutathione (GSH) concentrations. In addition, the arsenic complexes are recognized as substrates by multidrug resistance proteins and subsequently excreted from the cells. Therefore, Nrf2-associated activation of the GSH biosynthetic pathway, followed by increased levels of intracellular GSH, are key mechanisms underlying accelerated arsenic efflux and attenuation of the cytotoxic effects of ATO. PMID:27317373

  11. Impairment of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier properties by retrovirus-activated T lymphocytes: reduction in cerebrospinal fluid-to-blood efflux of prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Khuth, Seng Thuon; Strazielle, Nathalie; Giraudon, Pascale; Belin, Marie-Françoise; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-François

    2005-09-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium forms the interface between the blood and the CSF. In conjunction with the tight junctions restricting the paracellular pathway, polarized specific transport systems in the choroidal epithelium allow a fine regulation of CSF-borne biologically active mediators. The highly vascularized stroma delimited by the choroidal epithelium can be a reservoir for retrovirus-infected or activated immune cells. In this work, new insight in the implication of the blood-CSF barrier in neuroinfectious and inflammatory diseases is provided by using a differentiated cellular model of the choroidal epithelium, exposed to infected T lymphocytes. We demonstrate that T cells activated by a retroviral infection, but not non-infected cells, reduce the transporter-mediated CSF-to-blood efflux of organic anions, in particular that of the potent pro-inflammatory prostaglandin PGE2, via the release of soluble factors. A moderate alteration of the paracellular permeability also occurs. We identified the viral protein Tax, oxygenated free radicals, matrix-metalloproteinases and pro-inflammatory cytokines as active molecules released during the exposure of the epithelium to infected T cells. Among them, tumour necrosis factor and interleukin 1 are directly involved in the mechanism underlying the decrease in some choroidal organic anion efflux. Given the strong involvement of CSF-borne PGE2 in sickness behaviour syndrome, these data suggest that the blood-CSF barrier plays an important role in the pathophysiology of neuroinflammation and neuroinfection, via changes in the transport processes controlling the CSF biodisposition of PGE2. PMID:16026393

  12. Antibiotic-potentiation activities of four Cameroonian dietary plants against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria expressing efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The continuous spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria, partially due to efflux pumps drastically reduced the efficacy of the antibiotic armory, increasing the frequency of therapeutic failure. The search for new compounds to potentiate the efficacy of commonly used antibiotics is therefore important. The present study was designed to evaluate the ability of the methanol extracts of four Cameroonian dietary plants (Capsicum frutescens L. var. facilulatum, Brassica oleacera L. var. italica, Brassica oleacera L. var. butyris and Basilicum polystachyon (L.) Moench.) to improve the activity of commonly used antibiotics against MDR Gram-negative bacteria expressing active efflux pumps. Methods The qualitative phytochemical screening of the plant extracts was performed using standard methods whilst the antibacterial activity was performed by broth micro-dilution method. Results All the studied plant extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, phenols, flavonoids, triterpenes and sterols. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the studied extracts ranged from 256-1024 μg/mL. Capsicum frutescens var. facilulatum extract displayed the largest spectrum of activity (73%) against the tested bacterial strains whilst the lower MIC value (256 μg/mL) was recorded with Basilicum polystachyon against E. aerogenes ATCC 13048 and P. stuartii ATCC 29916. In the presence of PAβN, the spectrum of activity of Brassica oleacera var. italica extract against bacteria strains increased (75%). The extracts from Brassica oleacera var. butyris, Brassica oleacera var. italica, Capsicum frutescens var. facilulatum and Basilicum polystachyon showed synergistic effects (FIC ≤ 0.5) against the studied bacteria, with an average of 75.3% of the tested antibiotics. Conclusion These results provide promising information for the potential use of the tested plants alone or in combination with some commonly used antibiotics in the fight against MDR Gram-negative bacteria

  13. Use of a combined effect model approach for discriminating between ABCB1- and ABCC1-type efflux activities in native bivalve gill tissue.

    PubMed

    Faria, Melissa; Pavlichenko, Vasiliy; Burkhardt-Medicke, Kathleen; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Altenburger, Rolf; Barata, Carlos; Luckenbach, Till

    2016-04-15

    Aquatic organisms, such as bivalves, employ ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters for efflux of potentially toxic chemicals. Anthropogenic water contaminants can, as chemosensitizers, disrupt efflux transporter function enabling other, putatively toxic compounds to enter the organism. Applying rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR we identified complete cDNAs encoding ABCB1- and ABCC1-type transporter homologs from zebra mussel providing the molecular basis for expression of both transporter types in zebra mussel gills. Further, efflux activities of both transporter types in gills were indicated with dye accumulation assays where efflux of the dye calcein-am was sensitive to both ABCB1- (reversin 205, verapamil) and ABCC1- (MK571) type specific inhibitors. The assumption that different inhibitors targeted different efflux pump types was confirmed when comparing measured effects of binary inhibitor compound mixtures in dye accumulation assays with predictions from mixture effect models. Effects by the MK571/reversin 205 mixture corresponded better with independent action, whereas reversin 205/verapamil joint effects were better predicted by the concentration addition model indicating different and equal targets, respectively. The binary mixture approach was further applied to identify the efflux pump type targeted by environmentally relevant chemosensitizing compounds. Pentachlorophenol and musk ketone, which were selected after a pre-screen of twelve compounds that previously had been identified as chemosensitizers, showed mixture effects that corresponded better with concentration addition when combined with reversine 205 but with independent action predictions when combined with MK571 indicating targeting of an ABCB1-type efflux pump by these compounds. PMID:26929997

  14. Harmine augments electrically evoked dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens shell.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Daniel I; Davidson, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Harmine is a β-carboline alkaloid and major component of ayahuasca, a traditional South American psychoactive tea with anecdotal efficacy for treatment of cocaine dependence. Harmine is an inhibitor of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) and interacts in vitro with several pharmacological targets which modulate dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. In vivo studies have demonstrated dopaminergic effects of harmine, attributed to monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) activity, however none have directly demonstrated a pharmacological mechanism. This study investigated the acute effects, and pharmacological mechanism(s), of harmine on electrically evoked DA efflux parameters in the nucleus accumbens both in the absence and presence of cocaine. Fast cyclic voltammetry in rat brain slices was used to measure electrically evoked DA efflux in accumbens core and shell. Harmine (300 nM) significantly augmented DA efflux (148±8% of baseline) in the accumbens shell. Cocaine augmented efflux in shell additive to harmine (260±35%). Harmine had no effect on efflux in the accumbens core or on reuptake in either sub-region. The effect of harmine in the shell was attenuated by the 5-HT(2A/2C) antagonist ketanserin. The MAOI moclobemide (10 µM) had no effect on DA efflux. These data suggest that harmine augments DA efflux via a novel, shell-specific, presynaptic 5-HT(2A) receptor-dependent mechanism, independent of MAOI activity. A DA-releasing 'agonist therapy' mechanism may thus contribute to the putative therapeutic efficacy of ayahuasca for cocaine dependence. PMID:23076833

  15. Antitumor activity of 7-aminocarboxycoumarin derivatives, a new class of potent inhibitors of lactate influx but not efflux.

    PubMed

    Draoui, Nihed; Schicke, Olivier; Seront, Emmanuel; Bouzin, Caroline; Sonveaux, Pierre; Riant, Olivier; Feron, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    High lactate concentration in tumors is associated with bad prognosis. Lactate is released by glycolytic cells in tumors and recaptured by oxidative cancer cells to feed the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle after conversion into pyruvate. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) mediate these fluxes of proton-linked lactate and represent attractive targets to interrupt lactate shuttle and to inhibit tumor growth. Here, we investigated the properties of 7-aminocarboxycoumarins (7ACC) developed to selectively interfere with lactate fluxes in the lactate-rich tumor microenvironment. The pharmacologic properties of two compounds of this family, including their effects on lactate influx and efflux and antitumor activity, were investigated using human cancer cell lines and mouse xenograft models. Contrary to the reference MCT1 inhibitor AR-C155858, 7ACC unexpectedly inhibited lactate influx but not efflux in tumor cells expressing MCT1 and MCT4 transporters. 7ACC delayed the growth of cervix SiHa tumors, colorectal HCT116 tumors, and orthoptopic MCF-7 breast tumors. MCT target engagement was confirmed by the lack of activity of 7ACC on bladder UM-UC-3 carcinoma that does not express functional MCT. 7ACC also inhibited SiHa tumor relapse after treatment with cisplatin. Finally, we found that contrary to AR-C155858, 7ACC did not prevent the cell entry of the substrate-mimetic drug 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) through MCT1, and contributed to the inhibition of tumor relapse after 3BP treatment. In conclusion, our results indicate that 7ACC selectively affects a single part of the MCT symporter translocation cycle, leading to strict inhibition of lactate influx. This singular activity is associated with antitumor effects less prone to resistance and side effects. PMID:24672058

  16. Inhibition by islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin, of P2-purinergic receptor-mediated iodide efflux and phosphoinositide turnover in FRTL-5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okajima, F.; Sho, K.; Kondo, Y.

    1988-08-01

    Exposure of FRTL-5 thyroid cells to ATP (1 microM to 1 mM) resulted in the stimulation of I- efflux in association with the induction of inositol trisphosphate production and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Nonhydrolyzable ATP derivatives, ADP and GTP, were also as effective in magnitude as ATP, whereas neither AMP nor adenosine exerted significant effect on I- efflux, suggesting a P2-purinergic receptor-mediated activation of I- efflux. Treatment of the cells with the islet-activating protein (IAP) pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylated a 41,000 mol wt membrane protein, effectively suppressed the phosphoinositide response to ATP in addition to ATP-dependent I- efflux at agonist concentrations below 10 microM. In contrast, the I- efflux stimulated by TSH, A23187, or phorbol myristate acetate was insusceptible to IAP. The IAP substrate, probably GTP-binding protein, is hence proposed to mediate the activation of P2-purinergic receptor-linked phospholipase-C in FRTL-5 cells. However, the responses to ATP, its nonhydrolyzable derivatives, or ADP at the higher agonist concentrations, especially above 100 microM, were only partially inhibited by IAP, even though the IAP substrate was totally ADP ribosylated by the toxin. The responses to GTP in the whole concentration range tested were not influenced by IAP treatment. Thus, signals arising from the P2-receptor might be transduced to phospholipase-C by two different pathways, i.e. IAP-sensitive and insensitive ones, and result in the stimulation of I- efflux.

  17. Methane efflux from marine sediments in passive and active margins: Estimations from bioenergetic reaction-transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, A. W.; Van Cappellen, P.; Aguilera, D. R.; Regnier, P.

    2008-01-01

    A simplified version of a kinetic-bioenergetic reaction model for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments [Dale, A.W., Regnier, P., Van Cappellen, P., 2006. Bioenergetic controls on anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in coastal marine sediments: a theoretical analysis. Am. J. Sci. 306, 246-294.] is used to assess the impact of transport processes on biomass distributions, AOM rates and methane release fluxes from the sea floor. The model explicitly represents the functional microbial groups and the kinetic and bioenergetic limitations of the microbial metabolic pathways involved in AOM. Model simulations illustrate the dominant control exerted by the transport regime on the activity and abundance of AOM communities. Upward fluid flow at active seep systems restricts AOM to a narrow subsurface reaction zone and sustains high rates of methane oxidation. In contrast, pore-water transport dominated by molecular diffusion leads to deeper and broader zones of AOM, characterized by much lower rates and biomasses. Under steady-state conditions, less than 1% of the upward dissolved methane flux reaches the water column, irrespective of the transport regime. However, a sudden increase in the advective flux of dissolved methane, for example as a result of the destabilization of methane hydrates, causes a transient efflux of methane from the sediment. The benthic efflux of dissolved methane is due to the slow growth kinetics of the AOM community and lasts on the order of 60 years. This time window is likely too short to allow for a significant escape of pore-water methane following a large scale gas hydrate dissolution event such as the one that may have accompanied the Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM).

  18. Dissociation between the induction of potassium efflux and cytostatic activity of polyene macrolides in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Malewicz, B; Jenkin, H M; Borowski, E

    1980-01-01

    The paper contains data on the induction of K+ efflux and viability of baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells after their treatment with macrolide antibiotics inducing specific pores in membrane. New water-soluble semisynthetic derivatives of amphotericin B and aureofacin (N-glycosyl and trimethylammonium methyl ester derivatives) as well as the parent compounds were used to compare the concentration of antibiotics inducing permeabilizing and cytostatic effects. We found that a two- to eight-times-higher concentration of polyene antibiotic was required to observe a cytostatic effect than for release of 50% of the cellular potassium (K50 concentration) from BHK-21 cells. These differences were larger for water-soluble derivatives than for the parent compounds. The amount of intracellular potassium in treated cells incubated under optimal growth conditions was higher than in cells which had been further washed with K+-free maintenance medium. The membrane permeability changes induced by low concentrations of specific polyenes were observed to be reversible. BHK-21 cells were able to repair polyene-induced membrane permeability within 3 to 12 h under optimal growth conditions, after cell treatment with K50 concentration of specific macrolide antibiotics. The repair phenomenon is postulated as an explanation for the dissociation observed between permeabilizing and cytostatic effect of specific polyenes in BHK-21 cells. PMID:7396461

  19. Intra-annual dynamics of stem CO2 efflux in relation to cambial activity and xylem development in Pinus cembra

    PubMed Central

    GRUBER, A.; WIESER, G.; OBERHUBER, W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The relationship between stem CO2 efflux (ES), cambial activity and xylem production in Pinus cembra was determined at the timberline (1950 m a.s.l.) of the Central Austrian Alps, throughout one year. ES was measured continuously from June 2006 to August 2007 using an infrared gas-analysis system. Cambial activity and xylem production was determined by repeated microcore sampling of the developing tree ring and radial increment was monitored using automated point dendrometers. Aside of temperature, the number of living tracheids and cambial cells was predominantly responsible for ES: ES normalized to 10°C (ES10) was significantly correlated to number of living cells throughout the year (r2 = 0,574; p < 0,001). However, elevated ES and missing correlation between ES10 and xylem production was detected during cambial reactivation in April and during transition from active phase to rest, which occurred in August and lasted until early September. Results of this study indicate that (i) during seasonal variations in cambial activity non-linearity between ES and xylem production occurs and (ii) elevated metabolic activity during transition stages in the cambial activity-dormancy cycle influence the carbon budget of Pinus cembra. Daily radial stem increment was primarily influenced by the number of enlarging cells and was not correlated to ES. PMID:19203979

  20. Hypoxic Stress Induced by Hydralazine Leads to a Loss of Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and an Increase in Efflux Transporter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chatard, Morgane; Puech, Clémentine

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by hypoxic stress is crucial to reduce blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in some neurological diseases. Since the brain is a complex organ, it makes the interpretation of in vivo data difficult, so BBB studies are often investigated using in vitro models. However, the investigation of hypoxia in cellular pathways is complex with physical hypoxia because HIF-1α (factor induced by hypoxia) has a short half-life. We had set up an innovative and original method of induction of hypoxic stress by hydralazine that was more reproducible, which allowed us to study its impact on an in vitro BBB model. Our results showed that hydralazine, a mimetic agent of the hypoxia pathway, had the same effect as physical hypoxia, with few cytotoxicity effects on our cells. Hypoxic stress led to an increase of BBB permeability which corresponded to an opening of our BBB model. Study of tight junction proteins revealed that this hypoxic stress decreased ZO-1 but not occludin expression. In contrast, cells established a defence mechanism by increasing expression and activity of their efflux transporters (Pgp and MRP-1). This induction method of hypoxic stress by hydralazine is simple, reproducible, controllable and suitable to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved by hypoxia on the BBB. PMID:27337093

  1. Robust passive and active efflux of cellular cholesterol to a designer functional mimic of high density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Luthi, Andrea J.; Lyssenko, Nicholas N.; Quach, Duyen; McMahon, Kaylin M.; Millar, John S.; Vickers, Kasey C.; Rader, Daniel J.; Phillips, Michael C.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2015-01-01

    The ability of HDL to support macrophage cholesterol efflux is an integral part of its atheroprotective action. Augmenting this ability, especially when HDL cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages is poor, represents a promising therapeutic strategy. One approach to enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux is infusing blood with HDL mimics. Previously, we reported the synthesis of a functional mimic of HDL (fmHDL) that consists of a gold nanoparticle template, a phospholipid bilayer, and apo A-I. In this work, we characterize the ability of fmHDL to support the well-established pathways of cellular cholesterol efflux from model cell lines and primary macrophages. fmHDL received cell cholesterol by unmediated (aqueous) and ABCG1- and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated diffusion. Furthermore, the fmHDL holoparticle accepted cholesterol and phospholipid by the ABCA1 pathway. These results demonstrate that fmHDL supports all the cholesterol efflux pathways available to native HDL and thus, represents a promising infusible therapeutic for enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux. fmHDL accepts cholesterol from cells by all known pathways of cholesterol efflux: unmediated, ABCG1- and SR-BI-mediated diffusion, and through ABCA1. PMID:25652088

  2. Robust passive and active efflux of cellular cholesterol to a designer functional mimic of high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Luthi, Andrea J; Lyssenko, Nicholas N; Quach, Duyen; McMahon, Kaylin M; Millar, John S; Vickers, Kasey C; Rader, Daniel J; Phillips, Michael C; Mirkin, Chad A; Thaxton, C Shad

    2015-05-01

    The ability of HDL to support macrophage cholesterol efflux is an integral part of its atheroprotective action. Augmenting this ability, especially when HDL cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages is poor, represents a promising therapeutic strategy. One approach to enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux is infusing blood with HDL mimics. Previously, we reported the synthesis of a functional mimic of HDL (fmHDL) that consists of a gold nanoparticle template, a phospholipid bilayer, and apo A-I. In this work, we characterize the ability of fmHDL to support the well-established pathways of cellular cholesterol efflux from model cell lines and primary macrophages. fmHDL received cell cholesterol by unmediated (aqueous) and ABCG1- and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated diffusion. Furthermore, the fmHDL holoparticle accepted cholesterol and phospholipid by the ABCA1 pathway. These results demonstrate that fmHDL supports all the cholesterol efflux pathways available to native HDL and thus, represents a promising infusible therapeutic for enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux. fmHDL accepts cholesterol from cells by all known pathways of cholesterol efflux: unmediated, ABCG1- and SR-BI-mediated diffusion, and through ABCA1. PMID:25652088

  3. Increased cellular cholesterol efflux in glycogen storage disease type Ia mice: a potential mechanism that protects against premature atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Andrew D; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Chou, Janice Yang

    2005-08-29

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) patients manifest a pro-atherogenic lipid profile but are not at elevated risk for developing atherosclerosis. Serum phospholipid, which correlates positively with the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated cholesterol efflux, and apolipoprotein A-IV and E, acceptors for ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)-mediated cholesterol transport, are increased in GSD-Ia mice. Importantly, sera from GSD-Ia mice are more efficient than sera from control littermates in promoting SR-BI- and ABCA1-mediated cholesterol effluxes. As the first step in reverse cholesterol transport, essential for cholesterol homeostasis, these observations provide one explanation why GSD-Ia patients are apparently protected against premature atherosclerosis. PMID:16098970

  4. Genotypic and phenotypic detection of efflux pump in Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Gressler, Letícia Trevisan; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Pötter, Luciana; da Silveira, Bibiana Petri; Sangioni, Luis Antônio; de Avila Botton, Sônia

    2014-01-01

    The req_39680 gene, associated to a putative efflux system, was detected in 60% (54/90) of R. equi isolates by PCR. The phenotypic expression of efflux mechanism was verified in 20% of the isolates using ethidium bromide. For the first time, the expression of efflux mechanism was demonstrated in R. equi. PMID:25242956

  5. Unraveling carbohydrate transport mechanisms in young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica f. purpurea) by 13CO2 efflux measurements from stem and soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoms, Ronny; Muhr, Jan; Keitel, Claudia; Kayler, Zachary; Gavrichkova, Olga; Köhler, Michael; Gessler, Arthur; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Transport mechanisms of soluble carbohydrates and diurnal CO2 efflux from tree stems and surrounding soil are well studied. However, the effect of transport carbohydrates on respiration and their interaction with storage processes is largely unknown. Therefore, we performed a set of 13CO2 pulse labeling experiments on young trees of European beech (Fagus sylvatica f. purpurea). We labeled the whole tree crowns in a closed transparent plastic chamber with 99% 13CO2 for 30 min. In one experiment, only a single branch was labeled and removed 36 hours after labeling. In all experiments, we continuously measured the 13CO2 efflux from stem, branch and soil and sampled leaf and stem material every 3 h for 2 days, followed by a daily sampling of leaves in the successive 5 days. The compound specific δ 13C value of extracted soluble carbohydrates from leaf and stem material was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography linked with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (HPLC-IRMS). The 13CO2 signal from soil respiration occurred only few hours after labeling indicating a very high transport rate of carbohydrates from leaf to roots and to the rhizosphere. The label was continuously depleted within the next 5 days. In contrast, we observed a remarkable oscillating pattern of 13CO2 efflux from the stem with maximum 13CO2 enrichment at noon and minima at night time. This oscillation suggests that enriched carbohydrates are respired during the day, whereas in the night the enriched sugars are not respired. The observed oscillation in stem 13CO2 enrichment remained unchanged even when only single branches were labelled and cut right afterwards. Thus, storage and conversion of carbohydrates only occurred within the stem. The δ13C patterns of extracted soluble carbohydrates showed, that a transformation of transitory starch to carbohydrates and vice versa was no driver of the oscillating 13CO2 efflux from the stem. Carbohydrates might have been transported in the phloem to

  6. FarR regulates the farAB-encoded efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae via an MtrR regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, E-H; Rouquette-Loughlin, C; Folster, J P; Shafer, W M

    2003-12-01

    The farAB operon of Neisseria gonorrhoeae encodes an efflux pump which mediates gonococcal resistance to antibacterial fatty acids. It was previously observed that expression of the farAB operon was positively regulated by MtrR, which is a repressor of the mtrCDE-encoded efflux pump system (E.-H. Lee and W. M. Shafer, Mol. Microbiol. 33:839-845, 1999). This regulation was believed to be indirect since MtrR did not bind to the farAB promoter. In this study, computer analysis of the gonococcal genome sequence database, lacZ reporter fusions, and gel mobility shift assays were used to elucidate the regulatory mechanism by which expression of the farAB operon is modulated by MtrR in gonococci. We identified a regulatory protein belonging to the MarR family of transcriptional repressors and found that it negatively controls expression of farAB by directly binding to the farAB promoter. We designated this regulator FarR to signify its role in regulating the farAB operon. We found that MtrR binds to the farR promoter, thereby repressing farR expression. Hence, MtrR regulates farAB in a positive fashion by modulating farR expression. This MtrR regulatory cascade seems to play an important role in adjusting levels of the FarAB and MtrCDE efflux pumps to prevent their excess expression in gonococci. PMID:14645274

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Is Determinant for ABCB1 and ABCG2 Drug-Efflux Transporters Function

    PubMed Central

    Atisha-Fregoso, Yemil; Lima, Guadalupe; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Baños-Peláez, Miguel; Fragoso-Loyo, Hilda; Jakez-Ocampo, Juan; Contreras-Yáñez, Irazú; Llorente, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare drug efflux function of ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with active disease and in remission. Methods Twenty two active RA patients (DAS28 ≥3.2) and 22 patients in remission (DAS28<2.6) were selected from an early RA clinic. All patients were evaluated at study inclusion and six months later. ABCB1 and ABCG2 functional activity was measured in peripheral lymphocytes by flow cytometry. The percentage of cells able to extrude substrates for ABCB1 and ABCG2 was recorded. Results Active patients had higher ABCB1 and ABCG2 activity compared with patients in remission (median [interquartile range]): 3.9% (1.4–22.2) vs (1.3% (0.6–3.2), p = 0.003 and 3.9% (1.1–13.3) vs 0.9% (0.5–1.9) p = 0.006 respectively. Both transporters correlated with disease activity assessed by DAS28, rho = 0.45, p = 0.002 and rho = 0.47, p = 0.001 respectively. Correlation was observed between the time from the beginning of treatment and transporter activity: rho = 0.34, p = 0.025 for ABCB1 and rho = 0.35, p = 0.018 for ABCG2. The linear regression model showed that DAS28 and the time from the onset of treatment are predictors of ABCB1 and ABCG2 functional activity, even after adjustment for treatment. After six months we calculated the correlation between change in DAS28 and change in the functional activity in both transporters and found a moderate and significant correlation for ABCG2 (rho = 0.28, p = 0.04) and a non-significant correlation for ABCB1 (rho = 0.22, p = 0.11). Conclusions Patients with active RA have an increased function of ABCB1 and ABCG2, and disease activity is the main determinant of this phenomena. PMID:27442114

  8. Activation of GPR55 Receptors Exacerbates oxLDL-Induced Lipid Accumulation and Inflammatory Responses, while Reducing Cholesterol Efflux from Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lanuti, Mirko; Talamonti, Emanuela; Maccarrone, Mauro; Chiurchiù, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor GPR55 has been proposed as a new cannabinoid receptor associated with bone remodelling, nervous system excitability, vascular homeostasis as well as in several pathophysiological conditions including obesity and cancer. However, its physiological role and underlying mechanism remain unclear. In the present work, we demonstrate for the first time its presence in human macrophages and its increased expression in ox-LDL-induced foam cells. In addition, pharmacological activation of GPR55 by its selective agonist O-1602 increased CD36- and SRB-I-mediated lipid accumulation and blocked cholesterol efflux by downregulating ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, as well as enhanced cytokine- and pro-metalloprotease-9 (pro-MMP-9)-induced proinflammatory responses in foam cells. Treatment with cannabidiol, a selective antagonist of GPR55, counteracted these pro-atherogenic and proinflammatory O-1602-mediated effects. Our data suggest that GPR55 could play deleterious role in ox-LDL-induced foam cells and could be a novel pharmacological target to manage atherosclerosis and other related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25970609

  9. The Arabidopsis AtPP2CA Protein Phosphatase Inhibits the GORK K+ Efflux Channel and Exerts a Dominant Suppressive Effect on Phosphomimetic-activating Mutations.

    PubMed

    Lefoulon, Cécile; Boeglin, Martin; Moreau, Bertrand; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Szponarski, Wojciech; Dauzat, Myriam; Michard, Erwan; Gaillard, Isabelle; Chérel, Isabelle

    2016-03-18

    The regulation of the GORK (Guard Cell Outward Rectifying) Shaker channel mediating a massive K(+) efflux in Arabidopsis guard cells by the phosphatase AtPP2CA was investigated. Unlike the gork mutant, the atpp2ca mutants displayed a phenotype of reduced transpiration. We found that AtPP2CA interacts physically with GORK and inhibits GORK activity in Xenopus oocytes. Several amino acid substitutions in the AtPP2CA active site, including the dominant interfering G145D mutation, disrupted the GORK-AtPP2CA interaction, meaning that the native conformation of the AtPP2CA active site is required for the GORK-AtPP2CA interaction. Furthermore, two serines in the GORK ankyrin domain that mimic phosphorylation (Ser to Glu) or dephosphorylation (Ser to Ala) were mutated. Mutations mimicking phosphorylation led to a significant increase in GORK activity, whereas mutations mimicking dephosphorylation had no effect on GORK. In Xenopus oocytes, the interaction of AtPP2CA with "phosphorylated" or "dephosphorylated" GORK systematically led to inhibition of the channel to the same baseline level. Single-channel recordings indicated that the GORK S722E mutation increases the open probability of the channel in the absence, but not in the presence, of AtPP2CA. The dephosphorylation-independent inactivation mechanism of GORK by AtPP2CA is discussed in relation with well known conformational changes in animal Shaker-like channels that lead to channel opening and closing. In plants, PP2C activity would control the stomatal aperture by regulating both GORK and SLAC1, the two main channels required for stomatal closure. PMID:26801610

  10. [Significance of efflux pumps in multidrug resistance of Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Wiercińska, Olga; Chojecka, Agnieszka; Kanclerski, Krzysztof; Rőhm-Rodowald, Ewa; Jakimiak, Bożenna

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug. resistance of bacteria is a serious problem of modern medicine. This resistance largely is a consequence of abuse and improper use of antibacterial substances, especially antibiotics and chemotherapeutics in hospital settings. Multidrug resistance is caused by a number of interacting mechanisms of resistance. Recent studies have indicated that efflux pumps and systems of efflux pumps are an important determinant of this phenomenon. Contribute to this particular RND efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria, which possess a wide range of substrates such as antibiotics, dyes, detergents, toxins and active substances of disinfectants and antiseptics. These transporters are usually encoded on bacterial chromosomes. Genes encoding efflux pumps' proteins may also be carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Such pumps are usually specific to a small group of substrates, but as an additional mechanism of resistance may contribute to the multidrug resistance. PMID:26084076

  11. Expression of homologous RND efflux pump genes is dependent upon AcrB expression: implications for efflux and virulence inhibitor design

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.; Smith, Helen E.; Ricci, Vito; Lawler, Amelia J.; Thompson, Louisa J.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Enterobacteriaceae have multiple efflux pumps that confer intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. AcrB mediates clinically relevant multidrug resistance and is required for virulence and biofilm formation, making it an attractive target for the design of inhibitors. The aim of this study was to assess the viability of single transporters as a target for efflux inhibition using Salmonella Typhimurium as the model pathogen. Methods The expression of resistance–nodulation–division (RND) efflux pump genes in response to the inactivation of single or multiple homologues was measured using real-time RT–PCR. Phenotypes of mutants were characterized by measuring antimicrobial susceptibility, dye accumulation and the ability to cause infection in vitro. Results The expression of all RND efflux pump genes was increased when single or multiple acr genes were inactivated, suggesting a feedback mechanism that activates the transcription of homologous efflux pump genes. When two or three acr genes were inactivated, the mutants had further reduced efflux, altered susceptibility to antimicrobials (including increased susceptibility to some, but conversely and counterintuitively, decreased susceptibility to some others) and were more attenuated in the tissue culture model than mutants lacking single pumps were. Conclusions These data indicate that it is critical to understand which pumps an inhibitor is active against and the effect of this on the expression of homologous systems. For some antimicrobials, an inhibitor with activity against multiple pumps will have a greater impact on susceptibility, but an unintended consequence of this may be decreased susceptibility to other drugs, such as aminoglycosides. PMID:25288678

  12. Crystal structure of an antigenic outer-membrane protein from Salmonella Typhi suggests a potential antigenic loop and an efflux mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Yoshimura, Masato; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Lin, Chien-Chih; Chen, Nai-Chi; Yang, Ming-Chi; Ismail, Asma; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    ST50, an outer-membrane component of the multi-drug efflux system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is an obligatory diagnostic antigen for typhoid fever. ST50 is an excellent and unique diagnostic antigen with 95% specificity and 90% sensitivity and is used in the commercial diagnosis test kit (TYPHIDOT(TM)). The crystal structure of ST50 at a resolution of 2.98 Å reveals a trimer that forms an α-helical tunnel and a β-barrel transmembrane channel traversing the periplasmic space and outer membrane. Structural investigations suggest significant conformational variations in the extracellular loop regions, especially extracellular loop 2. This is the location of the most plausible antibody-binding domain that could be used to target the design of new antigenic epitopes for the development of better diagnostics or drugs for the treatment of typhoid fever. A molecule of the detergent n-octyl-β-D-glucoside is observed in the D-cage, which comprises three sets of Asp361 and Asp371 residues at the periplasmic entrance. These structural insights suggest a possible substrate transport mechanism in which the substrate first binds at the periplasmic entrance of ST50 and subsequently, via iris-like structural movements to open the periplasmic end, penetrates the periplasmic domain for efflux pumping of molecules, including poisonous metabolites or xenobiotics, for excretion outside the pathogen. PMID:26563565

  13. Crystal structure of an antigenic outer-membrane protein from Salmonella Typhi suggests a potential antigenic loop and an efflux mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Yoshimura, Masato; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Lin, Chien-Chih; Chen, Nai-Chi; Yang, Ming-Chi; Ismail, Asma; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    ST50, an outer-membrane component of the multi-drug efflux system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is an obligatory diagnostic antigen for typhoid fever. ST50 is an excellent and unique diagnostic antigen with 95% specificity and 90% sensitivity and is used in the commercial diagnosis test kit (TYPHIDOTTM). The crystal structure of ST50 at a resolution of 2.98 Å reveals a trimer that forms an α-helical tunnel and a β-barrel transmembrane channel traversing the periplasmic space and outer membrane. Structural investigations suggest significant conformational variations in the extracellular loop regions, especially extracellular loop 2. This is the location of the most plausible antibody-binding domain that could be used to target the design of new antigenic epitopes for the development of better diagnostics or drugs for the treatment of typhoid fever. A molecule of the detergent n-octyl-β-D-glucoside is observed in the D-cage, which comprises three sets of Asp361 and Asp371 residues at the periplasmic entrance. These structural insights suggest a possible substrate transport mechanism in which the substrate first binds at the periplasmic entrance of ST50 and subsequently, via iris-like structural movements to open the periplasmic end, penetrates the periplasmic domain for efflux pumping of molecules, including poisonous metabolites or xenobiotics, for excretion outside the pathogen. PMID:26563565

  14. The multi-xenobiotic resistance (MXR) efflux activity in hemocytes of Mytilus edulis is mediated by an ATP binding cassette transporter of class C (ABCC) principally inducible in eosinophilic granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Rioult, Damien; Pasquier, Jennifer; Boulangé-Lecomte, Céline; Poret, Agnès; Abbas, Imane; Marin, Matthieu; Minier, Christophe; Le Foll, Frank

    2014-08-01

    In marine and estuarine species, immunotoxic and/or immunomodulatory mechanisms are the crossroad of interactions between xenobiotics, microorganisms and physicochemical variations of the environment. In mussels, immunity relies exclusively on innate responses carried out by cells collectively called hemocytes and found in the open hemolymphatic circulatory system of these organisms. However, hemocytes do not form a homogenous population of immune cells since distinct subtypes of mussel blood cells can be distinguished by cytochemistry, flow cytometry or cell motility analysis. Previous studies have also shown that these cells are able to efflux xenobiotics by means of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter activities conferring a multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) phenotype. ABC transporters corresponding to vertebrate class B/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and to class C/multidrug resistance related protein (MRP) are characterized in Mytilidae. Herein, we have investigated the relative contributions of ABCB- and ABCC-mediated efflux within the different hemocyte subpopulations of Mytilus edulis mussels, collected from areas differentially impacted by chemical contaminants in Normandy (France). RT-PCR analyses provide evidence for the presence of ABCB and ABCC transporters transcripts in hemocytes. Immunodetection of ABCB/P-gp with the monoclonal antibody UIC2 in living hemocytes revealed that expression was restricted to granular structures of spread cells. Efflux transporter activities, with calcein-AM as fluorescent probe, were measured by combining flow cytometry to accurate Coulter cell size measurements in order to get a cell-volume normalized fluorescence concentration. In these conditions, basal fluorescence levels were higher in hemocytes originating from Yport (control site) than in cells collected from the harbor of Le Havre, where mussels are more exposed to with persistent pollutants. By using specific ABCB/P-gp (verapamil, PSC833, zosuquidar) and ABCC/MRP (MK

  15. Impairment of the ABCA1 and SR-BI-mediated cholesterol efflux pathways and HDL anti-inflammatory activity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Abdelouahed; Berrougui, Hicham; Pawelec, Graham; Fulop, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of Alzheimer's disease (AD) on the cholesterol efflux capacity and anti-inflammatory activity of HDL. HDL and apoA-I were isolated from 20 healthy subjects and from 39 AD patients. Our results showed that serum- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux is significantly impaired in AD patients. This impairment of serum and HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was significantly inversely correlated to the AD severity as evaluated by MMSE scores. Results obtained from SR-BI-enriched Fu5AH and ABCA1-enriched J774 cells revealed that AD impaired the interaction of HDL and apoA-I with both the ABCA1 transporter and SR-BI receptor. Purified apoA-I from AD patients also failed to remove free excess cholesterol from ABCA1-enriched J774 macrophages. Interestingly, the decrease in plasma α-tocopherol content and the increase in MDA formation and HDL relative electrophoretic mobility indicated that AD patients had higher levels of oxidative stress. The anti-inflammatory activity of HDL was also significantly lower in AD patients as measured by the level of ICAM-1 expression. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the first time that the functionality of HDL is impaired in AD and that this alteration might be caused by AD-associated oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:22178419

  16. BBA, a Synthetic Derivative of 23-hydroxybutulinic Acid, Reverses Multidrug Resistance by Inhibiting the Efflux Activity of MRP7 (ABCC10)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-Jiang; Patel, Atish; Sodani, Kamlesh; Xiao, Zhi-Jie; Tiwari, Amit K.; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Li, Ying-Jie; Yang, Dong-Hua; Ye, Wen-Cai; Chen, Si-Dong; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Natural products are frequently used for adjuvant chemotherapy in cancer treatment. 23-O-(1,4'-bipiperidine-1-carbonyl) betulinic acid (BBA) is a synthetic derivative of 23-hydroxybutulinic acid (23-HBA), which is a natural pentacyclic triterpene and the major active constituent of the root of Pulsatillachinensis. We previously reported that BBA could reverse P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR). In the present study, we investigated whether BBA has the potential to reverse multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7/ABCC10)-mediated MDR. We found that BBA concentration-dependently enhanced the sensitivity of MRP7-transfected HEK293 cells to paclitaxel, docetaxel and vinblastine. Accumulation and efflux experiments demonstrated that BBA increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-paclitaxel by inhibiting the efflux of [3H]-paclitaxel from HEK293/MRP7 cells. In addition, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses indicated no significant alteration of MRP7 protein expression and localization in plasma membranes after treatment with BBA. These results demonstrate that BBA reverses MRP7-mediated MDR through blocking the drug efflux function of MRP7 without affecting the intracellular ATP levels. Our findings suggest that BBA has the potential to be used in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents to augment the response to chemotherapy. PMID:24069321

  17. Multidrug efflux pumps of Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Bryan D; Kaatz, Glenn W

    2016-07-01

    Gram-positive organisms are responsible for some of the most serious of human infections. Resistance to front-line antimicrobial agents can complicate otherwise curative therapy. These organisms possess multiple drug resistance mechanisms, with drug efflux being a significant contributing factor. Efflux proteins belonging to all five transporter families are involved, and frequently can transport multiple structurally unrelated compounds resulting in a multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. In addition to clinically relevant antimicrobial agents, MDR efflux proteins can transport environmental biocides and disinfectants which may allow persistence in the healthcare environment and subsequent acquisition by patients or staff. Intensive research on MDR efflux proteins and the regulation of expression of their genes is ongoing, providing some insight into the mechanisms of multidrug recognition and transport. Inhibitors of many of these proteins have been identified, including drugs currently being used for other indications. Structural modifications guided by structure-activity studies have resulted in the identification of potent compounds. However, lack of broad-spectrum pump inhibition combined with potential toxicity has hampered progress. Further work is required to gain a detailed understanding of the multidrug recognition process, followed by application of this knowledge in the design of safer and more highly potent inhibitors. PMID:27449594

  18. Mind the gap: non-biological processes contributing to soil CO2 efflux.

    PubMed

    Rey, Ana

    2015-05-01

    Widespread recognition of the importance of soil CO2 efflux as a major source of CO2 to the atmosphere has led to active research. A large soil respiration database and recent reviews have compiled data, methods, and current challenges. This study highlights some deficiencies for a proper understanding of soil CO2 efflux focusing on processes of soil CO2 production and transport that have not received enough attention in the current soil respiration literature. It has mostly been assumed that soil CO2 efflux is the result of biological processes (i.e. soil respiration), but recent studies demonstrate that pedochemical and geological processes, such as geothermal and volcanic CO2 degassing, are potentially important in some areas. Besides the microbial decomposition of litter, solar radiation is responsible for photodegradation or photochemical degradation of litter. Diffusion is considered to be the main mechanism of CO2 transport in the soil, but changes in atmospheric pressure and thermal convection may also be important mechanisms driving soil CO2 efflux greater than diffusion under certain conditions. Lateral fluxes of carbon as dissolved organic and inorganic carbon occur and may cause an underestimation of soil CO2 efflux. Traditionally soil CO2 efflux has been measured with accumulation chambers assuming that the main transport mechanism is diffusion. New techniques are available such as improved automated chambers, CO2 concentration profiles and isotopic techniques that may help to elucidate the sources of carbon from soils. We need to develop specific and standardized methods for different CO2 sources to quantify this flux on a global scale. Biogeochemical models should include biological and non-biological CO2 production processes before we can predict the response of soil CO2 efflux to climate change. Improving our understanding of the processes involved in soil CO2 efflux should be a research priority given the importance of this flux in the global

  19. [Inflammasome: activation mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Suárez, Raibel; Buelvas, Neudo

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation is a rapid biologic response of the immune system in vascular tissues, directed to eliminate stimuli capable of causing damage and begin the process of repair. The macromolecular complexes known as "inflammasomes" are formed by a receptor, either NOD (NLR) or ALR, the receptor absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2). In addition, the inflammasome is formed by the speck-like protein associated to apoptosis (ASC) and procaspase-1, that may be activated by variations in the ionic and intracellular and extracellular ATP concentrations; and the loss of stabilization of the fagolisosomme by internalization of insoluble crystals and redox mechanisms. As a result, there is activation of the molecular platform and the processing of inflammatory prointerleukins to their active forms. There are two modalities of activation of the inflammasome: canonical and non-canonical, both capable of generating effector responses. Recent data associate NLRP 3, IL-1β and IL-18 in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia, gout, malaria and hypertension. The inflammasome cascade is emerging as a new chemotherapeutic target in these diseases. In this review we shall discuss the mechanisms of activation and regulation of the inflammasome that stimulate, modulate and resolve inflammation. PMID:25920188

  20. Homologs of the Acinetobacter baumannii AceI Transporter Represent a New Family of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Henderson, Peter J. F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multidrug efflux systems are a major cause of resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria, including those pathogenic to humans, animals, and plants. These proteins are ubiquitous in these pathogens, and five families of bacterial multidrug efflux systems have been identified to date. By using transcriptomic and biochemical analyses, we recently identified the novel AceI (Acinetobacter chlorhexidine efflux) protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that conferred resistance to the biocide chlorhexidine, via an active efflux mechanism. Proteins homologous to AceI are encoded in the genomes of many other bacterial species and are particularly prominent within proteobacterial lineages. In this study, we expressed 23 homologs of AceI and examined their resistance and/or transport profiles. MIC analyses demonstrated that, like AceI, many of the homologs conferred resistance to chlorhexidine. Many of the AceI homologs conferred resistance to additional biocides, including benzalkonium, dequalinium, proflavine, and acriflavine. We conducted fluorimetric transport assays using the AceI homolog from Vibrio parahaemolyticus and confirmed that resistance to both proflavine and acriflavine was mediated by an active efflux mechanism. These results show that this group of AceI homologs represent a new family of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps, which we have designated the proteobacterial antimicrobial compound efflux (PACE) family of transport proteins. PMID:25670776

  1. Reversal of efflux of an anticancer drug in human drug-resistant breast cancer cells by inhibition of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan Woo; Asai, Daisuke; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2016-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a 170-kDa transmembrane protein that mediates the efflux of anticancer drugs from cells. Pgp overexpression has a distinct role in cells exhibiting multidrug resistance (MDR). We examined reversal of drug resistance in human MDR breast cancer cells by inhibition of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) activity, which is associated with Pgp-mediated efflux of anticancer drugs. PKCα activity was confirmed by measurement of phosphorylation levels of a PKCα-specific peptide substrate (FKKQGSFAKKK-NH2), showing relatively higher basal activity in drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells (84 %) than that in drug-sensitive MCF-7 cells (63 %). PKCα activity was effectively suppressed by the PKC inhibitor, Ro-31-7549, and reversal of intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin was observed by inhibition of PKCα activity in MCF-7/ADR cells compared with their intrinsic drug resistance. Importantly, increased accumulation of doxorubicin could enhance the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in MDR cells significantly. These results suggest a potential for overcoming MDR via inhibition of PKCα activity with conventional anticancer drugs. PMID:26323260

  2. A Simple Method for Assessment of MDR Bacteria for Over-Expressed Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P; Viveiros, Miguel; Couto, Isabel; Fanning, Séamus; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Amaral, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    It is known that bacteria showing a multi-drug resistance phenotype use several mechanisms to overcome the action of antibiotics. As a result, this phenotype can be a result of several mechanisms or a combination of thereof. The main mechanisms of antibiotic resistance are: mutations in target genes (such as DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV); over-expression of efflux pumps; changes in the cell envelope; down regulation of membrane porins, and modified lipopolysaccharide component of the outer cell membrane (in the case of Gram-negative bacteria). In addition, adaptation to the environment, such as quorum sensing and biofilm formation can also contribute to bacterial persistence. Due to the rapid emergence and spread of bacterial isolates showing resistance to several classes of antibiotics, methods that can rapidly and efficiently identify isolates whose resistance is due to active efflux have been developed. However, there is still a need for faster and more accurate methodologies. Conventional methods that evaluate bacterial efflux pump activity in liquid systems are available. However, these methods usually use common efflux pump substrates, such as ethidium bromide or radioactive antibiotics and therefore, require specialized instrumentation, which is not available in all laboratories. In this review, we will report the results obtained with the Ethidium Bromide-agar Cartwheel method. This is an easy, instrument-free, agar based method that has been modified to afford the simultaneous evaluation of as many as twelve bacterial strains. Due to its simplicity it can be applied to large collections of bacteria to rapidly screen for multi-drug resistant isolates that show an over-expression of their efflux systems. The principle of the method is simple and relies on the ability of the bacteria to expel a fluorescent molecule that is substrate for most efflux pumps, ethidium bromide. In this approach, the higher the concentration of ethidium bromide required to

  3. K+ efflux is the Common Trigger of NLRP3 inflammasome Activation by Bacterial Toxins and Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Kuffa, Peter; Martínez-Colón, Giovanny; Smith, Brenna L.; Rajendiran, Thekkelnaycke M.; Núñez, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Summary The NLRP3 inflammasome is an important component of the innate immune system. However, its mechanism of activation remains largely unknown. We show that NLRP3 activators including bacterial pore-forming toxins, nigericin, ATP and particulate matter caused mitochondrial perturbation or the opening of a large membrane pore; but this was not required for NLRP3 activation. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species generation or a change in cell volume was not necessary for NLRP3 activation. Instead, the only common activity induced by all NLRP3 agonists was the permeation of the cell membrane to K+ and Na+. Notably, reduction of the intracellular K+ concentration was sufficient to activate NLRP3 whereas an increase in intracellular Na+ modulated, but was not strictly required for inflammasome activation. These results provide a unifying model for the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in which a drop in cytosolic K+ is the common step that is necessary and sufficient for caspase-1 activation. PMID:23809161

  4. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  5. Structures of the TetR-like simocyclinone efflux pump repressor, SimR, and the mechanism of ligand-mediated derepression.

    PubMed

    Le, Tung B K; Stevenson, Clare E M; Fiedler, Hans-Peter; Maxwell, Anthony; Lawson, David M; Buttner, Mark J

    2011-04-22

    Simocyclinone D8 (SD8), a potent DNA gyrase inhibitor made by Streptomyces antibioticus, is exported from the producing organism by the SimX efflux pump. The expression of simX is under the control of SimR, a member of the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. SimR represses simX transcription by binding to operators in the intergenic region between simR and simX. Previously, we have shown that the mature antibiotic SD8 or its biosynthetic intermediate, simocyclinone C4, can dissociate SimR from its operators, leading to derepression of simX and export of SD8 from the cell. This provides a mechanism that couples the biosynthesis of the antibiotic to its export. Here, we report the crystal structures of SimR alone and in complex with either SD8 or simocyclinone C4. The ligand-binding pocket is unusual compared to those of other characterized TetR-family transcriptional regulators: the structures show an extensive ligand-binding pocket spanning both monomers in the functional dimeric unit, with the aminocoumarin moiety of SD8 buried in the protein core, while the angucyclic polyketide moiety is partially exposed to bulk solvent. Through comparisons of the structures, we postulate a derepression mechanism for SimR that invokes rigid-body motions of the subunits relative to one another, coupled with a putative locking mechanism to restrict further conformational change. PMID:21354180

  6. Tunicamycin Depresses P-Glycoprotein Glycosylation Without an Effect on Its Membrane Localization and Drug Efflux Activity in L1210 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Šereš, Mário; Cholujová, Dana; Bubenčíkova, Tatiana; Breier, Albert; Sulová, Zdenka

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), also known as ABCB1, is a member of the ABC transporter family of proteins. P-gp is an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump that is localized to the plasma membrane of mammalian cells and confers multidrug resistance in neoplastic cells. P-gp is a 140-kDa polypeptide that is glycosylated to a final molecular weight of 170 kDa. Our experimental model used two variants of L1210 cells in which overexpression of P-gp was achieved: either by adaptation of parental cells (S) to vincristine (R) or by transfection with the human gene encoding P-gp (T). R and T cells were found to differ from S cells in transglycosylation reactions in our recent studies. The effects of tunicamycin on glycosylation, drug efflux activity and cellular localization of P-gp in R and T cells were examined in the present study. Treatment with tunicamycin caused less concentration-dependent cellular damage to R and T cells compared with S cells. Tunicamycin inhibited P-gp N-glycosylation in both of the P-gp-positive cells. However, tunicamycin treatment did not alter either the P-gp cellular localization to the plasma membrane or the P-gp transport activity. The present paper brings evidence that independently on the mode of P-gp expression (selection with drugs or transfection with a gene encoding P-gp) in L1210 cells, tunicamycin induces inhibition of N-glycosylation of this protein, without altering its function as plasma membrane drug efflux pump. PMID:22174631

  7. Chlorinated phenols control the expression of the multi-drug resistance efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by activating NalC

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Cremers, Claudia M.; Jakob, Ursula; Love, Nancy G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary NalC is a TetR type regulator that represses the multidrug efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we explain the mechanism of NalC mediated regulation of MexAB-OprM. We show that NalC non-covalently binds chlorinated phenols and chemicals containing chlorophenol sidechains such as triclosan. NalC-chlorinated phenol binding results in its dissociation from promoter DNA and up-regulation of NalC’s downstream targets, including the MexR antirepressor ArmR. ArmR up-regulation and MexR-ArmR complex formation have previously been shown to upregulate MexAB-OprM. In vivo mexB and armR expression analyses were used to corroborate in vitro NalC chlorinated phenol binding. We also show that the interaction between chlorinated phenols and NalC is reversible, such that removal of these chemicals restored NalC promoter DNA binding. Thus, the NalC-chlorinated phenol interaction is likely a pertinent physiological mechanism that P. aeruginosa uses to control expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. PMID:21231970

  8. Glucocorticoid receptors in the prefrontal cortex regulate dopamine efflux to stress via descending glutamatergic feedback to the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Butts, Kelly A; Phillips, Anthony G

    2013-09-01

    Enhanced dopamine (DA) efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is a well-documented response to acute stress. We have previously shown that glucocorticoid receptors in the mPFC regulate stress-evoked DA efflux but the underlying mechanism is unknown. DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) receive excitatory input from and send reciprocal projections to the mPFC. We hypothesize that blockade of prefrontal glucocorticoid receptors can reduce activity of descending glutamatergic input to the VTA, thereby attenuating stress-evoked DA efflux in the mPFC. Using in vivo microdialysis, we demonstrate that acute tail-pinch stress leads to a significant increase in glutamate efflux in the VTA. Blockade of prefrontal glucocorticoid receptors with the selective antagonist CORT 108297 attenuates stress-evoked glutamate efflux in the VTA together with DA efflux in the mPFC. Furthermore, blockade of ionotrophic glutamate receptors in the VTA attenuates stress-evoked DA efflux in the mPFC. We also examine the possible role of glucocorticoid-induced synthesis and release of endocannabinoids acting presynaptically via cannabinoid CB1 receptors to inhibit GABA release onto prefrontal pyramidal cells, thus enhancing descending glutamatergic input to the VTA leading to an increase in mPFC DA efflux during stress. However, administration of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist into the mPFC does not attenuate stress-evoked DA efflux in the mPFC. Taken together, our data indicate that glucocorticoids act locally within the mPFC to modulate mesocortical DA efflux by potentiation of glutamatergic drive onto DA neurons in the VTA. PMID:23590841

  9. Trimerized apolipoprotein A-I (TripA) forms lipoproteins, activates lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase, elicits lipid efflux, and is transported through aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ohnsorg, Pascale M; Mary, Jean-Luc; Rohrer, Lucia; Pech, Michael; Fingerle, Jürgen; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2011-12-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) exerts many potentially anti-atherogenic properties and is therefore attractive for prevention and therapy of coronary heart disease. Since induction of apoA-I production by small molecules has turned out as difficult, application of exogenous apoA-I is pursued as an alternative therapeutic option. To counteract fast renal filtration of apoA-I, a trimeric high-molecular weight variant of apoA-I (TripA) was produced by recombinant technology. We compared TripA and apoA-I for important properties in reverse cholesterol transport. Reconstituted high-density lipoproteins (rHDL) containing TripA or apoA-I together with palmitoyl-2-oleyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) differed slightly by size. Compared to apoA-I, TripA activated lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) with similar maximal velocity but concentration leading to half maximal velocity was slightly reduced (K(m)=2.1±0.3μg/mL vs. 0.59±0.06μg/mL). Both in the lipid-free form and as part of rHDL, TripA elicited cholesterol efflux from THP1-derived macrophages with similar kinetic parameters and response to liver-X-receptor activation as apoA-I. Lipid-free TripA is bound and transported by aortic endothelial cells through mechanisms which are competed by apoA-I and TripA and inhibited by knock-down of ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) A1. Pre-formed TripA/POPC particles were bound and transported by endothelial cells through mechanisms which are competed by excess native HDL as well as reconstituted HDL containing either apoA-I or TripA and which involve ABCG1 and scavenger receptor B1 (SR-BI). In conclusion, apoA-I and TripA show similar in vitro properties which are important for reverse cholesterol transport. These findings are important for further development of TripA as an anti-atherosclerotic drug. PMID:21930241

  10. Peptide mediators of cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan

    2013-04-09

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABAC1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  11. The Peptide Toxin Amylosin of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens from Moisture-Damaged Buildings Is Immunotoxic, Induces Potassium Efflux from Mammalian Cells, and Has Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Teplova, Vera V.; Andersson, Maria A.; Mikkola, Raimo; Kankkunen, Päivi; Matikainen, Sampsa; Gahmberg, Carl G.; Andersson, Leif C.; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2015-01-01

    Amylosin, a heat-stable channel-forming non-ribosomally synthesized peptide toxin produced by strains of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens isolated from moisture-damaged buildings, is shown in this paper to have immunotoxic and cytotoxic effects on human cells as well as antagonistic effects on microbes. Human macrophages exposed to 50 ng of amylosin ml−1 secreted high levels of cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 within 2 h, indicating activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, an integral part of the innate immune system. At the same exposure level, expression of IL-1β and IL-18 mRNA increased. Amylosin caused dose-dependent potassium ion efflux from all tested mammalian cells (human monocytes and keratinocytes and porcine sperm cells) at 1 to 2 μM exposure. Amylosin also inhibited the motility of porcine sperm cells and depolarized the mitochondria of human keratinocytes. Amylosin may thus trigger the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequently cytokine release by causing potassium efflux from exposed cells. The results of this study indicate that exposure to amylosin activates the innate immune system, which could offer an explanation for the inflammatory symptoms experienced by occupants of moisture-damaged buildings. In addition, the amylosin-producing B. amyloliquefaciens inhibited the growth of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic indoor microbes, and purified amylosin also had an antimicrobial effect. These antimicrobial effects could make amylosin producers dominant and therefore significant causal agents of health problems in some moisture-damaged sites. PMID:25681192

  12. First evidence for the presence of efflux pump in the earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    PubMed

    Hackenberger, Branimir K; Velki, Mirna; Stepić, Sandra; Hackenberger, Davorka K

    2012-01-01

    Efflux pumps are transport proteins involved in the extrusion of toxic substrates from cells to the external environment. Activities of efflux pumps have been found in many organisms, however such activity has not been evidenced in earthworms. Adult Eisenia andrei earthworms were exposed to efflux modulators - verapamil (a known inhibitor of efflux pump protein) and dexamethasone (a known inducer of efflux activity) - and the amount of absorbed fluorescent dye rhodamine B was measured. The results showed that verapamil inhibited efflux activity and decreased removal of rhodamine B, whereas dexamethasone induced efflux activity and increased removal of rhodamine B. This is the first evidence of the presence of efflux pump in earthworm Eisenia andrei. Since earthworms are often used as test organisms due to their sensitive reactions towards environmental influences, the discovery of efflux pump activity can contribute to the better understanding of toxicity of certain pollutants. PMID:22033226

  13. Efflux Pump, the Masked Side of ß-Lactam Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pages, Jean-Marie; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Leflon-Guibout, Véronique; Marcon, Estelle; Bert, Frédéric; Noussair, Latifa; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène

    2009-01-01

    Background β-lactamase production and porin decrease are the well-recognized mechanisms of acquired ß-lactam resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates. However, such mechanisms proved to be absent in K. pneumoniae isolates that are non susceptible to cefoxitin (FOX) and succeptible to amoxicillin+clavulanic acid in our hospital. Assessing the role of efflux pumps in this β-lactam phenotype was the aim of this study. Methodology/Findings MICs of 9 β-lactams, including cloxacillin (CLX), and other antibiotic families were tested alone and with an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI), then with both CLX (subinhibitory concentrations) and EPI against 11 unique bacteremia K. pneumoniae isolates displaying the unusual phenotype, and 2 ATCC strains. CLX and EPI-dose dependent effects were studied on 4 representatives strains. CLX MICs significantly decreased when tested with EPI. A similar phenomenon was observed with piperacillin+tazobactam whereas MICs of the other β-lactams significantly decreased only in the presence of both EPI and CLX. Thus, FOX MICs decreased 128 fold in the K. pneumoniae isolates but also16 fold in ATCC strain. Restoration of FOX activity was CLX dose-dependent suggesting a competitive relationship between CLX and the other β-lactams with regard to their efflux. For chloramphenicol, erythromycin and nalidixic acid whose resistance was also due to efflux, adding CLX to EPI did not increase their activity suggesting differences between the efflux process of these molecules and that of β-lactams. Conclusion This is the first study demonstrating that efflux mechanism plays a key role in the β-lactam susceptibility of clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae. Such data clearly evidence that the involvement of efflux pumps in ß-lactam resistance is specially underestimated in clinical isolates. PMID:19279676

  14. Stimulation of H+ Efflux and Inhibition of Photosynthesis by Esters of Carboxylic Acids 1

    PubMed Central

    Duhaime, Donna E.; Bown, Alan W.

    1983-01-01

    Suspensions of mechanically isolated Asparagus sprengeri Regel mesophyll cells were used to investigate the influence of various carboxyester compounds on rates of net H+ efflux in the dark or light and photosynthetic O2 production. Addition of 0.15 to 1.5 millimolar malathion, α-naphthyl acetate, phenyl acetate, or p-nitrophenyl acetate stimulated H+ efflux and inhibited photosynthesis within 1 minute. In contrast, the more polar esters methyl acetoacetate or ethyl p-aminobenzoate had little or no effect on either of these two processes. A 0.15 millimolar concentration of α-naphthylacetate stimulated the normal rate of H+ efflux, 0.77 nanomoles H+ per 106 cells per minute by 750% and inhibited photosynthesis by 100%. The four active carboxyester compounds also stimulated H+ efflux after the normal rate of H+ efflux was eliminated with 0.01 milligrams per milliliter oligomycin or 100% N2. Oligomycin reduced the ATP level by 70%. Incubation of cells with malathion, α-naphthyl acetate, or p-nitrophenyl acetate resulted in the generation of the respective hydrolysis products ethanol, α-naphthol, and p-nitrophenol. It is proposed that inhibition of photosynthesis and stimulation of H+ efflux result when nonpolar carboxyester compounds enter the cell and generate acidic carboxyl groups when hydrolyzed by esterase enzymes. PMID:16663308

  15. The ins and outs of RND efflux pumps in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Anes, João; McCusker, Matthew P.; Fanning, Séamus; Martins, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain one of the principal causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. Relevant authorities including the WHO and CDC have expressed serious concern regarding the continued increase in the development of multidrug resistance among bacteria. They have also reaffirmed the urgent need for investment in the discovery and development of new antibiotics and therapeutic approaches to treat multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. The extensive use of antimicrobial compounds in diverse environments, including farming and healthcare, has been identified as one of the main causes for the emergence of MDR bacteria. Induced selective pressure has led bacteria to develop new strategies of defense against these chemicals. Bacteria can accomplish this by several mechanisms, including enzymatic inactivation of the target compound; decreased cell permeability; target protection and/or overproduction; altered target site/enzyme and increased efflux due to over-expression of efflux pumps. Efflux pumps can be specific for a single substrate or can confer resistance to multiple antimicrobials by facilitating the extrusion of a broad range of compounds including antibiotics, heavy metals, biocides and others, from the bacterial cell. To overcome antimicrobial resistance caused by active efflux, efforts are required to better understand the fundamentals of drug efflux mechanisms. There is also a need to elucidate how these mechanisms are regulated and how they respond upon exposure to antimicrobials. Understanding these will allow the development of combined therapies using efflux inhibitors together with antibiotics to act on Gram-negative bacteria, such as the emerging globally disseminated MDR pathogen Escherichia coli ST131 (O25:H4). This review will summarize the current knowledge on resistance-nodulation-cell division efflux mechanisms in E. coli, a bacteria responsible for community and hospital-acquired infections, as well as foodborne outbreaks worldwide

  16. Efflux-Mediated Drug Resistance in Bacteria: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps play a key role in drug resistance and also serve other functions in bacteria. There has been a growing list of multidrug and drug-specific efflux pumps characterized from bacteria of human, animal, plant and environmental origins. These pumps are mostly encoded on the chromosome although they can also be plasmid-encoded. A previous article (Li X-Z and Nikaido H, Drugs, 2004; 64[2]: 159–204) had provided a comprehensive review regarding efflux-mediated drug resistance in bacteria. In the past five years, significant progress has been achieved in further understanding of drug resistance-related efflux transporters and this review focuses on the latest studies in this field since 2003. This has been demonstrated in multiple aspects that include but are not limited to: further molecular and biochemical characterization of the known drug efflux pumps and identification of novel drug efflux pumps; structural elucidation of the transport mechanisms of drug transporters; regulatory mechanisms of drug efflux pumps; determining the role of the drug efflux pumps in other functions such as stress responses, virulence and cell communication; and development of efflux pump inhibitors. Overall, the multifaceted implications of drug efflux transporters warrant novel strategies to combat multidrug resistance in bacteria. PMID:19678712

  17. Identification of a multidrug efflux pump in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ankita; Mallik, Dhriti; Kar, Debasish; Ghosh, Anindya S

    2016-07-01

    Cell wall impermeability and active efflux of drugs are among the primary reasons for drug resistance in mycobacteria. Efflux pumps are tripartite membrane localized transport proteins that expel drug molecules outside the cells. Several of such efflux pumps are annotated in mycobacteria, but few have been characterized, like MSMEG_2991, a putative efflux pump permease of Mycobacterium smegmatis To substantiate this, we overexpressed MSMEG_2991 protein in Escherichia coli 2443. Expression of MSMEG_2991 elevated the resistance towards structurally unrelated groups of antibiotics. An active antibiotic efflux pump nature of MSMEG_2991 was revealed by assessing the acquisition of ciprofloxacin in the absence and presence of the efflux pump inhibitor, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone, indicating the involvement of proton-motive force (pmf) during the efflux activity. MSMEG_2991 expression elevated biofilm formation in E. coli by 4-fold, keeping parity to some of the earlier reported efflux pumps. In silico analysis suggested the presence of 12 transmembrane helices in MSMEG_2991 resembling EmrD efflux pump of E. coli Based on in vivo and in silico analyses, MSMEG_2991 may be designated as a pmf-mediated multidrug efflux pump protein that expels diverse groups of antibiotics and might as well be involved in the biofilm enhancement. PMID:27190152

  18. Leiurus quinquestriatus venom inhibits BRL 34915-induced /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from the rat portal vein

    SciTech Connect

    Quast, U.; Cook, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the crude venom of the Israeli scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus on the /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux stimulated by the K/sup +/ channel opener BRL 34915 in the rat portal vein was examined. Applied alone, the venom greatly increased the spontaneous mechanical activity of and the concomitant /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from the vessel. When the excitability of the vein was suppressed by the dihydropyridine calcium antagonist, PN 200-110, the /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux stimulated by BRL 34915 could be shown to be inhibited by the venom. From the concentration dependence of this inhibition an IC/sub 50/ value of 0.17 +/- 0.01 mg/ml was estimated. This venom is thus the most potent blocker of BRL 34915-evoked /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux reported so far. 17 references, 2 figures.

  19. Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages through PPAR-γ/LXR-α signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaolin; Li, Qian; Pang, Liewen; Huang, Guoqian; Huang, Jiechun; Shi, Meng; Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Yiqing

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Arctigenin enhanced cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages. •The expression of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE was upregulated in arctigenin-treated cells. •Arctigenin promoted the expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α. •Inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α reversed arctigenin-mediated biological effects. •Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux via activation of PPAR-γ/LXR-α/ABCA1 pathway. -- Abstract: Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a critical mechanism to prevent the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa, on the cholesterol efflux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-loaded THP-1 macrophages. Our data showed that arctigenin significantly accelerated apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density lipoprotein-induced cholesterol efflux in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Moreover, arctigenin treatment enhanced the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and apoE, all of which are key molecules in the initial step of cholesterol efflux, at both mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also caused a concentration-dependent elevation in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and liver X receptor-alpha (LXR-α). The arctigenin-mediated induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE was abolished by specific inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α using small interfering RNA technology. Our results collectively indicate that arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages through upregulation of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE, which is dependent on the enhanced expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α.

  20. Zidovudine and ursodeoxycholic acid conjugation: design of a new prodrug potentially able to bypass the active efflux transport systems of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Paganetto, Guglielmo; Pavan, Barbara; Fogagnolo, Marco; Medici, Alessandro; Beggiato, Sarah; Perrone, Daniela

    2012-04-01

    We have synthesized a new prodrug obtained by the 5'-ester conjugation of zidovudine (AZT), an antiviral agent substrate of active efflux transport systems (AET), with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a bile acid able to permeate into the central nervous system (CNS). We have demonstrated, by HPLC analysis, that UDCA-AZT is quickly hydrolyzed in rat plasma and whole blood (half-life <10 s). The same compound was hydrolyzed with slower rates in human plasma (half-life =7.53 ± 0.44 h) and whole blood (half-life =3.71 ± 0.16 h), allowing to control the AZT release. UDCA-AZT appeared hydrolyzed also in rat brain (half-life = 7.24 ± 0.45 min) and liver homogenates (half-life = 2.70 ± 0.14 min). In the aim to study the permeation properties of the UDCA-AZT across physiological barriers, we have used an established human retinal pigment epithelium (HRPE) cell line to obtain a polarized cell monolayer showing epithelial features. The bidirectional permeation of 30 μM AZT across this monolayer was regulated by apparent permeability coefficients (P(E)) higher from the apical to basolateral compartments (P(E) = 209 ± 4 × 10⁻⁵ cm/min) than in the opposite way (P(E) = 133 ± 8 × 10⁻⁵ cm/min), in conformity with the in vivo behavior of AZT, actively effluxed from the CNS. The influx (P(E) = 39.1 ± 1.2 × 10⁻⁵ cm/min) and efflux (P(E) = 31.3 ± 3.6 × 10⁻⁵ cm/min) permeability coefficients of 30 μM UDCA-AZT were instead the same, suggesting the ability of the prodrug to avoid the AET systems and, potentially, to allow its accumulation in the CNS. The relatively low P(E) values of UDCA-AZT were associated with a partial hydrolysis during its permeation across the cell monolayer. PMID:22356133

  1. Differential Regulation of ABCA1 and Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux By Elaidic and Oleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Fei; Ford, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Trans fatty acid consumption is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. This increased risk has been attributed to decreased levels of HDL cholesterol and increased levels of LDL cholesterol. However, the mechanism by which trans fatty acid modulates cholesterol transit remains poorly defined. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)-mediated macrophage cholesterol efflux is the rate-limiting step initiating apolipoprotein A-I lipidation. In this study, elaidic acid, the most abundant trans fatty acid in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, was shown to stabilize macrophage ABCA1 protein levels in comparison to that of its cis fatty acid isomer, oleic acid. The mechanism responsible for the disparate effects of oleic and elaidic acid on ABCA1 levels was through accelerated ABCA1 protein degradation in cells treated with oleic acid. In contrast, no apparent differences were observed in ABCA1 mRNA levels, and only minor changes were observed in Liver X receptor/Retinoic X receptor promoter activity in cells treated with elaidic and oleic acid. Efflux of both tracers and cholesterol mass revealed that elaidic acid slightly increased ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, while oleic acid led to decreased ABCA1-mediated efflux. In conclusion, these studies sho that cis and trans structural differences in eighteen carbon n-9 monoenoic fatty acids variably impact cholesterol efflux through disparate effects on ABCA1 protein degradation. PMID:23800855

  2. Mitochondria Influence CDR1 Efflux Pump Activity, Hog1-Mediated Oxidative Stress Pathway, Iron Homeostasis, and Ergosterol Levels in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Edwina; Roman, Elvira; Claypool, Steven; Manzoor, Nikhat; Pla, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in Candida albicans is known to be associated with drug susceptibility, cell wall integrity, phospholipid homeostasis, and virulence. In this study, we deleted CaFZO1, a key component required during biogenesis of functional mitochondria. Cells with FZO1 deleted displayed fragmented mitochondria, mitochondrial genome loss, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and were rendered sensitive to azoles and peroxide. In order to understand the cellular response to dysfunctional mitochondria, genome-wide expression profiling of fzo1Δ/Δ cells was performed. Our results show that the increased susceptibility to azoles was likely due to reduced efflux activity of CDR efflux pumps, caused by the missorting of Cdr1p into the vacuole. In addition, fzo1Δ/Δ cells showed upregulation of genes involved in iron assimilation, in iron-sufficient conditions, characteristic of iron-starved cells. One of the consequent effects was downregulation of genes of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway with a commensurate decrease in cellular ergosterol levels. We therefore connect deregulated iron metabolism to ergosterol biosynthesis pathway in response to dysfunctional mitochondria. Impaired activation of the Hog1 pathway in the mutant was the basis for increased susceptibility to peroxide and increase in reactive oxygen species, indicating the importance of functional mitochondria in controlling Hog1-mediated oxidative stress response. Mitochondrial phospholipid levels were also altered as indicated by an increase in phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine and decrease in phosphatidylcholine in fzo1Δ/Δ cells. Collectively, these findings reinforce the connection between functional mitochondria and azole tolerance, oxidant-mediated stress, and iron homeostasis in C. albicans. PMID:23979757

  3. An overview of bacterial efflux pumps and computational approaches to study efflux pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Shirin; Sutton, J Mark; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2016-02-01

    Micro-organisms express a wide range of transmembrane pumps known as multidrug efflux pumps that improve the micro-organism's ability to survive in severe environments and contribute to resistance against antibiotic and antimicrobial agents. There is significant interest in developing efflux inhibitors as an adjunct to treatment with current and next generation of antibiotics. A greater understanding of drug recognition and transport by multidrug efflux pumps is needed to develop clinically useful inhibitors, given the breadth of molecules that can be effluxed by these systems. We summarize some structural and functional data that could provide insights into the inhibition of transport mechanisms of these intricate molecular nanomachines with a focus on the advances in computational approaches. PMID:26824720

  4. Structural mechanism of transcription regulation of the Staphylococcus aureus multidrug efflux operon mepRA by the MarR family repressor MepR.

    PubMed

    Birukou, Ivan; Seo, Susan M; Schindler, Bryan D; Kaatz, Glenn W; Brennan, Richard G

    2014-02-01

    The multidrug efflux pump MepA is a major contributor to multidrug resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. MepR, a member of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family, represses mepA and its own gene. Here, we report the structure of a MepR-mepR operator complex. Structural comparison of DNA-bound MepR with 'induced' apoMepR reveals the large conformational changes needed to allow the DNA-binding winged helix-turn-helix motifs to interact with the consecutive major and minor grooves of the GTTAG signature sequence. Intriguingly, MepR makes no hydrogen bonds to major groove nucleobases. Rather, recognition-helix residues Thr60, Gly61, Pro62 and Thr63 make sequence-specifying van der Waals contacts with the TTAG bases. Removing these contacts dramatically affects MepR-DNA binding activity. The wings insert into the flanking minor grooves, whereby residue Arg87, buttressed by Asp85, interacts with the O2 of T4 and O4' ribosyl oxygens of A23 and T4. Mutating Asp85 and Arg87, both conserved throughout the MarR family, markedly affects MepR repressor activity. The His14':Arg59 and Arg10':His35:Phe108 interaction networks stabilize the DNA-binding conformation of MepR thereby contributing significantly to its high affinity binding. A structure-guided model of the MepR-mepA operator complex suggests that MepR dimers do not interact directly and cooperative binding is likely achieved by DNA-mediated allosteric effects. PMID:24293644

  5. The Role of Efflux and Physiological Adaptation in Biofilm Tolerance and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Heleen; Coenye, Tom

    2016-06-10

    Microbial biofilms demonstrate a decreased susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. Various mechanisms have been proposed to be involved in this recalcitrance. We focus on two of these factors. Firstly, the ability of sessile cells to actively mediate efflux of antimicrobial compounds has a profound impact on resistance and tolerance, and several studies point to the existence of biofilm-specific efflux systems. Secondly, biofilm-specific stress responses have a marked influence on cellular physiology, and contribute to the occurrence of persister cells. We provide an overview of the data that demonstrate that both processes are important for survival following exposure to antimicrobial agents. PMID:27129224

  6. Natural and Synthetic Polymers as Inhibitors of Drug Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of efflux pumps is an emerging approach in cancer therapy and drug delivery. Since it has been discovered that polymeric pharmaceutical excipients such as Tweens® or Pluronics® can inhibit efflux pumps, various other polymers have been investigated regarding their potential efflux pump inhibitory activity. Among them are polysaccharides, polyethylene glycols and derivatives, amphiphilic block copolymers, dendrimers and thiolated polymers. In the current review article, natural and synthetic polymers that are capable of inhibiting efflux pumps as well as their application in cancer therapy and drug delivery are discussed. PMID:17896100

  7. RAGE Suppresses ABCG1-Mediated Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Daffu, Gurdip; Shen, Xiaoping; Senatus, Laura; Thiagarajan, Devi; Abedini, Andisheh; Hurtado Del Pozo, Carmen; Rosario, Rosa; Song, Fei; Friedman, Richard A; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes exacerbates cardiovascular disease, at least in part through suppression of macrophage cholesterol efflux and levels of the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ABCG1. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is highly expressed in human and murine diabetic atherosclerotic plaques, particularly in macrophages. We tested the hypothesis that RAGE suppresses macrophage cholesterol efflux and probed the mechanisms by which RAGE downregulates ABCA1 and ABCG1. Macrophage cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A1 and HDL and reverse cholesterol transport to plasma, liver, and feces were reduced in diabetic macrophages through RAGE. In vitro, RAGE ligands suppressed ABCG1 and ABCA1 promoter luciferase activity and transcription of ABCG1 and ABCA1 through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG)-responsive promoter elements but not through liver X receptor elements. Plasma levels of HDL were reduced in diabetic mice in a RAGE-dependent manner. Laser capture microdissected CD68(+) macrophages from atherosclerotic plaques of Ldlr(-/-) mice devoid of Ager (RAGE) displayed higher levels of Abca1, Abcg1, and Pparg mRNA transcripts versus Ager-expressing Ldlr(-/-) mice independently of glycemia or plasma levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides. Antagonism of RAGE may fill an important therapeutic gap in the treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications. PMID:26253613

  8. Overexpression of MexAB-OprM efflux pump in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ya-Ping; Xu, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Zhong-Xin; Fang, Ya-Ping; Shen, Ji-Lu

    2016-08-01

    Efflux pump systems are one of the most important mechanisms conferring multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MexAB-OprM efflux pump is one of the largest multi-drug resistant efflux pumps with high-level expression, which is controlled by regulatory genes mexR, nalC, and nalD. This study investigated the role of efflux pump MexAB-OprM in 75 strains of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa and evaluated the influence of point mutation of the regulatory genes. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of imipenem and meropenem, with or without MC207110, an efflux pump inhibitor, were determined by agar dilution method to select the positive strains for an overexpressed active efflux pump. Carba NP test and EDTA-disk synergy test were used for the detection of carbapenemase and metallo-β-lactamases, respectively. The gene mexA, responsible for the fusion protein structure, and the reference gene rpoD of the MexAB-OprM pump were amplified by real-time PCR. The quantity of relative mRNA expression was determined simultaneously. By PCR method, the efflux regulatory genes mexR, nalC, and nalD and outer membrane protein OprD2 were amplified for the strains showing overexpression of MexAB-OprM and subsequently analyzed by BLAST. Among the 75 P. aeruginosa strains, the prevalence of efflux pump-positive phenotype was 17.3 % (13/75). Carba NP test and EDTA-disk synergy test were all negative in the 13 strains. PCR assay results showed that ten strains overexpressed the MexAB-OprM efflux pump and were all positive for the regulatory genes mexR, nalC, and nalD. Sequence analysis indicated that of the ten isolates, nine had a mutation (Gly → Glu) at 71st amino acid position in NalC, and eight also had a mutation (Ser → Arg) at 209th position in NalC. Only one strain had a mutation (Thr → Ile) at the 158th amino acid position in NalD, whereas eight isolates had mutations in MexR. In conclusion, overexpression of efflux pump MexAB-OprM plays an important role in

  9. Rifaximin resistance in Escherichia coli associated with inflammatory bowel disease correlates with prior rifaximin use, mutations in rpoB, and activity of Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide-inhibitable efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Kothary, Vishesh; Scherl, Ellen J; Bosworth, Brian; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Dupont, Herbert L; Harel, Josee; Simpson, Kenneth W; Dogan, Belgin

    2013-02-01

    Escherichia coli is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable derivative of rifampin effective against E. coli, improves symptoms in mild-to-moderate IBD. However, rifaximin resistance can develop in a single step in vitro. We examined the prevalence and mechanisms of rifaximin resistance in 62 strains of E. coli isolated from the ileal mucosa of 50 patients (19 with ileal Crohn's disease [L1+L3], 6 with colonic Crohn's disease [L2], 13 with ulcerative colitis [UC], 4 with symptomatic non-IBD diagnoses [NI], and 8 healthy [H]). Resistance (MIC > 1,024 mg/liter) was present in 12/48 IBD-associated ileal E. coli strains. Resistance correlated with prior rifaximin treatment (P < 0.00000001) but not with the presence of ileal inflammation (P = 0.73) or E. coli phylogroup. Mutations in a 1,057-bp region of rpoB, which encodes the bacterial target of rifaximin, were identified in 10/12 resistant strains versus 0/50 sensitive strains (P < 0.000000001) and consisted of seven amino acid substitutions. The efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide (PAβN) lowered the MIC of 9/12 resistant strains 8- to 128-fold. Resistance was stable in the absence of rifaximin in 10/12 resistant strains after 30 passages. We conclude that IBD-associated ileal E. coli frequently manifest resistance to rifaximin that correlates with prior rifaximin use, amino acid substitutions in rpoB, and activity of PAβN-inhibitable efflux pumps, but not with the presence of ileal inflammation or E. coli phylogroup. These findings have significant implications for treatment trials targeting IBD-associated E. coli. PMID:23183443

  10. Rifaximin Resistance in Escherichia coli Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Correlates with Prior Rifaximin Use, Mutations in rpoB, and Activity of Phe-Arg-β-Naphthylamide-Inhibitable Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Kothary, Vishesh; Scherl, Ellen J.; Bosworth, Brian; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; DuPont, Herbert L.; Harel, Josee

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable derivative of rifampin effective against E. coli, improves symptoms in mild-to-moderate IBD. However, rifaximin resistance can develop in a single step in vitro. We examined the prevalence and mechanisms of rifaximin resistance in 62 strains of E. coli isolated from the ileal mucosa of 50 patients (19 with ileal Crohn's disease [L1+L3], 6 with colonic Crohn's disease [L2], 13 with ulcerative colitis [UC], 4 with symptomatic non-IBD diagnoses [NI], and 8 healthy [H]). Resistance (MIC > 1,024 mg/liter) was present in 12/48 IBD-associated ileal E. coli strains. Resistance correlated with prior rifaximin treatment (P < 0.00000001) but not with the presence of ileal inflammation (P = 0.73) or E. coli phylogroup. Mutations in a 1,057-bp region of rpoB, which encodes the bacterial target of rifaximin, were identified in 10/12 resistant strains versus 0/50 sensitive strains (P < 0.000000001) and consisted of seven amino acid substitutions. The efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide (PAβN) lowered the MIC of 9/12 resistant strains 8- to 128-fold. Resistance was stable in the absence of rifaximin in 10/12 resistant strains after 30 passages. We conclude that IBD-associated ileal E. coli frequently manifest resistance to rifaximin that correlates with prior rifaximin use, amino acid substitutions in rpoB, and activity of PAβN-inhibitable efflux pumps, but not with the presence of ileal inflammation or E. coli phylogroup. These findings have significant implications for treatment trials targeting IBD-associated E. coli. PMID:23183443

  11. Inflammatory remodeling of the HDL proteome impairs cholesterol efflux capacity.

    PubMed

    Vaisar, Tomáš; Tang, Chongren; Babenko, Ilona; Hutchins, Patrick; Wimberger, Jake; Suffredini, Anthony F; Heinecke, Jay W

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that HDL's ability to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophages associates strongly with cardioprotection in humans independently of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apoA-I, HDL's major protein. However, the mechanisms that impair cholesterol efflux capacity during vascular disease are unclear. Inflammation, a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, has been shown to impair HDL's cholesterol efflux capacity. We therefore tested the hypothesis that HDL's impaired efflux capacity is mediated by specific changes of its protein cargo. Humans with acute inflammation induced by low-level endotoxin had unchanged HDL-C levels, but their HDL-C efflux capacity was significantly impaired. Proteomic analyses demonstrated that HDL's cholesterol efflux capacity correlated inversely with HDL content of serum amyloid A (SAA)1 and SAA2. In mice, acute inflammation caused a marked impairment of HDL-C efflux capacity that correlated with a large increase in HDL SAA. In striking contrast, the efflux capacity of mouse inflammatory HDL was preserved with genetic ablation of SAA1 and SAA2. Our observations indicate that the inflammatory impairment of HDL-C efflux capacity is due in part to SAA-mediated remodeling of HDL's protein cargo. PMID:25995210

  12. Role of outer membrane barrier in efflux-mediated tetracycline resistance of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Thanassi, D G; Suh, G S; Nikaido, H

    1995-01-01

    Accumulation of tetracycline in Escherichia coli was studied to determine its permeation pathway and to provide a basis for understanding efflux-mediated resistance. Passage of tetracycline across the outer membrane appeared to occur preferentially via the porin OmpF, with tetracycline in its magnesium-bound form. Rapid efflux of magnesium-chelated tetracycline from the periplasm was observed. In E. coli cells that do not contain exogenous tetracycline resistance genes, the steady-state level of tetracycline accumulation was decreased when porins were absent or when the fraction of Mg(2+)-chelated tetracycline was small. This is best explained by assuming the presence of a low-level endogenous active efflux system that bypasses the outer membrane barrier. When influx of tetracycline is slowed, this efflux is able to reduce the accumulation of tetracycline in the cytoplasm. In contrast, we found no evidence of a special outer membrane bypass mechanism for high-level efflux via the Tet protein, which is an inner membrane efflux pump coded for by exogenous tetA genes. Fractionation and equilibrium density gradient centrifugation experiments showed that the Tet protein is not localized to regions of inner and outer membrane adhesion. Furthermore, a high concentration of tetracycline was found in the compartment that rapidly equilibrated with the medium, most probably the periplasm, of Tet-containing E. coli cells, and the level of tetracycline accumulation in Tet-containing cells was not diminished by the mutational loss of the OmpF porin. These results suggest that the Tet protein, in contrast to the endogenous efflux system(s), pumps magnesium-chelated tetracycline into the periplasm. A quantitative model of tetracycline fluxes in E. coli cells of various types is presented. PMID:7860612

  13. Differences in the mechanisms that increase noradrenaline efflux after administration of d-amphetamine: a dual-probe microdialysis study in rat frontal cortex and hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Géranton, Sandrine M; Heal, David J; Stanford, S Clare

    2003-08-01

    1. The extent to which impulse-independent release of noradrenaline and/or inhibition of its reuptake contribute to the response to d-amphetamine in vivo is unclear. Here, dual-probe microdialysis was used to investigate this question in the rat frontal cortex and hypothalamus. 2. After systemic administration of d-amphetamine (10 mg kg(-1)), or its local infusion (10 micro M), the increase in noradrenaline efflux in the hypothalamus was greater than in the frontal cortex. 3. In contrast, during local infusion of the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, BTS 54 354 (50 micro M), the noradrenaline response was similar in the frontal cortex and hypothalamus, even after systemic administration of the alpha(2)-antagonist, atipamezole, to block presynaptic inhibition of transmitter release and neuronal firing. 4. In the frontal cortex, but not the hypothalamus, the noradrenaline response to 10 micro M d-amphetamine was constrained by activation of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. This suggests that, at this concentration, inhibition of reuptake of noradrenaline, following its impulse-dependent release, is evident in the frontal cortex, but that the noradrenaline response in the hypothalamus derives mostly from impulse-independent release (retrotransport). 5. Atipamezole did not affect the noradrenaline response to 100 micro M d-amphetamine in either brain region possibly because, at this higher concentration, retrotransport of noradrenaline masks any compensatory reduction in impulse-evoked release. 6. It is concluded that inhibition of reuptake and retrotransport make different contributions to the noradrenaline response to d-amphetamine in the frontal cortex and hypothalamus and that retrotransport increases with the concentration of d-amphetamine. PMID:12922931

  14. Aromatic inhibitors derived from ammonia-pretreated lignocellulose hinder bacterial ethanologenesis by activating regulatory circuits controlling inhibitor efflux and detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Keating, David H.; Zhang, Yaoping; Ong, Irene M.; McIlwain, Sean; Morales, Eduardo H.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Tremaine, Mary; Bothfeld, William; Higbee, Alan; Ulbrich, Arne; Balloon, Allison J.; Westphall, Michael S.; Aldrich, Josh; Lipton, Mary S.; Kim, Joonhoon; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Bukhman, Yury V.; Coon, Joshua J.; Kiley, Patricia J.; Bates, Donna M.; Landick, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Efficient microbial conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels is a key barrier to the economically viable deployment of lignocellulosic biofuels. A chief contributor to this barrier is the impact on microbial processes and energy metabolism of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, including phenolic carboxylates, phenolic amides (for ammonia-pretreated biomass), phenolic aldehydes, and furfurals. To understand the bacterial pathways induced by inhibitors present in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, which are less well studied than acid-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, we developed and exploited synthetic mimics of ammonia-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). To determine regulatory responses to the inhibitors normally present in ACSH, we measured transcript and protein levels in an Escherichia coli ethanologen using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics during fermentation to ethanol of synthetic hydrolysates containing or lacking the inhibitors. Our study identified four major regulators mediating these responses, the MarA/SoxS/Rob network, AaeR, FrmR, and YqhC. Induction of these regulons was correlated with a reduced rate of ethanol production, buildup of pyruvate, depletion of ATP and NAD(P)H, and an inhibition of xylose conversion. The aromatic aldehyde inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural appeared to be reduced to its alcohol form by the ethanologen during fermentation, whereas phenolic acid and amide inhibitors were not metabolized. Together, our findings establish that the major regulatory responses to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors are mediated by transcriptional rather than translational regulators, suggest that energy consumed for inhibitor efflux and detoxification may limit biofuel production, and identify a network of regulators for future synthetic biology efforts. PMID:25177315

  15. Bacterial multi-drug efflux transporters

    PubMed Central

    Delmar, Jared A.; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by bacteria remain a leading cause of death worldwide. While antibiotics remain a key clinical therapy, their effectiveness has been severely compromised by the development of drug resistance in these pathogens. A common and powerful resistance mechanism, multi-drug efflux transporters are capable of extruding a number of structurally unrelated antimicrobials from the bacterial cell, including antibiotics and toxic heavy metal ions, facilitating their survival in noxious environments. Those transporters belonging to the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) superfamily typically assemble as tripartite efflux complexes, spanning the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope. In Escherichia coli, the CusCFBA complex, which mediates resistance to copper(I) and silver(I) ions, is the only known RND transporter with a specificity for heavy metals. Herein, we describe the current knowledge of individual pump components of the Cus system, a paradigm for efflux machinery, and speculate on how RND pumps assemble to fight diverse antimicrobials. PMID:24702006

  16. Stimulant mechanisms of cathinones - effects of mephedrone and other cathinones on basal and electrically evoked dopamine efflux in rat accumbens brain slices.

    PubMed

    Opacka-Juffry, Jolanta; Pinnell, Thomas; Patel, Nisha; Bevan, Melissa; Meintel, Meghan; Davidson, Colin

    2014-10-01

    Mephedrone, an erstwhile "legal high", and some non-abused cathinones (ethcathinone, diethylpropion and bupropion) were tested for stimulant effects in vitro, through assessing their abilities to increase basal and electrically evoked dopamine efflux in rat accumbens brain slices, and compared with cocaine and amphetamine. We also tested mephedrone against cocaine in a dopamine transporter binding study. Dopamine efflux was electrically evoked and recorded using voltammetry in the rat accumbens core. We constructed concentration response curves for these cathinones for effects on basal dopamine levels; peak efflux after local electrical stimulation and the time-constant of the dopamine decay phase, an index of dopamine reuptake. We also examined competition between mephedrone or cocaine and [(125)I]RTI121 at the dopamine transporter. Mephedrone was less potent than cocaine at displacing [(125)I]RTI121. Mephedrone and amphetamine increased basal levels of dopamine in the absence of electrical stimulation. Cocaine, bupropion, diethylpropion and ethcathinone all increased the peak dopamine efflux after electrical stimulation and slowed dopamine reuptake. Cocaine was more potent than bupropion and ethcathinone, while diethylpropion was least potent. Notably, cocaine had the fastest onset of action. These data suggest that, with respect to dopamine efflux, mephedrone is more similar to amphetamine than cocaine. These findings also show that cocaine was more potent than bupropion and ethcathinone while diethylpropion was least potent. Mephedrone's binding to the dopamine transporter is consistent with stimulant effects but its potency was lower than that of cocaine. These findings confirm and further characterize stimulant properties of mephedrone and other cathinones in adolescent rat brain. PMID:24795175

  17. Arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages through PPAR-γ/LXR-α signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolin; Li, Qian; Pang, Liewen; Huang, Guoqian; Huang, Jiechun; Shi, Meng; Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Yiqing

    2013-11-15

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a critical mechanism to prevent the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa, on the cholesterol efflux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-loaded THP-1 macrophages. Our data showed that arctigenin significantly accelerated apolipoprotein A-I- and high-density lipoprotein-induced cholesterol efflux in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Moreover, arctigenin treatment enhanced the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and apoE, all of which are key molecules in the initial step of cholesterol efflux, at both mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also caused a concentration-dependent elevation in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and liver X receptor-alpha (LXR-α). The arctigenin-mediated induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE was abolished by specific inhibition of PPAR-γ or LXR-α using small interfering RNA technology. Our results collectively indicate that arctigenin promotes cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-loaded THP-1 macrophages through upregulation of ABCA1, ABCG1 and apoE, which is dependent on the enhanced expression of PPAR-γ and LXR-α. PMID:24140409

  18. Alkylaminoquinolines inhibit the bacterial antibiotic efflux pump in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Malléa, Monique; Mahamoud, Abdallah; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Alibert-Franco, Sandrine; Brouant, Pierre; Barbe, Jacques; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    Over the last decade, MDR (multidrug resistance) has increased worldwide in microbial pathogens by efflux mechanisms, leading to treatment failures in human infections. Several Gram-negative bacteria efflux pumps have been described. These proteinaceous channels are capable of expelling structurally different drugs across the envelope and conferring antibiotic resistance in various bacterial pathogens. Combating antibiotic resistance is an urgency and the blocking of efflux pumps is an attractive response to the emergence of MDR phenotypes in infectious bacteria. In the present study, various alkylaminoquinolines were tested as potential inhibitors of drug transporters. We showed that alkylaminoquinolines are capable of restoring susceptibilities to structurally unrelated antibiotics in clinical isolates of MDR Gram-negative bacteria. Antibiotic efflux studies indicated that 7-nitro-8-methyl-4-[2'-(piperidino)ethyl]aminoquinoline acts as an inhibitor of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump and restores a high level of intracellular drug concentration. Inhibitory activity of this alkylaminoquinoline is observed on clinical isolates showing different resistance phenotypes. PMID:12959639

  19. Control of Cl− Efflux in Chara corallina by Cytosolic pH, Free Ca2+, and Phosphorylation Indicates a Role of Plasma Membrane Anion Channels in Cytosolic pH Regulation1

    PubMed Central

    Johannes, Eva; Crofts, Alan; Sanders, Dale

    1998-01-01

    Enhanced Cl− efflux during acidosis in plants is thought to play a role in cytosolic pH (pHc) homeostasis by short-circuiting the current produced by the electrogenic H+ pump, thereby facilitating enhanced H+ efflux from the cytosol. Using an intracellular perfusion technique, which enables experimental control of medium composition at the cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane of charophyte algae (Chara corallina), we show that lowered pHc activates Cl− efflux via two mechanisms. The first is a direct effect of pHc on Cl− efflux; the second mechanism comprises a pHc-induced increase in affinity for cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c), which also activates Cl− efflux. Cl− efflux was controlled by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events, which override the responses to both pHc and [Ca2+]c. Whereas phosphorylation (perfusion with the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A in the presence of ATP) resulted in a complete inhibition of Cl− efflux, dephosphorylation (perfusion with alkaline phosphatase) arrested Cl− efflux at 60% of the maximal level in a manner that was both pHc and [Ca2+]c independent. These findings imply that plasma membrane anion channels play a central role in pHc regulation in plants, in addition to their established roles in turgor/volume regulation and signal transduction. PMID:9733536

  20. Evaluation of the tannic acid inhibitory effect against the NorA efflux pump of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tintino, Saulo R; Oliveira-Tintino, Cícera D M; Campina, Fábia F; Silva, Raimundo L P; Costa, Maria do S; Menezes, Irwin R A; Calixto-Júnior, João T; Siqueira-Junior, José P; Coutinho, Henrique D M; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C; Balbino, Valdir Q

    2016-08-01

    During the early periods of antibiotic usage, bacterial infections were considered tamed. However, widespread antibiotic use has promoted the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, including multidrug resistant strains. Active efflux is a mechanism for bacterial resistance to inhibitory substances, known simply as drug efflux pumps. The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogenic bacterium responsible for an array of infections. The NorA efflux pump has been shown to be responsible for moderate fluoroquinolone resistance of S. aureus. The inhibition of the efflux pump was assayed using a sub-inhibitory concentration of standard efflux pump inhibitors and tannic acid (MIC/8), where its capacity to decrease the MIC of Ethidium bromide (EtBr) and antibiotics due to the possible inhibitory effect of these substances was observed. The MICs of EtBr and antibiotics were significantly reduced in the presence of tannic acid, indicating the inhibitory effect of this agent against the efflux pumps of both strains causing a three-fold reduction of the MIC when compared with the control. These results indicate the possible usage of tannic acid as an adjuvant in antibiotic therapy against multidrug resistant bacteria (MDR). PMID:27057677

  1. Expression of Efflux Pumps and Fatty Acid Activator One Genes in Azole Resistant Candida Glabrata Isolated From Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Farahyar, Shirin; Zaini, Farideh; Kordbacheh, Parivash; Rezaie, Sassan; Falahati, Mehraban; Safara, Mahin; Raoofian, Reza; Hatami, Kamran; Mohebbi, Masoumeh; Heidari, Mansour

    2016-07-01

    Acquired azole resistance in opportunistic fungi causes severe clinical problems in immunosuppressed individuals. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms of azole resistance in clinical isolates of Candida glabrata. Six unmatched strains were obtained from an epidemiological survey of candidiasis in immunocompromised hosts that included azole and amphotericin B susceptible and azole resistant clinical isolates. Candida glabrata CBS 138 was used as reference strain. Antifungal susceptibility testing of clinical isolates was evaluated using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technology, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and sequencing were employed for identification of potential genes involved in azole resistance. Candida glabrata Candida drug resistance 1 (CgCDR1) and Candida glabrata Candida drug resistance 2 (CgCDR2) genes, which encode for multidrug transporters, were found to be upregulated in azole-resistant isolates (≥2-fold). Fatty acid activator 1 (FAA1) gene, belonging to Acyl-CoA synthetases, showed expression in resistant isolates ≥2-fold that of the susceptible isolates and the reference strain. This study revealed overexpression of the CgCDR1, CgCDR2, and FAA1 genes affecting biological pathways, small hydrophobic compounds transport, and lipid metabolism in the resistant clinical C.glabrata isolates. PMID:27424018

  2. Calcium efflux activity of plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase-4 (PMCA4) mediates cell cycle progression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Afroze, Talat; Yang, Ge; Khoshbin, Amir; Tanwir, Mansoor; Tabish, Taha; Momen, Abdul; Husain, Mansoor

    2014-03-01

    We explored the role played by plasma membrane calcium ATPase-4 (PMCA4) and its alternative splice variants in the cell cycle of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). A novel variant (PMCA4e) was discovered. Quantitative real-time-PCR-quantified PMCA4 splice variant proportions differed in specific organs. The PMCA4a:4b ratio in uninjured carotid arteries (∼1:1) was significantly reduced by wire denudation injury (to ∼1:3) by modulation of alternative splicing, as confirmed by novel antibodies against PMCA4a/e and PMCA4b. Laser capture microdissection localized this shift to the media and adventitia. Primary carotid VSMC from PMCA4 knock-out (P4KO) mice showed impaired [(3)H]thymidine incorporation and G1 phase arrest as compared with wild type (P4WT). Electroporation of expression constructs encoding PMCA4a, PMCA4b, and a PMCA4b mutant lacking PDZ binding rescued this phenotype of P4KO cells, whereas a mutant with only 10% of normal Ca(2+) efflux activity could not. Microarray of early G1-synchronized VSMC showed 39-fold higher Rgs16 (NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) target; MAPK inhibitor) and 69-fold higher Decorin (G1 arrest marker) expression in P4KO versus P4WT. Validation by Western blot also revealed decreased levels of Cyclin D1 and NFATc3 in P4KO. Microarrays of P4KO VSMC rescued by PMCA4a or PMCA4b expression showed reversal of perturbed Rgs16, Decorin, and NFATc3 expression levels. However, PMCA4a rescue caused a 44-fold reduction in AP-2β, a known anti-proliferative transcription factor, whereas PMCA4b rescue resulted in a 50-fold reduction in p15 (Cyclin D1/Cdk4 inhibitor). We conclude that Ca(2+) efflux activity of PMCA4 underlies G1 progression in VSMC and that PMCA4a and PMCA4b differentially regulate specific downstream mediators. PMID:24448801

  3. Mechanically Active Electrospun Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Jaimee M.

    Electrospinning, a technique used to fabricate small diameter polymer fibers, has been employed to develop unique, active materials falling under two categories: (1) shape memory elastomeric composites (SMECs) and (2) water responsive fiber mats. (1) Previous work has characterized in detail the properties and behavior of traditional SMECs with isotropic fibers embedded in an elastomer matrix. The current work has two goals: (i) characterize laminated anisotropic SMECs and (ii) develop a fabrication process that is scalable for commercial SMEC manufacturing. The former ((i)) requires electrospinning aligned polymer fibers. The aligned fibers are similarly embedded in an elastomer matrix and stacked at various fiber orientations. The resulting laminated composite has a unique response to tensile deformation: after stretching and releasing, the composite curls. This curling response was characterized based on fiber orientation. The latter goal ((ii)) required use of a dual-electrospinning process to simultaneously electrospin two polymers. This fabrication approach incorporated only industrially relevant processing techniques, enabling the possibility of commercial application of a shape memory rubber. Furthermore, the approach had the added benefit of increased control over composition and material properties. (2) The strong elongational forces experienced by polymer chains during the electrospinning process induce molecular alignment along the length of electrospun fibers. Such orientation is maintained in the fibers as the polymer vitrifies. Consequently, residual stress is stored in electrospun fiber mats and can be recovered by heating through the polymer's glass transition temperature. Alternatively, the glass transition temperature can be depressed by introducing a plasticizing agent. Poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) is plasticized by water, and its glass transition temperature is lowered below room temperature. Therefore, the residual stress can be relaxed at room

  4. Action of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol on Staphylococcus aureus efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Tintino, Saulo R; Morais-Tintino, Cícera D; Campina, Fábia F; Pereira, Raimundo L; Costa, Maria do S; Braga, Maria Flaviana B M; Limaverde, Paulo W; Andrade, Jacqueline C; Siqueira-Junior, José P; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Balbino, Valdir Q; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C; Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-tocopherol is one the most abundant and biologically active isoforms of vitamin E. This compound is a potent antioxidant and one of most studied isoforms of vitamin E. Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is an important nutrient for calcium homeostasis and bone health, that has also been recognized as a potent modulator of the immune response. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most important causative agent of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of alpha-tocopherol and cholecalciferol on both S. aureus and multidrug resistant S. aureus efflux pumps. The RN4220 strain has the plasmid pUL5054 that is the carrier of gene that encodes the macrolide resistance protein (an efflux pump) MsrA; the IS-58 strain possesses the TetK tetracycline efflux protein in its genome and the 1199B strain resists to hydrophilic fluoroquinolones via a NorA-mediated mechanism. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by determining the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and a possible inhibition of efflux pumps was associated to a reduction of the MIC. In this work we observed that in the presence of the treatments there was a decrease in the MIC for the RN4220 and IS-58 strains, suggesting that the substances presented an inhibitory effect on the efflux pumps of these strains. Significant efforts have been done to identify efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) from natural sources and, therefore, the antibacterial properties of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol might be attributed to a direct effect on the bacterial cell depending on their amphipathic structure. PMID:27298617

  5. Action of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol on Staphylococcus aureus efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    Tintino, Saulo R.; Morais-Tintino, Cícera D.; Campina, Fábia F.; Pereira, Raimundo L.; Costa, Maria do S.; Braga, Maria Flaviana B.M.; Limaverde, Paulo W.; Andrade, Jacqueline C.; Siqueira-Junior, José P.; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Balbino, Valdir Q.; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C.; Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-tocopherol is one the most abundant and biologically active isoforms of vitamin E. This compound is a potent antioxidant and one of most studied isoforms of vitamin E. Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is an important nutrient for calcium homeostasis and bone health, that has also been recognized as a potent modulator of the immune response. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most important causative agent of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of alpha-tocopherol and cholecalciferol on both S. aureus and multidrug resistant S. aureus efflux pumps. The RN4220 strain has the plasmid pUL5054 that is the carrier of gene that encodes the macrolide resistance protein (an efflux pump) MsrA; the IS-58 strain possesses the TetK tetracycline efflux protein in its genome and the 1199B strain resists to hydrophilic fluoroquinolones via a NorA-mediated mechanism. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by determining the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and a possible inhibition of efflux pumps was associated to a reduction of the MIC. In this work we observed that in the presence of the treatments there was a decrease in the MIC for the RN4220 and IS-58 strains, suggesting that the substances presented an inhibitory effect on the efflux pumps of these strains. Significant efforts have been done to identify efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) from natural sources and, therefore, the antibacterial properties of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol might be attributed to a direct effect on the bacterial cell depending on their amphipathic structure. PMID:27298617

  6. NLRP3 inflammasome signaling is activated by low-level lysosome disruption but inhibited by extensive lysosome disruption: roles for K+ efflux and Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed

    Katsnelson, Michael A; Lozada-Soto, Kristen M; Russo, Hana M; Miller, Barbara A; Dubyak, George R

    2016-07-01

    Nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich-repeat-containing family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) is a cytosolic protein that nucleates assembly of inflammasome signaling platforms, which facilitate caspase-1-mediated IL-1β release and other inflammatory responses in myeloid leukocytes. NLRP3 inflammasomes are assembled in response to multiple pathogen- or environmental stress-induced changes in basic cell physiology, including the destabilization of lysosome integrity and activation of K(+)-permeable channels/transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). However, the quantitative relationships between lysosome membrane permeabilization (LMP), induction of increased PM K(+) permeability, and activation of NLRP3 signaling are incompletely characterized. We used Leu-Leu-O-methyl ester (LLME), a soluble lysosomotropic agent, to quantitatively track the kinetics and extent of LMP in relation to NLRP3 inflammasome signaling responses (ASC oligomerization, caspase-1 activation, IL-1β release) and PM cation fluxes in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Treatment of BMDCs with submillimolar (≤1 mM) LLME induced slower and partial increases in LMP that correlated with robust NLRP3 inflammasome activation and K(+) efflux. In contrast, supramillimolar (≥2 mM) LLME elicited extremely rapid and complete collapse of lysosome integrity that was correlated with suppression of inflammasome signaling. Supramillimolar LLME also induced dominant negative effects on inflammasome activation by the canonical NLRP3 agonist nigericin; this inhibition correlated with an increase in NLRP3 ubiquitination. LMP elicited rapid BMDC death by both inflammasome-dependent pyroptosis and inflammasome-independent necrosis. LMP also triggered Ca(2+) influx, which attenuated LLME-stimulated NLRP3 inflammasome signaling but potentiated LLME-induced necrosis. Taken together, these studies reveal a previously unappreciated signaling network that defines the coupling between LMP, changes

  7. MAPK1 of Leishmania donovani Modulates Antimony Susceptibility by Downregulating P-Glycoprotein Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Mansi

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of resistance to pentavalent antimonials has become a severe obstacle in the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in the Indian subcontinent. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are well-known mediators of signal transduction of eukaryotes, regulating important processes, like proliferation, differentiation, stress response, and apoptosis. In Leishmania, MAPK1 has been shown to be consistently downregulated in antimony-resistant field isolates, suggesting that it has a role in antimony resistance. The present work investigates the molecular mechanism of MAPK1 in antimony resistance in Leishmania donovani. The L. donovani MAPK1 (LdMAPK1) single-allele replacement mutants exhibited increased resistance to Sb(III) (5.57-fold) compared to wild-type promastigotes, while overexpressing parasites became much more susceptible to antimony. The LdMAPK1-mediated drug sensitivity was directly related to antimony-induced apoptotic death of the parasite, as was evidenced by a 4- to 5-fold decrease in cell death parameters in deletion mutants and a 2- to 3-fold increase in MAPK1-overexpressing cells. LdMAPK1-underexpressing parasites also exhibited increased P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated efflux pump activity, while a significant decrease in pump activity was observed in overexpressing cells. This change in efflux pump activity was directly related to expression levels of P-gp in all cell lines. However, episomal complementation of the gene restored normal growth, drug sensitivity, P-gp expression, and efflux pump activity. The data indicate that LdMAPK1 negatively regulates the expression of P-glycoprotein-type efflux pumps in the parasite. The decrease in efflux pump activity with an increase in LdMAPK1 expression may result in increased antimony accumulation in the parasite, making it more vulnerable to the drug. PMID:25870075

  8. In squid axons intracellular Mg2+ is essential for ATP-dependent Na+ efflux in the absence and presence of strophanthidin.

    PubMed

    Beaugé, L; Rojas, H; DiPolo, R

    1983-03-01

    The effect on Na+ efflux of removal of intracellular Mg2+ was studied in squid giant axons dialyzed without internal Ca2+. In the absence of Mg2i+, ATP was unable to stimulate any efflux of Na+ above the baseline of about 1 pmol . cm-2 . s-1. This behavior was observed in otherwise normal axons and in axons poisoned with 50 microM strophanthidin in the sea water. Reinstatement of 4 mM MgCl2 in excess to ATP in the dialysis solution brought about the usual response of Na+ efflux to ATP, external K+ and strophanthidin. The present experiments show that, regardless of the mechanism for the ATP-dependent Na+ efflux in strophanthidin-poisoned axons, this type of flux shares with the active Na+ extrusion the need for the simultaneous presence of intracellular ATP and Mg2+. PMID:6402014

  9. Lack of efflux mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A.

    PubMed

    Baucheron, Sylvie; Monchaux, Isabelle; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates from human patients in France displaying different levels of resistance to quinolones or fluoroquinolones were studied for resistance mechanisms to these antimicrobial agents. All resistant isolates carried either single or multiple target gene mutations (i.e., in gyrA, gyrB, or parC) correlating with the resistance levels observed. Active efflux, through upregulation of multipartite efflux systems, has also been previously reported as contributing mechanism for other serovars. Therefore, we investigated also the occurrence of non-target gene mutations in regulatory regions affecting efflux pump expression. However, no mutation was detected in these regions in both Typhi and Paratyphi isolates of this study. Besides, no overexpression of the major efflux systems was observed for these isolates. Nevertheless, a large deletion of 2334 bp was identified in the acrS-acrE region of all S. Typhi strains but which did not affect the resistance phenotype. As being specific to S. Typhi, this deletion could be used for specific molecular detection purposes. In conclusion, the different levels of quinolone or FQ resistance in both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A seem to rely only on target modifications. PMID:24478769

  10. Regulation of P-glycoprotein efflux activity by Z-guggulsterone of Commiphora mukul at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Bin; Yu, Jing; Xu, Lu-Zhong; Fu, Jun

    2016-04-15

    The present study was to investigate whether Z-guggulsterone had the regulatory effect on the activity and expression of P-glycoprotein in rat brain microvessel endothelial cells (rBMECs) and in rat brain. Inorganic phosphate liberation assay, high performance liquid chromatography, and western blot analysis were performed to assess the P-glycoprotein ATPase activity, the accumulation of NaF and rhodamine 123, and P-glycoprotein and MRP1 expression. The results showed that Z-guggulsterone (0-100 μM) significantly enhanced basal P-glycoprotein ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Tetrandrine (0.1, 0.3, 1 μM) or cyclosporine A (0.1, 0.3, 1 μM) had non-competitively inhibitory manner on Z-guggulsterone-stimulated P-glycoprotein ATPase activity, suggesting that Z-guggulsterone might have unique binding site or regulating site on P-glycoprotein. However, Z-guggulsterone (30, 100 μM) had almost no influence on MRP1 expression in rBMECs. Further results revealed that Z-guggulsterone (50mg/kg) significantly increased the accumulation of rhodamine 123 by down-regulating P-glycoprotein expression in rat brain, as compared with control (P<0.05). Our studies suggested that Z-guggulsterone potentially inhibited the activity and expression of P-glycoprotein in rBMECs and in rat brain. PMID:27000241

  11. Simultaneous Influx and Efflux of Nitrate during Uptake by Perennial Ryegrass 1

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M. A.; Volk, R. J.; Jackson, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments with intact plants of Lolium perenne previously grown with 14NO3− revealed significant efflux of this isotopic species when the plants were transferred to solutions of highly enriched 15NO3−. The exuded 14NO3− was subsequently reabsorbed when the ambient solutions were not replaced. When they were frequently replaced, continual efflux of the 14NO3− was observed. Influx of 15NO3− was significantly greater than influx of 14NO3− from solutions of identical NO3− concentration. Transferring plants to 14NO3− solutions after a six-hour period in 15NO3− resulted in efflux of the latter. Presence of Mg2+, rather than Ca2+, in the ambient 15NO3− solution resulted in a decidedly increased rate of 14NO3− efflux and a slight but significant increase in 15NO3− influx. Accordingly, net NO3− influx was slightly depressed. A model in accordance with these observations is presented; its essential features include a passive bidirectional pathway, an active uptake mechanism, and a pathway for recycling of endogenous NO3− within unstirred layers from the passive pathway to the active uptake site. PMID:16658313

  12. IP/sub 3/ stimulates CA/sup + +/ efflux from fusogenic carrot protoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Rincon, M.; Boss, W.F.

    1986-04-01

    Polyphosphoinositide breakdown plays an important role in signal transduction in animal cells (Berridge and Irvine, 1984, Nature, 312:315). Upon stimulation, phospholipase C hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) and diacylglycerol both of which act as cellular second messengers. IP/sub 3/ mobilizes Ca/sup + +/ from internal stores, hence the cytosolic free Ca/sup + +/ concentration increases and those physiological activities regulated by Ca/sup + +/ are stimulated. To test if plant cells also responded to IP/sub 3/, Ca/sup + +/ efflux studies were done with fusogenic carrot protoplasts released in EGTA. The protoplasts were preloaded with /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ placed in a Ca/sup + +/-free medium, and efflux determined as /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ loss from the protoplasts. IP/sub 3/ (10-20..mu..M) caused enhanced /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux and the response was sustained for at least 15 min. In plants, as in animals, the observed IP/sub 3/-enhanced /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ efflux suggested that IP/sub 3/ released Ca/sup + +/ from internal stores, and the increased free cytosolic Ca/sup + +/ activated Ca/sup + +/ pumping mechanisms which restored the Ca/sup + +/ concentration in the cytosol to the normal level.

  13. CO2 efflux from subterranean nests of ant communities in a seasonal tropical forest, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Hasin, Sasitorn; Ohashi, Mizue; Yamada, Akinori; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki; Tasen, Wattanachai; Kume, Tomonori; Yamane, Seiki

    2014-01-01

    Many ant species construct subterranean nests. The presence of their nests may explain soil respiration “hot spots”, an important factor in the high CO2 efflux from tropical forests. However, no studies have directly measured CO2 efflux from ant nests. We established 61 experimental plots containing 13 subterranean ant species to evaluate the CO2 efflux from subterranean ant nests in a tropical seasonal forest, Thailand. We examined differences in nest CO2 efflux among ant species. We determined the effects of environmental factors on nest CO2 efflux and calculated an index of nest structure. The mean CO2 efflux from nests was significantly higher than those from the surrounding soil in the wet and dry seasons. The CO2 efflux was species-specific, showing significant differences among the 13 ant species. The soil moisture content significantly affected nest CO2 efflux, but there was no clear relationship between nest CO2 efflux and nest soil temperature. The diameter of the nest entrance hole affected CO2 efflux. However, there was no significant difference in CO2 efflux rates between single-hole and multiple-hole nests. Our results suggest that in a tropical forest ecosystem the increase in CO2 efflux from subterranean ant nests is caused by species-specific activity of ants, the nest soil environment, and nest structure. PMID:25505521

  14. Do Phytotropins Inhibit Auxin Efflux by Impairing Vesicle Traffic?1

    PubMed Central

    Petrášek, Jan; Černá, Adriana; Schwarzerová, Kateřina; Elčkner, Miroslav; Morris, David A.; Zažímalová, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Phytotropins such as 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) strongly inhibit auxin efflux, but the mechanism of this inhibition remains unknown. Auxin efflux is also strongly decreased by the vesicle trafficking inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA). Using suspension-cultured interphase cells of the BY-2 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright-Yellow 2) cell line, we compared the effects of NPA and BFA on auxin accumulation and on the arrangement of the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The inhibition of auxin efflux (stimulation of net accumulation) by both NPA and BFA occurred rapidly with no measurable lag. NPA had no observable effect on the arrangement of microtubules, actin filaments, or ER. Thus, its inhibitory effect on auxin efflux was not mediated by perturbation of the cytoskeletal system and ER. BFA, however, caused substantial alterations to the arrangement of actin filaments and ER, including a characteristic accumulation of actin in the perinuclear cytoplasm. Even at saturating concentrations, NPA inhibited net auxin efflux far more effectively than did BFA. Therefore, a proportion of the NPA-sensitive auxin efflux carriers may be protected from the action of BFA. Maximum inhibition of auxin efflux occurred at concentrations of NPA substantially below those previously reported to be necessary to perturb vesicle trafficking. We found no evidence to support recent suggestions that the action of auxin transport inhibitors is mediated by a general inhibition of vesicle-mediated protein traffic to the plasma membrane. PMID:12529533

  15. Do phytotropins inhibit auxin efflux by impairing vesicle traffic?

    PubMed

    Petrásek, Jan; Cerná, Adriana; Schwarzerová, Katerina; Elckner, Miroslav; Morris, David A; Zazímalová, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Phytotropins such as 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) strongly inhibit auxin efflux, but the mechanism of this inhibition remains unknown. Auxin efflux is also strongly decreased by the vesicle trafficking inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA). Using suspension-cultured interphase cells of the BY-2 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright-Yellow 2) cell line, we compared the effects of NPA and BFA on auxin accumulation and on the arrangement of the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The inhibition of auxin efflux (stimulation of net accumulation) by both NPA and BFA occurred rapidly with no measurable lag. NPA had no observable effect on the arrangement of microtubules, actin filaments, or ER. Thus, its inhibitory effect on auxin efflux was not mediated by perturbation of the cytoskeletal system and ER. BFA, however, caused substantial alterations to the arrangement of actin filaments and ER, including a characteristic accumulation of actin in the perinuclear cytoplasm. Even at saturating concentrations, NPA inhibited net auxin efflux far more effectively than did BFA. Therefore, a proportion of the NPA-sensitive auxin efflux carriers may be protected from the action of BFA. Maximum inhibition of auxin efflux occurred at concentrations of NPA substantially below those previously reported to be necessary to perturb vesicle trafficking. We found no evidence to support recent suggestions that the action of auxin transport inhibitors is mediated by a general inhibition of vesicle-mediated protein traffic to the plasma membrane. PMID:12529533

  16. Induction of Expression and Functional Activity of P-glycoprotein Efflux Transporter by Bioactive Plant Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Abuznait, Alaa H.; Qosa, Hisham; O’Connell, Nicholas D.; Akbarian-Tefaghi, Jessica; Sylvester, Paul W.; El Sayed, Khalid A.; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2011-01-01

    The effect of bioactive plant natural products on the expression and functional activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is poorly understood. Interactions of bioactive plant-based food and dietary supplements with P-gp can cause significant alteration of pharmacokinetic properties of P-gp substrate drugs when used in combination. This can augment toxicity and/or interfere with the drug’s therapeutic outcomes. This study investigated the effects of diverse commonly used plant natural products on the expression and activity of P-gp in human adenocarcinoma cells (LS-180). These natural products included the tobacco cembranoid (1S,2E,4R,6R,7E,11E)-2,7,11-cembratriene-4,6-diol (cembratriene), the palm oil-derived γ-tocotrienol, the extra-virgin olive oil-derived secoiridoid oleocanthal, and the triterpene acid asiatic acid derived from Melaleuca ericifolia and abundant in several other common plant dietary supplements. Treatment with 25 μM of cembratriene, oleocanthal, γ-tocotrienol, or asiatic acid showed 2.3-3.0-fold increase in P-gp expression as demonstrated by Western blotting. These results were consistent with those obtained by quantitative analysis of fluorescent micrographs for P-gp. Accumulation studies demonstrated 31-38% decrease in rhodamine 123 intracellular levels when LS-180 cells were treated with the investigated compounds as a result of P-gp induction. Bioactive natural products can up-regulate the P-gp expression and functionality, which may induce herb/food-drug interactions when concomitantly used with P-gp substrate drugs. PMID:21851848

  17. Genomic Analysis of ATP Efflux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Theodore W.; Miller, Aaron W.; Tourette, Cendrine; Agren, Hannah; Hubbard, Alan; Hughes, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plays an important role as a primary molecule for the transfer of chemical energy to drive biological processes. ATP also functions as an extracellular signaling molecule in a diverse array of eukaryotic taxa in a conserved process known as purinergic signaling. Given the important roles of extracellular ATP in cell signaling, we sought to comprehensively elucidate the pathways and mechanisms governing ATP efflux from eukaryotic cells. Here, we present results of a genomic analysis of ATP efflux from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring extracellular ATP levels in cultures of 4609 deletion mutants. This screen revealed key cellular processes that regulate extracellular ATP levels, including mitochondrial translation and vesicle sorting in the late endosome, indicating that ATP production and transport through vesicles are required for efflux. We also observed evidence for altered ATP efflux in strains deleted for genes involved in amino acid signaling, and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the retrograde signaling pathway potentiates amino acid signaling to promote mitochondrial respiration. This study advances our understanding of the mechanism of ATP secretion in eukaryotes and implicates TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and nutrient signaling pathways in the regulation of ATP efflux. These results will facilitate analysis of ATP efflux mechanisms in higher eukaryotes. PMID:26585826

  18. A mass spectrometry-based assay for improved quantitative measurements of efflux pump inhibition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam R; Ettefagh, Keivan A; Todd, Daniel; Cole, Patrick S; Egan, Joseph M; Foil, Daniel H; Graf, Tyler N; Schindler, Bryan D; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cech, Nadja B

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial efflux pumps are active transport proteins responsible for resistance to selected biocides and antibiotics. It has been shown that production of efflux pumps is up-regulated in a number of highly pathogenic bacteria, including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, the identification of new bacterial efflux pump inhibitors is a topic of great interest. Existing assays to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity rely on fluorescence by an efflux pump substrate. When employing these assays to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity of plant extracts and some purified compounds, we observed severe optical interference that gave rise to false negative results. To circumvent this problem, a new mass spectrometry-based method was developed for the quantitative measurement of bacterial efflux pump inhibition. The assay was employed to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity of a crude extract of the botanical Hydrastis Canadensis, and to compare the efflux pump inhibitory activity of several pure flavonoids. The flavonoid quercetin, which appeared to be completely inactive with a fluorescence-based method, showed an IC50 value of 75 μg/mL with the new method. The other flavonoids evaluated (apigenin, kaempferol, rhamnetin, luteolin, myricetin), were also active, with IC50 values ranging from 19 μg/mL to 75 μg/mL. The assay described herein could be useful in future screening efforts to identify efflux pump inhibitors, particularly in situations where optical interference precludes the application of methods that rely on fluorescence. PMID:25961825

  19. A Mass Spectrometry-Based Assay for Improved Quantitative Measurements of Efflux Pump Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adam R.; Ettefagh, Keivan A.; Todd, Daniel; Cole, Patrick S.; Egan, Joseph M.; Foil, Daniel H.; Graf, Tyler N.; Schindler, Bryan D.; Kaatz, Glenn W.; Cech, Nadja B.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial efflux pumps are active transport proteins responsible for resistance to selected biocides and antibiotics. It has been shown that production of efflux pumps is up-regulated in a number of highly pathogenic bacteria, including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, the identification of new bacterial efflux pump inhibitors is a topic of great interest. Existing assays to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity rely on fluorescence by an efflux pump substrate. When employing these assays to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity of plant extracts and some purified compounds, we observed severe optical interference that gave rise to false negative results. To circumvent this problem, a new mass spectrometry-based method was developed for the quantitative measurement of bacterial efflux pump inhibition. The assay was employed to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity of a crude extract of the botanical Hydrastis Canadensis, and to compare the efflux pump inhibitory activity of several pure flavonoids. The flavonoid quercetin, which appeared to be completely inactive with a fluorescence-based method, showed an IC50 value of 75 μg/mL with the new method. The other flavonoids evaluated (apigenin, kaempferol, rhamnetin, luteolin, myricetin), were also active, with IC50 values ranging from 19 μg/mL to 75 μg/mL. The assay described herein could be useful in future screening efforts to identify efflux pump inhibitors, particularly in situations where optical interference precludes the application of methods that rely on fluorescence. PMID:25961825

  20. Molecular mechanisms of microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Zielasek, J; Hartung, H P

    1996-01-01

    Microglial cells are brain macrophages which serve specific functions in the defense of the central nervous system (CNS) against microorganisms, the removal of tissue debris in neurodegenerative diseases or during normal development, and in autoimmune inflammatory disorders of the brain. In cultured microglial cells, several soluble inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and bacterial products like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were demonstrated to induce a wide range of microglial activities, e.g. increased phagocytosis, chemotaxis, secretion of cytokines, activation of the respiratory burst and induction of nitric oxide synthase. Since heightened microglial activation was shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of experimental inflammatory CNS disorders, understanding the molecular mechanisms of microglial activation may lead to new treatment strategies for neurodegenerative disorders, multiple sclerosis and bacterial or viral infections of the nervous system. PMID:8876774

  1. Efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) as new antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Askoura, Momen; Mottawea, Walid; Abujamel, Turki; Taher, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen and one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. The difficulty in treatment of pseudomonas infections arises from being multidrug resistant (MDR) and exhibits resistance to most antimicrobial agents due to the expression of different mechanisms overcoming their effects. Of these resistance mechanisms, the active efflux pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that belong to the resistance nodulation division (RND) plays a very important role in extruding the antibiotics outside the bacterial cells providing a protective means against their antibacterial activity. Beside its role against the antimicrobial agents, these pumps can extrude biocides, detergents, and other metabolic inhibitors. It is clear that efflux pumps can be targets for new antimicrobial agents. Peptidomimetic compounds such as phenylalanine arginyl β-naphthylamide (PAβN) have been introduced as efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs); their mechanism of action is through competitive inhibition with antibiotics on the efflux pump resulting in increased intracellular concentration of antibiotic, hence, restoring its antibacterial activity. The advantage of EPIs is the difficulty to develop bacterial resistance against them, but the disadvantage is their toxic property hindering their clinical application. The structure activity relationship of these compounds showed other derivatives from PAβN that are higher in their activity with higher solubility in biological fluids and decreased toxicity level. This raises further questions on how can we compact Pseudomonas infections. Of particular importance, the recent resurgence in the use of older antibiotics such as polymyxins and probably applying stricter control measures in order to prevent their spread in clinical sittings. PMID:21594004

  2. Potent and selective mediators of cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K; Johansson, Jan

    2015-03-24

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABAC1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  3. Multidrug Efflux Pumps Attenuate the Effect of MGMT Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tomaszowski, Karl-Heinz; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Kaina, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    Various mechanisms of drug resistance attenuate the effectiveness of cancer therapeutics, including drug transport and DNA repair. The DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a key factor determining the resistance against alkylating anticancer drugs inducing the genotoxic DNA lesions O(6)-methylguanine and O(6)-chloroethylguanine, and MGMT inactivation or depletion renders cells more susceptible to treatment with methylating and chloroethylating agents. Highly specific and efficient inhibitors of the repair protein MGMT were designed, including O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)BG) and O(6)-(4-bromothenyl)guanine (O(6)BTG) that are nontoxic on their own. Unfortunately, these inhibitors do not select between MGMT in normal and cancer cells, causing nontarget effects in the healthy tissue. Therefore, a targeting strategy for MGMT inhibitors is required. Here, we used O(6)BG and O(6)BTG conjugated to β-d-glucose (O(6)BG-Glu and O(6)BTG-Glu, respectively) in order to selectively inhibit MGMT in tumors, harnessing their high demand for glucose. Both glucose conjugates efficiently inhibited MGMT in several cancer cell lines, but with different extents of sensitization to DNA alkylating agents, with lomustine being more effective than temozolomide. We further show that the glucose conjugates are subject to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated efflux, involving P-glycoprotein, MRP1, and BCRP, which impacts the efficiency of MGMT inhibition. Surprisingly, also O(6)BG and O(6)BTG were subject to an active transport out of the cell. We also show that pharmacological inhibition of efflux transporters increases the induction of cell death following treatment with these MGMT inhibitors and temozolomide. We conclude that strategies of attenuating the efflux by ABC transporters are required for achieving successful MGMT targeting. PMID:26379107

  4. Current Advances in Developing Inhibitors of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Hannah Y; Jamshidi, Shirin; Sutton, J Mark; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance represents a significant challenge to future healthcare provision. An acronym ESKAPEE has been derived from the names of the organisms recognised as the major threats although there are a number of other organisms, notably Neisseria gonorrhoeae, that have become equally challenging to treat in the clinic. These pathogens are characterised by the ability to rapidly develop and/or acquire resistance mechanisms in response to exposure to different antimicrobial agents. A key part of the armoury of these pathogens is a series of efflux pumps, which effectively exclude or reduce the intracellular concentration of a large number of antibiotics, making the pathogens significantly more resistant. These efflux pumps are the topic of considerable interest, both from the perspective of basic understanding of efflux pump function, and its role in drug resistance but also as targets for the development of novel adjunct therapies. The necessity to overcome antimicrobial resistance has encouraged investigations into the characterisation of resistance-modifying efflux pump inhibitors to block the mechanisms of drug extrusion, thereby restoring antibacterial susceptibility and returning existing antibiotics into the clinic. A greater understanding of drug recognition and transport by multidrug efflux pumps is needed to develop clinically useful inhibitors, given the breadth of molecules that can be effluxed by these systems. This review discusses different bacterial EPIs originating from both natural source and chemical synthesis and examines the challenges to designing successful EPIs that can be useful against multidrug resistant bacteria. PMID:26947776

  5. Helicobacter pylori uptake and efflux: basis for intrinsic susceptibility to antibiotics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bina, J E; Alm, R A; Uria-Nickelsen, M; Thomas, S R; Trust, T J; Hancock, R E

    2000-02-01

    We previously demonstrated (M. M. Exner, P. Doig, T. J. Trust, and R. E. W. Hancock, Infect. Immun. 63:1567-1572, 1995) that Helicobacter pylori has at least one nonspecific porin, HopE, which has a low abundance in the outer membrane but forms large channels. H. pylori is relatively susceptible to most antimicrobial agents but less susceptible to the polycationic antibiotic polymyxin B. We demonstrate here that H. pylori is able to take up higher basal levels of the hydrophobic fluorescent probe 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN) than Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli, consistent with its enhanced susceptibility to hydrophobic agents. Addition of polymyxin B led to a further increase in NPN uptake, indicative of a self-promoted uptake pathway, but it required a much higher amount of polymyxin B to yield a 50% increase in NPN uptake in H. pylori (6 to 8 microg/ml) than in P. aeruginosa or E. coli (0.3 to 0.5 microg/ml), suggesting that H. pylori has a less efficient self-promoted uptake pathway. Since intrinsic resistance involves the collaboration of restricted outer membrane permeability and secondary defense mechanisms, such as periplasmic beta-lactamase (which H. pylori lacks) or efflux, we examined the possible role of efflux in antibiotic susceptibility. We had previously identified in H. pylori 11637 the presence of portions of three genes with homology to potential restriction-nodulation-division (RND) efflux systems. It was confirmed that H. pylori contained only these three putative RND efflux systems, named here hefABC, hefDEF, and hefGHI, and that the hefGHI system was expressed only in vivo while the two other RND systems were expressed both in vivo and in vitro. In uptake studies, there was no observable energy-dependent tetracycline, chloramphenicol, or NPN efflux activity in H. pylori. Independent mutagenesis of the three putative RND efflux operons in the chromosome of H. pylori had no effect on the in vitro susceptibility of H. pylori to 19

  6. Identification and characterization of the emhABC efflux system for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Pseudomonas fluorescens cLP6a.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Elizabeth M; Dennis, Jonathan J; Gray, Murray R; Foght, Julia M

    2003-11-01

    The hydrocarbon-degrading environmental isolate Pseudomonas fluorescens LP6a possesses an active efflux mechanism for the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons phenanthrene, anthracene, and fluoranthene but not for naphthalene or toluene. PCR was used to detect efflux pump genes belonging to the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) superfamily in a plasmid-cured derivative, P. fluorescens cLP6a, which is unable to metabolize hydrocarbons. One RND pump, whose gene was identified in P. fluorescens cLP6a and was designated emhB, showed homology to the multidrug and solvent efflux pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. The emhB gene is located in a gene cluster with the emhA and emhC genes, which encode the membrane fusion protein and outer membrane protein components of the efflux system, respectively. Disruption of emhB by insertion of an antibiotic resistance cassette demonstrated that the corresponding gene product was responsible for the efflux of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The emhB gene disruption did not affect the resistance of P. fluorescens cLP6a to tetracycline, erythromycin, trimethoprim, or streptomycin, but it did decrease resistance to chloramphenicol and nalidixic acid, indicating that the EmhABC system also functions in the efflux of these compounds and has an unusual selectivity. Phenanthrene efflux was observed in P. aeruginosa, P. putida, and Burkholderia cepacia but not in Azotobacter vinelandii. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons represent a new class of nontoxic, highly hydrophobic compounds that are substrates of RND efflux systems, and the EmhABC system in P. fluorescens cLP6a has a narrow substrate range for these hydrocarbons and certain antibiotics. PMID:14563857

  7. Role of Efflux Pumps and Intracellular Thiols in Natural Antimony Resistant Isolates of Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Smita; Bhaskar; Goel, Sudhir K.; Nath Dwivedi, Upendra; Sundar, Shyam; Goyal, Neena

    2013-01-01

    Background In view of the recent upsurge in the phenomenon of therapeutic failure, drug resistance in Leishmania, developed under natural field conditions, has become a great concern yet little understood. Accordingly, the study of determinants of antimony resistance is urgently warranted. Efflux transporters have been reported in Leishmania but their role in clinical resistance is still unknown. The present study was designed to elucidate the mechanism of natural antimony resistance in L. donovani field isolates by analyzing the functionality of efflux pump(s) and expression profiles of known genes involved in transport and thiol based redox metabolism Methodology/Principal Findings We selected 7 clinical isolates (2 sensitive and 5 resistant) in addition to laboratory sensitive reference and SbIII resistant mutant strains for the present study. Functional characterization using flow cytometry identified efflux pumps that transported substrates of both P-gp and MRPA and were inhibited by the calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine. For the first time, verapamil sensitive efflux pumps for rhodamine 123 were observed in L. donovani that were differentially active in resistant isolates. RT-PCR confirmed the over-expression of MRPA in isolates with high resistance index only. Resistant isolates also exhibited consistent down regulation of AQP1 and elevated intracellular thiol levels which were accompanied with increased expression of ODC and TR genes. Interestingly, γ-GCS is not implicated in clinical resistance in L. donovani isolates. Conclusions/Significance Here we demonstrate for the first time, the role of P-gp type plasma membrane efflux transporter(s) in antimony resistance in L. donovani field isolates. Further, decreased levels of AQP1 and elevated thiols levels have emerged as biomarkers for clinical resistance. PMID:24069359

  8. Clinically Relevant Chromosomally Encoded Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2006-01-01

    Efflux pump genes and proteins are present in both antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Pumps may be specific for one substrate or may transport a range of structurally dissimilar compounds (including antibiotics of multiple classes); such pumps can be associated with multiple drug (antibiotic) resistance (MDR). However, the clinical relevance of efflux-mediated resistance is species, drug, and infection dependent. This review focuses on chromosomally encoded pumps in bacteria that cause infections in humans. Recent structural data provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of drug transport. MDR efflux pumps contribute to antibiotic resistance in bacteria in several ways: (i) inherent resistance to an entire class of agents, (ii) inherent resistance to specific agents, and (iii) resistance conferred by overexpression of an efflux pump. Enhanced efflux can be mediated by mutations in (i) the local repressor gene, (ii) a global regulatory gene, (iii) the promoter region of the transporter gene, or (iv) insertion elements upstream of the transporter gene. Some data suggest that resistance nodulation division systems are important in pathogenicity and/or survival in a particular ecological niche. Inhibitors of various efflux pump systems have been described; typically these are plant alkaloids, but as yet no product has been marketed. PMID:16614254

  9. Case report: A novel apolipoprotein A-I missense mutation apoA-I (Arg149Ser)Boston associated with decreased lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activation and cellular cholesterol efflux.

    PubMed

    Anthanont, Pimjai; Asztalos, Bela F; Polisecki, Eliana; Zachariah, Benoy; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel heterozygous apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) missense mutation (c.517C>A, p.Arg149Ser, designated as apoA-IBoston) in a 67-year-old woman and her 2 sons, who had mean serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, apoA-I, and apoA-I in very large α-1 HDL that were 10%, 35%, and 16% of normal, respectively (all P < .05). The percentage of HDL cholesterol in the esterified form was also significantly (P < .05) reduced to 52% of control values. Cholesteryl ester tranfer protein (CETP) activity was normal. The mean global, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter A1 and scavenger receptor B type I-mediated cellular cholesterol efflux capacity in apoB-depleted serum from affected family members were 41%, 37%, 47%, 54%, and 48% of control values, respectively (all P < .05). lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity in plasma was 71% of controls, whereas in the cell-based assay, it was 73% of control values (P < .05). The data indicate that this novel apoA-I missense is associated with markedly decreased levels of HDL cholesterol and very large α-1 HDL, as well as decreased serum cellular cholesterol efflux and LCAT activity, but not with premature coronary heart disease, similar to other apoA-I mutations that have been associated with decreased LCAT activity. PMID:26073399

  10. Cholesterol efflux is LXRα isoform-dependent in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The nuclear receptor liver X receptor (LXR) has two isoforms: LXRα and LXRβ. LXR activation promotes cholesterol efflux in macrophages, but the relative importance of each LXR isoform in mediating cholesterol efflux remains elusive. Methods We evaluated the ability of different doses of LXRs agonist T0901317 to affect cholesterol efflux in human macrophages and its relationship with mRNA and protein levels of several well-characterized proteins involved in cholesterol efflux, including ABCA1, ABCG1, SR-BI, LXRβ and LXRα, using quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and siRNA techniques. Results Here we show that LXRα rather than LXRβ sustains baseline cholesterol efflux in human blood-derived macrophages. Treatment of human macrophages with a non-isoform-specific LXR agonist T0901317 substantially increased HDL- and apoA-I-mediated cholesterol efflux, which was associated with increased mRNA and protein expression levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, SR-BI, LXRα and LXRβ. The siRNA- mediated silencing of LXRα, but not LXRβ significantly reduced the protein levels of ABCA1,ABCG1, and SR-BI as wellas HDL- and ApoA1-mediated cholesterol in human macrophages. Conclusions These findings imply that LXRα- rather than LXRβ- specific agonists may promote reverse cholesterol transport in humans. PMID:24996838

  11. HCO3-stimulated Cl efflux in the gulf toadfish acclimated to sea water.

    PubMed

    Kormanik, G A; Evans, D H

    1979-04-01

    Unidirectional efflux of Cl was examined in the Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta, in artificial seawater solutions with modified concentrations of Cl and HCO3. Removal of Cl HCO3 reduced Cl efflux. Addition of HCO3 at typical seawater concentrations stimulated Cl efflux, independent of changes in the transepithelial potential. This active, HCO3-stimulated Cl efflux is saturable, with a Km of 2.4 mM, typical of the concentration of HCO3 found in sea water, and independent of external pH. Active extrusion of Cl offsets the net diffusional and oral gain of Cl faced by O. beta in sea water. PMID:469477

  12. Staphylococcus aureus MnhF Mediates Cholate Efflux and Facilitates Survival under Human Colonic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sannasiddappa, Thippeswamy H.; Hood, Graham A.; Hanson, Kevan J.; Costabile, Adele; Gibson, Glenn R.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to the innate defenses of the intestine is crucial for the survival and carriage of Staphylococcus aureus, a common colonizer of the human gut. Bile salts produced by the liver and secreted into the intestines are one such group of molecules with potent antimicrobial activity. The mechanisms by which S. aureus is able to resist such defenses in order to colonize and survive in the human gut are unknown. Here we show that mnhF confers resistance to bile salts, which can be abrogated by efflux pump inhibitors. MnhF mediates the efflux of radiolabeled cholic acid both in S. aureus and when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, rendering them resistant. Deletion of mnhF attenuated the survival of S. aureus in an anaerobic three-stage continuous-culture model of the human colon (gut model), which represents different anatomical areas of the large intestine. PMID:25824834

  13. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells mitigates glucocorticoid-induced decreases in prostaglandin production and prostaglandin synthase activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chromiak, J. A.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1994-01-01

    The glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) induces a decline in protein synthesis and protein content in tissue cultured, avian skeletal muscle cells, and this atrophy is attenuated by repetitive mechanical stretch. Since the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor indomethacin mitigated this stretch attenuation of muscle atrophy, the effects of Dex and mechanical stretch on prostaglandin production and prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) activity were examined. In static cultures, 10(-8) M Dex reduced PGF2 alpha production 55-65% and PGE2 production 84-90% after 24-72 h of incubation. Repetitive 10% stretch-relaxations of non-Dex-treated cultures increased PGF2 alpha efflux 41% at 24 h and 276% at 72 h, and increased PGE2 production 51% at 24 h and 236% at 72 h. Mechanical stimulation of Dex-treated cultures increased PGF2 alpha production 162% after 24 h, returning PGF2 alpha efflux to the level of non-Dex-treated cultures. At 72 h, stretch increased PGF2 alpha efflux 65% in Dex-treated cultures. Mechanical stimulation of Dex-treated cultures also increased PGE2 production at 24 h, but not at 72 h. Dex reduced PGHS activity in the muscle cultures by 70% after 8-24 h of incubation, and mechanical stimulation of the Dex-treated cultures increased PGHS activity by 98% after 24 h. Repetitive mechanical stimulation attenuates the catabolic effects of Dex on cultured skeletal muscle cells in part by mitigating the Dex-induced declines in PGHS activity and prostaglandin production.

  14. Astaxanthin enhances ATP-binding cassette transporter A1/G1 expressions and cholesterol efflux from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Maki; Ayaori, Makoto; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Yakushiji, Emi; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Makoto; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Yogo, Makiko; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Kondo, Kazuo; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC) A1 and G1 are key molecules in cholesterol efflux from macrophages, which is an initial step of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), a major anti-atherogenic property of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Astaxanthin is one of the naturally occurring carotenoids responsible for the pink-red pigmentation in a variety of living organisms. Although astaxanthin is known to be a strong antioxidant, it remains unclear through what mechanism of action it affects cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. We therefore investigated the effects of astaxanthin on cholesterol efflux and ABCA1/G1 expressions in macrophages. Astaxanthin enhanced both apolipoprotein (apo) A-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from RAW264.7 cells. In supporting these enhanced cholesterol efflux mechanisms, astaxanthin promoted ABCA1/G1 expression in various macrophages. In contrast, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, liver X receptor (LXR) α and LXRβ levels remained unchanged by astaxanthin. An experiment using actinomycin D demonstrated that astaxanthin transcriptionally induced ABCA1/G1 expression, and oxysterol depletion caused by overexpression of cholesterol sulfotransferase further revealed that these inductions in ABCA1/G1 were independent of LXR-mediated pathways. Finally, we performed luciferase assays using human ABCA1/G1 promoter-reporter constructs to reveal that astaxanthin activated both promoters irrespective of the presence or absence of LXR-responsive elements, indicating LXR-independence of these activations. In conclusion, astaxanthin increased ABCA1/G1 expression, thereby enhancing apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages in an LXR-independent manner. In addition to the anti-oxidative properties, the potential cardioprotective properties of astaxanthin might therefore be associated with an enhanced anti-atherogenic function of HDL. PMID:22790567

  15. Nitrogen monoxide (NO)-mediated iron release from cells is linked to NO-induced glutathione efflux via multidrug resistance-associated protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Ralph N.; Hawkins, Clare; Ponka, Prem; Richardson, Des R.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen monoxide (NO) plays a role in the cytotoxic mechanisms of activated macrophages against tumor cells by inducing iron (Fe) release. We have shown that NO-mediated Fe efflux from cells required glutathione (GSH), and we have hypothesized that a GS–Fe–NO complex was released. Hence, we studied the role of the GSH-conjugate transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) in NO-mediated Fe efflux. MCF7-VP cells overexpressing MRP1 exhibited a 3- to 4-fold increase in NO-mediated 59Fe and GSH efflux compared with WT cells (MCF7-WT) over 4 h. Similar results were found for other MRP1-overexpressing cell types but not those expressing another drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein. NO-mediated 59Fe and GSH efflux were temperature- and energy-dependent and were significantly decreased by the GSH-depleting agent and MRP1 transport inhibitor l-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine. Other MRP1 inhibitors, MK571, probenecid, and difloxacin, significantly inhibited NO-mediated 59Fe release. EPR spectroscopy demonstrated the dinitrosyl-dithiol-Fe complex (DNIC) peak in NO-treated cells was increased by MRP1 inhibitors, indicating inhibited DNIC transport from cells. The extent of DNIC accumulation correlated with the ability of MRP1 inhibitors to prevent NO-mediated 59Fe efflux. MCF7-VP cells were more sensitive than MCF7-WT cells to growth inhibition by effects of NO, which was potentiated by l-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine. These data indicate the importance of GSH in NO-mediated inhibition of proliferation. Collectively, NO stimulates Fe and GSH efflux from cells via MRP1. Active transport of NO by MRP1 overcomes diffusion that is inefficient and nontargeted, which has broad ramifications for understanding NO biology. PMID:16679408

  16. Nanostructured lipid-carrageenan hybrid carriers (NLCCs) for controlled delivery of mitoxantrone hydrochloride to enhance anticancer activity bypassing the BCRP-mediated efflux.

    PubMed

    Ling, Guixia; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Jin; He, Zhonggui

    2016-08-01

    Novel nanostructured lipid-carrageenan hybrid carriers (NLCCs) were exploited for controlled delivery of water soluble chemotherapeutic agent mitoxantrone hydrochloride (MTO) with high loading capacity, sustained release property, and potential for improving oral bioavailability and antitumor efficacy. By introducing the negative polymer of carrageenan, MTO was highly incorporated into NLCCs with encapsulation efficiency of 95.8% by electrostatic interaction. In vivo pharmacokinetics of MTO solution (MTO-Sol) and MTO-NLCCs in rats demonstrated that the apparent bioavailability of MTO-NLCCs was increased to approximate 3.5-fold compared to that of MTO-Sol. The cytotoxicity investigations by MTT method indicated that NLCCs could significantly enhanced the antitumor efficacy against resistant MCF-7/MX cells. The relative cellular association of MTO-NLCCs was 9.2-fold higher than that of MTO-Sol in breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) over-expressing MCF-7/MX cells, implying that BCRP-mediated drug efflux was diminished by the introduction of NLCCs. The endocytosis inhibition study implied that the NLCCs entered the MCF-7/MX cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis process, which can bypass the efflux of MTO mediated by BCRP. The new developed NLCCs provide an effective strategy for oral delivery of water-soluble MTO with improved encapsulation efficiency, oral bioavailability, and cytotoxicity against resistant breast cancer cells. PMID:26754913

  17. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sofia Santos; Viveiros, Miguel; Amaral, Leonard; Couto, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of infections caused by multi- or pan-resistant bacteria in the hospital or in the community settings is an increasing health concern. Albeit there is no single resistance mechanism behind multiresistance, multidrug efflux pumps, proteins that cells use to detoxify from noxious compounds, seem to play a key role in the emergence of these multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. During the last decades, experimental data has established their contribution to low level resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria and their potential role in the appearance of MDR phenotypes, by the extrusion of multiple, unrelated compounds. Recent studies suggest that efflux pumps may be used by the cell as a first-line defense mechanism, avoiding the drug to reach lethal concentrations, until a stable, more efficient alteration occurs, that allows survival in the presence of that agent. In this paper we review the current knowledge on MDR efflux pumps and their intricate regulatory network in Staphylococcus aureus, a major pathogen, responsible from mild to life-threatening infections. Particular emphasis will be given to the potential role that S. aureus MDR efflux pumps, either chromosomal or plasmid-encoded, have on resistance towards different antimicrobial agents and on the selection of drug - resistant strains. We will also discuss the many questions that still remain on the role of each specific efflux pump and the need to establish appropriate methodological approaches to address all these questions. PMID:23569469

  18. Correlation between rhodamine 123 accumulation and azole sensitivity in Candida species: possible role for drug efflux in drug resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, F S; Parkinson, T; Hitchcock, C A; Gow, N A

    1996-01-01

    A wide variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells exhibit a multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, indicating that resistance to potentially toxic compounds is mediated by their active efflux from the cell. We have sought to determine whether resistance to azoles in some strains of Candida species may be due in part to active drug efflux. Rhodamine 123 (Rh123) is a fluorescent compound that is transported by a wide variety of MDR cell types. We have shown that certain azole-resistant strains of Candida albicans, C. glabrata, and C. krusei accumulate less Rh123 than azole-susceptible ones. In C. albicans, Rh123 accumulation was growth phase and temperature dependent and was increased by proton uncouplers and by reserpine, an MDR modulator. This is consistent with an energy-dependent efflux mechanism for Rh123, mediated by an MDR transporter. In C. glabrata, but not in C. albicans, there was competition between Rh123 and fluconazole for efflux. Thus, in C. glabrata, Rh123 and fluconazole appear to be transported via a common MDR-like transporter, whereas in C. albicans, the Rh123 transporter does not appear to transport azoles. PMID:8834890

  19. Low-Level Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to Thrombin-Induced Platelet Microbicidal Protein 1 In Vitro Associated with qacA Gene Carriage Is Independent of Multidrug Efflux Pump Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, A. S.; Kupferwasser, L. I.; Brown, M. H.; Skurray, R. A.; Grkovic, S.; Jones, T.; Mukhopadhay, K.; Yeaman, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    Thrombin-induced platelet microbial protein 1 (tPMP-1), a cationic antimicrobial polypeptide released from thrombin-stimulated rabbit platelets, targets the Staphylococcus aureus cytoplasmic membrane to initiate its microbicidal effects. In vitro resistance to tPMP-1 correlates with survival advantages in vivo. In S. aureus, the plasmid-carried qacA gene encodes a multidrug transporter, conferring resistance to organic cations (e.g., ethidium [Et]) via proton motive force (PMF)-energized export. We previously showed that qacA also confers a tPMP-1-resistant (tPMP-1r) phenotype in vitro. The current study evaluated whether (i) transporters encoded by the qacB and qacC multidrug resistance genes also confer tPMP-1r and (ii) tPMP-1r mediated by qacA is dependent on efflux pump activity. In contrast to tPMP-1r qacA-bearing strains, the parental strain and its isogenic qacB- and qacC-containing strains were tPMP-1 susceptible (tPMP-1s). Efflux pump inhibition by cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone abrogated Etr, but not tPMP-1r, in the qacA-bearing strain. In synergy assays, exposure of the qacA-bearing strain to tPMP-1 did not affect the susceptibility of Et (ruling out Et-tPMP-1 cotransport). The following cytoplasmic membrane parameters did not differ significantly between the qacA-bearing and parental strains: contents of the major phospholipids; asymmetric distributions of the positively charged species, lysyl-phosphotidylglycerol; fatty acid composition; and relative surface charge. Of note, the qacA-bearing strain exhibited greater membrane fluidity than that of the parental, qacB-, or qacC-bearing strain. In conclusion, among these families of efflux pumps, only the multidrug transporter encoded by qacA conferred a tPMP-1r phenotype. These data suggest that qacA-encoded tPMP-1r results from the impact of a specific transporter upon membrane structure or function unrelated to PMF-dependent peptide efflux. PMID:16801425

  20. Premature Termination of MexR Leads to Overexpression of MexAB-OprM Efflux Pump in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The present study was undertaken to investigate the mutations that are present in mexR gene of multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected from a tertiary referral hospital of north east India. Methods 76 MDR clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained from the patients who were admitted to or attended the clinics of Silchar medical college and hospital. They were screened phenotypically for the presence of efflux pump activity by an inhibitor based method. Acquired resistance mechanisms were detected by multiplex PCR. Real time PCR was performed to study the expression of mexA gene of MexAB-OprM efflux pump in isolates with increase efflux pump activity. mexR gene of the isolates with overexpressed MexAB-OprM efflux pump was amplified, sequenced and analysed. Results Out of 76 MDR isolates, 24 were found to exhibit efflux pump activity phenotypically against ciprofloxacin and meropenem. Acquired resistance mechanisms were absent in 11 of them and among those isolates, 8 of them overexpressed MexAB-OprM. All the 8 isolates possessed mutation in mexR gene. 11 transversions, 4 transitions, 2 deletion mutations and 2 insertion mutations were found in all the isolates. However, the most significant observation was the formation of a termination codon at 35th position which resulted in the termination of the polypeptide and leads to overexpression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. Conclusions This study highlighted emergence of a novel mutation which is probably associated with multi drug resistance. Therefore, further investigations and actions are needed to prevent or at least hold back the expansion and emergence of newer mutations in nosocomial pathogens which may compromise future treatment options. PMID:26866484

  1. Cysteines Introduced into Extracellular Loops 1 and 4 of Human P-Glycoprotein That Are Close Only in the Open Conformation Spontaneously Form a Disulfide Bond That Inhibits Drug Efflux and ATPase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Tip W.; Clarke, David M.

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette drug pump that protects us from toxic compounds and confers multidrug resistance. The protein is organized into two halves. The halves contain a transmembrane domain (TMD) with six transmembrane segments and a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). The drug- and ATP-binding sites reside at the TMD1/TMD2 and NBD1/NBD2 interfaces, respectively. ATP-dependent drug efflux involves changes between the open inward-facing (NBDs apart, extracellular loops (ECLs) close together) and the closed outward-facing (NBDs close together, ECLs apart) conformations. It is controversial, however, whether the open conformation only exists transiently in intact cells because of the presence of high levels of ATP. To test for the presence of an open conformation in intact cells, reporter cysteines were placed in extracellular loops 1 (A80C, N half) and 4 (R741C, C half). The rationale was that cysteines A80C/R741C would only come close enough to form a disulfide bond in an open conformation (6.9 Å apart) because they are separated widely (30.4 Å apart) in the closed conformation. It was observed that the mutant A80C/R741C cross-linked spontaneously (>90%) when expressed in cells. In contrast to previous reports showing that trapping P-gp in a closed conformation highly activated ATPase activity, here we show that A80C/R741C cross-linking inhibited ATPase activity and drug efflux. Both activities were restored when the cross-linked mutant was treated with a thiol-reducing agent. The results show that an open conformation can be readily detected in cells and that cross-linking of cysteines placed in ECLs 1 and 4 inhibits activity. PMID:25053414

  2. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M; Brown, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL. PMID:25130461

  3. Leoligin, the Major Lignan from Edelweiss (Leontopodium nivale subsp. alpinum), Promotes Cholesterol Efflux from THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limei; Ladurner, Angela; Latkolik, Simone; Schwaiger, Stefan; Linder, Thomas; Hošek, Jan; Palme, Veronika; Schilcher, Nicole; Polanský, Ondřej; Heiss, Elke H; Stangl, Herbert; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M; Atanasov, Atanas G

    2016-06-24

    Leoligin is a natural lignan found in Edelweiss (Leontopodium nivale ssp. alpinum). The aim of this study was to examine its influence on cholesterol efflux and to address the underlying mechanism of action. Leoligin increases apo A1- as well as 1% human plasma-mediated cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages without affecting cell viability as determined by resazurin conversion. Western blot analysis revealed that the protein levels of the cholesterol efflux transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 were upregulated, whereas the SR-B1 protein level remained unchanged upon treatment with leoligin (10 μM, 24 h). Quantitative reverse transcription PCR further uncovered that leoligin also increased ABCA1 and ABCG1 mRNA levels without affecting the half-life of the two mRNAs in the presence of actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor. Proteome analysis revealed the modulation of protein expression fingerprint in the presence of leoligin. Taken together, these results suggest that leoligin induces cholesterol efflux in THP-1-derived macrophages by upregulating ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. This novel activity suggests leoligin as a promising candidate for further studies addressing a possible preventive or therapeutic application in the context of atherosclerosis. PMID:27220065

  4. Leoligin, the Major Lignan from Edelweiss (Leontopodium nivale subsp. alpinum), Promotes Cholesterol Efflux from THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Leoligin is a natural lignan found in Edelweiss (Leontopodium nivale ssp. alpinum). The aim of this study was to examine its influence on cholesterol efflux and to address the underlying mechanism of action. Leoligin increases apo A1- as well as 1% human plasma-mediated cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages without affecting cell viability as determined by resazurin conversion. Western blot analysis revealed that the protein levels of the cholesterol efflux transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 were upregulated, whereas the SR-B1 protein level remained unchanged upon treatment with leoligin (10 μM, 24 h). Quantitative reverse transcription PCR further uncovered that leoligin also increased ABCA1 and ABCG1 mRNA levels without affecting the half-life of the two mRNAs in the presence of actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor. Proteome analysis revealed the modulation of protein expression fingerprint in the presence of leoligin. Taken together, these results suggest that leoligin induces cholesterol efflux in THP-1-derived macrophages by upregulating ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. This novel activity suggests leoligin as a promising candidate for further studies addressing a possible preventive or therapeutic application in the context of atherosclerosis. PMID:27220065

  5. Perspective on plasma membrane cholesterol efflux and spermatozoal function.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Dhastagir Sultan; Ali, Elshaari Farag

    2010-05-01

    The process of sperm maturation, capacitation, and fertilization occur in different molecular milieu provided by epididymis and female reproductive tract including oviduct. The different tissue environment with different oxygen tension and temperature may still influence the process of sperm maturation and capacitation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is reported to be an initial switch that may activate the molecular process of capacitation. Therefore, the generation of reactive oxygen species and its possible physiological role depends upon a balance between its formation and degradation in an open environment provided by female reproductive tract. The sensitivity of the spermatozoa to the action of ROS may be due to its exposure for the first time to an oxygen rich external milieu compared to its internal milieu in the male reproductive tract. Reduced temperature in testicular environment coupled with reduced oxygen tension may be the right molecular environment for the process of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis. The morphologically mature spermatozoa then may attain its motility in an environment provided by the caput epididymis wherein, the dyenin motor can become active. This ability to move forward will make the spermatozoa physiologically fit to undertake its sojourn in the competitive race of fertilization in a new oxygen rich female reproductive tract. The first encounter may be oxygen trigger or preconditioning of the spermatozoa with reactive oxygen species that may alter the spermatozoal function. Infertility is still one of the major global health problems that need medical attention. Apart from the development of artificial methods of reproduction and development of newer techniques in the field of andrology focuses attention on spermatozoal structure and metabolism. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in fertilization in general and that of sperm capacitation in particular may help lead to new and better techniques for

  6. From phenothiazine to 3-phenyl-1,4-benzothiazine derivatives as inhibitors of the Staphylococcus aureus NorA multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefano; Kaatz, Glenn W; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Brandini, David; Fravolini, Arnaldo

    2008-07-24

    Overexpression of efflux pumps is an important mechanism by which bacteria evade effects of substrate antimicrobial agents and inhibition of such pumps is a promising strategy to circumvent this resistance mechanism. NorA is a Staphylococcus aureus multidrug efflux pump, the activity of which confers decreased susceptibility to many structurally unrelated agents, including fluoroquinolones, resulting in a multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotype. In this work, a series of 1,4-benzothiazine derivatives were designed and synthesized as a minimized structural template of phenothiazine MDR efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) in an effort to identify more potent S. aureus NorA EPIs. Almost all derivatives evaluated showed good activity in combination with ciprofloxacin against S. aureus ATCC 25923; some were capable of completely restoring ciprofloxacin activity in a norA-overexpressing strain (SA-K2378). Compounds 6k and 7j displayed good activity against SA-1199B, a strain that also overexpresses norA, in an ethidium bromide (EtBr) efflux inhibition assay. PMID:18578473

  7. The role of efflux pumps in macrolide resistance in Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Liliana; Sampaio, Daniela; Couto, Isabel; Machado, Diana; Kern, Winfried V; Amaral, Leonard; Viveiros, Miguel

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacteriumavium complex (MAC) is clinically important since it can cause severe infections in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients and other immunocompromised individuals. Use of the macrolides clarithromycin and azithromycin has improved the outcome of MAC infections, but therapeutic failure is still a major problem. In this work, we studied efflux pump activity in MAC clinical strains and evaluated the contribution of active efflux to macrolide resistance. Eighteen clinical strains isolated from AIDS patients were evaluated for macrolide resistance in the presence and absence of the efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) thioridazine, chlorpromazine and verapamil. The efflux activity of these strains was then assessed by a semi-automated fluorometric method that detects extrusion of ethidium bromide (EtBr), a known efflux pump substrate. Resistance to clarithromycin was significantly reduced in the presence of thioridazine, chlorpromazine and verapamil. The same EPIs were effective in decreasing the efflux of EtBr from MAC cells. Moreover, increased retention of [(14)C]-erythromycin in the presence of these EPIs further demonstrated that active efflux contributes to MAC resistance to macrolides. This study demonstrates that efflux pumps play an important role in MAC resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19740629

  8. Focus on the Outer Membrane Factor OprM, the Forgotten Player from Efflux Pumps Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Phan, Gilles; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have been used extensively during several decades and we are now facing the emergence of multidrug resistant strains. It has become a major public concern, urging the need to discover new strategies to combat them. Among the different ways used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, the active efflux is one of the main mechanisms. In Gram-negative bacteria the efflux pumps are comprised of three components forming a long edifice crossing the complete cell wall from the inside to the outside of the cell. Blocking these pumps would permit the restoration of the effectiveness of the current antibiotherapy which is why it is important to increase our knowledge on the different proteins involved in these complexes. A tremendous number of experiments have been performed on the inner membrane protein AcrB from Escherichia coli and, to a lesser extent, the protein partners forming the AcrAB-TolC pump, but less information is available concerning the efflux pumps from other virulent Gram-negative bacteria. The present review will focus on the OprM outer membrane protein from the MexAB-OprM pump of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, highlighting similarities and differences compare to the archetypal AcrAB-TolC in terms of structure, function, and assembly properties. PMID:27025640

  9. Novel epitopes identified from efflux pumps of Mycobacterium tuberculosis could induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Ming-xia; Chen, Fei; Zhao, Yuan-yuan; Wu, Ya-hong; Li, Guo-dong; Qi, Yuan-ming

    2015-01-01

    Overcoming drug-resistance is one of the major challenges to control tuberculosis (TB). The up-regulation of efflux pumps is one common mechanism that leads to drug-resistance. Therefore, immunotherapy targeting these efflux pump antigens could be promising strategy to be combined with current chemotherapy. Considering that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) induced by antigenic peptides (epitopes) could elicit HLA-restricted anti-TB immune response, efflux pumps from classical ABC family (Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mtb) were chosen as target antigens to identify CTL epitopes. HLA-A2 restricted candidate peptides from Rv2937, Rv2686c and Rv2687c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were predicted, synthesized and tested. Five peptides could induce IFN-γ release and cytotoxic activity in PBMCs from HLA-A2+ PPD+ donors. Results from HLA-A2/Kb transgenic mice immunization assay suggested that four peptides Rv2937-p168, Rv2937-p266, Rv2686c-p151, and Rv2686c-p181 could induce significant CTL response in vivo. These results suggested that these novel epitopes could be used as immunotherapy candidates to TB drug-resistance. PMID:26417538

  10. Focus on the Outer Membrane Factor OprM, the Forgotten Player from Efflux Pumps Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Gilles; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have been used extensively during several decades and we are now facing the emergence of multidrug resistant strains. It has become a major public concern, urging the need to discover new strategies to combat them. Among the different ways used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, the active efflux is one of the main mechanisms. In Gram-negative bacteria the efflux pumps are comprised of three components forming a long edifice crossing the complete cell wall from the inside to the outside of the cell. Blocking these pumps would permit the restoration of the effectiveness of the current antibiotherapy which is why it is important to increase our knowledge on the different proteins involved in these complexes. A tremendous number of experiments have been performed on the inner membrane protein AcrB from Escherichia coli and, to a lesser extent, the protein partners forming the AcrAB-TolC pump, but less information is available concerning the efflux pumps from other virulent Gram-negative bacteria. The present review will focus on the OprM outer membrane protein from the MexAB-OprM pump of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, highlighting similarities and differences compare to the archetypal AcrAB-TolC in terms of structure, function, and assembly properties. PMID:27025640

  11. Multidrug Efflux Pumps from Enterobacteriaceae, Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus Bacterial Food Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jody L.; He, Gui-Xin; Kakarla, Prathusha; KC, Ranjana; Kumar, Sanath; Lakra, Wazir Singh; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Tran, Thuy; Varela, Manuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses caused by bacterial microorganisms are common worldwide and constitute a serious public health concern. In particular, microorganisms belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families of Gram-negative bacteria, and to the Staphylococcus genus of Gram-positive bacteria are important causative agents of food poisoning and infection in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Recently, variants of these bacteria have developed resistance to medically important chemotherapeutic agents. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter spp., and Staphylococcus aureus are becoming increasingly recalcitrant to clinical treatment in human patients. Of the various bacterial resistance mechanisms against antimicrobial agents, multidrug efflux pumps comprise a major cause of multiple drug resistance. These multidrug efflux pump systems reside in the biological membrane of the bacteria and actively extrude antimicrobial agents from bacterial cells. This review article summarizes the evolution of these bacterial drug efflux pump systems from a molecular biological standpoint and provides a framework for future work aimed at reducing the conditions that foster dissemination of these multidrug resistant causative agents through human populations. PMID:25635914

  12. Alterations in the intestine of Patagonian silverside (Odontesthes hatcheri) exposed to microcystin-LR: Changes in the glycosylation pattern of the intestinal wall and inhibition of multidrug resistance proteins efflux activity.

    PubMed

    Bieczynski, Flavia; Torres, Walter D C; Painefilu, Julio C; Castro, Juan M; Bianchi, Virginia A; Frontera, Jimena L; Paz, Dante A; González, Carolina; Martín, Alejandro; Villanueva, Silvina S M; Luquet, Carlos M

    2016-09-01

    )), calcein efflux was inhibited by MCLR (2.3μmolL(-1)) and MK571 (3μmolL(-1)) by 38 and 27%, respectively (p<0.05). Finally, middle intestine segments were incubated with different concentrations of MCLR applied alone or together with 3μM MK571. After one hour, protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) activity, the main target of MCLR, was measured. 2.5μM MCLR did not produce any significant effect, while the same amount plus MK571 inhibited PP1 activity (p<0.05). This effect was similar to that of 5μM MCLR. Our results suggest that in O. hatcheri enterocytes MCLR is conjugated with GSH via GST and then exported to the intestinal lumen through Abcc-like transporters. This mechanism would protect the cell from MCLR toxicity, limiting toxin transport into the blood, which is probably mediated by basolateral Abccs. From an ecotoxicological point of view, elimination of MCLR through this mechanism would reduce the amount of toxin available for trophic transference. PMID:27474942

  13. Salvianolic acid B accelerated ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux by targeting PPAR-γ and LXRα

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Jianmei; Li, Bo; Jing, Qingping; Guan, Qingbo

    2015-07-03

    Objectives: Cholesterol efflux has been thought to be the main and basic mechanism by which free cholesterol is transferred from extra hepatic cells to the liver or intestine for excretion. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) has been widely used for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerotic diseases. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of Sal B on the cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages. Methods: After PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells were exposed to 50 mg/L of oxLDL and [{sup 3}H] cholesterol (1.0 μCi/mL) for another 24 h, the effect of Sal B on cholesterol efflux was evaluated in the presence of apoA-1, HDL{sub 2} or HDL{sub 3}. The expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ), and liver X receptor-alpha (LXRα) was detected both at protein and mRNA levels in THP-1 cells after the stimulation of Sal B. Meanwhile, specific inhibition of PPAR-γ and LXRα were performed to investigate the mechanism. Results: The results showed that Sal B significantly accelerated apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, Sal B treatment also enhanced the expression of ABCA1 at both mRNA and protein levels. Then the data demonstrated that Sal B increased the expression of PPAR-γ and LXRα. And the application of specific agonists and inhibitors of further confirmed that Sal exert the function through PPAR-γ and LXRα. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that Sal B promotes cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages through ABCA1/PPAR-γ/LXRα pathway. - Highlights: • Sal B promotes the expression of ABCA1. • Sal B promotes cholesterol efflux in macrophages. • Sal B promotes the expression of ABCA1 and cholesterol efflux through PPAR-γ/LXRα signaling pathway.

  14. Tripartite assembly of RND multidrug efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    Daury, Laetitia; Orange, François; Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Verchère, Alice; Monlezun, Laura; Gounou, Céline; Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle; Pos, Klaas M.; Lambert, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Tripartite multidrug efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria are composed of an inner membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and a periplasmic adaptor protein. They are assumed to form ducts inside the periplasm facilitating drug exit across the outer membrane. Here we present the reconstitution of native Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB–OprM and Escherichia coli AcrAB–TolC tripartite Resistance Nodulation and cell Division (RND) efflux systems in a lipid nanodisc system. Single-particle analysis by electron microscopy reveals the inner and outer membrane protein components linked together via the periplasmic adaptor protein. This intrinsic ability of the native components to self-assemble also leads to the formation of a stable interspecies AcrA–MexB–TolC complex suggesting a common mechanism of tripartite assembly. Projection structures of all three complexes emphasize the role of the periplasmic adaptor protein as part of the exit duct with no physical interaction between the inner and outer membrane components. PMID:26867482

  15. Tripartite assembly of RND multidrug efflux pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daury, Laetitia; Orange, François; Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Verchère, Alice; Monlezun, Laura; Gounou, Céline; Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle; Pos, Klaas M.; Lambert, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Tripartite multidrug efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria are composed of an inner membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and a periplasmic adaptor protein. They are assumed to form ducts inside the periplasm facilitating drug exit across the outer membrane. Here we present the reconstitution of native Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM and Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC tripartite Resistance Nodulation and cell Division (RND) efflux systems in a lipid nanodisc system. Single-particle analysis by electron microscopy reveals the inner and outer membrane protein components linked together via the periplasmic adaptor protein. This intrinsic ability of the native components to self-assemble also leads to the formation of a stable interspecies AcrA-MexB-TolC complex suggesting a common mechanism of tripartite assembly. Projection structures of all three complexes emphasize the role of the periplasmic adaptor protein as part of the exit duct with no physical interaction between the inner and outer membrane components.

  16. Kinetic analysis of receptor-controlled tracer efflux from sealed membrane fragments

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Julius; Neumann, Eberhard

    1978-01-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis is presented for activator-receptor-mediated efflux of tracer substances from vesicular membrane systems in general and from sealed fragments of excitable membranes in particular. Rate constants and amplitudes, as the primary measurable quantities of the efflux kinetics, are expressed in terms of fundamental properties of vesicular membrane systems containing receptors of chemical gating systems. The experimental determination and theoretical analysis of single contributions to a complex receptor-controlled efflux has been treated for the acetylcholine receptor system; also the effect of “pharmacological densensitization” on efflux is explicitly formulated. The dependence of the measured efflux parameters on the concentration of activators can be used to derive the kinetic and thermodynamic constants for receptor activation and inactivation processes; a general kinetic scheme and two limiting cases are analyzed. The efflux of 22Na from “excitable microsacs” of Torpedo marmorata is treated as an example, and the power of the rigorous analytical method is demonstrated. In particular, the analysis of efflux amplitudes from only a few data points offers an alternative to the longer lasting measurements for obtaining efflux curves when a safety factor is involved, as in the case of tracer ions like 22Na. PMID:16592553

  17. Ezetimibe Promotes Brush Border Membrane-to-Lumen Cholesterol Efflux in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Ono, Hiraku; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya; Murakoshi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Ezetimibe inhibits Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), an apical membrane cholesterol transporter of enterocytes, thereby reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption. This treatment also increases extrahepatic reverse cholesterol transport via an undefined mechanism. To explore this, we employed a trans-intestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) assay, which directly detects circulation-to-intestinal lumen 3H-cholesterol transit in a cannulated jejunal segment, and found an increase of TICE by 45%. To examine whether such increase in efflux occurs at the intestinal brush border membrane(BBM)-level, we performed luminal perfusion assays, similar to TICE but the jejunal wall was labelled with orally-given 3H-cholesterol, and determined elevated BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux by 3.5-fold with ezetimibe. Such increased efflux probably promotes circulation-to-lumen cholesterol transit eventually; thus increases TICE. Next, we wondered how inhibition of NPC1L1, an influx transporter, resulted in increased efflux. When we traced orally-given 3H-cholesterol in mice, we found that lumen-to-BBM 3H-cholesterol transit was rapid and less sensitive to ezetimibe treatment. Comparison of the efflux and fractional cholesterol absorption revealed an inverse correlation, indicating the efflux as an opposite-regulatory factor for cholesterol absorption efficiency and counteracting to the naturally-occurring rapid cholesterol influx to the BBM. These suggest that the ezetimibe-stimulated increased efflux is crucial in reducing cholesterol absorption. Ezetimibe-induced increase in cholesterol efflux was approximately 2.5-fold greater in mice having endogenous ATP-binding cassette G5/G8 heterodimer, the major sterol efflux transporter of enterocytes, than the knockout counterparts, suggesting that the heterodimer confers additional rapid BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux in response to NPC1L1 inhibition. The observed framework for intestinal cholesterol fluxes may provide ways to modulate the flux

  18. Ezetimibe Promotes Brush Border Membrane-to-Lumen Cholesterol Efflux in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Ono, Hiraku; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya; Murakoshi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Ezetimibe inhibits Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), an apical membrane cholesterol transporter of enterocytes, thereby reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption. This treatment also increases extrahepatic reverse cholesterol transport via an undefined mechanism. To explore this, we employed a trans-intestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) assay, which directly detects circulation-to-intestinal lumen 3H-cholesterol transit in a cannulated jejunal segment, and found an increase of TICE by 45%. To examine whether such increase in efflux occurs at the intestinal brush border membrane(BBM)-level, we performed luminal perfusion assays, similar to TICE but the jejunal wall was labelled with orally-given 3H-cholesterol, and determined elevated BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux by 3.5-fold with ezetimibe. Such increased efflux probably promotes circulation-to-lumen cholesterol transit eventually; thus increases TICE. Next, we wondered how inhibition of NPC1L1, an influx transporter, resulted in increased efflux. When we traced orally-given 3H-cholesterol in mice, we found that lumen-to-BBM 3H-cholesterol transit was rapid and less sensitive to ezetimibe treatment. Comparison of the efflux and fractional cholesterol absorption revealed an inverse correlation, indicating the efflux as an opposite-regulatory factor for cholesterol absorption efficiency and counteracting to the naturally-occurring rapid cholesterol influx to the BBM. These suggest that the ezetimibe-stimulated increased efflux is crucial in reducing cholesterol absorption. Ezetimibe-induced increase in cholesterol efflux was approximately 2.5-fold greater in mice having endogenous ATP-binding cassette G5/G8 heterodimer, the major sterol efflux transporter of enterocytes, than the knockout counterparts, suggesting that the heterodimer confers additional rapid BBM-to-lumen cholesterol efflux in response to NPC1L1 inhibition. The observed framework for intestinal cholesterol fluxes may provide ways to modulate the flux

  19. Energy Metabolism and Drug Efflux in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Black, Philippa A.; Warren, Robin M.; Louw, Gail E.; van Helden, Paul D.; Victor, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent drug susceptibility of microorganisms is determined by multiple factors, including growth state, the rate of drug diffusion into and out of the cell, and the intrinsic vulnerability of drug targets with regard to the corresponding antimicrobial agent. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), remains a significant source of global morbidity and mortality, further exacerbated by its ability to readily evolve drug resistance. It is well accepted that drug resistance in M. tuberculosis is driven by the acquisition of chromosomal mutations in genes encoding drug targets/promoter regions; however, a comprehensive description of the molecular mechanisms that fuel drug resistance in the clinical setting is currently lacking. In this context, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that active extrusion of drugs from the cell is critical for drug tolerance. M. tuberculosis encodes representatives of a diverse range of multidrug transporters, many of which are dependent on the proton motive force (PMF) or the availability of ATP. This suggests that energy metabolism and ATP production through the PMF, which is established by the electron transport chain (ETC), are critical in determining the drug susceptibility of M. tuberculosis. In this review, we detail advances in the study of the mycobacterial ETC and highlight drugs that target various components of the ETC. We provide an overview of some of the efflux pumps present in M. tuberculosis and their association, if any, with drug transport and concomitant effects on drug resistance. The implications of inhibiting drug extrusion, through the use of efflux pump inhibitors, are also discussed. PMID:24614376

  20. Cholesterol efflux monitoring in macrophage form cells by using fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young Sik; Lee, Sang Hak; Park, Byoung Hee; Kim, Soo Hyeok; Hwang, Won Sang; Kim, Dug Young

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherosclerotic plaque destabilization and rupture, since they accumulate large amounts of lipid through the uptake of modified lipoproteins which results in foam cell formation. Cholesterol efflux is the process of removing cholesterol from macrophages in the subintima of the vessel wall, and efflux mechanism in a cell is one of the critical issues for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. High density lipoproteins (HDL) stimulate cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells in the arterial wall. Radioisotope-labeled cholesterol analysis method is well known conventional method for observing cholesterol efflux. The major drawback of this method is its long and complicated process. Fluorescence intensity imaging schemes are replacing the radioisotope-labeled method in recent years for cholesterol efflux monitoring. Various spectroscopic methods are also adapted for cholesterol efflux imaging. Here we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging method for more quantitative observation of cholesterol efflux process in macrophages, which enables us to observe cholesterol level changes with various conditions. We used J774 macrophage cell and 25-NBD-cholesterol which is a famous cholesterol specific dye. Our lifetime imaging results clearly show cholesterol efflux rate very effectively. We believe that fluorescence lifetime analysis is new and very powerful for cholesterol imaging or monitoring.

  1. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  2. Tracking metal ions through a Cu/Ag efflux pump assigns the functional roles of the periplasmic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mealman, Tiffany D.; McEvoy, Megan M.; Blackburn, Ninian J.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an essential nutrient for all aerobic organisms but is toxic in excess. At the host–pathogen interface, macrophages respond to bacterial infection by copper-dependent killing mechanisms, whereas the invading bacteria are thought to counter with an up-regulation of copper transporters and efflux pumps. The tripartite efflux pump CusCBA and its metallochaperone CusF are vital to the detoxification of copper and silver ions in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. However, the mechanism of efflux by this complex, which requires the activation of the inner membrane pump CusA, is poorly understood. Here, we use selenomethionine (SeM) active site labels in a series of biological X-ray absorption studies at the selenium, copper, and silver edges to establish a “switch” role for the membrane fusion protein CusB. We determine that metal-bound CusB is required for activation of cuprous ion transfer from CusF directly to a site in the CusA antiporter, showing for the first time (to our knowledge) the in vitro activation of the Cus efflux pump. This metal-binding site of CusA is unlike that observed in the crystal structures of the CusA protein and is composed of one oxygen and two sulfur ligands. Our results suggest that metal transfer occurs between CusF and apo-CusB, and that, when metal-loaded, CusB plays a role in the regulation of metal ion transfer from CusF to CusA in the periplasm. PMID:25313055

  3. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Varela, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS. PMID:25750934

  4. Evolution from a natural flavones nucleus to obtain 2-(4-Propoxyphenyl)quinoline derivatives as potent inhibitors of the S. aureus NorA efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefano; Gosetto, Francesca; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Tabarrini, Oriana; Kaatz, Glenn W; Patel, Diixa; Cecchetti, Violetta

    2011-08-25

    Overexpression of efflux pumps is an important mechanism by which bacteria evade the effects of substrate antimicrobial agents. Inhibition of such pumps is a promising strategy to circumvent this resistance mechanism. NorA is a Staphylococcus aureus efflux pump that confers reduced susceptibility to many structurally unrelated agents, including fluoroquinolones, resulting in a multidrug resistant phenotype. In this work, a series of 2-phenyl-4(1H)-quinolone and 2-phenyl-4-hydroxyquinoline derivatives, obtained by modifying the flavone nucleus of known efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs), were synthesized in an effort to identify more potent S. aureus NorA EPIs. The 2-phenyl-4-hydroxyquinoline derivatives 28f and 29f display potent EPI activity against SA-1199B, a strain that overexpresses norA, in an ethidium bromide efflux inhibition assay. The same compounds, in combination with ciprofloxacin, were able to completely restore its antibacterial activity against both S. aureus SA-K2378 and SA-1199B, norA-overexpressing strains. PMID:21751791

  5. Effects of Efflux Transporter Genes on Susceptibility of Escherichia coli to Tigecycline (GAR-936)

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Takahiro; Saito, Asami; Nishino, Kunihiko; Tamura, Norihisa; Yamaguchi, Akihito

    2004-01-01

    The activity of tigecycline, 9-(t-butylglycylamido)-minocycline, against Escherichia coli KAM3 (acrB) strains harboring plasmids encoding various tetracycline-specific efflux transporter genes, tet(B), tet(C), and tet(K), and multidrug transporter genes, acrAB, acrEF, and bcr, was examined. Tigecycline showed potent activity against all three Tet-expressing, tetracycline-resistant strains, with the MICs for the strains being equal to that for the host strain. In the Tet(B)-containing vesicle study, tigecycline did not significantly inhibit tetracycline efflux-coupled proton translocation and at 10 μM did not cause proton translocation. This suggests that tigecycline is not recognized by the Tet efflux transporter at a low concentration; therefore, it exhibits significant antibacterial activity. These properties can explain its potent activity against bacteria with a Tet efflux resistance determinant. Tigecycline induced the Tet(B) protein approximately four times more efficiently than tetracycline, as determined by Western blotting, indicating that it is at least recognized by a TetR repressor. The MICs for multidrug efflux proteins AcrAB and AcrEF were increased fourfold. Tigecycline inhibited active ethidium bromide efflux from intact E. coli cells overproducing AcrAB. Therefore, tigecycline is a possible substrate of AcrAB and its close homolog, AcrEF, which are resistance-modulation-division-type multicomponent efflux transporters. PMID:15155219

  6. Volume-dependent osmolyte efflux from neural tissues

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Stephen K.; Cheema, Tooba A.; Foster, Daniel J.; Heacock, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    The CNS is particularly vulnerable to reductions in plasma osmolarity, such as occurr during hyponatremia, the most commonly encountered electrolyte disorder in clinical practice. In response to a lowered plasma osmolarity, neural cells initially swell but then are able to restore their original volume through the release of osmolytes, both inorganic and organic, and the exit of osmotically obligated water. Given the importance of the maintenance of cell volume within the CNS, mechanisms underlying the release of osmolytes assume major significance. In this context, we review recent evidence obtained from our laboratory and others that indicates that the activation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors can markedly enhance the volume-dependent release of osmolytes from neural cells. Of particular significance is the observation that receptor activation significantly lowers the osmotic threshold at which osmolyte release occurs, thereby facilitating the ability of the cells to respond to small, more physiologically relevant, reductions in osmolarity. The mechanisms underlying G-protein-coupled receptor-mediated osmolyte release and the possibility that this efflux can result in both physiologically beneficial and potentially harmful pathophysiological consequences are discussed. PMID:18518929

  7. Direct Comparison of Manganese Detoxification/Efflux Proteins and Molecular Characterization of ZnT10 Protein as a Manganese Transporter.

    PubMed

    Nishito, Yukina; Tsuji, Natsuko; Fujishiro, Hitomi; Takeda, Taka-Aki; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Teranishi, Fumie; Okazaki, Fumiko; Matsunaga, Ayu; Tuschl, Karin; Rao, Rajini; Kono, Satoshi; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Narita, Hiroshi; Himeno, Seiichiro; Kambe, Taiho

    2016-07-01

    Manganese homeostasis involves coordinated regulation of specific proteins involved in manganese influx and efflux. However, the proteins that are involved in detoxification/efflux have not been completely resolved nor has the basis by which they select their metal substrate. Here, we compared six proteins, which were reported to be involved in manganese detoxification/efflux, by evaluating their ability to reduce manganese toxicity in chicken DT40 cells, finding that human ZnT10 (hZnT10) was the most significant contributor. A domain swapping and substitution analysis between hZnT10 and the zinc-specific transporter hZnT1 showed that residue Asn(43), which corresponds to the His residue constituting the potential intramembranous zinc coordination site in other ZnT transporters, is necessary to impart hZnT10's unique manganese mobilization activity; residues Cys(52) and Leu(242) in transmembrane domains II and V play a subtler role in controlling the metal specificity of hZnT10. Interestingly, the His → Asn reversion mutant in hZnT1 conferred manganese transport activity and loss of zinc transport activity. These results provide important information about manganese detoxification/efflux mechanisms in vertebrate cells as well as the molecular characterization of hZnT10 as a manganese transporter. PMID:27226609

  8. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  9. miR-206 controls LXRα expression and promotes LXR-mediated cholesterol efflux in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vinod, Manjula; Chennamsetty, Indumathi; Colin, Sophie; Belloy, Loic; De Paoli, Federica; Schaider, Helmut; Graier, Wolfgang F; Frank, Saša; Kratky, Dagmar; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Kostner, Gerhard M

    2014-06-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRα and LXRβ) are key transcription factors in cholesterol metabolism that regulate cholesterol biosynthesis/efflux and bile acid metabolism/excretion in the liver and numerous organs. In macrophages, LXR signaling modulates cholesterol handling and the inflammatory response, pathways involved in atherosclerosis. Since regulatory pathways of LXR transcription control are well understood, in the present study we aimed at identifying post-transcriptional regulators of LXR activity. MicroRNAs (miRs) are such post-transcriptional regulators of genes that in the canonical pathway mediate mRNA inactivation. In silico analysis identified miR-206 as a putative regulator of LXRα but not LXRβ. Indeed, as recently shown, we found that miR-206 represses LXRα activity and expression of LXRα and its target genes in hepatic cells. Interestingly, miR-206 regulates LXRα differently in macrophages. Stably overexpressing miR-206 in THP-1 human macrophages revealed an up-regulation and miR-206 knockdown led to a down-regulation of LXRα and its target genes. In support of these results, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from miR-206 KO mice also exhibited lower expression of LXRα target genes. The physiological relevance of these findings was proven by gain- and loss-of-function of miR-206; overexpression of miR-206 enhanced cholesterol efflux in human macrophages and knocking out miR-206 decreased cholesterol efflux from MPMs. Moreover, we show that miR-206 expression in macrophages is repressed by LXRα activation, while oxidized LDL and inflammatory stimuli profoundly induced miR-206 expression. We therefore propose a feed-back loop between miR-206 and LXRα that might be part of an LXR auto-regulatory mechanism to fine tune LXR activity. PMID:24603323

  10. miR-206 controls LXRα expression and promotes LXR-mediated cholesterol efflux in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, Manjula; Chennamsetty, Indumathi; Colin, Sophie; Belloy, Loic; De Paoli, Federica; Schaider, Helmut; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Frank, Saša; Kratky, Dagmar; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Kostner, Gerhard M.

    2014-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRα and LXRβ) are key transcription factors in cholesterol metabolism that regulate cholesterol biosynthesis/efflux and bile acid metabolism/excretion in the liver and numerous organs. In macrophages, LXR signaling modulates cholesterol handling and the inflammatory response, pathways involved in atherosclerosis. Since regulatory pathways of LXR transcription control are well understood, in the present study we aimed at identifying post-transcriptional regulators of LXR activity. MicroRNAs (miRs) are such post-transcriptional regulators of genes that in the canonical pathway mediate mRNA inactivation. In silico analysis identified miR-206 as a putative regulator of LXRα but not LXRβ. Indeed, as recently shown, we found that miR-206 represses LXRα activity and expression of LXRα and its target genes in hepatic cells. Interestingly, miR-206 regulates LXRα differently in macrophages. Stably overexpressing miR-206 in THP-1 human macrophages revealed an up-regulation and miR-206 knockdown led to a down-regulation of LXRα and its target genes. In support of these results, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from miR-206 KO mice also exhibited lower expression of LXRα target genes. The physiological relevance of these findings was proven by gain- and loss-of-function of miR-206; overexpression of miR-206 enhanced cholesterol efflux in human macrophages and knocking out miR-206 decreased cholesterol efflux from MPMs. Moreover, we show that miR-206 expression in macrophages is repressed by LXRα activation, while oxidized LDL and inflammatory stimuli profoundly induced miR-206 expression. We therefore propose a feed-back loop between miR-206 and LXRα that might be part of an LXR auto-regulatory mechanism to fine tune LXR activity. PMID:24603323

  11. Proton-dependent multidrug efflux systems.

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, I T; Brown, M H; Skurray, R A

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug efflux systems display the ability to transport a variety of structurally unrelated drugs from a cell and consequently are capable of conferring resistance to a diverse range of chemotherapeutic agents. This review examines multidrug efflux systems which use the proton motive force to drive drug transport. These proteins are likely to operate as multidrug/proton antiporters and have been identified in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Such proton-dependent multidrug efflux proteins belong to three distinct families or superfamilies of transport proteins: the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family, and the resistance/ nodulation/cell division (RND) family. The MFS consists of symporters, antiporters, and uniporters with either 12 or 14 transmembrane-spanning segments (TMS), and we show that within the MFS, three separate families include various multidrug/proton antiport proteins. The SMR family consists of proteins with four TMS, and the multidrug efflux proteins within this family are the smallest known secondary transporters. The RND family consists of 12-TMS transport proteins and includes a number of multidrug efflux proteins with particularly broad substrate specificity. In gram-negative bacteria, some multidrug efflux systems require two auxiliary constituents, which might enable drug transport to occur across both membranes of the cell envelope. These auxiliary constituents belong to the membrane fusion protein and the outer membrane factor families, respectively. This review examines in detail each of the characterized proton-linked multidrug efflux systems. The molecular basis of the broad substrate specificity of these transporters is discussed. The surprisingly wide distribution of multidrug efflux systems and their multiplicity in single organisms, with Escherichia coli, for instance, possessing at least nine proton-dependent multidrug efflux systems with overlapping specificities, is examined. We also

  12. Broad Specificity Efflux pumps and Their Role in Multidrug Resistance of Gram Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance mechanisms reported in Gram-negative bacteria are producing a worldwide health problem. The continuous dissemination of «multi-drug resistant» (MDR) bacteria drastically reduces the efficacy of our antibiotic “arsenal” and consequently increases the frequency of therapeutic failure. In MDR bacteria, the over-expression of efflux pumps that expel structurally-unrelated drugs contributes to the reduced susceptibility by decreasing the intracellular concentration of antibiotics. During the last decade, several clinical data indicate an increasing involvement of efflux pumps in the emergence and dissemination of resistant Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to clearly define the molecular, functional and genetic bases of the efflux pump in order to understand the translocation of antibiotic molecules through the efflux transporter. The recent investigation on the efflux pump AcrB at its structural and physiological level, including the identification of drug affinity sites and kinetic parameters for various antibiotics, may open the way to rationally develop an improved new generation of antibacterial agents as well as efflux inhibitors in order to efficiently combat efflux-based resistance mechanisms. PMID:21707670

  13. Efflux Pump Inhibitor Phenylalanine-Arginine Β-Naphthylamide Effect on the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated From Hospitalized Patients in Shahid Motahari Burn Hospital, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mehrdad; Hashemi, Ali; Hakemi-Vala, Mojdeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Hallajzadeh, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly troublesome pathogen and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among hospitalized burn patients. Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of the AdeABC genes and the role of the efflux pump (s) in the imipenem resistance of A. baumannii strains isolated from burn patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 60 A. baumannii isolates collected from 240 wound samples of burn patients admitted to the Burn Unit of Shahid Motahari Burn hospital, Tehran, Iran. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and broth microdilution according to the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines. The activity of the efflux pump was evaluated using the efflux pump inhibitor, the phenylalanine-arginine Β-naphthylamide (PAΒN). The AdeABC genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Results: In this study, 100% of the isolates were resistant to cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, cefepime, piperacillin, meropenem, co-trimoxazole, and piperacillin/tazobactam; 56 (94%) to gentamicin; 50 (81%) to amikacin; 58 (97%) to imipenem; and 45 (76%) to tetracycline. Additionally,all the isolates were susceptible to colistin. The susceptibility of the strains to imipenem was highly increased in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor such that for 58 (96.6%) of the isolates, the PAΒN reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) by 4- to 64-fold. The adeA and adeB genes were detected in 60 (100%) of the isolates, and the adeC gene was present in 51 (85%). Conclusions: The efflux pump may play a role in antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii isolates. The ability of A. baumannii isolates to acquire drug resistance by the efflux pump mechanism is a concern. Thus, new strategies are required in order to eliminate the efflux transport activity from resistant A. baumannii isolates causing

  14. Fluid transport by the cornea endothelium is dependent on buffering lactic acid efflux.

    PubMed

    Li, Shimin; Kim, Edward; Bonanno, Joseph A

    2016-07-01

    Maintenance of corneal hydration is dependent on the active transport properties of the corneal endothelium. We tested the hypothesis that lactic acid efflux, facilitated by buffering, is a component of the endothelial fluid pump. Rabbit corneas were perfused with bicarbonate-rich (BR) or bicarbonate-free (BF) Ringer of varying buffering power, while corneal thickness was measured. Perfusate was collected and analyzed for lactate efflux. In BF with no added HEPES, the maximal corneal swelling rate was 30.0 ± 4.1 μm/h compared with 5.2 ± 0.9 μm/h in BR. Corneal swelling decreased directly with [HEPES], such that with 60 mM HEPES corneas swelled at 7.5 ± 1.6 μm/h. Perfusate [lactate] increased directly with [HEPES]. Similarly, reducing the [HCO3 (-)] increased corneal swelling and decreased lactate efflux. Corneal swelling was inversely related to Ringer buffering power (β), whereas lactate efflux was directly related to β. Ouabain (100 μM) produced maximal swelling and reduction in lactate efflux, whereas carbonic anhydrase inhibition and an monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 inhibitor produced intermediate swelling and decreases in lactate efflux. Conversely, 10 μM adenosine reduced the swelling rate to 4.2 ± 0.8 μm/h and increased lactate efflux by 25%. We found a strong inverse relation between corneal swelling and lactate efflux (r = 0.98, P < 0.0001). Introducing lactate in the Ringer transiently increased corneal thickness, reaching a steady state (0 ± 0.6 μm/h) within 90 min. We conclude that corneal endothelial function does not have an absolute requirement for bicarbonate; rather it requires a perfusing solution with high buffering power. This facilitates lactic acid efflux, which is directly linked to water efflux, indicating that lactate flux is a component of the corneal endothelial pump. PMID:27225657

  15. Efflux Of Nitrate From Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Aslam, M.; Ward, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to measure influx, and efflux of nitrate from hydroponically grown wheat seedlings. Ratio between efflux and influx greater in darkness than in light; increased with concentration of nitrate in nutrient solution. On basis of experiments, authors suggest nutrient solution optimized at lowest possible concentration of nitrate.

  16. Efflux-Mediated Antifungal Drug Resistance†

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Richard D.; Lamping, Erwin; Holmes, Ann R.; Niimi, Kyoko; Baret, Philippe V.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Tanabe, Koichi; Niimi, Masakazu; Goffeau, Andre; Monk, Brian C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Fungi cause serious infections in the immunocompromised and debilitated, and the incidence of invasive mycoses has increased significantly over the last 3 decades. Slow diagnosis and the relatively few classes of antifungal drugs result in high attributable mortality for systemic fungal infections. Azole antifungals are commonly used for fungal infections, but azole resistance can be a problem for some patient groups. High-level, clinically significant azole resistance usually involves overexpression of plasma membrane efflux pumps belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily class of transporters. The heterologous expression of efflux pumps in model systems, such Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has enabled the functional analysis of efflux pumps from a variety of fungi. Phylogenetic analysis of the ABC pleiotropic drug resistance family has provided a new view of the evolution of this important class of efflux pumps. There are several ways in which the clinical significance of efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance can be mitigated. Alternative antifungal drugs, such as the echinocandins, that are not efflux pump substrates provide one option. Potential therapeutic approaches that could overcome azole resistance include targeting efflux pump transcriptional regulators and fungal stress response pathways, blockade of energy supply, and direct inhibition of efflux pumps. PMID:19366916

  17. ABCG1 is involved in vitamin E efflux.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Maryline; BottG, Remain; Frisdal, Eric; Nowick, Marion; Plengpanich, Wanee; Desmarchelier, Charles; Roi, Stéphanie; Quinn, Carmel M; Gelissen, Ingrid; Jessup, Wendy; Van Eck, Miranda; Guérin, Maryse; Le Goff, Wilfried; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2014-12-01

    Vitamin E membrane transport has been shown to involve the cholesterol transporters SR-BI, ABCA1 and NPC1L1. Our aim was to investigate the possible participation of another cholesterol transporter in cellular vitamin E efflux: ABCG1. In Abcgl-deficient mice, vitamin E concentration was reduced in plasma lipoproteins whereas most tissues displayed a higher vitamin E content compared to wild-type mice. α- and γ-tocopherol efflux was increased in CHO cells overexpressing human ABCG1 compared to control cells. Conversely, α- and γ- tocopherol efflux was decreased in ABCG1-knockdown human cells (Hep3B hepatocytes and THP-1 macro- phages). Interestingly, α- and γ-tocopherol significantly downregulated ABCG1 and ABCA1 expression levels in Hep3B and THP-1, an effect confirmed in vivo in rats given vitamin E for 5 days. This was likely due to reduced LXR activation by oxysterols, as Hep3B cells and rat liver treated with vitamin E displayed a significantly reduced content in oxysterols compared to their respective controls. Overall, the present study reveals for the first time that ABCG1 is involved in cellular vitamin E efflux. PMID:25462452

  18. Molecular Components of Nitrate and Nitrite Efflux in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Elisa; González-Montelongo, Rafaela; Giraldez, Teresa; de la Rosa, Diego Alvarez

    2014-01-01

    Some eukaryotes, such as plant and fungi, are capable of utilizing nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. Once transported into the cell, nitrate is reduced to ammonium by the consecutive action of nitrate and nitrite reductase. How nitrate assimilation is balanced with nitrate and nitrite efflux is unknown, as are the proteins involved. The nitrate assimilatory yeast Hansenula polymorpha was used as a model to dissect these efflux systems. We identified the sulfite transporters Ssu1 and Ssu2 as effective nitrate exporters, Ssu2 being quantitatively more important, and we characterize the Nar1 protein as a nitrate/nitrite exporter. The use of strains lacking either SSU2 or NAR1 along with the nitrate reductase gene YNR1 showed that nitrate reductase activity is not required for net nitrate uptake. Growth test experiments indicated that Ssu2 and Nar1 exporters allow yeast to cope with nitrite toxicity. We also have shown that the well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae sulfite efflux permease Ssu1 is also able to excrete nitrite and nitrate. These results characterize for the first time essential components of the nitrate/nitrite efflux system and their impact on net nitrate uptake and its regulation. PMID:24363367

  19. Novel effect of paeonol on the formation of foam cells: promotion of LXRα-ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin-Feng; Jim Leu, Shr-Jeng; Shyue, Song-Kun; Su, Kuo-Hui; Wei, Jeng; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2013-01-01

    Paeonol, a phenolic component purified from Paeonia suffruticosa (Cortex Moutan), is used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the effect of paeonol on cholesterol metabolism. We investigated the efficacy of paeonol on cholesterol metabolism and the underlying mechanism in macrophages and apolipoprotein E deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice. Treatment with paeonol markedly attenuated cholesterol accumulation induced by oxidized LDL in macrophages, which was due to increased cholesterol efflux. Additionally, paeonol enhanced the mRNA and protein expression of ATP-binding membrane cassette transport protein A1 (ABCA1) but did not alter the protein level of ABCG1 or other scavenger receptors. Inhibition of ABCA1 activity with a pharmacological inhibitor, neutralizing antibody or small interfering RNA (siRNA), negated the effects of paeonol on cholesterol efflux and cholesterol accumulation. Furthermore, paeonol induced the nuclear translocation of liver X receptor α (LXRα) by increasing its activity. siRNA knockdown of LXRα abolished the paeonol-induced upregulation of ABCA1, promotion of cholesterol efflux and suppression of cholesterol accumulation. Moreover, atherosclerotic lesions, hyperlipidemia and systemic inflammation were reduced and the protein expression of ABCA1 was increased in aortas of paeonol-treated apoE(-/-) mice. Paeonol may alleviate the formation of foam cells by enhancing LXRα-ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux. PMID:24117070

  20. Berry anthocyanins and anthocyanidins exhibit distinct affinities for the efflux transporters BCRP and MDR1

    PubMed Central

    Dreiseitel, A; Oosterhuis, B; Vukman, KV; Schreier, P; Oehme, A; Locher, S; Hajak, G; Sand, PG

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Dietary anthocyanins hold great promise in the prevention of chronic disease but factors affecting their bioavailability remain poorly defined. Specifically, the role played by transport mechanisms at the intestinal and blood–brain barriers (BBB) is currently unknown. Experimental approach: In the present study, 16 anthocyanins and anthocyanidins were exposed to the human efflux transporters multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), using dye efflux, ATPase and, for BCRP, vesicular transport assays. Key results: All test compounds interacted with the BCRP transporter in vitro. Of these, seven emerged as potential BCRP substrates (malvidin, petunidin, malvidin-3-galactoside, malvidin-3,5-diglucoside, cyanidin-3-galactoside, peonidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside) and 12 as potential inhibitors of BCRP (cyanidin, peonidin, cyanidin-3,5-diglucoside, malvidin, pelargonidin, delphinidin, petunidin, delphinidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-rutinoside, malvidin-3-glucoside, pelargonidin-3,5-diglucoside, malvidin-3-galactoside). Malvidin, malvidin-3-galactoside and petunidin exhibited bimodal activities serving as BCRP substrates at low concentrations and, at higher concentrations, as BCRP inhibitors. Effects on MDR1, in contrast, were weak. Only aglycones exerted mild inhibitory activity. Conclusions and implications: Although the anthocyanidins under study may alter pharmacokinetics of drugs that are BCRP substrates, they are less likely to interfere with activities of MDR1 substrates. The present data suggest that several anthocyanins and anthocyanidins may be actively transported out of intestinal tissues and endothelia, limiting their bioavailability in plasma and brain. PMID:19922539

  1. Evaluation of the Intestinal Absorption Mechanism of Casearin X in Caco-2 Cells with Modified Carboxylesterase Activity.

    PubMed

    Moreira da Silva, Rodrigo; Verjee, Sheela; de Gaitani, Cristiane Masetto; Moraes de Oliveira, Anderson Rodrigo; Pires Bueno, Paula Carolina; Cavalheiro, Alberto José; Peporine Lopes, Norberto; Butterweck, Veronika

    2016-04-22

    The clerodane diterpene casearin X (1), isolated from the leaves of Casearia sylvestris, is a potential new drug candidate due to its potent in vitro cytotoxic activity. In this work, the intestinal absorption mechanism of 1 was evaluated using Caco-2 cells with and without active carboxylesterases (CES). An LC-MS method was developed and validated for the quantification of 1. The estimation of permeability coefficients was possible only under CES-inhibited conditions in which 1 is able to cross the Caco-2 cell monolayer. The mechanism is probably by active transport, with no significant efflux, but with a high retention of the compound inside the cells. The enzymatic hydrolysis assay demonstrates the susceptibility of 1 to first-pass metabolism as substrate for specific CES expressed in human intestine. PMID:26990770

  2. Saikosaponin-a Attenuates Oxidized LDL Uptake and Prompts Cholesterol Efflux in THP-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Dan; Wang, Hongyan; Xu, Ling; Wang, Xiaoqing; Peng, Kuang; Wang, Lili; Liu, Pixu; Qu, Peng

    2016-06-01

    Saikosaponins-a (Ssa) is a major bioactive extract of Radix Bupleuri which is a traditional Chinese medicine. The roles of inflammatory response and lipid transportation in the process of atherosclerosis have drawn increasing attention. We explored the regulation of lipid transportation and immune-inflammatory role of Ssa in early atherosclerosis. The antiatherogenic actions and possible molecular mechanisms of Ssa were texted in THP-1 cells. We examined the effect of Ssa on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced lipid uptake, cholesterol efflux, immune-inflammatory response. THP-1 macrophages were treated with Ssa followed by ox-LDL for 24 hours. Results from western blot showed that Ssa obviously reduced lipoprotein uptake to block foam cell formation and the expression of Density Lipoprotein Receptor-1 and CD36. Ssa also significantly boosted cholesterol efflux and the expression of ATP binding cassettetransporter A1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. The results also indicated that Ssa inhibited ox-LDL-induced activation of AKT and nuclear factor-κB, assembly of NLRP3 inflammasome and production of proinflammatory cytokines. It is suggested that the ability against immune inflammatory response of Ssa is due to modulation of the PI3K/AKT/NF-κB/NLRP3 pathway. In conclusion, this study provides new insight into Ssa's molecular mechanism and its therapeutic potential in the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:26859197

  3. Anti-Campylobacter Activities and Resistance Mechanisms of Natural Phenolic Compounds in Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    Klančnik, Anja; Možina, Sonja Smole; Zhang, Qijing

    2012-01-01

    Background Campylobacter is a major foodborne pathogen and alternative antimicrobials are needed to prevent or decrease Campylobacter contamination in foods or food producing animals. The objectives of this study are to define the anti-Campylobacter activities of natural phenolic compounds of plant origin and to determine the roles of bacterial drug efflux systems in the resistance to these natural phenolics in Campylobacter jejuni. Methodology/Principal Findings Anti-Campylobacter activities were evaluated by an MIC assay using microdilution coupled with ATP measurement. Mutants of the cmeB and cmeF efflux genes and the cmeR transcriptional repressor gene were compared with the wild-type strain for their susceptibilities to phenolics in the absence and presence of efflux-pump inhibitors (EPIs). The phenolic compounds produced significant, but variable activities against both antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic resistant Campylobacter. The highest anti-Campylobacter activity was seen with carnosic and rosmarinic acids in their pure forms or in enriched plant extracts. Inactivation of cmeB rendered C. jejuni significantly more susceptible to the phenolic compounds, while mutation of cmeF or cmeR only produced a moderate effect on the MICs. Consistent with the results from the efflux pump mutants, EPIs, especially phenylalanine-arginine β-naphthylamide and NMP, significantly reduced the MICs of the tested phenolic compounds. Further reduction of MICs by the EPIs was also observed in the cmeB and cmeF mutants, suggesting that other efflux systems are also involved in Campylobacter resistance to phenolic compounds. Conclusion/Significance Natural phenolic compounds of plant origin have good anti-Campylobacter activities and can be further developed for potential use in controlling Campylobacter. The drug efflux systems in Campylobacter contribute significantly to its resistance to the phenolics and EPIs potentiate the anti-Campylobacter activities of plant phenolic

  4. Identification of Acinetobacter baumannii Serum-Associated Antibiotic Efflux Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Barnett, Pamela; Perlmutter, Jessamyn

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive antibiotic resistance is a newly described phenomenon by which Acinetobacter baumannii induces efflux pump activity in response to host-associated environmental cues that may, in part, account for antibiotic treatment failures against clinically defined susceptible strains. To that end, during adaptation to growth in human serum, the organism induces approximately 22 putative efflux-associated genes and displays efflux-mediated minocycline tolerance at antibiotic concentrations corresponding to patient serum levels. Here, we show that in addition to minocycline, growth in human serum elicits A. baumannii efflux-mediated tolerance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, meropenem, tetracycline, and tigecycline. Moreover, using a whole-cell high-throughput screen and secondary assays, we identified novel serum-associated antibiotic efflux inhibitors that potentiated the activities of antibiotics toward serum-grown A. baumannii. Two compounds, Acinetobacter baumannii efflux pump inhibitor 1 (ABEPI1) [(E)-4-((4-chlorobenzylidene)amino)benezenesulfonamide] and ABEPI2 [N-tert-butyl-2-(1-tert-butyltetrazol-5-yl)sulfanylacetamide], were shown to lead to minocycline accumulation within A. baumannii during serum growth and inhibit the efflux potential of the organism. While both compounds also inhibited the antibiotic efflux properties of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, they did not display significant cytotoxicity toward human cells or mammalian Ca2+ channel inhibitory effects, suggesting that ABEPI1 and ABEPI2 represent promising structural scaffolds for the development of new classes of bacterial antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors that can be used to potentiate the activities of current and future antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:25114126

  5. Serum albumin acts as a shuttle to enhance cholesterol efflux from cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Sandhya; de la Llera-Moya, Margarita; Drazul-Schrader, Denise; Phillips, Michael C.; Kellner-Weibel, Ginny; Rothblat, George H.

    2013-01-01

    An important mechanism contributing to cell cholesterol efflux is aqueous transfer in which cholesterol diffuses from cells into the aqueous phase and becomes incorporated into an acceptor particle. Some compounds can enhance diffusion by acting as shuttles transferring cholesterol to cholesterol acceptors, which act as cholesterol sinks. We have examined whether particles in serum can enhance cholesterol efflux by acting as shuttles. This task was accomplished by incubating radiolabeled J774 cells with increasing concentrations of lipoprotein-depleted sera (LPDS) or components present in serum as shuttles and a constant amount of LDL, small unilamellar vesicles, or red blood cells (RBC) as sinks. Synergistic efflux was measured as the difference in fractional efflux in excess of that predicted by the addition of the individual efflux values of sink and shuttle alone. Synergistic efflux was obtained when LPDS was incubated with cells and LDL. When different components of LPDS were used as shuttles, albumin produced synergistic efflux, while apoA-I did not. A synergistic effect was also obtained when RBC was used as the sink and albumin as shuttle. The previously observed negative association of albumin with coronary artery disease might be linked to reduced cholesterol shuttling that would occur when serum albumin levels are low. PMID:23288948

  6. High As exposure induced substantial arsenite efflux in As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanshan; Fu, Jing-Wei; Han, Yong-He; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-02-01

    Arsenite (AsIII) efflux is an important mechanism for arsenic (As) detoxification in plants. Low AsIII efflux has been observed in As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata, which may contribute to its highly efficient As translocation and accumulation; however, the results may be compromised by microbial AsIII oxidation, relatively low As concentration in the medium and short-term As exposure. Here, sterile P. vittata sporophytes were cultivated in sterile medium containing 10, 200 and 500 µM arsenate (AsV) for 28 d. Arsenite efflux to the growth medium and As speciation in P. vittata was investigated. Low AsIII efflux at 12% of AsV uptake was observed at 10 µM AsV, but high AsIII efflux (36-76%) was observed at 200 and 500 µM AsV, with 1987-2397 mg kg(-1) As being accumulated in the fronds. This is the first report to show efficient AsIII efflux in P. vittata. This study showed that P. vittata may use high AsIII efflux to cope with As toxicity under high As exposure, which may be necessary to sustain growth while accumulating As. PMID:26595313

  7. Mechanism of persulfate activation by phenols.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mushtaque; Teel, Amy L; Watts, Richard J

    2013-06-01

    The activation of persulfate by phenols was investigated to further the understanding of persulfate chemistry for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Phenol (pKa = 10.0) activated persulfate at pH 12 but not at pH 8, suggesting activation occurred only via the phenoxide form. Evaluation of the phenoxide activation mechanism was complicated by the concurrent activation of persulfate by hydroperoxide anion, which is generated by the base catalyzed hydrolysis of persulfate. Therefore, phenoxide activation was investigated using pentachlorophenoxide at pH 8.3, midway between the pKa of pentachlorophenol (pKa = 4.8) and that of hydrogen peroxide (pKa = 11.8). Of the two possible mechanisms for phenoxide activation of persulfate (reduction or nucleophilic attack) the results were consistent with reduction of persulfate by phenoxide with oxidation of the phenoxide. The concentration of phenoxide required for maximum persulfate activation was low (1 mM). The results of this research document that phenoxides activate persulfate via reduction; phenolic moieties ubiquitous to soil organic matter in the subsurface may have a significant role in the activation of persulfate during its injection into the subsurface for ISCO. Furthermore, the results provide the foundation for activation of persulfate by other organic anions without the toxicity of phenols, such as keto acids. PMID:23663058

  8. Competing activation mechanisms in epidemics on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Claudio; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2012-04-01

    In contrast to previous common wisdom that epidemic activity in heterogeneous networks is dominated by the hubs with the largest number of connections, recent research has pointed out the role that the innermost, dense core of the network plays in sustaining epidemic processes. Here we show that the mechanism responsible of spreading depends on the nature of the process. Epidemics with a transient state are boosted by the innermost core. Contrarily, epidemics allowing a steady state present a dual scenario, where either the hub independently sustains activity and propagates it to the rest of the system, or, alternatively, the innermost network core collectively turns into the active state, maintaining it globally. In uncorrelated networks the former mechanism dominates if the degree distribution decays with an exponent larger than 5/2, and the latter otherwise. Topological correlations, rife in real networks, may perturb this picture, mixing the role of both mechanisms.

  9. The pseudo-atomic structure of an RND-type tripartite multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Du, Dijun; Voss, Jarrod; Wang, Zhao; Chiu, Wah; Luisi, Ben F

    2015-09-01

    Microorganisms encode several classes of transmembrane molecular pumps that can expel a wide range of chemically distinct toxic substances. These machines contribute to the capacity of the organisms to withstand harsh environments, and they help to confer resistance against clinical antimicrobial agents. In Gram-negative bacteria, some of the pumps comprise tripartite assemblies that actively transport drugs and other harmful compounds across the cell envelope. We describe recent structural and functional data that have provided insights into the architecture and transport mechanism of the AcrA-AcrB-TolC pump of Escherichia coli. This multidrug efflux pump is powered by proton electrochemical gradients through the activity of AcrB, a member of the resistance/nodulation/cell division (RND) transporter family. Crystallographic data reveal how the small protein AcrZ binds to AcrB in a concave surface of the transmembrane domain, and we discuss how this interaction may affect the efflux activities of the transporter. PMID:25803077

  10. Time lag between photosynthesis and CO2 efflux from soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakov, Y.; Gavrichkova, O.

    2009-04-01

    Important part of CO2 efflux from planted soils is root-derived CO2, meaning that it originates directly and indirectly from roots: directly from root respiration, and indirectly from respiration of rhizosphere microorganisms decomposing organic substances released by roots into the soil (rhizodeposits). Recent studies have shown that apart of well studied effect of soil temperature and soil water content, the C supply of assimilates from photosynthetically active plant organs have a significant effect on the root-derived CO2. In fact, the effect of photosynthesis on root-derived CO2 is often masked by temperature because root biomass typically peaks in summer. However, roots can only respire the C that was allocated belowground, and so the effect of temperature on root respiration is likely to be constrained by photosynthesis. If models of soil respiration are to incorporate photosynthetic C inputs it is necessary to understand how these two fluxes are coupled and what are the factors affecting the time lag between C uptake and its following respiration by roots and associated microorganisms. We reviewed literature and own studies relevant for estimation of the delay of C assimilation by photosynthesis and CO2 efflux from soil. The most of the studies were based on pulse labeling of annual plants in the atmosphere with 14CO2 or 13CO2 and subsequent chase of 14C or 13C in the CO2 efflux from soil. We analyzed the dynamics of the CO2 efflux curves and evaluated 3 parameters: 1) the first appearance of labeled CO2 from soil, 2) maximum of labeled CO2, and 3) disappearance of the labeled CO2 from the total CO2 efflux from soil. Numerous studies showed that newly assimilated C cycles quickly within the ecosystem, being found in root respiration already some minutes after its assimilation. Reported time lags in situ and laboratory experiments varied from minutes to days. For annual and perennial grasses the first appearance of labeled CO2 from soil was measured within

  11. Solute carrier 41A3 encodes for a mitochondrial Mg(2+) efflux system.

    PubMed

    Mastrototaro, Lucia; Smorodchenko, Alina; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Kolisek, Martin; Sponder, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The important role of magnesium (Mg(2+)) in normal cellular physiology requires flexible, yet tightly regulated, intracellular Mg(2+) homeostasis (IMH). However, only little is known about Mg(2+) transporters of subcellular compartments such as mitochondria, despite their obvious importance for the deposition and reposition of intracellular Mg(2+) pools. In particular, knowledge about mechanisms responsible for extrusion of Mg(2+) from mitochondria is lacking. Based on circumstantial evidence, two possible mechanisms of Mg(2+) release from mitochondria were predicted: (1) Mg(2+) efflux coupled to ATP translocation via the ATP-Mg/Pi carrier, and (2) Mg(2+) efflux via a H(+)/Mg(2+) exchanger. Regardless, the identity of the H(+)-coupled Mg(2+) efflux system is unknown. We demonstrate here that member A3 of solute carrier (SLC) family 41 is a mitochondrial Mg(2+) efflux system. Mitochondria of HEK293 cells overexpressing SLC41A3 exhibit a 60% increase in the extrusion of Mg(2+) compared with control cells. This efflux mechanism is Na(+)-dependent and temperature sensitive. Our data identify SLC41A3 as the first mammalian mitochondrial Mg(2+) efflux system, which greatly enhances our understanding of intracellular Mg(2+) homeostasis. PMID:27302215

  12. Solute carrier 41A3 encodes for a mitochondrial Mg2+ efflux system

    PubMed Central

    Mastrototaro, Lucia; Smorodchenko, Alina; Aschenbach, Jörg R.; Kolisek, Martin; Sponder, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The important role of magnesium (Mg2+) in normal cellular physiology requires flexible, yet tightly regulated, intracellular Mg2+ homeostasis (IMH). However, only little is known about Mg2+ transporters of subcellular compartments such as mitochondria, despite their obvious importance for the deposition and reposition of intracellular Mg2+ pools. In particular, knowledge about mechanisms responsible for extrusion of Mg2+ from mitochondria is lacking. Based on circumstantial evidence, two possible mechanisms of Mg2+ release from mitochondria were predicted: (1) Mg2+ efflux coupled to ATP translocation via the ATP-Mg/Pi carrier, and (2) Mg2+ efflux via a H+/Mg2+ exchanger. Regardless, the identity of the H+-coupled Mg2+ efflux system is unknown. We demonstrate here that member A3 of solute carrier (SLC) family 41 is a mitochondrial Mg2+ efflux system. Mitochondria of HEK293 cells overexpressing SLC41A3 exhibit a 60% increase in the extrusion of Mg2+ compared with control cells. This efflux mechanism is Na+-dependent and temperature sensitive. Our data identify SLC41A3 as the first mammalian mitochondrial Mg2+ efflux system, which greatly enhances our understanding of intracellular Mg2+ homeostasis. PMID:27302215

  13. Functional cloning and characterization of the multidrug efflux pumps NorM from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and YdhE from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Long, Feng; Rouquette-Loughlin, Corinne; Shafer, William M; Yu, Edward W

    2008-09-01

    Active efflux of antimicrobial agents is one of the most important adapted strategies that bacteria use to defend against antimicrobial factors that are present in their environment. The NorM protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the YdhE protein of Escherichia coli have been proposed to be multidrug efflux pumps that belong to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family. In order to determine their antimicrobial export capabilities, we cloned, expressed, and purified these two efflux proteins and characterized their functions both in vivo and in vitro. E. coli strains expressing norM or ydhE showed elevated (twofold or greater) resistance to several antimicrobial agents, including fluoroquinolones, ethidium bromide, rhodamine 6G, acriflavine, crystal violet, berberine, doxorubicin, novobiocin, enoxacin, and tetraphenylphosphonium chloride. When they were expressed in E. coli, both transporters reduced the levels of ethidium bromide and norfloxacin accumulation through a mechanism requiring the proton motive force, and direct measurements of efflux confirmed that NorM behaves as an Na(+)-dependent transporter. The capacities of NorM and YdhE to recognize structurally divergent compounds were confirmed by steady-state fluorescence polarization assays, and the results revealed that these transporters bind to antimicrobials with dissociation constants in the micromolar region. PMID:18591276

  14. In vitro activity of levofloxacin against planktonic and biofilm Stenotrophomonas maltophilia lifestyles under conditions relevant to pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis, and relationship with SmeDEF multidrug efflux pump expression.

    PubMed

    Pompilio, Arianna; Crocetta, Valentina; Verginelli, Fabio; Bonaventura, Giovanni Di

    2016-07-01

    The activity of levofloxacin against planktonic and biofilm Stenotrophomonas maltophilia cells and the role played by the multidrug efflux pump SmeDEF were evaluated under conditions relevant to the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. MIC, MBC and MBEC of levofloxacin were assessed, against five CF strains, under 'standard' (CLSI-recommended) and 'CF-like' (pH 6.8, 5% CO2, in a synthetic CF sputum) conditions. Levofloxacin was tested against biofilms at concentrations (10, 50 and 100 μg mL(-1)) corresponding to achievable serum levels and sputum levels by aerosolisation. smeD expression was evaluated, under both conditions, in planktonic and biofilm cells by RT-PCR. The bactericidal effect of levofloxacin was decreased, in three out of five strains tested, under 'CF-like' conditions (MBC: 2-4 vs 8-16 μg mL(-1), under 'standard' and 'CF-like' conditions, respectively). Biofilm was intrinsically resistant to levofloxacin, regardless of conditions tested (MBECs ≥ 100 μg mL(-1) for all strains). Only under 'CF-like' conditions, smeD expression increased during planktonic-to-biofilm transition, and in biofilm cells compared to stationary planktonic cells. Our findings confirmed that S. maltophilia biofilm is intrinsically resistant to therapeutic concentrations of levofloxacin. Under conditions relevant to CF, smeD overexpression could contribute to levofloxacin resistance. Further studies are warranted to define the clinical relevance of our findings. PMID:27242375

  15. MCT Expression and Lactate Influx/Efflux in Tanycytes Involved in Glia-Neuron Metabolic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Elizondo, Roberto; Llanos, Paula; Uranga, Romina María; Nualart, Francisco; García, María Angeles

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic interaction via lactate between glial cells and neurons has been proposed as one of the mechanisms involved in hypothalamic glucosensing. We have postulated that hypothalamic glial cells, also known as tanycytes, produce lactate by glycolytic metabolism of glucose. Transfer of lactate to neighboring neurons stimulates ATP synthesis and thus contributes to their activation. Because destruction of third ventricle (III-V) tanycytes is sufficient to alter blood glucose levels and food intake in rats, it is hypothesized that tanycytes are involved in the hypothalamic glucose sensing mechanism. Here, we demonstrate the presence and function of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) in tanycytes. Specifically, MCT1 and MCT4 expression as well as their distribution were analyzed in Sprague Dawley rat brain, and we demonstrate that both transporters are expressed in tanycytes. Using primary tanycyte cultures, kinetic analyses and sensitivity to inhibitors were undertaken to confirm that MCT1 and MCT4 were functional for lactate influx. Additionally, physiological concentrations of glucose induced lactate efflux in cultured tanycytes, which was inhibited by classical MCT inhibitors. Because the expression of both MCT1 and MCT4 has been linked to lactate efflux, we propose that tanycytes participate in glucose sensing based on a metabolic interaction with neurons of the arcuate nucleus, which are stimulated by lactate released from MCT1 and MCT4-expressing tanycytes. PMID:21297988

  16. Responses of methane effluxes and soil methane concentrations to compaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plain, C.; Delogu, E.; Longdoz, B.; Epron, D.; Ranger, J.

    2015-12-01

    Forest soils host methanotrophic bacterial communities that make them a major methane sink worldwide. Soil compaction resulting from mechanization of forest operations is first affecting soil macroporosity, and thus gas and water transfer within the soil, leading to a reduced oxygenation of the soil. This reduction of soil aeration is expected to reduce the methanotrophic activity leading thus to less CH4 oxidation and more CH4 production, affecting the overall soil CH4budget. Compaction was applied in 2007 and had created linear ruts. We measured continuously since September 2014, in three different situations (compacted-mound, compacted hollow and control), soil CO2 and CH4 effluxes using closed chamber coupled to a cavity ring down spectrometer in an young oak plantation. Since December 2015, in addition to these measurements, we have implanted hydrophobic tubes to measure vertical soil profiles of CH4, O2 and CO2 concentrations in the 3 situations. The soil acts as CH4 sink, with no significant difference in net CH4uptake between control and both hollow and mound in the compacted treatment. However, the uptake of CH4 was significantly lower for the hollows than for the mounds resulting from both a lower diffusion of CH4 within soil and a higher production of CH4 in deeper layer when the soil is water saturated.

  17. Bovicin HC5, a lantibiotic produced by Streptococcus bovis HC5, catalyzed the efflux of intracellular potassium but not ATP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovicin HC5, a broad spectrum lantibiotic produced by Streptococcus bovis HC5, catalyzed the efflux of intracellular potassium from Streptococcus bovis JB1, a sensitive strain. ATP also decreased, but this decline appeared to be caused by the activity of the F1FO ATPase rather than efflux per se....

  18. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in the Genus Erwinia: Physiology and Regulation of Efflux Pump Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Thekkiniath, J; Ravirala, R; San Francisco, M

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogens belonging to the genus Erwinia cause diseases in several economically important plants. Plants respond to bacterial infection with a powerful chemical arsenal and signaling molecules to rid themselves of the microbes. Although our understanding of how Erwinia initiate infections in plants has become clear, a comprehensive understanding of how these bacteria rid themselves of noxious antimicrobial agents during the infection is important. Multidrug efflux pumps are key factors in bacterial resistance toward antibiotics by reducing the level of antimicrobial compounds in the bacterial cell. Erwinia induce the expression of efflux pump genes in response to plant-derived antimicrobials. The capability of Erwinia to co-opt plant defense signaling molecules such as salicylic acid to trigger multidrug efflux pumps might have developed to ensure bacterial survival in susceptible host plants. In this review, we discuss the developments in Erwinia efflux pumps, focusing in particular on efflux pump function and the regulation of efflux pump gene expression. PMID:27571694

  19. Molecular mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Min; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein signaling complexes that trigger the activation of inflammatory caspases and the maturation of interleukin-1β. Among various inflammasome complexes, the NLRP3 inflammasome is best characterized and has been linked with various human autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome may be a promising target for anti-inflammatory therapies. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the cytosol. We also describe the binding partners of NLRP3 inflammasome complexes activating or inhibiting the inflammasome assembly. Our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and how these influence inflammatory responses offers further insight into potential therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases associated with dysregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26549800

  20. Rasagiline and selegiline suppress calcium efflux from mitochondria by PK11195-induced opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore: a novel anti-apoptotic function for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuqiu; Kazumura, Kimiko; Maruyama, Wakako; Osawa, Toshihiko; Naoi, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    Rasagiline and selegiline, inhibitors of type B monoamine oxidase (MAO-B), protect neurons from cell death in cellular and animal models. Suppression of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and subsequent activation of apoptosis cascade, and induction of anti-apoptotic, pro-survival genes are proposed to contribute the anti-apoptotic function. Rasagiline suppresses neurotoxin- and oxidative stress-induced membrane permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, but the mechanism has been not fully clarified. In this paper, regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore by rasagiline and selegiline was examined in apoptosis induced by PK11195, a ligand of the outer membrane translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) in SH-SY5Y cells. The pore opening was quantitatively measured using a simultaneous monitoring system for calcium (Ca(2+)) and superoxide (O2(-)) (Ishibashi et al. in Biochem Biophys Res Commun 344:571-580, 2006). The association of the pore opening with Ca(2+) efflux and ROS increase was proved by the inhibition of Bcl-2 overexpression and cyclosporine A treatment. Potency to release Ca(2+) was correlated with the cytotoxicity of TSPO antagonists, PK11195, FGIN-1-27 and protoporphyrin IX, whereas a TSPO agonist, 4-chloro-diazepamine, did not significantly increase Ca(2+) or cause cell death. Rasagiline and selegiline inhibited mitochondrial Ca(2+) efflux through the mitochondrial permeability transition pore dose dependently. Ca(2+) efflux was confirmed as the initial signal in mitochondrial apoptotic cascade, and the suppression of Ca(2+) efflux may account for the neuroprotective function of rasagiline and selegiline. The quantitative measurement of Ca(2+) efflux can be applied to determine anti-apoptotic activity of neuroprotective compounds. The role of mitochondrial Ca(2+) release in neuronal death and also in neuroprotection by MAO-B inhibitors is discussed. PMID:25863936

  1. Mechanisms of Cell Propulsion by Active Stresses.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, A E

    2011-07-01

    The mechanisms by which cytoskeletal flows and cell-substrate interactions interact to generate cell motion are explored using a simplified model of the cytoskeleton as a viscous gel containing active stresses. This model yields explicit general results relating cell speed and traction forces to the distributions of active stress and cell-substrate friction. It is found that 1) the cell velocity is given by a function that quantifies the asymmetry of the active-stress distribution, 2) gradients in cell-substrate friction can induce motion even when the active stresses are symmetrically distributed, 3) the traction-force dipole is enhanced by protrusive stresses near the cell edges or contractile stresses near the center of the cell, and 4) the cell velocity depends biphasically on the cell-substrate adhesion strength if active stress is enhanced by adhesion. Specific experimental tests of the calculated dependences are proposed. PMID:21804763

  2. Mechanisms of Cell Propulsion by Active Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, A. E.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cytoskeletal flows and cell-substrate interactions interact to generate cell motion are explored using a simplified model of the cytoskeleton as a viscous gel containing active stresses. This model yields explicit general results relating cell speed and traction forces to the distributions of active stress and cell-substrate friction. It is found that 1) the cell velocity is given by a function that quantifies the asymmetry of the active-stress distribution, 2) gradients in cell-substrate friction can induce motion even when the active stresses are symmetrically distributed, 3) the traction-force dipole is enhanced by protrusive stresses near the cell edges or contractile stresses near the center of the cell, and 4) the cell velocity depends biphasically on the cell-substrate adhesion strength if active stress is enhanced by adhesion. Specific experimental tests of the calculated dependences are proposed. PMID:21804763

  3. Oxysterols trigger ABCA1-mediated basolateral surfactant efflux.

    PubMed

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mathur, Satya N; Zhou, Jiming; Field, F Jeffrey; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2004-08-01

    Surfactant is an apically-secreted surface-active material containing primarily disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPtdCho) that is released from alveolar epithelia into the alveolus. Surfactant deficiency is an important aspect of inflammatory lung disease and may result from extravasation of serum lipoproteins into the alveolus. We investigated whether one bioactive component of modified lipoproteins, oxysterols, might reduce surfactant PtdCho availability by altering its trafficking. The oxysterol, 22-hydroxycholesterol (22HC), in combination with its obligate partner, 9 cis-retinoic acid (RA), decreased surfactant PtdCho levels, in part, by stimulating basolateral phospholipid export in murine lung epithelia. 22HC/RA stimulated basolateral PtdCho efflux in cells via transcriptional activation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1) gene. This effect was mediated by a DR-4 locus within the ABCA1 promoter. ABCA1 knockdown studies using ABCA1 siRNA or the ABCA1 inhibitor, glyburide, selectively attenuated 22HC/RA-driven basolateral PtdCho efflux. 22HC/RA significantly increased export of PtdCho molecular species containing saturated (16:0) fatty-acyl species typical of DSPtdCho. Overexpression of ABCA1 mimicked 22HC/RA effects by increasing cellular PtdCho efflux, whereas mutagenesis of ABCA1 at Trp590 attenuated PtdCho release. The results indicate the existence of an oxysterol-activated basolateral exit pathway for surfactant that might impact the availability of phospholipid destined for apical secretion. PMID:15039140

  4. Evolution of Stiffness and Permeability in Fractures Subject to - and Mechanically-Activated Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faoro, I.; Elsworth, D.; Candela, T.

    2013-12-01

    Strong feedbacks link thermal gradients (T), hydrologic flow (H), chemical alteration (C) and mechanical deformation (M) in fractured rock. These processes are strongly interconnected since one process effects the initiation and progress of another. Dissolution and precipitation of minerals are affected by temperature and stress, and can result in significant changes in permeability and solute transport characteristics. Understanding these couplings is important for oil, gas, and geothermal reservoir engineering and for waste disposal in underground repositories and reservoirs. In order to experimentally investigate the interactions between THCM processes in a natural stressed fracture, we report on heated ( up to 150C) flow-through experiments on fractured core samples of Westerly granite. These experiments are performed to examine the influence of thermally and mechanically activated dissolution on the mechanical (stress/strain) and transport (permeability) characteristics of fractures. The evolutions of both the permeability and stiffness of the sample are recorded as the experimental thermal conditions change and chemical alteration progresses. Furthermore efflux of dissolved mineral mass is measured periodically to provide a record of the net mass removal, to correlate this with observed changes in fracture aperture, defined by the flow test. During the experiments the fracture shows high hydraulic sensitivity to the changing conditions of stress and temperature. Significant variation of the effluent fluid chemistry is observed. We argue that the formation of clay (Kaolinite) is the main mechanism responsible for the permanent change in permeability recorded at higher confining stresses (40 MPa).

  5. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  6. [Molecular mechanisms of niclosamide antitumor activity].

    PubMed

    Moskaleva, E Yu; Perevozchikova, V G; Zhirnik, A S; Severin, S E

    2015-01-01

    In this review the recent data regarding the antitumor activity of niclosamide and the molecular mechanisms of its antitumor activity are presented. Niclosamide has been used in the clinic for the treatment of intestinal parasite infections. In recent years in several screening investigations of various drugs and chemical compounds niclosamide was identified as a potential anticancer agent. Niclosamide not only inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin, mTORC1, STAT3, NF-κB and Notch signaling pathways, but also targets mitochondria in cancer cells to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis. A number of studies have established the anticancer activity of niclosamide in both in vitro and in vivo in xenotransplantation models using human tumors and immunodeficient mice. It is important that niclosamide is active not only against tumor cells but also cancer stem cells. Normal cells are resistant to niclosamide. The accumulated experimental data suggest niclosamide is a promising drug for the treatment of various types of cancer. PMID:26716739

  7. Topological mechanics: from metamaterials to active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical metamaterials are artificial structures with unusual properties, such as negative Poisson ratio, bistability or tunable acoustic response, which originate in the geometry of their unit cell. At the heart of such unusual behavior is often a mechanism: a motion that does not significantly stretch or compress the links between constituent elements. When activated by motors or external fields, these soft motions become the building blocks of robots and smart materials. In this talk, we discuss topological mechanisms that possess two key properties: (i) their existence cannot be traced to a local imbalance between degrees of freedom and constraints (ii) they are robust against a wide range of structural deformations or changes in material parameters. The continuum elasticity of these mechanical structures is captured by non-linear field theories with a topological boundary term similar to topological insulators and quantum Hall systems. We present several applications of these concepts to the design and experimental realization of 2D and 3D topological structures based on linkages, origami, buckling meta-materials and lastly active media that break time-reversal symmetry.

  8. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kenneth K Y; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  9. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  10. The Heterodimeric ABC Transporter EfrCD Mediates Multidrug Efflux in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Hürlimann, Lea M.; Corradi, Valentina; Hohl, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis are an emerging health problem. However, drug efflux pumps contributing to intrinsic drug resistance are poorly studied in this Gram-positive pathogen. In this study, we functionally investigated seven heterodimeric ABC transporters of E. faecalis that are annotated as drug efflux pumps. Deletion of ef0789-ef0790 on the chromosome of E. faecalis resulted in increased susceptibility to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, ethidium, and Hoechst 33342, and the corresponding transporter was named EfrCD. Unexpectedly, the previously described heterodimeric multidrug ABC transporter EfrAB contributes marginally to drug efflux in the endogenous context of E. faecalis. In contrast, heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis revealed that EfrAB, EfrCD, and the product of ef2226-ef2227 (EfrEF) mediate the efflux of fluorescent substrates and confer resistance to multiple dyes and drugs, including fluoroquinolones. Four of seven transporters failed to exhibit drug efflux activity for the set of drugs and dyes tested, even upon overexpression in L. lactis. Since all seven transporters were purified as heterodimers after overexpression in L. lactis, a lack of drug efflux activity is not attributed to poor expression or protein aggregation. Reconstitution of the purified multidrug transporters EfrAB, EfrCD, and EfrEF in proteoliposomes revealed functional coupling between ATP hydrolysis and drug binding. Our analysis creates an experimental basis for the accurate prediction of drug efflux transporters and indicates that many annotated multidrug efflux pumps might be incapable of drug transport and thus might fulfill other physiological functions in the cell. PMID:27381387

  11. The Heterodimeric ABC Transporter EfrCD Mediates Multidrug Efflux in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Hürlimann, Lea M; Corradi, Valentina; Hohl, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V; Tieleman, D Peter; Seeger, Markus A

    2016-09-01

    Nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis are an emerging health problem. However, drug efflux pumps contributing to intrinsic drug resistance are poorly studied in this Gram-positive pathogen. In this study, we functionally investigated seven heterodimeric ABC transporters of E. faecalis that are annotated as drug efflux pumps. Deletion of ef0789-ef0790 on the chromosome of E. faecalis resulted in increased susceptibility to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, ethidium, and Hoechst 33342, and the corresponding transporter was named EfrCD. Unexpectedly, the previously described heterodimeric multidrug ABC transporter EfrAB contributes marginally to drug efflux in the endogenous context of E. faecalis In contrast, heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis revealed that EfrAB, EfrCD, and the product of ef2226-ef2227 (EfrEF) mediate the efflux of fluorescent substrates and confer resistance to multiple dyes and drugs, including fluoroquinolones. Four of seven transporters failed to exhibit drug efflux activity for the set of drugs and dyes tested, even upon overexpression in L. lactis Since all seven transporters were purified as heterodimers after overexpression in L. lactis, a lack of drug efflux activity is not attributed to poor expression or protein aggregation. Reconstitution of the purified multidrug transporters EfrAB, EfrCD, and EfrEF in proteoliposomes revealed functional coupling between ATP hydrolysis and drug binding. Our analysis creates an experimental basis for the accurate prediction of drug efflux transporters and indicates that many annotated multidrug efflux pumps might be incapable of drug transport and thus might fulfill other physiological functions in the cell. PMID:27381387

  12. Cellular Mechanisms Controlling Caspase Activation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Amanda B.; Freel, Christopher D.; Kornbluth, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Caspases are the primary drivers of apoptotic cell death, cleaving cellular proteins that are critical for dismantling the dying cell. Initially translated as inactive zymogenic precursors, caspases are activated in response to a variety of cell death stimuli. In addition to factors required for their direct activation (e.g., dimerizing adaptor proteins in the case of initiator caspases that lie at the apex of apoptotic signaling cascades), caspases are regulated by a variety of cellular factors in a myriad of physiological and pathological settings. For example, caspases may be modified posttranslationally (e.g., by phosphorylation or ubiquitylation) or through interaction of modulatory factors with either the zymogenic or active form of a caspase, altering its activation and/or activity. These regulatory events may inhibit or enhance enzymatic activity or may affect activity toward particular cellular substrates. Finally, there is emerging literature to suggest that caspases can participate in a variety of cellular processes unrelated to apoptotic cell death. In these settings, it is particularly important that caspases are maintained under stringent control to avoid inadvertent cell death. It is likely that continued examination of these processes will reveal new mechanisms of caspase regulation with implications well beyond control of apoptotic cell death. PMID:23732469

  13. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  14. The effect of N-acetylcysteine on chloride efflux from airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Varelogianni, Georgia; Oliynyk, Igor; Roomans, Godfried M; Johannesson, Marie

    2010-03-01

    Defective chloride transport in epithelial cells increases mucus viscosity and leads to recurrent infections with high oxidative stress in patients with CF (cystic fibrosis). NAC (N-acetylcysteine) is a well known mucolytic and antioxidant drug, and an indirect precursor of glutathione. Since GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione) previously has been shown to be able to promote Cl- efflux from CF airway epithelial cells, it was investigated whether NAC also could stimulate Cl- efflux from CF and non-CF epithelial cells and through which mechanisms. CFBE (CF bronchial epithelial cells) and normal bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE) were treated with 1 mM, 5 mM, 10 mM or 15 mM NAC for 4 h at 37 degrees C. The effect of NAC on Cl- transport was measured by Cl- efflux measurements and by X-ray microanalysis. Cl- efflux from CFBE cells was stimulated by NAC in a dose-dependent manner, with 10 mM NAC causing a significant increase in Cl- efflux with nearly 80% in CFBE cells. The intracellular Cl- concentration in CFBE cells was significantly decreased up to 60% after 4 h treatment with 10 mM NAC. Moreover immunocytochemistry and Western blot experiments revealed expression of CFTR channel on CFBE cells after treatment with 10 mM NAC. The stimulation of Cl- efflux by NAC in CF airway epithelial cells may improve hydration of the mucus and thereby be beneficial for CF patients. PMID:19947928

  15. Multidrug efflux pumps as main players in intrinsic and acquired resistance to antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Corona, Fernando; Reales-Calderón, Jose A; Sánchez, María B; Martínez, José L

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps constitute a group of transporters that are ubiquitously found in any organism. In addition to other functions with relevance for the cell physiology, efflux pumps contribute to the resistance to compounds used for treating different diseases, including resistance to anticancer drugs, antibiotics or antifungal compounds. In the case of antimicrobials, efflux pumps are major players in both intrinsic and acquired resistance to drugs currently in use for the treatment of infectious diseases. One important aspect not fully explored of efflux pumps consists on the identification of effectors able to induce their expression. Indeed, whereas the analysis of clinical isolates have shown that mutants overexpressing these resistance elements are frequently found, less is known on the conditions that may trigger expression of efflux pumps, hence leading to transient induction of resistance in vivo, a situation that is barely detectable using classical susceptibility tests. In the current article we review the structure and mechanisms of regulation of the expression of bacterial and fungal efflux pumps, with a particular focus in those for which a role in clinically relevant resistance has been reported. PMID:27620952

  16. An Inducible Fusaric Acid Tripartite Efflux Pump Contributes to the Fusaric Acid Resistance in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rouh-Mei; Liao, Sih-Ting; Huang, Chiang-Ching; Huang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Tsuey-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusaric acid (5-butylpicolinic acid), a mycotoxin, is noxious to some microorganisms. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia displays an intrinsic resistance to fusaric acid. This study aims to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the intrinsic fusaric acid resistance in S. maltophilia. Methodology A putative fusaric acid resistance-involved regulon fuaR-fuaABC was identified by the survey of the whole genome sequence of S. maltophilia K279a. The fuaABC operon was verified by reverse transcriptase-PCR. The contribution of the fuaABC operon to the antimicrobial resistance was evaluated by comparing the antimicrobials susceptibility between the wild-type strain and fuaABC knock-out mutant. The regulatory role of fuaR in the expression of the fuaABC operon was assessed by promoter transcription fusion assay. Results The fuaABC operon was inducibly expressed by fusaric acid and the inducibility was fuaR dependent. FuaR functioned as a repressor of the fuaABC operon in absence of a fusaric acid inducer and as an activator in its presence. Overexpression of the fuaABC operon contributed to the fusaric acid resistance. Significance A novel tripartite fusaric acid efflux pump, FuaABC, was identified in this study. Distinct from the formally classification, the FuaABC may constitute a new type of subfamily of the tripartite efflux pump. PMID:23236431

  17. Modifications of laccase activities of copper efflux oxidase, CueO by synergistic mutations in the first and second coordination spheres of the type I copper center.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kunishige; Kogi, Hiroki; Tsujimura, Seiya; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-02-15

    The redox potential of type I copper in the Escherichia coli multicopper oxidase CueO was shifted in the positive or negative direction as a result of the single, double, and triple mutations in the first and second coordination spheres: the formation of the NH···S(-)(Cys500 ligand) hydrogen bond, the breakdown of the NH(His443 ligand)···O(-)(Asp439) hydrogen bond, and the substitution of the Met510 ligand for the non-coordinating Leu or coordinating Gln. Laccase activities of CueO were maximally enhanced 140-fold by virtue of the synergistic effect of mild mutations at and at around the ligand groups to type I copper. PMID:23337502

  18. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise.

  19. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  20. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  1. Radiocarbon in Tree STEM CO2 Efflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhr, J.; Czimczik, C. I.; Angert, A.; Trumbore, S.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon dioxide efflux from tree stems can be a significant component of the stand-level carbon balance. Recent studies have demonstrated that tree stem CO2 efflux may reflect more than just in-situ respiration but also transport from other locations and it has been suggested that it may also include C originally respired in roots or even uptake of soil CO2. We report measurements of the radiocarbon signature of carbon emitted from a range of mature tree stems in tropical and temperate forest ecosystems. Comparison of the radiocarbon signature of respired CO2 with the observed rate of decline in atmsopheric 14C-CO2 provides a measure of the time elapsed between C fixation by the plant and its return to the atmosphere as stem CO2 efflux. In all investigated trees, we observed that stem CO2 efflux had higher radiocarbon signatures than the contemporary atmospheric 14C-CO2, and therefore was derived from C fixed one to several years earlier. In tropical forest trees, we found that the 14C signature of CO2 within the stem (~4-5 cm depth) had even higher radiocarbon signatures than the stem CO2 efflux. In one of the investigated tree species, the in-stem CO2 was derived from C sources fixed on average ~20 years previously. These results confirm observations of root-respired CO2 that also have shown contributions of C substrates older than recent photosynthetic products, and the presence of extracable C reserves in wood that reflect the presence of older C sources. Our results imply that stem CO2 efflux is not only derived from respiration of recent photosynthetic products but includes contributions from older, stored C pools. Ongoing investigations will enable us to compare CO2 efflux for trees subjected to experimental drought, and using different life strategies (deciduous versus evergreen oaks) to determine if the use of these older C stores varies with stress.

  2. Antistreptococcal Activity of Telithromycin Compared with Seven Other Drugs in Relation to Macrolide Resistance Mechanisms in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Roman S.; Bogdanovitch, Tatiana M.; Appelbaum, Peter C.; Ednie, Lois; Stratchounski, Leonid S.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Bozdogan, Bülent

    2002-01-01

    The susceptibilities of 468 recent Russian clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates and 600 Streptococcus pyogenes isolates, from 14 centers in Russia, to telithromycin, erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin, levofloxacin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, and penicillin G were tested. Penicillin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae strains were rare except in Siberia, where their prevalence rate was 13.5%: most were penicillin intermediate, but for three strains (two from Smolensk and one from Novosibirsk) the MICs of penicillin G were 4 or 8 μg/ml. Overall, 2.5% of S. pneumoniae isolates were resistant to erythromycin. Efflux was the prevalent resistance mechanism (five strains; 41.7%), followed by ribosomal methylation encoded by constitutive erm(B), which was found in four isolates. Ribosomal mutation was the mechanism of macrolide resistance in three isolates; one erythromycin-resistant S. pneumoniae isolate had an A2059G mutation in 23S rRNA, and two isolates had substitution of GTG by TPS at positions 69 to 71 in ribosomal protein L4. All S. pyogenes isolates were susceptible to penicillin, and 11% were erythromycin resistant. Ribosomal methylation was the most common resistance mechanism for S. pyogenes (89.4%). These methylases were encoded by erm(A) [subclass erm(TR)] genes, and their expression was inducible in 96.6% of isolates. The rest of the erythromycin-resistant Russian S. pyogenes isolates (7.6%) had an efflux resistance mechanism. Telithromycin was active against 100% of pneumococci and 99.2% of S. pyogenes, and levofloxacin and quinupristin-dalfopristin were active against all isolates of both species. PMID:12183254

  3. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ashery, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level. PMID:26372048

  4. Increased efflux of glutathione conjugate in acutely diabetic cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Ting, Simon; Lau, Howard; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas; An, Ding; Qi, Dake; Abrahani, Mohammed A; Rodrigues, Brian

    2004-10-01

    In diabetes, cell death and resultant cardiomyopathy have been linked to oxidative stress and depletion of antioxidants like glutathione (GSH). Although the de novo synthesis and recycling of GSH have been extensively studied in the chronically diabetic heart, their contribution in modulating cardiac oxidative stress in acute diabetes has been largely ignored. Additionally, the possible contribution of cellular efflux in regulating GSH levels during diabetes is unknown. We used streptozotocin to make Wistar rats acutely diabetic and after 4 days examined the different processes that regulate cardiac GSH. Reduction in myocyte GSH in diabetic rats was accompanied by increased oxidative stress, excessive reactive oxygen species, and an elevated apoptotic cell death. The effect on GSH was not associated with any change in either synthesis or recycling, as both gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene expression (responsible for bio syn thesis) and glutathione reductase activity (involved with GSH recycling) remained unchanged. However, gene expression of multidrug resistance protein 1, a transporter implicated in effluxing GSH during oxidative stress, was elevated. GSH conjugate efflux mediated by multidrug resistance protein 1 also increased in diabetic cardiomyocytes, an effect that was blocked using MK-571, a specific inhibitor of this transporter. As MK-571 also decreased oxidative stress in diabetic cardiomyocytes, an important role can be proposed for this transporter in GSH and reactive oxygen species homeostasis in the acutely diabetic heart. PMID:15573148

  5. Activities of the Institute for Mechanical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Institute of Mechanical Engineering (IME) is part of Canada's National Research Council. Its mission is to undertake, support, promote, and disseminate research and development in the mechanical engineering aspects of three vital sectors of the Canadian economy: transportation, resource industries, and manufacturing. The IME achieves its mission by performing research and development in its own facilities; by developing, providing, and transferring expertise and knowledge; by making its research facilities available to collaborators and clients; and by participating in international liaison and collaborative research activities. Six research programs are conducted in the IME: Advanced Manufacturing Technology; Coastal Zone Engineering; Cold Regions Engineering; Combustion and Fluids Engineering; Ground Transportation Technology; and Machinery and Engine Technology. The rationale and major research thrusts of each program are described, and specific achievements in 1991-92 are reviewed. Lists of technical reports and papers presented by IME personnel are also included.

  6. Applicability of soil column incubation experiments to measure CO2 efflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Linlin; Nishimura, Taku; Imoto, Hiromi; Sun, Zhigang

    2015-10-01

    Accurate measurements of CO2 efflux from soils are essential to understand dynamic changes in soil carbon storage. Column incubation experiments are commonly used to study soil water and solute transport; however, the use of column incubation experiments to study soil CO2 efflux has seldom been reported. In this study, a 150-day greenhouse experiment with two treatments (no-tillage and tillage soils) was conducted to evaluate the applicability of soil column incubation experiments to study CO2 efflux. Both the chamber measurement and the gradient method were used, and results from the two methods were consistent: tillage increased soil cumulative CO2 efflux during the incubation period. Compared with fieldwork, incubation experiments can create or precisely control experimental conditions and thus have advantages for investigating the influence of climate factors or human activities on CO2 efflux. They are superior to bottle incubation because soil column experiments maintain a soil structure that is almost the same as that in the field, and thus can facilitate analyses on CO2 behaviour in the soil profile and more accurate evaluations of CO2 efflux. Although some improvements are still required for column incubation experiments, wider application of this method to study soil CO2 behaviour is expected.

  7. Characterization of MATE-Type Multidrug Efflux Pumps from Klebsiella pneumoniae MGH78578

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Wakano; Minato, Yusuke; Dodan, Hayata; Onishi, Motoyasu; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa; Kuroda, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    We previously described the cloning of genes related to drug resistance from Klebsiella pneumoniae MGH78578. Of these, we identified a putative gene encoding a MATE-type multidrug efflux pump, and named it ketM. Escherichia coli KAM32 possessing ketM on a plasmid showed increased minimum inhibitory concentrations for norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, acriflavine, Hoechst 33342, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenyl indole (DAPI). The active efflux of DAPI was observed in E. coli KAM32 possessing ketM on a plasmid. The expression of mRNA for ketM was observed in K. pneumoniae cells, and we subsequently disrupted ketM in K. pneumoniae ATCC10031. However, no significant changes were observed in drug resistance levels between the parental strain ATCC10031 and ketM disruptant, SKYM. Therefore, we concluded that KetM was a multidrug efflux pump, that did not significantly contribute to intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial chemicals in K. pneumoniae. MATE-type transporters are considered to be secondary transporters; therefore, we investigated the coupling cations of KetM. DAPI efflux by KetM was observed when lactate was added to produce a proton motive force, indicating that KetM effluxed substrates using a proton motive force. However, the weak efflux of DAPI by KetM was also noted when NaCl was added to the assay mixture without lactate. This result suggests that KetM may utilize proton and sodium motive forces. PMID:25807080

  8. Molecular mechanisms of asymmetric RAF dimer activation.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, Pablo G; Bohuszewicz, Olga; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Kolch, Walter; Rosta, Edina

    2014-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in cell regulatory mechanisms. Dimerization plays also a crucial role in the kinase activity of many kinases, including RAF, CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) and EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), with heterodimers often being the most active forms. However, the structural and mechanistic details of how phosphorylation affects the activity of homo- and hetero-dimers are largely unknown. Experimentally, synthesizing protein samples with fully specified and homogeneous phosphorylation states remains a challenge for structural biology and biochemical studies. Typically, multiple changes in phosphorylation lead to activation of the same protein, which makes structural determination methods particularly difficult. It is also not well understood how the occurrence of phosphorylation and dimerization processes synergize to affect kinase activities. In the present article, we review available structural data and discuss how MD simulations can be used to model conformational transitions of RAF kinase dimers, in both their phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms. PMID:25109958

  9. Pathways of Arsenic Uptake and Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Chi; Fu, Hsueh-Liang; Lin, Yung-Feng; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic substance and ranks first on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Superfund List. Arsenic is a carcinogen and a causative agent of numerous human diseases. Paradoxically arsenic is used as a chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Inorganic arsenic has two biological important oxidation states: As(V) (arsenate) and As(III) (arsenite). Arsenic uptake is adventitious because the arsenate and arsenite are chemically similar to required nutrients. Arsenate resembles phosphate and is a competitive inhibitor of many phosphate-utilizing enzymes. Arsenate is taken up by phosphate transport systems. In contrast, at physiological pH, the form of arsenite is As(OH)3, which resembles organic molecules such as glycerol. Consequently, arsenite is taken into cells by aquaglyceroporin channels. Arsenic efflux systems are found in nearly every organism and evolved to rid cells of this toxic metalloid. These efflux systems include members of the multidrug resistance protein family and the bacterial exchangers Acr3 and ArsB. ArsB can also be a subunit of the ArsAB As(III)-translocating ATPase, an ATP-driven efflux pump. The ArsD metallochaperone binds cytosolic As(III) and transfers it to the ArsA subunit of the efflux pump. Knowledge of the pathways and transporters for arsenic uptake and efflux is essential for understanding its toxicity and carcinogenicity and for rational design of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:23046656

  10. Re-evolution of the 2-phenylquinolines: ligand-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a potent new class of Staphylococcus aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors to combat antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefano; Gosetto, Francesca; Iraci, Nunzio; Barreca, Maria Letizia; Massari, Serena; Sancineto, Luca; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Tabarrini, Oriana; Dimovska, Mirjana; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cecchetti, Violetta

    2013-06-27

    Overexpression of efflux pumps is an important mechanism by which bacteria evade the effects of antimicrobial agents that are substrates. NorA is a Staphylococcus aureus efflux pump that confers reduced susceptibility to many structurally unrelated agents, including fluoroquinolones, biocides, and dyes, resulting in a multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotype. In this work, a series of 2-phenylquinoline derivatives was designed by means of ligand-based pharmacophore modeling in an attempt to identify improved S. aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Most of the 2-phenylquinoline derivatives displayed potent EPI activity against the norA overexpressing strain SA-1199B. The antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin, when used in combination with some of the synthesized compounds, was completely restored in SA-1199B and SA-K2378, a strain overexpressing norA from a multicopy plasmid. Compounds 3m and 3q also showed potent synergistic activity with the ethidium bromide dye in a strain overexpressing the MepA MDR efflux pump. PMID:23710549

  11. Recent advances in the brain-to-blood efflux transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Ken-ichi; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2002-11-01

    Elucidating the details of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport mechanism is a very important step towards successful drug targeting to the brain and understanding what happens in the brain. Although several brain uptake methods have been developed to characterize transport at the BBB, these are mainly useful for investigating influx transport across the BBB. In 1992, P-glycoprotein was found to act as an efflux pump for anti-cancer drugs at the BBB using primary cultured bovine brain endothelial cells. In order to determine the direct efflux transport from the brain to the circulating blood of exogenous compounds in vivo, the Brain Efflux Index method was developed to characterize several BBB efflux transport systems. Recently, we have established conditionally immortalized rat (TR-BBB) and mouse (TM-BBB) brain capillary endothelial cell lines from transgenic rats and mice harboring temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T-antigen gene to characterize the transport mechanisms at the BBB in vitro. TR-BBB and TM-BBB cells possess certain in vivo transport functions and express mRNAs for the BBB. Using a combination of newly developed in vivo and in vitro methods, we have elucidated the efflux transport mechanism at the BBB for neurosteroids, excitatory neurotransmitters, suppressive neurotransmitters, amino acids, and other organic anions to understand the physiological role played by the BBB as a detoxifying organ for the brain. PMID:12429456

  12. Mechanism and active variety of allelochemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peng, S.-L.; Wen, J.; Guo, Q.-F.

    2004-01-01

    This article summarizes allelochemicals' active variety, its potential causes and function mechanisms. Allelochemicals' activity varies with temperature, photoperiod, water and soils during natural processes, with its initial concentration, compound structure and mixed degree during functional processes, with plant accessions, tissues and maturity within-species, and with research techniques and operation processes. The prospective developmental aspects of allelopathy studies in the future are discussed. Future research should focus on: (1) to identify and purify allelochemicals more effectively, especially for agriculture, (2) the functions of allelopathy at the molecular structure level, (3) using allelopathy to explain plant species interactions, (4) allelopathy as a driving force of succession, and (5) the significance of allelopathy in the evolutionary processes.

  13. Ascorbate efflux as a new strategy for iron reduction and transport in plants.

    PubMed

    Grillet, Louis; Ouerdane, Laurent; Flis, Paulina; Hoang, Minh Thi Thanh; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Lobinski, Ryszard; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane

    2014-01-31

    Iron (Fe) is essential for virtually all living organisms. The identification of the chemical forms of iron (the speciation) circulating in and between cells is crucial to further understand the mechanisms of iron delivery to its final targets. Here we analyzed how iron is transported to the seeds by the chemical identification of iron complexes that are delivered to embryos, followed by the biochemical characterization of the transport of these complexes by the embryo, using the pea (Pisum sativum) as a model species. We have found that iron circulates as ferric complexes with citrate and malate (Fe(III)3Cit2Mal2, Fe(III)3Cit3Mal1, Fe(III)Cit2). Because dicotyledonous plants only transport ferrous iron, we checked whether embryos were capable of reducing iron of these complexes. Indeed, embryos did express a constitutively high ferric reduction activity. Surprisingly, iron(III) reduction is not catalyzed by the expected membrane-bound ferric reductase. Instead, embryos efflux high amounts of ascorbate that chemically reduce iron(III) from citrate-malate complexes. In vitro transport experiments on isolated embryos using radiolabeled (55)Fe demonstrated that this ascorbate-mediated reduction is an obligatory step for the uptake of iron(II). Moreover, the ascorbate efflux activity was also measured in Arabidopsis embryos, suggesting that this new iron transport system may be generic to dicotyledonous plants. Finally, in embryos of the ascorbate-deficient mutants vtc2-4, vtc5-1, and vtc5-2, the reducing activity and the iron concentration were reduced significantly. Taken together, our results identified a new iron transport mechanism in plants that could play a major role to control iron loading in seeds. PMID:24347170

  14. Ascorbate Efflux as a New Strategy for Iron Reduction and Transport in Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Grillet, Louis; Ouerdane, Laurent; Flis, Paulina; Hoang, Minh Thi Thanh; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Lobinski, Ryszard; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is essential for virtually all living organisms. The identification of the chemical forms of iron (the speciation) circulating in and between cells is crucial to further understand the mechanisms of iron delivery to its final targets. Here we analyzed how iron is transported to the seeds by the chemical identification of iron complexes that are delivered to embryos, followed by the biochemical characterization of the transport of these complexes by the embryo, using the pea (Pisum sativum) as a model species. We have found that iron circulates as ferric complexes with citrate and malate (Fe(III)3Cit2Mal2, Fe(III)3Cit3Mal1, Fe(III)Cit2). Because dicotyledonous plants only transport ferrous iron, we checked whether embryos were capable of reducing iron of these complexes. Indeed, embryos did express a constitutively high ferric reduction activity. Surprisingly, iron(III) reduction is not catalyzed by the expected membrane-bound ferric reductase. Instead, embryos efflux high amounts of ascorbate that chemically reduce iron(III) from citrate-malate complexes. In vitro transport experiments on isolated embryos using radiolabeled 55Fe demonstrated that this ascorbate-mediated reduction is an obligatory step for the uptake of iron(II). Moreover, the ascorbate efflux activity was also measured in Arabidopsis embryos, suggesting that this new iron transport system may be generic to dicotyledonous plants. Finally, in embryos of the ascorbate-deficient mutants vtc2-4, vtc5-1, and vtc5-2, the reducing activity and the iron concentration were reduced significantly. Taken together, our results identified a new iron transport mechanism in plants that could play a major role to control iron loading in seeds. PMID:24347170

  15. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Shawn P.; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications. PMID:26531291

  16. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Shawn P; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications. PMID:26531291

  17. Recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of the NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Próchnicki, Tomasz; Mangan, Matthew S.; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are high-molecular-weight protein complexes that are formed in the cytosolic compartment in response to danger- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns. These complexes enable activation of an inflammatory protease caspase-1, leading to a cell death process called pyroptosis and to proteolytic cleavage and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Along with caspase-1, inflammasome components include an adaptor protein, ASC, and a sensor protein, which triggers the inflammasome assembly in response to a danger signal. The inflammasome sensor proteins are pattern recognition receptors belonging either to the NOD-like receptor (NLR) or to the AIM2-like receptor family. While the molecular agonists that induce inflammasome formation by AIM2 and by several other NLRs have been identified, it is not well understood how the NLR family member NLRP3 is activated. Given that NLRP3 activation is relevant to a range of human pathological conditions, significant attempts are being made to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this process. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular events that lead to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to a range of K + efflux-inducing danger signals. We also comment on the reported involvement of cytosolic Ca 2+ fluxes on NLRP3 activation. We outline the recent advances in research on the physiological and pharmacological mechanisms of regulation of NLRP3 responses, and we point to several open questions regarding the current model of NLRP3 activation. PMID:27508077

  18. Recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of the NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Próchnicki, Tomasz; Mangan, Matthew S; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are high-molecular-weight protein complexes that are formed in the cytosolic compartment in response to danger- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns. These complexes enable activation of an inflammatory protease caspase-1, leading to a cell death process called pyroptosis and to proteolytic cleavage and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Along with caspase-1, inflammasome components include an adaptor protein, ASC, and a sensor protein, which triggers the inflammasome assembly in response to a danger signal. The inflammasome sensor proteins are pattern recognition receptors belonging either to the NOD-like receptor (NLR) or to the AIM2-like receptor family. While the molecular agonists that induce inflammasome formation by AIM2 and by several other NLRs have been identified, it is not well understood how the NLR family member NLRP3 is activated. Given that NLRP3 activation is relevant to a range of human pathological conditions, significant attempts are being made to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this process. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular events that lead to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to a range of K (+) efflux-inducing danger signals. We also comment on the reported involvement of cytosolic Ca (2+) fluxes on NLRP3 activation. We outline the recent advances in research on the physiological and pharmacological mechanisms of regulation of NLRP3 responses, and we point to several open questions regarding the current model of NLRP3 activation. PMID:27508077

  19. Spontaneous Activity of Cochlear Hair Cells Triggered by Fluid Secretion Mechanism in Adjacent Support Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han Chin; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Cheung, Rocky; Zhang-Hooks, YingXin; Agarwal, Amit; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Rock, Jason; Bergles, Dwight E

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous electrical activity of neurons in developing sensory systems promotes their maturation and proper connectivity. In the auditory system, spontaneous activity of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) is initiated by the release of ATP from glia-like inner supporting cells (ISCs), facilitating maturation of central pathways before hearing onset. Here, we find that ATP stimulates purinergic autoreceptors in ISCs, triggering Cl(-) efflux and osmotic cell shrinkage by opening TMEM16A Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels. Release of Cl(-) from ISCs also forces K(+) efflux, causing transient depolarization of IHCs near ATP release sites. Genetic deletion of TMEM16A markedly reduces the spontaneous activity of IHCs and spiral ganglion neurons in the developing cochlea and prevents ATP-dependent shrinkage of supporting cells. These results indicate that supporting cells in the developing cochlea have adapted a pathway used for fluid secretion in other organs to induce periodic excitation of hair cells. PMID:26627734

  20. Adaptive drug resistance mediated by root-nodulation-cell division efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Daniels, C; Ramos, J L

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major therapeutic problem. Bacteria use the same mechanisms for developing resistance to antibiotics as they do for developing resistance to biocide compounds present in some cleaning and personal care products. Root-nodulation-cell division (RND) family efflux pumps are a common means of multidrug resistance, and induction of their expression can explain the observed cross-resistance found between antibiotics and biocides in laboratory strains. Hence, there is a relationship between the active chemicals used in household products, organic solvents and antibiotics. The widespread use of biocide-containing modern-day household products may promote the development of microbial resistance and, in particular, cross-resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19220351

  1. Distribution of AdeABC efflux system genes in genotypically diverse strains of clinical Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Piotr; Sacha, Paweł; Czaban, Sławomir; Hauschild, Tomasz; Ojdana, Dominika; Kowalczuk, Oksana; Milewski, Robert; Poniatowski, Bogusław; Nikliński, Jacek; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2013-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly problematic hospital-associated pathogen. Different mechanisms contribute to the formation of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii, including the AdeABC efflux system. Distribution of the structural and regulatory genes encoding the AdeABC efflux system among genetically diverse clinical A. baumannii strains was achieved by using PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques. The distribution of adeABRS genes is extremely high among our A. baumannii strains, except the adeC gene. We have observed a large proportion of strains presenting multidrug-resistance phenotype for several years. The efflux pump could be an important mechanism in these strains in resistance to antibiotics. PMID:23886790

  2. Snow-melting season CO2 efflux along the trans-Alaska pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Nakai, T.

    2011-12-01

    This research was conducted to estimate CO2 effluxes in exposed and snow-covered soils along the trans-Alaska pipeline (ca. 660 km) during snow-melting seasons of April 2010 and April-May 2011. In-situ CO2 efflux was measured with a dynamic chamber system that consisted of a chamber (22 cm in diameter and 6 cm high), pump, NDIR (CO2 analyzer), and a laptop computer. Soil temperature and snow depth were measured with a portable thermocouple and from snow pit-wall. The difference in snow-melting season CO2 efflux was remarkably showed in exposed and snow-covered soils of boreal forest and tundra, suggesting the distinctly latitudinal CO2 efflux gradient. Mean CO2 efflux was 0.88±0.51 and 2.4±3.4 gCO2-C/m2/day in soil temperature of -1.8±4.0 and -1.1±3.4 °C during the snow-melting period of 2010 and 2011, respectively. When the snow was disappeared, mean CO2 efflux was 1.3±0.3 and 5.4±3.7 gCO2-C/m2/day for 2010 and 2011; on the other hand, when the seasonal covered snow was melting, mean CO2 efflux was 0.2±0.2 and 0.3±0.3 gCO2-C/m2/day for both years. However, the coastal site near Arctic sea was not still melted, showing much lower CO2 efflux was 0.02±0.02 and 0.08±0.12 gCO2-C/m2/day in soil temperature of -12.4±2.2 and -12.9±3.4 °C for 2010 and 2011, respectively. A relationship between mean CO2 efflux at each site and mean soil temperature at 5 cm below the surface along the trans-Alaska pipeline is a good exponential, which the equation is as follows: CO2 efflux = 885×exp(0.335×Ts) (R2=0.86; p<0.001) and CO2 efflux = 888×exp(0.337×Ts) (R2=0.92; p<0.001) for 2010 and 2011, respectively. CO2 efflux in a white spruce forest during the snow-thawing season was measured in four directions from the bottom stem, suggesting that distinct differences of CO2 efflux between the exposed soil and the snow-covered soil in the four directions. This may be due to the fast decomposition of soil organic carbon and/or active root respiration in the exposed soil

  3. Toxin sensitivity of the calcium-dependent rubidium efflux in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Tauc, M; Gastineau, M; Poujeol, P

    1993-01-29

    86Rb+ efflux was measured on polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells under A23187 or ATP stimulation. This efflux, inhibited by barium, Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus venom and charybdotoxin was attributed to the stimulation of Ca(++)-activated maxi K+ channels. Snake venom from Dendroaspis polylepis did not alter the stimulation as well as did apamine. ATP was effective on both the apical and basolateral membranes and the Ca(++)-activated maxi K+ channels were predominantly found on the basolateral membrane. This study presents the physiological evidence that dendrotoxin is ineffective on the epithelial Ca(++)-activated maxi K+ channel present in MDCK cells. PMID:7678959

  4. Transcriptional Analysis of MexAB-OprM Efflux Pumps System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Role in Carbapenem Resistance in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem resistance presents severe threat to the treatment of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The study was undertaken to investigate the role of efflux pumps in conferring meropenem resistance and effect of single dose exposure of meropenem on transcription level of mexA gene in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital of India. Further, in this investigation an effort was made to assess whether different components of MexAB-OprM operon expresses in the same manner and the extent of contributions of those components in meropenem resistance in its natural host (P. aeruginosa) and in a heterologous host (E. coli). Out of 83 meropenem nonsusceptible isolates, 22 isolates were found to possess efflux pump activity phenotypically. Modified hodge test and multiplex PCR confirmed the absence of carbapenemase genes in those isolates. All of them were of multidrug resistant phenotype and were resistant to all the carbepenem drug tested. MexAB-OprM efflux pump was found to be overexpressed in all the study isolates. It could be observed that single dose exposure meropenem could give rise to trivial increase in transcription of mexA gene. Different constructs of MexAB-OprM (mexR-mexA-mexB-OprM; mexA-mexB-OprM; mexA-mexB) could be expressed in both its natural (P. aeruginosa PAO1) and heterologous host (E. coli JM107) but transcription level of mexA gene varied in both the hosts before and after single dose exposure of meropenem. Different components of the operon failed to enhance meropenem resistance in E. coli JM107 and P. aeruginosa PAO1. This study could prove that MexAB-OprM efflux pump can significantly contribute to meropenem resistance in hospital isolates of P. aeruginosa where an acquired resistant mechanism is absent. Thus, equal importance should be given for diagnosis of intrinsic resistance mechanism so as to minimize treatment failure. As meropenem could not enhance mexA transcriptions significantly, there

  5. Evidence of deregulated cholesterol efflux in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mourmoura, Evanthia; Vasilaki, Anna; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanouel; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Tsezou, Aspasia

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies indicated that lipids may be associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA); however the molecular mechanism involved is unclear. Our study aimed to investigate the expression pattern of cholesterol efflux related proteins in AAA. Liver X receptors (LXRα and LXRβ), ATP-binding-cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), Apolipoprotein AI (ApoAI), smooth muscle α-actin (α-SM) and vimentin expression levels were evaluated in human AAA, atherosclerotic (ATH) and normal abdominal aortic tissues. We found significant differences in LXRα, LXRβ and ABCA1 mRNA expression levels between AAA, ATH and normal whole aortic tissues and also within the AAA, ATH and normal "intima-media" layers. Specifically, LXRα, LXRβ and ABCA1 mRNA levels were decreased in AAA compared to ATH-whole tissues, as well as in AAA "intima-media" compared to ATH and normal "intima-media" layers. Moreover, immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that LXRα and ABCA1 immunoreactivities (IR) were reduced in the AAA media compared to the normal and ATH media layers and that they were also reduced in the intima layer of AAA and ATH tissues, whereas ApoAI-IR was increased in the AAA and ATH aortic walls compared to normal pointing to possible deregulation of the cholesterol efflux mechanism in AAA. Furthermore, double staining for vimentin and α-SM showed vimentin expression in the intima and inner media layer of AAA with sparse vimentin positive SMCs designating possible SMCs phenotype switch from contractile to synthetic form. In addition, histochemical analysis showed excessive lipid accumulation in the AAA wall, while co-staining using Oil Red O with α-SM or CD68 revealed lipid accumulation in SMCs and macrophages, respectively. Our study provides novel evidence for impaired cholesterol efflux in AAA associated with lipid accumulation in SMCs and macrophages, as well as switch of SMCs phenotype from contractile to synthetic form. PMID:26725543

  6. Effects of ATP and vanadate on calcium efflux from barnacle muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M T; Blaustein, M P

    1981-01-22

    Calcium ions carry the inward current during depolarization of barnacle muscle fibres and are involved in the contraction process. Intracellular ionized calcium ([Ca2+]i) in barnacle muscle, as in other cells, is kept at a very low concentration, against a large electrochemical gradient. This large gradient is maintained by Ca2+ extrusion mechanisms. When [Ca2+]i is below the contraction threshold, Ca2+ efflux from giant barnacle muscle fibres is, largely, both ATP dependent and external Na+ (Na+0) dependent (see also refs 5,6). When [Ca2+]i is raised to the level expected during muscle contraction (2-5 muM), most of the Ca2+ efflux from perfused fibres is Na0 dependent; as in squid axons, this Na+0-dependent Ca2+ efflux is ATP independent. Orthovanadate is an inhibitor of (Na+ + K+) ATPase and the red cell Ca2+-ATpase. We report here that vanadate inhibits ATP-promoted, Na+0-dependent Ca2+ efflux from barnacle muscle fibres perfused with low [Ca2+]i (0.2-0.5 microM), but has little effect on the Na+0-dependent, ATP-independent Ca2+ efflux from fibres with a high [Ca]i (2-5 microM). Nevertheless, ATP depletion or vanadate treatment of high [Ca2+]i fibres causes an approximately 50-fold increase of Ca2+ efflux into Ca2+-containing lithium seawater. These results demonstrate that both vanadate and ATP affect Ca2+ extrusion, including the Na+0-dependent Ca2+ efflux (Na-Ca exchange), in barnacle muscle. PMID:6256662

  7. Plant cells use auxin efflux to explore geometry.

    PubMed

    Zaban, Beatrix; Liu, Wenwen; Jiang, Xingyu; Nick, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cell movement is the central mechanism for animal morphogenesis. Plant cell development rather relies on flexible alignment of cell axis adjusting cellular differentiation to directional cues. As central input, vectorial fields of mechanical stress and gradients of the phytohormone auxin have been discussed. In tissue contexts, mechanical and chemical signals will always act in concert; experimentally it is difficult to dissect their individual roles. We have designed a novel approach, based on cells, where directionality has been eliminated by removal of the cell wall. We impose a new axis using a microfluidic set-up to generate auxin gradients. Rectangular microvessels are integrated orthogonally with the gradient. Cells in these microvessels align their new axis with microvessel geometry before touching the wall. Auxin efflux is necessary for this touch-independent geometry exploration and we suggest a model, where auxin gradients can be used to align cell axis in tissues with minimized mechanical tensions. PMID:25068254

  8. CO2 Efflux from Cleared Mangrove Peat

    PubMed Central

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Ruess, Roger W.; Feller, Ilka C.

    2011-01-01

    Background CO2 emissions from cleared mangrove areas may be substantial, increasing the costs of continued losses of these ecosystems, particularly in mangroves that have highly organic soils. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured CO2 efflux from mangrove soils that had been cleared for up to 20 years on the islands of Twin Cays, Belize. We also disturbed these cleared peat soils to assess what disturbance of soils after clearing may have on CO2 efflux. CO2 efflux from soils declines from time of clearing from ∼10 600 tonnes km−2 year−1 in the first year to 3000 tonnes km2 year−1 after 20 years since clearing. Disturbing peat leads to short term increases in CO2 efflux (27 umol m−2 s−1), but this had returned to baseline levels within 2 days. Conclusions/Significance Deforesting mangroves that grow on peat soils results in CO2 emissions that are comparable to rates estimated for peat collapse in other tropical ecosystems. Preventing deforestation presents an opportunity for countries to benefit from carbon payments for preservation of threatened carbon stocks. PMID:21738628

  9. Peptides having reduced toxicity that stimulate cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan; Danho, Waleed

    2016-08-16

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABCA1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. Further, the peptides of the invention have little or no toxicity when administered at therapeutic and higher doses. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  10. Telatinib reverses chemotherapeutic multidrug resistance mediated by ABCG2 efflux transporter in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sodani, Kamlesh; Patel, Atish; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Singh, Satyakam; Yang, Dong-Hua; Kathawala, Rishil J; Kumar, Priyank; Talele, Tanaji T; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a phenomenon where cancer cells become simultaneously resistant to anticancer drugs with different structures and mechanisms of action. MDR has been shown to be associated with overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Here, we report that telatinib, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, enhances the anticancer activity of ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs by inhibiting ABCG2 efflux transporter activity. Co-incubation of ABCG2-overexpressing drug resistant cell lines with telatinib and ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs significantly reduced cellular viability, whereas telatinib alone did not significantly affect drug sensitive and drug resistant cell lines. Telatinib at 1 μM did not significantly alter the expression of ABCG2 in ABCG2-overexpressing cell lines. Telatinib at 1 μM significantly enhanced the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-mitoxantrone (MX) in ABCG2-overexpressing cell lines. In addition, telatinib at 1 μM significantly reduced the rate of [3H]-MX efflux from ABCG2-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, telatinib significantly inhibited ABCG2-mediated transport of [3H]-E217βG in ABCG2 overexpressing membrane vesicles. Telatinib stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCG2 in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that telatinib might be a substrate of ABCG2. Binding interactions of telatinib were found to be in transmembrane region of homology modeled human ABCG2. In addition, telatinib (15 mg/kg) with doxorubicin (1.8 mg/kg) significantly decreased the growth rate and tumor size of ABCG2 overexpressing tumors in a xenograft nude mouse model. These results, provided that they can be translated to humans, suggesting that telatinib, in combination with specific ABCG2 substrate drugs may be useful in treating tumors that overexpress ABCG2. PMID:24565910

  11. Brain uptake, retention, and efflux of aluminum and manganese.

    PubMed Central

    Yokel, Robert A

    2002-01-01

    My colleagues and I investigated the sites and mechanisms of aluminum (Al) and manganese (Mn) distribution through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Microdialysis was used to sample non-protein-bound Al in the extracellular fluid (ECF) of blood (plasma) and brain. Brain ECF Al appearance after intravenous Al citrate injection was too rapid to attribute to diffusion or to transferrin-receptor-mediated endocytosis, suggesting another carrier-mediated process. The brain:blood ECF Al concentration ratio was 0.15 at constant blood and brain ECF Al concentrations, suggesting carrier-mediated brain Al efflux. Pharmacological manipulations suggested the efflux carrier might be a monocarboxylate transporter (MCT). However, the lack of Al (14)C-citrate uptake into rat erythrocytes suggested it is not a good substrate for isoform MCT1 or for the band 3 anion exchanger. Al (14)C-citrate uptake into murine-derived brain endothelial cells appeared to be carrier mediated, Na independent, pH independent, and energy dependent. Uptake was inhibited by substrate/inhibitors of the MCT and organic anion transporter families. Determination of (26)Al in rat brain at various times after intravenous (26)Al suggested a prolonged brain (26)Al half-life. It appears that Al transferrin and Al citrate cross the BBB by different mechanisms, that much of the Al entering brain ECF is rapidly effluxed, probably as Al citrate, but that some Al is retained for quite some time. Brain influx of the Mn(2+) ion and Mn citrate, determined with the in situ brain perfusion technique, was greater than that attributable to diffusion, suggesting carrier-mediated uptake. Mn citrate uptake was approximately 3-fold greater than the Mn(2+) ion, suggesting it is a primary Mn species entering the brain. After Mn(2+) ion, Mn citrate, or Mn transferrin injection into the brain, brain Mn efflux was not more rapid than that predicted from diffusion. The BBB permeation of Al and Mn is mediated by carriers that may help

  12. Vectorial transport of fexofenadine across Caco-2 cells: involvement of apical uptake and basolateral efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Ming, Xin; Knight, Beverly M; Thakker, Dhiren R

    2011-10-01

    Fexofenadine is a nonsedative antihistamine that exhibits good oral bioavailability despite its zwitterionic chemical structure and efflux by P-gp. Evidence exists that multiple uptake and efflux transporters play a role in hepatic disposition of fexofenadine. However, the roles of specific transporters and their interrelationship in intestinal absorption of this drug are unclear. This study was designed to elucidate vectorial absorptive transport of fexofenadine across Caco-2 cells involving specific apical uptake and efflux transporters as well as basolateral efflux transporters. Studies with cellular models expressing single transporters showed that OATP2B1 expression stimulated uptake of fexofenadine at pH 6.0. Apical uptake of fexofenadine into Caco-2 cells was decreased by 45% by pretreatment with estrone 3-sulfate, an OATP inhibitor, at pH 6.0 but not at pH 7.4, indicating that OATP2B1 mediates apical uptake of fexofenadine into these cells. Examination of fexofenadine efflux from preloaded Caco-2 cells in the presence or absence of (i) the MRP inhibitor MK-571 and (ii) the P-gp inhibitor GW918 showed that apical efflux is predominantly mediated by P-gp, with a small contribution by MRP2, whereas basolateral efflux is predominantly mediated by MRP3. These results also showed that while OSTαβ is functionally active in the basolateral membrane of Caco-2 cells, it does not play a role in the export of fexofenadine. MK-571 decreased the absorptive transport of fexofenadine by 17%. However, the decrease in absorptive transport by MK-571 was 42% when P-gp was inhibited by GW918. The results provide a novel insight into a vectorial transport system mainly consisting of apical OATP2B1 and basolateral MRP3 that may play an important role in delivering hydrophilic anionic and zwitterionic drugs such as pravastatin and fexofenadine into systemic circulation upon oral administration. PMID:21780830

  13. Efflux of Creatine Kinase from Isolated Soleus Muscle Depends on Age, Sex and Type of Exercise in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baltusnikas, Juozas; Venckunas, Tomas; Kilikevicius, Audrius; Fokin, Andrej; Ratkevicius, Aivaras

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity is often used as an indicator of exercise-induced muscle damage. Our aim was to study effects of contraction type, sex and age on CK efflux from isolated skeletal muscles of mice. The soleus muscle (SOL) of adult (7.5-month old) female C57BL/6J mice was subjected to either 100 passive stretches, isometric contractions or eccentric contractions, and muscle CK efflux was assessed after two-hour incubation in vitro. SOL of young (3-month old) male and female mice was studied after 100 eccentric contractions. For adult females, muscle CK efflux was larger (p < 0.05) after eccentric contractions than after incubation without exercise (698 ± 344 vs. 268 ± 184 mU·h−1, respectively), but smaller (p < 0.05) than for young females after the same type of exercise (1069 ± 341 mU·h−1). Eccentric exercise-induced CK efflux was larger in muscles of young males compared to young females (2046 ± 317 vs 1069 ± 341 mU · h−1, respectively, p < 0.001). Our results show that eccentric contractions induce a significant increase in muscle CK efflux immediately after exercise. Isolated muscle resistance to exercise-induced CK efflux depends on age and sex of mice. Key points Muscle lengthening contractions induce the highest CK efflux in vitro compared with similar protocol of isometric contractions or passive stretches. Muscle CK efflux in vitro is applicable in studying changes of sarcolemma permeability/integrity, a proxy of muscle damage, in response to muscle contractile activity. Isolated muscle resistance to exercise-induced CK efflux is greater in female compared to male mice of young age and is further increased in adult female mice. PMID:25983588

  14. Energy-dependent efflux of cadmium coded by a plasmid resistance determinant in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Tynecka, Z; Gos, Z; Zajac, J

    1981-01-01

    Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strain 17810R to Cd2+ appears to be due to a plasmid-coded Cd2+ efflux system. Complete efflux of Cd2+ after transfer of preloaded cells into Cd2+-free medium occurred in the resistant strain 17810R, but not in the plasmidless derivative strain 17810S. Net efflux was blocked by 2,4-dinitrophenol, N,N,-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), and incubation at 4 degrees C. The inhibition of Cd2+ efflux by DCCD paralleled a stimulation of net uptake in the resistant cells by this agent. Cd2+ efflux by the resistant strain was accompanied by a reversal of inhibition of respiration, whereas in the sensitive strain, inhibition of respiration was not reversed after transfer to Cd2+-free medium. Net Cd2+ uptake by strain 17810R was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate. In Cd2+ contrast, Cd2+ uptake by the plasmidless strain 17810S was affected neither by p-chloromercuribenzoate nor by DCCD when added alone, but was blocked by a combination of these two agents. Valinomycin had no effect on the reduced Cd2+ uptake by the resistant strain, whereas nigericin stimulated uptake to values comparable to those of the untreated sensitive cells. With sensitive cells, valinomycin reduced Cd2+ uptake by about 50%, whereas nigericin was without effect. A possible mechanism of Cd2+ movements in both strains is discussed. PMID:7263609

  15. MexXY multidrug efflux system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Anti-pseudomonas aminoglycosides, such as amikacin and tobramycin, are used in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. However, their use is linked to the development of resistance. During the last decade, the MexXY multidrug efflux system has been comprehensively studied, and numerous reports of laboratory and clinical isolates have been published. This system has been increasingly recognized as one of the primary determinants of aminoglycoside resistance in P. aeruginosa. In P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis isolates, upregulation of the pump is considered the most common mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance. Non-fermentative Gram-negative pathogens possessing very close MexXY orthologs such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and various Burkholderia species (e.g., Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. cepacia complexes), but not B. gladioli, are intrinsically resistant to aminoglycosides. Here, we summarize the properties (e.g., discovery, mechanism, gene expression, clinical significance) of the P. aeruginosa MexXY pump and other aminoglycoside efflux pumps such as AcrD of Escherichia coli, AmrAB-OprA of B. pseudomallei, and AdeABC of Acinetobacter baumannii. MexXY inducibility of the PA5471 gene product, which is dependent on ribosome inhibition or oxidative stress, is noteworthy. Moreover, the discovery of the cognate outer membrane component (OprA) of MexXY in the multidrug-resistant clinical isolate PA7, serotype O12 deserves special attention. PMID:23233851

  16. Vertical profile of branch CO2 efflux in a Norway spruce tree: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, M.; Pavelka, M.

    2012-04-01

    Despite woody-tissue CO2 effluxes having been recognized as an important component of forest carbon budget due to the fraction of assimilates used and the dramatic increase in woody with stand development, there is limited research to determine the CO2 efflux vertical variability of woody-tissue components. For a better understanding and quantification of branch woody-tissue CO2 efflux in forest ecosystems, it is necessary to identify the environmental factors influencing it and the role of the branch distribution within the canopy. The proper assessment of this forest component will improve the knowledge of the ratio between ecosystem respiration and gross primary production at forest ecosystem. In order to achieve this goal, branch CO2 efflux of Norway spruce tree was measured in ten branches at five different whorls during the growing season 2004 (from June till October) in campaigns of 3-4 times per month at the Beskydy Mts., the Czech Republic, using a portable infrared gas analyzer operating as a closed system. Branch woody tissue temperature was measured continuously in ten minutes intervals for each sample position during the whole experiment period. On the basis of relation between CO2 efflux rate and woody tissue temperature a value of Q10 and normalized CO2 efflux rate (E10 - CO2 efflux rate at 10° C) were calculated for each sampled position. Estimated Q10 values ranged from 2.12 to 2.89 and E10 ranged from 0.41 to 1.19 ?molCO2m-2 s-1. Differences in branch CO2 efflux were found between orientations; East side branches presented higher efflux rate than west side branches. The highest branch CO2 efflux rate values were measured in August and the lowest in October, which were connected with woody tissue temperature and ontogenetic processes during these periods. Branch CO2 efflux was significantly and positively correlated with branch position within canopy and woody tissue temperature. Branches from the upper whorls showed higher respiration activity

  17. Novel Piperazine Arylideneimidazolones Inhibit the AcrAB-TolC Pump in Escherichia coli and Simultaneously Act as Fluorescent Membrane Probes in a Combined Real-Time Influx and Efflux Assay.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Jürgen A; Schuster, Sabine; Kern, Winfried V; Karcz, Tadeusz; Olejarz, Agnieszka; Kaczor, Aneta; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested five compounds belonging to a novel series of piperazine arylideneimidazolones for the ability to inhibit the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump. The biphenylmethylene derivative (BM-19) and the fluorenylmethylene derivative (BM-38) were found to possess the strongest efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) activities in the AcrAB-TolC-overproducingEscherichia colistrain 3-AG100, whereas BM-9, BM-27, and BM-36 had no activity at concentrations of up to 50 μM in a Nile red efflux assay. MIC microdilution assays demonstrated that BM-19 at 1/4 MIC (intrinsic MIC, 200 μM) was able to reduce the MICs of levofloxacin, oxacillin, linezolid, and clarithromycin 8-fold. BM-38 at 1/4 MIC (intrinsic MIC, 100 μM) was able to reduce only the MICs of oxacillin and linezolid (2-fold). Both compounds markedly reduced the MIC of rifampin (BM-19, 32-fold; and BM-38, 4-fold), which is suggestive of permeabilization of the outer membrane as an additional mechanism of action. Nitrocefin hydrolysis assays demonstrated that in addition to their EPI activity, both compounds were in fact weak permeabilizers of the outer membrane. Moreover, it was found that BM-19, BM-27, BM-36, and BM-38 acted as near-infrared-emitting fluorescent membrane probes, which allowed for their use in a combined influx and efflux assay and thus for tracking of the transport of an EPI across the outer membrane by an efflux pump in real time. The EPIs BM-38 and BM-19 displayed the most rapid influx of all compounds, whereas BM-27, which did not act as an EPI, showed the slowest influx. PMID:26824939

  18. Efflux-Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Acinetobacter spp. ▿

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Sébastien; Courvalin, Patrice; Périchon, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Among Acinetobacter spp., A. baumannii is the most frequently implicated in nosocomial infections, in particular in intensive care units. It was initially thought that multidrug resistance (MDR) in this species was due mainly to horizontal acquisition of resistance genes. However, it has recently become obvious that increased expression of chromosomal genes for efflux systems plays a major role in MDR. Among the five superfamilies of pumps, resistance-nodulation-division (RND) systems are the most prevalent in multiply resistant A. baumannii. RND pumps typically exhibit a wide substrate range that can include antibiotics, dyes, biocides, detergents, and antiseptics. Overexpression of AdeABC, secondary to mutations in the adeRS genes encoding a two-component regulatory system, constitutes a major mechanism of multiresistance in A. baumannii. AdeIJK, intrinsic to this species, is responsible for natural resistance, but since overexpression above a certain threshold is toxic for the host, its contribution to acquired resistance is minimal. The recently described AdeFGH, probably regulated by a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, also confers multidrug resistance when overexpressed. Non-RND efflux systems, such as CraA, AmvA, AbeM, and AbeS, have also been characterized for A. baumannii, as have AdeXYZ and AdeDE for other Acinetobacter spp. Finally, acquired narrow-spectrum efflux pumps, such as the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) members TetA, TetB, CmlA, and FloR and the small multidrug resistance (SMR) member QacE in Acinetobacter spp., have been detected and are mainly encoded by mobile genetic elements. PMID:21173183

  19. Chlorogenic Acid Protects against Atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− Mice and Promotes Cholesterol Efflux from RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chongming; Luan, Hong; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Xiaopo; Sun, Xiaobo; Guo, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is one of the most abundant polyphenols in the human diet and is suggested to be a potential antiatherosclerotic agent due to its proposed hypolipidemic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CGA on atherosclerosis development in ApoE−/− mice and its potential mechanism. ApoE−/− mice were fed a cholesterol-rich diet without (control) or with CGA (200 and 400 mg/kg) or atorvastatin (4 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. During the study plasma lipid and inflammatory parameters were determined. Treatment with CGA (400 mg/kg) reduced atherosclerotic lesion area and vascular dilatation in the aortic root, comparable to atorvastatin. CGA (400 mg/kg) also significantly decreased plasma levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol as well as inflammatory markers. Supplementation with CGA or CGA metabolites-containing serum suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced lipid accumulation and stimulated cholesterol efflux from RAW264.7 cells. CGA significantly increased the mRNA levels of PPARγ, LXRα, ABCA1 and ABCG1 as well as the transcriptional activity of PPARγ. Cholesterol efflux assay showed that three major metabolites, caffeic, ferulic and gallic acids, significantly stimulated cholesterol efflux from RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that CGA potently reduces atherosclerosis development in ApoE−/− mice and promotes cholesterol efflux from RAW264.7 macrophages. Caffeic, ferulic and gallic acids may be the potential active compounds accounting for the in vivo effect of CGA. PMID:25187964

  20. Quantification of In Vitro Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux and In Vivo Macrophage-Specific Reverse Cholesterol Transport.

    PubMed

    Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Santos, David; Cedó, Lídia; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Julve, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Promotion of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is thought to be a major HDL-mediated mechanism for protecting against atherosclerosis. Preclinical studies support the concept that increasing cholesterol efflux from macrophages may confer atheroprotective benefits independently of the plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration. The application of the macrophage-to-feces RCT method in genetically engineered mice has provided evidence that this major HDL property correlates closely with changes in atherosclerosis susceptibility. This chapter provides details on the methodologies currently used to measure in vitro cholesterol efflux from macrophages or in vivo macrophage-specific RCT. The general principles and techniques described herein may be applied to measure the in vitro cholesterol efflux capacity of human serum in macrophage cultures and to evaluate the effect of different experimental pathophysiological conditions or the efficacy of different therapeutic strategies on the modulation of in vivo macrophage-RCT in mice. PMID:26445792

  1. UV-C induces K sup + efflux from bean but not from oat leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, A.J.; Gueltig, B.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Previous reports have shown that ultraviolet radiation (UV) induces a specific leakage of K{sup +} from cells in culture as well as from guard cells of bean leaves resulting in stomatal closure. In an effort to determine how general this response may be in photosynthetic leaf cells, we measured the UV-C-induced K{sup +} efflux from irradiated 10-14 day-old bean and oat leaf sections. Our results show that oat leaves do not respond to UV-C irradiation with K{sup +} efflux. However UV-C irradiated bean leaves leaked K{sup +} at a rate of approximately 47 nmoles cm{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} and the leakage was linear for at least 3.5 hours. The source cells for K{sup +} efflux and the possible mechanisms responsible for this difference in UV-sensitivity will be discussed.

  2. Stress responses as determinants of antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: multidrug efflux and more.

    PubMed

    Poole, Keith

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a notoriously antimicrobial-resistant organism that is increasingly refractory to antimicrobial chemotherapy. While the usual array of acquired resistance mechanisms contribute to resistance development in this organism a multitude of endogenous genes also play a role. These include a variety of multidrug efflux loci that contribute to both intrinsic and acquired antimicrobial resistance. Despite their roles in resistance, however, it is clear that these efflux systems function in more than just antimicrobial efflux. Indeed, recent data indicate that they are recruited in response to environmental stress and, therefore, function as components of the organism's stress responses. In fact, a number of endogenous resistance-promoting genes are linked to environmental stress, functioning as part of known stress responses or recruited in response to a variety of environmental stress stimuli. Stress responses are, thus, important determinants of antimicrobial resistance in P. aeruginosa. As such, they represent possible therapeutic targets in countering antimicrobial resistance in this organism. PMID:25388098

  3. Mechanisms of Specificity for Hox Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Metazoans encode clusters of paralogous Hox genes that are critical for proper development of the body plan. However, there are a number of unresolved issues regarding how paralogous Hox factors achieve specificity to control distinct cell fates. First, how do Hox paralogs, which have very similar DNA binding preferences in vitro, drive different transcriptional programs in vivo? Second, the number of potential Hox binding sites within the genome is vast compared to the number of sites bound. Hence, what determines where in the genome Hox factors bind? Third, what determines whether a Hox factor will activate or repress a specific target gene? Here, we review the current evidence that is beginning to shed light onto these questions. In particular, we highlight how cooperative interactions with other transcription factors (especially PBC and HMP proteins) and the sequences of cis-regulatory modules provide a basis for the mechanisms of Hox specificity. We conclude by integrating a number of the concepts described throughout the review in a case study of a highly interrogated Drosophila cis-regulatory module named “The Distal-less Conserved Regulatory Element” (DCRE). PMID:27583210

  4. Contribution of the biological crust to the soil CO2 efflux in a Mediterranean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillas, Lourdes; Bellucco, Veronica; Lo Cascio, Mauro; Marras, Serena; Spano, Donatella; Mereu, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Lately, the important role of the soil biological crust (hereafter biocrust) in Mediterranean ecosystems is emerging from a multitude of articles. It is becoming apparent that the biocrust has an important role in regulating ecosystem functions and that it interacts with the woody and herbaceous vegetation to a degree depending on the availability of water among other factors. Here we present the first results of a wider project and focus on the contribution of the biocrust to soil CO2 efflux, and on how the respiration of the biocrust responds to soil water content and temperature. A manipulative experiment was performed in a Mediterranean shrubland ecosystem in Sardinia (Italy) to assess the contribution of the bicocrust to soil CO2 efflux and to identify the main environmental drivers of the CO2 efflux in this ecosystem. For 19 months,in situ soil CO2 efflux was measured over three different surfaces: soil deprived of biocrust (hereafter Soil), biocrust (hereafter BC) and intact soil (hereafter Soil+BC). For these surfaces, three different approaches were used to investigate the dependency of CO2 efflux on soil temperature and soil water content, e.g. a simple linear regression, a multi-linear equation, and a modified version of the most common used Lloyd and Taylor model (Lloyd and Taylor, 1994). Results showed that CO2 effluxes emitted by Soil, BC and Soil+BC were differently driven by soil moisture and temperature: BC respiration was mainly controlled by soil moisture at 5 cm depth, whereas both soil temperature and water content at 20 cm depth determined Soil CO2 efflux. Soil temperature and water content at 5 cm depth drove Soil+BC respiration. We also found that biocrust can contribute substantially (up to 60%) to the total soil respiration depending on its moisture content. This contribution persists even in periods in which deeper soil layers are inactive, as small water pulses can activate lichens, mosses and cyanobacteria associated to the biocrust as

  5. Maize ZmALMT2 is a root anion transporter that mediates constitutive root malate efflux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a primary limitation to crop productivity on acid soils throughout the plant. Root efflux of organic acid anions constitutes a mechanism by which plants cope with toxic aluminum (Al) ions on acid soils. In this study, we have characterized ZmALMT2 (a member of aluminum-acti...

  6. Chalcone inhibitors of the NorA efflux pump in Staphylococcus aureus whole cells and enriched everted membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Holler, Jes Gitz; Slotved, Hans-Christian; Mølgaard, Per; Olsen, Carl Erik; Christensen, Søren Brøgger

    2012-07-15

    A library of 117 chalcones was screened for efflux pump inhibitory (EPI) activity against NorA mediated ethidium bromide efflux. Five of the chalcones (5-7, 9, and 10) were active and two chalcones (9 and 10) were equipotent to reserpine with IC(50)-values of 9.0 and 7.7 μM, respectively. Twenty chalcones were subsequently proved to be inhibitors of the NorA efflux pump in everted membrane vesicles. Compounds 5, 7, and 9 synergistically increased the effect of ciprofloxacin on Staphylococcus aureus. Our results suggest that chalcones might be developed into drugs for overcoming multidrug resistance based on efflux transporters of microorganisms. PMID:22682300

  7. Development of efflux pump inhibitors in antituberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Lele; Wu, Xueqiong

    2016-06-01

    Resistance and tolerance to antituberculosis (anti-TB) drugs, especially the first-line drugs, has become a serious problem in anti-TB therapy. Efflux of antimicrobial agents via bacterial efflux pumps is one of the main reasons for drug resistance. Efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) bind to efflux pumps to inhibit drug efflux and thus enhance the drug effect and reduce drug resistance. Studies on EPIs targeting the efflux pumps of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) help to understand Mtb resistance and to identify the potential drug target and are of significance in guiding the development of new anti-TB drugs and optimal combinations. Currently, there are many potential EPIs under study, but none of them has been used clinically for anti-TB therapy. In this article, we will provide an overview on the current development of EPIs targeting the efflux pumps of Mtb and discuss their potential clinical applications. PMID:27211826

  8. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Ana-Maria; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs) and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects. PMID:24212665

  9. Identification and molecular characterization of an efflux system involved in Pseudomonas putida S12 multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kieboom, J; de Bont, J

    2001-01-01

    The authors previously described srpABC, an operon involved in proton-dependent solvent efflux in the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12. Recently, it was shown that organic solvents and not antibiotics induce this operon. In the present study, the authors characterize a new efflux pump, designated ArpABC, on the basis of two isolated chloramphenicol-sensitive transposon mutants. The arpABC operon is involved in the active efflux of multiple antibiotics, such as tetracycline, chloramphenicol, carbenicillin, streptomycin, erythromycin and novobiocin. The deduced amino acid sequences encoded by the three genes involved show a striking resemblance to proteins of the resistance/nodulation/cell division family, which are involved in both organic solvent and multiple drug efflux. These findings demonstrate that ArpABC is highly homologous to the MepABC and TtgABC efflux systems for organic solvents and multiple antibiotics. However, ArpABC does not contribute to organic solvent tolerance in P. putida S12 but is solely involved in multidrug resistance. PMID:11160799

  10. Microbial Efflux Systems and Inhibitors: Approaches to Drug Discovery and the Challenge of Clinical Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Kourtesi, Christina; Ball, Anthony R; Huang, Ying-Ying; Jachak, Sanjay M; Vera, D Mariano A; Khondkar, Proma; Gibbons, Simon; Hamblin, Michael R; Tegos, George P

    2013-01-01

    Conventional antimicrobials are increasingly ineffective due to the emergence of multidrug-resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. The need to overcome these deficiencies has triggered exploration for novel and unconventional approaches to controlling microbial infections. Multidrug efflux systems (MES) have been a profound obstacle in the successful deployment of antimicrobials. The discovery of small molecule efflux system blockers has been an active and rapidly expanding research discipline. A major theme in this platform involves efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) from natural sources. The discovery methodologies and the available number of natural EPI-chemotypes are increasing. Advances in our understanding of microbial physiology have shed light on a series of pathways and phenotypes where the role of efflux systems is pivotal. Complementing existing antimicrobial discovery platforms such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) with efflux inhibition is a subject under investigation. This core information is a stepping stone in the challenge of highlighting an effective drug development path for EPIs since the puzzle of clinical implementation remains unsolved. This review summarizes advances in the path of EPI discovery, discusses potential avenues of EPI implementation and development, and underlines the need for highly informative and comprehensive translational approaches. PMID:23569468

  11. Endothelial cellular senescence is inhibited by liver X receptor activation with an additional mechanism for its atheroprotection in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Toshio; Kotani, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Tomoe; Taguchi, Kumiko; Iida, Mayu; Ina, Koichiro; Maeda, Morihiko; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Hattori, Yuichi; Ignarro, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Senescence of vascular endothelial cells leads to endothelial dysfunction and contributes to the progression of atherosclerosis. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors whose activation protects against atherosclerosis by transcriptional regulation of genes important in promoting cholesterol efflux and inhibiting inflammation. Here we found that LXR activation with specific ligands reduced the increase in senescence-associated (SA) β-gal activity, a senescence marker, and reversed the decrease in telomerase activity, a replicative senescence marker, in human endothelial cells under high glucose. This effect of LXR activation was associated with reduced reactive oxygen species and increased endothelial NO synthase activity. A series of experiments that used siRNAs indicated that LXRβ mediates the prevention of endothelial cellular senescence, and that sterol regulatory element binding protein-1, which was up-regulated as a direct LXRβ target gene, may act as a brake of endothelial cellular senescence. Although oral administration of the LXR ligand led to severe fatty liver in diabetic rats, concomitant therapy with metformin avoided the development of hepatic steatosis. However, the preventive effect of the LXR ligand on SA β-gal–stained cells in diabetic aortic endothelium was preserved even if metformin was coadministered. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that an additional mechanism, such as the regulation of endothelial cellular senescence, is related to the antiatherogenic properties of LXRs, and concomitant treatment with metformin may provide a clinically useful therapeutic strategy to alleviate an LXR activation-mediated adverse effects on liver triglyceride metabolism. PMID:24398515

  12. Contribution of the Ade Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type Efflux Pumps to Fitness and Pathogenesis of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Balloy, Viviane; Fiette, Laurence; Chignard, Michel; Courvalin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Overexpression of chromosomal resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems with broad substrate specificity contributes to multidrug resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii. We have shown that modulation of expression of the structural genes for the efflux systems AdeABC and AdeIJK confers MDR and results in numerous alterations of membrane-associated cellular functions, in particular biofilm formation. However, the contribution of these RND pumps to cell fitness and virulence has not yet been studied. The biological cost of an antibiotic resistance mechanism is a key parameter in determining its stability and dissemination. From an entirely sequenced susceptible clinical isolate, we have generated a set of isogenic derivatives having single point mutations resulting in overexpression of each efflux system or with every pump deleted by allelic replacement. We found that overproduction of the pumps results in a significant decrease in fitness of the bacterial host when measured by competition experiments in vitro. Fitness and virulence were also evaluated in vivo both in systemic and pulmonary infection models in immunocompetent mice. A diminished competitiveness of the AdeABC-overexpressing mutant was observed only after intraperitoneal inoculation, but not after intranasal inoculation, the latter mimicking the most frequent type of human A. baumannii infection. However, in mice infected intranasally, this mutant was more virulent and stimulated an enhanced neutrophil activation in the lungs. Altogether, these data account for the observation that adeABC overexpression is common in MDR A. baumannii frequently found in ventilator-associated pneumonia. PMID:27247231

  13. Glucocorticoid receptors in the prefrontal cortex regulate stress-evoked dopamine efflux and aspects of executive function

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Kelly A.; Weinberg, Joanne; Young, Allan H.; Phillips, Anthony G.

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced dopamine efflux in the prefrontal cortex is a well-documented response to acute stress. However, the underlying mechanism(s) for this response is unknown. Using in vivo microdialysis, we demonstrate that blocking glucocorticoid receptors locally within the rat prefrontal cortex results in a reduction in stress-evoked dopamine efflux. In contrast, blocking glucocorticoid receptors in the ventral tegmental area did not affect stress-evoked dopamine efflux in the prefrontal cortex. Additionally, local administration of corticosterone into the prefrontal cortex increased prefrontal dopamine efflux. The functional impact of enhanced dopamine efflux evoked by acute stress was demonstrated using a cognitive task dependent on the prefrontal cortex and sensitive to impairment in working memory. Notably, stress-induced impairments in cognition were attenuated by blockade of glucocorticoid receptors in the prefrontal cortex. Taken together, these data demonstrate that glucocorticoids act locally within the prefrontal cortex to modulate mesocortical dopamine efflux leading to the cognitive impairments observed during acute stress. PMID:22032926

  14. Engineering microbial biofuel tolerance and export using efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Mary J; Dossani, Zain Y; Szmidt, Heather L; Chu, Hou Cheng; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D; Hadi, Masood Z; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2011-01-01

    Many compounds being considered as candidates for advanced biofuels are toxic to microorganisms. This introduces an undesirable trade-off when engineering metabolic pathways for biofuel production because the engineered microbes must balance production against survival. Cellular export systems, such as efflux pumps, provide a direct mechanism for reducing biofuel toxicity. To identify novel biofuel pumps, we used bioinformatics to generate a list of all efflux pumps from sequenced bacterial genomes and prioritized a subset of targets for cloning. The resulting library of 43 pumps was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, where we tested it against seven representative biofuels. By using a competitive growth assay, we efficiently distinguished pumps that improved survival. For two of the fuels (n-butanol and isopentanol), none of the pumps improved tolerance. For all other fuels, we identified pumps that restored growth in the presence of biofuel. We then tested a beneficial pump directly in a production strain and demonstrated that it improved biofuel yields. Our findings introduce new tools for engineering production strains and utilize the increasingly large database of sequenced genomes. PMID:21556065

  15. Cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Favari, Elda; Chroni, Angelika; Tietge, Uwe J F; Zanotti, Ilaria; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Bernini, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Both alterations of lipid/lipoprotein metabolism and inflammatory events contribute to the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque, characterized by the accumulation of abnormal amounts of cholesterol and macrophages in the artery wall. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) may counteract the pathogenic events leading to the formation and development of atheroma, by promoting the high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated removal of cholesterol from the artery wall. Recent in vivo studies established the inverse relationship between RCT efficiency and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD), thus suggesting that the promotion of this process may represent a novel strategy to reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden and subsequent cardiovascular events. HDL plays a primary role in all stages of RCT: (1) cholesterol efflux, where these lipoproteins remove excess cholesterol from cells; (2) lipoprotein remodeling, where HDL undergo structural modifications with possible impact on their function; and (3) hepatic lipid uptake, where HDL releases cholesterol to the liver, for the final excretion into bile and feces. Although the inverse association between HDL plasma levels and CVD risk has been postulated for years, recently this concept has been challenged by studies reporting that HDL antiatherogenic functions may be independent of their plasma levels. Therefore, assessment of HDL function, evaluated as the capacity to promote cell cholesterol efflux may offer a better prediction of CVD than HDL levels alone. Consistent with this idea, it has been recently demonstrated that the evaluation of serum cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) is a predictor of atherosclerosis extent in humans. PMID:25522988

  16. Targeting mitochondrial 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux and lipid phenotype.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janice M W; Allen, Anne-Marie; Graham, Annette

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish mitochondrial cholesterol trafficking 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) as a potential therapeutic target, capable of increasing macrophage cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein acceptors. Expression and activity of TSPO in human (THP-1) macrophages were manipulated genetically and by the use of selective TSPO ligands. Cellular responses were analysed by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), immunoblotting and radiolabelling, including [3H]cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and human serum. Induction of macrophage cholesterol deposition by acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL) increased expression of TSPO mRNA and protein, reflecting findings in human carotid atherosclerosis. Transient overexpression of TSPO enhanced efflux (E%) of [3H]cholesterol to apoA-I, HDL and human serum compared with empty vector (EV) controls, whereas gene knockdown of TSPO achieved the converse. Ligation of TSPO (using PK11195, FGIN-1-27 and flunitrazepam) triggered increases in [3H]cholesterol efflux, an effect that was amplified in TSPO-overexpressing macrophages. Overexpression of TSPO induced the expression of genes [PPARA (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor α), NR1H3 (nuclear receptor 1H3/liver X receptor α), ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette A1), ABCG4 (ATP-binding cassette G4) and APOE (apolipoprotein E)] and proteins (ABCA1 and PPARα) involved in cholesterol efflux, reduced macrophage neutral lipid mass and lipogenesis and limited cholesterol esterification following exposure to AcLDL. Thus, targeting TSPO reduces macrophage lipid content and prevents macrophage foam cell formation, via enhanced cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein acceptors. PMID:24814875

  17. Oral and inhaled corticosteroids: differences in P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) mediated efflux.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Andrew; Tan, Ai May

    2012-05-01

    There is concern that P-glycoprotein mediated efflux contributes to steroid resistance. Therefore, this study examined bidirectional corticosteroid transport and induction capabilities for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to understand which of the systemic and inhaled corticosteroids interacted with P-gp to the greatest extent. Hydrocortisone, prednisolone, prednisone, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone represented systemically active drugs, while fluticasone propionate, beclomethasone dipropionate, ciclesonide and budesonide represented inhaled corticosteroids. Aldosterone and fludrocortisone represented mineralocorticoids. All drugs were detected using individually optimised HPLC protocols. Transport studies were conducted through Caco-2 monolayers. Hydrocortisone and aldosterone had efflux ratios below 1.5, while prednisone showed a P-gp mediated efflux ratio of only 1.8 compared to its active drug, prednisolone, with an efflux ratio of 4.5. Dexamethasone and beclomethasone had efflux ratios of 2.1 and 3.3 respectively, while this increased to 5.1 for methylprednisolone. Fluticasone showed an efflux ratio of 2.3. Protein expression studies suggested that all of the inhaled corticosteroids were able to induce P-gp expression, from 1.6 to 2 times control levels. Most of the systemic corticosteroids had higher passive permeability (>20×10(-6) cm/s) compared to the inhaled corticosteroids (>5×10(-6) cm/s), except for budesonide, with permeability similar to the systemic corticosteroids. Inhaled corticosteroids are not transported by P-gp to the same extent as systemic corticosteroids. However, they are able to induce P-gp production. Thus, inhaled corticosteroids may have greater interactions with other P-gp substrates, but P-gp itself is less likely to influence resistance to the drugs. PMID:22464980

  18. Reactivation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Efflux Rescues Abnormal Lysosomal Storage in FIG4-Deficient Cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianlong; Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Yan, Qing; Hamilton, Audra; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Vanoye, Carlos G; Li, Jun

    2015-04-29

    Loss of function of FIG4 leads to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 4J, Yunis-Varon syndrome, or an epilepsy syndrome. FIG4 is a phosphatase with its catalytic specificity toward 5'-phosphate of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-diphosphate (PI3,5P2). However, the loss of FIG4 decreases PI3,5P2 levels likely due to FIG4's dominant effect in scaffolding a PI3,5P2 synthetic protein complex. At the cellular level, all these diseases share similar pathology with abnormal lysosomal storage and neuronal degeneration. Mice with no FIG4 expression (Fig4(-/-)) recapitulate the pathology in humans with FIG4 deficiency. Using a flow cytometry technique that rapidly quantifies lysosome sizes, we detected an impaired lysosomal fission, but normal fusion, in Fig4(-/-) cells. The fission defect was associated with a robust increase of intralysosomal Ca(2+) in Fig4(-/-) cells, including FIG4-deficient neurons. This finding was consistent with a suppressed Ca(2+) efflux of lysosomes because the endogenous ligand of lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 is PI3,5P2 that is deficient in Fig4(-/-) cells. We reactivated the TRPML1 channels by application of TRPML1 synthetic ligand, ML-SA1. This treatment reduced the intralysosomal Ca(2+) level and rescued abnormal lysosomal storage in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and ex vivo DRGs. Furthermore, we found that the suppressed Ca(2+) efflux in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and Fig4(-/-) mouse brains profoundly downregulated the expression/activity of dynamin-1, a GTPase known to scissor organelle membranes during fission. This downregulation made dynamin-1 unavailable for lysosomal fission. Together, our study revealed a novel mechanism explaining abnormal lysosomal storage in FIG4 deficiency. Synthetic ligands of the TRPML1 may become a potential therapy against diseases with FIG4 deficiency. PMID:25926456

  19. The efflux pump inhibitor timcodar improves the potency of antimycobacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Trudy H; Shoen, Carolyn M; Jones, Steven M; Jones, Peter L; Cynamon, Michael H; Locher, Christopher P

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies indicated that inhibition of efflux pumps augments tuberculosis therapy. In this study, we used timcodar (formerly VX-853) to determine if this efflux pump inhibitor could increase the potency of antituberculosis (anti-TB) drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in in vitro and in vivo combination studies. When used alone, timcodar weakly inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in broth culture (MIC, 19 μg/ml); however, it demonstrated synergism in drug combination studies with rifampin, bedaquiline, and clofazimine but not with other anti-TB agents. When M. tuberculosis was cultured in host macrophage cells, timcodar had about a 10-fold increase (50% inhibitory concentration, 1.9 μg/ml) in the growth inhibition of M. tuberculosis and demonstrated synergy with rifampin, moxifloxacin, and bedaquiline. In a mouse model of tuberculosis lung infection, timcodar potentiated the efficacies of rifampin and isoniazid, conferring 1.0 and 0.4 log10 reductions in bacterial burden in lung, respectively, compared to the efficacy of each drug alone. Furthermore, timcodar reduced the likelihood of a relapse infection when evaluated in a mouse model of long-term, chronic infection with treatment with a combination of rifampin, isoniazid, and timcodar. Although timcodar had no effect on the pharmacokinetics of rifampin in plasma and lung, it did increase the plasma exposure of bedaquiline. These data suggest that the antimycobacterial drug-potentiating activity of timcodar is complex and drug dependent and involves both bacterial and host-targeted mechanisms. Further study of the improvement of the potency of antimycobacterial drugs and drug candidates when used in combination with timcodar is warranted. PMID:25534740

  20. Efflux and uptake transporters involved in the disposition of bazedoxifene.

    PubMed

    Lušin, Tina Trdan; Mrhar, Aleš; Stieger, Bruno; Kristl, Albin; Berginc, Katja; Trontelj, Jurij

    2016-06-01

    Bazedoxifene, a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator, has complex pharmacokinetics with rapid absorption, high metabolic clearance, low oral bioavailability (6.25 %) and a slow elimination phase. Our hypothesis is that drug uptake and efflux transporters may play an important role in its disposition. To adequately cover all aspects of bazedoxifene transport, several approaches were undertaken: PAMPA assay, ATPase assay, membrane inside-out vesicles and Caco-2 and CHO cell lines. The results obtained from PAMPA experiments showed moderate passive permeability of bazedoxifene (P app ≈ 2 × 10(-6)cm/s), suggesting the existence of an active transport during the rapid absorption phase. The Caco-2 transport assay showed large and significant changes in the measured efflux ratios of bazedoxifene when selective transporter inhibitors were applied: verapamil (a Pgp inhibitor), MK571 (an MRP inhibitor), Ko143 (a BCRP inhibitor) and DIDS (an OATP inhibitor). Additionally, membrane preparation experiments demonstrated the interaction of bazedoxifene with P-gp, MRP2 and BCRP. CHO experiments did not show any interactions of bazedoxifene with OATP1B1 or OATP1B3; therefore, bazedoxifene may be a substrate of other OATP isoform(s). The comprehensive in vitro study indicates a strong involvement of Pgp, MRP, BCRP and OATP in bazedoxifene disposition. PMID:25631963

  1. PKCβ Inhibitors Attenuate Amphetamine-Stimulated Dopamine Efflux.

    PubMed

    Zestos, Alexander G; Mikelman, Sarah R; Kennedy, Robert T; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2016-06-15

    Amphetamine abuse afflicts over 13 million people, and there is currently no universally accepted treatment for amphetamine addiction. Amphetamine serves as a substrate for the dopamine transporter and reverses the transporter to cause an increase in extracellular dopamine. Activation of the beta subunit of protein kinase C (PKCβ) enhances extracellular dopamine in the presence of amphetamine by facilitating the reverse transport of dopamine and internalizing the D2 autoreceptor. We previously demonstrated that PKCβ inhibitors block amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux in synaptosomes from rat striatum in vitro. In this study, we utilized in vivo microdialysis in live, behaving rats to assess the effect of the PKCβ inhibitors, enzastaurin and ruboxistaurin, on amphetamine-stimulated locomotion and increases in monoamines and their metabolites. A 30 min perfusion of the nucleus accumbens core with 1 μM enzastaurin or 1 μM ruboxistaurin reduced efflux of dopamine and its metabolite 3-methoxytyramine induced by amphetamine by approximately 50%. The inhibitors also significantly reduced amphetamine-stimulated extracellular levels of norepinephrine. The stimulation of locomotor behavior by amphetamine, measured simultaneously with the analytes, was comparably reduced by the PKCβ inhibitors. Using a stable isotope label retrodialysis procedure, we determined that ruboxistaurin had no effect on basal levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, or GABA. In addition, normal uptake function through the dopamine transporter was unaltered by the PKCβ inhibitors, as measured in rat synaptosomes. Our results support the utility of using PKCβ inhibitors to reduce the effects of amphetamine. PMID:26996926

  2. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  3. Basal efflux of bile acids contributes to drug-induced bile acid-dependent hepatocyte toxicity in rat sandwich-cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Susukida, Takeshi; Sekine, Shuichi; Ogimura, Eiichiro; Aoki, Shigeki; Oizumi, Kumiko; Horie, Toshiharu; Ito, Kousei

    2015-10-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP or Bsep) functions as an apical transporter to eliminate bile acids (BAs) from hepatocytes into the bile. BSEP or Bsep inhibitors engender BA retention, suggested as an underlying mechanism of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury. We previously reported a method to evaluate BSEP-mediated BA-dependent hepatocyte toxicity by using sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCHs). However, basal efflux transporters, including multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP or Mrp) 3 and 4, also participate in BA efflux. This study examined the contribution of basal efflux transporters to BA-dependent hepatocyte toxicity in rat SCHs. The apical efflux of [(3)H]taurocholic acid (TC) was potently inhibited by 10 μM cyclosporine A (CsA), with later inhibition of basal [(3)H]TC efflux, while MK571 simultaneously inhibited both apical and basal [(3)H]TC efflux. CsA-induced BA-dependent hepatocyte toxicity was 30% at most at 10 μM CsA and ∼60% at 50 μM, while MK571 exacerbated hepatocyte toxicity at concentrations of ≥50 μM. Quinidine inhibited only basal [(3)H]TC efflux and showed BA-dependent hepatocyte toxicity in rat SCHs. Hence, inhibition of basal efflux transporters as well as Bsep may precipitate BA-dependent hepatocyte toxicity in rat SCHs. PMID:26055650

  4. The Challenge of Efflux-Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The global emergence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a growing threat to antibiotic therapy. The chromosomally encoded drug efflux mechanisms that are ubiquitous in these bacteria greatly contribute to antibiotic resistance and present a major challenge for antibiotic development. Multidrug pumps, particularly those represented by the clinically relevant AcrAB-TolC and Mex pumps of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) superfamily, not only mediate intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) but also are involved in other functions, including the bacterial stress response and pathogenicity. Additionally, efflux pumps interact synergistically with other resistance mechanisms (e.g., with the outer membrane permeability barrier) to increase resistance levels. Since the discovery of RND pumps in the early 1990s, remarkable scientific and technological advances have allowed for an in-depth understanding of the structural and biochemical basis, substrate profiles, molecular regulation, and inhibition of MDR pumps. However, the development of clinically useful efflux pump inhibitors and/or new antibiotics that can bypass pump effects continues to be a challenge. Plasmid-borne efflux pump genes (including those for RND pumps) have increasingly been identified. This article highlights the recent progress obtained for organisms of clinical significance, together with methodological considerations for the characterization of MDR pumps. PMID:25788514

  5. Association between cholesterol efflux capacity and coronary restenosis after successful stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Satoshi; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Takata, Kohei; Takamiya, Yosuke; Kuwano, Takashi; Sugihara, Makoto; Ike, Amane; Iwata, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) functionality could be useful for identifying patients who have an increased risk of coronary restenosis after stent implantation. In the present study, we elucidates whether HDL functionality can predict restenosis. The participants included 48 consecutive patients who had stable angina and were successfully implanted with a drug-eluting stent (DES) or bare-metal stent. Follow-up coronary angiography was performed after 6-8 months of stenting. Cholesterol efflux and the anti-inflammatory capacity of HDL were measured before stenting (at baseline) and at follow-up. The mean age was 64 ± 11 years and the body mass index was 24 ± 3 kg/m(2). While HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) significantly increased from baseline to follow-up, there was no significant association between HDL-C level at baseline and in-stent late loss. Cholesterol efflux capacity was significantly increased from baseline to follow-up. The efflux capacity at baseline was negatively correlated with in-stent late loss, whereas the anti-oxidative activity of HDL at baseline was not associated with in-stent late loss. We analyzed the predictors of in-stent late loss using independent variables (efflux capacity and anti-oxidative capacity at baseline in addition to age, gender, HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol at baseline, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, lesion length and DES implantation, history of myocardial infarction and prior percutaneous coronary intervention) by a multiple regression analysis. The efflux capacity at baseline was only independently associated with in-stent late loss. In conclusion, cholesterol efflux capacity at baseline could predict coronary restenosis in patients with successful stent implantation. PMID:26337618

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation modulates the osmosensitivity of volume-dependent taurine efflux from glial cells in the rat supraoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Deleuze, Charlotte; Duvoid, Anne; Moos, Françoise C; Hussy, Nicolas

    2000-01-01

    In the supraoptic nucleus, taurine, selectively released in an osmodependent manner by glial cells through volume-sensitive anion channels, is likely to inhibit neuronal activity as part of the osmoregulation of vasopressin release. We investigated the involvement of various kinases in the activation of taurine efflux by measuring [3H]taurine release from rat acutely isolated supraoptic nuclei. The protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin B44 specifically reduced, but did not suppress, both the basal release of taurine and that evoked by a hypotonic stimulus. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase by orthovanadate had the opposite effect. The tyrosine kinase and phosphatase inhibitors shifted the relationship between taurine release and medium osmolarity in opposite directions, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation modulates the osmosensitivity of taurine release, but is not necessary for its activation. Genistein also increased the amplitude of the decay of the release observed during prolonged hypotonic stimulation. Potentiation of taurine release by tyrosine kinases could serve to maintain a high level of taurine release in spite of cell volume regulation. Taurine release was unaffected by inhibitors and/or activators of PKA, PKC, MEK and Rho kinase. Our results demonstrate a unique regulation by protein tyrosine kinase of the osmosensitivity of taurine efflux in supraoptic astrocytes. This points to the presence of specific volume-dependent anion channels in these cells, or to a specific activation mechanism or regulatory properties. This may relate to the particular role of the osmodependent release of taurine in this structure in the osmoregulation of neuronal activity. PMID:10699075

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation modulates the osmosensitivity of volume-dependent taurine efflux from glial cells in the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Deleuze, C; Duvoid, A; Moos, F C; Hussy, N

    2000-03-01

    1. In the supraoptic nucleus, taurine, selectively released in an osmodependent manner by glial cells through volume-sensitive anion channels, is likely to inhibit neuronal activity as part of the osmoregulation of vasopressin release. We investigated the involvement of various kinases in the activation of taurine efflux by measuring [3H]taurine release from rat acutely isolated supraoptic nuclei. 2. The protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin B44 specifically reduced, but did not suppress, both the basal release of taurine and that evoked by a hypotonic stimulus. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase by orthovanadate had the opposite effect. 3. The tyrosine kinase and phosphatase inhibitors shifted the relationship between taurine release and medium osmolarity in opposite directions, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation modulates the osmosensitivity of taurine release, but is not necessary for its activation. 4. Genistein also increased the amplitude of the decay of the release observed during prolonged hypotonic stimulation. Potentiation of taurine release by tyrosine kinases could serve to maintain a high level of taurine release in spite of cell volume regulation. 5. Taurine release was unaffected by inhibitors and/or activators of PKA, PKC, MEK and Rho kinase. 6. Our results demonstrate a unique regulation by protein tyrosine kinase of the osmosensitivity of taurine efflux in supraoptic astrocytes. This points to the presence of specific volume-dependent anion channels in these cells, or to a specific activation mechanism or regulatory properties. This may relate to the particular role of the osmodependent release of taurine in this structure in the osmoregulation of neuronal activity. PMID:10699075

  8. Purple perilla extracts with α-asarone enhance cholesterol efflux from oxidized LDL-exposed macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hye; Paek, Ji Hun; Shin, Daekeun; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-04-01

    The cellular accumulation of cholesterol is critical in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an essential role in mediating the efflux of excess cholesterol. In the current study, we investigated whether purple Perilla frutescens extracts (PPE) at a non-toxic concentration of 1-10 µg/ml stimulate the induction of the ABC transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1, and cholesterol efflux from lipid-laden J774A.1 murine macrophages exposed to 50 ng/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Purple perilla, an annual herb in the mint family and its constituents, have been reported to exhibit antioxidant and cytostatic activity, as well as to exert anti-allergic effects. Our results revealed that treatment with oxidized LDL for 24 h led to the accumulation of lipid droplets in the macrophages. PPE suppressed the oxidized LDL-induced foam cell formation by blocking the induction of scavenger receptor B1. However, PPE promoted the induction of the ABC transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1, and subsequently accelerated cholesterol efflux from the lipid-loaded macrophages. The liver X receptor (LXR) agonist, TO-091317, and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist, pioglitazone, increased ABCA1 expression and treatment with 10 µg/ml PPE further enhanced this effect. PPE did not induce LXRα and PPARγ expression per se, but enhanced their expression in the macrophages exposed to oxidized LDL. α-asarone was isolated from PPE and characterized as a major component enhancing the induction of ABCA1 and ABCG1 in macrophages exposed to oxidized LDL. α-asarone, but not β-asarone was effective in attenuating foam cell formation and enhancing cholesterol efflux, revealing an isomeric difference in their activity. The results from the present study demonstrate that PPE promotes cholesterol efflux from macrophages by activating the interaction of PPARγ-LXRα-ABC transporters. PMID:25673178

  9. Qualification of active mechanical components for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Mollerus, F.J.

    1983-11-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute has undertaken a study of active safety related mechanical components in domestic nuclear plants to determine what qualification information exists and to establish a plan for qualification of those components. Active safety related mechanical components are those which undergo mechanical motion to perform a safety function. The overall objective of the study is to recommend appropriate methods and realistic criteria for the environmental, seismic and dynamic qualification of active mechanical components. This paper presents the results of progress in this project through May 1983.

  10. Characterization of Zebrafish Abcc4 as an Efflux Transporter of Organochlorine Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xing; Long, Yong; Lin, Li; Sun, Rongze; Zhong, Shan; Cui, Zongbin

    2014-01-01

    DDT and lindane are highly toxic organochlorine pesticides and posing adverse effects on the environment and public health due to their frequent usage in developing countries. ABCC4/MRP4 is an organic anion transporter that mediates cellular efflux of a wide range of exogenous and endogenous compounds such as cyclic nucleotides and anti-cancer drugs; however, it remains unclear whether ABCC4 and its orthologs function in the detoxification of organochlorine pesticides. Here, we demonstrated the roles of zebrafish Abcc4 in cellular efflux of DDT and lindane. Zebrafish abcc4 was maternally expressed in the oocytes and its transcripts were detected in the lens, pancreas, gills, liver, intestine and bladder of developing embryos and in adult tissues examined. DDT and lindane were able to induce the expression of abcc4 gene and overexpression of Abcc4 significantly decreased the cytotoxicity and accumulation of DDT and lindane in LLC-PK1 cells and developing embryos. In contrast, overexpression of an Abcc4-G1188D mutant abolished its transporter function without effects on its substrate binding activity, and sensitized LLC-PK1 cells and developing embryos to toxic pesticides. Moreover, glutathione (GSH) was involved in the efflux of cellular pesticides and ATPase activity in developing embryos can be induced by DDT or lindane. Thus, zebrafish Abcc4 plays crucial roles in cellular efflux of organochlorine pesticides and can be used a potential molecular marker for the monitor of DDT and lindane contamination in the aquatic environment. PMID:25478949

  11. The ABCG2 efflux transporter from rabbit placenta: Cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Halwachs, Sandra; Kneuer, Carsten; Gohlsch, Katrin; Müller, Marian; Ritz, Vera; Honscha, Walther

    2016-02-01

    In human placenta, the ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 is highly expressed in syncytiotrophoblast cells and mediates cellular excretion of various drugs and toxins. Hence, physiological ABCG2 activity substantially contributes to the fetoprotective placenta barrier function during gestation. Developmental toxicity studies are often performed in rabbit. However, despite its toxicological relevance, there is no data so far on functional ABCG2 expression in this species. Therefore, we cloned ABCG2 from placenta tissues of chinchilla rabbit. Sequencing showed 84-86% amino acid sequence identity to the orthologues from man, rat and mouse. We transduced the rabbit ABCG2 clone (rbABCG2) in MDCKII cells and stable rbABCG2 gene and protein expression was shown by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The rbABCG2 efflux activity was demonstrated with the Hoechst H33342 assay using the specific ABCG2 inhibitor Ko143. We further tested the effect of established human ABCG2 (hABCG2) drug substrates including the antibiotic danofloxacin or the histamine H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine on H33342 accumulation in MDCKII-rbABCG2 or -hABCG2 cells. Human therapeutic plasma concentrations of all tested drugs caused a comparable competitive inhibition of H33342 excretion in both ABCG2 clones. Altogether, we first showed functional expression of the ABCG2 efflux transporter in rabbit placenta. Moreover, our data suggest a similar drug substrate spectrum of the rabbit and the human ABCG2 efflux transporter. PMID:26907376

  12. Dopamine inhibits maitotoxin-stimulated pituitary /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux and prolactin release

    SciTech Connect

    Login, I.S.; Judd, A.M.; MacLeod, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    The authors examined the hypothesis that dopaminergic inhibition of prolactin release is coupled to modulation of cellular calcium flux. Dispersed female rat pituitary cells were prelabeled in /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ and perifused to determine simultaneously fractional calcium efflux and prolactin release, as stimulated by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator. The integrated response of each parameter to 5 ng/ml maitotoxin was obtained in individual perifusion columns in the absence or presence of various concentrations of dopamine. Maitotoxin-stimulated calcium efflux was suppressed by dopamine concentrations of 0.01 ..mu..M and greater and achieved a maximal effect at approx.0.1 ..mu..M, at which calcium efflux was reduced by 50%. Maitotoxin-stimulated prolactin release was inhibited by 0.03 ..mu..M dopamine and greater concentrations, and at a concentration of approx.10.0 ..mu..M dopamine the effect became maximal at approx.85% suppression. Haloperidol (0.1 ..mu..M) blocked the effects of 0.1 ..mu..M dopamine on both parameters. Simultaneous suppression of maitotoxin-stimulated calcium efflux and prolactin release by concentrations of dopamine within the nonomolar range suggests that dopamine receptor activation is negatively coupled to modulation of calcium flux in the physiological regulation of prolactin secretion.

  13. Characterization of zebrafish Abcc4 as an efflux transporter of organochlorine pesticides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xing; Long, Yong; Lin, Li; Sun, Rongze; Zhong, Shan; Cui, Zongbin

    2014-01-01

    DDT and lindane are highly toxic organochlorine pesticides and posing adverse effects on the environment and public health due to their frequent usage in developing countries. ABCC4/MRP4 is an organic anion transporter that mediates cellular efflux of a wide range of exogenous and endogenous compounds such as cyclic nucleotides and anti-cancer drugs; however, it remains unclear whether ABCC4 and its orthologs function in the detoxification of organochlorine pesticides. Here, we demonstrated the roles of zebrafish Abcc4 in cellular efflux of DDT and lindane. Zebrafish abcc4 was maternally expressed in the oocytes and its transcripts were detected in the lens, pancreas, gills, liver, intestine and bladder of developing embryos and in adult tissues examined. DDT and lindane were able to induce the expression of abcc4 gene and overexpression of Abcc4 significantly decreased the cytotoxicity and accumulation of DDT and lindane in LLC-PK1 cells and developing embryos. In contrast, overexpression of an Abcc4-G1188D mutant abolished its transporter function without effects on its substrate binding activity, and sensitized LLC-PK1 cells and developing embryos to toxic pesticides. Moreover, glutathione (GSH) was involved in the efflux of cellular pesticides and ATPase activity in developing embryos can be induced by DDT or lindane. Thus, zebrafish Abcc4 plays crucial roles in cellular efflux of organochlorine pesticides and can be used a potential molecular marker for the monitor of DDT and lindane contamination in the aquatic environment. PMID:25478949

  14. Importance of Non-Diffusive Transport for Soil CO2 Efflux in a Temperate Mountain Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Marilyn; Vicca, Sara; Bahn, Michael; Ladreiter-Knauss, Thomas; Schmitt, Michael; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2015-04-01

    A key focus in climate change is on the dynamics and predictions of the soil CO2 efflux (SCE) from terrestrial ecosystems. Limited knowledge of CO2 transport through the soil restricts our understanding of the various biotic and abiotic processes underlying these emissions. Diffusion is often thought to be the main transport mechanism for trace gases in soils, an assumption that is reflected in the increasing popularity of the flux-gradient approach (FGA). Based on Fick's law, the FGA calculates soil CO2 efflux from CO2 concentration profiles, given good estimates of the diffusion coefficient. The latter can be calculated via different commonly used models, and solid-state sensors allow continuous high-frequency measurements of soil CO2 concentrations with minimal disturbance to the soil conditions in a cost-effective way. Fast growing evidence of pressure pumping and advection, makes it impossible to disregard non-diffusive gas transport when evaluating diel and day-to-day dynamics of soil CO2 emissions. We have analyzed combined measurements from solid-state sensors and soil chambers to gain insight in the CO2 transport mechanisms in a grassland site in the Austrian Alps. The FGA-derived efflux underestimated the chamber efflux by 10 to 87% at our site, depending on which model was used for calculation of the diffusion coefficient. We found that the actual transport rates correlated well with irradiation and wind speed, even more when the soil moisture content was below 33%. These findings suggest that bulk soil air transport was enhanced by pressure changes induced by wind shear at the surface and by local heating of the soil surface. Considering the importance of non-diffusive transport processes is a prerequisite when using solid-state CO2 concentration measurements to estimate soil CO2 efflux at any given site.

  15. Impaired Cholesterol Efflux Capacity of High-Density Lipoprotein Isolated From Interstitial Fluid in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus—Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Tietge, Uwe J.F.; Dikkers, Arne; Parini, Paolo; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Objective— Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, the mechanism of which is incompletely understood. Their high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles in plasma have been reported to have impaired cholesterol efflux capacity. However, the efflux capacity of HDL from interstitial fluid (IF), the starting point for reverse cholesterol transport, has not been studied. We here investigated the cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL from IF and plasma from T2D patients and healthy controls. Approach and Results— HDL was isolated from IF and peripheral plasma from 35 T2D patients and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Cholesterol efflux to HDL was determined in vitro, normalized for HDL cholesterol, using cholesterol-loaded macrophages. Efflux capacity of plasma HDL was 10% lower in T2D patients than in healthy controls, in line with previous observations. This difference was much more pronounced for HDL from IF, where efflux capacity was reduced by 28% in T2D. Somewhat surprisingly, the efflux capacity of HDL from IF was lower than that of plasma HDL, by 15% and 32% in controls and T2D patients, respectively. Conclusion— These data demonstrate that (1) HDL from IF has a lower cholesterol efflux capacity than plasma HDL and (2) the efflux capacity of HDL from IF is severely impaired in T2D when compared with controls. Because IF comprises the compartment where reverse cholesterol transport is initiated, the marked reduction in cholesterol efflux capacity of IF-HDL from T2D patients may play an important role for their increased risk to develop atherosclerosis. PMID:27034474

  16. Regulation and mechanism of potassium release from barley roots: an in planta 42K+ analysis.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Devrim; Britto, Dev T; Kronzucker, Herbert J

    2010-12-01

    Potassium (K(+) ) flux into plant cells is a well-characterized ion transport phenomenon. By contrast, little is known about the mechanisms and regulation of K(+) flux from the cell. Here, we present a radioisotopic analysis of K(+) fluxes from roots of intact barley (Hordeum vulgare), in the context of recent discoveries in the molecular biology and electrophysiology of this process. Plants were labelled with (42)K(+), and kinetics of its release from roots were monitored at low (0.1 mM) or high (1.0 mM) external K concentration, [K(+)](ext), and with the application of channel modulators and nutrient shifts. At 0.1 (but not 1.0) mM [K(+)], where K(+) efflux is thought to be mediated by K(+)-outward-rectifying channels, (42)K(+) efflux was inhibited by the channel blockers barium (Ba(2+)), caesium (Cs(+)), tetraethylammonium (TEA(+)), and lanthanum (La(3+)). Ammonium and nitrate (10 mM) stimulated and inhibited (42)K(+) efflux, respectively, while 10 mM [K(+)](ext) or [Rb(+) ](ext) decreased it. No evidence for the involvement of ATP-binding cassettes, nonselective cation channels, or active K(+)-efflux pumps was found. Our study provides new evidence for the thermodynamic transition between high- and low-affinity transport, from the efflux perspective, identifying the operation of channels at low [K(+)], and the cessation of transmembrane efflux at high [K(+)]. PMID:20731780

  17. Influence of multidrug efflux systems on methylene blue-mediated photodynamic inactivation of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Prates, Renato A.; Kato, Ilka T.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether the major fungal multidrug efflux systems (MESs) affect the efficiency of methylene blue (MB)-mediated antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) in pathogenic fungi and test specific inhibitors of these efflux systems to potentiate APDI. Methods Candida albicans wild-type and mutants that overexpressed two classes of MESs [ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS)] were tested for APDI using MB as the photosensitizer with and without addition of MES inhibitors. The uptake and cytoplasm localization of photosensitizer were achieved using laser confocal microscopy. Results ABC MES overexpression reduced MB accumulation and APDI killing more than MFS MES overexpression. Furthermore, by combining MB APDI with the ABC inhibitor verapamil, fungal killing and MB uptake were potentiated, while by combining MB APDI with the MFS inhibitor INF271, fungal killing and MB uptake were inhibited. This latter surprising finding may be explained by the hypothesis that the MFS channel can also serve as an uptake mechanism for MB. Conclusions The ABC pumps are directly implicated in MB efflux from the cell cytoplasm. Both the influx and efflux of MB may be regulated by MFS systems, and blocking this gate before incubation with MB can decrease the uptake and APDI effects. An ABC inhibitor could be usefully combined with MB APDI for treating C. albicans infections. PMID:21525022

  18. AMPK activators: mechanisms of action and physiological activities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joungmok; Yang, Goowon; Kim, Yeji; Kim, Jin; Ha, Joohun

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of energy homeostasis, which coordinates metabolic pathways and thus balances nutrient supply with energy demand. Because of the favorable physiological outcomes of AMPK activation on metabolism, AMPK has been considered to be an important therapeutic target for controlling human diseases including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Thus, activators of AMPK may have potential as novel therapeutics for these diseases. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of both indirect and direct AMPK activators and their modes of action in relation to the structure of AMPK. We discuss the functional differences among isoform-specific AMPK complexes and their significance regarding the development of novel AMPK activators and the potential for combining different AMPK activators in the treatment of human disease. PMID:27034026

  19. AMPK activators: mechanisms of action and physiological activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joungmok; Yang, Goowon; Kim, Yeji; Kim, Jin; Ha, Joohun

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of energy homeostasis, which coordinates metabolic pathways and thus balances nutrient supply with energy demand. Because of the favorable physiological outcomes of AMPK activation on metabolism, AMPK has been considered to be an important therapeutic target for controlling human diseases including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Thus, activators of AMPK may have potential as novel therapeutics for these diseases. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of both indirect and direct AMPK activators and their modes of action in relation to the structure of AMPK. We discuss the functional differences among isoform-specific AMPK complexes and their significance regarding the development of novel AMPK activators and the potential for combining different AMPK activators in the treatment of human disease. PMID:27034026

  20. A new work mechanism on neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rubin; Tsuda, Ichiro; Zhang, Zhikang

    2015-05-01

    By re-examining the neuronal activity energy model, we show the inadequacies in the current understanding of the energy consumption associated with neuron activity. Specifically, we show computationally that a neuron first absorbs and then consumes energy during firing action potential, and this result cannot be produced from any current neuron models or biological neural networks. Based on this finding, we provide an explanation for the observation that when neurons are excited in the brain, blood flow increases significantly while the incremental oxygen consumption is very small. We can also explain why external stimulation and perception emergence are synchronized. We also show that negative energy presence in neurons at the sub-threshold state is an essential reason that leads to blood flow incremental response time in the brain rather than neural excitation to delay. PMID:25640576

  1. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 Represses Liver X Receptor-mediated ABCA1 Expression and Cholesterol Efflux in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Elina; Hussein, Maryem A; Savas, Jeffery N; Ouimet, Mireille; Barrett, Tessa J; Leone, Sarah; Yates, John R; Moore, Kathryn J; Fisher, Edward A; Garabedian, Michael J

    2016-05-20

    Liver X receptors (LXR) are oxysterol-activated nuclear receptors that play a central role in reverse cholesterol transport through up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCA1 and ABCG1) that mediate cellular cholesterol efflux. Mouse models of atherosclerosis exhibit reduced atherosclerosis and enhanced regression of established plaques upon LXR activation. However, the coregulatory factors that affect LXR-dependent gene activation in macrophages remain to be elucidated. To identify novel regulators of LXR that modulate its activity, we used affinity purification and mass spectrometry to analyze nuclear LXRα complexes and identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) as an LXR-associated factor. In fact, PARP-1 interacted with both LXRα and LXRβ. Both depletion of PARP-1 and inhibition of PARP-1 activity augmented LXR ligand-induced ABCA1 expression in the RAW 264.7 macrophage line and primary bone marrow-derived macrophages but did not affect LXR-dependent expression of other target genes, ABCG1 and SREBP-1c. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed PARP-1 recruitment at the LXR response element in the promoter of the ABCA1 gene. Further, we demonstrated that LXR is poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated by PARP-1, a potential mechanism by which PARP-1 influences LXR function. Importantly, the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide enhanced macrophage ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux to the lipid-poor apolipoprotein AI. These findings shed light on the important role of PARP-1 on LXR-regulated lipid homeostasis. Understanding the interplay between PARP-1 and LXR may provide insights into developing novel therapeutics for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:27026705

  2. MexCD-OprJ Multidrug Efflux System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Involvement in Chlorhexidine Resistance and Induction by Membrane-Damaging Agents Dependent upon the AlgU Stress Response Sigma Factor▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraud, Sebastien; Campigotto, Aaron J.; Chen, Zhilin; Poole, Keith

    2008-01-01

    The biocide chlorhexidine (CHX) as well as additional membrane-active agents were shown to induce expression of the mexCD-oprJ multidrug efflux operon, dependent upon the AlgU stress response sigma factor. Hyperexpression of this efflux system in nfxB mutants was also substantially AlgU dependent. CHX resistance correlated with efflux gene expression in various mutants, consistent with MexCD-OprJ being a determinant of CHX resistance. PMID:18838593

  3. MexCD-OprJ multidrug efflux system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: involvement in chlorhexidine resistance and induction by membrane-damaging agents dependent upon the AlgU stress response sigma factor.

    PubMed

    Fraud, Sebastien; Campigotto, Aaron J; Chen, Zhilin; Poole, Keith

    2008-12-01

    The biocide chlorhexidine (CHX) as well as additional membrane-active agents were shown to induce expression of the mexCD-oprJ multidrug efflux operon, dependent upon the AlgU stress response sigma factor. Hyperexpression of this efflux system in nfxB mutants was also substantially AlgU dependent. CHX resistance correlated with efflux gene expression in various mutants, consistent with MexCD-OprJ being a determinant of CHX resistance. PMID:18838593

  4. Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein-1 (MRP-1)-dependent Glutathione Disulfide (GSSG) Efflux as a Critical Survival Factor for Oxidant-enriched Tumorigenic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, Gayle M; Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Spieldenner, James M; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial cell tumors are the most common soft tissue tumors in infants. Tumor-forming endothelial (EOMA) cells are able to escape cell death fate despite excessive nuclear oxidant burden. Our previous work recognized perinuclear Nox-4 as a key contributor to EOMA growth. The objective of this work was to characterize the mechanisms by which EOMA cells evade oxidant toxicity and thrive. In EOMA cells, compared with in the cytosol, the nuclear GSSG/GSH ratio was 5-fold higher. Compared to the ratio observed in healthy murine aortic endothelial (MAE) cells, GSSG/GSH was over twice as high in EOMA cells. Multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP-1), an active GSSG efflux mechanism, showed 2-fold increased activity in EOMA compared with MAE cells. Hyperactive YB-1 and Ape/Ref-1 were responsible for high MRP-1 expression in EOMA. Proximity ligand assay demonstrated MRP-1 and YB-1 binding. Such binding enabled the nuclear targeting of MRP-1 in EOMA in a leptomycin-B-sensitive manner. MRP-1 inhibition as well as knockdown trapped nuclear GSSG, causing cell death of EOMA. Disulfide loading of cells by inhibition of GSSG reductase (bischoloronitrosourea) or thioredoxin reductase (auranofin) was effective in causing EOMA death as well. In sum, EOMA cells survive a heavy oxidant burden by rapid efflux of GSSG, which is lethal if trapped within the cell. A hyperactive MRP-1 system for GSSG efflux acts as a critical survival factor for these cells, making it a potential target for EOMA therapeutics. PMID:26961872

  5. Enhanced cadmium efflux and root-to-shoot translocation are conserved in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii (Crassulaceae family).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongchun; Yu, Qi; Du, Hanying; Ai, Wenli; Yao, Xuan; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Qiu, Baosheng

    2016-06-01

    Investigation on the molecular mechanisms of cadmium hyperaccumulation has been mostly focused on members of the Brassicaceae family. Here, we show using hyperaccumulating (HP) and nonhyperaccumulating (NHP) populations of Sedum alfredii (Crassulaceae), that Cd hypertolerance correlates with higher Cd efflux rates and less cadmium accumulation in suspension cells and roots. The heavy metal ATPase HMA2, but not HMA4, was highly expressed in suspension cultures and roots from HP plants compared to NHP cells and plants. Reciprocal grafting also showed that Cd translocation is more efficient in HP plants. These results suggest that cadmium efflux is a conserved mechanism among natural cadmium hyperaccumulator species. PMID:27222256

  6. Mechanism for Clastogenic Activity of Naphthalene

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2015-09-29

    Naphthalene incubations form DNA adducts in vitro in a dose dependent manner in both mouse and rat tissues. Rodent tissue incubations with naphthalene indicate that naphthalene forms as many DNA adducts as Benzo(a)pyrene, a known DNA binding carcinogen. The mouse airway has the greatest number of DNA adducts, corresponding to the higher metabolic activation of naphthalene in this location. Both rat tissues, the rat olfactory (tumor target) and the airways (non-tumor target), have similar levels of NA-DNA adducts, indicating that short term measures of initial adduct formation do not directly correlate with sites of tumor formation in the NTP bioassays.

  7. The Role of Monocarboxylate Transporters and Their Chaperone CD147 in Lactate Efflux Inhibition and the Anticancer Effects of Terminalia chebula in Neuroblastoma Cell Line N2-A

    PubMed Central

    Messeha, S. S.; Zarmouh, N. O.; Taka, E.; Gendy, S. G.; Shokry, G. R.; Kolta, M. G.; Soliman, K. F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims In the presence of oxygen, most of the synthesized pyruvate during glycolysis in the cancer cell of solid tumors is released away from the mitochondria to form lactate (Warburg Effect). To maintain cell homeostasis, lactate is transported across the cell membrane by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). The major aim of the current investigation is to identify novel compounds that inhibit lactate efflux that may lead to identifying effective targets for cancer treatment. Study Design In this study, 900 ethanol plant extracts were screened for their lactate efflux inhibition using neuroblastoma (N2-A) cell line. Additionally, we investigated the mechanism of inhibition for the most potent plant extract regarding monocarboxylate transporters expression, and consequences effects on viability, growth, and apoptosis. Methodology The potency of lactate efflux inhibition of ethanol plant extracts was evaluated in N2-A cells by measuring extracellular lactate levels. Caspase 3- activity and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining were performed to assess the apoptotic effect. The antiproliferative effect was measured using WST assay. Western blotting was performed to quantify protein expression of MCTs and their chaperone CD147 in treated cells lysates. Results Terminalia chebula plant extract was the most potent lactate efflux inhibitor in N2-A cells among the 900 - tested plant extracts. The results obtained show that extract of Terminalia chebula fruits (TCE) significantly (P = 0.05) reduced the expression of the MCT1, MCT3, MCT4 and the chaperone CD147. The plant extract was more potent (IC50 of 3.59 ± 0.26 μg/ml) than the MCT standard inhibitor phloretin (IC50 76.54 ± 3.19 μg/ml). The extract also showed more potency and selective cytotoxicity in cancer cells than DI-TNC1 primary cell line (IC50 7.37 ± 0.28 vs. 17.35 ± 0.19 μg/ml). Moreover, TCE Inhibited N2-A cell growth (IG50 = 5.20 ± 0.30 μg/ml) and induced apoptosis at the 7.5 μg/ml concentration

  8. Mechanism of antibacterial activity of copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Chakraborty, Ruchira; Basu, Tarakdas

    2014-04-01

    In a previous communication, we reported a new method of synthesis of stable metallic copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs), which had high potency for bacterial cell filamentation and cell killing. The present study deals with the mechanism of filament formation and antibacterial roles of Cu-NPs in E. coli cells. Our results demonstrate that NP-mediated dissipation of cell membrane potential was the probable reason for the formation of cell filaments. On the other hand, Cu-NPs were found to cause multiple toxic effects such as generation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA degradation in E. coli cells. In vitro interaction between plasmid pUC19 DNA and Cu-NPs showed that the degradation of DNA was highly inhibited in the presence of the divalent metal ion chelator EDTA, which indicated a positive role of Cu2+ ions in the degradation process. Moreover, the fast destabilization, i.e. the reduction in size, of NPs in the presence of EDTA led us to propose that the nascent Cu ions liberated from the NP surface were responsible for higher reactivity of the Cu-NPs than the equivalent amount of its precursor CuCl2; the nascent ions were generated from the oxidation of metallic NPs when they were in the vicinity of agents, namely cells, biomolecules or medium components, to be reduced simultaneously.

  9. Smooth muscle cell calcium activation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is controlled by the Ca2+ and Rho kinase signalling pathways. While the SMC Rho kinase system seems to be reasonably constant, there is enormous variation with regard to the mechanisms responsible for generating Ca2+ signals. One way of dealing with this diversity is to consider how this system has been adapted to control different SMC functions. Phasic SMCs (vas deferens, uterus and bladder) rely on membrane depolarization to drive Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. This depolarization can be induced by neurotransmitters or through the operation of a membrane oscillator. Many tonic SMCs (vascular, airway and corpus cavernosum) are driven by a cytosolic Ca2+ oscillator that generates periodic pulses of Ca2+. A similar oscillator is present in pacemaker cells such as the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and atypical SMCs that control other tonic SMCs (gastrointestinal, urethra, ureter). The changes in membrane potential induced by these cytosolic oscillators does not drive contraction directly but it functions to couple together individual oscillators to provide the synchronization that is a characteristic feature of many tonic SMCs. PMID:18787034

  10. Mechanism of photodynamic activity of pheophorbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanielian, Charles; Kobayashi, Masami; Wolff, Christian

    2001-04-01

    Plasmid DNA is efficiently photocleaved by sodium pheophorbides (Na-Phdes) a and b in the absence of oxygen as well as in the presence of oxygen. Fluorescence microscopic observation shows a rapid incorporation of Na-Phde a into nuclei, mitochondria, and lysosome of human oral mucosa cells. In contrast Na-Phde b is incorporated only into the plasma membrane. The photodynamic activity of these pigments in living tissues is probably determined by the monomeric pigment molecules formed in hydrophobic cellular structures and involves two types of reactions: (1) direct electron transfer between DNA bases (especially guanine) and pheophorbide singlet excited state, and (2) indirect reactions medicated by reactive oxygen species, including singlet oxygen whose production from molecular oxygen is sensitized by the Na-Phdes triplet state.

  11. Comparison of surficial CO2 efflux to other measures of subsurface crude oil degradation.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ean; Sihota, Natasha J; Hostettler, Frances D; Bekins, Barbara A

    2014-08-01

    At a spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota, crude oil at the water table has been undergoing anaerobic biodegradation for over 30years. Previous work at this site has shown that methane produced from biodegradation of the oil migrates upward and is oxidized in a methanotrophic zone midway between the water table and the surface. To compare microbial activity measurement methods from multiple locations in the oil body, surficial carbon dioxide efflux, methanogen and methanotroph concentrations, and oil degradation state were collected. Carbon dioxide effluxes over the oil body averaged more than four times those at the background site. Methanotrophic bacteria concentrations measured using pmoA were over 10(5) times higher above the oil-contaminated sediments compared with the background site. Methanogenic archaea measured using mcrA ranged from 10(5) to over 10(7) in the oil and were below detection in the background. Methanogens correlated very well with methanotroph concentrations (r=0.99), n-alkylcyclohexane losses as a proxy for degradation state (r=-0.96), and somewhat less well with carbon dioxide efflux (r=0.92). Carbon dioxide efflux similarly correlated to methanotroph concentrations (r=0.90) and n-alkylcyclohexane losses (r=-0.91). PMID:25038543

  12. Insight into determinants of substrate binding and transport in a multidrug efflux protein

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Kamela O.; Paul, Stephanie; Labarbuta, Paola; Law, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance arising from the activity of integral membrane transporter proteins presents a global public health threat. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, transporter proteins belonging to the major facilitator superfamily make a considerable contribution to multidrug resistance by catalysing efflux of myriad structurally and chemically different antimicrobial compounds. Despite their clinical relevance, questions pertaining to mechanistic details of how these promiscuous proteins function remain outstanding, and the role(s) played by individual amino acid residues in recognition, binding and subsequent transport of different antimicrobial substrates by multidrug efflux members of the major facilitator superfamily requires illumination. Using in silico homology modelling, molecular docking and mutagenesis studies in combination with substrate binding and transport assays, we identified several amino acid residues that play important roles in antimicrobial substrate recognition, binding and transport by Escherichia coli MdtM, a representative multidrug efflux protein of the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, our studies suggested that ‘aromatic clamps’ formed by tyrosine and phenylalanine residues located within the substrate binding pocket of MdtM may be important for antimicrobial substrate recognition and transport by the protein. Such ‘clamps’ may be a structurally and functionally important feature of all major facilitator multidrug efflux proteins. PMID:26961153

  13. Insight into determinants of substrate binding and transport in a multidrug efflux protein.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Kamela O; Paul, Stephanie; Labarbuta, Paola; Law, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance arising from the activity of integral membrane transporter proteins presents a global public health threat. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, transporter proteins belonging to the major facilitator superfamily make a considerable contribution to multidrug resistance by catalysing efflux of myriad structurally and chemically different antimicrobial compounds. Despite their clinical relevance, questions pertaining to mechanistic details of how these promiscuous proteins function remain outstanding, and the role(s) played by individual amino acid residues in recognition, binding and subsequent transport of different antimicrobial substrates by multidrug efflux members of the major facilitator superfamily requires illumination. Using in silico homology modelling, molecular docking and mutagenesis studies in combination with substrate binding and transport assays, we identified several amino acid residues that play important roles in antimicrobial substrate recognition, binding and transport by Escherichia coli MdtM, a representative multidrug efflux protein of the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, our studies suggested that 'aromatic clamps' formed by tyrosine and phenylalanine residues located within the substrate binding pocket of MdtM may be important for antimicrobial substrate recognition and transport by the protein. Such 'clamps' may be a structurally and functionally important feature of all major facilitator multidrug efflux proteins. PMID:26961153

  14. Efflux of hydraulically lifted water from mycorrhizal fungal hyphae during imposed drought

    PubMed Central

    Querejeta, José Ignacio; Allen, Michael F

    2008-01-01

    Apart from improving plant and soil water status during drought, it has been suggested that hydraulic lift (HL) could enhance plant nutrient capture through the flow of mineral nutrients directly from the soil to plant roots, or by maintaining the functioning of mycorrhizal fungi. We evaluated the extent to which the diel cycle of water availability created by HL covaries with the efflux of HL water from the tips of extramatrical (external) mycorrhizal hyphae, and the possible effects on biogeochemical processes. Phenotypic mycorrhizal fungal variables, such as total and live hyphal lengths, were positively correlated with HL efflux from hyphae, soil water potential (dawn), and plant response variables (foliar 15N). The efflux of HL water from hyphae was also correlated with bacterial abundance and soil enzyme activity (P), and the moistening of soil organic matter. Such findings indicate that the efflux of HL water from the external mycorrhizal mycelia may be a complementary explanation for plant nutrient acquisition and survival during drought. PMID:19704776

  15. Dietary ellagic acid attenuates oxidized LDL uptake and stimulates cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hye; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Sook; Han, Seon-Young; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2011-11-01

    Foam cell formation is the hallmark of early atherosclerosis. Lipid uptake by scavenger receptors (SR) in macrophages initiates chronic proinflammatory cascades linked to atherosclerosis. It has been reported that the upregulation of cholesterol efflux may be protective in the development of atherosclerosis. Ellagic acid, a polyphenolic compound mostly found in berries, walnuts, and pomegranates, possesses antioxidative, growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-promoting activities in cancer cells. However, the antiatherogenic actions of ellagic acid are not well defined. The current study elucidated oxidized LDL handling of ellagic acid in J774A1 murine macrophages. Noncytotoxic ellagic acid suppressed SR-B1 induction and foam cell formation within 6 h after the stimulation of macrophages with oxidized LDL, confirmed by Oil red O staining of macrophages. Ellagic acid at ≤5 μmol/L upregulated PPARγ and ATP binding cassette transporter-1 in lipid-laden macrophages, all responsible for cholesterol efflux. In addition, 5 μmol/L ellagic acid accelerated expression and transcription of the nuclear receptor of liver X receptor-α highly implicated in the PPAR signaling. Furthermore, ellagic acid promoted cholesterol efflux in oxidized LDL-induced foam cells. These results provide new information that ellagic acid downregulated macrophage lipid uptake to block foam cell formation of macrophages and boosted cholesterol efflux in lipid-laden foam cells. Therefore, dietary and pharmacological interventions with berries rich in ellagic acid may be promising treatment strategies to interrupt the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:21940512

  16. Comparison of surficial CO2 efflux to other measures of subsurface crude oil degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warren, Ean; Sihota, Natasha J.; Hostettler, Frances D.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    At a spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota, crude oil at the water table has been undergoing anaerobic biodegradation for over 30 years. Previous work at this site has shown that methane produced from biodegradation of the oil migrates upward and is oxidized in a methanotrophic zone midway between the water table and the surface. To compare microbial activity measurement methods from multiple locations in the oil body, surficial carbon dioxide efflux, methanogen and methanotroph concentrations, and oil degradation state were collected. Carbon dioxide effluxes over the oil body averaged more than four times those at the background site. Methanotrophic bacteria concentrations measured using pmoA were over 105 times higher above the oil-contaminated sediments compared with the background site. Methanogenic archaea measured using mcrA ranged from 105 to over 107 in the oil and were below detection in the background. Methanogens correlated very well with methanotroph concentrations (r = 0.99), n-alkylcyclohexane losses as a proxy for degradation state (r = − 0.96), and somewhat less well with carbon dioxide efflux (r = 0.92). Carbon dioxide efflux similarly correlated to methanotroph concentrations (r = 0.90) and n-alkylcyclohexane losses (r = − 0.91).

  17. Impact of heme oxygenase-1 on cholesterol synthesis, cholesterol efflux and oxysterol formation in cultured astroglia.

    PubMed

    Hascalovici, Jacob R; Song, Wei; Vaya, Jacob; Khatib, Soliman; Fuhrman, Bianca; Aviram, Michael; Schipper, Hyman M

    2009-01-01

    Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and altered cholesterol (CH) metabolism are characteristic of Alzheimer-diseased neural tissues. The liver X receptor (LXR) is a molecular sensor of CH homeostasis. In the current study, we determined the effects of HO-1 over-expression and its byproducts iron (Fe(2+)), carbon monoxide (CO) and bilirubin on CH biosynthesis, CH efflux and oxysterol formation in cultured astroglia. HO-1/LXR interactions were also investigated in the context of CH efflux. hHO-1 over-expression for 3 days ( approximately 2-3-fold increase) resulted in a 30% increase in CH biosynthesis and a two-fold rise in CH efflux. Both effects were abrogated by the competitive HO inhibitor, tin mesoporphyrin. CO, released from administered CORM-3, significantly enhanced CH biosynthesis; a combination of CO and iron stimulated CH efflux. Free iron increased oxysterol formation three-fold. Co-treatment with LXR antagonists implicated LXR activation in the modulation of CH homeostasis by heme degradation products. In Alzheimer's disease and other neuropathological states, glial HO-1 induction may transduce ambient noxious stimuli (e.g. beta-amyloid) into altered patterns of glial CH homeostasis. As the latter may impact synaptic plasticity and neuronal repair, modulation of glial HO-1 expression (by pharmacological or other means) may confer neuroprotection in patients with degenerative brain disorders. PMID:19046352

  18. Paraoxonase 1-treated oxLDL promotes cholesterol efflux from macrophages by stimulating the PPARγ-LXRα-ABCA1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ikhlef, Souade; Berrougui, Hicham; Kamtchueng Simo, Olivier; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2016-06-01

    Here, we investigate the mechanism through which paraoxonase 1 (PON1) may regulate cholesterol efflux. Pretreatment of oxLDL with PON1 (oxLDL-PON1) contributed to the formation of LysoPC. In J774 macrophages, oxLDL-PON1 increased cholesterol efflux by more than 47% compared to oxLDL alone. oxLDL-PON1 significantly increased mRNA and protein expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1, as well as of PPARγ and LXRα compared to oxLDL alone. Intraperitoneal injection of oxLDL-PON1- or LysoPC-treated J774 macrophages significantly increased the fecal elimination of macrophage-derived cholesterol in these mice. Our results suggest that PON1 stimulates cholesterol efflux via a mechanism that involves oxidized phospholipid hydrolysis. PMID:27148853

  19. Quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism by promoting cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and cholesterol efflux in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Xie, Zongkai; Gao, Weina; Pu, Lingling; Wei, Jingyu; Guo, Changjiang

    2016-03-01

    Quercetin, a common member of the flavonoid family, is widely present in plant kingdom. Despite that quercetin is implicated in regulating cholesterol metabolism, the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. We hypothesized that quercetin regulates cholesterol homeostasis through regulating the key enzymes involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we compared the profile of key enzymes and transcription factors involved in the hepatic cholesterol metabolism in rats with or without quercetin supplementation. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control and quercetin-supplemented groups. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids in feces and bile were measured. Hepatic enzymatic activities were determined by activity assay kit and high-performance liquid chromatography-based analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses, respectively. The results showed that the activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, a critical enzyme in the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, was significantly elevated by quercetin. The expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, as well as liver X receptor α, an important transcription factor, was also increased at both mRNA and protein levels by quercetin. However, quercetin exposure had no impact on the activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol. We also found that quercetin treatment significantly increased ATP binding cassette transporter G1 mRNA and protein expression in the liver, suggesting that quercetin may increase hepatic cholesterol efflux. Collectively, the results presented here indicate that quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism mainly through the pathways that promote cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and

  20. Oral and inhaled corticosteroids: Differences in P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) mediated efflux

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, Andrew Tan, Ai May

    2012-05-01

    There is concern that P-glycoprotein mediated efflux contributes to steroid resistance. Therefore, this study examined bidirectional corticosteroid transport and induction capabilities for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to understand which of the systemic and inhaled corticosteroids interacted with P-gp to the greatest extent. Hydrocortisone, prednisolone, prednisone, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone represented systemically active drugs, while fluticasone propionate, beclomethasone dipropionate, ciclesonide and budesonide represented inhaled corticosteroids. Aldosterone and fludrocortisone represented mineralocorticoids. All drugs were detected using individually optimised HPLC protocols. Transport studies were conducted through Caco-2 monolayers. Hydrocortisone and aldosterone had efflux ratios below 1.5, while prednisone showed a P-gp mediated efflux ratio of only 1.8 compared to its active drug, prednisolone, with an efflux ratio of 4.5. Dexamethasone and beclomethasone had efflux ratios of 2.1 and 3.3 respectively, while this increased to 5.1 for methylprednisolone. Fluticasone showed an efflux ratio of 2.3. Protein expression studies suggested that all of the inhaled corticosteroids were able to induce P-gp expression, from 1.6 to 2 times control levels. Most of the systemic corticosteroids had higher passive permeability (> 20 × 10{sup −6} cm/s) compared to the inhaled corticosteroids (> 5 × 10{sup −6} cm/s), except for budesonide, with permeability similar to the systemic corticosteroids. Inhaled corticosteroids are not transported by P-gp to the same extent as systemic corticosteroids. However, they are able to induce P-gp production. Thus, inhaled corticosteroids may have greater interactions with other P-gp substrates, but P-gp itself is less likely to influence resistance to the drugs. -- Highlights: ► Inhaled corticosteroids are only weak substrates for P-gp, including budesonide. ► Inhaled corticosteroid potent P-gp inducers especially

  1. The Role of Efflux Pumps in Schistosoma mansoni Praziquantel Resistant Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Armada, Ana; Belo, Silvana; Carrilho, Emanuel; Viveiros, Miguel; Afonso, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a neglected disease caused by a trematode of the genus Schistosoma that is second only to malaria in public health significance in Africa, South America, and Asia. Praziquantel (PZQ) is the drug of choice to treat this disease due to its high cure rates and no significant side effects. However, in the last years increasingly cases of tolerance to PZQ have been reported, which has caused growing concerns regarding the emergency of resistance to this drug. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe the selection of a parasitic strain that has a stable resistance phenotype to PZQ. It has been reported that drug resistance in helminths might involve efflux pumps such as members of ATP-binding cassette transport proteins, including P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein families. Here we evaluate the role of efflux pumps in Schistosoma mansoni resistance to PZQ, by comparing the efflux pumps activity in susceptible and resistant strains. The evaluation of the efflux activity was performed by an ethidium bromide accumulation assay in presence and absence of Verapamil. The role of efflux pumps in resistance to PZQ was further investigated comparing the response of susceptible and resistant parasites in the absence and presence of different doses of Verapamil, in an ex vivo assay, and these results were further reinforced through the comparison of the expression levels of SmMDR2 RNA by RT-PCR. Conclusions/Significance This work strongly suggests the involvement of Pgp-like transporters SMDR2 in Praziquantel drug resistance in S. mansoni. Low doses of Verapamil successfully reverted drug resistance. Our results might give an indication that a combination therapy with PZQ and natural or synthetic Pgp modulators can be an effective strategy for the treatment of confirmed cases of resistance to PZQ in S. mansoni. PMID:26445012

  2. Gamma Band Activity in the RAS-intracellular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; Kezunovic, N.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Hyde, J.; Bisagno, V.; Urbano, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the intrinsic membrane properties behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms involve high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels or sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. We address three necessary next steps resulting from these discoveries, an intracellular mechanism responsible for maintaining gamma band activity based on persistent G-protein activation, separate intracellular pathways that differentiate between gamma band activity during waking vs during REM sleep, and an intracellular mechanism responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in schizophrenia. These findings open several promising research avenues that have not been thoroughly explored. What are the effects of sleep or REM sleep deprivation on these RAS mechanisms? Are these mechanisms involved in memory processing during waking and/or during REM sleep? Does gamma band processing differ during waking vs REM sleep after sleep or REM sleep deprivation? PMID:24309750

  3. Mechanical Activation of Construction Binder Materials by Various Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediuk, R. S.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with the mechanical grinding down to the nano powder of construction materials. During mechanical activation a composite binder active molecules cement minerals occur in the destruction of the molecular defects in the areas of packaging and breaking metastable phase decompensation intermolecular forces. The process is accompanied by a change in the kinetics of hardening of portland cement. Mechanical processes during grinding mineral materials cause, along with the increase in their surface energy, increase the Gibbs energy of powders and, respectively, their chemical activity, which also contributes to the high adhesion strength when contacting them with binders. Thus, the set of measures for mechanical activation makes better use of the weight of components filled with cement systems and adjust their properties. At relatively low cost is possible to provide a spectacular and, importantly, easily repeatable results in a production environment.

  4. Structural insight into the oxidation-sensing mechanism of the antibiotic resistance of regulator MexR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hao; Yi, Chengqi; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Wenru; Ge, Zhiyun; Yang, Cai-Guang; He, Chuan

    2010-11-05

    MexR functions as the primary regulator of the mexAB-oprM multidrug efflux expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It has been shown that MexR senses oxidative stress by interprotomer disulphide bond formation between redox-active cysteines. This oxidation induces MexR to dissociate from the promoter DNA, thus activating the transcriptional expression of efflux pump genes. In this study, we present the crystal structure of MexR in its oxidized form at a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. This crystal structure reveals the mechanism by which oxidative signal allosterically derepresses the MexR-controlled transcription activation.

  5. Restoration of Chloride Efflux by Azithromycin in Airway Epithelial Cells of Cystic Fibrosis Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Rebeyrol, Carine; Ruffin, Manon; Roque, Telma; Guillot, Loïc; Jacquot, Jacky; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) has shown promising anti-inflammatory properties in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and clinical studies have presented an improvement in the respiratory condition of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate, in human airway cells, the mechanism by which AZM has beneficial effects in CF. We demonstrated that AZM did not have any anti-inflammatory effect on CF airway cells but restored Cl− efflux. PMID:21220528

  6. NADP redox state and mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux: a controversial issue.

    PubMed

    Vercesi, A E; Pereira-da-Silva, L

    1984-01-01

    It has been shown that Ca2+ efflux from respiring liver mitochondria is promoted by the oxidized steady state of mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides (NAD(P)), whereas Ca2+ retention is favored by a more reduced state (Lehninger, A.L., Vercesi, A.E. and Bababunmi, E.A., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 75, 1690-1694, 1978). The physiological relevance and the molecular mechanism responsible for the process are controversial and are discussed here. PMID:6529616

  7. Genomic potential for arsenic efflux and methylation varies among global Prochlorococcus populations.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Jaclyn K; Rocap, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    The globally significant picocyanobacterium Prochlorococcus is the main primary producer in oligotrophic subtropical gyres. When phosphate concentrations are very low in the marine environment, the mol:mol availability of phosphate relative to the chemically similar arsenate molecule is reduced, potentially resulting in increased cellular arsenic exposure. To mediate accidental arsenate uptake, some Prochlorococcus isolates contain genes encoding a full or partial efflux detoxification pathway, consisting of an arsenate reductase (arsC), an arsenite-specific efflux pump (acr3) and an arsenic-related repressive regulator (arsR). This efflux pathway was the only previously known arsenic detox pathway in Prochlorococcus. We have identified an additional putative arsenic mediation strategy in Prochlorococcus driven by the enzyme arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase (ArsM) which can convert inorganic arsenic into more innocuous organic forms and appears to be a more widespread mode of detoxification. We used a phylogenetically informed approach to identify Prochlorococcus linked arsenic genes from both pathways in the Global Ocean Sampling survey. The putative arsenic methylation pathway is nearly ubiquitously present in global Prochlorococcus populations. In contrast, the complete efflux pathway is only maintained in populations which experience extremely low PO4:AsO4, such as regions in the tropical and subtropical Atlantic. Thus, environmental exposure to arsenic appears to select for maintenance of the efflux detoxification pathway in Prochlorococcus. The differential distribution of these two pathways has implications for global arsenic cycling, as their associated end products, arsenite or organoarsenicals, have differing biochemical activities and residence times. PMID:26151644

  8. Adaptive and Mutational Resistance: Role of Porins and Efflux Pumps in Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The substantial use of antibiotics in the clinic, combined with a dearth of new antibiotic classes, has led to a gradual increase in the resistance of bacterial pathogens to these compounds. Among the various mechanisms by which bacteria endure the action of antibiotics, those affecting influx and efflux are of particular importance, as they limit the interaction of the drug with its intracellular targets and, consequently, its deleterious effects on the cell. This review evaluates the impact of porins and efflux pumps on two major types of resistance, namely, mutational and adaptive types of resistance, both of which are regarded as key phenomena in the global rise of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. In particular, we explain how adaptive and mutational events can dramatically influence the outcome of antibiotic therapy by altering the mechanisms of influx and efflux of antibiotics. The identification of porins and pumps as major resistance markers has opened new possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies directed specifically against these mechanisms. PMID:23034325

  9. A Fluorescent Microplate Assay Quantifies Bacterial Efflux and Demonstrates Two Distinct Compound Binding Sites in AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Annette; Rijnbrand, R.; Erwin, Alice L.

    2015-01-01

    A direct assay of efflux by Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC and related multidrug pumps would have great value in discovery of new Gram-negative antibiotics. The current understanding of how efflux is affected by the chemical structure and physical properties of molecules is extremely limited, derived from antibacterial data for compounds that inhibit growth of wild-type E. coli. We adapted a previously described fluorescent efflux assay to a 96-well microplate format that measured the ability of test compounds to compete for efflux with Nile Red (an environment-sensitive fluor), independent of antibacterial activity. We show that Nile Red and the lipid-sensitive probe DiBAC4-(3) [bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)-trimethine oxonol] can quantify efflux competition in E. coli. We extend the previous findings that the tetracyclines compete with Nile Red and show that DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides. The extent of the competition shows a modest correlation with the effect of the acrB deletion on MICs within the compound sets for both dyes. Crystallographic studies identified at least two substrate binding sites in AcrB, the proximal and distal pockets. High-molecular-mass substrates bound the proximal pocket, while low-mass substrates occupied the distal pocket. As DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides but not with Nile Red, we propose that DiBAC4-(3) binds the proximal pocket and Nile Red likely binds the distal site. In conclusion, competition with fluorescent probes can be used to study the efflux process for diverse chemical structures and may provide information as to the site of binding and, in some cases, enable rank-ordering a series of related compounds by efflux. PMID:25645845

  10. Cloning and molecular characterization of apical efflux transporters (ABCB1, ABCB11 and ABCC2) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zaja, Roko; Munić, Vesna; Klobucar, Roberta Sauerborn; Ambriović-Ristov, Andreja; Smital, Tvrtko

    2008-12-11

    Fish possess similar mechanisms of billiary excretion of xeno(endo)biotics and their metabolites as found in higher vertebrates and various types of ABC efflux proteins expressed in apical membranes of polarized cells appears to be key mediators of this vectorial transport. To test this hypothesis the main goals of this study were identification and cloning of genes coding for different types of ABC transport proteins, determination of the gene transcript (mRNA) levels, and characterization of the related protein transport activities in primary cultured rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. We have cloned one partial and two full gene sequences, which show high degree of identity with mammalian Pgp1 (ABCB1), BSEP (ABCB11) and MRP2 (ABCC2) efflux transporters. Using real-time RT-PCR expression levels of the mRNA of these genes were determined. Identical relative expression patterns of identified efflux transporters (BSEP>MRP2>Pgp1) were observed for both liver and primary hepatocytes, with expression of all three transporter mRNAs approximately 3-4-fold lower in primary hepatocytes in comparison to intact liver. In addition, the presence of Pgp1-, BSEP- and MRP-like transport activities were indicated using putative specific fluorescent substrates (rhodamine 123, calcein-AM, bodipy-verapamil and dihydrofluorescein diacetat), model inhibitors (verapamil, cyclosporine A, MK571, reversine 205, taurocholate and taurochenodeoxycholate) and their combinations. Taken together the results of this study showed that primary trout hepatocytes express critical components of detoxification pathways-phase I and II enzymes, as well as the ABC proteins involved in transport of xenobiotics, affirming this in vitro model as a promising tool in (eco)toxicological research. PMID:19008001

  11. P-glycoprotein in adriamycin-resistant cells functions as an efflux pump for benzopyrene, a chemical carcinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Chao Yeh, G.; Poore, C.M.; Lopaczynska, J.; Phang, J.M. )

    1991-03-15

    The physiological function of multidrug resistant gene (MDR 1) coded P-glycoprotein 170 (P-gp) in normal tissues remains unknown. The authors propose that P-gp functions as an efflux pump in normal tissues for benzopyrene and other xenobiotic substances. To examine their hypothesis the authors used a series of MDR human breast cancer MCF-7 cells with increasing degrees of drug resistance, expression of MDR and levels of P-gp. First, they found the IC{sub 50} for benzopyrene is linearly correlated with the levels of P-gp at different stages of adriamycin resistant MCF-7 cells. Using P-gp ({sup 3}H)azidopine labeling as a measurement of P-gp they found benzopyrene competes for labeling of P-gp. Finally, they directly measured cellular efflux of benzopyrene with adherent cell laser cytometry and found that resistant cells expressing high levels of P-gp showed rapid efflux of benzopyrene. By contrast, drug sensitive wild type cells with undetectable P-gp showed negligible efflux. They conclude that P-gp can function as an efflux pump for benzopyrene and suggest that P-gp may be a cellular mechanism for resistance to carcinogens.

  12. Plasma cholesterol efflux capacity from human THP-1 macrophages is reduced in HIV-infected patients: impact of HAART[S

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Petra; Ghislain, Mathilde; Villard, Elise F.; Le Goff, Wilfried; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Yeni, Patrick; Meyer, Laurence; Vigouroux, Corinne; Goujard, Cécile; Guerin, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of HDL to remove cholesterol from macrophages is inversely associated with the severity of angiographic coronary artery disease. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or its treatment on the ability of HDL particles to stimulate cholesterol efflux from human macrophages has never been studied. We evaluated the capacity of whole plasma and isolated HDL particles from HIV-infected subjects (n = 231) and uninfected controls (n = 200), as well as in a subset of 41 HIV subjects receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to mediate cholesterol efflux from human macrophages. Plasma cholesterol efflux capacity was reduced (−12%; P = 0.001) in HIV patients as compared with controls. HIV infection reduced by 27% (P < 0.05) the capacity of HDL subfractions to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophages. We observed a reduced ABCA1-dependent efflux capacity of plasma (−27%; P < 0.0001) from HIV-infected subjects as a result of a reduction in the efflux capacity of HDL3 particles. HAART administration restored the capacity of plasma from HIV patients to stimulate cholesterol efflux from human macrophages (9.4%; P = 0.04). During HIV infection, the capacity of whole plasma to remove cholesterol from macrophages is reduced, thus potentially contributing to the increased coronary heart disease in the HIV population. HAART administration restored the removal of cholesterol from macrophages by increasing HDL functionality. PMID:25573889

  13. Common mechanisms activate plant guard receptors and TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    In metazoans, the innate immune system uses Pattern Recognition Receptors to detect conserved microbial products, whereas in plants Guard Receptors detect virulence factors or activities encoded by pathogens. In a recent study, Williams and colleagues report that plant Guard receptors can be activated by a mechanism remarkably similar to that of mammalian Toll-like Receptor 4. PMID:25224694

  14. Tractor Mechanics: Learning Activity Packages 1-19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Learning activity packages are presented for teaching tractor mechanics. The first of two sections deals with miscellaneous tasks and contains learning activity packages on cleaning the tractor and receiving new tractor parts. Section 2 is concerned with maintaining and servicing the electrical system, and it includes the following learning…

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Active Zone Organization at Vertebrate Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Organization of presynaptic active zones is essential for development, plasticity, and pathology of the nervous system. Recent studies indicate a trans-synaptic molecular mechanism that organizes the active zones by connecting the pre- and the postsynaptic specialization. The presynaptic component of this trans-synaptic mechanism is comprised of cytosolic active zone proteins bound to the cytosolic domains of voltage-dependent calcium channels (P/Q-, N-, and L-type) on the presynaptic membrane. The postsynaptic component of this mechanism is the synapse organizer (laminin β2) that is expressed by the postsynaptic cell and accumulates specifically on top of the postsynaptic specialization. The pre- and the postsynaptic components interact directly between the extracellular domains of calcium channels and laminin β2 to anchor the presynaptic protein complex in front of the postsynaptic specialization. Hence, the presynaptic calcium channel functions as a scaffolding protein for active zone organization and as an ion-conducting channel for synaptic transmission. In contrast to the requirement of calcium influx for synaptic transmission, the formation of the active zone does not require the calcium influx through the calcium channels. Importantly, the active zones of adult synapses are not stable structures and require maintenance for their integrity. Furthermore, aging or diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system impair the active zones. This review will focus on the molecular mechanisms that organize the presynaptic active zones and summarize recent findings at the neuromuscular junctions and other synapses. PMID:22135013

  16. Effect of ABCG2/BCRP Expression on Efflux and Uptake of Gefitinib in NSCLC Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Galetti, Maricla; Petronini, Pier Giorgio; Fumarola, Claudia; Cretella, Daniele; La Monica, Silvia; Bonelli, Mara; Cavazzoni, Andrea; Saccani, Francesca; Caffarra, Cristina; Andreoli, Roberta; Mutti, Antonio; Tiseo, Marcello; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Alfieri, Roberta R.

    2015-01-01

    Background BCRP/ABCG2 emerged as an important multidrug resistance protein, because it confers resistance to several classes of cancer chemotherapeutic agents and to a number of novel molecularly-targeted therapeutics such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Gefitinib is an orally active, selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of patients with advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) carrying activating EGFR mutations. Membrane transporters may affect the distribution and accumulation of gefitinib in tumour cells; in particular a reduced intracellular level of the drug may result from poor uptake, enhanced efflux or increased metabolism. Aim The present study, performed in a panel of NSCLC cell lines expressing different ABCG2 plasma membrane levels, was designed to investigate the effect of the efflux transporter ABCG2 on intracellular gefitinib accumulation, by dissecting the contribution of uptake and efflux processes. Methods and Results Our findings indicate that gefitinib, in lung cancer cells, inhibits ABCG2 activity, as previously reported. In addition, we suggest that ABCG2 silencing or overexpression affects intracellular gefitinib content by modulating the uptake rather than the efflux. Similarly, overexpression of ABCG2 affected the expression of a number of drug transporters, altering the functional activities of nutrient and drug transport systems, in particular inhibiting MPP, glucose and glutamine uptake. Conclusions Therefore, we conclude that gefitinib is an inhibitor but not a substrate for ABCG2 and that ABCG2 overexpression may modulate the expression and activity of other transporters involved in the uptake of different substrates into the cells. PMID:26536031

  17. Sarothrin from Alkanna orientalis is an antimicrobial agent and efflux pump inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Bame, Jessica R.; Graf, Tyler N.; Junio, Hiyas A.; Bussey, R. Owen; Jarmusch, Scott A.; El-Elimat, Tamam; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Cech, Richard A.; Cech, Nadja B.

    2015-01-01

    An Alkanna orientalis leaf and flower extract inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, a pathogen that causes an estimated 478,000 hospitalizations in the US annually. Bioassay-guided fractionation of A. orientalis resulted in isolation of the flavonoid sarothrin (5,7,4′-trihydroxy-3,6,8-trimethoxyflavone), which inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis (MIC 75 μM) and S. aureus (MIC >800 μM), and possessed efflux pump inhibitory activity. This is the first report of antimicrobial or efflux pump inhibitory activity of sarothrin, and of its presence in A. orientalis. Our findings suggest that the effectiveness of A. orientalis extracts is due to a combination of multiple constituents, including sarothrin. PMID:23468310

  18. Regulation of ABC efflux transporters at blood-brain barrier in health and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; Miller, David S; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2015-12-01

    The strength of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in providing protection to the central nervous system from exposure to circulating chemicals is maintained by tight junctions between endothelial cells and by a broad range of transporter proteins that regulate exchange between CNS and blood. The most important transporters that restrict the permeability of large number of toxins as well as therapeutic agents are the ABC transporters. Among them, P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP2 are the utmost studied. These efflux transporters are neuroprotective, limiting the brain entry of neurotoxins; however, they could also restrict the entry of many therapeutics and contribute to CNS pharmacoresistance. Characterization of several regulatory pathways that govern expression and activity of ABC efflux transporters in the endothelium of brain capillaries have led to an emerging consensus that these processes are complex and contain several cellular and molecular elements. Alterations in ABC efflux transporters expression and/or activity occur in several neurological diseases. Here, we review the signaling pathways that regulate expression and transport activity of P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP2 as well as how their expression/activity changes in neurological diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26187753

  19. Hepatic calcium efflux during cytochrome P-450-dependent drug oxidations at the endoplasmic reticulum in intact liver.

    PubMed

    Sies, H; Graf, P; Estrela, J M

    1981-06-01

    During metabolism of (type I) drugs by cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase of the endoplasmic reticulum, the NADPH/NADP+ ratio in rat liver selectively decreases to approximately one-half of the control values, whereas the NADH/NAD+ ratio remains practically unaffected [Sies, H. & Brauser, B. (1970) Eur. J. Biochem. 15, 521-540]. In view of the observations with isolated mitochondria [Lehninger, A. L., Vercesi, A. & Bababunmi, E. A. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 1690-1694] of stimulated Ca2+ efflux upon nicotinamide nucleotide oxidation, the selective oxidation of NADPH in cytosol and mitochondria during drug oxidations was considered a useful experimental tool for the determination of whether the oxidation of NADPH or of NADH is responsible for Ca2+ efflux. With perfused livers from phenobarbital-treated rats, Ca2+ efflux was demonstrated, amounting to 8 nmol/min per gram of liver (wet weight), with aminopyrine, ethylmorphine, or hexobarbital as drug substrates. Drug-associated Ca2+ release was diminished when the inhibitor metyrapone was also present, or when drug oxidation was suppressed during N2 anoxia or in the presence of antimycin A in livers from fasted rats. Ca2+ efflux was elicited also by infusion of the thiol oxidant diamide, and by t-butyl hydroperoxide. However whereas Ca2+ efflux elicited by these compounds was restricted upon addition of the thiol dithioerythritol, there was little, if any, sensitivity of the drug-associated Ca2+ efflux to the thiol. Further mitochondrial oxidation of NADPH by addition of ammonium chloride had no effect on drug-associated Ca2+ efflux. Prior addition of the alpha-agonist phenylephrine suppressed the Ca2+ release by drug addition. While the molecular mechanism involved in Ca2+ efflux from liver mitochondria and from hepatocytes as well as the regulatory significance are not yet known, it is concluded from the present experiments that in case of nicotinamide nucleotide-linked Ca2+ efflux the oxidation of

  20. Comparative Molecular Docking Studies with ABCC1 and Aquaporin 9 in the Arsenite Complex Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Poojan, Shiv; Dhasmana, Anupam; Jamal, Qazi Mohammad Sajid; Haneef, Mohd; Lohani, Mohtashim

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is the most toxic metalloid present in the natural environment in both organic and inorganic arsenic forms. Inorganic arsenic is often more hazardous than the organic form. Arsenite and arsenate compounds are the major inorganic forms which are toxic causing severe human health dysfunction including cancer. Excretion of arsenic from the system is found elusive. Therefore, it is of interest to screen channel proteins with the arsenic complex in the different combination of arsenic, GSH (glutathione) and arsenic, selenium using docking methods. The mode of arsenic removal. The complex structure revealed the mode of arsenic binding efficiency with the receptor aquaporine 9 and ABCC1 channel protein. This provides insights to understand the mechanism of arsenic efflux. These inferences find application in the design, identification and development of novel nutracetucal or any other formulation useful in the balance of arsenic efflux. PMID:25258480

  1. Application of flexure structures to active and adaptive opto-mechanical mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, Lorenzo; Genequand, Pierre M.; Kjelberg, Ivar; Morschel, Joseph

    1997-03-01

    Active and adaptive structures, also commonly called 'smart' structures, combine in one integrated system various functions such as load carrying and structural function, mechanical (cinematic) functions, sensing, control and actuating. Originally developed for high accuracy opto-mechanical applications, CSEM's technology of flexure structures and flexible mechanisms is particularly suited to solve many structural and mechanical issues found in such active/adaptive mechanisms. The paper illustrates some recent flexure structures developments at CSEM and outlines the comprehensive know-how involved in this technology. This comprises in particular the elaboration of optimal design guidelines, related to the geometry, kinematics and dynamics issues (for instance, the minimization of spurious high frequency effects), the evaluation and predictability of all performance quantities relevant to the utilization of flexure structures in space (reliability, fatigue, static and dynamic modeling, etc.). material issues and manufacturing procedures.

  2. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  3. Active vibration control using mechanical and electrical analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Perez, A.; Hassan, A.; Kaczmarczyk, S.; Picton, P.

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical-electrical analogous circuit models are widely used in electromechanical system design as they represent the function of a coupled electrical and mechanical system using an equivalent electrical system. This research uses electrical circuits to establish a discussion of simple active vibration control principles using two scenarios: an active vibration isolation system and an active dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using a voice coil motor (VCM) actuator. Active control laws such as gain scheduling are intuitively explained using circuit analysis techniques. Active vibration control approaches are typically constraint by electrical power requirements. The electrical analogous is a fast approach for specifying power requirements on the experimental test platform which is based on a vibration shaker that provides the based excitation required for the single Degree- of-Freedom (1DoF) vibration model under study.

  4. Structure and function of efflux pumps that confer resistance to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Borges-Walmsley, M Ines; McKeegan, Kenneth S; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to therapeutic drugs encompasses a diverse range of biological systems, which all have a human impact. From the relative simplicity of bacterial cells, fungi and protozoa to the complexity of human cancer cells, resistance has become problematic. Stated in its simplest terms, drug resistance decreases the chance of providing successful treatment against a plethora of diseases. Worryingly, it is a problem that is increasing, and consequently there is a pressing need to develop new and effective classes of drugs. This has provided a powerful stimulus in promoting research on drug resistance and, ultimately, it is hoped that this research will provide novel approaches that will allow the deliberate circumvention of well understood resistance mechanisms. A major mechanism of resistance in both microbes and cancer cells is the membrane protein-catalysed extrusion of drugs from the cell. Resistant cells exploit proton-driven antiporters and/or ATP-driven ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters to extrude cytotoxic drugs that usually enter the cell by passive diffusion. Although some of these drug efflux pumps transport specific substrates, many are transporters of multiple substrates. These multidrug pumps can often transport a variety of structurally unrelated hydrophobic compounds, ranging from dyes to lipids. If we are to nullify the effects of efflux-mediated drug resistance, we must first of all understand how these efflux pumps can accommodate a diverse range of compounds and, secondly, how conformational changes in these proteins are coupled to substrate translocation. These are key questions that must be addressed. In this review we report on the advances that have been made in understanding the structure and function of drug efflux pumps. PMID:13678421

  5. Pharmacophore generation of 2-substituted benzothiazoles as AdeABC efflux pump inhibitors in A. baumannii.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, S; Altinkanat-Gelmez, G; Bolelli, K; Guneser-Merdan, D; Over-Hasdemir, M U; Yildiz, I; Aki-Yalcin, E; Yalcin, I

    2014-01-01

    RND family efflux pumps are important for multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. To date no efflux pump inhibitors for clinical use have been found, so developing the specific inhibitors of this pump system will be beneficial for the treatment of infections caused by these multidrug-resistant pathogens. A set of BSN-coded 2-substituted benzothiazoles were tested alone and in combination with ciprofloxacin (CIP) against the RND family efflux pump AdeABC overexpressor Acinetobacter baumannii SbMox-2 strain. The results indicated that the BSN compounds did not have antimicrobial activity when tested alone. However, if they were applied in combination with CIP, it was observed that the antibiotic had antimicrobial activity against the tested pathogen, possessing a minimum inhibitory concentration value that could be utilized in clinical treatment. A 3D-common features pharmacophore model was applied by using the HipHop method and the generated pharmacophore hypothesis revealed that the hydrogen bond acceptor property of nitrogen in the thiazole ring and the oxygen of the amide substituted at the second position of the benzothiazole ring system were significant for binding to the target protein. Moreover, three hydrophobic aromatic features were found to be essential for inhibitory activity. PMID:24905472

  6. Bacterial resistance to tetracycline: mechanisms, transfer, and clinical significance.

    PubMed Central

    Speer, B S; Shoemaker, N B; Salyers, A A

    1992-01-01

    Tetracycline has been a widely used antibiotic because of its low toxicity and broad spectrum of activity. However, its clinical usefulness has been declining because of the appearance of an increasing number of tetracycline-resistant isolates of clinically important bacteria. Two types of resistance mechanisms predominate: tetracycline efflux and ribosomal protection. A third mechanism of resistance, tetracycline modification, has been identified, but its clinical relevance is still unclear. For some tetracycline resistance genes, expression is regulated. In efflux genes found in gram-negative enteric bacteria, regulation is via a repressor that interacts with tetracycline. Gram-positive efflux genes appear to be regulated by an attenuation mechanism. Recently it was reported that at least one of the ribosome protection genes is regulated by attenuation. Tetracycline resistance genes are often found on transmissible elements. Efflux resistance genes are generally found on plasmids, whereas genes involved in ribosome protection have been found on both plasmids and self-transmissible chromosomal elements (conjugative transposons). One class of conjugative transposon, originally found in streptococci, can transfer itself from streptococci to a variety of recipients, including other gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and mycoplasmas. Another class of conjugative transposons has been found in the Bacteroides group. An unusual feature of the Bacteroides elements is that their transfer is enhanced by preexposure to tetracycline. Thus, tetracycline has the double effect of selecting for recipients that acquire a resistance gene and stimulating transfer of the gene. PMID:1423217

  7. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid depletes ATP and inhibits a swelling-activated, ATP-sensitive taurine channel.

    PubMed

    Ballatori, N; Wang, W

    1997-05-01

    The mechanism by which nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a lipoxygenase inhibitor, prevents swelling-activated organic osmolyte efflux was examined in the human hepatoma cell line Hep G2. When swollen in hypotonic medium, Hep G2 cell exhibited a regulatory volume decrease that was associated with the release of intracellular taurine, an amino acid found at a concentrations of 22.0 +/- 2.5 nmol/mg protein (approximately 5 mM) in these cells. Rate coefficients for swelling-activated [3H]taurine uptake and efflux were unaffected when extracellular taurine was increased from 0.1 to 25 mM, indicating that taurine is released via a channel. Taurine efflux was rapidly activated after cell swelling and immediately inactivated when cells were returned to normal size by restoration of isotonicity. Swelling-activated taurine efflux was not altered by replacement of extracellular Na+ with choline+ or K+ but was inhibited when cellular ATP levels were decreased with a variety of chemical agents, consistent with an ATP-regulated channel previously described in other cell types. NDGA inhibited swelling-activated [3H]taurine efflux in Hep G2 cells at concentrations of 50-150 microM; however, these same concentrations of NDGA also lowered cell ATP levels. Likewise, ketoconazole, an inhibitor of cytochrome P-450 monoxygenases, inhibited [3H]taurine efflux only at concentrations at which cell ATP levels were also lowered. In contrast, other inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (indomethacin, 100 microM) or of lipoxygenases (caffeic acid, 100 microM), as well as arachidonic acid itself (100 microM), had no effect on either taurine efflux or cell ATP. The present findings characterize a swelling-activated, ATP-sensitive osmolyte channel in Hep G2 cells and demonstrate that inactivation of the channel by NDGA is related to the ability of this drug to deplete cellular ATP. PMID:9176131

  8. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  9. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration.

    PubMed

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  10. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  11. Cadmium induced potassium efflux from Scenedesmus quadricauda

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, G.N.; Prasad, M.N.V.

    1992-10-01

    Plants, algae and bacteria respond to heavy metal toxicity by inducing different enzymes, ion influx/efflux for ionic balance and synthesize small peptides such as poly({gamma}-glutamyl cysteinyl) glycines called phytochelatins (PCs) mainly consisting of glutamate, cysteine and glycine. These peptides bind metal ions and reduce toxicity. The uptake of metal ions comprises two phases. The first phase consists of a quick and nonspecific binding of the cations to negatively-charged membrane components located at the cell surface. The second phase consists of energy-dependent intracellular uptake of the metal ions. During uptake of Co{sup 2+} by yeast cells, an electroneutral 2:1 exchange with K{sup +} was found. Cd{sup 2+} uptake by yeast also caused loss of cell K{sup +}, however, there was no electroneutral exchange of K{sup +}. The molar ratio of K{sup +} released and Cd{sup 2+} accumulated by yeast in the initial stage of incubation is 22 and seems to be independent of the Cd concentration. Disruption of the cell membrane of part of the cells, according to an all-or-none process, by Cd{sup 2+} may explain the disproportional loss of cell K{sup +} during Cd{sup 2+} uptake. This paper examines the exchange of K{sup +} with Cd{sup 2+} uptake in Scenedesmus quadricauda, and whether it follows an electroneutral 2:1 exchange or an all-or-none process. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Modulation of bone remodeling via mechanically activated ion channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Randall L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A critical factor in the maintenance of bone mass is the physical forces imposed upon the skeleton. Removal of these forces, such as in a weightless environment, results in a rapid loss of bone, whereas application of exogenous mechanical strain has been shown to increase bone formation. Numerous flight and ground-based experiments indicate that the osteoblast is the key bone cell influenced by mechanical stimulation. Aside from early transient fluctuations in response to unloading, osteoclast number and activity seem unaffected by removal of strain. However, bone formation is drastically reduced in weightlessness and osteoblasts respond to mechanical strain with an increase in the activity of a number of second messenger pathways resulting in increased anabolic activity. Unfortunately, the mechanism by which the osteoblast converts physical stimuli into a biochemical message, a process we have termed biochemical coupling, remains elusive. Prior to the application of this grant, we had characterized a mechanosensitive, cation nonselective channel (SA-cat) in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells that we proposed is the initial signalling mechanism for mechanotransduction. During the execution of this grant, we have made considerable progress to further characterize this channel as well as to determine its role in the osteoblastic response to mechanical strain. To achieve these goals, we combined electrophysiologic techniques with cellular and molecular biology methods to examine the role of these channels in the normal function of the osteoblast in vitro.

  13. Experimental investigation of charged liquid jet efflux from a capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhakin, A. I.; Belov, P. A.; Kuz'ko, A. E.

    2013-03-01

    The shapes and electrical characteristics of charged liquid (water, ethanol, glycerol, castor oil) jets emitted from a metal capillary have been experimentally studied depending on the applied high voltage. A map of efflux regimes in the flow velocity-applied voltage coordinates is constructed for water. The effects of medium viscosity, surface tension, and charge relaxation time on the laws of jet efflux are analyzed.

  14. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation

    PubMed Central

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  15. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation.

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-Awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-04-15

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  16. The mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE loaded ALN after mechanical activation for joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kemeng; Qu, Shuxin; Liu, Yumei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yongchao; Jiang, Chongxi; Shen, Ru

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN) has tremendous potential as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. However, poor mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN are still obstacle for further application. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of mechanical activation on mechanical and tribological properties of 1wt% ALN-loaded UHMWPE (UHMWPE-ALN-ma). In this study, tensile test, small punch test and reciprocating sliding wear test were applied to characterize the mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were employed to characterize UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Tensile test and small punch test showed that Young׳s modulus, tensile strength and work-to-failure (WTF) of UHMWPE-ALN-ma increased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. The friction coefficients and wear factors of UHMWPE-ALN-ma both decreased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. Mechanical activation obviously reduced type 1 (void) and type 2 (the disconnected and dislocated machining marks) fusion defects of UHMWPE-ALN-ma, which were revealed by SEM images of freeze fracture surfaces after etching and lateral surfaces of specimens after extension to fracture, respectively. It was attributed to peeled-off layers and chain scission of molecular chains of UHMWPE particles after mechanical activation, which were revealed by SEM images and FTIR spectra of UHMWPE-ALN-ma and UHMWPE-ALN, respectively. Moreover, EDS spectra revealed the more homogeneous distribution of ALN in UHMWPE-ALN-ma compared to that of UHMWPE-ALN. The present results showed that mechanical activation was a potential strategy to improve mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. PMID:27104932

  17. Boron tolerance in barley is mediated by efflux of boron from the roots.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Julie E; Reid, Robert J

    2004-10-01

    Many plants are known to reduce the toxic effects of high soil boron (B) by reducing uptake of B, but no mechanism for limiting uptake has previously been identified. The B-tolerant cultivar of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), Sahara, was shown to be able to maintain root B concentrations up to 50% lower than in the B-sensitive cultivar, Schooner. This translated into xylem concentrations that were approximately 64% lower and leaf concentrations 73% lower in the tolerant cultivar. In both cultivars, B accumulation was rapid and reached a steady-state concentration in roots within 3 h. In Schooner, this concentration was similar to the external medium, whereas in Sahara, the root concentration was maintained at a lower concentration. For this to occur, B must be actively extruded from the root in Sahara, and this is presumed to be the basis for B tolerance in barley. The extrusion mechanism was inhibited by sodium azide but not by treatment at low temperature. Several anion channel inhibitors were also effective in limiting extrusion, but it was not clear whether they acted directly or via metabolic inhibition. The ability of Sahara to maintain lower root B concentrations was constitutive and occurred across a wide range of B concentrations. This ability was lost at high pH, and both Schooner and Sahara then had similar root B concentrations. A predictive model that is consistent with the empirical results and explains the tolerance mechanism based on the presence of a borate anion efflux transporter in Sahara is presented. PMID:15466242

  18. The selective delta opioid agonist SNC80 enhances amphetamine-mediated efflux of dopamine from rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Kelly E; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Gnegy, Margaret E; Traynor, John R

    2008-10-01

    The highly selective delta opioid agonist, SNC80, elicits dopamine-related behaviors including locomotor stimulation and conditioned place-preference. In contrast, it has been reported that SNC80 fails to promote dopamine efflux from the striatum of freely moving rats. However, SNC80 does enhance behavioral responses to the stimulants, amphetamine and cocaine, suggesting an interaction between delta opioids and psychostimulants. Since the increase in locomotor activity elicited by amphetamine and related stimulants acting at the dopamine transporter is associated with increases in extracellular concentrations of dopamine within the striatum, we hypothesized that SNC80 enhances this activity by potentiating the overflow of dopamine through the transporter. To test this hypothesis, striatal preparations from Sprague Dawley rats were assayed for dopamine efflux in response to amphetamine challenge. SNC80 was given either in vivo or in vitro directly to rat striatal tissue, prior to in vitro amphetamine challenge. Both in vivo and in vitro administration of SNC80 enhanced amphetamine-mediated dopamine efflux in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, SNC80 in either treatment paradigm produced no stimulation of dopamine efflux in the absence of amphetamine. The effect of SNC80 on amphetamine-mediated dopamine overflow, but not the effect of amphetamine alone, was blocked by the delta selective antagonist, naltrindole and was also observed with other delta agonists. The results of this study demonstrate that even though SNC80 does not stimulate dopamine efflux alone, it is able to augment amphetamine-mediated dopamine efflux through a delta opioid receptor mediated action locally in the striatum. PMID:18602932

  19. Pathways for Ca2+ efflux in heart and liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzuto, R; Bernardi, P; Favaron, M; Azzone, G F

    1987-01-01

    1. Two processes of Ruthenium Red-insensitive Ca2+ efflux exist in liver and in heart mitochondria: one Na+-independent, and another Na+-dependent. The processes attain maximal rates of 1.4 and 3.0 nmol of Ca2+.min-1.mg-1 for the Na+-dependent and 1.2 and 2.0 nmol of Ca2+.min-1.mg-1 for the Na+-independent, in liver and heart mitochondria, respectively. 2. The Na+-dependent pathway is inhibited, both in heart and in liver mitochondria, by the Ca2+ antagonist diltiazem with a Ki of 4 microM. The Na+-independent pathway is inhibited by diltiazem with a Ki of 250 microM in liver mitochondria, while it behaves as almost insensitive to diltiazem in heart mitochondria. 3. Stretching of the mitochondrial inner membrane in hypo-osmotic media results in activation of the Na+-independent pathway both in liver and in heart mitochondria. 4. Both in heart and liver mitochondria the Na+-independent pathway is insensitive to variations of medium pH around physiological values, while the Na+-dependent pathway is markedly stimulated parallel with acidification of the medium. The pH-activated, Na+-dependent pathway maintains the diltiazem sensitivity. 5. In heart mitochondria, the Na+-dependent pathway is non-competitively inhibited by Mg2+ with a Ki of 0.27 mM, while the Na+-independent pathway is less affected; similarly, in liver mitochondria Mg2+ inhibits the Na+-dependent pathway more than it does the Na+-independent pathway. In the presence of physiological concentrations of Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, the Na+-independent and the Na+-dependent pathways operate at rates, respectively, of 0.5 and 1.0 nmol of Ca2+.min-1.mg-1 in heart mitochondria and 0.9 and 0.2 nmol of Ca2+.min-1.mg-1 in liver mitochondria. It is concluded that both heart and liver mitochondria possess two independent pathways for Ca2+ efflux operating at comparable rates. PMID:3689311

  20. Engineering bacterial efflux pumps for solar-powered bioremediation of surface waters.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Vikram; Wendell, David

    2013-05-01

    Antibiotics are difficult to selectively remove from surface waters by present treatment methods. Bacterial efflux pumps have evolved the ability to discriminately expel antibiotics and other noxious agents via proton and ATP driven pathways. Here, we describe light-dependent removal of antibiotics by engineering the bacterial efflux pump AcrB into a proteovesicle system. We have created a chimeric protein with the requisite proton motive force by coupling AcrB to the light-driven proton pump Delta-rhodopsin (dR) via a glycophorin A transmembrane domain. This creates a solar powered protein material capable of selectively capturing antibiotics from bulk solutions. Using environmental water and direct sunlight, our AcrB-dR vesicles removed almost twice as much antibiotic as the treatment standard, activated carbon. Altogether, the AcrB-dR system provides an effective means of extracting antibiotics from surface waters as well as potential antibiotic recovery through vesicle solubilization. PMID:23581993

  1. The Antiviral Activities and Mechanisms of Marine Polysaccharides: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shi-Xin; Guan, Hua-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the studies on the antiviral activities of marine natural products, especially marine polysaccharides, are attracting more and more attention all over the world. Marine-derived polysaccharides and their lower molecular weight oligosaccharide derivatives have been shown to possess a variety of antiviral activities. This paper will review the recent progress in research on the antiviral activities and the mechanisms of these polysaccharides obtained from marine organisms. In particular, it will provide an update on the antiviral actions of the sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine algae including carrageenans, alginates, and fucans, relating to their structure features and the structure–activity relationships. In addition, the recent findings on the different mechanisms of antiviral actions of marine polysaccharides and their potential for therapeutic application will also be summarized in detail. PMID:23235364

  2. The MexJK Efflux Pump of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Requires OprM for Antibiotic Efflux but Not for Efflux of Triclosan

    PubMed Central

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Narasaki, Craig T.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2002-01-01

    Using the biocide triclosan as a selective agent, several triclosan-resistant mutants of a susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain were isolated. Cloning and characterization of a DNA fragment conferring triclosan resistance from one of these mutants revealed a hitherto uncharacterized efflux system of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) family, which was named MexJK and which is encoded by the mexJK operon. Expression of this operon is negatively regulated by the product of mexL, a gene located upstream of and transcribed divergently from mexJK. The triclosan-resistant mutant contained a single nucleotide change in mexL, which caused an amino acid change in the putative helix-turn-helix domain of MexL. The MexL protein belongs to the TetR family of repressor proteins. The MexJK system effluxed tetracycline and erythromycin but only in the presence of the outer membrane protein channel OprM; OprJ and OprN did not function with MexJK. Triclosan efflux required neither of the outer membrane protein channels tested but necessitated the MexJ membrane fusion protein and the MexK inner membrane RND transporter. The results presented in this study suggest that MexJK may function as a two-component RND pump for triclosan efflux but must associate with OprM to form a tripartite antibiotic efflux system. Furthermore, the results confirm that triclosan is an excellent tool for the study of RND multidrug efflux systems and that this popular biocide therefore readily selects mutants which are cross-resistant with antibiotics. PMID:12193619

  3. CFTR mediates noradrenaline-induced ATP efflux from DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In our earlier study, noradrenaline (NA) stimulated ATP release from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons as mediated via β3 adrenoceptors linked to Gs protein involving protein kinase A (PKA) activation, to cause allodynia. The present study was conducted to understand how ATP is released from DRG neurons. In an outside-out patch-clamp configuration from acutely dissociated rat DRG neurons, single-channel currents, sensitive to the P2X receptor inhibitor PPADS, were evoked by approaching the patch-electrode tip close to a neuron, indicating that ATP is released from DRG neurons, to activate P2X receptor. NA increased the frequency of the single-channel events, but such NA effect was not found for DRG neurons transfected with the siRNA to silence the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. In the immunocytochemical study using acutely dissociated rat DRG cells, CFTR was expressed in neurons alone, but not satellite cells, fibroblasts, or Schwann cells. It is concluded from these results that CFTR mediates NA-induced ATP efflux from DRG neurons as an ATP channel. PMID:21943397

  4. Mechanisms of NOD-like receptor-associated inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Haitao; Miao, Edward A; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2013-09-19

    A major function of a subfamily of NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing, or NOD-like receptor) proteins is in inflammasome activation, which has been implicated in a multitude of disease models and human diseases. This work will highlight key progress in understanding the mechanisms that activate the best-studied NLRs (NLRP3, NLRC4, NAIP, and NLRP1) and in uncovering inflammasome NLRs. PMID:24054327

  5. Involvement of both sodium influx and potassium efflux in ciguatoxin-induced nodal swelling of frog myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Mattei, César; Molgó, Jordi; Benoit, Evelyne

    2014-10-01

    Ciguatoxins, mainly produced by benthic dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus species, are responsible for a complex human poisoning known as ciguatera. Previous pharmacological studies revealed that these toxins activate voltage-gated Na+ channels. In frog nodes of Ranvier, ciguatoxins induce spontaneous and repetitive action potentials (APs) and increase axonal volume that may explain alterations of nerve functioning in intoxicated humans. The present study aimed determining the ionic mechanisms involved in Pacific ciguatoxin-1B (P-CTX-1B)-induced membrane hyperexcitability and subsequent volume increase in frog nodes of Ranvier, using electrophysiology and confocal microscopy. The results reveal that P-CTX-1B action is not dependent on external Cl- ions since it was not affected by substituting Cl- by methylsulfate ions. In contrast, substitution of external Na+ by Li+ ions suppressed spontaneous APs and prevented nodal swelling. This suggests that P-CTX-1B-modified Na+ channels are not selective to Li+ ions and/or are blocked by these ions, and that Na+ influx through Na+ channels opened during spontaneous APs is required for axonal swelling. The fact that the K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium modified, but did not suppress, spontaneous APs and greatly reduced nodal swelling induced by P-CTX-1B indicates that K+ efflux might also be involved. This is supported by the fact that P-CTX-1B, when tested in the presence of both tetraethylammonium and the K+ ionophore valinomycin, produced the characteristic nodal swelling. It is concluded that, during the action of P-CTX-1B, water movements responsible for axonal swelling depend on both Na+ influx and K+ efflux. These results pave the way for further studies regarding ciguatera treatment. PMID:24950451

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum stress impairs cholesterol efflux and synthesis in hepatic cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Winter, Katharina; Korbelius, Melanie; Obrowsky, Sascha; Kratky, Dagmar; Kovacs, Werner J.; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes cause hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which affects neutral lipid metabolism. However, the role of ER stress in cholesterol metabolism is incompletely understood. Here, we show that induction of acute ER stress in human hepatic HepG2 cells reduced ABCA1 expression and caused ABCA1 redistribution to tubular perinuclear compartments. Consequently, cholesterol efflux to apoA-I, a key step in nascent HDL formation, was diminished by 80%. Besides ABCA1, endogenous apoA-I expression was reduced upon ER stress induction, which contributed to reduced cholesterol efflux. Liver X receptor, a key regulator of ABCA1 in peripheral cells, was not involved in this process. Despite reduced cholesterol efflux, cellular cholesterol levels remained unchanged during ER stress. This was due to impaired de novo cholesterol synthesis by reduction of HMG-CoA reductase activity by 70%, although sterol response element-binding protein-2 activity was induced. In mice, ER stress induction led to a marked reduction of hepatic ABCA1 expression. However, HDL cholesterol levels were unaltered, presumably because of scavenger receptor class B, type I downregulation under ER stress. Taken together, our data suggest that ER stress in metabolic disorders reduces HDL biogenesis due to impaired hepatic ABCA1 function. PMID:24179149

  7. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  8. Amyloid-β efflux from the CNS into the plasma

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kaleigh Filisa; Elbert, Donald L.; Kasten, Tom P.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Sigurdson, Wendy C.; Connors, Rose E.; Ovod, Vitaliy; Munsell, Ling Y.; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Miller-Thomas, Michelle M.; Moran, Christopher J.; Cross, Dewitte T.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to measure the flux of amyloid-β (Aβ) across the human cerebral capillary bed in order to determine if transport into the blood is a significant mechanism of clearance for Aβ produced in the central nervous system (CNS). Methods Time-matched blood samples were simultaneously collected from a cerebral vein (including the sigmoid sinus, inferior petrosal sinus, and the internal jugular vein), femoral vein, and radial artery of patients undergoing Inferior Petrosal Sinus Sampling (IPSS). For each plasma sample, Aβ concentration was assessed by three assays and the venous to arterial Aβ concentration ratios were determined. Results Aβ concentration was increased by ~7.5% in venous blood leaving the CNS capillary bed compared to arterial blood, indicating efflux from the CNS into the peripheral blood (p < 0.0001). There was no difference in peripheral venous Aβ concentration compared to arterial blood concentration. Interpretation Our results are consistent with clearance of CNS-derived Aβ into the venous blood supply with no increase from a peripheral capillary bed. Modeling these results suggests that direct transport of Aβ across the blood-brain barrier accounts for ~25% of Aβ clearance, and reabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid Aβ accounts for ~25% of the total CNS Aβ clearance in humans. PMID:25205593

  9. Inflammatory Regulation of ATP Binding Cassette Efflux Transporter Expression and Function in Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Christopher J.; Hossain, Muhammad M.; Richardson, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters, including multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mdr1), breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrps) extrude chemicals from the brain. Although ABC transporters are critical for blood-brain barrier integrity, less attention has been placed on the regulation of these proteins in brain parenchymal cells such as microglia. Prior studies demonstrate that inflammation after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment alters transporter expression in the livers of mice. Here, we sought to determine the effects of inflammation on the expression and function of transporters in microglia. To test this, the expression and function of ABC efflux transport proteins were quantified in mouse BV-2 microglial cells in response to activation with LPS. Intracellular retention of fluorescent rhodamine 123, Hoechst 33342, and calcein acetoxymethyl ester was increased in LPS-treated microglia, suggesting that the functions of Mdr1, Bcrp, and Mrps were decreased, respectively. LPS reduced Mdr1, Bcrp, and Mrp4 mRNA and protein expression between 40 and 70%. Conversely, LPS increased expression of Mrp1 and Mrp5 mRNA and protein. Immunofluorescent staining confirmed reduced Bcrp and Mrp4 and elevated Mrp1 and Mrp5 protein in activated microglia. Pharmacological inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcriptional signaling attenuated down-regulation of Mdr1a mRNA and potentiated up-regulation of Mrp5 mRNA in LPS-treated cells. Together, these data suggest that LPS stimulates microglia and impairs efflux of prototypical ABC transporter substrates by altering mRNA and protein expression, in part through NF-κB signaling. Decreased transporter efflux function in microglia may lead to the retention of toxic chemicals and aberrant cell-cell communication during neuroinflammation. PMID:22942241

  10. Differential MSC activation leads to distinct mononuclear leukocyte binding mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Daniel J.; Dicarlo, Bryan; Hetz, Robert A.; Smith, Philippa; Cox, Charles S.; Olson, Scott D.

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the field of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal cell (MSC) biology have demonstrated that MSCs can improve disease outcome when `activated' to exert immunomodulatory effects. However, the precise mechanisms modulating MSC-immune cells interactions remain largely elusive. In here, we activated MSC based on a recent polarization paradigm, in which MSCs can be polarized towards a pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotype depending on the Toll-like receptor stimulated, to dissect the mechanisms through which MSCs physically interact with and modulate leukocytes in this context. Our data show that MSCs activated through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 dependent binding of leukocytes. On the other hand, TLR3 stimulation strongly increases leukocytes affinity to MSC comparatively, through the formation of cable-like hyaluronic acid structures. In addition, TLR4 activation elicited secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators by MSCs, whereas TLR3-activated MSCs displayed a milder pro-inflammatory phenotype, similar to inactivated MSCs. However, the differently activated MSCs maintained their ability to suppress leukocyte activation at similar levels in our in vitro model, and this immunomodulatory property was shown here to be partially mediated by prostaglandin. These results reinforce the concept that alternate activation profiles control MSC responses and may impact the therapeutic use of MSCs.

  11. Long-Term Ritonavir Exposure Increases Fatty Acid and Glycerol Recycling in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes as Compensatory Mechanisms for Increased Triacylglycerol Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Adler-Wailes, Diane C.; Guiney, Evan L.; Wolins, Nathan E.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2010-01-01

    Lipodystrophy with high nonesterified fatty acid (FA) efflux is reported in humans receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to treat HIV infection. Ritonavir, a common component of HAART, alters adipocyte FA efflux, but the mechanism for this effect is not established. To investigate ritonavir-induced changes in FA flux and recycling through acylglycerols, we exposed differentiated murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes to ritonavir for 14 d. FA efflux, uptake, and incorporation into acylglycerols were measured. To identify a mediator of FA efflux, we measured adipocyte triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) transcript and protein. To determine whether ritonavir-treated adipocytes increased glycerol backbone synthesis for FA reesterification, we measured labeled glycerol and pyruvate incorporation into triacylglycerol (TAG). Ritonavir-treated cells had increased FA efflux, uptake, and incorporation into TAG (all P < 0.01). Ritonavir increased FA efflux without consistently increasing glycerol release or changing TAG mass, suggesting increased partial TAG hydrolysis. Ritonavir-treated adipocytes expressed significantly more ATGL mRNA (P < 0.05) and protein (P < 0.05). Ritonavir increased glycerol (P < 0.01) but not pyruvate (P = 0.41), utilization for TAG backbone synthesis. Consistent with this substrate utilization, glycerol kinase transcript (required for glycerol incorporation into TAG backbone) was up-regulated (P < 0.01), whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase transcript (required for pyruvate utilization) was down-regulated (P < 0.001). In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, long-term ritonavir exposure perturbs FA metabolism by increasing ATGL-mediated partial TAG hydrolysis, thus increasing FA efflux, and leads to compensatory increases in FA reesterification with glycerol and acylglycerols. These changes in FA metabolism may, in part, explain the increased FA efflux observed in ritonavir-associated lipodystrophy. PMID:20228169

  12. Mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity of DYRK1A.

    PubMed

    Walte, Agnes; Rüben, Katharina; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Preisinger, Christian; Bamberg-Lemper, Simone; Hilz, Nikolaus; Bracher, Franz; Becker, Walter

    2013-09-01

    The function of many protein kinases is controlled by the phosphorylation of a critical tyrosine residue in the activation loop. Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs) autophosphorylate on this tyrosine residue but phosphorylate substrates on aliphatic amino acids. This study addresses the mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity in DYRK1A and related kinases. Tyrosine autophosphorylation of DYRK1A occurred rapidly during in vitro translation and did not depend on the non-catalytic domains or other proteins. Expression in bacteria as well as in mammalian cells revealed that tyrosine kinase activity of DYRK1A is not restricted to the co-translational autophosphorylation in the activation loop. Moreover, mature DYRK1A was still capable of tyrosine autophosphorylation. Point mutants of DYRK1A and DYRK2 lacking the activation loop tyrosine showed enhanced tyrosine kinase activity. A series of structurally diverse DYRK1A inhibitors was used to pharmacologically distinguish different conformational states of the catalytic domain that are hypothesized to account for the dual specificity kinase activity. All tested compounds inhibited substrate phosphorylation with higher potency than autophosphorylation but none of the tested inhibitors differentially inhibited threonine and tyrosine kinase activity. Finally, the related cyclin-dependent kinase-like kinases (CLKs), which lack the activation loop tyrosine, autophosphorylated on tyrosine both in vitro and in living cells. We propose a model of DYRK autoactivation in which tyrosine autophosphorylation in the activation loop stabilizes a conformation of the catalytic domain with enhanced serine/threonine kinase activity without disabling tyrosine phosphorylation. The mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity probably applies to related serine/threonine kinases that depend on tyrosine autophosphorylation for maturation. PMID:23809146

  13. Mechanism of coupling drug transport reactions located in two different membranes.

    PubMed

    Zgurskaya, Helen I; Weeks, Jon W; Ntreh, Abigail T; Nickels, Logan M; Wolloscheck, David

    2015-01-01

    Gram- negative bacteria utilize a diverse array of multidrug transporters to pump toxic compounds out of the cell. Some transporters, together with periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) and outer membrane channels, assemble trans-envelope complexes that expel multiple antibiotics across outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and into the external medium. Others further potentiate this efflux by pumping drugs across the inner membrane into the periplasm. Together these transporters create a powerful network of efflux that protects bacteria against a broad range of antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the mechanism of coupling transport reactions located in two different membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic and biophysical approaches we have reconstructed the sequence of events leading to the assembly of trans-envelope drug efflux complexes and characterized the roles of periplasmic and outer membrane proteins in this process. Our recent data suggest a critical step in the activation of intermembrane efflux pumps, which is controlled by MFPs. We propose that the reaction cycles of transporters are tightly coupled to the assembly of the trans-envelope complexes. Transporters and MFPs exist in the inner membrane as dormant complexes. The activation of complexes is triggered by MFP binding to the outer membrane channel, which leads to a conformational change in the membrane proximal domain of MFP needed for stimulation of transporters. The activated MFP-transporter complex engages the outer membrane channel to expel substrates across the outer membrane. The recruitment of the channel is likely triggered by binding of effectors (substrates) to MFP or MFP-transporter complexes. This model together with recent structural and functional advances in the field of drug efflux provides a fairly detailed understanding of the mechanism of drug efflux across the two membranes. PMID:25759685

  14. Mechanism of coupling drug transport reactions located in two different membranes

    PubMed Central

    Zgurskaya, Helen I.; Weeks, Jon W.; Ntreh, Abigail T.; Nickels, Logan M.; Wolloscheck, David

    2015-01-01

    Gram- negative bacteria utilize a diverse array of multidrug transporters to pump toxic compounds out of the cell. Some transporters, together with periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) and outer membrane channels, assemble trans-envelope complexes that expel multiple antibiotics across outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and into the external medium. Others further potentiate this efflux by pumping drugs across the inner membrane into the periplasm. Together these transporters create a powerful network of efflux that protects bacteria against a broad range of antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the mechanism of coupling transport reactions located in two different membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic and biophysical approaches we have reconstructed the sequence of events leading to the assembly of trans-envelope drug efflux complexes and characterized the roles of periplasmic and outer membrane proteins in this process. Our recent data suggest a critical step in the activation of intermembrane efflux pumps, which is controlled by MFPs. We propose that the reaction cycles of transporters are tightly coupled to the assembly of the trans-envelope complexes. Transporters and MFPs exist in the inner membrane as dormant complexes. The activation of complexes is triggered by MFP binding to the outer membrane channel, which leads to a conformational change in the membrane proximal domain of MFP needed for stimulation of transporters. The activated MFP-transporter complex engages the outer membrane channel to expel substrates across the outer membrane. The recruitment of the channel is likely triggered by binding of effectors (substrates) to MFP or MFP-transporter complexes. This model together with recent structural and functional advances in the field of drug efflux provides a fairly detailed understanding of the mechanism of drug efflux across the two membranes. PMID:25759685

  15. UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS OF CHANGE IN CHILDREN'S PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROGRAMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a lack of understanding of why childhood physical activity interventions succeed or fail. A model is proposed that relates program process to mediating variables and outcomes. Using the mdoel to design and evaluate interventions could result in a greater understanding of the mechanisms of c...

  16. ACID RAIN AND SOIL MICROBIAL ACTIVITY: EFFECTS AND THEIR MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the investigation, our aim was to determine if acid rain affects soil microbial activity and to identify possible mechanisms of observed effects. A Sierran forest soil (pH 6.4) planted with Ponderosa pine seedlings was exposed to simulated rain (pH 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.6) with ...

  17. Resistance-nodulation-division efflux pump acrAB is modulated by florfenicol and contributes to drug resistance in the fish pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Rodrigo; Oliver, Cristian; Valdivia, Sharin; Valenzuela, Karla; Haro, Ronie E; Sánchez, Patricio; Olavarría, Víctor H; Valenzuela, Paulina; Avendaño-Herrera, Rubén; Romero, Alex; Cárcamo, Juan G; Figueroa, Jaime E; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2016-06-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is a fastidious intracellular pathogen responsible for high mortality rates in farmed salmonids, with serious economic consequences for the Chilean aquaculture industry. Oxytetracycline and florfenicol are the most frequently used antibiotics against P. salmonis, but routine use could contribute to drug resistance. This study identified differentiated florfenicol susceptibilities in two P. salmonis strains, LF-89 and AUSTRAL-005. The less susceptible isolate, AUSTRAL-005, also showed a high ethidium bromide efflux rate, indicating a higher activity of general efflux pump genes than LF-89. The P. salmonis genome presented resistance nodulation division (RND) family members, a family containing typical multidrug resistance-related efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. Additionally, efflux pump acrAB genes were overexpressed in AUSTRAL-005 following exposure to the tolerated maximal concentration of florfenicol, in contrast to LF-89. These results indicate that tolerated maximum concentrations of florfenicol can modulate RND gene expression and increase efflux pump activity. We propose that the acrAB efflux pump is essential for P. salmonis survival at critical florfenicol concentrations and for the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. PMID:27190287

  18. Altered regulation of hepatic efflux transporters disrupts acetaminophen disposition in pediatric nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Canet, Mark J; Merrell, Matthew D; Hardwick, Rhiannon N; Bataille, Amy M; Campion, Sarah N; Ferreira, Daniel W; Xanthakos, Stavra A; Manautou, Jose E; A-Kader, H Hesham; Erickson, Robert P; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2015-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease, representing a spectrum of liver pathologies that include simple hepatic steatosis and the more advanced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The current study was conducted to determine whether pediatric NASH also results in altered disposition of acetaminophen (APAP) and its two primary metabolites, APAP-sulfate and APAP-glucuronide. Pediatric patients with hepatic steatosis (n = 9) or NASH (n = 3) and healthy patients (n = 12) were recruited in a small pilot study design. All patients received a single 1000-mg dose of APAP. Blood and urine samples were collected at 1, 2, and 4 hours postdose, and APAP and APAP metabolites were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Moreover, human liver tissues from patients diagnosed with various stages of NAFLD were acquired from the Liver Tissue Cell Distribution System to investigate the regulation of the membrane transporters, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and 3 (MRP2 and MRP3, respectively). Patients with the more severe disease (i.e., NASH) had increased serum and urinary levels of APAP-glucuronide along with decreased serum levels of APAP-sulfate. Moreover, an induction of hepatic MRP3 and altered canalicular localization of the biliary efflux transporter, MRP2, describes the likely mechanism for the observed increase in plasma retention of APAP-glucuronide, whereas altered regulation of sulfur activation genes may explain decreased sulfonation activity in NASH. APAP-glucuronide and APAP-sulfate disposition is altered in NASH and is likely due to hepatic membrane transporter dysregulation as well as altered intracellular sulfur activation. PMID:25788542

  19. The Effects of Nitrogen Enrichment and a Simulated Rainfall Event on Soil Carbon Dioxide Efflux in an Annual California Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. P.; Strong, A. L.; Chiariello, N.; Field, C. B.

    2013-12-01

    Soils contain the largest pool of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems and play a critical role in the global carbon cycle. Previous studies have shown that enhanced precipitation (projected by climate models) and human activities (such as increased fertilizer use) may alter this cycle by enhancing soil microbial activity, although effects are often variable. Soils in semi-arid grasslands play a vital role in the global carbon cycle and may be responsive to environmental perturbations. Previous studies have demonstrated that wet-up treatments positively influence soil carbon dioxide efflux rates, which are otherwise low during dry summers. A preliminary study performed in a semi-arid annual grassland has shown that long-term nitrogen enrichment (equivalent to 70kg N per hectare) positively influences soil carbon dioxide efflux during peak biomass in the wet season. However, the combined effect and seasonal dynamics of these environmental changes is poorly understood. In order to assess this interaction, we explore the short-term response of soil carbon dioxide efflux rates in a semi-arid grassland to a combination of long-term nitrogen enrichment and a simulated 20-mm rainfall event in the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRCGE), a long-term, multi-factorial experiment in a semi-arid annual grassland located in the foothills of the Santa Cruz mountains in central California. We measured soil carbon dioxide efflux rates from pre-installed soil respiration collars for forty-eight hours after a simulated rainfall event (20mm) during the dry season in late July 2013. Both the enhanced and non-enhanced nitrogen treatments had an immediate pronounced response to the wet-up stimulation in which efflux rates increased by an average of more than six-fold. In contrast with previous studies of soil carbon dioxide efflux at JRGCE during the wet season in which N enrichment elevated efflux rates relative to controls, however, the soil carbon dioxide efflux rates in response

  20. Antibiotic resistance and multidrug-resistant efflux pumps expression in lactic acid bacteria isolated from pozol, a nonalcoholic Mayan maize fermented beverage.

    PubMed

    Wacher-Rodarte, Maria Del Carmen; Trejo-Muñúzuri, Tanya Paulina; Montiel-Aguirre, Jesús Fernando; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa; Gutiérrez-Lucas, Raúl L; Castañeda-Sánchez, Jorge Ismael; Sainz-Espuñes, Teresita

    2016-05-01

    Pozol is a handcrafted nonalcoholic Mayan beverage produced by the spontaneous fermentation of maize dough by lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are carriers of chromosomal encoded multidrug-resistant efflux pumps genes that can be transferred to pathogens and/or confer resistance to compounds released during the fermentation process causing food spoiling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic sensibility and the transcriptional expression of ABC-type efflux pumps in LAB isolated from pozol that contributes to multidrug resistance. Analysis of LAB and Staphylococcus (S.) aureus ATCC 29213 and ATCC 6538 control strains to antibiotic susceptibility, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) to ethidium bromide were based in "standard methods" whereas the ethidium bromide efflux assay was done by fluorometric assay. Transcriptional expression of efflux pumps was analyzed by RT-PCR. LAB showed antibiotic multiresistance profiles, moreover, Lactococcus (L.) lactis and Lactobacillus (L.) plantarum displayed higher ethidium bromide efflux phenotype than S. aureus control strains. Ethidium bromide resistance and ethidium bromide efflux phenotypes were unrelated with the overexpression of lmrD in L. lactics, or the underexpression of lmrA in L. plantarum and norA in S. aureus. These findings suggest that, moreover, the analyzed efflux pumps genes, other unknown redundant mechanisms may underlie the antibiotic resistance and the ethidium bromide efflux phenotype in L. lactis and L. plantarum. Phenotypic and molecular drug multiresistance assessment in LAB may improve a better selection of the fermentation starter cultures used in pozol, and to control the antibiotic resistance widespread and food spoiling for health safety. PMID:27247772

  1. Reciprocal Regulation of Resistance-Nodulation-Division Efflux Systems and the Cpx Two-Component System in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Dawn L.; Bina, X. Renee; Slamti, Leyla; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    The Cpx two-component regulatory system has been shown in Escherichia coli to alleviate stress caused by misfolded cell envelope proteins. The Vibrio cholerae Cpx system was previously found to respond to cues distinct from those in the E. coli system, suggesting that this system fulfills a different physiological role in the cholera pathogen. Here, we used microarrays to identify genes that were regulated by the V. cholerae Cpx system. Our observations suggest that the activation of the V. cholerae Cpx system does not induce expression of genes involved in the mitigation of stress generated by misfolded cell envelope proteins but promotes expression of genes involved in antimicrobial resistance. In particular, activation of the Cpx system induced expression of the genes encoding the VexAB and VexGH resistance-nodulation-division (RND) efflux systems and their cognate outer membrane pore protein TolC. The promoters for these loci contained putative CpxR consensus binding sites, and ectopic cpxR expression activated transcription from the promoters for the RND efflux systems. CpxR was not required for intrinsic antimicrobial resistance, but CpxR activation enhanced resistance to antimicrobial substrates of VexAB and VexGH. Mutations that inactivated VexAB or VexGH efflux activity resulted in the activation of the Cpx response, suggesting that vexAB and vexGH and the cpxP-cpxRA system are reciprocally regulated. We speculate that the reciprocal regulation of the V. cholerae RND efflux systems and the Cpx two-component system is mediated by the intracellular accumulation of an endogenously produced metabolic by-product that is normally extruded from the cell by the RND efflux systems. PMID:24799626

  2. Regulation of the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE efflux-pump system modulates the in vivo fitness of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Warner, Douglas M; Folster, Jason P; Shafer, William M; Jerse, Ann E

    2007-12-15

    The Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrC-MtrD-MtrE multidrug-resistance efflux pump expels macrolide antibiotics, penicillin, and antimicrobial effectors of the innate defense. Mutation of the mtrR locus, which encodes a transcriptional repressor of the mtrCDE operon, increases gonococcal resistance to these agents. Here we report that, in a mouse infection model, an mtrR mutant is more fit than the wild-type bacteria. Consistent with derepression of the mtrCDE operon as the primary reason for the fitness benefit, an mtrR,mtrE double mutant and an mtrE mutant showed no difference in survival phenotype. Gonococcal mutants deficient in MtrA, an activator of the mtrCDE operon, exhibited significantly reduced fitness in vivo, and mtrA mutants with spontaneous compensatory mtrR mutations were selected during infection. These results confirm the importance of the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE efflux-pump system during experimental gonococcal genital-tract infection and also illustrate an antibiotic-resistance mechanism that is accompanied by a fitness benefit rather than a fitness cost. PMID:18190261

  3. Increased Systemic Exposure of Methotrexate by a Polyphenol-Rich Herb via Modulation on Efflux Transporters Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-Ping; Hsieh, Yun-Chung; Shia, Chi-Sheng; Hsu, Pei-Wen; Chen, Jen-Yuan; Hou, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Yo-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Scutellariae radix (SR, roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi), a popular Chinese medicine, contains plenty of flavonoids such as baicalin, wogonoside, baicalein, and wogonin. Methotrexate (MTX), an important immunosuppressant with a narrow therapeutic index, is a substrate of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). This study investigated the effect of SR on MTX pharmacokinetics and the underlying mechanisms. Rats were orally administered MTX alone and with 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg of SR. The serum concentrations of MTX were determined by a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Cell models were used to explore the involvement of MRP2 and BCRP in the interaction. The results showed that 1.0 g/kg of SR significantly increased Cmax, AUC(0-30), AUC(0-2880), and mean residence time (MRT) of MTX by 50%, 45%, 501%, and 347%, respectively, and 2.0 g/kg of SR significantly enhanced the AUC(0-2880) and MRT by 242% and 293%, respectively, but decreased AUC(0-30) by 41%. Cell line studies indicated that SR activated the BCRP-mediated efflux transport, whereas the serum metabolites of SR inhibited both the BCRP- and MRP2-mediated efflux transports. In conclusion, SR ingestion increased the systemic exposure and MRT of MTX via modulation on MRP2 and BCRP. PMID:26852865

  4. Mechanisms of specificity in neuronal activity-regulated gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Michelle R.; West, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is a highly adaptable organ that is capable of converting sensory information into changes in neuronal function. This plasticity allows behavior to be accommodated to the environment, providing an important evolutionary advantage. Neurons convert environmental stimuli into long-lasting changes in their physiology in part through the synaptic activity-regulated transcription of new gene products. Since the neurotransmitter-dependent regulation of Fos transcription was first discovered nearly 25 years ago, a wealth of studies have enriched our understanding of the molecular pathways that mediate activity-regulated changes in gene transcription. These findings show that a broad range of signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators can be engaged by neuronal activity to sculpt complex programs of stimulus-regulated gene transcription. However, the shear scope of the transcriptional pathways engaged by neuronal activity raises the question of how specificity in the nature of the transcriptional response is achieved in order to encode physiologically relevant responses to divergent stimuli. Here we summarize the general paradigms by which neuronal activity regulates transcription while focusing on the molecular mechanisms that confer differential stimulus-, cell-type-, and developmental-specificity upon activity-regulated programs of neuronal gene transcription. In addition, we preview some of the new technologies that will advance our future understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of activity-regulated gene transcription in the brain. PMID:21620929

  5. (18)F-FCWAY, a serotonin 1A receptor radioligand, is a substrate for efflux transport at the human blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Liow, Jeih-San; Zoghbi, Sami S; Hu, Shuo; Hall, Matthew D; Hines, Christina S; Shetty, H Umesha; Araneta, Maria D; Page, Emily M; Pike, Victor W; Kreisl, William C; Herscovitch, Peter; Gottesman, Michael M; Theodore, William H; Innis, Robert B

    2016-09-01

    Efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier can decrease the entry of drugs and increase the removal of those molecules able to bypass the transporter. We previously hypothesized that (18)F-FCWAY, a radioligand for the serotonin 5-HT1A receptor, is a weak substrate for permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) based on its very early peak and rapid washout from human brain. To determine whether (18)F-FCWAY is a substrate for P-gp, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and multidrug resistance protein (MRP1) - the three most prevalent efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier - we performed three sets of experiments. In vitro, we conducted fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) flow cytometry studies in cells over-expressing P-gp, BCRP, and MRP1 treated with inhibitors specific to each transporter and with FCWAY. Ex vivo, we measured (18)F-FCWAY concentration in plasma and brain homogenate of transporter knockout mice using γ-counter and radio-HPLC. In vivo, we conducted positron emission tomography (PET) studies to assess changes in humans who received (18)F-FCWAY during an infusion of tariquidar (2-4mg/kg iv), a potent and selective P-gp inhibitor. In vitro studies showed that FCWAY allowed fluorescent substrates to get into the cell by competitive inhibition of all three transporters at the cell membrane. Ex vivo measurements in knockout mice indicate that (18)F-FCWAY is a substrate only for P-gp and not BCRP. In vivo, tariquidar increased (18)F-FCWAY brain uptake in seven of eight subjects by 60-100% compared to each person's baseline. Tariquidar did not increase brain uptake via some peripheral mechanism, given that it did not significantly alter concentrations in plasma of the parent radioligand (18)F-FCWAY or its brain-penetrant radiometabolite (18)F-FC. These results show that (18)F-FCWAY is a weak substrate for efflux transport at the blood-brain barrier; some radioligand can enter brain, but its removal is hastened by P-gp. Although (18)F-FCWAY is

  6. Mechanisms of active control in cylindrical fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes ongoing efforts to understand and exploit active control techniques for low frequency noise suppression in aerospace applications. Analytical models are utilized in an effort to understand the mechanisms that govern noise transmission into acoustic spaces enclosed by lightweight structures and to examine the results of experimental implementations of active control schemes. Emphasis is placed on attaining global noise reductions using a minimum number of actuators rather than localized control over many subregions. This program has demonstrated the effect of synchrophasing and interface modal filtering, in limiting the modal density within the acoustic space, and how strong reactive effects may occur in two dimensional geometries. Finally, the performance of active control systems utilizing acoustic and vibration actuators is evaluated. Suppressions of 10 to 30 dB are demonstrated in practice, and performance is discussed in relation to the physical mechanisms and parameters of the system.

  7. Mechanisms of xenobiotic receptor activation: Direct vs. indirect.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak, Bryan; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-09-01

    The so-called xenobiotic receptors (XRs) have functionally evolved into cellular sensors for both endogenous and exogenous stimuli by regulating the transcription of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, as well as those involving energy homeostasis, cell proliferation, and/or immune responses. Unlike prototypical steroid hormone receptors, XRs are activated through both direct ligand-binding and ligand-independent (indirect) mechanisms by a plethora of structurally unrelated chemicals. This review covers research literature that discusses direct vs. indirect activation of XRs. A particular focus is centered on the signaling control of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the pregnane X receptor (PXR), and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We expect that this review will shed light on both the common and distinct mechanisms associated with activation of these three XRs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:26877237

  8. A Possible Mechanism for Redox Control of Human Neuroglobin Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) promotes neuron survival under hypoxic/ischemic conditions. In vivo and in vitro assays provide evidence for redox-regulated functioning of Ngb. On the basis of X-ray crystal structures and our MD simulations, a mechanism for redox control of human Ngb (hNgb) activity via the influence of the CD loop on the active site is proposed. We provide evidence that the CD loop undergoes a strand-to-helix transition when the external environment becomes sufficiently oxidizing, and that this CD loop conformational transition causes critical restructuring of the active site. We postulate that the strand-to-helix mechanics of the CD loop allows hNgb to utilize the lability of Cys46/Cys55 disulfide bonding and of the Tyr44/His64/heme propionate interaction network for redox-controlled functioning of hNgb. PMID:24855999

  9. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  10. Insights into the Thiamine Diphosphate Enzyme Activation Mechanism: Computational Model for Transketolase Using a Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Method.

    PubMed

    Nauton, Lionel; Hélaine, Virgil; Théry, Vincent; Hecquet, Laurence

    2016-04-12

    We propose the first computational model for transketolase (TK), a thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme, using a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method on the basis of crystallographic TK structures from yeast and Escherichia coli, together with experimental kinetic data reported in the literature with wild-type and mutant TK. This model allowed us to define a new route for ThDP activation in the enzyme environment. We evidenced a strong interaction between ThDP and Glu418B of the TK active site, itself stabilized by Glu162A. The crucial point highlighted here is that deprotonation of ThDP C2 is not performed by ThDP N4' as reported in the literature, but by His481B, involving a HOH688A molecule bridge. Thus, ThDP N4' is converted from an amino form to an iminium form, ensuring the stabilization of the C2 carbanion or carbene. Finally, ThDP activation proceeds via an intermolecular process and not by an intramolecular one as reported in the literature. More generally, this proposed ThDP activation mechanism can be applied to some other ThDP-dependent enzymes and used to define the entire TK mechanism with donor and acceptor substrates more accurately. PMID:26998737

  11. Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphotyrosyl Phosphatase Activator

    SciTech Connect

    Chao,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Xu, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Jeffrey, P.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase act