Science.gov

Sample records for active feedback stabilization

  1. Feedback stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  2. Active feedback stabilization of flute instability in a mirror trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'Ery, Ilan; Seemann, Omri; Fruchtman, Amnon; Fisher, Amnon; Ron, Amiram

    2013-10-01

    The flute instability in a table-top mirror machine has been stabilized by a feedback system consisting of optical probes, digital signal processor, and needle electrodes. The total response time of the system is 5 μs, which is considerably faster than the typical flute growth time. Simulation and a dynamic model of the plasma's response to the needle actuators were tested against cyclic bias experiments. The plasma density is increased by the stabilization by a factor of two and is limited by other decay processes.

  3. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  4. STABILIZED FEEDBACK AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Fishbine, H.L.; Sewell, C. Jr.

    1957-08-01

    Negative feedback amplifiers, and particularly a negative feedback circuit which is economical on amode power consumption, are described. Basically, the disclosed circuit comprises two tetrode tubes where the output of the first tube is capacitamce coupled to the grid of the second tube, which in turn has its plate coupled to the cathode of the first tube to form a degenerative feedback circuit. Operating potential for screen of the second tube is supplied by connecting the cathode resistor of the first tube to the screen, while the screen is by-passed to the cathode of its tube for the amplified frequencies. Also, the amplifier incorporates a circuit to stabilize the transconductance of the tubes by making the grid potential of each tube interdependent on anode currents of both lubes by voltage divider circuitry.

  5. Active feedback stabilization of multimode flute instability in a mirror trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'ery, I.; Seemann, O.; Fisher, A.

    2014-07-01

    The flute instability in a table-top mirror machine has been stabilized by a feedback system consisting of optical sensors, a digital signal processor and charge-injecting electrodes. The use of multiple sensors and actuators enable the feedback to simultaneously stabilize two modes of the fast-growing, slowly rotating flute instability. Step function response and magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy indicate a smooth frequency response and an inherent delayed response of the plasma drift due to the sheath resistivity. The measured feedback power is very small relative to the heating power of the plasma.

  6. Active Feedback Stabilization of the Resistive Wall Mode on the DIII-D Device

    SciTech Connect

    Okabayashi, M; Bialek, J; Chance, M S; Chu, M S; Fredrickson, E D; Garofalo, A M; Gryaznevich, M; Hatcher, R E; Jensen, T H; Johnson, L C; Lahaye, R J; Lazarus, E A; Makowski, M A; Manickam, J; Navratil, G A; Scoville, J T; Strait, E J; Turnbull, A D; Walker, M L

    2000-11-01

    A proof of principle magnetic feedback stabilization experiment has been carried out to suppress the resistive wall mode (RWM), a branch of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink mode under the influence of a stabilizing resistive wall, on the DIII-D tokamak device. The RWM was successfully suppressed and the high beta duration above the no wall limit was extended to more than 50 times the resistive wall flux diffusion time. It was observed that the mode structure was well preserved during the time of the feedback application. Several lumped parameter formulations were used to study the feedback process. The observed feedback characteristics are in good qualitative agreement with the analysis. These results provide encouragement to future efforts towards optimizing the RWM feedback methodology in parallel to what has been successfully developed for the n = 0 vertical positional control. Newly developed MHD codes have been extremely useful in guiding the experiments and in providing possible paths for the next step.

  7. Workshop on Feedback Stabilization of MHD Stabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R.; Mauel, M.; Nevins, W.; Prager, S.

    1996-12-31

    The feedback stabilization of MHD instabilities is an area of research that is critical for improving the performance and economic attractiveness of magnetic confinement devices. A Workshop dedicated to feedback stabilization of MHD instabilities was held from December 11-13, 1996 at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton NJ, USA. The resulting presentations, conclusions, and recommendations are summarized.

  8. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  9. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  10. Frequency stabilization of the zero-phonon line of a quantum dot via phonon-assisted active feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Hansom, Jack; Schulte, Carsten H. H.; Matthiesen, Clemens; Stanley, Megan J.; Atatüre, Mete

    2014-10-27

    We report on the feedback stabilization of the zero-phonon emission frequency of a single InAs quantum dot. The spectral separation of the phonon-assisted component of the resonance fluorescence provides a probe of the detuning between the zero-phonon transition and the resonant driving laser. Using this probe in combination with active feedback, we stabilize the zero-phonon transition frequency against environmental fluctuations. This protocol reduces the zero-phonon fluorescence intensity noise by a factor of 22 by correcting for environmental noise with a bandwidth of 191 Hz, limited by the experimental collection efficiency. The associated sub-Hz fluctuations in the zero-phonon central frequency are reduced by a factor of 7. This technique provides a means of stabilizing the quantum dot emission frequency without requiring access to the zero-phonon emission.

  11. An 11 μ w, two-electrode transimpedance biosignal amplifier with active current feedback stabilization.

    PubMed

    Inan, O T; Kovacs, G T A

    2010-04-01

    A novel two-electrode biosignal amplifier circuit is demonstrated by using a composite transimpedance amplifier input stage with active current feedback. Micropower, low gain-bandwidth product operational amplifiers can be used, leading to the lowest reported overall power consumption in the literature for a design implemented with off-the-shelf commercial integrated circuits (11 μW). Active current feedback forces the common-mode input voltage to stay within the supply rails, reducing baseline drift and amplifier saturation problems that can be present in two-electrode systems. The bandwidth of the amplifier extends from 0.05-200 Hz and the midband voltage gain (assuming an electrode-to-skin resistance of 100 kΩ) is 48 dB. The measured output noise level is 1.2 mV pp, corresponding to a voltage signal-to-noise ratio approaching 50 dB for a typical electrocardiogram (ECG) level input of 1 mVpp. Recordings were taken from a subject by using the proposed two-electrode circuit and, simultaneously, a three-electrode standard ECG circuit. The residual of the normalized ensemble averages for both measurements was computed, and the power of this residual was 0.54% of the power of the standard ECG measurement output. While this paper primarily focuses on ECG applications, the circuit can also be used for amplifying other biosignals, such as the electroencephalogram. PMID:23853316

  12. High normalized beta plasmas exceeding the ideal stability limit and projected RWM active stabilization performance using newly installed feedback sensors in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Berkery, J. W.; Bialek, J. M.; Yoon, S. W.; Jeon, Y. M.; Bak, J. G.; Ko, W. H.; Hahn, S. H.; Bae, C.; Bae, Y. S.; in, Y. K.; Kim, J.; Lee, S. G.; Kwak, J. G.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, H. K.; Choi, M. J.; Yun, G. S.

    2015-11-01

    H-mode plasma operation of KSTAR has been expanded to significantly surpass the ideal MHD no-wall beta limit by achieving normalized beta up to 4.3 while reducing plasma internal inductance to near 0.7 exceeding the computed n = 1 ideal no-wall limit by a factor of 1.6. These high normalized beta values have been achieved in discharges having BT in the range 0.9-1.1 T after the plasma reached flattop current of 0.35-0.4 MA, with the highest neutral beam heating power of 4 MW. A significant conclusion of the analysis of these plasmas is that low- n global kink/ballooning or RWMs were not detected, and therefore were not the cause of the plasma termination. Advances from the 2015 run campaign aiming to achieve prolonged pulse duration at maximum normalized beta and to subsequently investigate the MHD stability of these plasmas will be reported. As KSTAR H-mode operation can now routinely surpass the ideal no-wall stability limit, n = 1 RWM active control is planned for the device. RWM active feedback using a newly installed set of poloidal magnetic field sensors mounted on the passive stabilizer plates and designed for optimal performance is analyzed using the VALEN-3D code. The advantages of the new sensors over other device sensors for RWM active control are discussed. Supported by U.S. DOE grant DE-FG02-99ER54524.

  13. Finite-time robust stabilization of uncertain delayed neural networks with discontinuous activations via delayed feedback control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leimin; Shen, Yi; Sheng, Yin

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the finite-time robust stabilization of delayed neural networks (DNNs) in the presence of discontinuous activations and parameter uncertainties. By using the nonsmooth analysis and control theory, a delayed controller is designed to realize the finite-time robust stabilization of DNNs with discontinuous activations and parameter uncertainties, and the upper bound of the settling time functional for stabilization is estimated. Finally, two examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. PMID:26878721

  14. Remote feedback stabilization of tokamak instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A.K. )

    1994-05-01

    A novel remote suppressor consisting of an injected ion beam has been used for the stabilization of plasma instabilities. A collisionless curvature-driven trapped-particle instability, an [bold E][times][bold B] flute mode and an ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability have been successfully suppressed down to noise levels using this scheme. Furthermore, the first experimental demonstration of a multimode feedback stabilization with a single sensor--suppressor pair has been achieved. Two modes (an [bold E][times][bold B] flute and an ITG mode) were simultaneously stabilized with a simple state-feedback-type method where more state'' information was generated from a single-sensor Langmuir probe by appropriate signal processing. The above experiments may be considered as paradigms for controlling several important tokamak instabilities. First, feedback suppression of edge fluctuations in a tokamak with a suitable form of insulated segmented poloidal limiter sections used as Langmuir-probe-like suppressors is proposed. Other feedback control schemes are proposed for the suppression of electrostatic core fluctuations via appropriately phased ion density input from a modulated neutral beam. Most importantly, a scheme to control major disruptions in tokamaks via feedback suppression of kink (and possibly) tearing modes is discussed. This may be accomplished by using a modulated neutral beam suppressor in a feedback loop, which will supply a momentum input of appropriate phase and amplitude. Simple theoretical models predict modest levels of beam energy, current, and power.

  15. Equilibria and stability of a class of positive feedback loops.

    PubMed

    López-Caamal, Fernando; Middleton, Richard H; Huber, Heinrich J

    2014-02-01

    Positive feedback loops are common regulatory elements in metabolic and protein signalling pathways. The length of such feedback loops determines stability and sensitivity to network perturbations. Here we provide a mathematical analysis of arbitrary length positive feedback loops with protein production and degradation. These loops serve as an abstraction of typical regulation patterns in protein signalling pathways. We first perform a steady state analysis and, independently of the chain length, identify exactly two steady states that represent either biological activity or inactivity. We thereby provide two formulas for the steady state protein concentrations as a function of feedback length, strength of feedback, as well as protein production and degradation rates. Using a control theory approach, analysing the frequency response of the linearisation of the system and exploiting the Small Gain Theorem, we provide conditions for local stability for both steady states. Our results demonstrate that, under some parameter relationships, once a biological meaningful on steady state arises, it is stable, while the off steady state, where all proteins are inactive, becomes unstable. We apply our results to a three-tier feedback of caspase activation in apoptosis and demonstrate how an intermediary protein in such a loop may be used as a signal amplifier within the cascade. Our results provide a rigorous mathematical analysis of positive feedback chains of arbitrary length, thereby relating pathway structure and stability. PMID:23358701

  16. Orbit stability and feedback control in synchrotron radiation rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.H.

    1989-01-01

    Stability of the electron orbit is essential for the utilization of a low emittance storage ring as a high brightness radiation source. We discuss the development of the measurement and feedback control of the closed orbit, with emphasis on the activities as the National Synchrotron Light Source of BNL. We discuss the performance of the beam position detectors in use and under development: the PUE rf detector, split ion chamber detector, photo-emission detector, solid state detector, and the graphite detector. Depending on the specific experiments, different beamlines require different tolerances on the orbit motion. Corresponding to these different requirements, we discuss two approaches to closed orbit feedback: the global and local feedback systems. Then we describe a new scheme for the real time global feedback by implementing a feedback system based upon a harmonic analysis of both the orbit movements and the correction magnetic fields. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Mechanical feedback stabilizes budding yeast morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banavar, Samhita; Trogdon, Michael; Petzold, Linda; Campas, Otger

    Walled cells have the ability to remodel their shape while sustaining an internal turgor pressure that can reach values up to 10 atmospheres. This requires a tight and simultaneous regulation of cell wall assembly and mechanochemistry, but the underlying mechanisms by which this is achieved remain unclear. Using the growth of mating projections in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) as a motivating example, we have developed a theoretical description that couples the mechanics of cell wall expansion and assembly via a mechanical feedback. In the absence of a mechanical feedback, cell morphogenesis is inherently unstable. The presence of a mechanical feedback stabilizes changes in cell shape and growth, and provides a mechanism to prevent cell lysis in a wide range of conditions. We solve for the dynamics of the system and obtain the different dynamical regimes. In particular, we show that several parameters affect the stability of growth, including the strength of mechanical feedback in the system. Finally, we compare our results to existing experimental data.

  18. Stabilizing feedbacks in glacier-bed erosion.

    PubMed

    Alley, R B; Lawson, D E; Larson, G J; Evenson, E B; Baker, G S

    2003-08-14

    Glaciers often erode, transport and deposit sediment much more rapidly than nonglacial environments, with implications for the evolution of glaciated mountain belts and their associated sedimentary basins. But modelling such glacial processes is difficult, partly because stabilizing feedbacks similar to those operating in rivers have not been identified for glacial landscapes. Here we combine new and existing data of glacier morphology and the processes governing glacier evolution from diverse settings to reveal such stabilizing feedbacks. We find that the long profiles of beds of highly erosive glaciers tend towards steady-state angles opposed to and slightly more than 50 per cent steeper than the overlying ice-air surface slopes, and that additional subglacial deepening must be enabled by non-glacial processes. Climatic or glaciological perturbations of the ice-air surface slope can have large transient effects on glaciofluvial sediment flux and apparent glacial erosion rate. PMID:12917679

  19. Adaptive feedback active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Sen M.; Vijayan, Dipa

    Feedforward active noise control (ANC) systems use a reference sensor that senses a reference input to the controller. This signal is assumed to be unaffected by the secondary source and is a good measure of the undesired noise to be cancelled by the system. The reference sensor may be acoustic (e.g., microphone) or non-acoustic (e.g., tachometer, optical transducer). An obvious problem when using acoustic sensors is that the reference signal may be corrupted by the canceling signal generated by the secondary source. This problem is known as acoustic feedback. One way of avoiding this is by using a feedback active noise control (FANC) system which dispenses with the reference sensor. The FANC technique originally proposed by Olson and May employs a high gain negative feedback amplifier. This system suffered from the drawback that the error microphone had to be placed very close to the loudspeaker. The operation of the system was restricted to low frequency range and suffered from instability due to the possibility of positive feedback. Feedback systems employing adaptive filtering techniques for active noise control were developed. This paper presents the FANC system modeled as an adaptive prediction scheme.

  20. The Prolyl Peptidases PRCP/PREP Regulate IRS-1 Stability Critical for Rapamycin-induced Feedback Activation of PI3K and AKT*

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Lei; Ying, Guoguang; Danzer, Brian; Perez, Ricardo E.; Shariat-Madar, Zia; Levenson, Victor V.; Maki, Carl G.

    2014-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB/AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway conveys signals from receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) to regulate cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, and motility. Previously we found that prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP) regulate proliferation and survival in breast cancer cells. In this study, we found that PRCP and the related family member prolylendopeptidase (PREP) are essential for proliferation and survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Depletion/inhibition of PRCP and PREP-induced serine phosphorylation and degradation of IRS-1, leading to inactivation of the cellular PI3K and AKT. Notably, depletion/inhibition of PRCP/PREP destabilized IRS-1 in the cells treated with rapamycin, blocking the feedback activation PI3K/AKT. Consequently, inhibition of PRCP/PREP enhanced rapamycin-induced cytotoxicity. Thus, we have identified PRCP and PREP as a stabilizer of IRS-1 which is critical for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:24936056

  1. Stabilizing entanglement by quantum-jump-based feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, A. R. R.; Hope, J. J.

    2007-07-15

    We show that direct feedback based on quantum-jump detection can be used to generate entangled steady states. We present a strategy that is insensitive to detection inefficiencies and robust against errors in the control Hamiltonian. This feedback procedure is also shown to overcome spontaneous emission effects by stabilizing states with a high degree of entanglement.

  2. On stability theory. [of nonlinear feedback control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safonov, M. G.; Athans, M.

    1979-01-01

    It is found that under mild assumptions, feedback system stability can be concluded if one can 'topologically separate' the infinite-dimensional function space containing the system's dynamical input-output relations into two regions, one region containing the dynamical input-output relation of the 'feedforward' element of the system and the other region containing the dynamical output-input relation of the 'feedback' element. Nonlinear system stability criteria of both the input-output type and the state-space (Liapunov) type are interpreted in this context. The abstract generality and conceptual simplicity afforded by the topological separation perspective clarifies some of the basic issues underlying stability theory and serves to suggest improvements in existing stability criteria. A generalization of Zames' (1966) conic-relation stability criterion is proved, laying the foundation for improved multivariable generalizations of the frequency-domain circle stability criterion for nonlinear systems.

  3. Stabilizing PID controllers for a single-link biomechanical model with position, velocity, and force feedback.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Kamran; Roy, Anindo

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we address the problem of PID stabilization of a single-link inverted pendulum-based biomechanical model with force feedback, two levels of position and velocity feedback, and with delays in all the feedback loops. The novelty of the proposed model lies in its physiological relevance, whereby both small and medium latency sensory feedbacks from muscle spindle (MS), and force feedback from Golgi tendon organ (GTO) are included in the formulation. The biomechanical model also includes active and passive viscoelastic feedback from Hill-type muscle model and a second-order low-pass function for muscle activation. The central nervous system (CNS) regulation of postural movement is represented by a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. Padé approximation of delay terms is employed to arrive at an overall rational transfer function of the biomechanical model. The Hermite-Biehler theorem is then used to derive stability results, leading to the existence of stabilizing PID controllers. An algorithm for selection of stabilizing feedback gains is developed using the linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach. PMID:15796343

  4. Sampled-Data State Feedback Stabilization of Boolean Control Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Jinde; Sun, Liangjie; Lu, Jianquan

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we investigate the sampled-data state feedback control (SDSFC) problem of Boolean control networks (BCNs). Some necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for the global stabilization of BCNs by SDSFC. Different from conventional state feedback controls, new phenomena observed the study of SDSFC. Based on the controllability matrix, we derive some necessary and sufficient conditions under which the trajectories of BCNs can be stabilized to a fixed point by piecewise constant control (PCC). It is proved that the global stabilization of BCNs under SDSFC is equivalent to that by PCC. Moreover, algorithms are given to construct the sampled-data state feedback controllers. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results. PMID:26890349

  5. Stability of constant gain systems with vector feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The state space, the controllability, and the observability concepts are discussed in connection with the proposed stability analysis which permits drastic dimensional reductions for a vector feedback problem. Any constant gain system's stability can thus be analyzed in the frequency domain with a single Nyquist plot. The analysis considers the total system with all loops closed, a disturbance vector as input, and the feedback vector as output. All constant gain systems are shown to be decomposable into stable subsystems where the degree of the decomposition determines the dimensions. The maximum decomposition results in the state-space approach which is the limit case. The method is demonstrated with the stability analysis of the pogo phenomenon, an oscillatory interaction between the propulsion and the structure of a space vehicle. This problem, with eigenvalues over a hundred, was drastically but rigorously reduced to a stability analysis of a 4x4 matrix.

  6. Does visual augmented feedback reduce local dynamic stability while walking?

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Daniel; Hamacher, Dennis; Schega, Lutz

    2015-10-01

    Augmented feedback is frequently used in gait training to efficiently correct specific gait patterns in patients with different disorders. The patients use this external augmented feedback to align actual movements in a way that predefined gait characteristics can be achieved. Voluntary changes of gait characteristics are reported to reduce local dynamic stability (LDS) which in turn is associated with increased risk of falling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the instantaneous effect of visual feedback, provided to help patients to correct frontal plane pelvis and trunk movements, on the LDS of pelvis and trunk. Kinematic gait data was captured in ten women with gait disorders. The effect of visual feedback on LDS, quantified with the largest Lyapunov exponent, of walking was examined. We found a significant decreased LDS (e.g. pelvis: p=.009) in our subjects when they were using visual augmented feedback. Our data suggest that the use of visual augmented feedback causes less stable gait patterns indicating a reduced ability to respond to small perturbations which might increase risk of falling. Therefore, researchers or clinicians who aim to correct gait patterns through real time based external augmented feedback should consider the potential negative effect on gait stability. It should be evaluated if the possible increased fall risk provoked by visual feedback exceeds possible increases in fall risk induced by conventional gait-retraining interventions. The external validity of the study is limited because of the low sample size and inhomogeneous group characteristics. Thus, further studies including homogeneous cohorts are required. PMID:26296676

  7. Permafrost-carbon feedbacks and climate stabilization costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsumasa; Addor, Nans

    2013-04-01

    Thawing of permafrost in recent years is reported at various locations in the arctic. Studies using a range of climate models show that permafrost thawing due to arctic warming and resulting CO2 and CH4 emissions provide feedbacks to the global climate system. However, such permafrost-carbon feedbacks have not been accounted for in the calculations of stabilization emissions scenarios of greenhouse gases and related components to cap the global warming below certain levels (e.g. 2°C target). This raises the following two questions: 1) how permafrost-carbon feedbacks influence the pathways of climate stabilizations and 2) how much permafrost-carbon feedbacks generate additional economic costs to stabilize the temperature. We derive a simple parameterization of permafrost-carbon feedbacks from the results of (Schneider von Deimling et al. 2012) that show the ranges of CO2 and CH4 emissions due to the thawing of permafrost under the RCP8.5 scenario. Schneider von Deimling et al. (2012) developed a process-based model to estimate CO2 and CH4 emissions from mineral and peatland soils distributed across 50 latitudinal bands in the arctic and varied a large number of parameters stochastically to estimate uncertainty ranges in the output. In contrast, we limit the number of stochastic parameters to several and tune them to reproduce the stochastic behavior of the model of Schneider von Deimling et al. (2012). This simple parameterization is based on a linear dependence of the permafrost thaw on global temperature changes and relies on a system of linear reservoirs to control CO2 and CH4 emissions. It can be easily implemented in Simple Climate Models (SCMs). We implement such a simplified parameterization of permafrost-carbon feedbacks to the Aggregate Carbon Cycle, Atmospheric Chemistry, and Climate model (ACC2) (Tanaka et al. 2007), which comprises a box model of the global carbon cycle, simple parameterizations of the atmospheric chemistry and the radiative forcing

  8. Visual Feedback Stabilization of Balancing Tasks with Camera Misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Kentaro; Mizuno, Takashi

    In this paper, we consider visual feedback stabilization which tolerates small camera misalignment. Specifically, a balancing task with a cart-pendulum system using camera image is examined. Such a task is known to rely heavily on the detection of the vertical direction and the angle measurement error due to the camera misalignment could be fatal for stabilization. From a mathematical model of the measurement error, the effect of the misalignment is naturally represented by affine perturbation to the coefficient matrix of the output equation. Motivated by this fact, a special type of robust dynamic output feedback stabilization against polytopic uncertainty is investigated. By solving the related BMI, one can design a controller which tolerates the camera misalignment to some extent. The result is verified via experiments.

  9. Issues on stability of ADP feedback controllers for dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S N; Ding, Jie; Lewis, Frank L

    2008-08-01

    This paper traces the development of neural-network (NN)-based feedback controllers that are derived from the principle of adaptive/approximate dynamic programming (ADP) and discusses their closed-loop stability. Different versions of NN structures in the literature, which embed mathematical mappings related to solutions of the ADP-formulated problems called "adaptive critics" or "action-critic" networks, are discussed. Distinction between the two classes of ADP applications is pointed out. Furthermore, papers in "model-free" development and model-based neurocontrollers are reviewed in terms of their contributions to stability issues. Recent literature suggests that work in ADP-based feedback controllers with assured stability is growing in diverse forms. PMID:18632377

  10. Stabilization and feedback control of weak measurement monitored quantum oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, Hermann; Du Toit, Pieter; Burd, Shaun; Konrad, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We study feedback control of quantum oscillators, monitored through periodic weak measurement. By implementing reversals of measurement perturbations based on a Bayesian estimate of the state dynamics, we demonstrate suppressed measurement noise leading to greater oscillator stability and improved quantum feedback control. The work in this paper was supported in part by the National Research Foundation of South Africa through Grant No. 93602 as well as an award by the United States Airforce Office of Scientific Research, Award No. FA9550-14-1-0151.

  11. Studies of Feedback Stabilization of Axisymmetric Modes in Deformable Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, David John

    A new linear MHD stability code, NOVA-W, is described and applied to the study of the feedback stabilization of the axisymmetric mode in deformable tokamak plasmas. The NOVA-W code is a modification of the non-variational MHD stability code NOVA^1 that includes the effects of resistive passive conductors and active feedback circuits. The vacuum calculation has been reformulated in terms of the perturbed poloidal flux to allow the inclusion of perturbed toroidal currents outside the plasma. The boundary condition at the plasma-vacuum interface relates the instability displacement to the perturbed poloidal flux. This allows a solution of the linear MHD stability equations with the feedback effects included. The code has been tested for the case of passive stabilization against a simplified analytic model and against a different numerical calculation for a realistic tokamak configuration. The comparisons demonstrate the accuracy of the NOVA-W results. The utility and performance of the NOVA-W code are demonstrated for calculations of varying configurations of passive conductors. Active feedback calculations are performed for the CIT tokamak design demonstrating the effect of varying the position of the flux loops which provide the measurements of vertical displacement. The results compare well to those of earlier calculations using a less efficient nonlinear code. The NOVA-W code is used to examine the effects of plasma deformability on feedback stabilization. It is seen that plasmas with shaped cross sections have unstable motion different from a rigid shift. Plasma equilibria with large triangularity show particularly significant deviations from a uniform rigid shift. Furthermore, the placement of passive conductors is shown to modify the non-rigid components of the motion in a way that reduces the stabilizing effects of these conductors. The eigenfunction is also modified under the effects of active feedback. This deformation is seen to depend strongly on the

  12. Temperature sensitive stability of feedback controllers for MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batterbee, D. C.; Sims, N. D.

    2008-03-01

    Smart fluid dampers can undergo large temperature changes due to the heating associated with energy dissipation. Such heating will alter the fluid's properties and could degrade control system performance. For example, previous work by the authors has shown that the stability of an MR damper under feedback control is dependent on the fluid's compressibility and viscosity. In the present study, a temperature dependent model of a magnetorheological damper is developed from experimental data, and it is shown that the fluid's yield stress, viscosity and compressibility parameters vary significantly. An experimental and numerical control study is then performed to investigate the resulting effects of temperature on the stability of two feedback controllers - a PID controller, and a proportional controller. Experimental results indicate that both controllers can exhibit a reduction in stability with increasing temperature, particularly if the controller gains are not suitably chosen. The temperature dependent MR damper model predicts this behaviour well, and it is shown that the change in viscosity has the most significant effect on stability. Future work could focus on the resulting effect on a complete vibration system, devices with different modes of operation, and alternative controllers.

  13. Stability of a double inverted pendulum model during human quiet stance with continuous delay feedback control.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Nomura, Taishin; Morasso, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    Recent debate about neural mechanisms for stabilizing human upright quiet stance focuses on whether the active and time delay neural feedback control generating muscle torque is continuous or intermittent. A single inverted pendulum controlled by the active torque actuating the ankle joint has often been used for the debate on the presumption of well-known ankle strategy hypothesis claiming that the upright quiet stance can be stabilized mostly by the ankle torque. However, detailed measurements are showing that the hip joint angle exhibits amount of fluctuations comparable with the ankle joint angle during natural postural sway. Here we analyze a double inverted pendulum model during human quiet stance to demonstrate that the conventional proportional and derivative delay feedback control, i.e., the continuous delay PD control with gains in the physiologically plausible range is far from adequate as the neural mechanism for stabilizing human upright quiet stance. PMID:22256061

  14. Feedback stabilization system for pulsed single longitudinal mode tunable lasers

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Raymond, Thomas D.

    1991-10-01

    A feedback stabilization system for pulse single longitudinal mode tunable lasers having an excited laser medium contained within an adjustable length cavity and producing a laser beam through the use of an internal dispersive element, including detection of angular deviation in the output laser beam resulting from detuning between the cavity mode frequency and the passband of the internal dispersive element, and generating an error signal based thereon. The error signal can be integrated and amplified and then applied as a correcting signal to a piezoelectric transducer mounted on a mirror of the laser cavity for controlling the cavity length.

  15. Feedback stabilization of displaced periodic orbits: Application to binary asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simo, Jules; McInnes, Colin R.

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates displaced periodic orbits at linear order in the circular restricted Earth-Moon system (CRTBP), where the third massless body utilizes a hybrid of solar sail and solar electric propulsion (SEP). A feedback linearization control scheme is implemented to perform stabilization and trajectory tracking for the nonlinear system. Next, attention is directed to binary asteroid systems as an application of the restricted problem. The idea of combining a solar sail with an SEP auxiliary system to obtain a hybrid sail system is important especially due to the challenges of performing complex trajectories.

  16. Design of power system stabilizer through state variable feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.; Takeda, S.

    1980-05-01

    When the transmission line is very long or the generator is operated at a power factor nearly equal to 1.0, the machine regulated by an automatic voltage regulator (AVR) cannot be operated stably due to poor dynamic stability. To overcome this difficulty, the so called power system stabilizer (PSS) is very useful, in that output power or rotor speed of the generator is used as a feedback signal. The primary obective of the PSS is to damp the swing of the generator as quickly as possible. A method is proposed for designing PSS which yields a given eigenvalue. In the second method, the use of a Heffron-Phillips model is discussed. Next, a detailed procedure for the proposed design method is presented. A generalized method of a PSS design based on Park's equation and matrix operation is proposed.

  17. Neuromechanical models for insect locomotion: Stability, maneuverability, and proprioceptive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukillaya, R.; Proctor, J.; Holmes, P.

    2009-06-01

    We describe a hierarchy of models for legged locomotion, emphasizing relationships among feedforward (preflexive) stability, maneuverability, and reflexive feedback. We focus on a hexapedal geometry representative of insect locomotion in the ground plane that includes a neural central pattern generator circuit, nonlinear muscles, and a representative proprioceptive sensory pathway. Although these components of the model are rather complex, neglect of leg mass yields a neuromechanical system with only three degrees of freedom, and numerical simulations coupled with a Poincaré map analysis shows that the feedforward dynamics is strongly stable, apart from one relatively slow mode and a neutral mode in body yaw angle. These modes moderate high frequency perturbations, producing slow heading changes that can be corrected by a stride-to-stride steering strategy. We show that the model's response to a lateral impulsive perturbation closely matches that of a cockroach subject to a similar impulse. We also describe preliminary studies of proprioceptive leg force feedback, showing how a reflexive pathway can reinforce the preflexive stability inherent in the system.

  18. Treatment with a position feedback-controlled head stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Harris, F A

    1979-08-01

    A position feedback-controlled head stabilizer has been developed to provide cerebral palsied individuals with resistive exercise to strengthen the neck musculature. This apparatus detects "involuntary" head motion and stabilizes the head by applying opposing forces; it also can be used to facilitate muscular contraction by resisting the subject's voluntary movements. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether voluntary head control in cerebral palsied individuals can be improved through systematic exercise using the stabilizer to strengthen the muscles of the neck and improve their balance of action. The findings support the author's contention that this is possible. The apparatus consists of a helmet and shoulder pads, interconnected so that the head is supported in the helmet by a manipulator arm. At its lower end, the manipulator arm is attached to the shoulder pad mounting frame via a gimbal assembly which allows head movement in two planes of tilt (pitch, or forward-and back, and roll, or side-to-side). Feedback control circuitry is so arranged that any deviation of the head from the desired position leads to actuation of pneumatic cylinders, which apply torques to the manipulator gimbal axes so as to oppose or conteract the incipient head movement. It is particularly significant that none of these patients participating in these experiments were at all apprehensive about or resisted being placed in the apparatus. (Even the youngest subject to use the apparatus--five year old-- did not mind being restrained by the shoulder pads or having his head gripped by helment.) While JG utilized the safety release valve quite often during the first few head control training sessions, he soon became confident enough in the action of the stabilizer that he did not even bother to grip the handle of the release valve. While DA had the action of safety valve explained and demonstrated for her, she never bothered to use it even from the outset of her experience

  19. Convective Mixing, Lower Tropospheric Stability and Low Cloud Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, H.; Jiang, J. H.; Zhai, C.; Shen, T. P. J.

    2014-12-01

    A recently published study by Sherwood et al. (2014) suggested that convective mixing is a key process that determines the inter-model spread in low cloud feedback and equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS). The parameterized sub-grid scale convective mixing (S) is represented by the temperature and humidity differences between the lower free troposphere, 700 hPa, and the boundary layer, 850 hPa. Although a strong correlation between convective mixing strengths averaged over a deep convective region and ECSs among the models was shown, how convective mixing relates to the distribution and variation of low clouds was not examined in the study. Lower tropospheric stability (LTS, the potential temperature difference between 700 hPa and 1000 hPa) is known to have a strong correlation with low cloud fraction (Klein and Hartmann 1993). How S is related to LTS and whether model simulations of LTS contribute to the model spread in low cloud feedback are of great scientific interest. Combined AIRS and CloudSat/CALIPSO observations along with CMIP5 model simulations are analyzed to address the relationships between S, LTS, and cloud variations in the past decade and in the future climate model projections under the doubling of CO2. The implications for climate sensitivity are explored.

  20. Metrology with AN Optical Feedback Frequency Stabilized Crds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassi, Samir; Burkart, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    We will present a metrological application of our recently developed Optical Feedback Frequency Stabilized - Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (OFFS-CRDS). This instrument, which ideally fits with an optical frequency comb for absolute frequency calibration, relies on the robust lock of a steady cavity ring down resonator against a highly stable, radiofrequency tuned optical source. At 1.6 μm, over 7 nm, we demonstrate Lamb dip spectroscopy of CO_2 with line frequency retrieval at the kHz level, a dynamic in excess of 700,000 on the absorption scale and a detectivity of 4x10-13cm-1Hz-1/2. Such an instrument nicely meets the requirements for the most demanding spectroscopy spanning from accurate isotopic ratio determination and very precise lineshape recordings to Boltzmann constant redefinition.

  1. Look who's judging-Feedback source modulates brain activation to performance feedback in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Peterburs, Jutta; Sandrock, Carolin; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Straube, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    It is as yet unknown if behavioral and neural correlates of performance monitoring in socially anxious individuals are affected by whether feedback is provided by a person or a computer. This fMRI study investigated modulation of feedback processing by feedback source (person vs. computer) in participants with high (HSA) (N=16) and low social anxiety (LSA) (N=16). Subjects performed a choice task in which they were informed that they would receive positive or negative feedback from a person or the computer. Subjective ratings indicated increased arousal and anxiety in HSA versus LSA, most pronounced for social and negative feedback. FMRI analyses yielded hyperactivation in ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC)/anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insula for social relative to computer feedback, and in mPFC/ventral ACC for positive relative to negative feedback in HSA as compared to LSA. These activation patterns are consistent with increased interoception and self-referential processing in social anxiety, especially during processing of positive feedback. Increased ACC activation in HSA to positive feedback may link to unexpectedness of (social) praise as posited in social anxiety disorder (SAD) psychopathology. Activation in rostral ACC showed a reversed pattern, with decreased activation to positive feedback in HSA, possibly indicating altered action values depending on feedback source and valence. The present findings corroborate a crucial role of mPFC for performance monitoring in social anxiety. PMID:27033687

  2. Optogenetic feedback control of neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Jonathan P; Fong, Ming-fai; Millard, Daniel C; Whitmire, Clarissa J; Stanley, Garrett B; Potter, Steve M

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable precise excitation and inhibition of firing in specified neuronal populations and artifact-free recording of firing activity. Several studies have suggested that optical stimulation provides the precision and dynamic range requisite for closed-loop neuronal control, but no approach yet permits feedback control of neuronal firing. Here we present the ‘optoclamp’, a feedback control technology that provides continuous, real-time adjustments of bidirectional optical stimulation in order to lock spiking activity at specified targets over timescales ranging from seconds to days. We demonstrate how this system can be used to decouple neuronal firing levels from ongoing changes in network excitability due to multi-hour periods of glutamatergic or GABAergic neurotransmission blockade in vitro as well as impinging vibrissal sensory drive in vivo. This technology enables continuous, precise optical control of firing in neuronal populations in order to disentangle causally related variables of circuit activation in a physiologically and ethologically relevant manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07192.001 PMID:26140329

  3. Role of ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks in recent ice wedge degradation and stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, M. T.; Kanevskiy, M.; Shur, Y.; Moskalenko, N.; Brown, D. R. N.; Wickland, K.; Striegl, R.; Koch, J.

    2015-11-01

    Ground ice is abundant in the upper permafrost throughout the Arctic and fundamentally affects terrain responses to climate warming. Ice wedges, which form near the surface and are the dominant type of massive ice in the Arctic, are particularly vulnerable to warming. Yet processes controlling ice wedge degradation and stabilization are poorly understood. Here we quantified ice wedge volume and degradation rates, compared ground ice characteristics and thermal regimes across a sequence of five degradation and stabilization stages and evaluated biophysical feedbacks controlling permafrost stability near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Mean ice wedge volume in the top 3 m of permafrost was 21%. Imagery from 1949 to 2012 showed thermokarst extent (area of water-filled troughs) was relatively small from 1949 (0.9%) to 1988 (1.5%), abruptly increased by 2004 (6.3%) and increased slightly by 2012 (7.5%). Mean annual surface temperatures varied by 4.9°C among degradation and stabilization stages and by 9.9°C from polygon center to deep lake bottom. Mean thicknesses of the active layer, ice-poor transient layer, ice-rich intermediate layer, thermokarst cave ice, and wedge ice varied substantially among stages. In early stages, thaw settlement caused water to impound in thermokarst troughs, creating positive feedbacks that increased net radiation, soil heat flux, and soil temperatures. Plant growth and organic matter accumulation in the degraded troughs provided negative feedbacks that allowed ground ice to aggrade and heave the surface, thus reducing surface water depth and soil temperatures in later stages. The ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks greatly complicate efforts to assess permafrost responses to climate change.

  4. Real-time quantum feedback prepares and stabilizes photon number states.

    PubMed

    Sayrin, Clément; Dotsenko, Igor; Zhou, Xingxing; Peaudecerf, Bruno; Rybarczyk, Théo; Gleyzes, Sébastien; Rouchon, Pierre; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Amini, Hadis; Brune, Michel; Raimond, Jean-Michel; Haroche, Serge

    2011-09-01

    Feedback loops are central to most classical control procedures. A controller compares the signal measured by a sensor (system output) with the target value or set-point. It then adjusts an actuator (system input) to stabilize the signal around the target value. Generalizing this scheme to stabilize a micro-system's quantum state relies on quantum feedback, which must overcome a fundamental difficulty: the sensor measurements cause a random back-action on the system. An optimal compromise uses weak measurements, providing partial information with minimal perturbation. The controller should include the effect of this perturbation in the computation of the actuator's operation, which brings the incrementally perturbed state closer to the target. Although some aspects of this scenario have been experimentally demonstrated for the control of quantum or classical micro-system variables, continuous feedback loop operations that permanently stabilize quantum systems around a target state have not yet been realized. Here we have implemented such a real-time stabilizing quantum feedback scheme following a method inspired by ref. 13. It prepares on demand photon number states (Fock states) of a microwave field in a superconducting cavity, and subsequently reverses the effects of decoherence-induced field quantum jumps. The sensor is a beam of atoms crossing the cavity, which repeatedly performs weak quantum non-demolition measurements of the photon number. The controller is implemented in a real-time computer commanding the actuator, which injects adjusted small classical fields into the cavity between measurements. The microwave field is a quantum oscillator usable as a quantum memory or as a quantum bus swapping information between atoms. Our experiment demonstrates that active control can generate non-classical states of this oscillator and combat their decoherence, and is a significant step towards the implementation of complex quantum information operations. PMID

  5. Role of ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks in recent ice wedge degradation and stabilization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mark Torre Jorgenson; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Yuri Shur; Natalia Moskalenko; Dana Brown; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Striegl, Rob; Koch, Joshua C.

    2015-01-01

    Ground ice is abundant in the upper permafrost throughout the Arctic and fundamentally affects terrain responses to climate warming. Ice wedges, which form near the surface and are the dominant type of massive ice in the Arctic, are particularly vulnerable to warming. Yet processes controlling ice wedge degradation and stabilization are poorly understood. Here we quantified ice wedge volume and degradation rates, compared ground ice characteristics and thermal regimes across a sequence of five degradation and stabilization stages and evaluated biophysical feedbacks controlling permafrost stability near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Mean ice wedge volume in the top 3 m of permafrost was 21%. Imagery from 1949 to 2012 showed thermokarst extent (area of water-filled troughs) was relatively small from 1949 (0.9%) to 1988 (1.5%), abruptly increased by 2004 (6.3%) and increased slightly by 2012 (7.5%). Mean annual surface temperatures varied by 4.9°C among degradation and stabilization stages and by 9.9°C from polygon center to deep lake bottom. Mean thicknesses of the active layer, ice-poor transient layer, ice-rich intermediate layer, thermokarst cave ice, and wedge ice varied substantially among stages. In early stages, thaw settlement caused water to impound in thermokarst troughs, creating positive feedbacks that increased net radiation, soil heat flux, and soil temperatures. Plant growth and organic matter accumulation in the degraded troughs provided negative feedbacks that allowed ground ice to aggrade and heave the surface, thus reducing surface water depth and soil temperatures in later stages. The ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks greatly complicate efforts to assess permafrost responses to climate change.

  6. Electromagnetically Sustained Liquid Metal Flow for Feedback Stabilization Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhoseini, Seyyed Mohammad; Volpe, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Liquid metal walls in fusion reactors, whether nearly static or rapidly flowing, will be subject to instabilities that will make them locally bulge, thus entering in contact with the plasma, or deplete, hence exposing the underlying solid substrate. To prevent this, research has begun at Columbia University to create liquid metal flows and demonstrate their stabilization by electromagnetic forces, adjusted in feedback with thickness measurements. Here we present initial results regarding the sustainment of a flow of Galinstan (a gallium, indium, tin alloy) by a special pump consisting of a ferromagnetic rotor, with permanent magnets mounted on it. The magnetic field is partly ``frozen'' in the liquid metal surrounding the rotor. Therefore, as the field rotates, the liquid metal rotates as well, although with a slip factor. This solution was preferred to conventional pumps, which would enter in electrical contact with the metal flow. The pump, 3D-printed at Columbia, allows to adjust the flow-velocity from few mm/s to several cm/s.

  7. Teacher Feedback during Active Learning: Current Practices in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bergh, Linda; Ros, Anje; Beijaard, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Background: Feedback is one of the most powerful tools, which teachers can use to enhance student learning. It appears dif?cult for teachers to give qualitatively good feedback, especially during active learning. In this context, teachers should provide facilitative feedback that is focused on the development of meta-cognition and social learning.…

  8. Global exponential stability of recurrent neural networks for synthesizing linear feedback control systems via pole assignment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunong; Wang, Jun

    2002-01-01

    Global exponential stability is the most desirable stability property of recurrent neural networks. The paper presents new results for recurrent neural networks applied to online computation of feedback gains of linear time-invariant multivariable systems via pole assignment. The theoretical analysis focuses on the global exponential stability, convergence rates, and selection of design parameters. The theoretical results are further substantiated by simulation results conducted for synthesizing linear feedback control systems with different specifications and design requirements. PMID:18244461

  9. Deterministic creation and stabilization of entanglement in circuit QED by homodyne-mediated feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhuo; Kuang Luelin; Hu Kai; Xu Luting; Wei Suhua; Guo Lingzhen; Li Xinqi

    2010-09-15

    In a solid-state circuit QED system, we demonstrate that a homodyne-current-based feedback can create and stabilize highly entangled two-qubit states in the presence of a moderate noisy environment. Particularly, we present an extended analysis for the current-based Markovian feedback, which leads to an improved feedback scheme. We show that this is essential to achieve a desirable control effect by the use of dispersive measurement.

  10. Soil aggregate stabilization and carbon sequestration: Feedbacks through organomineral associations

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrow, J.D.; Miller, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Primary production (specifically, the rate and quality of C transfer below ground) and soil microbial activity (specifically, the rates of C transformation and decay) are recognized as the overall biological processes governing soil organic C (SOC) dynamics. These two processes and, hence, SOC cycling and storage are controlled by complex underlying biotic and abiotic interactions and feedbacks, most of which can be tied in one way or another to the influences of the five state factors related to soil formation, and many of which are sensitive to management practices. Overall, C input rates and quality are largely dependent on climate (especially temperature and precipitation), vegetation type and landscape, soil type, and management practices. Decomposition processes and turnover rates, however, are greatly influenced by climate, the type and quality of organic matter (e.g., N content and the ratios of C:N and lignin:N), chemical or physicochemical associations of organic matter (OM) with soil mineral components, and the location of OM within the soil.

  11. Optimization of Feedback Control Coils for Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, J.; Boozer, A. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    1999-11-01

    Recent experiments in DIII--D on Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) stabilization with active feedback have been very promising. We investigated extensions to the sensor and control coil set that would further improve RWM stabilization. The VALEN computer code models the RWM as an equivalent current distribution on the unperturbed plasma boundary which duplicates the plasma external magnetic field of the mode, as calculated by GATO. This surface current determines the plasma interaction with all conducting structures. In three dimensions the VALEN code models the unstable plasma, passive structure, proposed sensors, and proposed control coils together with the control logic. The problem may be examined as a transient simulation, or for a linear power supply model, as an eigenvalue calculation. A summary of the configurations examined and their predicted effectiveness will be presented.

  12. Reengineering Activities in K-8 Classrooms: Focus on Formative Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Patrick N.

    2006-01-01

    Almost every K-8 technology activity includes feedback. Technology teachers generally view the input-process-output paradigm as being incomplete. A step toward completion would be the inclusion of a "feedback" component incorporating reengineering. This article provides an example of how one activity evolved through several stages to include…

  13. Theoretical modelling of the feedback stabilization of external MHD modes in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Chu, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical framework for understanding the feedback mechanism for stabilization of external MHD modes has been formulated. Efficient computational tools - the GATO stability code coupled with a substantially modified VACUUM code - have been developed to effectively design viable feedback systems against these modes. The analysis assumed a thin resistive shell and a feedback coil structure accurately modelled in θ and phi, albeit with only a single harmonic variation in phi. Time constants and induced currents in the enclosing resistive shell are calculated. An optimized configuration based on an idealized model has been computed for the DIII-D device. Up to 90% of the effectiveness of an ideal wall can be achieved.

  14. Feedback stabilization of the resistive shell mode in a tokamak fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1997-07-01

    Stabilization of the {open_quotes}resistive shell mode{close_quotes} is vital to the success of the {open_quotes}advanced tokamak{close_quotes} concept. The most promising reactor relevant approach is to apply external feedback using, for instance, the previously proposed {open_quotes}fake rotating shell{close_quotes} scheme [R. Fitzpatrick and T. H. Jensen, Phys. Plasmas {bold 3}, 2641 (1996)]. This scheme, like other simple feedback schemes, only works if the feedback controlled conductors are located inside the {open_quotes}critical radius{close_quotes} at which a perfectly conducting shell is just able to stabilize the ideal external kink mode. In general, this is not possible in a reactor, since engineering constraints demand that any feedback controlled conductors be placed {ital outside} the neutron shielding blanket (i.e., relatively far from the edge of the plasma). It is demonstrated that the fake rotating shell feedback scheme can be modified so that it works even when the feedback controlled conductors are located well beyond the critical radius. The gain, bandwidth, current, and total power requirements of such a feedback system for a reactor sized plasma are estimated to be less than 100, a few Hz, a fews tens of kA, and a few MW, respectively. These requirements could easily be met using existing technology. It is concluded that feedback stabilization of the resistive shell mode is possible in a tokamak fusion reactor. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Rapid feedback control and stabilization of an optical tweezers with a budget microcontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Daniel; Wang, Haowei; Milstein, Joshua N.

    2014-09-01

    Laboratories ranging the scientific disciplines employ feedback control to regulate variables within their experiments, from the flow of liquids within a microfluidic device to the temperature within a cell incubator. We have built an inexpensive, yet fast and rapidly deployed, feedback control system that is straightforward and flexible to implement from a commercially available Arduino Due microcontroller. This is in comparison with the complex, time-consuming and often expensive electronics that are commonly implemented. As an example of its utility, we apply our feedback controller to the task of stabilizing the main trapping laser of an optical tweezers. The feedback controller, which is inexpensive yet fast and rapidly deployed, was implemented from hacking an open source Arduino Due microcontroller. Our microcontroller based feedback system can stabilize the laser intensity to a few tenths of a per cent at 200 kHz, which is an order of magnitude better than the laser's base specifications, illustrating the utility of these devices.

  16. Feedback stabilizes propagation of synchronous spiking in cortical neural networks.

    PubMed

    Moldakarimov, Samat; Bazhenov, Maxim; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2015-02-24

    Precisely timed action potentials related to stimuli and behavior have been observed in the cerebral cortex. However, information carried by the precise spike timing has to propagate through many cortical areas, and noise could disrupt millisecond precision during the transmission. Previous studies have demonstrated that only strong stimuli that evoke a large number of spikes with small dispersion of spike times can propagate through multilayer networks without degrading the temporal precision. Here we show that feedback projections can increase the number of spikes in spike volleys without degrading their temporal precision. Feedback also increased the range of spike volleys that can propagate through multilayer networks. Our work suggests that feedback projections could be responsible for the reliable propagation of information encoded in spike times through cortex, and thus could serve as an attentional mechanism to regulate the flow of information in the cortex. Feedback projections may also participate in generating spike synchronization that is engaged in cognitive behaviors by the same mechanisms described here for spike propagation. PMID:25675531

  17. Stabilization and robustness of non-linear unity-feedback system - Factorization approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, C. A.; Kabuli, M. G.

    1988-01-01

    The paper is a self-contained discussion of a right factorization approach in the stability analysis of the nonlinear continuous-time or discrete-time, time-invariant or time-varying, well-posed unity-feedback system S1(P, C). It is shown that a well-posed stable feedback system S1(P, C) implies that P and C have right factorizations. In the case where C is stable, P has a normalized right-coprime factorization. The factorization approach is used in stabilization and simultaneous stabilization results.

  18. Nonlinear power flow feedback control for improved stability and performance of airfoil sections

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2013-09-03

    A computer-implemented method of determining the pitch stability of an airfoil system, comprising using a computer to numerically integrate a differential equation of motion that includes terms describing PID controller action. In one model, the differential equation characterizes the time-dependent response of the airfoil's pitch angle, .alpha.. The computer model calculates limit-cycles of the model, which represent the stability boundaries of the airfoil system. Once the stability boundary is known, feedback control can be implemented, by using, for example, a PID controller to control a feedback actuator. The method allows the PID controller gain constants, K.sub.I, K.sub.p, and K.sub.d, to be optimized. This permits operation closer to the stability boundaries, while preventing the physical apparatus from unintentionally crossing the stability boundaries. Operating closer to the stability boundaries permits greater power efficiencies to be extracted from the airfoil system.

  19. Output feedback trajectory stabilization of the uncertainty DC servomechanism system.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Ibañez, Carlos; Garrido-Moctezuma, Ruben; Davila, Jorge

    2012-11-01

    This work proposes a solution for the output feedback trajectory-tracking problem in the case of an uncertain DC servomechanism system. The system consists of a pendulum actuated by a DC motor and subject to a time-varying bounded disturbance. The control law consists of a Proportional Derivative controller and an uncertain estimator that allows compensating the effects of the unknown bounded perturbation. Because the motor velocity state is not available from measurements, a second-order sliding-mode observer permits the estimation of this variable in finite time. This last feature allows applying the Separation Principle. The convergence analysis is carried out by means of the Lyapunov method. Results obtained from numerical simulations and experiments in a laboratory prototype show the performance of the closed loop system. PMID:22884179

  20. Pitch attitude stabilization system utilizing engine pressure ratio feedback signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, W. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The changes in the engine pressure ratio signals which result from thrust changes are used to generate a pitch stabilization signal. The signal is combined with other pitch control signals to automatically counteract pitching moments resulting from the changes in engine thrust.

  1. Ponderomotive stabilization of flute modes in mirrors Feedback control and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Similon, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Ponderomotive stabilization of rigid plasma flute modes is numerically investigated by use of a variational principle, for a simple geometry, without eikonal approximation. While the near field of the studied antenna can be stabilizing, the far field has a small contribution only, because of large cancellation by quasi mode-coupling terms. The field energy for stabilization is evaluated and is a nonnegligible fraction of the plasma thermal energy. A new antenna design is proposed, and feedback stabilization is investigated. Their use drastically reduces power requirements.

  2. Positive And Negative Feedback Loops Coupled By Common Transcription Activator And Repressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielewiesiuk, Jan; Łopaciuk, Agata

    2015-03-01

    Dynamical systems consisting of two interlocked loops with negative and positive feedback have been studied using the linear analysis of stability and numerical solutions. Conditions for saddle-node bifurcation were formulated in a general form. Conditions for Hopf bifurcations were found in a few symmetrical cases. Auto-oscillations, when they exist, are generated by the negative feedback repressive loop. This loop determines the frequency and amplitude of oscillations. The positive feedback loop of activation slightly modifies the oscillations. Oscillations are possible when the difference between Hilll's coefficients of the repression and activation is sufficiently high. The highly cooperative activation loop with a fast turnover slows down or even makes the oscillations impossible. The system under consideration can constitute a component of epigenetic or enzymatic regulation network.

  3. Active feedback cooling of massive electromechanical quartz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Jahng, Junghoon; Lee, Manhee; Stambaugh, Corey; Bak, Wan; Jhe, Wonho

    2011-08-15

    We present a general active feedback cooling scheme for massive electromechanical quartz resonators. We cool down two kinds of macrosized quartz tuning forks and find several characteristic constants for this massive quartz-resonator feedback cooling, in good agreement with theoretical calculations. When combined with conventional cryogenic techniques and low-noise devices, one may reach the quantum sensitivity for macroscopic sensors. This may be useful for high sensitivity measurements and for quantum information studies.

  4. Combustion diagnostic for active engine feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jr., Johney Boyd; Daw, Charles Stuart; Wagner, Robert Milton

    2007-10-02

    This invention detects the crank angle location where combustion switches from premixed to diffusion, referred to as the transition index, and uses that location to define integration limits that measure the portions of heat released during the combustion process that occur during the premixed and diffusion phases. Those integrated premixed and diffusion values are used to develop a metric referred to as the combustion index. The combustion index is defined as the integrated diffusion contribution divided by the integrated premixed contribution. As the EGR rate is increased enough to enter the low temperature combustion regime, PM emissions decrease because more of the combustion process is occurring over the premixed portion of the heat release rate profile and the diffusion portion has been significantly reduced. This information is used to detect when the engine is or is not operating in a low temperature combustion mode and provides that feedback to an engine control algorithm.

  5. Three-axis stabilization of spacecraft using parameter-independent nonlinear quaternion feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Kelkar, Atul G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of rigid spacecraft. A nonlinear control law which uses the feedback of the unit quaternion and the measured angular velocities is proposed and is shown to provide global asymptotic stability. The control law does not require the knowledge of the system parameters, and is therefore robust to modeling errors. The significance of the control law is that it can be used for large-angle maneuvers with guaranteed stability.

  6. Stabilization of traffic flow in optimal velocity model via delayed-feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yanfei; Hu, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Traffic jams may occur due to various reasons, such as traffic accidents, lane reductions and on-ramps. In order to suppress the traffic congestion in an optimal velocity traffic model without any driver's delay taken into account, a delayed-feedback control of both displacement and velocity differences is proposed in this study. By using the delay-independent stability criteria and the H∞-norm, the delayed-feedback control can be determined to stabilize the unstable traffic flow and suppress the traffic jam. The numerical case studies are given to demonstrate and verify the new control method. Furthermore, a comparison is made between the new control method and the method proposed by Konishi et al. [K. Konishi, M. Hirai, H. Kokame, Decentralized delayed-feedback control of an optimal velocity traffic model, Eur. Phys. J. B 15 (2000) 715-722]. The results show that the new control method makes the traffic flow more stable and improves the control performance.

  7. A generalization of the Nyquist stability criterion. [extension to multivariable linear feedback systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, P. K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a generalization of the Nyquist stability criterion to include general multivariable linear stationary systems subject to linear static and dynamic feedback. At the same time, a unifying proof is given for all known versions of the Nyquist criterion for finite dimensional systems.

  8. Global Output-Feedback Control for Simultaneous Tracking and Stabilization of Wheeled Mobile Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J.; Zhang, L. J.; Xue, D.

    A time-varying global output-feedback controller is presented that solves both tracking and stabilization for wheeled mobile robots simultaneously at the torque level. The controller synthesis is based on a coordinate transformation, Lyapunov direct method and backstepping technique. The performance of the proposed controller is demonstrated by simulation.

  9. Decorrelation of Neural-Network Activity by Inhibitory Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Einevoll, Gaute T.; Diesmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Correlations in spike-train ensembles can seriously impair the encoding of information by their spatio-temporal structure. An inevitable source of correlation in finite neural networks is common presynaptic input to pairs of neurons. Recent studies demonstrate that spike correlations in recurrent neural networks are considerably smaller than expected based on the amount of shared presynaptic input. Here, we explain this observation by means of a linear network model and simulations of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that inhibitory feedback efficiently suppresses pairwise correlations and, hence, population-rate fluctuations, thereby assigning inhibitory neurons the new role of active decorrelation. We quantify this decorrelation by comparing the responses of the intact recurrent network (feedback system) and systems where the statistics of the feedback channel is perturbed (feedforward system). Manipulations of the feedback statistics can lead to a significant increase in the power and coherence of the population response. In particular, neglecting correlations within the ensemble of feedback channels or between the external stimulus and the feedback amplifies population-rate fluctuations by orders of magnitude. The fluctuation suppression in homogeneous inhibitory networks is explained by a negative feedback loop in the one-dimensional dynamics of the compound activity. Similarly, a change of coordinates exposes an effective negative feedback loop in the compound dynamics of stable excitatory-inhibitory networks. The suppression of input correlations in finite networks is explained by the population averaged correlations in the linear network model: In purely inhibitory networks, shared-input correlations are canceled by negative spike-train correlations. In excitatory-inhibitory networks, spike-train correlations are typically positive. Here, the suppression of input correlations is not a result of the mere existence of correlations between

  10. Effects of invalid feedback on learning and feedback-related brain activity in decision-making.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Benjamin; Steinhauser, Marco

    2015-10-01

    For adaptive decision-making it is important to utilize only relevant, valid and to ignore irrelevant feedback. The present study investigated how feedback processing in decision-making is impaired when relevant feedback is combined with irrelevant and potentially invalid feedback. We analyzed two electrophysiological markers of feedback processing, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300, in a simple decision-making task, in which participants processed feedback stimuli consisting of relevant and irrelevant feedback provided by the color and meaning of a Stroop stimulus. We found that invalid, irrelevant feedback not only impaired learning, it also altered the amplitude of the P300 to relevant feedback, suggesting an interfering effect of irrelevant feedback on the processing of relevant feedback. In contrast, no such effect on the FRN was obtained. These results indicate that detrimental effects of invalid, irrelevant feedback result from failures of controlled feedback processing. PMID:26263382

  11. Feedback-controlled NTM stabilization on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stober, J.; Barrera, L.; Behler, K.; Bock, A.; Buhler, A.; Eixenberger, H.; Giannone, L.; Kasparek, W.; Maraschek, M.; Mlynek, A.; Monaco, F.; Poli, E.; Rapson, C. J.; Reich, M.; Schubert, M.; Treutterer, W.; Wagner, D.; Zohm, H.

    2015-03-01

    On ASDEX Upgrade a concept for real-time stabilization of NTMs has been realized and successfully applied to (3,2)- and (2,1)-NTMs. Since most of the work has meanwhile been published elsewhere, a short summary with the appropriate references is given. Limitations, deficits and future extensions of the system are discussed. In a second part the recent work on using modulated ECCD for NTM stabilisation is described in some detail. In these experiments ECCD power is modulated according to a magnetic footprint of the rotating NTM. In agreement with earlier results it could be shown that O-point heating reduces the necessary average power for stabilisation whereas X-point heating hampers stabilisation. Although this modulated scheme is not relevant for routine NTM stabilisation on ASDEX Upgrade it may be mandatory for ITER or DEMO. On ASDEX Upgrade it has been re-developed to demonstrate the usage of a FAst DIrectional Switch to continously heat the O-point of the rotating island with only one gyrotron switching between two launchers which target the mode at locations separated in phase by 180 degrees as described in [1].

  12. Feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in a reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Brunsell, P.R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y.Q.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J.R.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.

    2005-09-15

    An array of saddle coils having N{sub c}=16 equally spaced positions along the toroidal direction has been installed for feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsaker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]. Using feedback, multiple nonresonant RWMs are simultaneously suppressed for three to four wall times. Feedback stabilization of RWMs results in a significant prolongation of the discharge duration. This is linked to a better sustainment of the plasma and tearing mode toroidal rotation with feedback. Due to the limited number of coils in the toroidal direction, pairs of modes with toroidal mode numbers n,n{sup '} that fulfill the condition |n-n{sup '}|=N{sub c} are coupled by the feedback action from the discrete coil array. With only one unstable mode in a pair of coupled modes, the suppression of the unstable mode is successful. If two modes are unstable in a coupled pair, two possibilities exist: partial suppression of both modes or, alternatively, complete stabilization of one target mode while the other is left unstable.

  13. Dynamics of dc bus networks and their stabilization by decentralized delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Keiji; Sugitani, Yoshiki; Hara, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The present paper deals with the dynamics of bus networks, which consist of several identical dc bus systems connected by resistors. It is analytically guaranteed that the stability of a stand-alone dc bus system is equivalent to that of the networks, independent of the number of bus systems and the network topology. In addition, we show that a decentralized delayed-feedback control can stabilize an unstable operating point embedded within the networks. Moreover, this stabilization does not depend on the number of bus systems or the network topology. A systematic procedure for designing the controller is presented. Finally, the validity of the analytical results is confirmed through numerical examples.

  14. Stabilizing operation point technique based on the tunable distributed feedback laser for interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xuefeng; Zhou, Xinlei; Yu, Qingxu

    2016-02-01

    We describe a stabilizing operation point technique based on the tunable Distributed Feedback (DFB) laser for quadrature demodulation of interferometric sensors. By introducing automatic lock quadrature point and wavelength periodically tuning compensation into an interferometric system, the operation point of interferometric system is stabilized when the system suffers various environmental perturbations. To demonstrate the feasibility of this stabilizing operation point technique, experiments have been performed using a tunable-DFB-laser as light source to interrogate an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric vibration sensor and a diaphragm-based acoustic sensor. Experimental results show that good tracing of Q-point was effectively realized.

  15. Optimization and static output-feedback control for half-car active suspensions with constrained information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Changzheng; Yu, Shenbo

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the static output-feedback control problem of active suspension systems with information structure constraints is investigated. In order to simultaneously improve the ride comfort and stability, a half car model is used. Other constraints such as suspension deflection, actuator saturation, and controller constrained information are also considered. A novel static output-feedback design method based on the variable substitution is employed in the controller design. A single-step linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem is solved to derive the initial feasible solution with a sparsity constraint. The initial infeasibility issue of the static output-feedback is resolved by using state-feedback information. Specifically, an optimization algorithm is proposed to search for less conservative results based on the feasible controller gain matrix. Finally, the validity of the designed controller for different road profiles is illustrated through numerical examples. The simulation results indicate that the optimized static output-feedback controller can achieve better suspension performances when compared with the feasible static output-feedback controller.

  16. Using Frequency Noise Feedback to Improve Stability in Extended Cavity Diode Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, Mckinley; Durfee, Dallin

    2016-03-01

    We are developing a feedback system to stabilize extended cavity diode lasers using frequency noise. In other literature, amplitude noise has been used to predict and prevent mode hops. We've found, however, that amplitude noise only correlates to an impending mode hop when the laser is locked to a frequency reference. We have found evidence that the amplitude noise is generated from more fundamental frequency noise by the lock feedback. We therefore propose a way to use frequency noise directly to generate a signal to predict and prevent mode hops.

  17. Active vibration control for nonlinear vehicle suspension with actuator delay via I/O feedback linearization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jing; Jiang, Zuo; Li, Ya-Li; Li, Wu-Xin

    2014-10-01

    The problem of nonlinear vibration control for active vehicle suspension systems with actuator delay is considered. Through feedback linearization, the open-loop nonlinearity is eliminated by the feedback nonlinear term. Based on the finite spectrum assignment, the quarter-car suspension system with actuator delay is converted into an equivalent delay-free one. The nonlinear control includes a linear feedback term, a feedforward compensator, and a control memory term, which can be derived from a Riccati equation and a Sylvester equation, so that the effects produced by the road disturbances and the actuator delay are compensated, respectively. A predictor is designed to implement the predictive state in the designed control. Moreover, a reduced-order observer is constructed to solve its physical unrealisability problem. The stability proofs for the zero dynamics and the closed-loop system are provided. Numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness and the simplicity of the designed control.

  18. Feedback controllers for broadband active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjean, Benoit; Legrain, Isabelle

    1994-09-01

    The aim of the present paper is to demonstrate the efficiency of an LQG-based controller for the active control of the acoustic field radiated by a rectangular panel. This topic has been of interest for numerous researchers in the past 10 or 15 years, but very little attention has been paid to broadband disturbances occurring in a relatively high frequency range. These are unfortunately common features of noise perturbations in realistic structures such as airplanes or helicopters. The few articles that deal with this problem provide very scarce experimental results and are related to frequency bands where the structure dynamics is rather poor. From the outset, the problem at hand involves numerous difficulties, such as the modeling of the active structure itself and the possible large size of the controller. In the following, the experimental setup is described, then the controller design procedure is developed and finally some experimental results are shown that prove the efficiency of the method.

  19. Finite-time stabilization of uncertain nonholonomic systems in feedforward-like form by output feedback.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fangzheng; Wu, Yuqiang; Zhang, Zhongcai

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the problem of finite-time stabilization by output feedback for a class of nonholonomic systems in chained form with uncertainties. Comparing with the existing relevant literature, a distinguishing feature of the systems under investigation is that the x-subsystem is a feedforward-like rather than feedback-like system. This renders the existing control methods inapplicable to the control problems of the systems. A constructive design procedure for output feedback control is given. The designed controller renders that the states of closed-loop system are regulated to zero in a finite time. Two simulation examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:26434417

  20. Ultrafast Outflows: Galaxy-scale Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2013-01-01

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  1. ULTRAFAST OUTFLOWS: GALAXY-SCALE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2013-01-20

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  2. Resonant passive-active vibration absorber with integrated force feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høgsberg, Jan; Brodersen, Mark L.; Krenk, Steen

    2016-04-01

    A general format of a two-terminal vibration absorber is constructed by placing a passive unit in series with a hybrid unit, composed of an active actuator in parallel with a second passive element. The displacement of the active actuator is controlled by an integrated feedback control with the difference in force between the two passive elements as input. This format allows passive and active contributions to be combined arbitrarily within the hybrid unit, which results in a versatile absorber format with guaranteed closed-loop stability. This is demonstrated for resonant absorbers with inertia realized passively by a mechanical inerter or actively by the integrated force feedback. Accurate calibration formulae are presented for two particular absorber configurations and the performance is subsequently demonstrated with respect to both equal modal damping and effective response reduction.

  3. Active following fuzzy output feedback sliding mode control of real-vehicle semi-active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Nonami, K.; Hagiwara, T.

    2008-07-01

    Many semi-active suspension systems have been investigated in various literatures in order to achieve lower energy consumption and as good performance as full-active suspension systems. Full-active suspension systems can achieve a good ride quality by actuators; however, their implementation equipments are expensive. The full-active suspensions are perfect from the point of view of control; hence, semi-active control laws with performance similar to full-active controls have attracted the engineering community for their ease and lower cost of implementation. This paper presents a new active following fuzzy output feedback sliding mode control for a real-vehicle semi-active suspension system. The performance of the proposed controller has been verified by comparing it with passive control and also with the full-active target semi-active approximation control method. In the experiment, it was shown that the proposed method has the effectiveness in stabilizing heave, roll and pitch movement of the car body.

  4. Single state feedback stabilization of unified chaotic systems and circuit implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Chun-Guo; He, Ping; Fan, Tao; Li, Yangmin; Chen, Changzhong; Song, Xin

    2014-11-01

    This paper focuses on the single state feedback stabilization problem of unified chaotic system and circuit implementation. Some stabilization conditions will be derived via the single state feedback control scheme. The robust performance of controlled unified chaotic systems with uncertain parameter will be investigated based on maximum and minimum analysis of uncertain parameter, the robust controller which only requires information of a state of the system is proposed and the controller is linear. Both the unified chaotic system and the designed controller are synthesized and implemented by an analog electronic circuit which is simpler because only three variable resistors are required to be adjusted. The numerical simulation and control in MATLAB/Simulink is then provided to show the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed method which is robust against some uncertainties. The results presented in this paper improve and generalize the corresponding results of recent works.

  5. Longitudinal stability and control in wind shear with energy height rate feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gera, J.

    1980-01-01

    The longitudinal linearized equations of motion in wind shear were derived for the NASA Terminal Configured Vehicle, a modified Boeing 737 airplane. In addition to the apparent acceleration terms resulting from wind shear, the equations included altitude dependent stability derivatives. A linear analysis of these equations indicates a first order divergence type of instability due to wind shear in which head wind decreased with altitude. Furthermore, this instability cannot be stabilized by attitude control alone. However, attitude control used in combination with an addition feedback loop which consisted of the energy height rate feedback to the throttle proved to be effective in suppressing instability due to wind shear. A brief piloted, real time, nonlinear simulation indicated the desirability of using a display based on the rate of change of energy height rate and of commanded thrust.

  6. Robust torque control of an elastic robotic arm based on invertibility and feedback stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, S. N.; Schy, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    An approach to the control of elastic robotic systems for space applications using inversion, servocompensation, and feedback stabilization is presented. For simplicity, a robot arm (PUMA-type) with three rotational joints is considered. The third link is assumed to be elastic. Using an inversion algorithm, a nonlinear decoupling control law, u sub d, is derived such that in the closed loop system, independent control of joint angles by the three joint torquers is accomplished. For the stabilization of elastic oscillations, a linear feedback torquer control law, u sub s, is obtained applying linear quadratic optimization to the linearized arm model augmented with a servocompensator about the terminal state. Simulation results show that, in spite of uncertainties in the payload and vehicle angular velocity, good joint angle control and damping of elastic oscillations are obtained with the torquer control law u = u sub d + u sub s.

  7. Absorption line metrology by optical feedback frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, Johannes; Kassi, Samir

    2015-04-01

    Optical feedback frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy (OFFS-CRDS) is a near-shot-noise-limited technique combining a sensitivity of with a highly linear frequency axis and sub-kHz resolution. Here, we give an in-depth review of the key elements of the experimental setup encompassing a highly stable V-shaped reference cavity, an integrated Mach-Zehnder modulator and a tightly locked ring-down cavity with a finesse of 450,000. Carrying out a detailed analysis of the spectrometer performance and its limitations, we revisit the photo-electron shot-noise limit in CRDS and discuss the impact of optical fringes. We demonstrate different active schemes for fringe cancelation by varying the phase of parasitic reflections. The proof-of-principle experiments reported here include a broadband high-resolution spectrum of carbon dioxide at 1.6 µm and an isolated line-shape measurement with a signal-to-noise ratio of 80,000. Beyond laboratory-based absorption line metrology for fundamental research, OFFS-CRDS holds a considerable potential for field laser measurements of trace gas concentrations and isotopic ratios by virtue of its small sample volume and footprint, the robust cavity-locking scheme and supreme precision.

  8. The stability of the feedback negativity and its relationship with depression during childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Bress, Jennifer N; Meyer, Alexandria; Proudfit, Greg Hajcak

    2015-11-01

    Feedback negativity (FN) is an event-related potential elicited by monetary reward and loss; it is thought to relate to reward-related neural activity and has been linked to depression in children and adults. In the current study, we examined the stability of FN, and its relationship with depression in adolescents, over 2 years in 45 8- to 13-year-old children. From Time 1 to Time 2, FN in response to monetary loss and in response to monetary gain showed moderate to strong reliability (rs = .64 and .67, respectively); these relationships remained significant even when accounting for related variables. FN also demonstrated high within-session reliability. Moreover, the relationship between a blunted FN and greater depression observed at Time 1 was reproduced at Time 2, and the magnitude of FN at Time 1 predicted depressive symptomatology at Time 2. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that FN and its relationship with depression remain consistent over the course of development, and that FN may prospectively predict later depressive symptomatology. The current results suggest that FN may be suitable as a biomarker of depressive symptoms during adolescence. PMID:26439074

  9. Stabilization of Gyrotron Frequency by PID Feedback Control on the Acceleration Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutoryan, E. M.; Idehara, T.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-12-01

    The results of frequency stabilization by proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback control of acceleration voltage in the 460-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GVI (the official name in Osaka University is Gyrotron FU CW GOI) are presented. The experiment was organized on the basis of the frequency modulation by modulation of acceleration voltage of beam electrons. The frequency stabilization during 10 h experiment was better than 10-6, which is compared with the results of the frequency deviation in free-running gyrotron operation.

  10. Feedback-Induced Phase Transitions in Active Heterogeneous Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, Samuel A.; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-04-01

    An active conducting medium is one where the resistance (conductance) of the medium is modified by the current (flow) and in turn modifies the flow, so that the classical linear laws relating current and resistance, e.g., Ohm's law or Darcy's law, are modified over time as the system itself evolves. We consider a minimal model for this feedback coupling in terms of two parameters that characterize the way in which addition or removal of matter follows a simple local (or nonlocal) feedback rule corresponding to either flow-seeking or flow-avoiding behavior. Using numerical simulations and a continuum mean field theory, we show that flow-avoiding feedback causes an initially uniform system to become strongly heterogeneous via a tunneling (channel-building) phase separation; flow-seeking feedback leads to an immuring (wall-building) phase separation. Our results provide a qualitative explanation for the patterning of active conducting media in natural systems, while suggesting ways to realize complex architectures using simple rules in engineered systems.

  11. Feedback-induced phase transitions in active heterogeneous conductors.

    PubMed

    Ocko, Samuel A; Mahadevan, L

    2015-04-01

    An active conducting medium is one where the resistance (conductance) of the medium is modified by the current (flow) and in turn modifies the flow, so that the classical linear laws relating current and resistance, e.g., Ohm's law or Darcy's law, are modified over time as the system itself evolves. We consider a minimal model for this feedback coupling in terms of two parameters that characterize the way in which addition or removal of matter follows a simple local (or nonlocal) feedback rule corresponding to either flow-seeking or flow-avoiding behavior. Using numerical simulations and a continuum mean field theory, we show that flow-avoiding feedback causes an initially uniform system to become strongly heterogeneous via a tunneling (channel-building) phase separation; flow-seeking feedback leads to an immuring (wall-building) phase separation. Our results provide a qualitative explanation for the patterning of active conducting media in natural systems, while suggesting ways to realize complex architectures using simple rules in engineered systems. PMID:25884126

  12. Design, parametrization, and pole placement of stabilizing output feedback compensators via injective cogenerator quotient signal modules.

    PubMed

    Blumthaler, Ingrid; Oberst, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Control design belongs to the most important and difficult tasks of control engineering and has therefore been treated by many prominent researchers and in many textbooks, the systems being generally described by their transfer matrices or by Rosenbrock equations and more recently also as behaviors. Our approach to controller design uses, in addition to the ideas of our predecessors on coprime factorizations of transfer matrices and on the parametrization of stabilizing compensators, a new mathematical technique which enables simpler design and also new theorems in spite of the many outstanding results of the literature: (1) We use an injective cogenerator signal module ℱ over the polynomial algebra [Formula: see text] (F an infinite field), a saturated multiplicatively closed set T of stable polynomials and its quotient ring [Formula: see text] of stable rational functions. This enables the simultaneous treatment of continuous and discrete systems and of all notions of stability, called T-stability. We investigate stabilizing control design by output feedback of input/output (IO) behaviors and study the full feedback IO behavior, especially its autonomous part and not only its transfer matrix. (2) The new technique is characterized by the permanent application of the injective cogenerator quotient signal module [Formula: see text] and of quotient behaviors [Formula: see text] of [Formula: see text]-behaviors B. (3) For the control tasks of tracking, disturbance rejection, model matching, and decoupling and not necessarily proper plants we derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of proper stabilizing compensators with proper and stable closed loop behaviors, parametrize all such compensators as IO behaviors and not only their transfer matrices and give new algorithms for their construction. Moreover we solve the problem of pole placement or spectral assignability for the complete feedback behavior. The properness of the full feedback behavior

  13. Learners' Interpersonal Beliefs and Generated Feedback in an Online Role-Playing Peer-Feedback Activity: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Yu-Hui; Hsu, Yu-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Peer feedback affords interaction and critical thinking opportunities for learners in online courses. However, various factors prevent learners from taking advantage of these promising benefits. This study explored learners' perceptions of the interpersonal factors in a role-playing peer-feedback activity, and examined the types of peer feedback…

  14. Landform-water-vegetation feedbacks regulate ecosystem stability and restoration potential in semiarid landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno de las Heras, Mariano; Saco, Patricia; Merino Martin, Luis; Espigares, Tiscar; Nicolau, Jose Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Plant production and vegetation dynamics in drylands are shaped by landform patterns, and largely depends on favorable surface redistribution of runoff and sediments. Similarly, the organization of vegetation in these systems controls runoff generation and erosion, and strongly influences the spatial redistribution of water and soil resources. Landform-water-vegetation feedbacks may have, therefore, a key role determining the stability and restoration potential of arid and semiarid ecosystems. We present a synthesis of field, remotely-sensed and modelling studies on landform-soil-vegetation patterns in semiarid rangelands of Australia and reclaimed coal-mining slopes of Mediterranean-dry Spain. Our results indicate that the organization and stability of vegetation patterns strongly depends on feedbacks with coevolving landforms. Exploration of banded woodlands in central Australia reveals that disturbances (e.g. grazing, wildfires) can impact landform-water-vegetation feedbacks, altering the way water is spatially redistributed and used by vegetation, which results in non-linear reductions of ecosystem function. Successful experiences on the restoration of these systems suggest that the spatial management of runoff and sediments is decisive to rehabilitate vegetation patchiness and landscape function. The study of vegetation-water-landform feedbacks in Mediterranean-dry reclaimed mining slopes of Spain offers additional indications on the restoration of drylands, particularly on the effects of rill and gully erosion on the stability of restored vegetation. The development of rill and gully networks provides very efficient drainage networks for the routing of runoff and sediments that drastically reduce the availability of water and soil resources for plant production, ultimately causing degradation of vegetation and restoration failure. This work is supported by a Beatriu de Pinós fellowship co-funded by the European Commission and the Generalitat de Catalunya

  15. Landform-Water-Vegetation Feedbacks: Exploring Ecosystem Stability and Restoration Potential in Semiarid Hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno de las Heras, M.; Saco, P. M.; Merino-Martin, L.; Espigares, T.; Nicolau, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation dynamics and soil surface processes (e.g. runoff, soil erosion, sedimentation) are tightly coupled in drylands, where vegetation cover is patchy and plant production largely depends on favourable redistribution of water and sediments. At the same time, the amount and spatial distribution of vegetation control hillslope runoff and erosion, and strongly influence the redistribution of water and soil resources in these systems. Large shifts in the structure and organization of vegetation are associated with land degradation, frequently involving nonlinear responses to both human and climatic pressures. The study of landform-water-vegetation feedbacks has, therefore, a critical role for the comprehension of ecosystem stability and restoration potential in arid and semiarid environments. We present a synthesis of field-based, remote-sensed and modelling studies on soil-vegetation patterns in semiarid rangelands of Australia and water-restricted reclaimed mining slopes of Spain. Our results indicate that the organization and stability of vegetation patterns strongly depends on feedbacks with coevolving landforms. Exploration of degradation trends in banded Mulga shrublands of central Australia reveals that human disturbances (e.g. grazing) can strongly alter landform-water-vegetation feedbacks and particularly the way water is spatially redistributed and used by vegetation, resulting in threshold-like responses of ecosystem function. Successful experiences on the restoration of these systems highlight that the management of runoff and sediment flows is decisive to recover vegetation patchiness and landscape function. The study of vegetation-water-landform feedbacks in Mediterranean-dry reclaimed mining slopes of Spain offers additional indications on the restoration of drylands, particularly on the effects of rill and gully erosion on the stability of restored vegetation. The development of rill and gully networks provides very efficient drainage networks for

  16. Imaging stability in force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung I; Boehm, Ryan D

    2013-02-01

    We studied the stability of force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy (HSAFM) by imaging soft, hard, and biological sample surfaces at various applied forces. The HSAFM images showed sudden topographic variations of streaky fringes with a negative applied force when collected on a soft hydrocarbon film grown on a grating sample, whereas they showed stable topographic features with positive applied forces. The instability of HSAFM images with the negative applied force was explained by the transition between contact and noncontact regimes in the force-distance curve. When the grating surface was cleaned, and thus hydrophilic by removing the hydrocarbon film, enhanced imaging stability was observed at both positive and negative applied forces. The higher adhesive interaction between the tip and the surface explains the improved imaging stability. The effects of imaging rate on the imaging stability were tested on an even softer adhesive Escherichia coli biofilm deposited onto the grating structure. The biofilm and planktonic cell structures in HSAFM images were reproducible within the force deviation less than ∼0.5 nN at the imaging rate up to 0.2s per frame, suggesting that the force-feedback HSAFM was stable for various imaging speeds in imaging softer adhesive biological samples. PMID:23274682

  17. An inexpensive programmable illumination microscope with active feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, Nathan; Fraden, Seth

    2016-02-01

    We have developed a programmable illumination system capable of tracking and illuminating numerous objects simultaneously using only low-cost and reused optical components. The active feedback control software allows for a closed-loop system that tracks and perturbs objects of interest automatically. Our system uses a static stage where the objects of interest are tracked computationally as they move across the field of view allowing for a large number of simultaneous experiments. An algorithmically determined illumination pattern can be applied anywhere in the field of view with simultaneous imaging and perturbation using different colors of light to enable spatially and temporally structured illumination. Our system consists of a consumer projector, camera, 35-mm camera lens, and a small number of other optical and scaffolding components. The entire apparatus can be assembled for under 4,000. Supplemental matlab code is available to assist in the setup of the active feedback software.

  18. Stability and Hopf bifurcation of a nonlinear electromechanical coupling system with time delay feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Zhao, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Zhao-Long; Li, Hai-Bin

    2015-01-01

    The stability and the Hopf bifurcation of a nonlinear electromechanical coupling system with time delay feedback are studied. By considering the energy in the air-gap field of the AC motor, the dynamical equation of the electromechanical coupling transmission system is deduced and a time delay feedback is introduced to control the dynamic behaviors of the system. The characteristic roots and the stable regions of time delay are determined by the direct method, and the relationship between the feedback gain and the length summation of stable regions is analyzed. Choosing the time delay as a bifurcation parameter, we find that the Hopf bifurcation occurs when the time delay passes through a critical value. A formula for determining the direction of the Hopf bifurcation and the stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions is given by using the normal form method and the center manifold theorem. Numerical simulations are also performed, which confirm the analytical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61104040), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2012203090), and the University Innovation Team of Hebei Province Leading Talent Cultivation Project, China (Grant No. LJRC013).

  19. A switched state feedback law for the stabilization of LTI systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Santarelli, Keith R.

    2009-09-01

    Inspired by prior work in the design of switched feedback controllers for second order systems, we develop a switched state feedback control law for the stabilization of LTI systems of arbitrary dimension. The control law operates by switching between two static gain vectors in such a way that the state trajectory is driven onto a stable n - 1 dimensional hyperplane (where n represents the system dimension). We begin by briefly examining relevant geometric properties of the phase portraits in the case of two-dimensional systems to develop intuition, and we then show how these geometric properties can be expressed as algebraic constraints on the switched vector fields that are applicable to LTI systems of arbitrary dimension. We then derive necessary and sufficient conditions to ensure stabilizability of the resulting switched system (characterized primarily by simple conditions on eigenvalues), and describe an explicit procedure for designing stabilizing controllers. We then show how the newly developed control law can be applied to the problem of minimizing the maximal Lyapunov exponent of the corresponding closed-loop state trajectories, and we illustrate the closed-loop transient performance of these switched state feedback controllers via multiple examples.

  20. Dynamics of dc bus networks and their stabilization by decentralized delayed feedback.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Keiji; Sugitani, Yoshiki; Hara, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The present paper deals with the dynamics of bus networks, which consist of several identical dc bus systems connected by resistors. It is analytically guaranteed that the stability of a stand-alone dc bus system is equivalent to that of the networks, independent of the number of bus systems and the network topology. In addition, we show that a decentralized delayed-feedback control can stabilize an unstable operating point embedded within the networks. Moreover, this stabilization does not depend on the number of bus systems or the network topology. A systematic procedure for designing the controller is presented. Finally, the validity of the analytical results is confirmed through numerical examples. PMID:25679686

  1. Stability and multiple bifurcations of a damped harmonic oscillator with delayed feedback near zero eigenvalue singularity.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongli; Zhang, Tonghua; Tadé, Moses O

    2008-12-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a damped harmonic oscillator with delayed feedback near zero eigenvalue singularity. We perform a linearized stability analysis and multiple bifurcations of the zero solution of the system near zero eigenvalue singularity. Taking the time delay as the bifurcation parameter, the presence of steady-state bifurcation, Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation, triple zero, and Hopf-zero singularities is demonstrated. In the case when the system has a simple zero eigenvalue, center manifold reduction and normal form theory are used to investigate the stability and the types of steady-state bifurcation. The stability of the zero solution of the system near the simple zero eigenvalue singularity is completely solved. PMID:19123623

  2. Stability and chaotification of vibration isolation floating raft systems with time-delayed feedback control.

    PubMed

    Li, Y L; Xu, D L; Fu, Y M; Zhou, J X

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a systematic study on the stability of a two-dimensional vibration isolation floating raft system with a time-delayed feedback control. Based on the generalized Sturm criterion, the critical control gain for the delay-independent stability region and critical time delays for the stability switches are derived. The critical conditions can provide a theoretical guidance of chaotification design for line spectra reduction. Numerical simulations verify the correctness of the approach. Bifurcation analyses reveal that chaotification is more likely to occur in unstable region defined by these critical conditions, and the stiffness of the floating raft and mass ratio are the sensitive parameters to reduce critical control gain. PMID:21974650

  3. Rapid in situ X-ray position stabilization via extremum seeking feedback.

    PubMed

    Zohar, S; Venugopalan, N; Kissick, D; Becker, M; Xu, S; Makarov, O; Stepanov, S; Ogata, C; Sanishvili, R; Fischetti, R F

    2016-03-01

    X-ray beam stability is crucial for acquiring high-quality data at synchrotron beamline facilities. When the X-ray beam and defining apertures are of similar dimensions, small misalignments driven by position instabilities give rise to large intensity fluctuations. This problem is solved using extremum seeking feedback control (ESFC) for in situ vertical beam position stabilization. In this setup, the intensity spatial gradient required for ESFC is determined by phase comparison of intensity oscillations downstream from the sample with pre-existing vertical beam oscillations. This approach compensates for vertical position drift from all sources with position recovery times <6 s and intensity stability through a 5 µm aperture measured at 1.5% FWHM over a period of 8 hours. PMID:26917131

  4. Robust control based on feedback linearization for roll stabilizing of autonomous underwater vehicle under wave disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Li-Xin; Jin, Hong-Zhang; Wang, Lin-Lin

    2011-06-01

    In the case of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) navigating with low speed near water surface, a new method for design of roll motion controller is proposed in order to restrain wave disturbance effectively and improve roll stabilizing performance. Robust control is applied, which is based on uncertain nonlinear horizontal motion model of AUV and the principle of zero speed fin stabilizer. Feedback linearization approach is used to transform the complex nonlinear system into a comparatively simple linear system. For parameter uncertainty of motion model, the controller is designed with mixed-sensitivity method based on H-infinity robust control theory. Simulation results show better robustness improved by this control method for roll stabilizing of AUV navigating near water surface.

  5. Stabilization of an inverted pendulum-cart system by fractional PI-state feedback.

    PubMed

    Bettayeb, M; Boussalem, C; Mansouri, R; Al-Saggaf, U M

    2014-03-01

    This paper deals with pole placement PI-state feedback controller design to control an integer order system. The fractional aspect of the control law is introduced by a dynamic state feedback as u(t)=K(p)x(t)+K(I)I(α)(x(t)). The closed loop characteristic polynomial is thus fractional for which the roots are complex to calculate. The proposed method allows us to decompose this polynomial into a first order fractional polynomial and an integer order polynomial of order n-1 (n being the order of the integer system). This new stabilization control algorithm is applied for an inverted pendulum-cart test-bed, and the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed control are examined by experiments. PMID:24315056

  6. Stability robustness improvement of direct eigenspace assignment based feedback systems using singular value sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    1989-01-01

    A methodology to improve the stability robustness of feedback control systems designed using direct eigenspace assignment techniques is presented. The method consists of considering the sensitivity of the minimum singular value of the return difference transfer matrix at the plant input to small changes in the desired closed-loop eigenvalues and the specified elements of the desired closed-loop eigenvectors. Closed-form expressions for the gradient of the minimum return difference singular value with respect to desired closed-loop eigenvalue and eigenvector parameters are derived. Closed-form expressions for the gradients of the control feedback gains with respect to the specified eigenspace parameters are obtained as an intermediate step. The use of the gradient information to improve the guaranteed gain and phase margins in eigenspace assignment based designs is demonstrated by application to an advanced fighter aircraft.

  7. Hybrid Invariance and Stability of a Feedback Linearizing Controller for Powered Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Anne E.; Gregg, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of powered lower-limb prostheses has the potential to significantly improve amputees’ quality of life. By applying advanced control schemes, such as hybrid zero dynamics (HZD), to prostheses, more intelligent prostheses could be designed. Originally developed to control bipedal robots, HZD-based control specifies the motion of the actuated degrees of freedom using output functions to be zeroed, and the required torques are calculated using feedback linearization. Previous work showed that an HZD-like prosthesis controller can successfully control the stance period of gait. This paper shows that an HZD-based prosthesis controller can be used for the entire gait cycle and that feedback linearization can be performed using only information measured with on-board sensors. An analytic metric for orbital stability of a two-step periodic gait is developed. The results are illustrated in simulation. PMID:26604427

  8. Stabilizing detached Bridgman melt crystal growth: Proportional-integral feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeckel, Andrew; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2012-10-01

    The dynamics, operability limits, and tuning of a proportional-integral feedback controller to stabilize detached vertical Bridgman crystal growth are analyzed using a capillary model of shape stability. The manipulated variable is the pressure difference between upper and lower vapor spaces, and the controlled variable is the gap width at the triple-phase line. Open and closed loop dynamics of step changes in these state variables are analyzed under both shape stable and shape unstable growth conditions. Effects of step changes in static contact angle and growth angle are also studied. Proportional and proportional-integral control can stabilize unstable growth, but only within tight operability limits imposed by the narrow range of allowed meniscus shapes. These limits are used to establish safe operating ranges of controller gain. Strong nonlinearity of the capillary model restricts the range of perturbations that can be stabilized, and under some circumstances, stabilizes a spurious operating state far from the set point. Stabilizing detachment at low growth angle proves difficult and becomes impossible at zero growth angle.

  9. Modeling of the Feedback Stabilization of the Resistive Wall Mode in Tokamak Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.; Chu, M. S.

    1999-11-01

    The VACUUM^1 code is currently being modified to simulate the feedback stabilization of the RWM in the DIII-D device^2. We formulate the problem in terms of the eigenfunctions of the surface Laplacian obtained from the matching of the fields across a thin resistive toroidally symmetric shell. The window pane feedback (C-)coils are modeled accurately in the poloidal angle θ, and approximately by a single harmonic variation in φ. VACUUM relates the perturbations on the various surfaces, i.e., the plasma, both sides of the resistive shell and the C-coil. This results in an operator made up of a set of coupled time dependent equations relating the shell response to the plasma and feedback coil. Various attributes of the system can be calculated, such as the eddy current patterns and the time responses of the eigenmodes of the surface Laplacian operator. As a first appproximation, a PEST or GATO surface eigenmode of an ideal kink is assumed, whose structure remains unchanged during the feedback process, allowing only the magnitude to change. By energizing the C-coils according to the various proposed feedback schemes we propose to correlate with the present experimental results, and also to provide helpful guidance for future runs. rule[1.ex]1.9in.005in This work supported by DoE contract No. DE-AC02-76-CHO-3073 ^1 M.S. Chance, Phys. Plasmas, 4(1997)2161 ^2 A. A. Garofalo et al., Phys. Plasmas 6(1999) 1893

  10. Density increase due to active feedback in mirror machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seemann, Omri; Be'Ery, Ilan

    2014-10-01

    Mirror machines are one of the schemes for future fusion systems. Its main drawbacks are the flute instability and being open ended which results in plasma losses. A feedback system is used to stabilize the flute instability in a table top mirror machine with a continuous plasma source and RF heating. Under certain source density and temperature conditions, although the plasma was stabilized, plasma density increase was not measured. After decreasing the source density and increasing the temperature, Plasma density increase was achieved. It is theorized that these results are due to transition of the plasma main loss mechanism from collision dominated to instability dominated. In the former, the main density loss is through diffusion and In the latter, it is through flute instability which drives the plasma to the edge of the vacuum chamber. Future research directions are discussed for a planned machine which should achieve higher temperatures and better diagnostic capabilities. The research will focus on magnetic actuators and passive RF stabilization.

  11. Fuzzy logic based feedback control system for laser beam pointing stabilization.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjeet; Patel, Kiran; Govindarajan, J; Kumar, Ajai

    2010-09-20

    This paper reports a fuzzy logic based feedback control system for beam pointing stabilization of a high-power nanosecond Nd:YAG laser operating at 30 Hz. This is achieved by generating the correcting signal for each consequent pulse from the error in the pointing position of the previous laser pulse. We have successfully achieved a reduction of beam position fluctuation from ±60 to ±5.0 μrad without the focusing optics and ±0.9 μrad with focusing optics. PMID:20856289

  12. Gyrotron Output Power Stabilization by PID Feedback Control of Heater Current and Anode Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutoryan, E. M.; Idehara, T.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Ueda, K.

    2014-12-01

    To provide stable output power of a gyrotron during long operation time the power stabilization was achieved by two schemes with PID feedback control of heater current and anode voltage. It was based on the dependence of the output power on both the anode voltage and the beam current and also on the dependence of the beam current on the gun heater current. Both schemes provided decrease of the power standard deviation to 0.3-0.5%. The comparison between parameters of both schemes is discussed in the paper.

  13. Effects of Active galactic nuclei feedback in galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, C.; Cora, S.; Padilla, N.

    We analyze the effects of feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) on the formation and evolution of galaxies, which is assumed to quench cooling flows in massive halos. With this aim we use an hybrid model that combines a cosmological Lambda CDM simulation with a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. We consider the semi-analytic model described by Cora (2006) (SAMC06) which has been improved by including AGNs, which are associated with the presence of supermassive black holes (BHs). Modellization of BH includes gas accretion during merger-driven starbursts and black hole mergers (Malbon et al., 2006), accretion during starbursts triggered by disk instabilities (Bower et al. 2006), and accretion of cooling gas from quasi-hydrostatically cooling haloes (Croton et al. 2006); Eddington limit is applied in all accretion processes. It is assumed that feedback from AGNs operates in the later case. We show that this new model can simultaneously explain: (i) the bright-end of the galaxy luminosity function (LF); (ii) the observed older population of stars in massive galaxies, thus reproducing the stellar mass function (SMF); (iii) a star formation rate (SFR) seemingly showing an anti-hierarchical galaxy growth. The success of our model is mainly due to the ability of AGN feedback to suppress further cooling and SF in the most massive structures.

  14. Feedback-stabilization of an arbitrary pure state of a two-level atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Wiseman, H. M.

    2001-12-01

    Unit-efficiency homodyne detection of the resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom collapses the quantum state of the atom to a stochastically moving point on the Bloch sphere. Recently, Hofmann, Mahler, and Hess [Phys. Rev. A 57, 4877 (1998)] showed that by making part of the coherent driving proportional to the homodyne photocurrent one can stabilize the state to any point on the bottom-half of the sphere. Here we reanalyze their proposal using the technique of stochastic master equations, allowing their results to be generalized in two ways. First, we show that any point on the upper- or lower-half, but not the equator, of the sphere may be stabilized. Second, we consider nonunit-efficiency detection, and quantify the effectiveness of the feedback by calculating the maximal purity obtainable in any particular direction in Bloch space.

  15. Stabilizing a multimachine power system via decentralized feedback linearizing excitation control

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, J.W.; Ilic, M.D. ); King, C.A. ); Eng, L. ); Kaufman, H. )

    1993-08-01

    A new controller for the generator excitation system is described that uses a combination of feedback linearization and the observation decoupled state space. This creates a controller that can be realistically implemented using only local measurements, and whose performance is consistent with respect to changes in network configuration, loading and power transfer conditions. The control differs in this respect from linear constant-gain controllers such as power system stabilizers, whose characteristics can vary significantly with changes in operating conditions. The design is well-suited to a multimachine setting, in that it is not based on an infinite-bus approximation. Simulations are performed on a 38-bus reduced model of the Northeast Power Coordinating Council system and benchmarked against simulations in which automatic voltage regulators with power system stabilizers are substituted in place of the nonlinear controls.

  16. Improved feedback control of wall stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Rhodes, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for feedback control of rotating, wall-stabilized kink modes in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device maintains an accurate phase shift between the perturbation and the measured rotating mode through current control, with control power emphasizing fast rotation and phase jumps over fast amplitude changes. In HBT-EP, wall-stabilized kink modes become unstable above the ideal wall stability limit, and feedback suppression is aimed at delaying the onset of discharge disruption through reduction of the kink mode amplitude. Performance of the new feedback algorithm is tested under different experimental conditions, including variation of the plasma-wall coupling, insertion of a ferritic wall, changing mode rotation frequency over the range of 4-8 kHz using an internal biased electrode, and adjusting the feedback phase-angle to accelerate, amplify, or suppress the mode. We find the previously reported excitation of the slowly rotating mode at high feedback gain in HBT-EP is mitigated by the current control scheme. We also find good agreement between the observed and predicted changes to the mode rotation frequency and amplitude. When ferritic material is introduced, or the plasma-wall coupling becomes weaker as the walls are retracted from plasma, the feedback gain needs to be increased to achieve the same level of suppression. When mode rotation is slowed by a biased electrode, the feedback system still achieves mode suppression, and demonstrates wide bandwidth effectiveness.

  17. Feedback-induced phase transitions in active porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, Samuel; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-11-01

    We consider a reduced-complexity model for an active porous medium where flow and resistance are coupled to each other i.e. the porous medium is modified by the flow and in turn modifies the flow. Using numerical simulations, we show that this results in both channelization and wall-building transitions depending on the form of the feedback. A continuum model allows us to understand the qualitative features of the resulting phase diagram, and suggests ways to realize complex architectures using simple rules in engineered systems. Human Frontiers Science Program Grant RGP0066/2012- TURNER.

  18. Ultra reliable infrared absorption water vapor detection through the all-electronic feedback stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C. G.; Chang, J.; Wang, P. P.; Wang, Q.; Wei, W.; Tian, J. Q.; Chang, H. T.; Liu, X. Z.; Zhang, S. S.

    2014-03-01

    Single-beam balanced radiometric detection (BRD) system with all-electronic feedback stabilization has been proposed for high reliability water vapor detection under rough environmental conditions, which is insensitive to the fluctuation of transmission loss of light. The majority of photocurrent attenuation caused by the optical loss can be effectively compensated by automatically adjusting the splitting ratio of probe photocurrent. Based on the Ebers-Moll model, we present a theoretical analysis which can be suppressed the photocurrent attenuation caused by optical loss from 0.5552 dB to 0.0004 dB by using the all-electronic feedback stabilization. The deviation of the single-beam BRD system is below 0.29% with the bending loss of 0.31 dB in fiber, which is obviously lower than the dual-beam BRD system (5.96%) and subtraction system (11.3%). After averaging and filtering, the absorption sensitivity of water vapor at 1368.597 nm has been demonstrated, which is 7.368×10-6.

  19. STABILIZING CLOUD FEEDBACK DRAMATICALLY EXPANDS THE HABITABLE ZONE OF TIDALLY LOCKED PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Cowan, Nicolas B.

    2013-07-10

    The habitable zone (HZ) is the circumstellar region where a planet can sustain surface liquid water. Searching for terrestrial planets in the HZ of nearby stars is the stated goal of ongoing and planned extrasolar planet surveys. Previous estimates of the inner edge of the HZ were based on one-dimensional radiative-convective models. The most serious limitation of these models is the inability to predict cloud behavior. Here we use global climate models with sophisticated cloud schemes to show that due to a stabilizing cloud feedback, tidally locked planets can be habitable at twice the stellar flux found by previous studies. This dramatically expands the HZ and roughly doubles the frequency of habitable planets orbiting red dwarf stars. At high stellar flux, strong convection produces thick water clouds near the substellar location that greatly increase the planetary albedo and reduce surface temperatures. Higher insolation produces stronger substellar convection and therefore higher albedo, making this phenomenon a stabilizing climate feedback. Substellar clouds also effectively block outgoing radiation from the surface, reducing or even completely reversing the thermal emission contrast between dayside and nightside. The presence of substellar water clouds and the resulting clement surface conditions will therefore be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  20. Feedback stabilization of vortex flows in a finite-length straight pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Gong, R.; Rusak, Z.; Xu, L.; Taylor, S.; Jeng, L.

    2012-11-01

    The properties of a recently proposed feedback stabilization method of swirling flows in a finite-length pipe are studied. In the natural case, when swirl is above a critical level, linearly unstable modes appear in sequence as swirl increases and evolve to a vortex breakdown state. Based on a long-wave approach, the feedback control methodology is shown to enforce decay of perturbation's kinetic energy and to quench all instability modes at above critical swirl. In the case of a solid-body rotation, the effectiveness of this control approach is further analyzed through a mode analysis of the full linearized flow control problem. We first establish the asymptotic decay of all modes with real growth rates. We then compute growth rates of all modes according to the linearized flow control problem for swirl up to 50% above critical level. Flow stabilization in the whole swirl range is demonstrated. However, control effectiveness is sensitive to choice of the control gain. An inadequate gain, either insufficient or excessive, could lead to a failure of control at high swirl levels. Predictions of controlled flow cases agree with numerical simulations using the full unsteady and axisymmetric Euler equations with fluidic actuation along the pipe wall. Rusak et al. JFM 2012.

  1. 78 FR 13057 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism... to review and approve a previously approved information collection requirement regarding IT Dashboard... identified by Information Collection 3090- 0285, IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism, by any of the...

  2. Active sensing via movement shapes spatiotemporal patterns of sensory feedback.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Sarah A; Roth, Eatai; Cowan, Noah J; Fortune, Eric S

    2012-05-01

    Previous work has shown that animals alter their locomotor behavior to increase sensing volumes. However, an animal's own movement also determines the spatial and temporal dynamics of sensory feedback. Because each sensory modality has unique spatiotemporal properties, movement has differential and potentially independent effects on each sensory system. Here we show that weakly electric fish dramatically adjust their locomotor behavior in relation to changes of modality-specific information in a task in which increasing sensory volume is irrelevant. We varied sensory information during a refuge-tracking task by changing illumination (vision) and conductivity (electroreception). The gain between refuge movement stimuli and fish tracking responses was functionally identical across all sensory conditions. However, there was a significant increase in the tracking error in the dark (no visual cues). This was a result of spontaneous whole-body oscillations (0.1 to 1 Hz) produced by the fish. These movements were costly: in the dark, fish swam over three times further when tracking and produced more net positive mechanical work. The magnitudes of these oscillations increased as electrosensory salience was degraded via increases in conductivity. In addition, tail bending (1.5 to 2.35 Hz), which has been reported to enhance electrosensory perception, occurred only during trials in the dark. These data show that both categories of movements - whole-body oscillations and tail bends - actively shape the spatiotemporal dynamics of electrosensory feedback. PMID:22496294

  3. MOMENTUM DRIVING: WHICH PHYSICAL PROCESSES DOMINATE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK?

    SciTech Connect

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Choi, Ena; Novak, Gregory S.; Ciotti, Luca; Proga, Daniel

    2010-10-10

    The deposition of mechanical feedback from a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in an active galactic nucleus into the surrounding galaxy occurs via broad-line winds which must carry mass and radial momentum as well as energy. The effect can be summarized by the dimensionless parameter {eta}= M-dot{sub outf}/ M-dot{sub acc}=2{epsilon}{sub w}c{sup 2}/v{sub w}{sup 2} where {epsilon}{sub w} ({identical_to} E-dot{sub w}/(M-dot{sub acc}c{sup 2})) is the efficiency with which accreted matter is turned into wind energy in the disk surrounding the central SMBH. The outflowing mass and momentum are proportional to {eta}, and many prior treatments have essentially assumed that {eta} = 0. We perform one- and two-dimensional simulations and find that the growth of the central SMBH is very sensitive to the inclusion of the mass and momentum driving but is insensitive to the assumed mechanical efficiency. For example in representative calculations, the omission of momentum and mass feedback leads to a hundred-fold increase in the mass of the SMBH to over 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}. When allowance is made for momentum driving, the final SMBH mass is much lower and the wind efficiencies that lead to the most observationally acceptable results are relatively low with {epsilon}{sub w} {approx}< 10{sup -4}.

  4. Feedback stabilization of an oscillating vertical cylinder by POD Reduced-Order Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, Gilles; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective is to demonstrate the use of reduced-order models (ROM) based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to stabilize the flow over a vertically oscillating circular cylinder in the laminar regime (Reynolds number equal to 60). The 2D Navier-Stokes equations are first solved with a finite element method, in which the moving cylinder is introduced via an ALE method. Since in fluid-structure interaction, the POD algorithm cannot be applied directly, we implemented the fictitious domain method of Glowinski et al. [1] where the solid domain is treated as a fluid undergoing an additional constraint. The POD-ROM is classically obtained by projecting the Navier-Stokes equations onto the first POD modes. At this level, the cylinder displacement is enforced in the POD-ROM through the introduction of Lagrange multipliers. For determining the optimal vertical velocity of the cylinder, a linear quadratic regulator framework is employed. After linearization of the POD-ROM around the steady flow state, the optimal linear feedback gain is obtained as solution of a generalized algebraic Riccati equation. Finally, when the optimal feedback control is applied, it is shown that the flow converges rapidly to the steady state. In addition, a vanishing control is obtained proving the efficiency of the control approach.

  5. Active electrostatic control of liquid bridge dynamics and stability.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, David B; Wei, Wei; Marston, Philip L

    2004-11-01

    Stabilization of cylindrical liquid bridges beyond the Rayleigh-Plateau limit has been demonstrated in both Plateau-tank experiments and in short-duration low gravity on NASA KC-135 aircraft using an active electrostatic control method. The method controls the (2,0) capillary mode using an optical modal-amplitude detector and mode-coupled electrostatic feedback stress. The application of mode-coupled stresses to a liquid bridge is also a very useful way to study mode dynamics. A pure (2,0)-mode oscillation can be excited by periodic forcing and then the forcing can be turned off to allow for a free decay from which the frequency and damping of the mode is measured. This can be done in the presence or absence of feedback control. Mode-coupled feedback stress applied in proportion to modal amplitude with appropriate gain leads to stiffening of the mode allowing for stabilization beyond the Rayleigh-Plateau limit. If the opposite sign of gain is applied the mode frequency is reduced. It has also been demonstrated that, by applying feedback in proportion to the modal velocity, the damping of the mode can be increased or decreased depending on the velocity gain. Thus, both the mode frequency and damping can be independently controlled at the same time and this has been demonstrated in Plateau-tank experiments. The International Space Station (ISS) has its own modes of oscillation, some of which are in a low frequency range comparable to the (2,0)-mode frequency of typical liquid bridges. In the event that a vibration mode of the ISS were close to the frequency of a capillary mode it would be possible, with active electrostatic control, to shift the capillary-mode frequency away from that of the disturbance and simultaneously add artificial damping to further reduce the effect of the g-jitter. In principle, this method could be applied to any fluid configuration with a free surface. PMID:15644377

  6. Fast Orbit Feedback and Beam Stability at the Swiss Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schlott, V.; Boege, M.; Keil, B.; Pollet, P.; Schilcher, T.

    2004-11-10

    A global, fast orbit feedback (FOFB) based on the digital beam position monitor (DBPM) system has been in user operation at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) since November 2003. The SVD-based correction scheme acts at a sampling rate of 4 kHz using position information from all 72 DBPM stations and applying corrections with all 72 horizontal and 72 vertical corrector magnets. As a result, the FOFB successfully damps orbit distortions, which are mainly caused by ground and girder vibrations as well as the 3-Hz booster crosstalk. It also allows fast and independent ID gap changes, which are completely transparent to all SLS users. With top-up as a regular operation mode at SLS, global beam stability on a {mu}m-level has been achieved from days to milliseconds.

  7. Exponential and polynomial stability of an elastic Bresse system with two locally distributed feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehbe, Ali; Youssef, Wael

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we study the energy decay rate for the elastic Bresse system in one-dimensional bounded domain. The physical system consists of three wave equations. The two wave equations about the rotation angle and the longitudinal displacement are damped by two locally distributed feedbacks at the neighborhood of the boundary. Then indirect damping is applied to the equation for the transverse displacement of the beam through the coupling terms. We will establish the exponential stability for this system in the case of the same speed of propagation in the equation for the vertical displacement and the equation for the rotation angle of the system. When the wave speeds are different, nonexponential decay rate is proved and a polynomial-type decay rate is obtained. The frequency domain method and the multiplier technique are applied.

  8. Exponential and polynomial stability of an elastic Bresse system with two locally distributed feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Wehbe, Ali; Youssef, Wael

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, we study the energy decay rate for the elastic Bresse system in one-dimensional bounded domain. The physical system consists of three wave equations. The two wave equations about the rotation angle and the longitudinal displacement are damped by two locally distributed feedbacks at the neighborhood of the boundary. Then indirect damping is applied to the equation for the transverse displacement of the beam through the coupling terms. We will establish the exponential stability for this system in the case of the same speed of propagation in the equation for the vertical displacement and the equation for the rotation angle of the system. When the wave speeds are different, nonexponential decay rate is proved and a polynomial-type decay rate is obtained. The frequency domain method and the multiplier technique are applied.

  9. Multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control using adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators.

    PubMed

    Vipperman, J S; Clark, R L

    1999-01-01

    An experimental implementation of a multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control system is demonstrated on a piezostructure plate with pinned boundary conditions. Four adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators provide an array of truly colocated actuator/sensor pairs to be used as control transducers. Radiation filters are developed based on the self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies of the structure and are included into the performance cost of an H2 control law which minimizes total radiated sound power. In the cost function, control effort is balanced with reductions in radiated sound power. A similarity transform which produces generalized velocity states that are required as inputs to the radiation filters is presented. Up to 15 dB of attenuation in radiated sound power was observed at the resonant frequencies of the piezostructure. PMID:9921654

  10. Power-Stabilization of High Frequency Gyrotrons Using a Double PID Feedback Control for Applications to High Power THz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, Toshitaka; Kuleshov, Alexei; Ueda, Keisuke; Khutoryan, Eduard

    2013-11-01

    High stabilization of the output power of high frequency gyrotrons for high power THz spectroscopy is an important issue in order to extend the applications of gyrotrons to wider subjects. For this objective, we tried a PID feedback control on a heater current of a triode magnetron injection gun (MIG) for stabilization of an electron beam current and an additional PID control of an anode voltage of the gun for direct stabilization of output power. This double PID control achieved effective responses for the stabilization of output power in both slow (from several tens seconds to several minutes) and fast (from milliseconds to seconds) time scales.

  11. Circadian neuron feedback controls the Drosophila sleep--activity profile.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Yu, Junwei; Jung, Hyung Jae; Abruzzi, Katharine C; Luo, Weifei; Griffith, Leslie C; Rosbash, Michael

    2016-08-18

    Little is known about the ability of Drosophila circadian neurons to promote sleep. Here we show, using optogenetic manipulation and video recording, that a subset of dorsal clock neurons (DN1s) are potent sleep-promoting cells that release glutamate to directly inhibit key pacemaker neurons. The pacemakers promote morning arousal by activating these DN1s, implying that a late-day feedback circuit drives midday siesta and night-time sleep. To investigate more plastic aspects of the sleep program, we used a calcium assay to monitor and compare the real-time activity of DN1 neurons in freely behaving males and females. Our results revealed that DN1 neurons were more active in males than in females, consistent with the finding that male flies sleep more during the day. DN1 activity is also enhanced by elevated temperature, consistent with the ability of higher temperatures to increase sleep. These new approaches indicate that DN1s have a major effect on the fly sleep-wake profile and integrate environmental information with the circadian molecular program. PMID:27479324

  12. Passive and Active Stabilization of Liquid Bridges in Low Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, David B.; Wei, Wei; Marston, Philip L.

    2002-11-01

    frequency band of the spacecraft and the response further reduced by control of the damping of the mode. The principle behind the AES method is to sense the (2,0)-mode amplitude and then apply a mode-coupled feedback stress to control the mode dynamics. Two concentric ring electrodes are used to produce a Maxwell-stress distribution that couples into the (2,0) mode of the bridge. By applying a feedback stress in proportion to the (2,0)-mode amplitude with appropriate gain, the mode frequency can be raised and bridges can be stabilized beyond S=pi. Models show that the stability is affected by the bandwidth of the controller and the (2,0)-mode damping. If the feedback stress is applied in proportion to the velocity of the mode amplitude with appropriate sign, the damping of the mode can be increased. Active control of damping has recently been demonstrated in Plateau-tank experiments. The dynamic response of a bridge to feedback control is predicted to be significantly different for bridges in air compared to those in a Plateau tank because of the different nature of the viscous damping for the two cases. Boundary-layer damping at the free interface is much more important for the case of a Plateau-tank bridge. A new fluid system is being used in the Plateau-tank facility to allow for studies of bridge dynamics and active control of damping with the AES system. The bath fluid is a high-density (1.61 g/cc), low viscosity (0.77 cS), low dielectric constant, fluorinated liquid with low water solubility. The bridge liquid is an aqueous solution of CsCl, density matched to the bath (approx. 52.3 wt% CsCl). The Ohnesorge number (ratio of viscous to inertial effects) for bridges with the new fluid system is around 0.003 which is close to that of a pure water bridge in air of the same diameter. The new system is still not dynamically similar to a bridge in air because the dynamics also depend on the density and viscosity ratios between the inner and outer fluids. Dynamics studies

  13. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-12-10

    We develop and study protocols for deterministic remote entanglement generation using quantum feedback, without relying on an entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can bemore » modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Lastly, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.« less

  14. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-12-10

    We develop and study protocols for deterministic remote entanglement generation using quantum feedback, without relying on an entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can be modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Lastly, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.

  15. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-12-01

    We consider the task of deterministically entangling two remote qubits using joint measurement and feedback, but no directly entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can be modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Finally, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.

  16. Developing an active artificial hair cell using nonlinear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2015-09-01

    The hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals. These cells have inspired a variety of artificial hair cells (AHCs) to serve as biologically inspired sound, fluid flow, and acceleration sensors and could one day replace damaged hair cells in humans. Most of these AHCs rely on passive transduction of stimulus while it is known that the biological cochlea employs active processes to amplify sound-induced vibrations and improve sound detection. In this work, an active AHC mimics the active, nonlinear behavior of the cochlea. The AHC consists of a piezoelectric bimorph beam subjected to a base excitation. A feedback control law is used to reduce the linear damping of the beam and introduce a cubic damping term which gives the AHC the desired nonlinear behavior. Model and experimental results show the AHC amplifies the response due to small base accelerations, has a higher frequency sensitivity than the passive system, and exhibits a compressive nonlinearity like that of the mammalian cochlea. This bio-inspired accelerometer could lead to new sensors with lower thresholds of detection, improved frequency sensitivities, and wider dynamic ranges.

  17. Robust stability analysis and design under consideration of multiple feedback loops of the tryptophan regulatory network of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Baese, A; Theis, F; Emmett, M R

    2010-01-01

    The tryptophan system present in Escherichia coli represents an important regulatory unit described by multiple feedback loops. The role of these feedback loops is crucial for the analysis of the dynamical behavior of the tryptophan synthesis. We analyze the robust stability of this system which models the dynamics of both fast state, such as transcription and synthesis of free operator, and slow state, such as translation and tryptophan synthesis under consideration of nonlinear uncertainties. In addition, we analyze the role of these feedback loops as key design components of this regulatory unit responsible for its physiological performance. The range of allowed parameter perturbations and the conditions that ensure the existence of asymptotically stable equilibria of the perturbed system are determined. We also analyze two important alternate regulatory designs for the tryptophan synthesis pathway and derive the stability conditions. PMID:20865501

  18. Intermittent Feedback-Control Strategy for Stabilizing Inverted Pendulum on Manually Controlled Cart as Analogy to Human Stick Balancing.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Ken; Nomura, Taishin

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of an inverted pendulum on a manually controlled cart (cart-inverted-pendulum; CIP) in an upright position, which is analogous to balancing a stick on a fingertip, is considered in order to investigate how the human central nervous system (CNS) stabilizes unstable dynamics due to mechanical instability and time delays in neural feedback control. We explore the possibility that a type of intermittent time-delayed feedback control, which has been proposed for human postural control during quiet standing, is also a promising strategy for the CIP task and stick balancing on a fingertip. Such a strategy hypothesizes that the CNS exploits transient contracting dynamics along a stable manifold of a saddle-type unstable upright equilibrium of the inverted pendulum in the absence of control by inactivating neural feedback control intermittently for compensating delay-induced instability. To this end, the motions of a CIP stabilized by human subjects were experimentally acquired, and computational models of the system were employed to characterize the experimental behaviors. We first confirmed fat-tailed non-Gaussian temporal fluctuation in the acceleration distribution of the pendulum, as well as the power-law distributions of corrective cart movements for skilled subjects, which was previously reported for stick balancing. We then showed that the experimental behaviors could be better described by the models with an intermittent delayed feedback controller than by those with the conventional continuous delayed feedback controller, suggesting that the human CNS stabilizes the upright posture of the pendulum by utilizing the intermittent delayed feedback-control strategy. PMID:27148031

  19. Intermittent Feedback-Control Strategy for Stabilizing Inverted Pendulum on Manually Controlled Cart as Analogy to Human Stick Balancing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Ken; Nomura, Taishin

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of an inverted pendulum on a manually controlled cart (cart-inverted-pendulum; CIP) in an upright position, which is analogous to balancing a stick on a fingertip, is considered in order to investigate how the human central nervous system (CNS) stabilizes unstable dynamics due to mechanical instability and time delays in neural feedback control. We explore the possibility that a type of intermittent time-delayed feedback control, which has been proposed for human postural control during quiet standing, is also a promising strategy for the CIP task and stick balancing on a fingertip. Such a strategy hypothesizes that the CNS exploits transient contracting dynamics along a stable manifold of a saddle-type unstable upright equilibrium of the inverted pendulum in the absence of control by inactivating neural feedback control intermittently for compensating delay-induced instability. To this end, the motions of a CIP stabilized by human subjects were experimentally acquired, and computational models of the system were employed to characterize the experimental behaviors. We first confirmed fat-tailed non-Gaussian temporal fluctuation in the acceleration distribution of the pendulum, as well as the power-law distributions of corrective cart movements for skilled subjects, which was previously reported for stick balancing. We then showed that the experimental behaviors could be better described by the models with an intermittent delayed feedback controller than by those with the conventional continuous delayed feedback controller, suggesting that the human CNS stabilizes the upright posture of the pendulum by utilizing the intermittent delayed feedback-control strategy. PMID:27148031

  20. Stability of Monte Carlo k-eigenvalue simulations with CMFD feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keady, Kendra P.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we perform a Fourier stability analysis of MC-CMFD, a hybrid Monte Carlo k-eigenvalue method that utilizes coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) feedback. The MC-CMFD method is nonlinear and contains random statistical errors; both of these features are inconsistent with the direct application of a Fourier stability analysis. To accomplish this analysis, we first formulate a non-random iteration method that approximates MC-CMFD, by assuming an infinite number of Monte Carlo particles per cycle. Then we (i) linearize this method, and (ii) Fourier-analyze the linearized method to theoretically predict its convergence properties. Finally, we demonstrate by direct numerical simulations that the Fourier analysis of the linearized non-random method accurately predicts the stability and fission source convergence rate (during the inactive cycles) of the original nonlinear MC-CMFD method. We do this by comparing the predictions of the Fourier analysis to simulations that utilize (i) a high-fidelity SN-CMFD code (which has no random statistical errors), and (ii) a MC-CMFD code (which has random statistical errors). The Fourier analysis and our two test codes confirm that the MC-CMFD method is stable if the optical thickness of the coarse grid (in the low-order CMFD calculation) is sufficiently small. However, the spectral radius increases monotonically with the coarse grid size, and if the latter exceeds a critical value, the MC-CMFD method becomes unstable. We discuss some implications of our results for practical MC-CMFD simulations.

  1. An active feedback flow control theory of the vortex breakdown process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, Joshua

    An active feedback flow control theory of the vortex breakdown process in incompressible, axisymmetric swirling flows in a finite-length, straight, circular pipe is developed. Flow injection distributed along the pipe wall is used as the controller. The flow is subjected to non-periodic inlet and outlet conditions. A long-wave asymptotic analysis, which involves a re-scaling of the axial distance and time at near critical swirl ratios, results in a nonlinear model problem for the dynamics and control of both inviscid and high-Reynolds number, Re, flows. The approach provides the bifurcation diagram of steady states and the stability characteristics of these states. Computed examples of the flow dynamics based on the full Euler and Navier-Stokes formulations at various swirl levels demonstrate the evolution to near-steady breakdown states when swirl is above a critical level which depends on Re. Numerical stability and mesh convergence studies performed on the inviscid and high-Re flow simulations ensure the accuracy of the computations and the agreement with the theoretical approaches. In addition, an energy analysis of the nonlinear model problem sheds insight into the mechanisms of the flow dynamics which lead to vortex breakdown and suggests a feedback control law which relates the flow injection and the evolving maximum radial velocity at the inlet. Moreover, applying the proposed feedback control law during flow evolution, shows for the first time the successful and robust elimination of the breakdown states and flow stabilization on an almost columnar state for a wide range of swirl up to 53 percent above the first critical level for the inviscid flow case and for a range of swirl up to 15 percent above the first critical level for viscous flows. The control law can be improved for a lower momentary maximum flux injection through the use of discrete injection regions along the pipe. The feedback control cuts the natural feed-forward mechanism of the breakdown

  2. Comparison of Active Noise Control Structures in the Presence of Acoustical Feedback by Using THEH∞SYNTHESIS Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, M. R.; Lin, H. H.

    1997-10-01

    This study compares three control structures of active noise cancellation for ducts: feedback control, feedforward control, and hybrid control. These structures are compared in terms of performance, stability, and robustness by using a general framework of theH∞robust control theory. In addition, theH∞synthesis procedure automatically incorporates the acoustic feedback path that is usually a plaguing problem to feedforward control design. The controllers are implemented by using a digital signal processor and tested on a finite-length duct. In an experimental verification, the proposed controllers are also compared with the well-known filtered-uleast mean square (FULMS) controller. The advantages and disadvantages of each ANC structure as well as the adverse effects due to acoustic feedback are addressed.

  3. Enhancing Peer Feedback and Speech Preparation: The Speech Video Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opt, Susan

    2012-01-01

    In the typical public speaking course, instructors or assistants videotape or digitally record at least one of the term's speeches in class or lab to offer students additional presentation feedback. Students often watch and self-critique their speeches on their own. Peers often give only written feedback on classroom presentations or completed…

  4. Active capture and stabilization of temporal solitons in microresonators.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xu; Yang, Qi-Fan; Youl Yang, Ki; Vahala, Kerry

    2016-05-01

    Soliton mode locking and femtosecond pulse generation have recently been demonstrated in high-Q optical microcavities and provide a new way to miniaturize frequency comb systems, as well as create integrated comb systems on a chip. However, triggering the mode-locking process is complicated by a well-known thermal hysteresis that can destabilize the solitons. Moreover, on a longer time scale, thermal drifting of the cavity resonant frequency relative to the pumping frequency causes loss of mode locking. In this Letter, an active feedback method is used both to capture specific soliton states and to stabilize the states indefinitely. The capture and stabilization method provides a reliable way to overcome thermal effects during soliton formation and to excite a desired number of circulating cavity solitons. It is also used to demonstrate a low pumping power of 22 mW for generation of microwave-repetition-rate solitons on a chip. PMID:27128068

  5. Hydroxyapatite microparticles as feedback-active reservoirs of corrosion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Snihirova, D; Lamaka, S V; Taryba, M; Salak, A N; Kallip, S; Zheludkevich, M L; Ferreira, M G S; Montemor, M F

    2010-11-01

    This work contributes to the development of new feedback-active anticorrosion systems. Inhibitor-doped hydroxyapatite microparticles (HAP) are used as reservoirs, storing corrosion inhibitor to be released on demand. Release of the entrapped inhibitor is triggered by redox reactions associated with the corrosion process. HAP were used as reservoirs for several inhibiting species: cerium(III), lanthanum(III), salicylaldoxime, and 8-hydroxyquinoline. These species are effective corrosion inhibitors for a 2024 aluminum alloy (AA2024), used here as a model metallic substrate. Dissolution of the microparticles and release of the inhibitor are triggered by local acidification resulting from the anodic half-reaction during corrosion of AA2024. Calculated values and experimentally measured local acidification over the aluminum anode (down to pH = 3.65) are presented. The anticorrosion properties of inhibitor-doped HAP were assessed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The microparticles impregnated with the corrosion inhibitors were introduced into a hybrid silica-zirconia sol-gel film, acting as a thin protective coating for AA2024, an alloy used for aeronautical applications. The protective properties of the sol-gel films were improved by the addition of HAP, proving their applicability as submicrometer-sized reservoirs of corrosion inhibitors for active anticorrosion coatings. PMID:20942404

  6. Optimal Recursive Digital Filters for Active Bending Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2013-01-01

    In the design of flight control systems for large flexible boosters, it is common practice to utilize active feedback control of the first lateral structural bending mode so as to suppress transients and reduce gust loading. Typically, active stabilization or phase stabilization is achieved by carefully shaping the loop transfer function in the frequency domain via the use of compensating filters combined with the frequency response characteristics of the nozzle/actuator system. In this paper we present a new approach for parameterizing and determining optimal low-order recursive linear digital filters so as to satisfy phase shaping constraints for bending and sloshing dynamics while simultaneously maximizing attenuation in other frequency bands of interest, e.g. near higher frequency parasitic structural modes. By parameterizing the filter directly in the z-plane with certain restrictions, the search space of candidate filter designs that satisfy the constraints is restricted to stable, minimum phase recursive low-pass filters with well-conditioned coefficients. Combined with optimal output feedback blending from multiple rate gyros, the present approach enables rapid and robust parametrization of autopilot bending filters to attain flight control performance objectives. Numerical results are presented that illustrate the application of the present technique to the development of rate gyro filters for an exploration-class multi-engined space launch vehicle.

  7. INSM1 increases N-myc stability and oncogenesis via a positive-feedback loop in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Insulinoma associated-1 (IA-1/INSM1) gene is exclusively expressed during early embryonic development, but has been found to be re-expressed at high levels in neuroendocrine tumors including neuroblastoma. Using over-expression and knockdown experiments in neuroblastoma cells, we showed that INSM1 is critical for cell proliferation, BME-coated invasion, and soft agar colony formation. Here, we identified INSM1 as a novel target gene activated by N-myc in N-myc amplified neuroblastoma cells. The Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway induced INSM1 by increasing N-myc expression. INSM1 activated PI3K/AKT/GSK3β pathways to suppress N-myc phosphorylation (Thr-58) and inhibited degradation of N-myc. Inversely, N-myc protein bound to the E2-box region of the INSM1 promoter and activated INSM1 expression. The invasion assay and the xenograft nude mouse tumor model revealed that the INSM1 factor facilitated growth and oncogenesis of neuroblastoma. The current data supports our hypothesis that a positive-feedback loop of sonic hedgehog signaling induced INSM1 through N-myc and INSM1 enhanced N-myc stability contributing to the transformation of human neuroblastoma. PMID:26456864

  8. INSM1 increases N-myc stability and oncogenesis via a positive-feedback loop in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B.; Lan, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Insulinoma associated-1 (IA-1/INSM1) gene is exclusively expressed during early embryonic development, but has been found to be re-expressed at high levels in neuroendocrine tumors including neuroblastoma. Using over-expression and knockdown experiments in neuroblastoma cells, we showed that INSM1 is critical for cell proliferation, BME-coated invasion, and soft agar colony formation. Here, we identified INSM1 as a novel target gene activated by N-myc in N-myc amplified neuroblastoma cells. The Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway induced INSM1 by increasing N-myc expression. INSM1 activated PI3K/AKT/GSK3β pathways to suppress N-myc phosphorylation (Thr-58) and inhibited degradation of N-myc. Inversely, N-myc protein bound to the E2-box region of the INSM1 promoter and activated INSM1 expression. The invasion assay and the xenograft nude mouse tumor model revealed that the INSM1 factor facilitated growth and oncogenesis of neuroblastoma. The current data supports our hypothesis that a positive-feedback loop of sonic hedgehog signaling induced INSM1 through N-myc and INSM1 enhanced N-myc stability contributing to the transformation of human neuroblastoma. PMID:26456864

  9. Brain Activation of Negative Feedback in Rule Acquisition Revealed in a Segmented Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Cao, Bihua; Cai, Xueli; Gao, Heming; Li, Fuhong

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the brain activation associated with the informative value of negative feedback in rule acquisition. In each trial of a segmented Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, participants were provided with three reference cards and one target card, and were asked to match one of three reference cards to the target card based on a classification rule. Participants received feedback after each match. Participants would acquire the rule after one negative feedback (1-NF condition) or two successive negative feedbacks (2-NF condition). The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results indicated that lateral prefrontal-to-parietal cortices were more active in the 2-NF condition than in the 1-NF condition. The activation in the right lateral prefrontal cortex and left posterior parietal cortex increased gradually with the amount of negative feedback. These results demonstrate that the informative value of negative feedback in rule acquisition might be modulated by the lateral prefronto-parietal loop. PMID:26469519

  10. Active galactic nucleus feedback in an isolated elliptical galaxy: The effect of strong radiative feedback in the kinetic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Zhaoming; Yuan, Feng; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ciotti, Luca; Novak, Gregory S.

    2014-07-10

    Based on two-dimensional high-resolution hydrodynamic numerical simulation, we study the mechanical and radiative feedback effects from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) on the cosmological evolution of an isolated elliptical galaxy. The inner boundary of the simulation domain is carefully chosen so that the fiducial Bondi radius is resolved and the accretion rate of the black hole is determined self-consistently. It is well known that when the accretion rates are high and low, the central AGNs will be in cold and hot accretion modes, which correspond to the radiative and kinetic feedback modes, respectively. The emitted spectrum from the hot accretion flows is harder than that from the cold accretion flows, which could result in a higher Compton temperature accompanied by a more efficient radiative heating, according to previous theoretical works. Such a difference of the Compton temperature between the two feedback modes, the focus of this study, has been neglected in previous works. Significant differences in the kinetic feedback mode are found as a result of the stronger Compton heating. More importantly, if we constrain models to correctly predict black hole growth and AGN duty cycle after cosmological evolution, we find that the favored model parameters are constrained: mechanical feedback efficiency diminishes with decreasing luminosity (the maximum efficiency being ≅ 10{sup –3.5}), and X-ray Compton temperature increases with decreasing luminosity, although models with fixed mechanical efficiency and Compton temperature can be found that are satisfactory as well. We conclude that radiative feedback in the kinetic mode is much more important than previously thought.

  11. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept with a small tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Parasite drag reduction evaluation is composed of wind tunnel tests with a standard L-1011 tail and two reduced area tail configurations. Trim drag reduction is evaluated by rebalancing the airplane for relaxed static stability. This is accomplished by pumping water to tanks in the forward and aft of the airplane to acheive desired center of gravity location. Also, the L-1011 is modified to incorporate term and advanced augmented systems. By using advanced wings and aircraft relaxed static stability significant fuel savings can be realized. An airplane's dynamic stability becomes more sensitive for decreased tail size, relaxed static stability, and advanced wing configurations. Active control pitch augmentation will be used to acheive the required handling qualities. Flight tests will be performed to evaluate the pitch augmentation systems. The effect of elevator downrig on stabilizer/elevator hinge moments will be measured. For control system analysis, the normal acceleration feedback and pitch rate feedback are analyzed.

  12. Effect of stabilization on biomass activity.

    PubMed

    Cokgor, Emine Ubay; Okutman Tas, Didem; Zengin, Gulsum Emel; Insel, Guclu

    2012-02-20

    The study aimed to compare aerobic and aerobic/anoxic stabilization processes in terms of organic matter and the biomass removal efficiencies using a municipal sludge sample. The efficiency of stabilization process was assessed monitoring suspended solids (SS), volatile suspended solids (VSS), total and dissolved organic carbon (TOC, DOC), nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate parameters. The oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurements were conducted to determine active biomass concentration. On the 30th day of the aerobic stabilization, the SS, VSS and TOC removal efficiencies were 22%, 28% and 55%, respectively. Under aerobic/anoxic conditions, removal efficiencies for SS, VSS and TOC were 25%, 27% and 67%. On the 17th day of the stabilization, SS and VSS removal rates were 60 mg SS/L day and 47 mg VSS/L day for aerobic and 102 mg SS/L day and 63 mg VSS/L day for aerobic/anoxic conditions, respectively. These findings reflected the higher stabilization performance of the aerobic/anoxic conditions. Based on respirometric results, the ratios of the active biomass were decreased to 30% and 24% for the 17th and 30th day of the aerobic stabilization, respectively. Such results have significant implications relative to the activity decrease quantification of the biomass as well as its further application potentials after aerobic or aerobic/anoxic sludge stabilization. PMID:21791229

  13. Cadence Feedback With ECE PEDO to Monitor Physical Activity Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Ardic, Fusun; Göcer, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the monitoring capabilities of the equipment for clever exercise pedometer (ECE PEDO) that provides audible feedback when the person exceeds the upper and lower limits of the target step numbers per minute and to compare step counts with Yamax SW-200 (YX200) as the criterion pedometer. A total of 30 adult volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were classified as normal weight (n = 10), overweight (n = 10), and obese (n = 10). After the submaximal exercise test on a treadmill, the moderate intensity for walking was determined by using YX200 pedometer and then the number of steps taken in a minute was measured. Lower and upper limits of steps per minute (cadence) were recorded in ECE PEDO providing audible feedback when the person's walking speed gets out of the limits. Volunteers walked for 30 minutes in the individual step count range by attaching the ECE PEDO and YX200 pedometer on both sides of the waist belt in the same session. Step counts of the volunteers were recorded. Wilcoxon, Spearman correlation, and Bland–Altman analyses were performed to show the relationship and agreement between the results of 2 devices. Subjects took an average of 3511 ± 426 and 3493 ± 399 steps during 30 minutes with ECE PEDO and criterion pedometer, respectively. About 3500 steps taken by ECE PEDO reflected that this pedometer has capability of identifying steps per minute to meet moderate intensity of physical activity. There was a strong correlation between step counts of both devices (P < 0.001, r = 0.96). Correlations across all three BMI categories and both sex remained consistently high ranging from 0.92 to 0.95. There was a high level of agreement between the ECE PEDO and YX200 pedometer in the Bland–Altman analysis. Although both devices showed a strong similarity in counting steps, the ECE PEDO provides monitoring of intensity such that a person can walk in a specified time with a

  14. Polarization and wavelength insensitive optical feedback control systems for stabilizing CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebali, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Power scaling of multi-kilowatt fiber lasers has been driving the development of glass and fiber processing technology. Designed for processing of large diameter fibers, this technology is used for the fabrication of fiber-based components such as end-pump and side pump combiners, large diameter endcaps, ball lenses for collimators and focusers… The use of 10.6um CO2 lasers as a heating element provides incomparable flexibility, process control and repeatability when compared to conventional heating methods. This low maintenance technology provides an accurate, adjustable and uniform heating area by absorption of fused silica of the 10.6m laser radiation. However, commercially available CO2 lasers can experience power, polarization and mode instability, which becomes important at 20W levels and higher of output power. This paper presents a polarization and wavelength insensitive optical feedback control system for stabilizing commercially available CO2 lasers. Less than 1% power fluctuation was achieved at different laser power levels, ranging from as 5 to 40W.

  15. Kuiper Airborne Observatory's Telescope Stabilization System: Disturbance Sensitivity Reduction Via Velocity Loop Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, David P.; Tsui, K. C.; Tucker, John; Mancini, Ronald E. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In July of 1994 the Kuiper Airborne Observatory's (KAO) Telescope Stabilization System (TSS) was upgraded to meet performance goals necessary to view the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet collision with Jupiter. The KAO is a modified C-141 Aircraft supporting a 36 inch Infrared telescope used to gather and analyze astronomical data. Before the upgrade, the TSS exhibited approximately a 10 arc-second resolution pointing accuracy. The majority of the inaccuracy was attributable to aircraft vibration and wind buffeting entering through the aircraft's telescope door opening; in other words, the TSS was overly sensitive to external disturbances. Because of power limitations and noise requirements, improving the pointing accuracy of the telescope required more sophistication than simply raising the bandwidth as some classical control strategies might suggest. Instead, relationships were developed between the disturbance sensitivity and closed loop transfer functions. These relationships suggested that employing velocity feedback along with an increase in current loop gain would dramatically improve the pointing resolution of the TSS by decreasing the control system's sensitivity to external disturbances. With the implementation of some classical control techniques and the above philosophy, the KAO's TSS's resolution was improved to approximately 2-3 arc-seconds.

  16. Long-term development of elongated tokamak plasmas after failure of feedback stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T. H.; Chu, M. S.

    1989-07-01

    Tokamaks with cross sections elongated in the axial direction are subject toan instability that basically involves an axial displacement of the plasma. Thisinstability can be stabilized by a feedback circuit. This Brief Communicationdeals with the long-term development of the plasma after a failure of thefeedback circuit during an otherwise normal discharge. The short-term (linear)development of such a plasma was considered earlier by Yokomizo /ital et/l. (Nucl. Fusion /bold 23/, 1593 (/bold 1983/)). During thelong-term development, the plasma makes intimate contact with the surroundingconducting shell (vacuum vessel). The timescale for this development is longcompared to the Alfven time, so that it is appropriate to consider the plasmain a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equlibrium which evolves slowly. This equilibrium(assumed axisymmetric) is unusual in that currents and forces are exchangedbetween the shell and the plasma. The dynamics of the equilibrium is determinedby Ohmic dissipation associated with the plasma currents and the toroidal andpoloidal currents of the shell. For a ''typical'' large tokamak, it is foundthat dissipation in the shell may dominate. Modeling of such long-termdevelopment may be important because the forces acting on the shell due to theshell currents may be large. It may be important that dissipation in the plasmacan be neglected or that it is small in such modeling since the uncertainty ofthe results, due to uncertainties associated with the plasma, is absent or maybe small.

  17. Modeling of Feedback Stabilization of External MHD Modes in Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Chance, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.

    2000-10-01

    The intelligent shell feedback scheme(C.M. Bishop, Plasma Phys. Contr. Nucl. Fusion 31), 1179 (1989). seeks to utilize external coils to suppress the unstable MHD modes slowed down by the resistive shell. We present a new formulation and numerical results of the interaction between the plasma and its outside vacuum region, with complete plasma response and the inclusion of a resistive vessel in general toroidal geometry. This is achieved by using the Green's function technique, which is a generalization of that previously used for the VACUUM(M.S. Chance, Phys. Plasmas 4), 2161 (1997). code and coupled with the ideal MHD code GATO. The effectiveness of different realizations of the intelligent shell concept is gauged by their ability to minimize the available free energy to drive the MHD mode. Computations indicate poloidal coverage of 30% of the total resistive wall surface area and 6 or 7 segments of ``intelligent coil'' arrays superimposed on the resistive wall will allow recovery of up to 90% the effectiveness of the ideal shell in stabilizing the ideal external kink.

  18. Even-odd mode excitation for stability investigation of Cartesian feedback amplifier used in parallel transmit array.

    PubMed

    Shooshtary, S; Solbach, K

    2015-08-01

    A 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system with parallel transmission (pTx) for 32 near-magnet Cartesian feedback loop power amplifiers (PA) with output power of 1kW is under construction at Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Variation of load impedance due to mutual coupling of neighborhood coils in the array may lead to instability of the Cartesian feedback loop amplifier. MRI safety requires unconditional stability of the PAs at any load. In order to avoid instability in the pTx system, conditions and limits of stability have to be investigated for every possible excitation mode for the coil array. In this work, an efficient method of stability check for an array of two transmit channels (Tx) with Cartesian feedback loop amplifier and a selective excitation mode for the coil array is proposed which allows extension of stability investigations to a large pTx array with any arbitrary excitation mode for the coil array. PMID:26736573

  19. Effects of social context on feedback-related activity in the human ventral striatum.

    PubMed

    Simon, Doerte; Becker, Michael P I; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Straube, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    It is now well established that activation of the ventral striatum (VS) encodes feedback related information, in particular, aspects of feedback validity, reward magnitude, and reward probability. More recent findings also point toward a role of VS in encoding social context of feedback processing. Here, we investigated the effect of social observation on neural correlates of feedback processing. To this end, subjects performed a time estimation task and received positive, negative, or uninformative feedback. In one half of the experiment subjects thought that an experimenter closely monitored their face via a camera. We successfully replicated an elevated VS response to positive relative to negative feedback. Further, our data demonstrate that this reward-related activation of the VS is increased during observation by others. Using uninformative feedback as reference condition, we show that specifically VS activation during positive feedback was modulated by observation manipulation. Our findings support accounts which posit a role of VS in integrating social context into the processing of feedback and, in doing so, signaling its social relevance. PMID:24904991

  20. Global feedback control of Turing patterns in network-organized activator-inhibitor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, S.; Nakao, H.; Mikhailov, A. S.

    2012-06-01

    Results of the first systematic study on feedback control of nonequilibrium pattern formation in networks are reported. Effects of global feedback control on Turing patterns in network-organized activator-inhibitor system have been investigated. The feedback signal was introduced into one of the parameters of the system and was proportional to the amplitude of the developing Turing pattern. Without the control, the Turing instability corresponded to a subcritical bifurcation and hysteresis effects were observed. Sufficiently strong feedback control rendered, however, the bifurcation supercritical and eliminated the hysteresis effects.

  1. Haptic stabilization of posture: changes in arm proprioception and cutaneous feedback for different arm orientations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, E.; Bortolami, S. B.; DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Postural sway during quiet stance is attenuated by actively maintained contact of the index finger with a stationary surface, even if the level of applied force (<1 N) cannot provide mechanical stabilization. In this situation, changes in force level at the fingertip lead changes in center of foot pressure by approximately 250 ms. These and related findings indicate that stimulation of the fingertip combined with proprioceptive information about the hand and arm can serve as an active sensor of body position relative to the point of contact. A geometric analysis of the relationship between hand and torso displacement during body sway led to the prediction that arm and hand proprioceptive and finger somatosensory information about body sway would be maximized with finger contact in the plane of body sway. Therefore, the most postural stabilization should be possible with such contact. To test this analysis, subjects touched a laterally versus anteriorly placed surface while in each of two stances: the heel-to-toe tandem Romberg stance that reduces medial-lateral stability and the heel-to-heel, toes-outward, knees-bent, "duck stance" that reduces fore-aft stability. Postural sway was always least with finger contact in the unstable plane: for the tandem stance, lateral fingertip contact was significantly more effective than frontal contact, and, for the duck stance, frontal contact was more effective than lateral fingertip contact. Force changes at the fingertip led changes in center of pressure of the feet by approximately 250 ms for both fingertip contact locations for both test stances. These results support the geometric analysis, which showed that 1) arm joint angles change by the largest amount when fingertip contact is maintained in the plane of greatest sway, and 2) the somatosensory cues at the fingertip provide both direction and amplitude information about sway when the finger is contacting a surface in the unstable plane.

  2. Effects of support surface stability on feedback control of trunk posture.

    PubMed

    Andreopoulou, Georgia; Maaswinkel, Erwin; Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the interactions of visual, vestibular, proprioceptive, and tactile sensory manipulations and sitting on either a stable or an unstable surface on mediolateral (ML) trunk sway. Fifteen individuals were measured. In each trial, subjects sat as quiet as possible, on a stable or unstable surface, with or without each of four sensory manipulations: visual (eyes open/closed), vestibular (left and right galvanic vestibular stimulation alternating at 0.25 Hz), proprioceptive (left and right paraspinal muscle vibration alternating at 0.25 Hz), and tactile (minimal finger contact with object moving in the frontal plane at 0.25 Hz). The root mean square (RMS) and the power at 0.25 Hz (P25) of the ML trunk acceleration were the dependent variables. The latter was analyzed only for the rhythmic sensory manipulations and the reference condition. RMS was always significantly larger on the unstable than the stable surface. Closing the eyes caused a significant increase in RMS, more so on the unstable surface. Vestibular stimulation significantly increased RMS and P25 and more so on the unstable surface. Main effects of the proprioceptive manipulation were significant, but the interactions with surface condition were not. Finally, also tactile manipulation increased RMS and P25, but did not interact with surface condition. Sensory information in feedback control of trunk posture appears to be reweighted depending on stability of the environment. The absolute effects of visual and vestibular manipulations increase on an unstable surface, suggesting a relative decrease in the weights of proprioceptive and tactile information. PMID:25537472

  3. Network feedback regulates motor output across a range of modulatory neuron activity.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Robert M; Blitz, Dawn M

    2016-06-01

    Modulatory projection neurons alter network neuron synaptic and intrinsic properties to elicit multiple different outputs. Sensory and other inputs elicit a range of modulatory neuron activity that is further shaped by network feedback, yet little is known regarding how the impact of network feedback on modulatory neurons regulates network output across a physiological range of modulatory neuron activity. Identified network neurons, a fully described connectome, and a well-characterized, identified modulatory projection neuron enabled us to address this issue in the crab (Cancer borealis) stomatogastric nervous system. The modulatory neuron modulatory commissural neuron 1 (MCN1) activates and modulates two networks that generate rhythms via different cellular mechanisms and at distinct frequencies. MCN1 is activated at rates of 5-35 Hz in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, network feedback elicits MCN1 activity time-locked to motor activity. We asked how network activation, rhythm speed, and neuron activity levels are regulated by the presence or absence of network feedback across a physiological range of MCN1 activity rates. There were both similarities and differences in responses of the two networks to MCN1 activity. Many parameters in both networks were sensitive to network feedback effects on MCN1 activity. However, for most parameters, MCN1 activity rate did not determine the extent to which network output was altered by the addition of network feedback. These data demonstrate that the influence of network feedback on modulatory neuron activity is an important determinant of network output and feedback can be effective in shaping network output regardless of the extent of network modulation. PMID:27030739

  4. Design of a feedback-feedforward steering controller for accurate path tracking and stability at the limits of handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapania, Nitin R.; Gerdes, J. Christian

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a feedback-feedforward steering controller that simultaneously maintains vehicle stability at the limits of handling while minimising lateral path tracking deviation. The design begins by considering the performance of a baseline controller with a lookahead feedback scheme and a feedforward algorithm based on a nonlinear vehicle handling diagram. While this initial design exhibits desirable stability properties at the limits of handling, the steady-state path deviation increases significantly at highway speeds. Results from both linear and nonlinear analyses indicate that lateral path tracking deviations are minimised when vehicle sideslip is held tangent to the desired path at all times. Analytical results show that directly incorporating this sideslip tangency condition into the steering feedback dramatically improves lateral path tracking, but at the expense of poor closed-loop stability margins. However, incorporating the desired sideslip behaviour into the feedforward loop creates a robust steering controller capable of accurate path tracking and oversteer correction at the physical limits of tyre friction. Experimental data collected from an Audi TTS test vehicle driving at the handling limits on a full length race circuit demonstrates the improved performance of the final controller design.

  5. Effects of feedback on activation of the quadriceps during weight-bearing tasks of the Wii

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes da Silva, Fabiano; Aparecido de Souza, Renato; Dias, Eric Fernandes; Silveira, Landulfo; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the effect of real-time feedback on electrical activation of the quadriceps during 3 weight-bearing tasks of the Wii Fit Plus®. [Subjects] Thirty male healthy volunteers were recruited. [Methods] Activation of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris muscles was recorded during virtual lunge, single leg extension, and single leg reach exercises. Each exercise was performed twice in 3 randomized experimental conditions (with visual feedback, with auditory feedback, and with no feedback). The normalized electromyographic data (using maximum voluntary isometric contraction) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey’s test. [Results] No significant difference was found in the muscles among the feedback conditions during the 3 exercises. However, the variation in the muscle activity of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis (18.23–29.20% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction) was higher (47–62%) than that in the rectus femoris (7.35–12.98% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction). [Conclusion] Real-time feedback did not alter quadriceps activation during the Wii tasks. Additionally, these games showed electromyographic activation levels similar to those for the same tasks outside the virtual environment. The Wii weight-bearing tasks could therefore constitute a physical activity program but without the additional benefit of feedback. PMID:26180301

  6. Effects of feedback on activation of the quadriceps during weight-bearing tasks of the Wii.

    PubMed

    Fernandes da Silva, Fabiano; Aparecido de Souza, Renato; Dias, Eric Fernandes; Silveira, Landulfo; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the effect of real-time feedback on electrical activation of the quadriceps during 3 weight-bearing tasks of the Wii Fit Plus(®). [Subjects] Thirty male healthy volunteers were recruited. [Methods] Activation of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris muscles was recorded during virtual lunge, single leg extension, and single leg reach exercises. Each exercise was performed twice in 3 randomized experimental conditions (with visual feedback, with auditory feedback, and with no feedback). The normalized electromyographic data (using maximum voluntary isometric contraction) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test. [Results] No significant difference was found in the muscles among the feedback conditions during the 3 exercises. However, the variation in the muscle activity of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis (18.23-29.20% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction) was higher (47-62%) than that in the rectus femoris (7.35-12.98% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction). [Conclusion] Real-time feedback did not alter quadriceps activation during the Wii tasks. Additionally, these games showed electromyographic activation levels similar to those for the same tasks outside the virtual environment. The Wii weight-bearing tasks could therefore constitute a physical activity program but without the additional benefit of feedback. PMID:26180301

  7. An Ungrounded Hand-Held Surgical Device Incorporating Active Constraints with Force-Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Christopher J.; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an ungrounded, hand-held surgical device that incorporates active constraints and force-feedback. Optical tracking of the device and embedded actuation allow for real-time motion compensation of a surgical tool as an active constraint is encountered. The active constraints can be made soft, so that the surgical tool tip motion is scaled, or rigid, so as to altogether prevent the penetration of the active constraint. Force-feedback is also provided to the operator so as to indicate penetration of the active constraint boundary by the surgical tool. The device has been evaluated in detailed bench tests to quantify its motion scaling and force-feedback capabilities. The combined effects of force-feedback and motion compensation are demonstrated during palpation of an active constraint with rigid and soft boundaries. A user study evaluated the combined effect of motion compensation and force-feedback in preventing penetration of a rigid active constraint. The results have shown the potential of the device operating in an ungrounded setup that incorporates active constraints with force-feedback. PMID:24744963

  8. Active stabilization of ion trap radiofrequency potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. G.; Wong-Campos, J. D.; Restelli, A.; Landsman, K. A.; Neyenhuis, B.; Mizrahi, J.; Monroe, C.

    2016-05-01

    We actively stabilize the harmonic oscillation frequency of a laser-cooled atomic ion confined in a radiofrequency (rf) Paul trap by sampling and rectifying the high voltage rf applied to the trap electrodes. We are able to stabilize the 1 MHz atomic oscillation frequency to be better than 10 Hz or 10 ppm. This represents a suppression of ambient noise on the rf circuit by 34 dB. This technique could impact the sensitivity of ion trap mass spectrometry and the fidelity of quantum operations in ion trap quantum information applications.

  9. Hybrid feedforward-feedback active noise reduction for hearing protection and communication.

    PubMed

    Ray, Laura R; Solbeck, Jason A; Streeter, Alexander D; Collier, Robert D

    2006-10-01

    A hybrid active noise reduction (ANR) architecture is presented and validated for a circumaural earcup and a communication earplug. The hybrid system combines source-independent feedback ANR with a Lyapunov-tuned leaky LMS filter (LyLMS) improving gain stability margins over feedforward ANR alone. In flat plate testing, the earcup demonstrates an overall C-weighted total noise reduction of 40 dB and 30-32 dB, respectively, for 50-800 Hz sum-of-tones noise and for aircraft or helicopter cockpit noise, improving low frequency (<100 Hz) performance by up to 15 dB over either control component acting individually. For the earplug, a filtered-X implementation of the LyLMS accommodates its nonconstant cancellation path gain. A fast time-domain identification method provides a high-fidelity, computationally efficient, infinite impulse response cancellation path model, which is used for both the filtered-X implementation and communication feedthrough. Insertion loss measurements made with a manikin show overall C-weighted total noise reduction provided by the ANR earplug of 46-48 dB for sum-of-tones 80-2000 Hz and 40-41 dB from 63 to 3000 Hz for UH-60 helicopter noise, with negligible degradation in attenuation during speech communication. For both hearing protectors, a stability metric improves by a factor of 2 to several orders of magnitude through hybrid ANR. PMID:17069300

  10. Feedback on Trait or Action Impacts on Caudate and Paracingulum Activity

    PubMed Central

    Appelgren, Alva; Bengtsson, Sara L

    2015-01-01

    There is a general conception that positive associations to one’s trait, e.g. ‘I’m clever’, are beneficial for cognitive performance. Scientific evidence shows that this is a simplification. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study we used written trial-based trait feedback ‘you are clever’, or task feedback ‘your choice was correct’, on each correct response of a rule-switching task, to investigate how the character of positive self-associations influences performance outcome. Twenty participants took part in this crossover design study. We found that trait feedback was less beneficial for motivation and performance improvement, and resulting in enhanced neural activation on more difficult bivalent rule trials. This indicates that the task was treated as more complex in this condition. For example, ‘you are clever’ feedback led to enhanced activation in anterior caudate nucleus, an area known to process uncertainty. We further observed that activation in anterior paracingulate cortex was sensitive to whether self-reflection was imposed by external feedback or generated from internal processes, where the latter activation correlated positively with performance when following after task feedback. Our results illustrate how feedback can evoke self-reflections that either help or hinder motivation and performance, most likely by impacting on processes of uncertainty. The results support social psychological models stipulating that trait focus take resources away from task focus. PMID:26102501

  11. EEG-based local brain activity feedback training—tomographic neurofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Herbert; Pllana, Avni

    2014-01-01

    Along with the development of distributed EEG source modeling methods, basic approaches to local brain activity (LBA-) neurofeedback (NF) have been suggested. Meanwhile several attempts using LORETA and sLORETA have been published. This article specifically reports on “EEG-based LBA-feedback training” developed by Bauer et al. (2011). Local brain activity-feedback has the advantage over other sLORETA-based approaches in the way that feedback is exclusively controlled by EEG-generating sources within a selected cortical region of training (ROT): feedback is suspended if there is no source. In this way the influence of sources in the vicinity of the ROT is excluded. First applications have yielded promising results: aiming to enhance activity in left hemispheric linguistic areas, five experimental subjects increased significantly the feedback rate whereas five controls receiving sham feedback did not, both after 13 training runs (U-test, p < 0.01). Preliminary results of another study that aims to document effects of LBA-feedback training of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC) and Dorso-Lateral Prefrontal Cortex (DLPFC) by fMRI revealed more local ACC-activity after successful training (Radke et al., 2014). PMID:25566027

  12. Analytical stability boundaries for quantum cascade lasers subject to optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friart, Gaetan; Van der Sande, Guy; Verschaffelt, Guy; Erneux, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We consider nonlinear rate equations appropriate for a quantum cascade laser subject to optical feedback. We analyze the conditions for a Hopf bifurcation in the limit of large values of the delay. We obtain a simple expression for the critical feedback rate that highlights the effects of key parameters such as the linewidth enhancement factor and the pump. All our asymptotic approximations are validated numerically by using a path continuation technique that allows us to follow Hopf bifurcation points in parameter space.

  13. Optoelectronic Chaos in a Simple Light Activated Feedback Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joiner, K. L.; Palmero, F.; Carretero-González, R.

    The nonlinear dynamics of an optoelectronic negative feedback switching circuit is studied. The circuit, composed of a bulb, a photoresistor, a thyristor and a linear resistor, corresponds to a nightlight device whose light is looped back into its light sensor. Periodic bifurcations and deterministic chaos are obtained by the feedback loop created when the thyristor switches on the bulb in the absence of light being detected by the photoresistor and the bulb light is then looped back into the nightlight to switch it off. The experimental signal is analyzed using tools of delay-embedding reconstruction that yield a reconstructed attractor with fractional dimension and positive Lyapunov exponent suggesting chaotic behavior for some parameter values. We construct a simple circuit model reproducing experimental results that qualitatively matches the different dynamical regimes of the experimental apparatus. In particular, we observe an order-chaos-order transition as the strength of the feedback is varied corresponding to varying the distance between the nightlight bulb and its photo-detector. A two-dimensional parameter diagram of the model reveals that the order-chaos-order transition is generic for this system.

  14. 78 FR 24469 - Proposed Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) Activity; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) Activity; Comment... Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor....

  15. Active training and driving-specific feedback improve older drivers' visual search prior to lane changes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Driving retraining classes may offer an opportunity to attenuate some effects of aging that may alter driving skills. Unfortunately, there is evidence that classroom programs (driving refresher courses) do not improve the driving performance of older drivers. The aim of the current study was to evaluate if simulator training sessions with video-based feedback can modify visual search behaviors of older drivers while changing lanes in urban driving. Methods In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the video-based feedback training, 10 older drivers who received a driving refresher course and feedback about their driving performance were tested with an on-road standardized evaluation before and after participating to a simulator training program (Feedback group). Their results were compared to a Control group (12 older drivers) who received the same refresher course and in-simulator active practice as the Feedback group without receiving driving-specific feedback. Results After attending the training program, the Control group showed no increase in the frequency of the visual inspection of three regions of interests (rear view and left side mirrors, and blind spot). In contrast, for the Feedback group, combining active training and driving-specific feedbacks increased the frequency of blind spot inspection by 100% (32.3 to 64.9% of verification before changing lanes). Conclusions These results suggest that simulator training combined with driving-specific feedbacks helped older drivers to improve their visual inspection strategies, and that in-simulator training transferred positively to on-road driving. In order to be effective, it is claimed that driving programs should include active practice sessions with driving-specific feedbacks. Simulators offer a unique environment for developing such programs adapted to older drivers' needs. PMID:22385499

  16. THE EFFECTS OF X-RAY FEEDBACK FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI ON HOST GALAXY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hambrick, D. Clay; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H.

    2011-09-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations of galaxies with active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have typically employed feedback that is purely local, i.e., an injection of energy to the immediate neighborhood of the black hole (BH). We perform GADGET-2 simulations of massive elliptical galaxies with an additional feedback component: an observationally calibrated X-ray radiation field which emanates from the BH and heats gas out to large radii from the galaxy center. We find that including the heating and radiation pressure associated with this X-ray flux in our simulations enhances the effects which are commonly reported from AGN feedback. This new feedback model is twice as effective as traditional feedback at suppressing star formation, produces three times less star formation in the last 6 Gyr, and modestly lowers the final BH mass (30%). It is also significantly more effective than an X-ray background in reducing the number of satellite galaxies.

  17. Stabilization of electrically conducting capillary bridges using feedback control of radial electrostatic stresses and the shapes of extended bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Thiessen, David B.; Blonigen, Florian J.; Marston, Philip L.

    2000-05-01

    Electrically conducting, cylindrical liquid bridges in a density-matched, electrically insulating bath were stabilized beyond the Rayleigh-Plateau (RP) limit using electrostatic stresses applied by concentric ring electrodes. A circular liquid cylinder of length L and radius R in real or simulated zero gravity becomes unstable when the slenderness S=L/2R exceeds π. The initial instability involves the growth of the so-called (2, 0) mode of the bridge in which one side becomes thin and the other side rotund. A mode-sensing optical system detects the growth of the (2, 0) mode and an analog feedback system applies the appropriate voltages to a pair of concentric ring electrodes positioned near the ends of the bridge in order to counter the growth of the (2, 0) mode and prevent breakup of the bridge. The conducting bridge is formed between metal disks which are grounded. Three feedback algorithms were tested and each found capable of stabilizing a bridge well beyond the RP limit. All three algorithms stabilized bridges having S as great as 4.3 and the extended bridges broke immediately when feedback was terminated. One algorithm was suitable for stabilization approaching S=4.493… where the (3, 0) mode is predicted to become unstable for cylindrical bridges. For that algorithm the equilibrium shapes of bridges that were slightly under or over inflated corresponded to solutions of the Young-Laplace equation with negligible electrostatic stresses. The electrical conductivity of the bridge liquid need not be large. The conductivity was associated with salt added to the aqueous bridge liquid.

  18. ACTIVE FEEDBACK STABILZATION OF THE RESISTIVE WALL MODE ON THE DIII-D DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    M. OKABAYASHI; J. BIALEK; M.S. CHANCE; M.S. CHU; E.D. FREDRICKSON; A.M. GAROFALO; M. GRYAZNEVICH; R.E HATCHER; T.H. JENSEN; L.C. JOHNSON; R.J. LA HAYE; E,A. LAZARUS; M.A. MAKOWSKI; J. MANICKAM; G.A. NAVRATIL; J.T. SCOVILLE; E.J. STRAIT; A.D. TURNBULL; M.L. WALKER

    2000-11-01

    A proof of principle magnetic feedback stabilization experiment has been carried out to suppress the resistive wall mode (RWM), a branch of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink mode under the influence of a stabilizing resistive wall, on the DIII-D tokamak device [Plasma Phys. and Contr. Fusion Research (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1986), p. 159]. The RWM was successfully suppressed and the high beta duration above the no wall limit was extended to more than 50 times the resistive wall flux diffusion time. It was observed that the mode structure was well preserved during the time of the feedback application. Several lumped parameter formulations were used to study the feedback process. The observed feedback characteristics are in good qualitative agreement with the analysis. These results provide encouragement to future efforts towards optimizing the RWM feedback methodology in parallel to what has been successfully developed for the n = 0 vertical positional control. Newly developed MHD codes have been extremely useful in guiding the experiments and in providing possible paths for the next step.

  19. On integral input-to-state stability for a feedback interconnection of parameterised discrete-time systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozi, N.; Khayatian, A.; Ahmadizadeh, S.; Karimi, H. R.

    2016-05-01

    This paper addresses integral input-to-state stability (iISS) for a feedback interconnection of parameterised discrete-time systems involving two subsystems. Particularly, we give a construction for a smooth iISS Lyapunov function for the whole system from the sum of nonlinearly weighted Lyapunov functions of individual subsystems. Motivations for such a construction are given. We consider two main cases. The first one investigates iISS for the whole system when both subsystems are iISS. The second one gives iISS for the interconnected system when one of subsystems is allowed to be input-to-state stable. The approach is also valid for both discrete-time cascades and a feedback interconnection of iISS and static systems. Examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the results.

  20. Stability and chaotic dynamics of a rate gyro with feedback control under uncertain vehicle spin and acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Heng-Hui

    2004-06-01

    An analysis of stability and chaotic dynamics is presented by a single-axis rate gyro subjected to linear feedback control loops. This rate gyro is supposed to be mounted on a space vehicle which undergoes an uncertain angular velocity ωZ( t) around its spin axis. And simultaneously acceleration ω˙X(t) occurs with respect to the output axis. The necessary and sufficient conditions of stability for the autonomous case, whose vehicle undergoes a steady rotation, were provided by Routh-Hurwitz theory. Also, the degeneracy conditions of the non-hyperbolic point were derived and the dynamics of the resulting system on the center manifold near the double-zero degenerate point by using center manifold and normal form methods were examined. The stability of the non-linear non-autonomous system was investigated by Liapunov stability and instability theorems. As the electrical time constant is much smaller than the mechanical time constant, the singularly perturbed system can be obtained by the singular perturbation theory. The Liapunov stability of this system by studying the reduced and boundary-layer systems was also analyzed. Numerical simulations were performed to verify the analytical results. The stable regions of the autonomous system were obtained in parametric diagrams. For the non-autonomous case in which ωZ( t) oscillates near boundary of stability, periodic, quasiperiodic and chaotic motions were demonstrated by using time history, phase plane and Poincaré maps.

  1. Adaptive Neural Stabilizing Controller for a Class of Mismatched Uncertain Nonlinear Systems by State and Output Feedback.

    PubMed

    Arefi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jahed-Motlagh, Mohammad Reza; Karimi, Hamid Reza

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, first, an adaptive neural network (NN) state-feedback controller for a class of nonlinear systems with mismatched uncertainties is proposed. By using a radial basis function NN (RBFNN), a bound of unknown nonlinear functions is approximated so that no information about the upper bound of mismatched uncertainties is required. Then, an observer-based adaptive controller based on RBFNN is designed to stabilize uncertain nonlinear systems with immeasurable states. The state-feedback and observer-based controllers are based on Lyapunov and strictly positive real-Lyapunov stability theory, respectively, and it is shown that the asymptotic convergence of the closed-loop system to zero is achieved while maintaining bounded states at the same time. The presented methods are more general than the previous approaches, handling systems with no restriction on the dimension of the system and the number of inputs. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed methods in the stabilization of mismatched nonlinear systems. PMID:25265641

  2. Building inhabitant feedback: Creating a reflective practice for environmental design using activity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Dara Suzanne

    The way buildings are designed now, there is little feedback from use involved in the design process. Attempts to correct this problem have been made in the form of Post Occupancy Evaluations (POEs) for 50-years but have largely failed. POEs are the accepted method for environmental designers to collect feedback about buildings in use. They are infrequently conducted, after the building is built, in a one-time only evaluation, and not funded as part of the build process. Other products receive feedback about the design in use from online critiques. Online critiques could provide a platform for feedback from actors engaged with buildings in use for environmental designers to utilize in developing reflective design rationale to avoid adverse consequences in future designs or correct consequences in past and current designs. Since buildings constitute such a large part of the human environment, it's important to research the effects of buildings on their inhabitants. In order for environmental designers to act on feedback from situated use, designers need to have access to that feedback and all actors interacting with the building design need to have an easy, inexpensive, and accessible method to submit feedback. These needs can be addressed by utilizing modern networked and mobile computing to collect and access building feedback. The analysis presented in this dissertation is informed by a thorough evaluation of the theory of reflective practice, activity theory, environmental design, and cognitive science research. From this analysis, I developed the following contributions. First, I expanded Schon's reflective practice by combining his theory with a modified version of activity theory, using activity theory to enrich reflective practice and create Reflective Activity Systems Theory (RAST), which provides a new framework to develop design rationale based on feedback from use and a focus on the activity. Second, I suggest the design of an activity information system

  3. Concepts for the design of a completely active helicopter isolation system using output vector feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, G.

    1977-01-01

    The theory of output vector feedback (a few measured quantities) is used to derive completely active oscillation isolation functions for helicopters. These feedback controller concepts are tested with various versions of the BO 105 helicopter and their performance is demonstrated. A compensation of the vibrational excitations from the rotor and harmonics of the number of blades are considered. There is also a fast and automatic trim function for maneuvers.

  4. Class I methanol megamasers: a potential probe of starburst activity and feedback in active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Zhang, J.-S.; Wang, J.-Z.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Wu, Q.-W.; Wu, Z.-Z.

    2016-06-01

    Previous observations have shown that the distribution of 36.2-GHz class I methanol megamaser (MM) emission in Arp 220 is highly correlated with the diffuse X-rays. On this basis it was suggested that methanol MM may be produced either by the effects of galactic-outflow-driven shocks and/or cosmic rays. Here we report the results of a single-dish survey undertaken with the Greenbank Telescope (GBT) to improve our understanding of the pumping conditions of extragalactic class I methanol masers and their relationship to starburst and feedback processes within the host galaxies, towards a sample which includes 16 galaxies which show both extended soft X-ray emission, and either OH or H2O MM emission. Large baseline ripples in the GBT spectra limited our results to tentative detections towards 11 of the target galaxies. Analysis of these tentative detections shows that there are significant correlations between the methanol intensity and the host-galaxy infrared, radio and OH MM emission, but no correlation with the X-ray and H2O MM emission. Some sources show methanol emission significantly offset from the systemic velocity of the galaxy (by up to 1000 km s-1) and we propose that these are associated with galactic-scale outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) feedback. The combined observational properties suggest that class I methanol MMs are related to significant starburst and molecular outflow activity and hence may provide a potential probe of AGN feedback and starburst processes in the host galaxies.

  5. Trunk stabilization during sagittal pelvic tilt: from trunk-on-pelvis to trunk-in-space due to vestibular and visual feedback.

    PubMed

    van Drunen, Paul; van der Helm, Frans C T; van Dieën, Jaap H; Happee, Riender

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the human ability to stabilize the trunk in space during pelvic tilt. Upper body sway was evoked in kneeling-seated healthy subjects by angular platform perturbations with a rotation around a virtual low-back pivot point between the L4 and L5 vertebrae. To investigate motor control modulation, variations in task instruction (balance naturally or minimize trunk sway), vision (eyes open or closed), and perturbation bandwidth (from 0.2 up to 1, 3, or 10 Hz) were applied. Cocontraction and proprioceptive muscle spindle feedback were associated with minimizing low-back flexion/extension (trunk-on-pelvis stabilization), while vestibular and visual feedback were supposed to contribute to trunk-in-space stabilization. Trunk-in-space stabilization was only observed with the minimize trunk sway task instruction, while the task instruction to balance naturally led to trunk-on-pelvis stabilization with trunk rotations even exceeding the perturbations. This indicates that vestibular feedback is used when minimizing trunk sway but has only a minor contribution during natural trunk stabilization in the sagittal plane. The eyes open condition resulted in reduced global trunk rotations and increased global trunk reflexive responses, demonstrating effective visual contributions to trunk-in-space stabilization. On the other hand, increasing perturbation bandwidth caused a decreased feedback contribution leading to deteriorated trunk-in-space stabilization. PMID:26745247

  6. Deficient recovery response and adaptive feedback potential in dynamic gait stability in unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder patients.

    PubMed

    McCrum, Christopher; Eysel-Gosepath, Katrin; Epro, Gaspar; Meijer, Kenneth; Savelberg, Hans H C M; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Karamanidis, Kiros

    2014-12-01

    Unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder (UPVD) causes deficient locomotor responses to novel environments due to a lack of accurate vestibular sensory information, increasing fall risk. This study aimed to examine recovery response (stability recovery actions) and adaptive feedback potential in dynamic stability of UPVD-patients and healthy control subjects during perturbed walking. 17 UPVD-patients (>6 months since onset) and 17 matched healthy control participants walked on a treadmill and were subjected to eight unexpected perturbations during the swing phase of the right leg. For each perturbation, the margin of stability (MS; state of body's centre of mass in relation to the base of support), was determined at touchdown of the perturbed leg and during the following six recovery steps. The first perturbation caused a reduced MS at touchdown for the perturbed leg compared to baseline, indicating an unstable position, with controls requiring five recovery steps to return to MS baseline and UPVD-patients not returning to baseline level within the analyzed six recovery steps. By the eighth perturbation, control subjects needed two steps, and UPVD-patients required three recovery steps, both thereby improving their recovery response with practice. However, MS at touchdown of the perturbed leg increased only for the controls after repeated perturbations, indicating adaptive feedback-driven locomotor improvements for the controls, but not for the UPVD-patients. We concluded that UPVD-patients have a diminished ability to control dynamic gait stability during unexpected perturbations, increasing their fall risk, and that vestibular dysfunction may inhibit the neuromotor system adapting the reactive motor response to perturbations. PMID:25501424

  7. Linear stable unity-feedback system - Necessary and sufficient conditions for stability under nonlinear plant perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, C. A.; Kabuli, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors consider a linear (not necessarily time-invariant) stable unity-feedback system, where the plant and the compensator have normalized right-coprime factorizations. They study two cases of nonlinear plant perturbations (additive and feedback), with four subcases resulting from: (1) allowing exogenous input to Delta P or not; 2) allowing the observation of the output of Delta P or not. The plant perturbation Delta P is not required to be stable. Using the factorization approach, the authors obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for all cases in terms of two pairs of nonlinear pseudostate maps. Simple physical considerations explain the form of these necessary and sufficient conditions. Finally, the authors obtain the characterization of all perturbations Delta P for which the perturbed system remains stable.

  8. Effect of vegetation-water table feedbacks on the stability and resilience of plant ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridolfi, Luca; D'Odorico, Paolo; Laio, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of vegetation with the groundwater is one of the key mechanisms affecting the dynamics of wetland plant ecosystems. The main feature of these interactions is the feedback between the downward shift of the water table caused by riparian vegetation and the emergence of soil aeration conditions favorable to plant establishment, growth, and survival. We develop a conceptual framework to explain how vegetation-water table feedbacks may lead to the emergence of multiple stable states in the dynamics of wetland forests and riparian ecosystems. This framework is used to investigate the sensitivity of these ecosystems to vegetation disturbances and changes in water table depth. As a result of these feedbacks, such ecosystems are prone to catastrophic shifts to an unvegetated state. Because of their competitive advantage, water-tolerant and shallow-rooted species can replace the original vegetation, contributing to the occurrence of vegetation succession in riparian zones and to the existence of alternative vegetation states between areas with shallow and deep water tables.

  9. Impact of a novel teaching method based on feedback, activity, individuality and relevance on students’ learning

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, William S.; Laskar, Simone N.; Benjamin, Miles W.; Chan, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examines the perceived impact of a novel clinical teaching method based on FAIR principles (feedback, activity, individuality and relevance) on students’ learning on clinical placement. Methods This was a qualitative research study. Participants were third year and final year medical students attached to one UK vascular firm over a four-year period (N=108). Students were asked to write a reflective essay on how FAIRness approach differs from previous clinical placement, and its advantages and disadvantages. Essays were thematically analysed and globally rated (positive, negative or neutral) by two independent researchers. Results Over 90% of essays reported positive experiences of feedback, activity, individuality and relevance model.  The model provided multifaceted feedback; active participation; longitudinal improvement; relevance to stage of learning and future goals; structured teaching; professional development; safe learning environment; consultant involvement in teaching. Students perceived preparation for tutorials to be time intensive for tutors/students; a lack of teaching on medical sciences and direct observation of performance; more than once weekly sessions would be beneficial; some issues with peer and public feedback, relevance to upcoming exam and large group sizes. Students described negative experiences of “standard” clinical teaching. Conclusions Progressive teaching programmes based on the FAIRness principles, feedback, activity, individuality and relevance, could be used as a model to improve current undergraduate clinical teaching. PMID:26995588

  10. Positive feedback of protein kinase C proteolytic activation during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Leverrier, Sabrina; Vallentin, Alice; Joubert, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    In contrast with protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and PKCepsilon, which are better known for promoting cell survival, PKCdelta is known for its pro-apoptotic function, which is exerted mainly through a caspase-3-dependent proteolytic activation pathway. In the present study, we used the rat GH3B6 pituitary adenoma cell line to show that PKCalpha and PKCepsilon are activated and relocalized together with PKCdelta when apoptosis is induced by a genotoxic stress. Proteolytic activation is a crucial step used by the three isoforms since: (1) the catalytic domains of the PKCalpha, PKCepsilon or PKCdelta isoforms (CDalpha, CDepsilon and CDdelta respectively) accumulated, and this accumulation was dependent on the activity of both calpain and caspase; and (2) transient expression of CDalpha, CDepsilon or CDdelta sufficed to induce apoptosis. However, following this initial step of proteolytic activation, the pathways diverge; cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation are induced by CDepsilon and CDdelta, but not by CDalpha. Another interesting finding of the present study is the proteolysis of PKCdelta induced by CDepsilon expression that revealed the existence of a cross-talk between PKC isoforms during apoptosis. Hence the PKC family may participate in the apoptotic process of pituitary adenoma cells at two levels: downstream of caspase and calpain, and via retro-activation of caspase-3, resulting in the amplification of its own proteolytic activation. PMID:12238950

  11. Feedback effect on flute dynamics in a mirror machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'Ery, Ilan; Seemann, Omri

    2015-11-01

    Active feedback techniques may stabilize the flute instability in mirror traps and make them viable candidates for fusion machines. A fast feedback with optical sensors and electrical actuators was implemented in a table-top mirror machine and used to study several aspects of feedback stabilization. For a cold, dense plasma the feedback reduces dramatically the flute amplitude of the first two mode. For higher temperature plasma, a significant increase of plasma density due to feedback stabilization is also demonstrated. The effect of changing feedback gain and phase has some interesting feature such as asymmetry with respect to positive and negative phase shifts and non-monotonic dependence of flute amplitude on feedback gain. These effects are explained using simplified analytic model of the flute and feedback.

  12. Feedback about more accurate versus less accurate trials: differential effects on self-confidence and activation.

    PubMed

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected byfeedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of two conditions: one group received feedback on the most accurate trials, whereas another group received feedback on the least accurate trials. On day 2, participants completed an anxiety questionnaire and performed a retention test. Shin conductance level, as a measure of arousal, was determined. The results indicated that feedback about more accurate trials resulted in more effective learning as well as increased self-confidence. Also, activation was a predictor of performance. PMID:22808705

  13. Ability of Low-Cost Force-Feedback Device to Influence Postural Stability.

    PubMed

    Baud-Bovy, Gabriel; Tatti, Fabio; Borghese, Nunzio A

    2015-01-01

    Low-cost gaming technology offers promising devices for the rehabilitation of stroke patients at home. While several attempts have been made to use low-cost motion tracking devices (Kinect) or balance boards (Wii Board), the potential of low-cost haptic devices has yet to be explored in this context. The objective of this study was to investigate whether it is possible to influence postural stability with a low-cost device despite its technical limitations, and to explore the most promising modes of haptic interaction to increase and decrease postural stability. Two groups of younger subjects used a high-end (Omega.3) and a low-cost (Falcon) device respectively. A third group of older subjects used the Falcon. We show that light touch contact with the device improves stability, whereas the force tasks decrease it. The effects of the different tasks are consistent in the two age groups. Although there are differences in the participants' interaction with the two devices, the effect of the devices on postural stability is comparable. We conclude that a low-cost haptic device can be used to increase or decrease postural stability of healthy subjects with an age similar to that of typical stroke patients, in a safe and controllable way. PMID:25398181

  14. Mechanoelectrical feedback regulates the arrhythmogenic activity of pulmonary veins

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S‐L; Chen, Y‐C; Chen, Y‐J; Wangcharoen, W; Lee, S‐H; Lin, C‐I; Chen, S‐A

    2007-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is commonly associated with dilated pulmonary veins. Stretch has been shown to have mechano‐electrical effects. Objective To investigate whether stretch can increase the arrhythmogenic activity of the pulmonary veins. Methods The transmembrane action potentials were recorded from rabbit pulmonary veins before and after stretch (100 and 300 mg). Gadolinium and streptomycin (stretch‐activated ion channel blockers) were each perfused into the pulmonary veins under a 300‐mg stretch. Results Stretch (0, 100 and 300 mg) force dependently increased the incidence of spontaneous activity (22%, 48% and 83%; p<0.05), mean (standard deviation (SD)) firing rates of spontaneous activity (1.7 (0.2), 2.1 (0.3) and 3 (0.2) Hz; p<0.05) and incidence of early post‐depolarisations (9%, 26% and 61%; p<0.05) and delayed post‐depolarisations (0%, 4% and 30%; p<0.05) in 23 pulmonary veins. In the seven preparations with spontaneous activity after the 300‐mg stretch, gadolinium (1, 3 and 10 μmol/l) decreased the incidence of spontaneous activity by 43%, 29% and 14%, respectively (p<0.05), and decreased the firing rate from 2.9 (0.1) Hz to 0.8 (0.4), 0.3 (0.1) and 0.1 (0.1) Hz, respectively (p<0.05). Streptomycin (10 and 40 μmol/l) decreased the incidence of spontaneous activity by 71% and 29%, respectively (p<0.05), and decreased the firing rate from 2.9 (0.1) Hz to 1.6 (0.4) and 0.5 (0.3) Hz, respectively (p<0.05). Conclusion Stretch is an important factor in the electrical activity of the pulmonary vein. Stretch‐induced arrhythmogenic activity of the pulmonary vein may contribute to the genesis of atrial fibrillation. PMID:16905626

  15. An Activity Theory Exegesis on Conflict and Contradictions in Networked Discussions and Feedback Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadjistassou, Stella K.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the culturally afforded contradictions that ten advanced English as a Second Language (ESL) learner encountered when they posted their paper topics and exchanged feedback strategies online and contextualized some of these strategies to draft their papers. Using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT),…

  16. Corrective Feedback via Instant Messenger Learning Activities in NS-NNS and NNS-NNS Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotillo, Susana

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study examines corrective feedback in native speaker-nonnative speaker (NS-NNS) and NNS-NNS dyads while participants were engaged in communicative and problem-solving activities via "Yahoo! Instant Messenger" (YIM). As "negotiation of meaning" studies of the 1990s have shown, linguistic items which learners negotiate in…

  17. 78 FR 49335 - Agency Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) Activity Under OMB Review... abstracted below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and comment. The PRA...

  18. 75 FR 9490 - Proposed Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) Activity: Comment....S.C. 3501-3521), Federal agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget...

  19. Differences in Feedback- and Inhibition-Related Neural Activity in Adult ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dibbets, Pauline; Evers, Lisbeth; Hurks, Petra; Marchetta, Natalie; Jolles, Jelle

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine response inhibition- and feedback-related neural activity in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) using event-related functional MRI. Sixteen male adults with ADHD and 13 healthy/normal controls participated in this study and performed a modified Go/NoGo task. Behaviourally,…

  20. Mirror Visual Feedback Induces Lower Neuromuscular Activity in Children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feltham, Max G.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effects of mirror feedback information on neuromuscular activation during bimanual coordination in eight children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy (SHCP) and a matched control group. The "mirror box" creates a visual illusion, which gives rise to a visual perception of a zero lag, symmetric movement between the two…

  1. 78 FR 36190 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... request to review and approve a previously approved information collection requirement regarding IT Dashboard Feedback Mechanism. A notice was published in the Federal Register at 78 FR 13057, on February 26... ADMINISTRATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; IT Dashboard...

  2. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  3. Understanding the Learning Process of Peer Feedback Activity: An Ethnographic Study of Exploratory Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Chunxian

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic study attempts to find, reveal and understand the learning possibilities, from the social learning perspective, in the process of peer feedback activity in a College English classroom for non-English majors in China. The study reveals the nature of Exploratory Practice (EP), and the investigation is guided by EP principles,…

  4. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF AN FPGA-BASED ACTIVE FEEDBACK DAMPING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zaipeng; Schulte, Mike; Deibele, Craig Edmond

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a high-intensity proton-based accelerator that produces neutron beams for neutronscattering research. As the most powerful pulsed neutron source in the world, the SNS accelerator has experienced an unprecedented beam instability that has a wide bandwidth (0 to 300MHz) and fast growth time (10 to100 s). In this paper, we propose and analyze several FPGA-based designs for an active feedback damping system. This signal processing system is the first FPGA-based design for active feedback damping of wideband instabilities in high intensity accelerators. It can effectively mitigate instabilities in highintensity protons beams, reduce radiation, and boost the accelerator s luminosity performance. Unlike existing systems, which are designed using analog components, our FPGA-based active feedback damping system offers programmability while maintaining high performance. To meet the system throughput and latency requirements, our proposed designs are guided by detailed analysis of resource and performance tradeoffs. These designs are mapped onto a reconfigurable platform that includes Xilinx Virtex-II Pro FPGAs and high-speed analog-to-digital and digital-toanalog converters. Our results show that our FPGA-based active feedback damping system can provide increased flexibility and improved signal processing performance that are not feasible with existing analog systems.

  5. Improving Teacher Feedback during Active Learning: Effects of a Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van den Bergh, Linda; Ros, Anje; Beijaard, Douwe

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on improving teacher feedback during active learning. Changing teachers' behavior sustainably, however, is very difficult. Several conditions should be taken into account, and programs should build on teachers' cognitions and practices. Effects of a specifically designed professional development program on 16…

  6. Feedback during Active Learning: Elementary School Teachers' Beliefs and Perceived Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bergh, Linda; Ros, Anje; Beijaard, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Giving feedback during active learning is an important, though difficult, task for teachers. In the present study, the problems elementary school teachers perceive and the beliefs they hold regarding this task were investigated. It appeared that teachers believe conditional teacher skills, especially time management, hinder them most from giving…

  7. Micron: an Actively Stabilized Handheld Tool for Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Robert A.; Becker, Brian C.; Tabarés, Jaime Cuevas; Podnar, Gregg W.; Lobes, Louis A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a hand-held actively stabilized tool to increase accuracy in micro-surgery or other precision manipulation. It removes involuntary motion such as tremor by actuating the tip to counteract the effect of the undesired handle motion. The key components are a three-degree-of-freedom piezoelectric manipulator that has 400 μm range of motion, 1 N force capability, and bandwidth over 100 Hz, and an optical position measurement subsystem that acquires the tool pose with 4 μm resolution at 2000 samples/s. A control system using these components attenuates hand motion by at least 15 dB (a fivefold reduction). By considering the effect of the frequency response of Micron on the human visual feedback loop, we have developed a filter that reduces unintentional motion, yet preserves intuitive eye-hand coordination. We evaluated the effectiveness of Micron by measuring the accuracy of the human/machine system in three simple manipulation tasks. Handheld testing by three eye surgeons and three non-surgeons showed a reduction in position error of between 32% and 52%, depending on the error metric. PMID:23028266

  8. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Elizabeth L; Clarke, T E; Sarazin, Craig L; Randall, Scott W; McNamara, Brian R

    2010-04-20

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves. PMID:20351250

  9. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Clarke, T. E.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Randall, Scott W.; McNamara, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves. PMID:20351250

  10. An active feedback system to control synchrotron oscillations in the SLC Damping Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.L.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1989-03-01

    Initially the SLC Damping Rings accomplished Robinson instability damping by operating the RF accelerating cavities slightly detuned. In order to be able to run the cavities tuned and achieve damping for Robinson instability and synchrotron oscillations at injection an active feedback system has been developed. This paper describes the theoretical basis for the feedback system and the development of the hardware. Extensive measurements of the loop response including stored beam were performed. Overall performance of the system is also reported. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Stabilizing detached Bridgman melt crystal growth: Model-based nonlinear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeckel, Andrew; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamics and operability limits of a nonlinear-proportional-integral controller designed to stabilize detached vertical Bridgman crystal growth are studied. The manipulated variable is the pressure difference between upper and lower vapor spaces, and the controlled variable is the gap width at the triple-phase line. The controller consists of a model-based nonlinear component coupled with a standard proportional-integral controller. The nonlinear component is based on a capillary model of shape stability. Perturbations to gap width, pressure difference, wetting angle, and growth angle are studied under both shape stable and shape unstable conditions. The nonlinear-PI controller allows a wider operating range of gain than a standard PI controller used alone, is easier to tune, and eliminates solution multiplicity from closed-loop operation.

  12. Deficient recovery response and adaptive feedback potential in dynamic gait stability in unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    McCrum, Christopher; Eysel‐Gosepath, Katrin; Epro, Gaspar; Meijer, Kenneth; Savelberg, Hans H. C. M.; Brüggemann, Gert‐Peter; Karamanidis, Kiros

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder (UPVD) causes deficient locomotor responses to novel environments due to a lack of accurate vestibular sensory information, increasing fall risk. This study aimed to examine recovery response (stability recovery actions) and adaptive feedback potential in dynamic stability of UPVD‐patients and healthy control subjects during perturbed walking. 17 UPVD‐patients (>6 months since onset) and 17 matched healthy control participants walked on a treadmill and were subjected to eight unexpected perturbations during the swing phase of the right leg. For each perturbation, the margin of stability (MS; state of body's centre of mass in relation to the base of support), was determined at touchdown of the perturbed leg and during the following six recovery steps. The first perturbation caused a reduced MS at touchdown for the perturbed leg compared to baseline, indicating an unstable position, with controls requiring five recovery steps to return to MS baseline and UPVD‐patients not returning to baseline level within the analyzed six recovery steps. By the eighth perturbation, control subjects needed two steps, and UPVD‐patients required three recovery steps, both thereby improving their recovery response with practice. However, MS at touchdown of the perturbed leg increased only for the controls after repeated perturbations, indicating adaptive feedback‐driven locomotor improvements for the controls, but not for the UPVD‐patients. We concluded that UPVD‐patients have a diminished ability to control dynamic gait stability during unexpected perturbations, increasing their fall risk, and that vestibular dysfunction may inhibit the neuromotor system adapting the reactive motor response to perturbations. PMID:25501424

  13. Implementation of local feedback controllers for vibration supression of a truss using active struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, Robert; Lim, Tae W.; Bosse, Albert; Fisher, Shalom

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of local feedback controllers for active vibration suppression of a laboratory truss referred to as the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) space truss. The NRL space truss is a 3.7 meter, 12-bay aluminum laboratory truss used as a testbed to explore smart structures technologies for future Navy spacecraft missions. To conduct real-time control and data acquisition for the implementation of controllers, a digital signal processor based system is used. Two piezoceramic active struts are employed in this experimental study. Each strut is instrumented with a force transducer and a displacement sensor. Modal strain energy computed using a refined finite element model was used to select the optimum locations of the two actuators to ensure controllability of the first two structural modes. Two local feedback controllers were designed and implemented, an integral force feedback and an integral plus double-integral force feedback. The controllers were designed independently for each active strut using classical control design techniques applied to an identified model of the system dynamics. System identification results and controller design procedure are described along with closed loop test results. The test results show up to a factor of 1/110 attenuation of the truss tip motion due to sinusoidal resonant input disturbances and up to 100 times increase in damping of the lower frequency modes of the truss.

  14. Feedbacks between tall shrubland development and active layer temperatures in northwest Siberian arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, H. E.; Frost, G. V.; Walker, D. A.; Matyshak, G.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost soils are a globally significant carbon store, but changes in permafrost thermal regime observed in recent decades across much of the Arctic suggest that permafrost carbon balance is likely to change with continued climate warming. Critical to changes in permafrost carbon balance in a warmer world, however, are feedbacks between changes in the composition and density of surface vegetation, and the thermal state of permafrost. Shrub expansion has been widely observed in the northwest Siberian Low Arctic, but the magnitude and direction of shrub-induced impacts to permafrost temperature and stability remain poorly understood. Here we evaluate changes to active layer properties and thermal regime that occur during tall shrubland development (shrubs > 1.5 m height) within a northwest Siberian landscape dominated by well-developed, small-scale patterned ground features (e.g., non-sorted circles). We measured the annual time-series of soil temperature at 5 cm and 20 cm depth, and the structural attributes of vegetation at patterned-ground microsites across four stages of tall shrubland development: low-growing tundra lacking erect shrubs, newly-developed shrublands, mature shrublands, and paludified shrublands. Mean summer soil temperatures declined with increasing shrub cover and moss thickness, but winter soil temperatures increased with shrub development. Shrubland development strongly attenuated cryoturbation, promoting the establishment of complete vegetation cover and the development of a continuous organic mat. Increased vegetation cover, in turn, led to further reduced cryoturbation and an aggrading permafrost table. These observations indicate that tall shrub expansion that is now occurring in patterned-ground landscapes of the northwest Siberian Arctic may buffer permafrost from atmospheric warming, and increase carbon storage in these systems at least in the short term.

  15. Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

    1986-01-21

    The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

  16. Trait self-esteem and neural activities related to self-evaluation and social feedback

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juan; Xu, Xiaofan; Chen, Yu; Shi, Zhenhao; Han, Shihui

    2016-01-01

    Self-esteem has been associated with neural responses to self-reflection and attitude toward social feedback but in different brain regions. The distinct associations might arise from different tasks or task-related attitudes in the previous studies. The current study aimed to clarify these by investigating the association between self-esteem and neural responses to evaluation of one’s own personality traits and of others’ opinion about one’s own personality traits. We scanned 25 college students using functional MRI during evaluation of oneself or evaluation of social feedback. Trait self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg self-esteem scale after scanning. Whole-brain regression analyses revealed that trait self-esteem was associated with the bilateral orbitofrontal activity during evaluation of one’s own positive traits but with activities in the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and occipital cortices during evaluation of positive social feedback. Our findings suggest that trait self-esteem modulates the degree of both affective processes in the orbitofrontal cortex during self-reflection and cognitive processes in the medial prefrontal cortex during evaluation of social feedback. PMID:26842975

  17. Trait self-esteem and neural activities related to self-evaluation and social feedback.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Xu, Xiaofan; Chen, Yu; Shi, Zhenhao; Han, Shihui

    2016-01-01

    Self-esteem has been associated with neural responses to self-reflection and attitude toward social feedback but in different brain regions. The distinct associations might arise from different tasks or task-related attitudes in the previous studies. The current study aimed to clarify these by investigating the association between self-esteem and neural responses to evaluation of one's own personality traits and of others' opinion about one's own personality traits. We scanned 25 college students using functional MRI during evaluation of oneself or evaluation of social feedback. Trait self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg self-esteem scale after scanning. Whole-brain regression analyses revealed that trait self-esteem was associated with the bilateral orbitofrontal activity during evaluation of one's own positive traits but with activities in the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and occipital cortices during evaluation of positive social feedback. Our findings suggest that trait self-esteem modulates the degree of both affective processes in the orbitofrontal cortex during self-reflection and cognitive processes in the medial prefrontal cortex during evaluation of social feedback. PMID:26842975

  18. Active muscle response using feedback control of a finite element human arm model.

    PubMed

    Östh, Jonas; Brolin, Karin; Happee, Riender

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical human body models (HBMs) are important research tools that are used to study the human response in car crash situations. Development of automotive safety systems requires the implementation of active muscle response in HBM, as novel safety systems also interact with vehicle occupants in the pre-crash phase. In this study, active muscle response was implemented using feedback control of a nonlinear muscle model in the right upper extremity of a finite element (FE) HBM. Hill-type line muscle elements were added, and the active and passive properties were assessed. Volunteer tests with low impact loading resulting in elbow flexion motions were performed. Simulations of posture maintenance in a gravity field and the volunteer tests were successfully conducted. It was concluded that feedback control of a nonlinear musculoskeletal model can be used to obtain posture maintenance and human-like reflexive responses in an FE HBM. PMID:21294008

  19. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  20. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Michael J.; Soffe, Stephen R.; Willshaw, David J.; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition. PMID:26824331

  1. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity.

    PubMed

    Hull, Michael J; Soffe, Stephen R; Willshaw, David J; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition. PMID:26824331

  2. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock.

    PubMed

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed. PMID:27370428

  3. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  4. Simulations of cosmic-ray feedback by active galactic nuclei in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijacki, Debora; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2008-07-01

    Feedback processes by active galactic nuclei (AGN) appear to be a key for understanding the nature of the very X-ray luminous cool cores found in many clusters of galaxies. We investigate a numerical model for AGN feedback where for the first time a relativistic particle population in AGN-inflated bubbles is followed within a full cosmological context. In our high-resolution simulations of galaxy cluster formation, we assume that black hole accretion is accompanied by energy feedback that occurs in two different modes, depending on the accretion rate itself. At high accretion rates, a small fraction of the radiated energy is coupled thermally to the gas surrounding the quasar, while in a low-accretion state, mechanically efficient feedback in the form of hot, buoyant bubbles that are inflated by radio activity is considered. Unlike previous work, we inject a non-thermal particle population of relativistic protons into the AGN bubbles, instead of adopting a purely thermal heating. We then follow the subsequent evolution of the cosmic-ray (CR) plasma inside the bubbles, considering both its hydrodynamical interactions and dissipation processes relevant to the CR population. This permits us to analyse the impact of CR bubbles on the surrounding intracluster medium, and in particular, how this contrasts with the purely thermal case. Due to the different buoyancy of relativistic plasma and the comparatively long CR dissipation time-scale, we find substantial changes in the evolution of clusters as a result of CR feedback. In particular, the non-thermal population can provide significant pressure support in central cluster regions at low thermal temperatures, providing a natural explanation for the decreasing temperature profiles found in cool core clusters. At the same time, the morphologies of the bubbles and of the induced X-ray cavities show a striking similarity to observational findings. AGN feedback with CRs also proves efficient in regulating cluster cooling

  5. Quadrupedal bounding with a segmented flexible torso: passive stability and feedback control.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qu; Poulakakis, Ioannis

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the implications of torso flexibility on the dynamics of quadrupedal running are examined in a template setting. In the same vein with the spring loaded inverted pendulum, a reductive sagittal-plane model with a segmented flexible torso and compliant legs is introduced to capture the dynamics of bounding in the presence of torso flexibility via a minimum number of variables and parameters. Numerical return map studies of the system in dimensionless setting reveal that a large variety of cyclic bounding motions can be realized passively, through the natural interaction of the model with its environment. Despite the simplicity of the model, the resulting motions correspond to torso bending movements that resemble those in galloping mammals without explicit reliance on the fine structural and morphological details. Furthermore, for certain combinations of the system parameters--in particular the torso and leg relative stiffness--self-stable bounding motions emerge. The implications of the existence of such self-stable bounding orbits to control design are also discussed and a hybrid control law is derived that is capable of stabilizing the system as it encounters significantly large disturbances using only a single actuator located at the torso joint. PMID:24166806

  6. Stabilizing the phase of superpositions of cat states in a cavity using real-time feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofek, N.; Petrenko, A.; Heeres, R.; Reinhold, P.; Liu, Y.; Leghtas, Z.; Vlastakis, B.; Frunzio, L.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    In a superconducting cQED architecture, a hardware efficient quantum error correction (QEC) scheme exists, called the cat code, which maps a qubit onto superpositions of cat states in a superconducting resonator, by mapping the occurrence of errors, or single photon jumps, onto unitary rotations of the encoded state. By tracking the parity of the encoded state, we can count the number of photon jumps and are able to apply a correcting unitary transformation. However, the situation is complicated by the fact that photon jumps do not commute with the deterministic anharmonic time evolution of a resonator state, or Kerr, inherited by the resonator from its coupling to a Josephson junction. As predicted in, a field in the resonator will inherit an overall phase θ = KT in IQ space each time a photon jumps that is proportional to the Kerr K and the time T at which the jump occurs. Here I will present how we can track the errors in real time, take them into account together with the time they occur and make it possible to stabilize the qubit information. Please place my talk right after the talk of Andrei Petrenko.

  7. Exploring the Impact of Role-Playing on Peer Feedback in an Online Case-Based Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Yu-Hui

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the impact of role-playing on the quality of peer feedback and learners' perception of this strategy in a case-based learning activity with VoiceThread in an online course. The findings revealed potential positive impact of role-playing on learners' generation of constructive feedback as role-playing was associated…

  8. Understanding EFL Students' Participation in Group Peer Feedback of L2 Writing: A Case Study from an Activity Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Shulin; Lee, Icy

    2015-01-01

    While the last three decades have witnessed a growing body of research on peer feedback in first language (L1) and second language (L2) writing, research about students' motives for participating in group peer feedback has remained underexplored. In order to fill this important gap, this case study, guided by the constructs of activity and motive…

  9. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  10. Active control of a flexible structure using a modal positive position feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poh, S.; Baz, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a new Modal Positive Position Feedback (MPPF) strategy in controlling the vibration of a complex flexible structure using a single piezo-electric active structural member is demonstrated. The control strategy generates its control forces by manipulating only the modal position signals of the structure to provide a damping action to undamped modes. This is in contrast to conventional modal controllers that rely in their operation on negative feedback of both the modal position and velocity. The proposed strategy is very simple to design and implement as it designs the controller at the uncoupled modal level and utilizes simple first order filters to achieve the Positive Position Feedback effect. The performance of the new strategy is enhanced by augmenting it with a time sharing strategy to share a small number of actuators between larger number of modes. The effectiveness of the new strategy is validated experimentally on a flexible box-type structure that has four bays and its first two bending modes are 2.015 and 6.535 Hz, respectively. A single piezo-electric actuator is utilized as an active structural member to control several transverse bending modes of the structure. The performance of the active control system is determined in the time and the frequency domains. The results are compared with those obtained when using the Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) of Meirovitch. The experimental results suggest the potential of the proposed strategy as a viable means for controlling the vibration of large flexible structures in real time.

  11. Neuronal adenosine release, and not astrocytic ATP release, mediates feedback inhibition of excitatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Lovatt, Ditte; Xu, Qiwu; Liu, Wei; Takano, Takahiro; Smith, Nathan A.; Schnermann, Jurgen; Tieu, Kim; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is a potent anticonvulsant acting on excitatory synapses through A1 receptors. Cellular release of ATP, and its subsequent extracellular enzymatic degradation to adenosine, could provide a powerful mechanism for astrocytes to control the activity of neural networks during high-intensity activity. Despite adenosine's importance, the cellular source of adenosine remains unclear. We report here that multiple enzymes degrade extracellular ATP in brain tissue, whereas only Nt5e degrades AMP to adenosine. However, endogenous A1 receptor activation during cortical seizures in vivo or heterosynaptic depression in situ is independent of Nt5e activity, and activation of astrocytic ATP release via Ca2+ photolysis does not trigger synaptic depression. In contrast, selective activation of postsynaptic CA1 neurons leads to release of adenosine and synaptic depression. This study shows that adenosine-mediated synaptic depression is not a consequence of astrocytic ATP release, but is instead an autonomic feedback mechanism that suppresses excitatory transmission during prolonged activity. PMID:22421436

  12. Stabilization of polymer electrolyte fuel cell voltage with reduced-order Lyapunov exponent feedback and corrective pressure perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, Michael B.; Litster, Shawn

    2015-02-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system efficiency can be decreased by instabilities resulting from the accumulation of water in the cathode as well as by excessive air delivery parasitic loads used to prevent liquid water accumulation. In this work, we present a new instability detection diagnostic tailored for the nonlinear and chaotic dynamics of PEFC operation with multi-phase flow in the gas channels. The instability statistic, the Lyapunov exponent of the reduced-order voltage return map, λ, is a measure of the exponential rate of divergence in the dynamic voltage signal measured from the fuel cell. A key advantage of this statistic for embedded control is that it is a self-referencing measure of the system stability for feedback and is not based on an a priori performance threshold. Our experiments demonstrate that the Lyapunov exponent statistic provides a warning typically 100 s in advance of significant power loss. Using this statistic as a control diagnostic, a new control scheme that detects PEFC instability in real time and mitigates it with pressure perturbations was applied experimentally to several fuel cell systems, including one that simulates stack operation. Our control scheme resulted in increased PEFC power, decreased cathode flooding leading to a lower parasitic load for air delivery, and stable PEFC performance.

  13. Segment Tracking via a Spatiotemporal Linking Process including Feedback Stabilization in an n-D Lattice Model

    PubMed Central

    Dellen, Babette; Aksoy, Eren Erdal; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2009-01-01

    Model-free tracking is important for solving tasks such as moving-object tracking and action recognition in cases where no prior object knowledge is available. For this purpose, we extend the concept of spatially synchronous dynamics in spin-lattice models to the spatiotemporal domain to track segments within an image sequence. The method is related to synchronization processes in neural networks and based on superparamagnetic clustering of data. Spin interactions result in the formation of clusters of correlated spins, providing an automatic labeling of corresponding image regions. The algorithm obeys detailed balance. This is an important property as it allows for consistent spin-transfer across subsequent frames, which can be used for segment tracking. Therefore, in the tracking process the correct equilibrium will always be found, which is an important advance as compared with other more heuristic tracking procedures. In the case of long image sequences, i.e., movies, the algorithm is augmented with a feedback mechanism, further stabilizing segment tracking. PMID:22291568

  14. Perceptual Salience and Reward Both Influence Feedback-Related Neural Activity Arising from Choice.

    PubMed

    Lou, Bin; Hsu, Wha-Yin; Sajda, Paul

    2015-09-23

    For day-to-day decisions, multiple factors influence our choice between alternatives. Two dimensions of decision making that substantially affect choice are the objective perceptual properties of the stimulus (e.g., salience) and its subjective value. Here we measure EEGs in human subjects to relate their feedback-evoked EEG responses to estimates of prediction error given a neurally derived expected value for each trial. Unlike in traditional reinforcement learning paradigms, in our experiment the reward itself is not probabilistic; rather, it is a fixed value, which, when combined with the variable stimulus salience, yields uncertainty in the choice. We find that feedback-evoked event-related potentials (ERPs), specifically those classically termed feedback-related negativity, are modulated by both the reward level and stimulus salience. Using single-trial analysis of the EEG, we show stimulus-locked EEG components reflecting perceived stimulus salience can be combined with the level of reward to create an estimate of expected reward. This expected reward is used to form a prediction error that correlates with the trial-by-trial variability of the feedback ERPs for negative, but not positive, feedback. This suggests that the valence of prediction error is more important than the valence of the actual feedback, since only positive rewards were delivered in the experiment (no penalty or loss). Finally, we show that these subjectively defined prediction errors are informative of the riskiness of the subject's choice on the subsequent trial. In summary, our work shows that neural correlates of stimulus salience interact with value information to yield neural representations of subjective expected reward. Significance statement: How we make perceptual decisions depends on sensory evidence and the value of our options. These two factors often interact to yield subjective decisions; i.e., individuals integrate sensory evidence and value to form their own estimates of

  15. Perceptual Salience and Reward Both Influence Feedback-Related Neural Activity Arising from Choice

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Bin; Hsu, Wha-Yin

    2015-01-01

    For day-to-day decisions, multiple factors influence our choice between alternatives. Two dimensions of decision making that substantially affect choice are the objective perceptual properties of the stimulus (e.g., salience) and its subjective value. Here we measure EEGs in human subjects to relate their feedback-evoked EEG responses to estimates of prediction error given a neurally derived expected value for each trial. Unlike in traditional reinforcement learning paradigms, in our experiment the reward itself is not probabilistic; rather, it is a fixed value, which, when combined with the variable stimulus salience, yields uncertainty in the choice. We find that feedback-evoked event-related potentials (ERPs), specifically those classically termed feedback-related negativity, are modulated by both the reward level and stimulus salience. Using single-trial analysis of the EEG, we show stimulus-locked EEG components reflecting perceived stimulus salience can be combined with the level of reward to create an estimate of expected reward. This expected reward is used to form a prediction error that correlates with the trial-by-trial variability of the feedback ERPs for negative, but not positive, feedback. This suggests that the valence of prediction error is more important than the valence of the actual feedback, since only positive rewards were delivered in the experiment (no penalty or loss). Finally, we show that these subjectively defined prediction errors are informative of the riskiness of the subject's choice on the subsequent trial. In summary, our work shows that neural correlates of stimulus salience interact with value information to yield neural representations of subjective expected reward. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT How we make perceptual decisions depends on sensory evidence and the value of our options. These two factors often interact to yield subjective decisions; i.e., individuals integrate sensory evidence and value to form their own estimates of

  16. A composite control method based on the adaptive RBFNN feedback control and the ESO for two-axis inertially stabilized platforms.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xusheng; Zou, Ying; Dong, Fei

    2015-11-01

    Due to the nonlinearity and time variation of a two-axis inertially stabilized platform (ISP) system, the conventional feedback control cannot be utilized directly. To realize the control performance with fast dynamic response and high stabilization precision, the dynamic model of the ISP system is expected to match the ideal model which satisfies the desired control performance. Therefore, a composite control method based on the adaptive radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) feedback control and the extended state observer (ESO), is proposed for ISP. The adaptive RBFNN is proposed to generate the feedback control parameters online. Based on the state error information in the working process, the adaptive RBFNN can be constructed and optimized directly. Therefore, no priori training data is needed for the construction of the RBFNN. Furthermore, a linear second-order ESO is constructed to compensate for the composite disturbance. The asymptotic stability of the proposed control method has been proven by the Lyapunov stability theory. The applicability of the proposed method is validated by a series of simulations and flight tests. PMID:26434418

  17. Regulation of BRAF protein stability by a negative feedback loop involving the MEK-ERK pathway but not the FBXW7 tumour suppressor.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Maria Aguilar; Patel, Bipin; Hey, Fiona; Giblett, Susan; Davis, Hayley; Pritchard, Catrin

    2016-06-01

    The (V600E)BRAF oncogenic mutation is detected in a wide range of human cancers and induces hyperactivation of the downstream MEK-ERK signalling cascade. Although output of the BRAF-MEK-ERK pathway is regulated by feed-forward RAF activity, feedback control also plays an important role. One such feedback pathway has been identified in Caenorhabditis elegans and involves ERK-mediated phosphorylation of BRAF within a CDC4 phosphodegron (CPD), targeting BRAF for degradation via CDC4 (also known as FBXW7), a component of the SKP1/CUL1/F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Here we investigate this pathway in mammalian cells. Short-term expression of autochthonous (V600E)BRAF in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) leads to down-regulation of BRAF protein levels in a proteasome-dependent manner and (V600E)BRAF has a reduced half-life compared to (WT)BRAF in HEK293(T) cells. These effects were reversed by treatment with the MEK inhibitor PD184352. We have identified the equivalent CPD at residues 400-405 in human BRAF and have found that mutation of ERK phosphorylation sites at residues T401 and S405 in (V600E)BRAF increases the half-life of the protein. While BRAF and FBXW7 co-immunoprecipitated, the overexpression of FBXW7 did not influence the half-life of either (WT)BRAF or (V600E)BRAF. Furthermore, disruption of the substrate-binding site of mouse FBXW7 using the R482Q mutation did not affect the interaction with BRAF and the expression levels of (WT)BRAF and (V600E)BRAF were not altered in MEFs derived from mice with the homozygous knockin (R482Q)FBXW7 mutation. Overall these data confirm the existence of a negative feedback pathway by which BRAF protein stability is regulated by ERK. However, unlike the situation in C. elegans, FBXW7 does not play a unique role in mediating subsequent BRAF degradation. PMID:26898828

  18. Dependence of stem cell fate in Arabidopsis on a feedback loop regulated by CLV3 activity.

    PubMed

    Brand, U; Fletcher, J C; Hobe, M; Meyerowitz, E M; Simon, R

    2000-07-28

    The fate of stem cells in plant meristems is governed by directional signaling systems that are regulated by negative feedback. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the CLAVATA (CLV) genes encode the essential components of a negative, stem cell-restricting pathway. We used transgenic plants overexpressing CLV3 to show that meristem cell accumulation and fate depends directly on the level of CLV3 activity and that CLV3 signaling occurs exclusively through a CLV1/CLV2 receptor kinase complex. We also demonstrate that the CLV pathway acts by repressing the activity of the transcription factor WUSCHEL, an element of the positive, stem cell-promoting pathway. PMID:10915624

  19. Sensory feedback, error correction, and remapping in a multiple oscillator model of place-cell activity.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Joseph D; Knierim, James J; Zhang, Kechen

    2011-01-01

    Mammals navigate by integrating self-motion signals ("path integration") and occasionally fixing on familiar environmental landmarks. The rat hippocampus is a model system of spatial representation in which place cells are thought to integrate both sensory and spatial information from entorhinal cortex. The localized firing fields of hippocampal place cells and entorhinal grid-cells demonstrate a phase relationship with the local theta (6-10 Hz) rhythm that may be a temporal signature of path integration. However, encoding self-motion in the phase of theta oscillations requires high temporal precision and is susceptible to idiothetic noise, neuronal variability, and a changing environment. We present a model based on oscillatory interference theory, previously studied in the context of grid cells, in which transient temporal synchronization among a pool of path-integrating theta oscillators produces hippocampal-like place fields. We hypothesize that a spatiotemporally extended sensory interaction with external cues modulates feedback to the theta oscillators. We implement a form of this cue-driven feedback and show that it can retrieve fixed points in the phase code of position. A single cue can smoothly reset oscillator phases to correct for both systematic errors and continuous noise in path integration. Further, simulations in which local and global cues are rotated against each other reveal a phase-code mechanism in which conflicting cue arrangements can reproduce experimentally observed distributions of "partial remapping" responses. This abstract model demonstrates that phase-code feedback can provide stability to the temporal coding of position during navigation and may contribute to the context-dependence of hippocampal spatial representations. While the anatomical substrates of these processes have not been fully characterized, our findings suggest several signatures that can be evaluated in future experiments. PMID:21994494

  20. A Coexisting Fungal-Bacterial Community Stabilizes Soil Decomposition Activity in a Microcosm Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ushio, Masayuki; Miki, Takeshi; Balser, Teri C.

    2013-01-01

    How diversity influences the stability of a community function is a major question in ecology. However, only limited empirical investigations of the diversity–stability relationship in soil microbial communities have been undertaken, despite the fundamental role of microbial communities in driving carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we conducted a microcosm experiment to investigate the relationship between microbial diversity and stability of soil decomposition activities against changes in decomposition substrate quality by manipulating microbial community using selective biocides. We found that soil respiration rates and degradation enzyme activities by a coexisting fungal and bacterial community (a taxonomically diverse community) are more stable against changes in substrate quality (plant leaf materials) than those of a fungi-dominated or a bacteria-dominated community (less diverse community). Flexible changes in the microbial community composition and/or physiological state in the coexisting community against changes in substrate quality, as inferred by the soil lipid profile, may be the mechanism underlying this positive diversity–stability relationship. Our experiment demonstrated that the previously found positive diversity–stability relationship could also be valid in the soil microbial community. Our results also imply that the functional/taxonomic diversity and community ecology of soil microbes should be incorporated into the context of climate–ecosystem feedbacks. Changes in substrate quality, which could be induced by climate change, have impacts on decomposition process and carbon dioxide emission from soils, but such impacts may be attenuated by the functional diversity of soil microbial communities. PMID:24260368

  1. The effect of active galactic nuclei feedback on the halo mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Weiguang; Borgani, Stefano; Murante, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    We investigate baryon effects on the halo mass function (HMF), with emphasis on the role played by active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback. Haloes are identified with both friends-of-friends (FoF) and spherical overdensity (SO) algorithms. We embed the standard SO algorithm into a memory-controlled frame program and present the Python spherIcAl Overdensity code - PIAO (Chinese character: ). For both FoF and SO haloes, the effect of AGN feedback is that of suppressing the HMFs to a level even below that of dark matter (DM) simulations. The ratio between the HMFs in the AGN and in the DM simulations is ˜0.8 at overdensity Δc = 500, a difference that increases at higher overdensity Δc = 2500, with no significant redshift and mass dependence. A decrease of the halo masses ratio with respect to the DM case induces the decrease of the HMF in the AGN simulation. The shallower inner density profiles of haloes in the AGN simulation witnesses that mass reduction is induced by the sudden displacement of gas induced by thermal AGN feedback. We provide fitting functions to describe halo mass variations at different overdensities, which can recover the HMFs with a residual random scatter ≲5 per cent for halo masses larger than 1013 h-1 M⊙.

  2. Feedback circuitry between miR-218 repression and RTK activation in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Lijoy K; Huangyang, Peiwei; Mucaj, Vera; Lee, Samuel S.; Skuli, Nicolas; Eisinger-Mathason, T.S. Karin; Biju, Kevin; Li, Bo; Venneti, Sriram; Lal, Priti; Lathia, Justin D; Rich, Jeremy N; Keith, Brian; Simon, M Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathway signaling plays a central role in the growth and progression of Glioblastoma (GBM), a highly aggressive group of brain tumors. We recently reported that miR-218 repression, an essentially uniform feature of human GBM, directly promotes RTK hyperactivation by increasing the expression of key positive signaling effectors, including EGFR, PLCγ1, PIK3CA and ARAF (1). However, enhanced RTK signaling is known to activate compensatory inhibitory feedback mechanisms in both normal and cancer cells. We demonstrate here that miR-218 repression in GBM cells also increases the abundance of additional upstream and downstream signaling mediators, including PDGFRα, RSK2, and S6K1, which collectively function to alleviate inhibitory RTK feedback regulation. In turn, RTK signaling suppresses miR-218 expression via STAT3, which binds directly to the miR-218 locus, along with BCLAF1, to repress its expression. These data identify novel interacting feedback loops by which miR-218 repression promotes increased RTK signaling in high-grade gliomas. PMID:25943352

  3. Effects of Goal Line Feedback on Level, Slope, and Stability of Performance within Curriculum-Based Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Nineteen special educators implemented Curriculum-Based Measurement with a total of 36 learning-disabled math pupils in grades 2-8 to examine the effects of goal line feedback. Results indicated comparable levels and slopes of student performance across treatment conditions, although goal line feedback was associated with greater performance…

  4. 3D active stabilization system with sub-micrometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Kursu, Olli; Tuukkanen, Tuomas; Rahkonen, Timo; Vähäsöyrinki, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Stable positioning between a measurement probe and its target from sub- to few micrometer scales has become a prerequisite in precision metrology and in cellular level measurements from biological tissues. Here we present a 3D stabilization system based on an optoelectronic displacement sensor and custom piezo-actuators driven by a feedback control loop that constantly aims to zero the relative movement between the sensor and the target. We used simulations and prototyping to characterize the developed system. Our results show that 95% attenuation of movement artifacts is achieved at 1 Hz with stabilization performance declining to ca. 70% attenuation at 10 Hz. Stabilization bandwidth is limited by mechanical resonances within the displacement sensor that occur at relatively low frequencies, and are attributable to the sensor's high force sensitivity. We successfully used brain derived micromotion trajectories as a demonstration of complex movement stabilization. The micromotion was reduced to a level of ∼1 µm with nearly 100 fold attenuation at the lower frequencies that are typically associated with physiological processes. These results, and possible improvements of the system, are discussed with a focus on possible ways to increase the sensor's force sensitivity without compromising overall system bandwidth. PMID:22900045

  5. 3D Active Stabilization System with Sub-Micrometer Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Rahkonen, Timo; Vähäsöyrinki, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Stable positioning between a measurement probe and its target from sub- to few micrometer scales has become a prerequisite in precision metrology and in cellular level measurements from biological tissues. Here we present a 3D stabilization system based on an optoelectronic displacement sensor and custom piezo-actuators driven by a feedback control loop that constantly aims to zero the relative movement between the sensor and the target. We used simulations and prototyping to characterize the developed system. Our results show that 95 % attenuation of movement artifacts is achieved at 1 Hz with stabilization performance declining to ca. 70 % attenuation at 10 Hz. Stabilization bandwidth is limited by mechanical resonances within the displacement sensor that occur at relatively low frequencies, and are attributable to the sensor's high force sensitivity. We successfully used brain derived micromotion trajectories as a demonstration of complex movement stabilization. The micromotion was reduced to a level of ∼1 µm with nearly 100 fold attenuation at the lower frequencies that are typically associated with physiological processes. These results, and possible improvements of the system, are discussed with a focus on possible ways to increase the sensor's force sensitivity without compromising overall system bandwidth. PMID:22900045

  6. Implementation of a physiologically identified PD feedback controller for regulating the active ankle torque during quiet stance.

    PubMed

    Vette, Albert H; Masani, Kei; Popovic, Milos R

    2007-06-01

    Our studies have recently demonstrated that a proportional and derivative (PD) feedback controller, which takes advantage of the body's position and velocity information to regulate balance during quiet standing, can compensate for long neurological time delays and generate a control command that precedes body sway by 100-200 ms. Furthermore, PD gain pairs were identified that ensure a robust system behavior and at the same time generate dynamic responses as observed in quiet standing experiments with able-bodied subjects. The purpose of the present study was to experimentally verify that the PD controller identified in our previous study can: 1) regulate the active ankle torque to stabilize the body during quiet standing in spite of long neurological time delays and 2) generate system dynamics, i.e., a motor command and body sway fluctuation, that successfully mimic those of the physiologic system of quiet standing. Our real-time closed-loop feedback circuit consisted of a center of mass position sensor and a functional electrical stimulator that elicited contractions of the plantar flexors as determined by the aforementioned PD controller. The control system regulated upright stance of a subject who was partially de-afferented and de-efferented due to a neurological disorder called von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome (McCormick Grade III). While the subject was able to generate a motor command for the ankle joints, he could not regulate the resulting torque sufficiently due to a lack of sensory feedback and motor control. It is important to mention that a time delay was included in the closed-loop circuit of the PD controller to mimic the actual neurological time delay observed in able-bodied individuals. The experimental results of this case study suggest that the proposed PD controller in combination with a functional electrical stimulation system can regulate the active ankle torque during quiet stance and generate the same system dynamics as observed in healthy

  7. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.; Dirusso, E.; Fleming, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 microns down to approximately 25 microns (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  8. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 micrometers down to approximately 25 micrometers (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  9. Brain activity elicited by positive and negative feedback in preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Mai, Xiaoqin; Tardif, Twila; Doan, Stacey N; Liu, Chao; Gehring, William J; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the processing of positive vs. negative feedback in children aged 4-5 years, we devised a prize-guessing game that is analogous to gambling tasks used to measure feedback-related brain responses in adult studies. Unlike adult studies, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) elicited by positive feedback was as large as that elicited by negative feedback, suggesting that the neural system underlying the FRN may not process feedback valence in early childhood. In addition, positive feedback, compared with negative feedback, evoked a larger P1 over the occipital scalp area and a larger positive slow wave (PSW) over the right central-parietal scalp area. We believe that the PSW is related to emotional arousal and the intensive focus on positive feedback that is present in the preschool and early school years has adaptive significance for both cognitive and emotional development during this period. PMID:21526189

  10. Brain Activity Elicited by Positive and Negative Feedback in Preschool-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Xiaoqin; Tardif, Twila; Doan, Stacey N.; Liu, Chao; Gehring, William J.; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the processing of positive vs. negative feedback in children aged 4–5 years, we devised a prize-guessing game that is analogous to gambling tasks used to measure feedback-related brain responses in adult studies. Unlike adult studies, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) elicited by positive feedback was as large as that elicited by negative feedback, suggesting that the neural system underlying the FRN may not process feedback valence in early childhood. In addition, positive feedback, compared with negative feedback, evoked a larger P1 over the occipital scalp area and a larger positive slow wave (PSW) over the right central-parietal scalp area. We believe that the PSW is related to emotional arousal and the intensive focus on positive feedback that is present in the preschool and early school years has adaptive significance for both cognitive and emotional development during this period. PMID:21526189

  11. VFC - Variational Feedback Controller and its application to semi-active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, G.; Carcaterra, A.

    2016-08-01

    Active and semi-active control of oscillating devices and structures is a challenging field and this paper proposes an original investigation based on variational controls that can be successfully applied to mechanical systems. The method produces a general class of new controllers, named VFC - Variational Feedback Controllers, that is the main theoretical contribution of the paper. The value of the theory relies on using a reformulation of the Variational Optimal Control Theory, that has in general the limit of producing control program strategies and not directly feedback control methods. The difficulties are in fact related to the intrinsic nature of the variational optimal control, that must solve initial and final boundary conditions. A special definition of the class of the considered objective functions, permits to skip this difficulty, producing a pure feedback control. The presented theory goes beyond with respect to the most acknowledged LQR variational-based techniques, in that VFC can be applied to more general nonlinear dynamical systems, even with finite time horizon. To test the effectiveness of the novel approach in real engineering problems, a deep investigation on nonlinear suspension systems treated by VFC is proposed in this paper. To this aim, VFC is systematically compared with the most recent methods available in this field and suitable to deal with nonlinear system control of car suspensions. In particular, the comparative analysis is made in terms of both comfort and handling key performance indexes, that permits to easily and significantly compare different control logics, such as the Sky-hook and Ground-hook control families, the Acceleration and Power Driven Dampers. The results of this comparison are collected in a performance plane, having comfort and handling indexes as coordinate axes, showing that VFC controllers completely cover the regions reached by the other mentioned control logics in this plane, but reveal to have access to

  12. Feedback Activation of STAT3 as a Cancer Drug-Resistance Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengguang; Li, Huameng; Lin, Huey-Jen; Yang, Shulin; Lin, Jiayuh; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays crucial roles in several cellular processes such as cell proliferation and survival, and has been found to be aberrantly activated in many cancers. Much research has explored the leading mechanisms for regulating the STAT3 pathway and its role in promoting tumorigenesis. We focus here on recent evidence suggesting that feedback activation of STAT3 plays a prominent role in mediating drug resistance to a broad spectrum of targeted cancer therapies and chemotherapies. We highlight the potential of co-targeting STAT3 and its primary target to overcome drug resistance, and provide perspective on repurposing clinically approved drugs as STAT3 pathway inhibitors, in combination with the FDA-approved receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors, to improve clinical outcome of cancer treatment. PMID:26576830

  13. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  14. Oxytocin selectively facilitates learning with social feedback and increases activity and functional connectivity in emotional memory and reward processing regions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiehui; Qi, Song; Becker, Benjamin; Luo, Lizhu; Gao, Shan; Gong, Qiyong; Hurlemann, René; Kendrick, Keith M

    2015-06-01

    In male Caucasian subjects, learning is facilitated by receipt of social compared with non-social feedback, and the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) facilitates this effect. In this study, we have first shown a cultural difference in that male Chinese subjects actually perform significantly worse in the same reinforcement associated learning task with social (emotional faces) compared with non-social feedback. Nevertheless, in two independent double-blind placebo (PLC) controlled between-subject design experiments we found OXT still selectively facilitated learning with social feedback. Similar to Caucasian subjects this OXT effect was strongest with feedback using female rather than male faces. One experiment performed in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that during the response, but not feedback phase of the task, OXT selectively increased activity in the amygdala, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and putamen during the social feedback condition, and functional connectivity between the amygdala and insula and caudate. Therefore, OXT may be increasing the salience and reward value of anticipated social feedback. In the PLC group, response times and state anxiety scores during social feedback were associated with signal changes in these same regions but not in the OXT group. OXT may therefore have also facilitated learning by reducing anxiety in the social feedback condition. Overall our results provide the first evidence for cultural differences in social facilitation of learning per se, but a similar selective enhancement of learning with social feedback under OXT. This effect of OXT may be associated with enhanced responses and functional connectivity in emotional memory and reward processing regions. PMID:25664702

  15. Active control of ECCD-induced tearing mode stabilization in coupled NIMROD/GENRAY HPC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Kruger, Scott; Held, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Actively controlled ECCD applied in or near magnetic islands formed by NTMs has been successfully shown to control/suppress these modes, despite uncertainties in island O-point locations (where induced current is most stabilizing) relative to the RF deposition region. Integrated numerical models of the mode stabilization process can resolve these uncertainties and augment experimental efforts to determine optimal ITER NTM stabilization strategies. The advanced SWIM model incorporates RF effects in the equations/closures of extended MHD as 3D (not toroidal or bounce-averaged) quasilinear diffusion coefficients. Equilibration of driven current within the island geometry is modeled using the same extended MHD dynamics governing the physics of island formation, yielding a more accurate/self-consistent picture of island response to RF drive. Additionally, a numerical active feedback control system gathers data from synthetic diagnostics to dynamically trigger & spatially align the RF fields. Computations which model the RF deposition using ray tracing, assemble the 3D QL operator from ray & profile data, calculate the resultant xMHD forces, and dynamically realign the RF to more efficiently stabilize modes are presented; the efficacy of various control strategies is also discussed. Supported by the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling (CEMM); see also https://cswim.org.

  16. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  17. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization. PMID:26730390

  18. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca2+ ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca2+ concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca2+ binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance. PMID:22580695

  19. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  20. WWOX guards genome stability by activating ATM

    PubMed Central

    Hazan, Idit; Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Hofmann, Thomas G; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) tend to break upon replication stress and have been suggested to be “hot spots” for genomic instability. Recent evidence, however, implies that in the wake of DNA damage, WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX, the gene product of the FRA16D fragile site), associates with ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and regulates its activation to maintain genomic integrity. PMID:27308504

  1. Clinical study of student learning using mastery style versus immediate feedback online activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladding, Gary; Gutmann, Brianne; Schroeder, Noah; Stelzer, Timothy

    2015-06-01

    This paper is part of a series of studies to improve the efficacy of online physics homework activities by integrating narrated animated solutions with mastery inspired exercises. In a clinical study using first- and second-year university students, the mastery group attempted question sets in four levels, with animated solutions between each attempt, until mastery was achieved on each level. This combined elements of formative assessment, the worked example effect, and mastery learning. The homework group attempted questions with immediate feedback and unlimited tries. The two groups took a similar amount of time to complete the activity. The mastery group significantly outperformed the homework group on a free response post-test that required students to show their work in solving near and far transfer problems.

  2. Feedback Activation of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor Limits Response to Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hanlin; Qu, Jia; Jin, Nan; Xu, Jun; Lin, Chenchu; Chen, Yi; Yang, Xinying; He, Xiang; Tang, Shuai; Lan, Xiaojing; Yang, Xiaotong; Chen, Ziqi; Huang, Min; Ding, Jian; Geng, Meiyu

    2016-09-12

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have demonstrated clinical benefits in subtypes of hematological malignancies. However, the efficacy of HDAC inhibitors in solid tumors remains uncertain. This study takes breast cancer as a model to understand mechanisms accounting for limited response of HDAC inhibitors in solid tumors and to seek combination solutions. We discover that feedback activation of leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) signaling in breast cancer limits the response to HDAC inhibition. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibition increases histone acetylation at the LIFR gene promoter, which recruits bromodomain protein BRD4, upregulates LIFR expression, and activates JAK1-STAT3 signaling. Importantly, JAK1 or BRD4 inhibition sensitizes breast cancer to HDAC inhibitors, implicating combination inhibition of HDAC with JAK1 or BRD4 as potential therapies for breast cancer. PMID:27622335

  3. Network-Based Output Tracking Control for a Class of T-S Fuzzy Systems That Can Not Be Stabilized by Nondelayed Output Feedback Controllers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Han, Qing-Long; Jia, Xinchun

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates network-based output tracking control for a T-S fuzzy system that can not be stabilized by a nondelayed fuzzy static output feedback controller, but can be stabilized by a delayed fuzzy static output feedback controller. By intentionally introducing a communication network that produces proper network-induced delays in the feedback control loop, a stable and satisfactory tracking control can be ensured for the T-S fuzzy system. Due to the presence of network-induced delays, the fuzzy system and the fuzzy tracking controller operate in an asynchronous way. Taking the asynchronous operation and network-induced delays into consideration, the network-based tracking control system is modeled as an asynchronous T-S fuzzy system with an interval time-varying delay. A new delay-dependent criterion for L2 -gain tracking performance is derived by using the deviation bounds of asynchronous normalized membership functions and a complete Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional. Applying a particle swarm optimization technique with the feasibility of the derived criterion, a novel design algorithm is presented to determine the minimum L2 -gain tracking performance and control gains simultaneously. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by performing network-based output tracking control of a Duffing-Van der Pol's oscillator. PMID:25222965

  4. Non-hypoxic activation of the negative regulatory feedback loop of prolyl-hydroxylase oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Tug, Suzan; Delos Reyes, Buena; Fandrey, Joachim; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, Utta

    2009-07-10

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) coordinate cellular responses towards hypoxia. HIFs are mainly regulated by a group of prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) that in the presence of oxygen, target the HIFalpha subunit for degradation. Herein, we studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating PHD activities under normoxic conditions. In the present study we show that different NO-donors initially inhibited endogenous PHD2 activity which led to accumulation of HIF-1alpha subsequently to enhance HIF-1 dependent increased PHD2 promoter activity. Consequently PHD2 abundance and activity were strongly induced which caused downregulation of HIF-1alpha. Interestingly, upregulation of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO was not found in cells that lack an intact pVHL dependent degradation pathway. Recovery of PHD activity required intact cells and was not observed in cell extracts or recombinant PHD2. In conclusion induction of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO is dependent on a feedback loop initiated despite normoxic conditions. PMID:19427832

  5. Teleoperator comfort and psychometric stability: Criteria for limiting master-controller forces of operation and feedback during telemanipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Steven F.; Hershkowitz, Elaine; Zik, John

    1989-01-01

    The following question is addressed: How much force should operators exert, or experience, when operating a telemanipulator master-controller for sustained periods without encountering significant fatigue and discomfort, and without loss of stability in psychometric perception of force. The need to minimize exertion demands to avoid fatigue is diametrically opposed by the need to present a wide range of force stimuli to enhance perception of applied or reflected forces. For 104 minutes subjects repetitiously performed a series of 15 s isometric pinch grasps; controlled at 5, 15, and 25 percent of their maximum voluntary strength. Cyclic pinch grasps were separated by rest intervals of 7.5 and 15 s. Upon completion of every 10 minute period, subjects interrupted grasping activities to gage the intensity of fatigue and discomfort in the hand and forearm using a cross-modal matching technique. A series of psychometric tests were then conducted to determine accuracy and stability in the subject's perception of force experienced. Results showed that onset of sensations of discomfort and fatigue were dependent upon the magnitude of grasp force, work/rest ratio, and progression of task. Declines in force magnitude estimation slopes, indicating a reduction in force perception sensitivity, occurred with increased grasp force when work/rest ratios were greater than 1.0. Specific recommendations for avoiding discomfort and shifts in force perception, by limiting pinch grasp force required for master-controller operation and range of force reflection or work/rest ratios, are provided.

  6. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  7. MicroRNAs Constitute a Negative Feedback Loop in Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Griss, Kathrin; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Seidel, Kerstin; Stielow, Christina; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Eberhardt, Martin; Wilhelm, Jochen; Vera, Julio; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-07-15

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes high mortality as a major pneumonia-inducing pathogen. In pneumonia, control of innate immunity is necessary to prevent organ damage. We assessed the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) as regulators in pneumococcal infection of human macrophages. Exposure of primary blood-derived human macrophages with pneumococci resulted in transcriptional changes in several gene clusters and a significant deregulation of 10 microRNAs. Computational network analysis retrieved miRNA-146a as one putatively important regulator of pneumococci-induced host cell activation. Its induction depended on bacterial structural integrity and was completely inhibited by blocking Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) or depleting its mediator MyD88. Furthermore, induction of miRNA-146a release did not require the autocrine feedback of interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α released from infected macrophages, and it repressed the TLR-2 downstream mediators IRAK-1 and TRAF-6, as well as the inflammatory factors cyclooxygenase 2 and interleukin 1β. In summary, pneumococci recognition induces a negative feedback loop, preventing excessive inflammation via miR-146a and potentially other miRNAs. PMID:26984146

  8. Contributions of Central Command and Muscle Feedback to Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Contracting Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Boulton, Daniel; Taylor, Chloe E.; Macefield, Vaughan G.; Green, Simon

    2016-01-01

    During voluntary contractions, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) to contracting muscles increases in proportion to force but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. To shed light on these mechanisms, particularly the influences of central command and muscle afferent feedback, the present study tested the hypothesis that MSNA is greater during voluntary compared with electrically-evoked contractions. Seven male subjects performed a series of 1-min isometric dorsiflexion contractions (left leg) separated by 2-min rest periods, alternating between voluntary and electrically-evoked contractions at similar forces (5–10% of maximum). MSNA was recorded continuously (microneurography) from the left peroneal nerve and quantified from cardiac-synchronized, negative-going spikes in the neurogram. Compared with pre-contraction values, MSNA increased by 51 ± 34% (P < 0.01) during voluntary contractions but did not change significantly during electrically-evoked contractions (−8 ± 12%, P > 0.05). MSNA analyzed at 15-s intervals revealed that this effect of voluntary contraction appeared 15–30 s after contraction onset (P < 0.01), remained elevated until the end of contraction, and disappeared within 15 s after contraction. These findings suggest that central command, and not feedback from contracting muscle, is the primary mechanism responsible for the increase in MSNA to contracting muscle. The time-course of MSNA suggests that there is a longer delay in the onset of this effect compared with its cessation after contraction. PMID:27242537

  9. Contributions of Central Command and Muscle Feedback to Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Contracting Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Daniel; Taylor, Chloe E; Macefield, Vaughan G; Green, Simon

    2016-01-01

    During voluntary contractions, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) to contracting muscles increases in proportion to force but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. To shed light on these mechanisms, particularly the influences of central command and muscle afferent feedback, the present study tested the hypothesis that MSNA is greater during voluntary compared with electrically-evoked contractions. Seven male subjects performed a series of 1-min isometric dorsiflexion contractions (left leg) separated by 2-min rest periods, alternating between voluntary and electrically-evoked contractions at similar forces (5-10% of maximum). MSNA was recorded continuously (microneurography) from the left peroneal nerve and quantified from cardiac-synchronized, negative-going spikes in the neurogram. Compared with pre-contraction values, MSNA increased by 51 ± 34% (P < 0.01) during voluntary contractions but did not change significantly during electrically-evoked contractions (-8 ± 12%, P > 0.05). MSNA analyzed at 15-s intervals revealed that this effect of voluntary contraction appeared 15-30 s after contraction onset (P < 0.01), remained elevated until the end of contraction, and disappeared within 15 s after contraction. These findings suggest that central command, and not feedback from contracting muscle, is the primary mechanism responsible for the increase in MSNA to contracting muscle. The time-course of MSNA suggests that there is a longer delay in the onset of this effect compared with its cessation after contraction. PMID:27242537

  10. Imaging of enzyme activity by scanning electrochemical microscope equipped with a feedback control for substrate-probe distance.

    PubMed

    Oyamatsu, Daisuke; Hirano, Yu; Kanaya, Norihiro; Mase, Yoshiaki; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2003-08-01

    The enzymatic activity of diaphorase (Dp) immobilized on a solid substrate was characterized using a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) with shear force feedback to control the substrate-probe distance. The shear force between the substrate and the probe was monitored with a tuning fork-type quartz crystal and used as the feedback control to set the microelectrode probe close to the substrate surface. The sensitivity and the contrast of the SECM image were improved in the constant distance mode (distance, 50 nm) with the shear force feedback compared to the image in the constant height mode without the feedback. By using this system, the SECM and topographic images of the immobilized diaphorase were simultaneously measured. The microelectrode tip used in this study was ground aslant like a syringe needle in order to obtain the shaper topographic images. This shape was also effective for avoiding the interference during the diffusion of the enzyme substrates. PMID:12893317

  11. Effect of wrist-worn activity monitor feedback on physical activity behavior: A randomized controlled trial in Finnish young men

    PubMed Central

    Jauho, Anna-Maiju; Pyky, Riitta; Ahola, Riikka; Kangas, Maarit; Virtanen, Paula; Korpelainen, Raija; Jämsä, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the use of an activity monitor providing feedback has an effect on physical activity (PA) in young men. A population-based sample of 276 conscription-aged (mean = 17.9, SD = 0.7 years) men participated in a 3-month randomized controlled trial in Oulu in 2012. Participants were randomized to an intervention group (INT, N = 137) and a control group (CON, N = 139). INT received a wrist-worn monitor (Polar Active) showing daily activity, and CON received identical monitors without feedback. Main outcome was the change from baseline in objectively measured weekly time spent in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and sedentary activity (SED), as assessed by generalized estimation equations (GEE). Other lifestyle factors were assessed by a questionnaire at baseline and at 3 months. Weekly physical activity data (≥ 4 days with ≥ 8 h each) were obtained from 72 (53%) and 90 (65%) men in the INT and CON, respectively. Based on GEE, time spent in MVPA increased (p = 0.012) and SED decreased (p = 0.032) in the INT compared with the CON. During the first 7 weeks, the INT spent on average 1 h less sedentary than the CON (t-test, p < 0.05). During the first week, the INT showed 12 minutes more MVPA compared to the CON (t-test, p = 0.034). Based on questionnaire data, the proportion of the most sedentary men decreased in the INT (Wilcoxon test, 28% vs. 10%, p = 0.029), with no change in the CON (20% vs. 19%, p = 0.546). To conclude, a wrist-worn activity monitor providing feedback had a short-term positive effect on PA and SED in young men. Trial registration This is a pilot study for a larger randomized controlled trial registered to the clinical trials register NCT01376986. PMID:26844128

  12. Cortical activity during motor execution, motor imagery, and imagery-based online feedback

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kai J.; Schalk, Gerwin; Fetz, Eberhard E.; den Nijs, Marcel; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Rao, Rajesh P. N.

    2010-01-01

    Imagery of motor movement plays an important role in learning of complex motor skills, from learning to serve in tennis to perfecting a pirouette in ballet. What and where are the neural substrates that underlie motor imagery-based learning? We measured electrocorticographic cortical surface potentials in eight human subjects during overt action and kinesthetic imagery of the same movement, focusing on power in “high frequency” (76–100 Hz) and “low frequency” (8–32 Hz) ranges. We quantitatively establish that the spatial distribution of local neuronal population activity during motor imagery mimics the spatial distribution of activity during actual motor movement. By comparing responses to electrocortical stimulation with imagery-induced cortical surface activity, we demonstrate the role of primary motor areas in movement imagery. The magnitude of imagery-induced cortical activity change was ∼25% of that associated with actual movement. However, when subjects learned to use this imagery to control a computer cursor in a simple feedback task, the imagery-induced activity change was significantly augmented, even exceeding that of overt movement. PMID:20160084

  13. Smart conjugated polymer nanocarrier for healthy weight loss by negative feedback regulation of lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhu, Sha; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Pei-Jian; Yao, Xi-Kuang; Qian, Cheng-Gen; Zhang, Can; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2016-02-14

    Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution. PMID:26790821

  14. Force Feedback Controls Motor Activity and Mechanical Properties of Self-Assembling Branched Actin Networks.

    PubMed

    Bieling, Peter; Li, Tai-De; Weichsel, Julian; McGorty, Ryan; Jreij, Pamela; Huang, Bo; Fletcher, Daniel A; Mullins, R Dyche

    2016-01-14

    Branched actin networks--created by the Arp2/3 complex, capping protein, and a nucleation promoting factor--generate and transmit forces required for many cellular processes, but their response to force is poorly understood. To address this, we assembled branched actin networks in vitro from purified components and used simultaneous fluorescence and atomic force microscopy to quantify their molecular composition and material properties under various forces. Remarkably, mechanical loading of these self-assembling materials increases their density, power, and efficiency. Microscopically, increased density reflects increased filament number and altered geometry but no change in average length. Macroscopically, increased density enhances network stiffness and resistance to mechanical failure beyond those of isotropic actin networks. These effects endow branched actin networks with memory of their mechanical history that shapes their material properties and motor activity. This work reveals intrinsic force feedback mechanisms by which mechanical resistance makes self-assembling actin networks stiffer, stronger, and more powerful. PMID:26771487

  15. Experimental Investigation of Active Feedback Control of Turbulent Transport in a Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Mark Allen

    2013-07-07

    A new and unique basic plasma science laboratory device - the HelCat device (HELicon-CAThode) - has been constructed and is operating at the University of New Mexico. HelCat is a 4 m long, 0.5 m diameter device, with magnetic field up to 2.2 kG, that has two independent plasmas sources - an RF helicon source, and a thermionic cathode. These two sources, which can operate independently or simultaneously, are capable of producing plasmas with a wide range of parameters and turbulence characteristics, well suited to a variety of basic plasma physics experiments. An extensive set of plasma diagnostics is also operating. Experiments investigating the active feedback control of turbulent transport of particles and heat via electrode biasing to affect plasma ExB flows are underway, and ongoing.

  16. Bubble mass center and fluid feedback force fluctuations activated by constant lateral impulse with variable thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1995-01-01

    Sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 are investigated in response to constant lateral impulse with variable thrust. The study, including how the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacts to the constant impulse with variable time period of thrust action in microgravity, how amplitudes of bubble mass center fluctuates with growth and decay of disturbances, and how fluid feedback forces fluctuates in activating on the rotating dewar through the dynamics of sloshing waves are investigated. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertial frame spacecraft bound coordinate with lateral impulses actuating on the rotating dewar in both inertial and non-inertial frames of thrust. Results of the simulations are illustrated.

  17. Smart conjugated polymer nanocarrier for healthy weight loss by negative feedback regulation of lipase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhu, Sha; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Pei-Jian; Yao, Xi-Kuang; Qian, Cheng-Gen; Zhang, Can; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution.Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution

  18. Active and Passive Interferometric Fringe Stabilization for Quantum Communications in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Joseph; Graham, Trent; Kwiat, Paul

    2015-05-01

    In interferometry, the relative phase between the paths is liable to drift over time due to environmental factors, i.e., vibrations in the components and from turbulence and temperature fluctuations in the air. If time-bin encoded photons are received from a moving space platform, e.g., a satellite or the International Space Station, there would be an additional large relative temporal shift because of the movement of the source toward or away from the receiver. This shift would alter the temporal coherence of adjacent timebins-as measured by a suitable temporally-unbalanced interferometer-in addition to the relative phase errors from the environment. To achieve accurate measurements in this situation, the interferometer needs to be stabilized against phase drifts. We have employed an active and passive stabilization scheme for a double unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration; while passive damping reduces most of the phase drift due to vibrations and fluctuations from the air, we designed and implemented an active feedback correction system to stabilize the remaining phase drift and the simulated temporal drift.

  19. Activation and stabilization of enzymes in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Muhammad; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2010-06-28

    As environmentally benign "green" solvents, room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have been used as solvents or (co)solvents in biocatalytic reactions and processes for a decade. The technological utility of enzymes can be enhanced greatly by their use in ionic liquids (ILs) rather than in conventional organic solvents or in their natural aqueous reaction media. In fact, the combination of green properties and unique tailor-made physicochemical properties make ILs excellent non-aqueous solvents for enzymatic catalysis with numerous advantages over other solvents, including high conversion rates, high selectivity, better enzyme stability, as well as better recoverability and recyclability. However, in many cases, particularly in hydrophilic ILs, enzymes show relative instability and/or lower activity compared with conventional solvents. To improve the enzyme activity as well as stability in ILs, various attempts have been made by modifying the form of the enzymes. Examples are enzyme immobilization onto support materials via adsorption or multipoint attachment, lyophilization in the presence of stabilizing agents, chemical modification with stabilizing agents, formation of cross-linked enzyme aggregates, pretreatment with polar organic solvents or enzymes combined with suitable surfactants to form microemulsions. The use of these enzyme preparations in ILs can dramatically increase the solvent tolerance, enhance activity as well as stability, and improve enantioselectivity. This perspective highlights a number of pronounced strategies being used successfully for activation and stabilization of enzymes in non-aqueous ILs media. This review is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather to present a general overview of the potential approaches to activate enzymes for diverse enzymatic processes and biotransformations in ILs. PMID:20445940

  20. Intrinsic Negative Feedback Governs Activation Surge in Two-Component Regulatory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Won-Sik; Zwir, Igor; Huang, Henry V.; Shin, Dongwoo; Kato, Akinori; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY PhoP and PhoQ comprise a two-component system in the bacterium Salmonella enterica. PhoQ is the sensor kinase/phosphatase that modifies the phosphorylation state of the regulator PhoP in response to stimuli. The amount of phosphorylated PhoP surges after activation, then declines to reach a steady-state level. We now recapitulate this surge in vitro by incubating PhoP and PhoQ with ATP and ADP. Mathematical modeling identified PhoQ’s affinity for ADP as the key parameter dictating phosphorylated PhoP levels, as ADP promotes PhoQ’s phosphatase activity toward phosphorylated PhoP. The lid covering the nucleotide-binding pocket of PhoQ governs the kinase to phosphatase switch because a lid mutation that decreased ADP binding compromised PhoQ’s phosphatase activity in vitro and resulted in sustained expression of PhoP-dependent mRNAs in vivo. This feedback mechanism may curtail futile ATP consumption because ADP not only stimulates PhoQ’s phosphatase activity but also inhibits ATP binding necessary for the kinase reaction. PMID:22325356

  1. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  2. Feeling Better About Self After Receiving Negative Feedback: When the Sense That Ability Can Be Improved Is Activated.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyi; Chen, Yinghe; Tian, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    Past studies suggest that managers and educators often consider negative feedback as a motivator for individuals to think about their shortcomings and improve their work, but delivering negative feedback does not always achieve desired results. The present study, based on incremental theory, employed an intervention method to activate the belief that a particular ability could be improved after negative feedback. Three experiments tested the intervention effect on negative self-relevant emotion. Study 1 indicated conveying suggestions for improving ability reduced negative self-relevant emotion after negative feedback. Study 2 tested whether activating the sense of possible improvement in the ability could reduce negative self-relevant emotion. Results indicated activating the belief that ability could be improved reduced negative self-relevant emotion after failure, but delivering emotion management information alone did not yield the same effect. Study 3 extended the results by affirming the effort participants made in doing the test, and found the affirmation reduced negative self-relevant emotion. Collectively, the findings indicated focusing on the belief that the ability could be improved in the future can reduce negative self-relevant emotion after negative feedback. PMID:25699420

  3. Active and passive stabilization of body pitch in insect flight

    PubMed Central

    Ristroph, Leif; Ristroph, Gunnar; Morozova, Svetlana; Bergou, Attila J.; Chang, Song; Guckenheimer, John; Wang, Z. Jane; Cohen, Itai

    2013-01-01

    Flying insects have evolved sophisticated sensory–motor systems, and here we argue that such systems are used to keep upright against intrinsic flight instabilities. We describe a theory that predicts the instability growth rate in body pitch from flapping-wing aerodynamics and reveals two ways of achieving balanced flight: active control with sufficiently rapid reactions and passive stabilization with high body drag. By glueing magnets to fruit flies and perturbing their flight using magnetic impulses, we show that these insects employ active control that is indeed fast relative to the instability. Moreover, we find that fruit flies with their control sensors disabled can keep upright if high-drag fibres are also attached to their bodies, an observation consistent with our prediction for the passive stability condition. Finally, we extend this framework to unify the control strategies used by hovering animals and also furnish criteria for achieving pitch stability in flapping-wing robots. PMID:23697713

  4. Enhanced Somatosensory Feedback Reduces Prefrontal Cortical Activity During Walking in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Christou, Evangelos A.; Ring, Sarah A.; Williamson, John B.; Doty, Leilani

    2014-01-01

    Background. The coordination of steady state walking is relatively automatic in healthy humans, such that active attention to the details of task execution and performance (controlled processing) is low. Somatosensation is a crucial input to the spinal and brainstem circuits that facilitate this automaticity. Impaired somatosensation in older adults may reduce automaticity and increase controlled processing, thereby contributing to deficits in walking function. The primary objective of this study was to determine if enhancing somatosensory feedback can reduce controlled processing during walking, as assessed by prefrontal cortical activation. Methods. Fourteen older adults (age 77.1±5.56 years) with mild mobility deficits and mild somatosensory deficits participated in this study. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy was used to quantify metabolic activity (tissue oxygenation index, TOI) in the prefrontal cortex. Prefrontal activity and gait spatiotemporal data were measured during treadmill walking and overground walking while participants wore normal shoes and under two conditions of enhanced somatosensation: wearing textured insoles and no shoes. Results. Relative to walking with normal shoes, textured insoles yielded a bilateral reduction of prefrontal cortical activity for treadmill walking (ΔTOI = −0.85 and −1.19 for left and right hemispheres, respectively) and for overground walking (ΔTOI = −0.51 and −0.66 for left and right hemispheres, respectively). Relative to walking with normal shoes, no shoes yielded lower prefrontal cortical activity for treadmill walking (ΔTOI = −0.69 and −1.13 for left and right hemispheres, respectively), but not overground walking. Conclusions. Enhanced somatosensation reduces prefrontal activity during walking in older adults. This suggests a less intensive utilization of controlled processing during walking. PMID:25112494

  5. "Go4Life" exercise counseling, accelerometer feedback, and activity levels in older people.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Warren G; Kuhle, Carol L; Koepp, Gabriel A; McCrady-Spitzer, Shelly K; Levine, James A

    2014-01-01

    Older people are more sedentary than other age groups. We sought to determine if providing an accelerometer with feedback about activity and counseling older subjects using Go4Life educational material would increase activity levels. Participants were recruited from independent living areas within assisted living facilities and the general public in the Rochester, MN area. 49 persons aged 65-95 (79.5±7.0 years) who were ambulatory but sedentary and overweight participated in this randomized controlled crossover trial for one year. After a baseline period of 2 weeks, group 1 received an accelerometer and counseling using Go4Life educational material (www.Go4Life.nia.nih.gov) for 24 weeks and accelerometer alone for the next 24 weeks. Group 2 had no intervention for the first 24 weeks and then received an accelerometer and Go4Life based counseling for 24 weeks. There were no significant baseline differences between the two groups. The intervention was not associated with a significant change in activity, body weight, % body fat, or blood parameters (p>0.05). Older (80-93) subjects were less active than younger (65-79) subjects (p=0.003). Over the course of the 48 week study, an increase in activity level was associated with a decline in % body fat (p=0.008). Increasing activity levels benefits older patients. However, providing an accelerometer and a Go4Life based exercise counseling program did not result in a 15% improvement in activity levels in this elderly population. Alternate approaches to exercise counseling may be needed in elderly people of this age range. PMID:24485546

  6. Active stabilization to prevent surge in centrifugal compression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Greitzer, Edward M.; Simon, Jon S.; Valavani, Lena

    1993-01-01

    This report documents an experimental and analytical study of the active stabilization of surge in a centrifugal engine. The aims of the research were to extend the operating range of a compressor as far as possible and to establish the theoretical framework for the active stabilization of surge from both an aerodynamic stability and a control theoretic perspective. In particular, much attention was paid to understanding the physical limitations of active stabilization and how they are influenced by control system design parameters. Previously developed linear models of actively stabilized compressors were extended to include such nonlinear phenomena as bounded actuation, bandwidth limits, and robustness criteria. This model was then used to systematically quantify the influence of sensor-actuator selection on system performance. Five different actuation schemes were considered along with four different sensors. Sensor-actuator choice was shown to have a profound effect on the performance of the stabilized compressor. The optimum choice was not unique, but rather shown to be a strong function of some of the non-dimensional parameters which characterize the compression system dynamics. Specifically, the utility of the concepts were shown to depend on the system compliance to inertia ratio ('B' parameter) and the local slope of the compressor speedline. In general, the most effective arrangements are ones in which the actuator is most closely coupled to the compressor, such as a close-coupled bleed valve inlet jet, rather than elsewhere in the flow train, such as a fuel flow modulator. The analytical model was used to explore the influence of control system bandwidth on control effectiveness. The relevant reference frequency was shown to be the compression system's Helmholtz frequency rather than the surge frequency. The analysis shows that control bandwidths of three to ten times the Helmholtz frequency are required for larger increases in the compressor flow range

  7. Active local oscillator power stabilization for a hot electron bolometer heterodyne receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayton, D. J.; Gao, J. R.; Kooi, J. W.; Ren, Y.; Zhang, W.; de Lange, G.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the application of a new technique for actively stabilizing the power of a far infrared gas laser as the local oscillator (LO) in a superconducting hot electron bolometer (HEB) heterodyne receiver system at 2.5 THz. The technique utilizes PID feedback control of the local oscillator intensity by means of a voice-coil based swing arm actuator placed in the beam path. The HEB itself is used as a direct detector to measure incident LO power whilst simultaneously continuing to function as heterodyne mixer. Results presented here demonstrate a factor of 50 improvement in the measured total power and spectroscopic Allan variance time. Allan times of 30 seconds and 25 seconds respectively are shown for large and small area HEB's with a measured effective noise fluctuation bandwidth of 12 MHz. The technique is versatile and can be applied to any LO source and at any LO frequency.

  8. Feedback in the local Universe: Relation between star formation and AGN activity in early type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher; Baum, Stefi; Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Whitmore, Samantha; Ahmed, Rabeea; Pierce, Katherine; Leary, Sara

    2015-08-01

    Aim: We address the relation between star formation and AGN activity in a large sample of nearby early type (E and S0) galaxies. The redshift range of the galaxies is 0.0002Feedback from the AGN is believed to play an important role in regulating star formation and thus the process of galaxy evolution and formation. Evidence of AGN feedback is found in massive galaxies in galaxy clusters. However, how common AGN feedback is in the local universe and in small scale systems is still not evident.Methods: To answer this question, we carried out a multiple wavelength study of a sample of 231 early type galaxies which were selected to have an apparent K-band magnitude brighter than 13.5 and whose positions correlate with Chandra ACIS-I and ACIS-S sources. The galaxies in the sample are unbiased regarding their star formation and radio source properties. Using the archival observations at radio, IR and UV from VLA, WISE and GALEX respectively, we obtained the radio power, estimate FUV star formation rate (SFR) and other galaxy properties to study AGN activity and ongoing star formation.Results: The relationship between radio power and stellar mass shows that there is an upper envelope of radio power that is a steep function of stellar luminosity. This suggests that less massive galaxies have low radio power while massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources. The Radio-MIR relation shows that galaxies with P>=1022 WHz-1 are potential candidates for being AGN. About ~ 7% of the sample show evidence of ongoing star formation with SFR ranging from 10-3 to 1 M⊙yr-1. These are also less massive and radio faint suggesting the absence of active accretion. There is nearly equal fraction of star forming galaxies in radio faint (P<1022 WHz-1) and radio bright galaxies (P>=1022 WHz-1) . Only ~ 5% of the galaxies in our sample have P>=1022 WHz-1 and most of them do not show evidence of bright accretion disks. We see a weak correlation and a dispersion of

  9. Livers with Constitutive mTORC1 Activity Resist Steatosis Independent of Feedback Suppression of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Kenerson, Heidi L.; Subramanian, Savitha; McIntyre, Rebecca; Kazami, Machiko; Yeung, Raymond S.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is an important contributing factor in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. AKT and mTORC1 are key components of the insulin pathway, and play a role in promoting de novo lipogenesis. However, mTORC1 hyperactivity per se does not induce steatosis in mouse livers, but instead, protects against high-fat diet induced steatosis. Here, we investigate the in vivo mechanism of steatosis-resistance secondary to mTORC1 activation, with emphasis on the role of S6K1-mediated feedback inhibition of AKT. Mice with single or double deletion of Tsc1 and/or S6k1 in a liver-specific or whole-body manner were generated to study glucose and hepatic lipid metabolism between the ages of 6–14 weeks. Following 8 weeks of high-fat diet, the Tsc1-/-;S6k1-/- mice had lower body weights but higher liver TG levels compared to that of the Tsc1-/- mice. However, the loss of S6k1 did not relieve feedback inhibition of Akt activity in the Tsc1-/- livers. To overcome Akt suppression, Pten was deleted in Tsc1-/- livers, and the resultant mice showed improved glucose tolerance compared with the Tsc1-/- mice. However, liver TG levels were significantly reduced in the Tsc1-/-;Pten-/- mice compared to the Pten-/- mice, which was restored with rapamycin. We found no correlation between liver TG and serum NEFA levels. Expression of lipogenic genes (Srebp1c, Fasn) were elevated in the Tsc1-/-;Pten-/- livers, but this was counter-balanced by an up-regulation of Cpt1a involved in fatty acid oxidation and the anti-oxidant protein, Nrf2. In summary, our in vivo models showed that mTORC1-induced resistance to steatosis was dependent on S6K1 activity, but not secondary to AKT suppression. These findings confirm that AKT and mTORC1 have opposing effects on hepatic lipid metabolism in vivo. PMID:25646773

  10. 77 FR 28894 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Collection of Qualitative Feedback Through Focus Groups

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... Register on February 8, 2012, at 77 FR 6573, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS/did not... Qualitative Feedback Through Focus Groups ACTION: 30-Day Notice of Information Collection for Office of... sure to add ``1615-NEW, Collection of Qualitative Feedback through Focus Groups'' in the subject...

  11. Using Instant Feedback System and Micro Exams to Enhance Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabag, N.; Kosolapov, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of the preliminary survey in which the method of IFS was used to integrate motivating questions into the lecture presentations in order to increase the students' involvement. Instant Feedback System (IFS) enables the educators to improve their own teaching by getting instant and real-time feedback about how clear…

  12. Neural activation during imitation with or without performance feedback: An fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaihua; Wang, Hui; Dong, Guangheng; Wang, Mengxing; Zhang, Jilei; Zhang, Hui; Meng, Weixia; Du, Xiaoxia

    2016-08-26

    In our daily lives, we often receive performance feedback (PF) during imitative learning, and we adjust our behaviors accordingly to improve performance. However, little is known regarding the neural mechanisms underlying this learning process. We hypothesized that appropriate PF would enhance neural activation or recruit additional brain areas during subsequent action imitation. Pictures of 20 different finger gestures without any social meaning were shown to participants from the first-person perspective. Imitation with or without PF was investigated by functional magnetic resonance imaging in 30 healthy subjects. The PF was given by a real person or by a computer. PF from a real person induced hyperactivation of the parietal lobe (precuneus and cuneus), cingulate cortex (posterior and anterior), temporal lobe (superior and transverse temporal gyri), and cerebellum (posterior and anterior lobes) during subsequent imitation. The positive PF and negative PF from a real person, induced the activation of more brain areas during the following imitation. The hyperactivation of the cerebellum, posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, and cuneus suggests that the subjects exhibited enhanced motor control and visual attention during imitation after PF. Additionally, random PF from a computer had a small effect on the next imitation. We suggest that positive and accurate PF may be helpful for imitation learning. PMID:27422729

  13. Structure of a Diguanylate Cyclase from Thermotoga maritima: Insights into Activation, Feedback Inhibition and Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, Angeline; Liew, Chong Wai; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Lescar, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale production of bis-3′-5′-cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) would facilitate biological studies of numerous bacterial signaling pathways and phenotypes controlled by this second messenger molecule, such as virulence and biofilm formation. C-di-GMP constitutes also a potentially interesting molecule as a vaccine adjuvant. Even though chemical synthesis of c-di-GMP can be done, the yields are incompatible with mass-production. tDGC, a stand-alone diguanylate cyclase (DGC or GGDEF domain) from Thermotoga maritima, enables the robust enzymatic production of large quantities of c-di-GMP. To understand the structural correlates of tDGC thermostability, its catalytic mechanism and feedback inhibition, we determined structures of an active-like dimeric conformation with both active (A) sites facing each other and of an inactive dimeric conformation, locked by c-di-GMP bound at the inhibitory (I) site. We also report the structure of a single mutant of tDGC, with the R158A mutation at the I-site, abolishing product inhibition and unproductive dimerization. A comparison with structurally characterized DGC homologues from mesophiles reveals the presence of a higher number of salt bridges in the hyperthermophile enzyme tDGC. Denaturation experiments of mutants disrupting in turn each of the salt bridges unique to tDGC identified three salt-bridges critical to confer thermostability. PMID:25360685

  14. 'Hybrid-PLEMO', rehabilitation system for upper limbs with active / passive force feedback mode.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Takehito; Jin, Ying; Fukushima, Kazuki; Akai, Hiroki; Furusho, Junji

    2008-01-01

    Several rehabilitation robots for upper limbs have been proposed so far, and clinical effectiveness was reported in several studies for the aged people or patients with stroke. However most of them have only 2-DOF for its active motion. It is important for designing a rehabilitation system which trains in the 3-DOF space because the upper limbs of humans works in 3-DOF space even expect for the wrist. We developed the quasi 3-DOF rehabilitation system which has 2-DOF force-feedback function in working plane but its working plane can be adjusted the inclination. And we named it Hybrid-PLEMO for it can be switched between active type and passive type. Hybrid-PLEMO is a compact, low-cost rehabilitation system for upper limbs with high safety by using ER brakes or ER actuators. Additionally, in Hybrid-PLEMO, we take direct-drive linkage mechanism by adding sub links. In this paper, we describe the mechanism and haptic control of Hybrid-PLEMO. PMID:19163078

  15. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.

  16. Functional near infrared spectroscopy study of age-related difference in cortical activation patterns during cycling with speed feedback.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Lin, Sang-I; Chen, Jia-Jin J

    2012-01-01

    Functional decline of lower-limb affects the ability of locomotion and the age-related brain differences have been elucidated among the elderly. Cycling exercise is a common training program for restoring motor function in the deconditioned elderly or stroke patients. The provision of speed feedback has been commonly suggested to clinical therapists for facilitating learning of controlled cycling performance and maintaining motivation in training programs with elderly participants. However, the cortical control of pedaling movements and the effect of external feedback remain poorly understanding. This study investigated the regional cortical activities detected by functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in 12 healthy young and 13 healthy elderly subjects under conditions of cycling without-(free cycling) and with feedback (target cycling). The elderly exhibited predominant activation of the sensorimotor cortex during free cycling similar to young subjects but with poorer cycling performance. The cycling performance improved in both groups, and the elderly showed increased brain activities of the supplementary motor area and premotor cortex under target cycling condition. These findings demonstrated age-related changes in the cortical control in processing external feedback and pedaling movements. Use of fNIRS to evaluate brain activation patterns after training may facilitate brain-based design of tailored therapeutic rehabilitation strategies. PMID:21984524

  17. The Effects of Physical Activity Feedback on Behavior and Awareness in Employees: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoye, Karen; Boen, Filip; Lefevre, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The SenseWear Armband (SWA) is a multisensor activity monitor that can be used in daily life to assess an individual's physical activity level (PAL). The primary goal of this study was to analyze the impact of different types of feedback on the PAL of Flemish employees. Methods/Design. We recruited 320 sedentary employees (age, 41.0 ± 10.7 years; BMI, 26.2 ± 4.2 kg/m2) to participate in the 12-month study. Participants were randomized into one of four intervention groups after being measured for 7 days and nights by means of the SWA: (1) a minimal intervention group received no feedback (MIG, n = 56); (2) a pedometer group was provided only information on their daily step count (PG, n = 57); (3) a display group received feedback on calories burned, steps taken, and minutes of physical activity by means of the SWA display (DG, n = 57); (4) a coaching group also received the display and had weekly meetings with a Personal Coach (CoachG, n = 57). We hypothesize that participants receiving feedback (SG, DG, and CoachG) will have a greater increase in physical activity outcome variables compared to participants of the minimal intervention group. PMID:23056040

  18. Impact of feedback on physical activity levels of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during pulmonary rehabilitation: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Joana; Brooks, Dina; Marques, Alda

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed at investigating whether providing feedback on physical activity (PA) levels to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is feasible and enhances daily PA during pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Patients with COPD participated in a 12-week PR program. Daily PA was measured using activity monitors on weeks 1, 7, and 12, and feedback was given in the following weeks on the number of steps, time spent in sedentary, light, and moderate-to-vigorous intensity activities, and time spent standing, sitting, and lying. Compliance with PA monitoring was collected. Two focus groups were conducted to obtain patients' perspectives on the use of activity monitors and on the feedback given. Differences in PA data were also assessed. Sixteen patients (65.63 ± 10.57 years; forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 70.31 ± 22.74% predicted) completed the study. From those, only eleven participants used the activity monitors during all monitoring days. Participants identified several problems regarding the use of activity monitors and monitoring duration. Daily steps (p = 0.026) and standing time (p = 0.030) were improved from week 1 to week 7; however, the former declined from week 7 to week 12. Findings suggest that using feedback to improve PA during PR is feasible and results in improved daily steps and standing time on week 7. The subsequent decline suggests that additional strategies may be needed to stimulate/maintain PA improvements. Further research with more robust designs is needed to investigate the impact of feedback on patients' daily PA. PMID:25278009

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON THE GROWTH OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Min-Su; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ciotti, Luca

    2012-01-20

    We investigate how environmental effects by gas stripping alter the growth of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and its host galaxy evolution, by means of one-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations that include both mechanical and radiative active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback effects. By changing the truncation radius of the gas distribution (R{sub t} ), beyond which gas stripping is assumed to be effective, we simulate possible environments for satellite and central galaxies in galaxy clusters and groups. The continuous escape of gas outside the truncation radius strongly suppresses star formation, while the growth of the SMBH is less affected by gas stripping because the SMBH accretion is primarily ruled by the density of the central region. As we allow for increasing environmental effects-the truncation radius decreasing from about 410 to 50 kpc-we find that the final SMBH mass declines from about 10{sup 9} to 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, but the outflowing mass is roughly constant at about 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. There are larger changes in the mass of stars formed, which declines from about 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, and the final thermal X-ray gas, which declines from about 10{sup 9} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, with increasing environmental stripping. Most dramatic is the decline in the total time that the objects would be seen as quasars, which declines from 52 Myr (for R{sub t} = 377 kpc) to 7.9 Myr (for R{sub t} = 51 kpc). The typical case might be interpreted as a red and dead galaxy having episodic cooling flows followed by AGN feedback effects resulting in temporary transitions of the overall galaxy color from red to green or to blue, with (cluster) central galaxies spending a much larger fraction of their time in the elevated state than do satellite galaxies. Our results imply that various scaling relations for elliptical galaxies, in

  20. Longitudinal development of frontoparietal activity during feedback learning: Contributions of age, performance, working memory and cortical thickness.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sabine; Van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Koolschijn, P Cédric M P; Crone, Eveline A

    2016-06-01

    Feedback learning is a crucial skill for cognitive flexibility that continues to develop into adolescence, and is linked to neural activity within a frontoparietal network. Although it is well conceptualized that activity in the frontoparietal network changes during development, there is surprisingly little consensus about the direction of change. Using a longitudinal design (N=208, 8-27 years, two measurements in two years), we investigated developmental trajectories in frontoparietal activity during feedback learning. Our first aim was to test for linear and nonlinear developmental trajectories in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), superior parietal cortex (SPC), supplementary motor area (SMA) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Second, we tested which factors (task performance, working memory, cortical thickness) explained additional variance in time-related changes in activity besides age. Developmental patterns for activity in DLPFC and SPC were best characterized by a quadratic age function leveling off/peaking in late adolescence. There was a linear increase in SMA and a linear decrease with age in ACC activity. In addition to age, task performance explained variance in DLPFC and SPC activity, whereas cortical thickness explained variance in SMA activity. Together, these findings provide a novel perspective of linear and nonlinear developmental changes in the frontoparietal network during feedback learning. PMID:27104668

  1. The formation of the brightest cluster galaxies in cosmological simulations: the case for active galactic nucleus feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martizzi, Davide; Teyssier, Romain; Moore, Ben

    2012-03-01

    We use 500 pc resolution cosmological simulations of a Virgo-like galaxy cluster to study the properties of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) that forms at the centre of the halo. We compared two simulations; one incorporating only supernova feedback and a second that also includes prescriptions for black hole growth and the resulting active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback from gas accretion. As previous work has shown, with supernova feedback alone we are unable to reproduce any of the observed properties of massive cluster ellipticals. The resulting BCG rotates quickly, has a high Sérsic index, a strong mass excess in the centre and a total central density profile falling more steeply than isothermal. Furthermore, it is far too efficient at converting most of the available baryons into stars which is strongly constrained by abundance matching. With a treatment of black hole dynamics and AGN feedback the BCG properties are in good agreement with data: they rotate slowly, have a cored surface density profile, a flat or rising velocity dispersion profile and a low stellar mass fraction. The AGN provides a new mechanism to create cores in luminous elliptical galaxies; the core expands due to the combined effects of heating from dynamical friction of sinking massive black holes and AGN feedback that ejects gaseous material from the central regions.

  2. Elliptically Bent X-ray Mirrors with Active Temperature Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Church, Matthew; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; McKinney, Wayne R.; Kirschman, Jonathan; Morrison, Greg; Noll, Tino; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-01-31

    We present details of design of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors developed and successfully used at the Advanced Light Source for submicron focusing. A distinctive feature of the mirror design is an active temperature stabilization based on a Peltier element attached directly to the mirror body. The design and materials have been carefully optimized to provide high heat conductance between the mirror body and substrate. We describe the experimental procedures used when assembling and precisely shaping the mirrors, with special attention paid to laboratory testing of the mirror-temperature stabilization. For this purpose, the temperature dependence of the surface slope profile of a specially fabricated test mirror placed inside a temperature-controlled container was measured. We demonstrate that with active mirror-temperature stabilization, a change of the surrounding temperature by more than 3K does not noticeably affect the mirror figure. Without temperature stabilization, the surface slope changes by approximately 1.5 ?mu rad rms (primarily defocus) under the same conditions.

  3. Personality predictors of longevity: Activity, Emotional Stability, and Conscientiousness

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Antonio; Löckenhoff, Corinna E.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Costa, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between personality traits and longevity. Methods Using the Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Survey, personality traits were assessed in 2359 participants (38% women; age: 17 to 98 years, M = 50) from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), starting in 1958. Over the duration of the study, 943 (40%) participants died, on average 18 years after their personality assessment. The association of each trait with longevity was examined by Cox regression controlling for demographic variables. Results In preliminary analyses among the deceased, those who scored one SD above the mean on General Activity (a facet of Extraversion), Emotional Stability (low Neuroticism), or Conscientiousness lived on average two to three years longer than those scoring one SD below the mean. Survival analyses on the full sample confirmed the association of General Activity, Emotional Stability, and Conscientiousness with lower risk of death, such that every one SD increase was related to about 13%, 15%, and 27% risk reduction, respectively. The association of personality traits with longevity was largely independent from the influence of smoking and obesity. Personality predictors of longevity did not differ by sex, except for Ascendance (a facet of Extraversion). Emotional Stability was a significant predictor when the analyses were limited to deaths due to cardiovascular disease, with comparable effect sizes for General Activity and Conscientiousness. Conclusions In a large sample of generally healthy individuals followed for almost five decades, longevity was associated with being conscientious, emotionally stable, and active. PMID:18596250

  4. Modeling of an actively stabilized regenerative amplifier for OMEGA pulse-shaping applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeldon, Mark D.; Babushkin, Andrei; Zuegel, Jonathan D.; Keck, Robert L.; Okishev, Andrey V.; Seka, Wolf D.

    1997-12-01

    We have modeled the output of a feedback stabilized regenerative amplifier (regen). We solve the rate equations including upper- and lower-laser-level lifetimes explicitly. The complete regen dynamics including the losses due to the feedback stabilizer are modeled. We provide a prescription for determining the injection-pulse shape required to produce a given output-pulse shape from this region. The model shows excellent agreement to measured regen output. This model of the regen along with our code RAINBOW, completely describes the temporal dynamics of the OMEGA laser system allowing OMEGA users to specify on-target pulse shapes in advance.

  5. ECCD-induced tearing mode stabilization via active control in coupled NIMROD/GENRAY HPC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Kruger, S. E.; Held, E. D.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-10-01

    Actively controlled electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) applied within magnetic islands formed by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) has been shown to control or suppress these modes. In conjunction with ongoing experimental efforts, the development and verification of integrated numerical models of this mode stabilization process is of paramount importance in determining optimal NTM stabilization strategies for ITER. In the advanced model developed by the SWIM Project, the equations/closures of extended (not reduced) MHD contain new terms arising from 3D (not toroidal or bounce-averaged) RF-induced quasilinear diffusion. The quasilinear operator formulation models the equilibration of driven current within the island using the same extended MHD dynamics which govern the physics of island formation, yielding a more accurate and self-consistent picture of 3D island response to RF drive. Results of computations which model ECRF deposition using ray tracing, assemble the 3D quasilinear operator from ray/profile data, and calculate the resultant forces within the extended MHD code will be presented. We also discuss the efficacy of various numerical active feedback control systems, which gather data from synthetic diagnostics to dynamically trigger and spatially align RF fields.

  6. Trading off stability against activity in extremophilic aldolases

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Markus; Weiergräber, Oliver H.; Classen, Thomas; Bisterfeld, Carolin; Bramski, Julia; Gohlke, Holger; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Understanding enzyme stability and activity in extremophilic organisms is of great biotechnological interest, but many questions are still unsolved. Using 2-deoxy-D-ribose-5-phosphate aldolase (DERA) as model enzyme, we have evaluated structural and functional characteristics of different orthologs from psychrophilic, mesophilic and hyperthermophilic organisms. We present the first crystal structures of psychrophilic DERAs, revealing a dimeric organization resembling their mesophilic but not their thermophilic counterparts. Conversion into monomeric proteins showed that the native dimer interface contributes to stability only in the hyperthermophilic enzymes. Nevertheless, introduction of a disulfide bridge in the interface of a psychrophilic DERA did confer increased thermostability, suggesting a strategy for rational design of more durable enzyme variants. Constraint network analysis revealed particularly sparse interactions between the substrate pocket and its surrounding α-helices in psychrophilic DERAs, which indicates that a more flexible active center underlies their high turnover numbers. PMID:26783049

  7. Trading off stability against activity in extremophilic aldolases.

    PubMed

    Dick, Markus; Weiergräber, Oliver H; Classen, Thomas; Bisterfeld, Carolin; Bramski, Julia; Gohlke, Holger; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Understanding enzyme stability and activity in extremophilic organisms is of great biotechnological interest, but many questions are still unsolved. Using 2-deoxy-D-ribose-5-phosphate aldolase (DERA) as model enzyme, we have evaluated structural and functional characteristics of different orthologs from psychrophilic, mesophilic and hyperthermophilic organisms. We present the first crystal structures of psychrophilic DERAs, revealing a dimeric organization resembling their mesophilic but not their thermophilic counterparts. Conversion into monomeric proteins showed that the native dimer interface contributes to stability only in the hyperthermophilic enzymes. Nevertheless, introduction of a disulfide bridge in the interface of a psychrophilic DERA did confer increased thermostability, suggesting a strategy for rational design of more durable enzyme variants. Constraint network analysis revealed particularly sparse interactions between the substrate pocket and its surrounding α-helices in psychrophilic DERAs, which indicates that a more flexible active center underlies their high turnover numbers. PMID:26783049

  8. Accretion disk winds in active galactic nuclei: X-ray observations, models, and feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to play a fundamental role in the evolution of both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the tight SMBH-galaxy relations. A strong support of this ``quasar mode'' feedback came from the recent X-ray observation of a mildly relativistic accretion disk wind in a ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) and its connection with a large-scale molecular outflow, providing a direct link between the SMBH and the gas out of which stars form. Spectroscopic observations, especially in the X-ray band, show that such accretion disk winds may be common in local AGN and quasars. However, their origin and characteristics are still not fully understood. Detailed theoretical models and simulations focused on radiation, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or a combination of these two processes to investigate the possible acceleration mechanisms and the dynamics of these winds. Some of these models have been directly compared to X-ray spectra, providing important insights into the wind physics. However, fundamental improvements on these studies will come only from the unprecedented energy resolution and sensitivity of the upcoming X-ray observatories, namely ASTRO-H (launch date early 2016) and Athena (2028).

  9. Progress of the 129Xe EDM search using active feedback nuclear spin maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tomoya; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Ohtomo, Yuichi; Sakamoto, Yu; Kojima, Shuichiro; Funayama, Chikako; Suzuki, Takahiro; Chikamori, Masatoshi; Hikota, Eri; Tsuchiya, Masato; Furukawa, Takeshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Bidinosti, Christopher; Ino, Takashi; Ueno, Hideki; Matsuo, Yukari; Fukuyama, Takeshi; Asahi, Koichiro

    2014-09-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle is an extremely sensitive probe for physics beyond the Standard Model. The objective of the present study is to search for the 129Xe EDM at a level of 10-28 ecm, beyond the current upper limit. In this experiment, an active-feedback nuclear spin maser is employed to achieve a precision measurement. Systematic instability sets a limit on the precision in our study. Co-magnetometry using 3He spin maser was incorporated into the maser system to eliminate the frequency drift caused by magnetic field fluctuations. Moreover, a double-cell geometry with linearly polarized laser was introduced to reduce frequency drifts arising from contact interactions with polarized Rb atoms. Having integrated these improvements, the 3He/129Xe dual spin maser was successfully operated. In the presentation, recent progress will be reported, including an analysis of spin maser frequencies, a study of electrode designs, and an estimation of possible systematic uncertainties.

  10. Cadence Feedback With ECE PEDO to Monitor Physical Activity Intensity: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Ardic, Fusun; Göcer, Esra

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the monitoring capabilities of the equipment for clever exercise pedometer (ECE PEDO) that provides audible feedback when the person exceeds the upper and lower limits of the target step numbers per minute and to compare step counts with Yamax SW-200 (YX200) as the criterion pedometer.A total of 30 adult volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were classified as normal weight (n = 10), overweight (n = 10), and obese (n = 10). After the submaximal exercise test on a treadmill, the moderate intensity for walking was determined by using YX200 pedometer and then the number of steps taken in a minute was measured. Lower and upper limits of steps per minute (cadence) were recorded in ECE PEDO providing audible feedback when the person's walking speed gets out of the limits. Volunteers walked for 30 minutes in the individual step count range by attaching the ECE PEDO and YX200 pedometer on both sides of the waist belt in the same session. Step counts of the volunteers were recorded. Wilcoxon, Spearman correlation, and Bland-Altman analyses were performed to show the relationship and agreement between the results of 2 devices.Subjects took an average of 3511 ± 426 and 3493 ± 399 steps during 30 minutes with ECE PEDO and criterion pedometer, respectively. About 3500 steps taken by ECE PEDO reflected that this pedometer has capability of identifying steps per minute to meet moderate intensity of physical activity. There was a strong correlation between step counts of both devices (P < 0.001, r = 0.96). Correlations across all three BMI categories and both sex remained consistently high ranging from 0.92 to 0.95. There was a high level of agreement between the ECE PEDO and YX200 pedometer in the Bland-Altman analysis.Although both devices showed a strong similarity in counting steps, the ECE PEDO provides monitoring of intensity such that a person can walk in a specified time with a desired speed. PMID

  11. Activity of Excitatory Neuron with Delayed Feedback Stimulated with Poisson Stream is Non-Markov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidybida, Alexander K.

    2015-09-01

    For a class of excitatory spiking neuron models with delayed feedback fed with a Poisson stochastic process, it is proven that the stream of output interspike intervals cannot be presented as a Markov process of any order.

  12. Firefighter feedback during active cooling: a useful tool for heat stress management?

    PubMed

    Savage, Robbie J; Lord, Cara; Larsen, Brianna L; Knight, Teagan L; Langridge, Peter D; Aisbett, Brad

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring an individual's thermic state in the workplace requires reliable feedback of their core temperature. However, core temperature measurement technology is expensive, invasive and often impractical in operational environments, warranting investigation of surrogate measures which could be used to predict core temperature. This study examines an alternative measure of an individual's thermic state, thermal sensation, which presents a more manageable and practical solution for Australian firefighters operating on the fireground. Across three environmental conditions (cold, warm, hot & humid), 49 Australian volunteer firefighters performed a 20-min fire suppression activity, immediately followed by 20 min of active cooling using hand and forearm immersion techniques. Core temperature (Tc) and thermal sensation (TS) were measured across the rehabilitation period at five minute intervals. Despite the decline in Tc and TS throughout the rehabilitation period, there was little similarity in the magnitude or rate of decline between each measure in any of the ambient conditions. Moderate to strong correlations existed between Tc and TS in the cool (0.41, p<0.05) and hot & humid (0.57, p<0.05) conditions, however this was resultant in strong correlation during the earlier stages of rehabilitation (first five minutes), which were not evident in the latter stages. Linear regression revealed TS to be a poor predictor of Tc in all conditions (SEE=0.45-0.54°C) with a strong trend for TS to over-predict Tc (77-80% of the time). There is minimal evidence to suggest that ratings of thermal sensation, which represent a psychophysical assessment of an individual's thermal comfort, are an accurate reflection of the response of an individual's core temperature. Ratings of thermal sensation can be highly variable amongst individuals, likely moderated by local skin temperature. In account of these findings, fire managers require a more reliable source of information to guide

  13. Density-dependence, Drift and Disturbance: Feedbacks and Interactions Between Hydraulics, Bed Stability and Invertebrates in a Sandy Gravel-bed River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbins, C. N.; Vericat, D.; Batalla, R.

    2008-12-01

    Whether invertebrate drift is dependent on benthic density or not remains a key but unresolved question in stream ecology. Downstream drift is important not only because voluntary entry into the water column is one of the main ways in which invertebrates can affect their redistribution, but because involuntary drift during floods is a very obvious cause of disturbance to benthic communities. Moreover, drifting invertebrates are an important source of food for many fish and so drift influences wider ecosystem processes. Despite its importance, a number of issues related to drift remain unclear and/or contentious; notable amongst these is the issue of whether drift rates depend on benthic density (i.e. whether drift is density-dependent). In this paper we assess whether channel hydraulics and bed stability affect the density-dependence of drift. We use a portable flume to manipulate hydraulic conditions in a section of river with contrasting sediment sizes, levels of bed stability and benthic densities and assess the drift responses of invertebrates. We describe the interactions and feedbacks between benthic invertebrate density, drift losses and substrate stability, focusing particularly on whether drift changes from being density dependent to independent once bed material is mobilized during flood events. The paper emphasizes the importance of substrate size and stability both for benthic assemblages and the magnitude of drift losses during periods of physical disturbance. It argues that large scale loss of animals from the bed can occur rapidly during small floods and even minor discharge fluctuations, such that exhaustion of the benthic source pool affects subsequent drift losses. Local (within- reach) differences in sediment sizes, bed structure and substrate stability influence the dependence of drift on benthic density.

  14. SIRRACT: An international randomized clinical trial of activity feedback during inpatient stroke rehabilitation enabled by wireless sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dorsch, Andrew K.; Thomas, Seth; Xu, Xiaoyu; Kaiser, William; Dobkin, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Walking-related disability is the most frequent reason for inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Task-related practice is a critical component for improving patient outcomes. Objective To test the feasibility of providing quantitative feedback about daily walking performance and motivating greater skills practice via remote sensing. Methods In this phase III randomized, single blind clinical trial, patients participated in conventional therapies while wearing wireless sensors (tri-axial accelerometers) at both ankles. Activity-recognition algorithms calculated the speed, distance, and duration of walking bouts. Three times a week, therapists provided either feedback about performance on a 10-meter walk (speed-only) or walking speed feedback plus a review of walking activity recorded by the sensors (augmented). Primary outcomes at discharge included total daily walking time, derived from the sensors, and a timed 15-meter walk. Results Sixteen rehabilitation centers in 11 countries enrolled 135 participants over 15 months. Sensors recorded more than 1800 days of therapy, 37,000 individual walking bouts, and 2.5 million steps. No significant differences were found between the two feedback groups in daily walking time (15.1±13.1min vs. 16.6±14.3min, p=0.54) or 15-meter walking speed (0.93±0.47m/s vs. 0.91±0.53m/s, p=0.96). Remarkably, 30% of participants decreased their total daily walking time over their rehabilitation stay. Conclusions In this first trial of remote monitoring of inpatient stroke rehabilitation, augmented feedback beyond speed alone did not increase the time spent practicing or improve walking outcomes. Remarkably modest time was spent walking. Wireless sensing, however, allowed clinicians to audit skills practice and provided ground truth regarding changes in clinically important, mobility-related activities. PMID:25261154

  15. Phase stabilization of an actively mode-locked ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Akira; Saika, Makoto; Nagano, Shigenori

    2015-03-01

    A phase-resolved system based on swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) has to incorporate a phase-stabilized wavelength-swept light source. The phase variation is induced by fluctuation of a beginning swept frequency. The conventional phase-sensitive SS-OCTs use a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in order to avoid A-scan trigger fluctuations. However this method does not always solve the trigger fluctuation problem. In actively mode-locked ring lasers (AMLLs), the beginning swept frequency fluctuates by abrupt frequency change between the end of a sweep and the beginning of the subsequent one. To overcome this issue, we proposes a new phase stabilization method. By employing the method with an auxiliary reference configuration, the sweeping phase has successfully stabilized because the timing jitter is calculated by interference signals from the auxiliary reference path. In this research, we have proposed the phase stabilization method that has nanometer sensitivity with millisecond response. In addition, the method has successfully suppressed the depth dependence of phase instability.

  16. Positive feedback produces broad distributions in maximum activation attained within a narrow time window in stochastic biochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit

    2013-01-01

    How do single cell fate decisions induced by activation of key signaling proteins above threshold concentrations within a time interval are affected by stochastic fluctuations in biochemical reactions? We address this question using minimal models of stochastic chemical reactions commonly found in cell signaling and gene regulatory systems. Employing exact solutions and semi-analytical methods we calculate distributions of the maximum value (N) of activated species concentrations (Pmax(N)) and the time (t) taken to reach the maximum value (Pmax(t)) within a time interval in the minimal models. We find, the presence of positive feedback interactions make Pmax(N) more spread out with a higher "peakedness" in Pmax(t). Thus positive feedback interactions may help single cells to respond sensitively to a stimulus when cell decision processes require upregulation of activated forms of key proteins to a threshold number within a time window.

  17. RELIEF OF PROFOUND FEEDBACK INHIBITION OF MITOGENIC SIGNALING BY RAF INHIBITORS ATTENUATES THEIR ACTIVITY IN BRAFV600E MELANOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Lito, Piro; Pratilas, Christine A.; Joseph, Eric W.; Tadi, Madhavi; Halilovic, Ensar; Zubrowski, Matthew; Huang, Alan; Wong, Wai Lin; Callahan, Margaret K.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Poulikakos, Poulikos I.; Fagin, James A.; Rosen, Neal

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY BRAFV600E drives tumors by dysregulating ERK signaling. In these tumors, we show that high levels of ERK-dependent negative feedback potently suppress ligand-dependent mitogenic signaling and Ras function. BRAFV600E activation is Ras-independent and it signals as a RAF-inhibitor sensitive monomer. RAF inhibitors potently inhibit RAF monomers and ERK signaling, causing relief of ERK-dependent feedback, reactivation of ligand-dependent signal transduction, increased Ras-GTP and generation of RAF inhibitor-resistant RAF dimers. This results in a rebound in ERK activity and culminates in a new steady state, wherein ERK signaling is elevated compared to its initial nadir after RAF inhibition. In this state, ERK signaling is RAF inhibitor resistant, and MEK inhibitor sensitive, and combined inhibition results in enhancement of ERK-pathway inhibition and antitumor activity. PMID:23153539

  18. Usability testing of a monitoring and feedback tool to stimulate physical activity

    PubMed Central

    van der Weegen, Sanne; Verwey, Renée; Tange, Huibert J; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; de Witte, Luc P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A monitoring and feedback tool to stimulate physical activity, consisting of an activity sensor, smartphone application (app), and website for patients and their practice nurses, has been developed: the ‘It’s LiFe!’ tool. In this study the usability of the tool was evaluated by technology experts and end users (people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or type 2 diabetes, with ages from 40–70 years), to improve the user interfaces and content of the tool. Patients and methods The study had four phases: 1) a heuristic evaluation with six technology experts; 2) a usability test in a laboratory by five patients; 3) a pilot in real life wherein 20 patients used the tool for 3 months; and 4) a final lab test by five patients. In both lab tests (phases 2 and 4) qualitative data were collected through a thinking-aloud procedure and video recordings, and quantitative data through questions about task complexity, text comprehensiveness, and readability. In addition, the post-study system usability questionnaire (PSSUQ) was completed for the app and the website. In the pilot test (phase 3), all patients were interviewed three times and the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI) was completed. Results After each phase, improvements were made, mainly to the layout and text. The main improvement was a refresh button for active data synchronization between activity sensor, app, and server, implemented after connectivity problems in the pilot test. The mean score on the PSSUQ for the website improved from 5.6 (standard deviation [SD] 1.3) to 6.5 (SD 0.5), and for the app from 5.4 (SD 1.5) to 6.2 (SD 1.1). Satisfaction in the pilot was not very high according to the SUMI. Discussion The use of laboratory versus real-life tests and expert-based versus user-based tests revealed a wide range of usability issues. The usability of the It’s LiFe! tool improved considerably during the study. PMID:24669188

  19. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  20. Weakly sheared active suspensions: hydrodynamics, stability, and rheology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenlu

    2011-03-01

    We present a kinetic model for flowing active suspensions and analyze the behavior of a suspension subjected to a weak steady shear. Asymptotic solutions are sought in Deborah number expansions. At the leading order, we explore the steady states and perform their stability analysis. We predict the rheology of active systems including an activity thickening or thinning behavior of the apparent viscosity and a negative apparent viscosity depending on the particle type, flow alignment, and the anchoring conditions, which can be tested on bacterial suspensions. We find remarkable dualities that show that flow-aligning rodlike contractile (extensile) particles are dynamically and rheologically equivalent to flow-aligning discoid extensile (contractile) particles for both tangential and homeotropic anchoring conditions. Another key prediction of this work is the role of the concentration of active suspensions in controlling the rheological behavior: the apparent viscosity may decrease with the increase of the concentration. PMID:21517529

  1. Weakly sheared active suspensions: Hydrodynamics, stability, and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhenlu

    2011-03-01

    We present a kinetic model for flowing active suspensions and analyze the behavior of a suspension subjected to a weak steady shear. Asymptotic solutions are sought in Deborah number expansions. At the leading order, we explore the steady states and perform their stability analysis. We predict the rheology of active systems including an activity thickening or thinning behavior of the apparent viscosity and a negative apparent viscosity depending on the particle type, flow alignment, and the anchoring conditions, which can be tested on bacterial suspensions. We find remarkable dualities that show that flow-aligning rodlike contractile (extensile) particles are dynamically and rheologically equivalent to flow-aligning discoid extensile (contractile) particles for both tangential and homeotropic anchoring conditions. Another key prediction of this work is the role of the concentration of active suspensions in controlling the rheological behavior: The apparent viscosity may decrease with the increase of the concentration.

  2. Impact of Personalised Feedback about Physical Activity on Change in Objectively Measured Physical Activity (the FAB Study): A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Godino, Job G.; Watkinson, Clare; Corder, Kirsten; Marteau, Theresa M.; Sutton, Stephen; Sharp, Stephen J.; Griffin, Simon J.; van Sluijs, Esther M. F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low levels of physical activity are a major public health concern, and interventions to promote physical activity have had limited success. Whether or not personalised feedback about physical activity following objective measurement motivates behaviour change has yet to be rigorously examined. Methods And Findings: In a parallel group, open randomised controlled trial, 466 healthy adults aged 32 to 54 years were recruited from the ongoing population-based Fenland Study (Cambridgeshire, UK). Participants were randomised to receive either no feedback until the end of the trial (control group, n=120) or one of three different types of feedback: simple, visual, or contextualised (intervention groups, n=346). The primary outcome was physical activity (physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in kJ/kg/day and average body acceleration (ACC) in m/s2) measured objectively using a combined heart rate monitor and accelerometer (Actiheart®). The main secondary outcomes included self-reported physical activity, intention to increase physical activity, and awareness of physical activity (the agreement between self-rated and objectively measured physical activity). At 8 weeks, 391 (83.9%) participants had complete physical activity data. The intervention had no effect on objectively measured physical activity (PAEE: β=-0.92, 95% CI=-3.50 to 1.66, p=0.48 and ACC: β=0.01, 95% CI=-0.00 to 0.02, p=0.21), self-reported physical activity (β=-0.39, 95% CI=-1.59 to 0.81), or intention to increase physical activity (β=-0.05, 95% CI=-0.22 to 0.11). However, it was associated with an increase in awareness of physical activity (OR=1.74, 95% CI=1.05 to 2.89). Results did not differ according to the type of feedback. Conclusions Personalised feedback about physical activity following objective measurement increased awareness but did not result in changes in physical activity in the short term. Measurement and feedback may have a role in promoting behaviour change but are

  3. The role of mRNA and protein stability in the function of coupled positive and negative feedback systems in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Moss Bendtsen, Kristian; Jensen, Mogens H; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Oscillators and switches are important elements of regulation in biological systems. These are composed of coupling negative feedback loops, which cause oscillations when delayed, and positive feedback loops, which lead to memory formation. Here, we examine the behavior of a coupled feedback system, the Negative Autoregulated Frustrated bistability motif (NAF). This motif is a combination of two previously explored motifs, the frustrated bistability motif (FBM) and the negative auto regulation motif (NAR), which both can produce oscillations. The NAF motif was previously suggested to govern long term memory formation in animals, and was used as a synthetic oscillator in bacteria. We build a mathematical model to analyze the dynamics of the NAF motif. We show analytically that the NAF motif requires an asymmetry in the strengths of activation and repression links in order to produce oscillations. We show that the effect of time delays in eukaryotic cells, originating from mRNA export and protein import, are negligible in this system. Based on the reported protein and mRNA half-lives in eukaryotic cells, we find that even though the NAF motif possesses the ability for oscillations, it mostly promotes constant protein expression at the biologically relevant parameter regimes. PMID:26365394

  4. The role of mRNA and protein stability in the function of coupled positive and negative feedback systems in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Moss Bendtsen, Kristian; Jensen, Mogens H.; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Oscillators and switches are important elements of regulation in biological systems. These are composed of coupling negative feedback loops, which cause oscillations when delayed, and positive feedback loops, which lead to memory formation. Here, we examine the behavior of a coupled feedback system, the Negative Autoregulated Frustrated bistability motif (NAF). This motif is a combination of two previously explored motifs, the frustrated bistability motif (FBM) and the negative auto regulation motif (NAR), which both can produce oscillations. The NAF motif was previously suggested to govern long term memory formation in animals, and was used as a synthetic oscillator in bacteria. We build a mathematical model to analyze the dynamics of the NAF motif. We show analytically that the NAF motif requires an asymmetry in the strengths of activation and repression links in order to produce oscillations. We show that the effect of time delays in eukaryotic cells, originating from mRNA export and protein import, are negligible in this system. Based on the reported protein and mRNA half-lives in eukaryotic cells, we find that even though the NAF motif possesses the ability for oscillations, it mostly promotes constant protein expression at the biologically relevant parameter regimes. PMID:26365394

  5. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK AT z ∼ 2 AND THE MUTUAL EVOLUTION OF ACTIVE AND INACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cimatti, A.; Brusa, M.; Talia, M.; Rodighiero, G.; Kurk, J.; Cassata, P.; Halliday, C.; Renzini, A.; Daddi, E.

    2013-12-10

    The relationship between galaxies of intermediate stellar mass and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 1 < z < 3 is investigated with a Galaxy Mass Assembly ultra-deep Spectroscopic Survey (GMASS) sample complemented with public data in the GOODS-South field. Using X-ray data, hidden AGNs are identified in unsuspected star-forming galaxies with no apparent signs of non-stellar activity. In the color-mass plane, two parallel trends emerge during the ∼2 Gyr between the average redshifts z ∼ 2.2 and z ∼ 1.3: while the red sequence becomes significantly more populated by ellipticals, the majority of AGNs with L(2-10 keV) > 10{sup 42.3} erg s{sup –1} disappear from the blue cloud/green valley where they were hosted predominantly by star-forming systems with disk and irregular morphologies. These results are even clearer when the rest-frame colors are corrected for dust reddening. At z ∼ 2.2, the ultraviolet spectra of active galaxies (including two Type 1 AGNs) show possible gas outflows with velocities up to about –500 km s{sup –1}, which are observed neither in inactive systems at the same redshift, nor at lower redshifts. Such outflows indicate the presence of gas that can move faster than the escape velocities of active galaxies. These results suggest that feedback from moderately luminous AGNs (log L{sub X} < 44.5 erg s{sup –1}) played a key role at z ≳ 2 by contributing to outflows capable of ejecting part of the interstellar medium and leading to a rapid decrease in star formation in host galaxies with stellar masses 10 < log(M/M{sub ⊙})< 11.

  6. Dermal nanocrystals from medium soluble actives - physical stability and stability affecting parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to increase the dermal penetration of drugs, but were applied by now only to poorly soluble drugs (e.g. 1-10 μg/ml). As a new concept nanocrystals from medium soluble actives were produced, using caffeine as model compound (solubility 16 mg/ml at 20 °C). Penetration should be increased by (a) further increase in solubility and (b) mainly by increased hair follicle targeting of nanocrystals compared to pure solution. Caffeine nanocrystal production in water lead to pronounced crystal growth. Therefore the stability of nanocrystals in water-ethanol (1:9) and ethanol-propylene glycol (3:7) mixtures with lower dielectric constant D was investigated, using various stabilizers. Both mixtures in combination with Carbopol 981 (non-neutralized) yielded stable nanosuspensions over 2 months at 4 °C and room temperature. Storage at 40 °C lead to crystal growth, attributed to too strong solubility increase, supersaturation and Ostwald ripening effects. Stability of caffeine nanocrystals at lower temperatures could not only be attributed to lower solubility, because the solubilities of caffeine in mixtures and in water are not that much different. Other effects such as quantified by reduced dielectric constant D, and specific interactions between dispersion medium and crystal surface seem to play a role. With the 2 mixtures and Carbopol 981, a basic formulation composition for this type of nanocrystals has been established, to be used in the in vivo proof of principle of the new concept. PMID:25016978

  7. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anella, Fabrizio; Danelon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristoleic acid (MA) vesicles at varying concentrations of Mg2+. The ligation rate is significantly lower at low-Mg2+ conditions. However, the loss of activity is overcompensated by the increased stability of RNA leading to a larger amount of intact ligated substrate after long reaction periods. Combining RNA ligation assays with fatty acid vesicles we found that MA vesicles made of 5 mM amphiphile are stable and do not impair ligase ribozyme activity in the presence of approximately 2 mM Mg2+. These results provide a scenario in which catalytic RNA and primordial membrane assembly can coexist in the same environment. PMID:25513761

  8. Loss of Consciousness Is Associated with Stabilization of Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Solovey, Guillermo; Alonso, Leandro M.; Yanagawa, Toru; Fujii, Naotaka; Magnasco, Marcelo O.; Cecchi, Guillermo A.

    2015-01-01

    What aspects of neuronal activity distinguish the conscious from the unconscious brain? This has been a subject of intense interest and debate since the early days of neurophysiology. However, as any practicing anesthesiologist can attest, it is currently not possible to reliably distinguish a conscious state from an unconscious one on the basis of brain activity. Here we approach this problem from the perspective of dynamical systems theory. We argue that the brain, as a dynamical system, is self-regulated at the boundary between stable and unstable regimes, allowing it in particular to maintain high susceptibility to stimuli. To test this hypothesis, we performed stability analysis of high-density electrocorticography recordings covering an entire cerebral hemisphere in monkeys during reversible loss of consciousness. We show that, during loss of consciousness, the number of eigenmodes at the edge of instability decreases smoothly, independently of the type of anesthetic and specific features of brain activity. The eigenmodes drift back toward the unstable line during recovery of consciousness. Furthermore, we show that stability is an emergent phenomenon dependent on the correlations among activity in different cortical regions rather than signals taken in isolation. These findings support the conclusion that dynamics at the edge of instability are essential for maintaining consciousness and provide a novel and principled measure that distinguishes between the conscious and the unconscious brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT What distinguishes brain activity during consciousness from that observed during unconsciousness? Answering this question has proven difficult because neither consciousness nor lack thereof have universal signatures in terms of most specific features of brain activity. For instance, different anesthetics induce different patterns of brain activity. We demonstrate that loss of consciousness is universally and reliably associated with stabilization

  9. Active vibration control of a sandwich plate by non-collocated positive position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Giovanni; Amabili, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The active vibration control of a free rectangular sandwich plate by using the Positive Position Feedback (PPF) algorithm was experimentally investigated in a previous study. Four normal modes were controlled by four nearly collocated couples of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The experimental results of the control showed some limitation, especially in the Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO) configuration. This was attributed to the specific type of sensors and their conditioning, as well as to the phase shifts present in the vibration at different points of the structure. An alternative approach is here undertaken by abandoning the configuration of quasi-perfect collocation between sensor and actuator. The positioning of the piezoelectric patches is still led by the strain energy value distribution on the plate; each couple of sensor and actuator is now placed on the same face of the plate but in two distinct positions, opposed and symmetrical with respect to the geometric center of the plate. Single-Input Single-Output (SISO) PPF is tested and the transfer function parameters of the controller are tuned according to the measured values of modal damping. Then the participation matrices necessary for the MIMO control algorithm are determined by means of a completely experimental procedure. PPF is able to mitigate the vibration of the first four natural modes, in spite of the rigid body motions due to the free boundary conditions. The amplitude reduction achieved with the non-collocated configuration is much larger than the one obtained with the nearby collocated one. The phase lags were addressed in the MIMO algorithm by correction phase delays, further increasing the performance of the controller.

  10. The catalytic activity of the kinase ZAP-70 mediates basal signaling and negative feedback of the T cell receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Debra A; Kadlecek, Theresa A.; Cantor, Aaron J.; Kuriyan, John

    2015-01-01

    T cell activation must be properly regulated to ensure normal T cell development and effective immune responses to pathogens and transformed cells while avoiding autoimmunity. The mechanisms controlling the fine-tuning of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and T cell activation are unclear. The Syk family kinase ζ chain–associated protein kinase of 70 kD (ZAP-70) is a critical component of the TCR signaling machinery that leads to T cell activation. To elucidate potential feedback targets that are dependent on the kinase activity of ZAP-70, we performed a mass spectrometry–based, phosphoproteomic study to quantify temporal changes in phosphorylation patterns after inhibition of ZAP-70 catalytic activity. Our results provide insights into the fine-tuning of the T cell signaling network before and after TCR engagement. The data indicate that the kinase activity of ZAP-70 stimulates negative feedback pathways that target the Src family kinase Lck and modulate the phosphorylation patterns of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) of the CD3 and ζ-chain components of the TCR, and of downstream signaling molecules, including ZAP-70. We developed a computational model that provides a unified mechanistic explanation for the experimental findings on ITAM phosphorylation in wild-type cells, ZAP-70–deficient cells, and cells with inhibited ZAP-70 catalytic activity. This model incorporates negative feedback regulation of Lck activity by the kinase activity of ZAP-70 and makes unanticipated specific predictions for the order in which tyrosines in the ITAMs of TCR ζ-chains must be phosphorylated to be consistent with the experimental data. PMID:25990959

  11. EDM measurement in 129Xe atom using dual active feedback nuclear spin maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Ichikawa, Y.; Ohtomo, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kojima, S.; Funayama, C.; Suzuki, T.; Chikamori, M.; Hikota, E.; Tsuchiya, M.; Furukawa, T.; Yoshimi, A.; Bidinosti, C. P.; Ino, T.; Ueno, H.; Matsuo, Y.; Fukuyama, T.; Asahi, K.

    2015-04-01

    The technique of an active nuclear spin maser is adopted in the search for electric dipole moment in a diamagnetic atom 129Xe. In order to reduce systematic uncertainties arising from long-term drifts of the external magnetic field and from the contact interaction between longitudinal polarized Rb atoms and 129Xe spin, a 3He comagnetometer with a double-cell geometry was employed. The remaining shift, which turned out to show some correlation with the cell temperature, was mitigated by stabilizing the cell temperature. As a result, the frequency drift of the 129Xe maser was reduced from 12 mHz to 700 μHz, and the determination precision of frequency of 8.7 nHz was obtained for a 2×104 s measurement time using the double-cell geometry cell.

  12. The Understanding and Interpretation of Innovative Technology-Enabled Multidimensional Physical Activity Feedback in Patients at Risk of Future Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Western, Max J.; Peacock, Oliver J.; Stathi, Afroditi; Thompson, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Background Innovative physical activity monitoring technology can be used to depict rich visual feedback that encompasses the various aspects of physical activity known to be important for health. However, it is unknown whether patients who are at risk of chronic disease would understand such sophisticated personalised feedback or whether they would find it useful and motivating. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether technology-enabled multidimensional physical activity graphics and visualisations are comprehensible and usable for patients at risk of chronic disease. Method We developed several iterations of graphics depicting minute-by-minute activity patterns and integrated physical activity health targets. Subsequently, patients at moderate/high risk of chronic disease (n=29) and healthcare practitioners (n=15) from South West England underwent full 7-days activity monitoring followed by individual semi-structured interviews in which they were asked to comment on their own personalised visual feedback Framework analysis was used to gauge their interpretation and of personalised feedback, graphics and visualisations. Results We identified two main components focussing on (a) the interpretation of feedback designs and data and (b) the impact of personalised visual physical activity feedback on facilitation of health behaviour change. Participants demonstrated a clear ability to understand the sophisticated personal information plus an enhanced physical activity knowledge. They reported that receiving multidimensional feedback was motivating and could be usefully applied to facilitate their efforts in becoming more physically active. Conclusion Multidimensional physical activity feedback can be made comprehensible, informative and motivational by using appropriate graphics and visualisations. There is an opportunity to exploit the full potential created by technological innovation and provide sophisticated personalised physical activity feedback

  13. The catalytic activity of the kinase ZAP-70 mediates basal signaling and negative feedback of the T cell receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Sjölin-Goodfellow, Hanna; Frushicheva, Maria P; Ji, Qinqin; Cheng, Debra A; Kadlecek, Theresa A; Cantor, Aaron J; Kuriyan, John; Chakraborty, Arup K; Salomon, Arthur R; Weiss, Arthur

    2015-05-19

    T cell activation by antigens binding to the T cell receptor (TCR) must be properly regulated to ensure normal T cell development and effective immune responses to pathogens and transformed cells while avoiding autoimmunity. The Src family kinase Lck and the Syk family kinase ZAP-70 (ζ chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kD) are sequentially activated in response to TCR engagement and serve as critical components of the TCR signaling machinery that leads to T cell activation. We performed a mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic study comparing the quantitative differences in the temporal dynamics of phosphorylation in stimulated and unstimulated T cells with or without inhibition of ZAP-70 catalytic activity. The data indicated that the kinase activity of ZAP-70 stimulates negative feedback pathways that target Lck and thereby modulate the phosphorylation patterns of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) of the CD3 and ζ chain components of the TCR and of signaling molecules downstream of Lck, including ZAP-70. We developed a computational model that provides a mechanistic explanation for the experimental findings on ITAM phosphorylation in wild-type cells, ZAP-70-deficient cells, and cells with inhibited ZAP-70 catalytic activity. This model incorporated negative feedback regulation of Lck activity by the kinase activity of ZAP-70 and predicted the order in which tyrosines in the ITAMs of TCR ζ chains must be phosphorylated to be consistent with the experimental data. PMID:25990959

  14. Pharmaceutically active compounds in sludge stabilization treatments: anaerobic and aerobic digestion, wastewater stabilization ponds and composting.

    PubMed

    Martín, Julia; Santos, Juan Luis; Aparicio, Irene; Alonso, Esteban

    2015-01-15

    Sewage sludge disposal onto lands has been stabilized previously but still many pollutants are not efficiently removed. Special interest has been focused on pharmaceutical compounds due to their potential ecotoxicological effects. Nowadays, there is scarce information about their occurrence in different sludge stabilization treatments. In this work, the occurrence of twenty-two pharmaceutically active compounds has been studied in sludge from four sludge stabilization treatments: anaerobic digestion, aerobic digestion, composting and lagooning. The types of sludge evaluated were primary, secondary, anaerobically-digested and dehydrated, composted, mixed, aerobically-digested and dehydrated and lagoon sludge. Nineteen of the twenty-two pharmaceutically active compounds monitored were detected in sewage sludge. The most contaminated samples were primary sludge, secondary sludge and mixed sludge (the average concentrations of studied compounds in these sludges were 179, 310 and 142 μg/kg dm, respectively) while the mean concentrations found in the other types of sewage sludge were 70 μg/kg dm (aerobically-digested sludge), 63 μg/kg dm (lagoon sludge), 12 μg/kg dm (composted sludge) and 8 μg/kg dm (anaerobically-digested sludge). The antibiotics ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin were found at the highest concentration levels in most of the analyzed sludge samples (up to 2660 and 4328 μg/kg dm, respectively). Anaerobic-digestion treatment reduced more considerably the concentration of most of the studied compounds than aerobic-digestion (especially in the case of bezafibrate and fluoroquinolones) and more than anaerobic stabilization ponds (in the case of acetaminophen, atenolol, bezafibrate, carbamazepine, 17α-ethinylestradiol, naproxen and salicylic acid). Ecotoxicological risk assessment, of sludge application onto soils, has also been evaluated. Risk quotients, expressed as the ratio between the predicted environmental concentration and the predicted non

  15. Performance Analysis of Positive-feedback-based Active Anti-islanding Schemes for Inverter-Based Distributed Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Pengwei; Aponte, Erick E.; Nelson, J. Keith

    2010-06-14

    Recently proposed positive-feedback-based anti-islanding schemes (AI) are highly effective in preventing islanding without causing any degradation in power quality. This paper aims to analyze the performance of these schemes quantitatively in the context of the dynamic models of inverter-based distributed generators (DG). In this study, the characteristics of these active anti-islanding methods are discussed and design guidelines are derived.

  16. Visual Feedback of the Non-Moving Limb Improves Active Joint-Position Sense of the Impaired Limb in Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smorenburg, Ana R. P.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the active joint-position sense in children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP) and the effect of static visual feedback and static mirror visual feedback, of the non-moving limb, on the joint-position sense. Participants were asked to match the position of one upper limb with that of the contralateral limb. The task…

  17. Evaluation of pancreatin stability through enzyme activity determination.

    PubMed

    Terra, Gleysson De Paula; Vinícius De Farias, Marcus; Trevisan, Marcello Garcia; Garcia, Jerusa Simone

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatin is a biotechnological product containing an enzyme complex, obtained from porcine pancreas, that is employed in treating pancreatic diseases. Experiments regarding the stability of the pharmaceutical formulation containing pancreatin were performed using standard binary mixtures with 6 excipients in a 1:1 ratio (m/m) and a commercial formulation. To accomplish these goals, samples were stored for 1, 3 and 6 months at 40 ± 1 °C and 75 ± 5 % relative humidity (RH) and 40 ± 1 °C and 0 % RH. Stress testing was also performed. All samples were analyzed to evaluate the α-amylase, lipase and protease activities through UV/Vis spectrophotometry. The results revealed that the excipient proprieties and the storage conditions affected enzyme stability. Humidity was a strong influencing factor in the reduction of α-amylase and protease activities. Stress testing indicated that pH 9.0 and UV light did not induce substantial alterations in enzyme activity. PMID:27383890

  18. X-Ray Properties Expected from Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Silvia; Ciotti, Luca; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed hydrodynamic simulations of active galactic nucleus feedback have been performed including the effects of radiative and mechanical momentum and energy input on the interstellar medium (ISM) of typical elliptical galaxies. We focus on the observational properties of the models in the soft and hard X-ray bands: nuclear X-ray luminosity; global X-ray luminosity and temperature of the hot ISM; and temperature and X-ray brightness profiles before, during, and after outbursts. After ~10 Gyr, the bolometric nuclear emission L BH is very sub-Eddington (l = L BH/L Edd ~ 10-4), and within the range observed, though larger than typical values. Outbursts last for ≈107 yr, and the duty cycle of nuclear activity is a few × (10-3 to 10-2), over the last 6 Gyr. The ISM thermal luminosity L X oscillates in phase with the nuclear luminosity, with broader peaks. This behavior helps statistically reproduce the observed large L X variation. The average gas temperature is within the observed range, in the upper half of those observed. In quiescence, the temperature profile has a negative gradient; thanks to past outbursts, the brightness profile lacks the steep shape of cooling flow models. After outbursts, disturbances are predicted in the temperature and brightness profiles (analyzed by unsharp masking). Most significantly, during major accretion episodes, a hot bubble of shocked gas is inflated at the galaxy center (within ≈100 pc) the bubble would be conical in shape in real galaxies and would be radio-loud. Its detection in X-rays is within current capabilities, though it would likely remain unresolved. The ISM resumes its smooth appearance on a timescale of ≈200 Myr the duty cycle of perturbations in the ISM is of the order of 5%-10%. While showing general agreement between the models and real galaxies, this analysis indicates that additional physical input may still be required including moving to two-dimensional or three-dimensional simulations, input of

  19. Peptide fibrils with altered stability, activity, and cell selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F.

    2014-01-01

    Peptides have some unique and superior features compared to proteins. However, the use of peptides as therapeutics is hampered by their low stability and cell selectivity. In this study, a new lytic peptide (CL-1, FLGALFRALSRLL) was constructed. Under the physiological condition, peptide CL-1 self-assembled into dynamically stable aggregates with fibrils-like structures. Aggregated CL-1 demonstrated dramatically altered activity and stability in comparison with single molecule CL-1 and other lytic peptides: when incubated with co-cultured bacteria and tissue cells, CL-1 aggregates killed bacteria selectively but spared co-cultured human cells; CL-1 aggregates kept intact in human serum for more than five hours. Peptide-cell interaction studies performed on lipid monolayers and live human tissue cells revealed that in comparison with monomeric CL-1, aggregated CL-1 had decreased cell affinity and membrane insertion capability on tissue cells. A dynamic process involving aggregate dissociation and rearrangement seemed to be an essential step for membrane bound CL-1 aggregates to realize its cytotoxicity to tissue cells. Our study suggests that peptide aggregation could be as important as the charge and secondary structure of a peptide in affecting peptide-cell interactions. Controlling peptide self-assembly represents a new way to increase the stability and cell selectivity of bioactive peptides for wide biomedical applications. PMID:23713839

  20. Synthesis of feedback control law for stabilization of chaotic system oscillations by means of analytic programming - Preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkerik, Roman; Oplatkova, Zuzana; Zelinka, Ivan; Davendra, Donald; Jasek, Roman

    2012-11-01

    This research deals with a synthesis of control law for selected discrete chaotic system - logistic equation by means of analytic programming. The novelty of the approach is that a tool for symbolic regression - analytic programming - is used for the purpose of stabilization of higher periodic orbits - oscillations between several values of chaotic system. The paper consists of the descriptions of analytic programming as well as used chaotic system and detailed proposal of cost function used in optimization process. For experimentation, Self-Organizing Migrating Algorithm (SOMA) with analytic programming and Differential evolution (DE) as second algorithm for meta-evolution were used.

  1. Stimulus-Outcome Learnability Differentially Activates Anterior Cingulate and Hippocampus at Feedback Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    Memory systems are known to be influenced by feedback and error processing, but it is not well known what aspects of outcome contingencies are related to different memory systems. Here we use the Rescorla-Wagner model to estimate prediction errors in an fMRI study of stimulus-outcome association learning. The conditional probabilities of outcomes…

  2. Continuous Activity with Immediate Feedback: A Good Strategy to Guarantee Student Engagement with the Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sancho-Vinuesa, Teresa; Escudero-Viladoms, Nuria; Masia, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the experience of applying a new teaching strategy to a basic mathematics course at the Open University of Catalonia. This strategy requires students to engage with practice and assessment tests with automatic feedback. The main aim of this research is to look into the extent to which the key elements of this teaching strategy…

  3. Control of Foxp3 stability through modulation of TET activity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiaojing; Trifari, Sara; Äijö, Tarmo; Tsagaratou, Ageliki; Pastor, William A; Zepeda-Martínez, Jorge A; Lio, Chan-Wang J; Li, Xiang; Huang, Yun; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rao, Anjana

    2016-03-01

    Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes oxidize 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and other oxidized methylcytosines, intermediates in DNA demethylation. In this study, we examine the role of TET proteins in regulating Foxp3, a transcription factor essential for the development and function of regulatory T cells (T reg cells), a distinct lineage of CD4(+) T cells that prevent autoimmunity and maintain immune homeostasis. We show that during T reg cell development in the thymus, TET proteins mediate the loss of 5mC in T reg cell-specific hypomethylated regions, including CNS1 and CNS2, intronic cis-regulatory elements in the Foxp3 locus. Similar to CNS2-deficient T reg cells, the stability of Foxp3 expression is markedly compromised in T reg cells from Tet2/Tet3 double-deficient mice. Vitamin C potentiates TET activity and acts through Tet2/Tet3 to increase the stability of Foxp3 expression in TGF-β-induced T reg cells. Our data suggest that targeting TET enzymes with small molecule activators such as vitamin C might increase induced T reg cell efficacy. PMID:26903244

  4. Control of Foxp3 stability through modulation of TET activity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xiaojing; Trifari, Sara; Äijö, Tarmo; Tsagaratou, Ageliki; Pastor, William A.; Zepeda-Martínez, Jorge A.; Lio, Chan-Wang J.; Li, Xiang; Huang, Yun; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Lähdesmäki, Harri

    2016-01-01

    Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes oxidize 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and other oxidized methylcytosines, intermediates in DNA demethylation. In this study, we examine the role of TET proteins in regulating Foxp3, a transcription factor essential for the development and function of regulatory T cells (T reg cells), a distinct lineage of CD4+ T cells that prevent autoimmunity and maintain immune homeostasis. We show that during T reg cell development in the thymus, TET proteins mediate the loss of 5mC in T reg cell–specific hypomethylated regions, including CNS1 and CNS2, intronic cis-regulatory elements in the Foxp3 locus. Similar to CNS2-deficient T reg cells, the stability of Foxp3 expression is markedly compromised in T reg cells from Tet2/Tet3 double-deficient mice. Vitamin C potentiates TET activity and acts through Tet2/Tet3 to increase the stability of Foxp3 expression in TGF-β–induced T reg cells. Our data suggest that targeting TET enzymes with small molecule activators such as vitamin C might increase induced T reg cell efficacy. PMID:26903244

  5. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths.

    PubMed

    Huppert, M; Jordan, I; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids. PMID:26724005

  6. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, M.; Jordan, I.; Wörner, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids.

  7. Passive and Active Stabilization of Liquid Bridges in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Thiessen, David B.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Wei, Wei; Niederhaus, Charles E.; Truong, Duc K.

    2001-01-01

    Tests are planned in the low gravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) of new methods for the suppression of the capillary instability of liquid bridges. Our suppression methods are unusual in that they are not limited to liquid bridges having very special properties and may impact a variety of low-gravity and earth-based technologies. There are two main approaches to be investigated: (1) Passive Acoustic Stabilization (PAS); and (2) Active Electrostatic Stabilization (AES). In PAS, the suppression of the mode growth is accomplished by placing the bridge in an acoustic field having the appropriate properties such that the acoustic radiation pressure automatically pulls outward on the thinnest portion of the bridge. In AES, the bridge deformation is sensed optically and counteracted by actively adjusting the electrostatic Maxwell stresses via two ring electrodes concentric with the slightly conducting bridge to offset the growth of the unstable mode. While the present work emphasizes cylindrical bridges, the methods need not be restricted to that case. The methods to be explored are relevant to the suppression of capillary instabilities in floating zone crystal growth, breakup of liquid jets and columns, bubbles, and annular films as well as the management of coolants or propellants in low-gravity.

  8. NEW RENIN-INHIBITORS--STABILITY AND ACTIVITY DETERMINATION. PART III.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Dorota; Goldnik, Anna; Winiecka, Iwona; Jaworski, Paweł; Mazurek, Aleksander P

    2016-01-01

    A series of new four potential renin inhibitors containing pseudodipeptides were synthesized. Stability for all compounds (1-4) in homogenates of liver, kidney, lung and in serum, gastric, intestinal juice and in the presence of α-chymotrypsin was determined. Compound 1 was unstable, compounds 2, 3 were stable, compound 4 was partly unstable, (liver and kidney homogenates, (α-chymotrypsin solution). Inhibitory activity of the compounds was measured in vitro by HPLC determination of lowering concentration of substrate (angiotensinogen) in the presence of renin and the potential renin inhibitor (compounds 1-4). Compound 1, 2, 3 and 4 showed inhibitory activity (1.7 x 10(-6), 9.6 x 10(-7), 1.05 x 10(-9) and 1.31 x 10(-7)M, respectively). PMID:27180425

  9. Prediction of Muscle Energy States at Low Metabolic Rates Requires Feedback Control of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activity by Inorganic Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Joep P. J.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.; van Oorschot, Joep W. M.; Prompers, Jeanine J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; van Riel, Natal A. W.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of the 100-fold dynamic range of mitochondrial ATP synthesis flux in skeletal muscle was investigated. Hypotheses of key control mechanisms were included in a biophysical model of oxidative phosphorylation and tested against metabolite dynamics recorded by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS). Simulations of the initial model featuring only ADP and Pi feedback control of flux failed in reproducing the experimentally sampled relation between myoplasmic free energy of ATP hydrolysis (ΔGp = ΔGpo′+RT ln ([ADP][Pi]/[ATP]) and the rate of mitochondrial ATP synthesis at low fluxes (<0.2 mM/s). Model analyses including Monte Carlo simulation approaches and metabolic control analysis (MCA) showed that this problem could not be amended by model re-parameterization, but instead required reformulation of ADP and Pi feedback control or introduction of additional control mechanisms (feed forward activation), specifically at respiratory Complex III. Both hypotheses were implemented and tested against time course data of phosphocreatine (PCr), Pi and ATP dynamics during post-exercise recovery and validation data obtained by 31P MRS of sedentary subjects and track athletes. The results rejected the hypothesis of regulation by feed forward activation. Instead, it was concluded that feedback control of respiratory chain complexes by inorganic phosphate is essential to explain the regulation of mitochondrial ATP synthesis flux in skeletal muscle throughout its full dynamic range. PMID:22470528

  10. Active Control of Sound Field Using State-Space Model and Feedback Control Theory: a Numerical Simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhen

    Active sound filed control techniques have received growing attention since they provide alternative solutions to low-frequency sound control, where the conventional passive methods have not been very successful. They have wide industrial and military applications such as noise reduction, room acoustics design, acoustic measurements, underwater acoustic camouflage, etc. An appropriate model of an acoustical system serves as the basis of control law synthesis and active control system design. A classical system model describes the dynamics of an acoustic system in a view of input/output relation through transfer functions. On the other hand, a time-domain based state-space model equivalently describes the system dynamics in terms of internal system variables and provides a direct physical insight of active control of sound. Furthermore, based on a state-space model, one can take advantage of modern control analysis and synthesis tools to design an optimal control system for broadband, global sound absorption. This thesis explores state-space feedback control in unbounded acoustic systems. State-space models are developed for unbounded one-dimensional acoustic systems using a finite-difference method with special boundary treatments. State feedback control algorithms including state estimations are developed using optimal control theory (LQG). Numerical simulation results of the closed-loop system responses demonstrate the optimal performance of active control systems considering the trade-off between the high reflection reduction and limited sensing/actuating power. Two numerical examples, an active underwater sound absorbing coating system, and an active noise control system in a duct, are studied. For the active underwater sound absorbing system, a feedback control system involving two sensors and one actuator is designed. Numerical simulation of the closed-loop response indicates a substantial and broadband reflection (echo) reduction for this design. A variety

  11. Theory, Investigation and Stability of Cathode Electrocatalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Lai, Samson; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Meilin

    2012-09-30

    The main objective of this project is to systematically characterize the surface composition, morphology, and electro-catalytic properties of catalysts coated on LSCF, aiming to establish the scientific basis for rational design of high-performance cathodes by combining a porous backbone (such as LSCF) with a thin catalyst coating. The understanding gained will help us to optimize the composition and morphology of the catalyst layer and microstructure of the LSCF backbone for better performance. More specifically, the technical objectives include: (1) to characterize the surface composition, morphology, and electro-catalytic properties of catalysts coated on LSCF; (2) to characterize the microscopic details and stability of the LSCF-catalyst (e.g., LSM) interfaces; (3) to establish the scientific basis for rational design of high-performance cathodes by combining a porous backbone (such as LSCF) with a thin catalyst coating; and (4) to demonstrate that the performance and stability of porous LSCF cathodes can be enhanced by the application of a thin-film coating of LSM through a solution infiltration process in small homemade button cells and in commercially available cells of larger dimension. We have successfully developed dense, conformal LSM films with desired structure, composition, morphology, and thickness on the LSCF surfaces by two different infiltration processes: a non-aqueous and a water-based sol-gel process. It is demonstrated that the activity and stability of LSCF cathodes can be improved by the introduction of a thin-film LSM coating through an infiltration process. Surface and interface of the LSM-coated LSCF cathode were systematically characterized using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. TEM observation suggests that a layer of La and Sr oxide was formed on LSCF surfaces after annealing. With LSM infiltration, in contrast, we no longer observe such La/Sr oxide layer on the LSM-coated LSCF samples after annealing under similar

  12. DRIVING OUTFLOWS WITH RELATIVISTIC JETS AND THE DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK EFFICIENCY ON INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM INHOMOGENEITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2012-10-01

    We examine the detailed physics of the feedback mechanism by relativistic active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets interacting with a two-phase fractal interstellar medium (ISM) in the kpc-scale core of galaxies using 29 three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations. The feedback efficiency, as measured by the amount of cloud dispersal generated by the jet-ISM interactions, is sensitive to the maximum size of clouds in the fractal cloud distribution but not to their volume filling factor. Feedback ceases to be efficient for Eddington ratios P{sub jet}/L{sub edd} {approx}< 10{sup -4}, although systems with large cloud complexes {approx}> 50 pc require jets of Eddington ratio in excess of 10{sup -2} to disperse the clouds appreciably. Based on measurements of the bubble expansion rates in our simulations, we argue that sub-grid AGN prescriptions resulting in negative feedback in cosmological simulations without a multi-phase treatment of the ISM are good approximations if the volume filling factor of warm-phase material is less than 0.1 and the cloud complexes are smaller than {approx}25 pc. We find that the acceleration of the dense embedded clouds is provided by the ram pressure of the high-velocity flow through the porous channels of the warm phase, flow that has fully entrained the shocked hot-phase gas it has swept up, and is additionally mass loaded by ablated cloud material. This mechanism transfers 10% to 40% of the jet energy to the cold and warm gas, accelerating it within a few 10 to 100 Myr to velocities that match those observed in a range of high- and low-redshift radio galaxies hosting powerful radio jets.

  13. Supplementary active stabilization of nonrigid gravity gradient satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keat, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of active control for stability augmentation of passive gravity gradient satellites is investigated. The reaction jet method of control is the main interest. Satellite nonrigidity is emphasized. The reduction in the Hamiltonian H is used as a control criteria. The velocities, relative to local vertical, of the jets along their force axes are shown to be of fundamental significance. A basic control scheme which satisfies the H reduction criteria is developed. Each jet is fired when its velocity becomes appropriately large. The jet is de-energized when velocity reaches zero. Firing constraints to preclude orbit alteration may be needed. Control is continued until H has been minimized. This control policy is investigated using impulse and rectangular pulse models of the jet outputs.

  14. Active control for stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, D.A.; Ferron, J.R.; La Haye, R.J.; Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.; Prater, R.; Welander, A.S.

    2006-05-15

    This work describes active control algorithms used by DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] to stabilize and maintain suppression of 3/2 or 2/1 neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) by application of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational q surface. The DIII-D NTM control system can determine the correct q-surface/ECCD alignment and stabilize existing modes within 100-500 ms of activation, or prevent mode growth with preemptive application of ECCD, in both cases enabling stable operation at normalized beta values above 3.5. Because NTMs can limit performance or cause plasma-terminating disruptions in tokamaks, their stabilization is essential to the high performance operation of ITER [R. Aymar et al., ITER Joint Central Team, ITER Home Teams, Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The DIII-D NTM control system has demonstrated many elements of an eventual ITER solution, including general algorithms for robust detection of q-surface/ECCD alignment and for real-time maintenance of alignment following the disappearance of the mode. This latter capability, unique to DIII-D, is based on real-time reconstruction of q-surface geometry by a Grad-Shafranov solver using external magnetics and internal motional Stark effect measurements. Alignment is achieved by varying either the plasma major radius (and the rational q surface) or the toroidal field (and the deposition location). The requirement to achieve and maintain q-surface/ECCD alignment with accuracy on the order of 1 cm is routinely met by the DIII-D Plasma Control System and these algorithms. We discuss the integrated plasma control design process used for developing these and other general control algorithms, which includes physics-based modeling and testing of the algorithm implementation against simulations of actuator and plasma responses. This systematic design/test method and modeling environment enabled successful mode suppression by the NTM control system upon first-time use in an

  15. Shoulder Musculature Activity and Stabilization During Upper Extremity Weight-Bearing Activities

    PubMed Central

    Pontillo, Marisa; Kremenic, Ian J.; McHugh, Malachy P.; Mullaney, Michael J.; Tyler, Timothy F.

    2007-01-01

    Background Upper extremity weight-bearing exercises are routinely used in physical therapy for patients with shoulder pathology. However, little evidence exists regarding the demand on the shoulder musculature. Objective To examine changes in shoulder muscle activity and center of pressure during upper extremity weight-bearing exercises of increasing difficulty. Methods Electromyographic (EMG) and kinetic data were recorded from both shoulders of 15 healthy subjects (10 male and 5 female). Participants were tested in a modified tripod position under three conditions of increasing difficulty: (1) hand directly on the force plate, (2) on a green Stability Trainer™ and (3) on a blue Stability Trainer™. Ground reaction forces were recorded for each trial. Surface EMG was recorded from the serratus anterior, pectoralis major, upper trapezius, lower trapezius, infraspinatus, anterior deltoid, posterior deltoid, and the lateral head of the triceps muscles. Results Mean deviation from center of pressure significantly increased when using the Stability Trainer™ pads. The activities of the triceps, serratus anterior, and anterior deltoid muscles significantly increased as each trial progressed, irrespective of stability condition. Additionally, activity in the anterior deltoid, lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles significantly decreased with increasing difficulty, whereas activity in the triceps muscles significantly increased. Discussion and Conclusion Balancing on a foam pad made it more difficult to maintain the upper extremity in a stable position. However, this activity did not alter the proprioceptive stimulus enough to elicit an increase in shoulder muscle activation. While the results on this study support the use of different level Stability Trainers™ to facilitate neuromuscular re-education, a less compliant unstable surface may produce larger training effects. PMID:21522206

  16. A novel hypoxia-induced miR-147a regulates cell proliferation through a positive feedback loop of stabilizing HIF-1α

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fan; Zhang, Haoxiang; Xu, Naihan; Huang, Nunu; Tian, Caiming; Ye, Anlin; Hu, Guangnan; He, Jie; Zhang, Yaou

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hypoxia is a general event in solid tumor growth. Therefore, induced cellular responses by hypoxia are important for tumorigenesis and tumor growth. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as important regulators of hypoxia induced cellular responses. Here we report that miR-147a is a novel and crucial hypoxia induced miRNA. HIF-1α up-regulates the expression of miR-147a, and miR-147a in turn stabilizes and accumulates HIF-1α protein via directly targeting HIF-3α, a dominant negative regulator of HIF-1α. Subsequent studies in xenograft mouse model reveal that miR-147a is capable of inhibiting tumor growth. Collectively, these data demonstrate a positive feedback loop between HIF-1α, miR-147a and HIF-3α, which provide a new insight into the mechanism of miR-147a induced cell proliferation arrest under hypoxia. PMID:27260617

  17. An Autonomous Sensor System Architecture for Active Flow and Noise Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M, Jr.; Culliton, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-channel sensor fusion represents a powerful technique to simply and efficiently extract information from complex phenomena. While the technique has traditionally been used for military target tracking and situational awareness, a study has been successfully completed that demonstrates that sensor fusion can be applied equally well to aerodynamic applications. A prototype autonomous hardware processor was successfully designed and used to detect in real-time the two-dimensional flow reattachment location generated by a simple separated-flow wind tunnel model. The success of this demonstration illustrates the feasibility of using autonomous sensor processing architectures to enhance flow control feedback signal generation.

  18. Iron Metallodrugs: Stability, Redox Activity and Toxicity against Artemia salina

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iron metallodrugs comprise mineral supplements, anti-hypertensive agents and, more recently, magnetic nanomaterials, with both therapeutic and diagnostic roles. As biologically-active metal compounds, concern has been raised regarding the impact of these compounds when emitted to the environment and associated ecotoxicological effects for the fauna. In this work we assessed the relative stability of several iron compounds (supplements based on glucoheptonate, dextran or glycinate, as well as 3,5,5-trimethylhexanoyl (TMH) derivatives of ferrocene) against high affinity models of biological binding, calcein and aprotransferrin, via a fluorimetric method. Also, the redox-activity of each compound was determined in a physiologically relevant medium. Toxicity toward Artemia salina at different developmental stages was measured, as well as the amount of lipid peroxidation. Our results show that polymer-coated iron metallodrugs are stable, non-redox-active and non-toxic at the concentrations studied (up to 300 µM). However, TMH derivatives of ferrocene were less stable and more redox-active than the parent compound, and TMH-ferrocene displayed toxicity and lipid peroxidation to A. salina, unlike the other compounds. Our results indicate that iron metallodrugs based on polymer coating do not present direct toxicity at low levels of emission; however other iron species (eg. metallocenes), may be deleterious for aquatic organisms. We suggest that ecotoxicity depends more on metal speciation than on the total amount of metal present in the metallodrugs. Future studies with discarded metallodrugs should consider the chemical speciation of the metal present in the composition of the drug. PMID:25849743

  19. Ultrasonic waste activated sludge disintegration for improving anaerobic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Tiehm, A; Nickel, K; Zellhorn, M; Neis, U

    2001-06-01

    The pretreatment of waste activated sludge by ultrasonic disintegration was studied in order to improve the anaerobic sludge stabilization. The ultrasound frequency was varied within a range from 41 to 3217 kHz. The impact of different ultrasound intensities and treatment times was examined. Sludge disintegration was most significant at low frequencies. Low-frequency ultrasound creates large cavitation bubbles which upon collapse initiate powerful jet streams exerting strong shear forces in the liquid. The decreasing sludge disintegration efficiency observed at higher frequencies was attributed to smaller cavitation bubbles which do not allow the initiation of such strong shear forces. Short sonication times resulted in sludge floc deagglomeration without the destruction of bacteria cells. Longer sonication brought about the break-up of cell walls, the sludge solids were distintegrated and dissolved organic compounds were released. The anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge following ultrasonic pretreatment causing microbial cell lysis was significantly improved. There was an increase in the volatile solids degradation as well as an increase in the biogas production. The increase in digestion efficiency was proportional to the degree of sludge disintegration. To a lesser degree the deagglomeration of sludge flocs also augmented the anaerobic volatile solids degradation. PMID:11337847

  20. Structural stability and catalytic activity of lanthanum-based perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Lucia M. Petkovic

    2011-05-01

    Perovskite-type oxide materials with a general formula La(1-x)A(x)Fe(1-y)Co(y)O(3-delta), where A is an alkaline earth metal Sr or Ba have been studied as cathode materials for catalytic reduction of oxygen in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), as well as combustion catalysts. In this study, we use a combination of temperature programmed reduction measurements, X-ray diffraction, carbon black catalytic oxidation measurements, and first-principles, density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations to elucidate the main processes that contribute into the structural stability and catalytic activity for soot oxidation of these materials. In particular, we investigate the dynamics of the structure reconstruction with oxygen loss during the regulated increase of the temperature. The calculations are in good qualitative agreement with catalytic experiments and allow identify special combinations of the perovskite chemical composition and local surface structures for which one could expect the highest catalytic activity for the soot oxidation process.

  1. Synthesis, thermal stability, and photocatalytic activity of nanocrystalline titanium carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Youjian; Zhang, Hong; Ma, DeKun; Ma, Jianhua; Ye, Hongnan; Qian, Gaojin; Ye, Yi

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} The synthesized temperature is lower than some conventional methods. {yields} These raw materials are safe; all manipulations are rather safe and convenient. {yields} The product exhibits photocatalytic activity in degradation of Rhodamine-B. -- Abstract: Titanium carbide (TiC) was prepared via one simple route by the reaction of metallic magnesium powders with titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and potassium acetate (CH{sub 3}COOK) in an autoclave at 600 {sup o}C and 8 h. Phase structure and morphology were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the product was cubic TiC, which consisted of particles with an average size of about 100 nm in diameter. The product was also studied by the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and its photocatalysis. It had good thermal stability and oxidation resistance below 350 {sup o}C in air. In addition, we discovered that the cubic TiC powders exhibited photocatalytic activity in degradation of Rhodamine-B (RhB) under 500 W mercury lamp light irradiation.

  2. Visual feedback of the non-moving limb improves active joint-position sense of the impaired limb in Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Smorenburg, Ana R P; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J A; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the active joint-position sense in children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP) and the effect of static visual feedback and static mirror visual feedback, of the non-moving limb, on the joint-position sense. Participants were asked to match the position of one upper limb with that of the contralateral limb. The task was performed in three visual conditions: without visual feedback (no vision); with visual feedback of the non-moving limb (screen); and with visual feedback of the non-moving limb and its mirror reflection (mirror). In addition to the proprioceptive measure, a functional test [Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST)] was performed and the amount of spasticity was determined in order to examine their relation with proprioceptive ability. The accuracy of matching was significantly influenced by the distance that had to be covered by the matching limb; a larger distance resulted in a lower matching accuracy. Moreover it was demonstrated that static (mirror) visual feedback improved the matching accuracy. A clear relation between functionality, as measured by the QUEST, and active joint-position sense was not found. This might be explained by the availability of visual information during the performance of the QUEST. It is concluded that static visual feedback improves matching accuracy in children with SHCP and that the initial distance between the limbs is an influential factor which has to be taken into account when measuring joint-position sense. PMID:21306868

  3. Stability of higher-order Bragg interactions in active periodic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggard, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The stability of waves in unbounded, longitudinally periodic media is studied for index and gain coupling. Time-independent periodic media are found to support both stable and absolutely unstable waves. The wave characteristics depend upon average gain or loss, coupling type, and Bragg order. The extended coupled waves equations provide explicit values of threshold, frequency, and temporal growth rate for instabilities at all Bragg resonances through the dispersion relation. Applications to multiharmonic periodicities and complex couplings are briefly discussed with particular note taken of possible reductions of the stability thresholds and removal of threshold degeneracies. Comparisons are made to the longitudinally bounded case of distributed feedback lasers.

  4. The effect of time delay on control stability of an electromagnetic active tuned mass damper for vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A.; Torres-Perez, A.; Kaczmarczyk, S.; Picton, P.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of time delays on the stability of a zero-placement position and velocity feedback law for a vibratory system comprising harmonic excitation equipped with an electromagnetic active tuned mass damper (ATMD). The purpose of the active control is broadening the vibration attenuation envelope of a primary mass to a higher frequency region identified as from 50±0.5Hz with a passive tuned mass damper (TMD) to a wider range of 50±5Hz with an ATMD. Stability conditions of the closed-loop system are determined by studying the position of the system closed-loop poles after the introduction of time delays for different excitation frequencies. A computer simulation of the model predicted that the proposed control system is subject to instability after a critical time delay margin dependent upon the frequency of excitation and the finding were experimentally validated. Three solutions are derived and experimentally tested for minimising the effect of time delays on the stability of the control system. The first solution is associated with the introduction of more damping in the absorber system. The second incorporates using a time-delayed ATMD by tuning its original natural resonant frequency to beyond the nominal operational frequency range of the composite system. The third involves an online gain tuning of filter coefficients in a dual arrangement of low-pass and high-pass filters to eliminate the effect time delays by manipulating the signal phase shifts.

  5. Evolution of an Antibiotic Resistance Enzyme Constrained by Stability and Activity Trade-offs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-08

    Pressured by antibiotic use, resistance enzymes have been evolving new activities. Does such evolution have a cost? To investigate this question at the molecular level, clinically isolated mutants of the {beta}-lactamase TEM-1 were studied. When purified, mutant enzymes had increased activity against cephalosporin antibiotics but lost both thermodynamic stability and kinetic activity against their ancestral targets, penicillins. The X-ray crystallographic structures of three mutant enzymes were determined. These structures suggest that activity gain and stability loss is related to an enlarged active site cavity in the mutant enzymes. In several clinically isolated mutant enzymes, a secondary substitution is observed far from the active site (Met182 {yields} Thr). This substitution had little effect on enzyme activity but restored stability lost by substitutions near the active site. This regained stability conferred an advantage in vivo. This pattern of stability loss and restoration may be common in the evolution of new enzyme activity.

  6. Mammary blood flow and metabolic activity are linked by a feedback mechanism involving nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cieslar, S R L; Madsen, T G; Purdie, N G; Trout, D R; Osborne, V R; Cant, J P

    2014-01-01

    To test which, if any, of the major milk precursors can elicit a rapid change in the rate of mammary blood flow (MBF) and to define the time course and magnitude of such changes, 4 lactating cows were infused with glucose, amino acids, or triacylglycerol into the external iliac artery feeding one udder half while iliac plasma flow (IPF) was monitored continuously by dye dilution. Adenosine and saline were infused as positive and negative controls, respectively, and insulin was infused to characterize the response to a centrally produced anabolic hormone. To test the roles of cyclooxygenase, NO synthase and ATP-sensitive K (KATP) channels in nutrient-mediated changes in blood flow, their respective inhibitors-indomethacin, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME), and glibenclamide-were infused simultaneously with glucose. Each day, 1 infusate was given twice to each cow, over a 20-min period each time, separated by a 20-min washout period. In addition, each treatment protocol was administered on 2 separate days. A 73% increase in IPF during adenosine infusion showed that the mammary vasodilatory response was quadratic in time, with most changes occurring in the first 5min. Glucose infusion decreased IPF by 9% in a quadratic manner, most rapidly in the first 5min, indicating that a feedback mechanism of local blood flow control, likely through adenosine release, was operative in the mammary vasculature. Amino acid infusion increased IPF 9% in a linear manner, suggesting that mammary ATP utilization was stimulated more than ATP production. This could reflect a stimulation of protein synthesis. Triacylglycerol only tended to decrease IPF and insulin did not affect IPF. A lack of IPF response to glibenclamide indicates that KATP channels are not involved in MBF regulation. Indomethacin and L-NAME both depressed IPF. In the presence of indomethacin, glucose infusion caused a quadratic 9% increase in IPF. Indomethacin is an inhibitor of mitochondrial

  7. A miR-221/222-mediated feedback loop maintains constitutive activation of NF-κB and STAT3 signaling in human colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sanhong; Sun, Xiaohua; Jiang, Yuhang; Liu, Zhanjie; Cao, Xinwei; Hou, Yingyong; Zhan, Yu; Tao, Yu; Wang, Lunshan; Xu, Chen; Chin, Eugene Y; Shi, Yufang; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Zhang, Xiaoren

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Constitutive activation of NF-κB and STAT3 pathways in human colorectal cancers links inflammation to CRC development and progression. However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here we investigated the roles of miR-221 and miR-222 in regulating both NF-κB and STAT3 activities and colorectal tumorigenesis. Methods miR-221/222 mimics and their inhibitors/sponges were transiently or stably transfected into cells. Dual luciferase reporter assays were utilized to examine the activation of both NF-κB and STAT3 signaling, as well as the regulation of miR-221/222. Quantitative PCR and immunoblot analysis were employed to examine the mRNA and protein expression. MTT assay, flow cytometric analysis and xenotransplant of tumor cells were performed to investigate the CRC cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Results miR-221 and miR-222 positively regulate both NF-κB and STAT3 activities, which in return induce miR-221/222 expression, creating a positive feedback loop in human CRCs. miR-221/222 directly bind to the coding region of RelA, leading to increased RelA mRNA stability. In addition, miR-221/222 reduce ubiquitination of RelA and STAT3 proteins by directly targeting the 3′ UTR of PDLIM2, an E3 ligase for both RelA and STAT3. We demonstrate that disruption of the positive feedback loop suppresses human CRC cell growth in vitro and in vivo. The expression of miR-221/222 correlates with the expression of RelA, STAT3 and PDLIM2 in human CRC clinical samples. Conclusions Our findings define a novel miR-221/222 mediated mechanism underlying constitutive activation of NF-κB and STAT3 pathways in human CRCs and provide a promising therapeutic target for human CRCs. PMID:24931456

  8. Arrayed SU-8 polymer thermal actuators with inherent real-time feedback for actively modifying MEMS’ substrate warpage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinghua; Xiao, Dingbang; Chen, Zhihua; Wu, Xuezhong

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and characterization of a batch-fabricated micro-thermal actuators array with inherent real-time self-feedback, which can be used to actively modify micro-electro-mechanical systems’ (MEMS’) substrate warpage. Arrayed polymer thermal actuators utilize SU-8 polymer (a thick negative photoresist) as a functional material with integrated Ti/Al film-heaters as a microscale heat source. The electro-thermo-mechanical response of a micro-fabricated actuator was measured. The resistance of the Al/Ti film resistor varies obviously with ambient temperature, which can be used as inherent feedback for observing real-time displacement of activated SU-8 bumps (0.43 μm Ω‑1). Due to the high thermal expansion coefficient, SU-8 bumps tend to have relatively large deflection at low driving voltage and are very easily integrated with MEMS devices. Experimental results indicated that the proposed SU-8 polymer thermal actuators (array) are able to achieve accurate rectification of MEMS’ substrate warpage, which might find potential applications for solving stress-induced problems in MEMS.

  9. Lp-stability (1 less than or equal to p less than or equal to infinity) of multivariable nonlinear time-varying feedback systems that are open-loop unstable. [noting unstable convolution subsystem forward control and time varying nonlinear feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callier, F. M.; Desoer, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    A class of multivariable, nonlinear time-varying feedback systems with an unstable convolution subsystem as feedforward and a time-varying nonlinear gain as feedback was considered. The impulse response of the convolution subsystem is the sum of a finite number of increasing exponentials multiplied by nonnegative powers of the time t, a term that is absolutely integrable and an infinite series of delayed impulses. The main result is a theorem. It essentially states that if the unstable convolution subsystem can be stabilized by a constant feedback gain F and if incremental gain of the difference between the nonlinear gain function and F is sufficiently small, then the nonlinear system is L(p)-stable for any p between one and infinity. Furthermore, the solutions of the nonlinear system depend continuously on the inputs in any L(p)-norm. The fixed point theorem is crucial in deriving the above theorem.

  10. INCREASED STABLE BETA IN DIII-D BY SUPPRESSION OF A NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE AND ACTIVE FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    LAHAYE,RJ; HUMPHREYS,DA; LOHR,J; LUCE,TC; PERKINS,FW; PETTY,CC; PRATER,R; STRAIT,EJ

    2002-09-01

    OAK A271 INCREASED STABLE BETA IN DIII-D BY SUPPRESSION OF A NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE AND ACTIVE FEEDBACK. In DIII-D, the first real-time active control of the electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of a neoclassical tearing mode (here m/n=3/2) is demonstrated. The plasma control system is put into a search and suppress mode to align the ECCD with the island by making either small rigid radial position shifts (of order 1 cm) of the entire plasma (and thus the island) or small changes in toroidal field (of order 0.5%) which radially moves the second harmonic resonance location (and thus the rf current drive). The optimum position minimizes the real-time mode amplitude signal and stabilization occurs despite changes in island location from discharge-to-discharge or from time-to-time. When the neutral beam heating power is programmed to rise after mode suppression by the ECCD, the plasma pressure increases above the peak at the onset of the neoclassical tearing mode until the magnetic island reappears due to the ECCD no longer being on the optimal position. Real-time tracking of the change in location of q=3/2 due to the Shafranov shift with increasing beta is necessary to position the ECCD in the absence of a mode so that higher stable beta can be sustained. The control techniques developed for the m/n=3/2 NTM are also being applied to the more deleterious m/n-2/1 NTM. For the first time in any tokamak, an m/n=2/1 mode has been completely suppressed using radially localized off-axis ECCD.

  11. Concurrent activation of multiple vasoactive signaling pathways in vasoconstriction caused by tubuloglomerular feedback: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Schnermann, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) describes the negative relationship between (a) NaCl concentration at the macula densa and (b) glomerular filtration rate or glomerular capillary pressure. TGF-induced vasoconstriction of the afferent arteriole results from the enhanced effect of several vasoconstrictors with an effect size sequence of adenosine = 20-HETE > angiotensin II > thromboxane = superoxide > renal nerves > ATP. TGF-mediated vasoconstriction is limited by the simultaneous release of several vasodilators with an effect size sequence of nitric oxide > carbon monoxide = kinins > adenosine. The sum of the constrictor effects exceeds that of the dilator effects by the magnitude of the TGF response. The validity of the additive model used in this analysis can be tested by determining the effect of combined inhibition of some or all agents contributing to TGF. Multiple independent contributors to TGF are consistent with the variability of TGF and of the factors contributing to TGF resetting. PMID:25668021

  12. Antioxidant Activities and Oxidative Stabilities of Some Unconventional Oilseeds.

    PubMed

    Uluata, Sibel; Ozdemir, Nurhayat

    2012-04-01

    The oils of some unconventional oilseeds (hemp, radish, terebinth, stinging nettle, laurel) were obtained by a cold-press method in which the total oil content, fatty acids, tocopherol isomers, some metal contents (Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu), antioxidant activity and oxidative stability were determined. The total oil content was determined ranging between 30.68 and 43.12%, and the oil samples had large amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, with oleic acid and linoleic acid. Of all the oils, terebinth seed oil had the highest α-tocopherol content (102.21 ± 1.01 mg/kg oil). Laurel oilseed had the highest antiradical activity in both the DPPH and ABTS assays. The peroxide value of the non-oxidized oils ranged between 0.51 and 3.73 mequiv O(2)/kg oil. The TBARS value of the non-oxidized oils ranged between 0.68 ± 0.02 and 6.43 ± 0.48 mmol MA equiv/g oil. At 110 °C, the Rancimat induction period of the oils ranged between 1.32 and 43.44 h. The infrared spectra of the samples were recorded by FTIR spectroscopy. The absorbance values of the spectrum bands were observed and it was determined that some of the chemical groups of oxidized oils caused changes in absorbance. As a result of the present research, the analyzed oils could be evaluated as an alternative to traditionally consumed vegetable oils or as additives to them. PMID:22467958

  13. Positive force feedback in bouncing gaits?

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Hartmut; Seyfarth, Andre; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    During bouncing gaits (running, hopping, trotting), passive compliant structures (e.g. tendons, ligaments) store and release part of the stride energy. Here, active muscles must provide the required force to withstand the developing tendon strain and to compensate for the inevitable energy losses. This requires an appropriate control of muscle activation. In this study, for hopping, the potential involvement of afferent information from muscle receptors (muscle spindles, Golgi tendon organs) is investigated using a two-segment leg model with one extensor muscle. It is found that: (i) positive feedbacks of muscle-fibre length and muscle force can result in periodic bouncing; (ii) positive force feedback (F+) stabilizes bouncing patterns within a large range of stride energies (maximum hopping height of 16.3 cm, almost twofold higher than the length feedback); and (iii) when employing this reflex scheme, for moderate hopping heights (up to 8.8 cm), an overall elastic leg behaviour is predicted (hopping frequency of 1.4-3 Hz, leg stiffness of 9-27 kN m(-1)). Furthermore, F+ could stabilize running. It is suggested that, during the stance phase of bouncing tasks, the reflex-generated motor control based on feedbacks might be an efficient and reliable alternative to central motor commands. PMID:14561282

  14. Temperature and Microbial Activity Effects on Soil Carbon Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissore, C.; van Diepen, L.; Wixon, D.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Giardina, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainties on the importance of environmental controls on soil C stabilization and turnover limit accurate predictions of the rate and magnitude of the response of soils to climate change. Here we report results from a study of interactions among vegetation and soil microbial communities in North American forests across a highly constrained, 22OC gradient mean annual temperature (MAT) as a proxy for understanding changes with climate. Previous work indicated that turnover and amount of labile SOC responded negatively to MAT, whereas stable SOC was insensitive to temperature variation. Hardwood forests stored a larger amount of stable SOC, but with shorter mean residence times than paired pine forests. Our findings suggest that the interaction between vegetation composition and microbial communities may affect SOC accumulation and stabilization responses to rising temperature. To investigate these relationships, we characterized the microbial communities with Phospholipid Fatty Acid (PLFA) analysis. PLFA analyses indicate complex microbial responses to increased MAT and vegetation composition. Microbial biomass declined with MAT in conifer forests and increased in hardwood forests. Relative abundance of actinomycetes increased with MAT for both forest types, and was correlated with amount and turnover of active SOC. The relative abundance of fungi decreased with increasing MAT, while gram+ bacteria increased, such that fungi:bacteria ratio decreased with MAT, with this trend being more pronounced for hardwood cover type. These results are consistent with a long-term warming experiment in a hardwood forest at the Harvard Forest LTER site, where after 12 years of warming the relative abundance of gram positive bacteria and actinomycetes increased, while fungal biomass decreased. In contrast, relationships between microbial groups and the stable fraction of SOC along the gradient were only observed in conifers. Increases in mean residence time of stable SOC were

  15. Positive feedback produces broad distributions in maximum activation attained within a narrow time window in stochastic biochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit

    2013-03-01

    Stochastic fluctuations in biochemical reactions can regulate single cell decision processes. Using exact solutions and semi-analytical methods we calculate distributions of the maximum value (N) of species concentrations (Pmax (N)) and the time (t) taken to reach the maximum value (Pmax (t)) in minimal models of stochastic chemical reactions commonly found in cell signaling systems. We find, the presence of positive feedback interactions make Pmax (N) more spread out with a higher ``peakedness'' in Pmax (t) . Thus positive feedback interactions may help single cells to respond sensitively to a stimulus when cell decision processes require upregulation of activated forms of key proteins to a threshold number within a time window. Moreover, unlike other models of strongly correlated random variables such as Brownian walks or fluctuating interfaces, the extreme value distributions for the chemical reactions display multiscaling behavior emphasizing the presence of many time scales in cell signaling kinetics. This work was funded by the Research Institute at the Nationwide Children's Hospital and a grant (1R56AI090115-01A1) from the NIH.

  16. Left-handers show no self-advantage in detecting a delay in visual feedback concerning an active movement.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Adria E N; Elzein, Yasmeenah; Harris, Laurence R

    2016-07-01

    Right-handed people show an advantage in detecting a delay in visual feedback concerning an active movement of their right hand when it is viewed in a natural perspective compared to when it is seen as if viewing another person's hand (Hoover and Harris in Exp Brain Res 233:1053-1060, 2012. doi: 10.1007/s00221-014-4181-9 ; Exp Brain Res 222:389-397, 2015a. doi: 10.1007/s00221-012-3224-3 ). This self-advantage is unique to their dominant hand and may reflect an enhanced sense of ownership which contributes to how right-handed people relate to the world. Here we asked whether left-handers show the same pattern of performance for their dominant hand. We measured the minimum delay that could be detected by 29 left-handers when viewing either their dominant or non-dominant hand from 'self' or 'other' perspectives and compared their thresholds to an age-matched sample of 22 right-handers. Right-handers showed a significant signature self-advantage of 19 ms when viewing their dominant hand in an expected 'self' perspective compared to 'other' perspectives. Left-handers, however, showed no such advantage for either their dominant or non-dominant hand. This lack of self-advantage in detecting delayed visual feedback might indicate a less secure sense of body ownership amongst left-handers. PMID:26914478

  17. The effects of squatting with visual feedback on the muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique and the vastus lateralis in young adults with an increased quadriceps angle

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Pil-Neo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of performing squat exercises with visual feedback on the activation of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles in young adults with an increased quadriceps angle (Q-angle). [Subjects] This study used a motion analysis program (Dartfish, Switzerland) to select 20 young adults with an increased Q-angle, who were then divided into a squat group that received visual feedback (VSG, n=10) and a squat group that received no visual feedback (SG, n=10). [Methods] The intensity of exercises was increased every two weeks over a six-week exercise period in both groups. A visual marker was attached to the patella of the subjects in the VSG, and they then performed squat exercises with a maximum of 90° of knee flexion within a route marked on a mirror. The SG performed squat exercises with a maximum 90° of knee flexion without attaching a visual feedback device. [Results] Analysis of the muscle activation due to 90° squat exercises indicated that both groups had statistically significant increases in activation of the VL. The VSG exhibited statistically significant increases in activation of the VMO. [Conclusion] This study confirmed that squat exercises with visual feedback are effective in activation of the VMO and VL muscles. The findings are meaningful in terms of preventing the occurrence of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26157251

  18. Integrated chassis control of active front steering and yaw stability control based on improved inverse nyquist array method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Chen, Yizhou; Zhao, Jian

    2014-01-01

    An integrated chassis control (ICC) system with active front steering (AFS) and yaw stability control (YSC) is introduced in this paper. The proposed ICC algorithm uses the improved Inverse Nyquist Array (INA) method based on a 2-degree-of-freedom (DOF) planar vehicle reference model to decouple the plant dynamics under different frequency bands, and the change of velocity and cornering stiffness were considered to calculate the analytical solution in the precompensator design so that the INA based algorithm runs well and fast on the nonlinear vehicle system. The stability of the system is guaranteed by dynamic compensator together with a proposed PI feedback controller. After the response analysis of the system on frequency domain and time domain, simulations under step steering maneuver were carried out using a 2-DOF vehicle model and a 14-DOF vehicle model by Matlab/Simulink. The results show that the system is decoupled and the vehicle handling and stability performance are significantly improved by the proposed method. PMID:24782676

  19. Integrated Chassis Control of Active Front Steering and Yaw Stability Control Based on Improved Inverse Nyquist Array Method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An integrated chassis control (ICC) system with active front steering (AFS) and yaw stability control (YSC) is introduced in this paper. The proposed ICC algorithm uses the improved Inverse Nyquist Array (INA) method based on a 2-degree-of-freedom (DOF) planar vehicle reference model to decouple the plant dynamics under different frequency bands, and the change of velocity and cornering stiffness were considered to calculate the analytical solution in the precompensator design so that the INA based algorithm runs well and fast on the nonlinear vehicle system. The stability of the system is guaranteed by dynamic compensator together with a proposed PI feedback controller. After the response analysis of the system on frequency domain and time domain, simulations under step steering maneuver were carried out using a 2-DOF vehicle model and a 14-DOF vehicle model by Matlab/Simulink. The results show that the system is decoupled and the vehicle handling and stability performance are significantly improved by the proposed method. PMID:24782676

  20. The cytolytic C5b-9 complement complex: feedback inhibition of complement activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bhakdi, S; Maillet, F; Muhly, M; Kazatchkine, M D

    1988-01-01

    We describe a regulatory function of the terminal cytolytic C5b-9 complex [C5b-9(m)] of human complement. Purified C5b-9(m) complexes isolated from target membranes, whether in solution or bound to liposomes, inhibited lysis of sensitized sheep erythrocytes by whole human serum in a dose-dependent manner. C9 was not required for the inhibitory function since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes isolated from membranes were also effective. No effect was found with the cytolytically inactive, fluid-phase SC5b-9 complex. However, tryptic modification of SC5b-9 conferred an inhibitory capacity to the complex, due probably to partial removal of the S protein. Experiments using purified components demonstrated that C5b-9(m) exerts a regulatory effect on the formation of the classical- and alternative-pathway C3 convertases and on the utilization of C5 by cell-bound C5 convertases. C5b-9(m) complexes were unable to inhibit the lysis of cells bearing C5b-7(m) by C8 and C9. Addition of C5b-9(m) to whole human serum abolished its bactericidal effect on the serum-sensitive Escherichia coli K-12 strain W 3110 and suppressed its hemolytic function on antibody-sensitized, autologous erythrocytes. Feedback inhibition by C5b-9(m) represents a biologically relevant mechanism through which complement may autoregulate its effector functions. Images PMID:3162317

  1. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  2. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  3. Evidence for Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in the Broad Absorption Lines and Reddening of Mrk 231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighly, Karen M.; Terndrup, Donald M.; Baron, Eddie; Lucy, Adrian B.; Dietrich, Matthias; Gallagher, Sarah C.

    2014-06-01

    We present the first J-band spectrum of Mrk 231, which reveals a large He I* λ10830 broad absorption line with a profile similar to that of the well-known Na I broad absorption line. Combining this spectrum with optical and UV spectra from the literature, we show that the unusual reddening noted by Veilleux et al. is explained by a reddening curve like those previously used to explain low values of total-to-selective extinction in Type Ia supernovae. The nuclear starburst may be the origin and location of the dust. Spatially resolved emission in the broad absorption line trough suggests nearly full coverage of the continuum emission region. The broad absorption lines reveal higher velocities in the He I* lines (produced in the quasar-photoionized H II region) compared with the Na I and Ca II lines (produced in the corresponding partially ionized zone). Cloudy simulations show that a density increase is required between the H II and partially ionized zones to produce ionic column densities consistent with the optical and IR absorption line measurements and limits, and that the absorber lies ~100 pc from the central engine. These results suggest that the He I* lines are produced in an ordinary quasar BAL wind that impacts upon, compresses, and accelerates the nuclear starburst's dusty effluent (feedback in action), and the Ca II and Na I lines are produced in this dusty accelerated gas. This unusual circumstance explains the rarity of Na I absorption lines; without the compression along our line of sight, Mrk 231 would appear as an ordinary iron low-ionization, broad absorption line quasar.

  4. Parallel feedback active noise control of MRI acoustic noise with signal decomposition using hybrid RLS-NLMS adaptive algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Anshuman; Krishna Vemuri, Sri Hari; Panahi, Issa

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a cost-effective adaptive feedback Active Noise Control (FANC) method for controlling functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) acoustic noise by decomposing it into dominant periodic components and residual random components. Periodicity of fMRI acoustic noise is exploited by using linear prediction (LP) filtering to achieve signal decomposition. A hybrid combination of adaptive filters-Recursive Least Squares (RLS) and Normalized Least Mean Squares (NLMS) are then used to effectively control each component separately. Performance of the proposed FANC system is analyzed and Noise attenuation levels (NAL) up to 32.27 dB obtained by simulation are presented which confirm the effectiveness of the proposed FANC method. PMID:25570676

  5. Active learning in a large-enrollment introductory biology class: Problem solving, formative feedback, and teaching as learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robison, Diane F.

    The purpose of this study was to take a case study approach to exploring student learning experiences in a large enrollment introductory biology class. Traditionally such classes are taught through the lecture method with limited instructor-student interaction and minimal student-centered learning (Lewis & Woodward, 1984; Wulff, Nyqst, & Abbott, 1987). Biology 120 taught at Brigham Young University winter semester 2006 by John Bell was chosen as the case for the study due to its large enrollment (263) and its innovative pedagogy. In the classroom, students applied their learning through a variety of student-centered activities including solving problems, discussing concepts with peers, drawing diagrams, and voting. Outside of the classroom students were assigned, in addition to reading from the textbook and homework problems, to teach each week's concepts to another student. Formative feedback was emphasized in classroom activities and through a unique assessment system. Students took self-graded weekly assessments designed to provide regular and timely feedback on their performance. The only traditionally-graded assessment was the final exam. Students were expected to understand, apply, and think analytically with their knowledge and this was reflected in the assessment items. Student learning, as measured by a pretest and a posttest, increased from an average of 44% correct to 77% correct on a set of 22 items common to both tests. Responses to pre and post-surveys indicated that students increased in their orientation towards understanding as apposed to grades during the course. Qualitative data suggested that during the course many students deepened their learning approach and increased in feelings of personal control over their learning.

  6. A CHANDRA STUDY OF THE RADIO GALAXY NGC 326: WINGS, OUTBURST HISTORY, AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund J.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2012-02-20

    NGC 326 is one of the most prominent 'X'- or 'Z'-shaped radio galaxies (XRGs/ZRGs) and has been the subject of several studies attempting to explain its morphology through either fluid motions or reorientation of the jet axis. We examine a 100 ks Chandra X-Ray Observatory exposure and find several features associated with the radio galaxy: a high-temperature front that may indicate a shock, high-temperature knots around the rim of the radio emission, and a cavity associated with the eastern wing of the radio galaxy. A reasonable interpretation of these features in light of the radio data allows us to reconstruct the history of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) outbursts. The active outburst was likely once a powerful radio source which has since decayed, and circumstantial evidence favors reorientation as the means to produce the wings. Because of the obvious interaction between the radio galaxy and the intracluster medium and the wide separation between the active lobes and wings, we conclude that XRGs are excellent sources in which to study AGN feedback in galaxy groups by measuring the heating rates associated with both active and passive heating mechanisms.

  7. Simple Optoelectronic Feedback in Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    A proposed method of stabilizing microwave and millimeter-wave oscillators calls for the use of feedback in optoelectronic delay lines characterized by high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). The method would extend the applicability of optoelectronic feedback beyond the previously reported class of optoelectronic oscillators that comprise two-port electronic amplifiers in closed loops with high-Q feedback circuits.

  8. A MAPK-Driven Feedback Loop Suppresses Rac Activity to Promote RhoA-Driven Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hetmanski, Joseph H. R.; Zindy, Egor; Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Caswell, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration in 3D microenvironments is fundamental to development, homeostasis and the pathobiology of diseases such as cancer. Rab-coupling protein (RCP) dependent co-trafficking of α5β1 and EGFR1 promotes cancer cell invasion into fibronectin (FN) containing extracellular matrix (ECM), by potentiating EGFR1 signalling at the front of invasive cells. This promotes a switch in RhoGTPase signalling to inhibit Rac1 and activate a RhoA-ROCK-Formin homology domain-containing 3 (FHOD3) pathway and generate filopodial actin-spike protrusions which drive invasion. To further understand the signalling network that drives RCP-driven invasive migration, we generated a Boolean logical model based on existing network pathways/models, where each node can be interrogated by computational simulation. The model predicted an unanticipated feedback loop, whereby Raf/MEK/ERK signalling maintains suppression of Rac1 by inhibiting the Rac-activating Sos1-Eps8-Abi1 complex, allowing RhoA activity to predominate in invasive protrusions. MEK inhibition was sufficient to promote lamellipodia formation and oppose filopodial actin-spike formation, and led to activation of Rac and inactivation of RhoA at the leading edge of cells moving in 3D matrix. Furthermore, MEK inhibition abrogated RCP/α5β1/EGFR1-driven invasive migration. However, upon knockdown of Eps8 (to suppress the Sos1-Abi1-Eps8 complex), MEK inhibition had no effect on RhoGTPase activity and did not oppose invasive migration, suggesting that MEK-ERK signalling suppresses the Rac-activating Sos1-Abi1-Eps8 complex to maintain RhoA activity and promote filopodial actin-spike formation and invasive migration. Our study highlights the predictive potential of mathematical modelling approaches, and demonstrates that a simple intervention (MEK-inhibition) could be of therapeutic benefit in preventing invasive migration and metastasis. PMID:27138333

  9. Novel active stabilization technology in highly crosslinked UHMWPEs for superior stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oral, Ebru; Neils, Andrew L.; Wannomae, Keith K.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2014-12-01

    Radiation cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is the bearing of choice in joint arthroplasty. The demands on the longevity of this polymer are likely to increase with the recently advancing deterioration of the performance of alternative metal-on-metal implants. Vitamin E-stabilized, cross-linked UHMWPEs are considered the next generation of improved UHMWPE bearing surfaces for improving the oxidation resistance of the polymer. It was recently discovered that in the absence of radiation-induced free radicals, lipids absorbed into UHMWPE from the synovial fluid can initiate oxidation and result in new free radical-mediated oxidation mechanisms. In the presence of radiation-induced free radicals, it is possible for the polymer to oxidize through both existing free radicals at the time of implantation and through newly formed free radicals in vivo. Thus, we showed that reducing the radiation-induced free radicals in vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE would increase its oxidative stability and presumably lead to improved longevity. We describe mechanical annealing and warm irradiation of irradiated vitamin E blends as novel methods to eliminate 99% of radiation-induced free radicals without sacrificing crystallinity. These are significant improvements in the processing of highly cross-linked UHMWPE for joint implants with improved longevity.

  10. Active polarization stabilization in optical fibers suitable for quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Wu, Guang; Li, Yao; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2007-12-24

    Polarization feedback control of single-photon pulses has been achieved in long-distance fibers for more than 10 hours, which facilitated "one-way" polarization-encoded quantum key distribution with long-term stabilities. Experimental test of polarization encoding in 75 km fibers demonstrated that the single-photon polarization transformation in long-distance fibers could be controlled to provide a typical QBER of (3.9+/-1.5)% within a long-term operation of 620 minutes. PMID:19551088

  11. STAT1 deficiency redirects IFN signalling toward suppression of TLR response through a feedback activation of STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun Sik; Kim, Dong Chan; Kim, Hong-Mi; Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kwon, Soon Jae; Kang, Suk-Jo; Kim, Sun Chang; Choi, Go-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) potentiate macrophage activation typically via a STAT1-dependent pathway. Recent studies suggest a functioning of STAT1-independent pathway in the regulation of gene expression by IFN-γ, thus pointing to the diversity in cellular responses to IFNs. Many functions of IFNs rely on cross-regulation of the responses to exogenous inflammatory mediators such as TLR ligands. Here we investigated the contribution of STAT1-independent pathway to macrophage activation and its underlying mechanism in the context of combined stimulation of IFN and TLR. We found that TLR-induced production of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-12) was not simply nullified but was significantly suppressed by signaling common to IFN-γ and IFN-β in STAT1-null macrophages. Such a shift in the suppression of TLR response correlated with a sustained STAT3 activation and attenuation of NF-κB signaling. Using a JAK2/STAT3 pathway inhibitor or STAT3-specific siRNA, blocking STAT3 in that context restored TNF-α production and NF-κB signaling, thus indicating a functional cross-regulation among STAT1, STAT3, and NF-κB. Our results suggest that STAT1 deficiency reprograms IFN signaling from priming toward suppression of TLR response via feedback regulation of STAT3, which may provide a new insight into the host defense response against microbial pathogens in a situation of STAT1 deficiency. PMID:26299368

  12. Effect of duration of synaptic activity on spike rate of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron with delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, M.; Valizadeh, A.; Azizi, Y.

    2012-02-01

    A recurrent loop consisting of a single Hodgkin-Huxley neuron influenced by a chemical excitatory delayed synaptic feedback is considered. We show that the behavior of the system depends on the duration of the activity of the synapse, which is determined by the activation and deactivation time constants of the synapse. For the fast synapses, those for which the effect of the synaptic activity is small compared to the period of firing, depending on the delay time, spiking with single and multiple interspike intervals is possible and the average firing rate can be smaller or larger than that of the open loop neuron. For slow synapses for which the synaptic time constants are of order of the period of the firing, the self-excitation increases the firing rate for all values of the delay time. We also show that for a chain consisting of few similar oscillators, if the synapses are chosen from different time constants, the system will follow the dynamics imposed by the fastest element, which is the oscillator that receives excitations via a slow synapse. The generalization of the results to other types of relaxation oscillators is discussed and the results are compared to those of the loops with inhibitory synapses as well as with gap junctions.

  13. THERMAL AND RADIATIVE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK HAVE A LIMITED IMPACT ON STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Orianne; Juneau, Stéphanie; Bournaud, Frédéric; Gabor, Jared M.

    2015-02-10

    The effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on their host galaxies depend on the coupling between the injected energy and the interstellar medium (ISM). Here, we model and quantify the impact of long-range AGN ionizing radiation—in addition to the often considered small-scale energy deposition—on the physical state of the multi-phase ISM of the host galaxy and on its total star formation rate (SFR). We formulate an AGN spectral energy distribution matched with observations, which we use with the radiative transfer (RT) code Cloudy to compute AGN ionization in a simulated high-redshift disk galaxy. We use a high-resolution (∼6 pc) simulation including standard thermal AGN feedback and calculate RT in post-processing. Surprisingly, while these models produce significant AGN-driven outflows, we find that AGN ionizing radiation and heating reduce the SFR by a few percent at most for a quasar luminosity (L {sub bol} = 10{sup 46.5} erg s{sup –1}). Although the circumgalactic gaseous halo can be kept almost entirely ionized by the AGN, most star-forming clouds (n ≳ 10{sup 2} {sup –} {sup 3} cm{sup –3}) and even the reservoirs of cool atomic gas (n ∼ 0.3-10 cm{sup –3})—which are the sites of future star formation (SF; 100-200 Myr), are generally too dense to be significantly affected. Our analysis ignores any absorption from a putative torus, making our results upper limits on the effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, while the AGN-driven outflows can remove substantial amounts of gas in the long term, the impact of AGN feedback on the SF efficiency in the interstellar gas in high-redshift galaxies is marginal, even when long-range radiative effects are accounted for.

  14. Shocks and Cavities from Multiple Outbursts in the Galaxy Group NGC 5813: A Window to Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, S. W.; Forman, W. R.; Giacintucci, S.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Sun, M.; Jones, C.; Churazov, E.; David, L. P.; Kraft, R.; Donahue, M.; Blanton, E. L.; Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.

    2011-01-01

    We present results from new Chandra, GMRT, and SOAR observations of NGC 5813, the dominant central galaxy in a nearby galaxy group. The system shows three pairs of collinear cavities at 1 kpc, 8 kpc, and 20 kpc from the central source, from three distinct outbursts of the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), which occurred 3 × 106, 2 × 107, and 9 × 107 yr ago. The Hα and X-ray observations reveal filaments of cool gas that has been uplifted by the X-ray cavities. The inner two cavity pairs are filled with radio-emitting plasma, and each pair is associated with an elliptical surface brightness edge, which we unambiguously identify as shocks (with measured temperature jumps) with Mach numbers of M ≈ 1.7 and M ≈ 1.5 for the inner and outer shocks, respectively. Such clear signatures from three distinct AGN outbursts in an otherwise dynamically relaxed system provide a unique opportunity to study AGN feedback and outburst history. The mean power of the two most recent outbursts differs by a factor of six, from (1.5-10)×1042 erg s-1, indicating that the mean jet power changes significantly over long (~107 yr) timescales. The total energy output of the most recent outburst is also more than an order of magnitude less than the total energy of the previous outburst (1.5 × 1056 erg versus 4 × 1057 erg), which may be a result of the lower mean power, or may indicate that the most recent outburst is ongoing. The outburst interval implied by both the shock and cavity ages (~107 yr) indicates that, in this system, shock heating alone is sufficient to balance radiative cooling close to the central AGN, which is the relevant region for regulating feedback between the intracluster medium and the central supermassive black hole.

  15. Hybrid Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels with Constrained Layer Damping and Model Predictive Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2000-01-01

    make the controller adaptive. For example, a mathematical model of the plant could be periodically updated as the plant changes, and the feedback gains recomputed from the updated model. To be practical, this approach requires a simple plant model that can be updated quickly with reasonable computational requirements. A recent paper by the authors discussed one way to simplify a feedback controller, by reducing the number of actuators and sensors needed for good performance. The work was done on a tensioned aircraft-style panel excited on one side by TBL flow in a low speed wind tunnel. Actuation was provided by a piezoelectric (PZT) actuator mounted on the center of the panel. For sensing, the responses of four accelerometers, positioned to approximate the response of the first radiation mode of the panel, were summed and fed back through the controller. This single input-single output topology was found to have nearly the same noise reduction performance as a controller with fifteen accelerometers and three PZT patches. This paper extends the previous results by looking at how constrained layer damping (CLD) on a panel can be used to enhance the performance of the feedback controller thus providing a more robust and efficient hybrid active/passive system. The eventual goal is to use the CLD to reduce sound radiation at high frequencies, then implement a very simple, reduced order, low sample rate adaptive controller to attenuate sound radiation at low frequencies. Additionally this added damping smoothes phase transitions over the bandwidth which promotes robustness to natural frequency shifts. Experiments were conducted in a transmission loss facility on a clamped-clamped aluminum panel driven on one side by a loudspeaker. A generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm, which is suited to online adaptation of its parameters, was used in single input-single output and multiple input-single output configurations. Because this was a preliminary look at the potential

  16. Teacher Feedback and Interactions in Physical Education: Effects of Student Gender and Physical Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicaise, Virginie; Cogerino, Genevieve; Fairclough, Stuart; Bois, Julien; Davis, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Previous research conducted in both classroom and physical education (PE) settings has examined the impact of student gender on teacher-student interactions. The purpose of this study was to extend this line of research by analysing the influence of student gender and different types of physical activity on the frequency and nature of teacher…

  17. Clinical Study of Student Learning Using Mastery Style versus Immediate Feedback Online Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladding, Gary; Gutmann, Brianne; Schroeder, Noah; Stelzer, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    This paper is part of a series of studies to improve the efficacy of online physics homework activities by integrating narrated animated solutions with mastery inspired exercises. In a clinical study using first- and second-year university students, the mastery group attempted question sets in four levels, with animated solutions between each…

  18. The comparison of abdominal muscle activation on unstable surface according to the different trunk stability exercises

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-seok; Kim, Da-yeon; Kim, Tae-ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of abdominal muscle activities and the activation ratio related to trunk stabilization to compare the effects between the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and lumbar stabilization exercises on an unstable base of support. [Subjects and Methods] Study subjects were 20 male and 10 female adults in their 20s without lumbar pain, who were equally and randomly assigned to either the abdominal drawing-in maneuver group and the lumbar stabilization exercise group. Abdominal muscle activation and ratio was measured using a wireless TeleMyo DTS during right leg raise exercises while sitting on a Swiss ball. [Results] Differences in rectus abdominis, external oblique abdominis, and internal oblique abdominis muscle activation were observed before and after treatment. Significant differences were observed between the groups in the muscle activation of the external oblique abdominis and internal oblique abdominis, and the muscle activation ratio of external oblique abdominis/rectus abdominis and internal oblique abdominis/rectus abdominis. [Conclusion] Consequently trunk stability exercise enhances internal oblique abdominis activity and increases trunk stabilization. In addition, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver facilitates the deep muscle more than LSE in abdominal muscle. Therefore, abdominal drawing-in maneuver is more effective than lumbar stabilization exercises in facilitating trunk stabilization. PMID:27134401

  19. GTP Cyclohydrolase I Expression, Protein, and Activity Determine Intracellular Tetrahydrobiopterin Levels, Independent of GTP Cyclohydrolase Feedback Regulatory Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Amy L.; Crabtree, Mark J.; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2009-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  20. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  1. Feedback loops blockade potentiates apoptosis induction and antitumor activity of a novel AKT inhibitor DC120 in human liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Deng, R; Qian, X-J; Chang, S-H; Wu, X-Q; Qin, J; Feng, G-K; Ding, K; Zhu, X-F

    2014-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase AKT is generally accepted as a promising anticancer therapeutic target. However, the relief of feedback inhibition and enhancement of other survival pathways often attenuate the anticancer effects of AKT inhibitors. These compensatory mechanisms are very complicated and remain poorly understood. In the present study, we found a novel 2-pyrimidyl-5-amidothiazole compound, DC120, as an ATP competitive AKT kinase inhibitor that suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in liver cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. DC120 blocked the phosphorylation of downstream molecules in the AKT signal pathway in dose- and time-dependent manners both in vitro and in vivo. However, unexpectedly, DC120 activated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway that was suggested by increased phosphorylation of 70KD ribosomal protein S6 kinase (P70S6K) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). The activated mTORC1 signal was because of increase of intracellular Ca(2+) via Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)/ signaling to human vacuolar protein sorting 34 (hVps34) upon AKT inhibition. Meanwhile, DC120 attenuated the inhibitory effect of AKT on CRAF by decreasing phosphorylation of CRAF at Ser259 and thus activated the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The activation of the mTORC1 and MAPK pathways by DC120 was not mutually dependent, and the combination of DC120 with mTORC1 inhibitor and/or MEK inhibitor induced significant apoptosis and growth inhibition both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, the combination of AKT, mTORC1 and/or MEK inhibitors would be a promising therapeutic strategy for liver cancer treatment. PMID:24625973

  2. Enhancing Student Performance in First-Semester General Chemistry Using Active Feedback through the World Wide Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Kent A.; Blake, Bob

    2007-01-01

    The World Wide Web recently launched a new interactive feedback system for the instructors, so that can better understanding about their students and their problems. The feedback, in combination with tailored lectures is expected to enhance student performance in the first semester of general chemistry.

  3. Promoting University Students' Critical Thinking Skills through Peer Feedback Activity in an Online Discussion Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekahitanond, Visara

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of the critical inquiry model through peer feedback strategies in an online environment on university students' critical thinking skills and examined their attitudes towards learning through the critical inquiry model and peer feedback strategies. Pre-and post-tests were employed to measure critical thinking…

  4. Targets of polyamine dysregulation in major depression and suicide: Activity-dependent feedback, excitability, and neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Limon, Agenor; Mamdani, Firoza; Hjelm, Brooke E; Vawter, Marquis P; Sequeira, Adolfo

    2016-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide characterized by altered neuronal activity in brain regions involved in the control of stress and emotion. Although multiple lines of evidence suggest that altered stress-coping mechanisms underlie the etiology of MDD, the homeostatic control of neuronal excitability in MDD at the molecular level is not well established. In this review, we examine past and current evidence implicating dysregulation of the polyamine system as a central factor in the homeostatic response to stress and the etiology of MDD. We discuss the cellular effects of abnormal metabolism of polyamines in the context of their role in sensing and modulation of neuronal, electrical, and synaptic activity. Finally, we discuss evidence supporting an allostatic model of depression based on a chronic elevation in polyamine levels resulting in self-sustained stress response mechanisms maintained by maladaptive homeostatic mechanisms. PMID:27108532

  5. Retrograde fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22) signaling regulates insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) expression for activity-dependent synapse stabilization in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Akiko; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M; Bullock, Brenna; Lehtinen, Maria K; Umemori, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Communication between pre- and postsynaptic cells promotes the initial organization of synaptic specializations, but subsequent synaptic stabilization requires transcriptional regulation. Here we show that fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22), a target-derived presynaptic organizer in the mouse hippocampus, induces the expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) for the stabilization of presynaptic terminals. FGF22 is released from CA3 pyramidal neurons and organizes the differentiation of excitatory nerve terminals formed onto them. Local application of FGF22 on the axons of dentate granule cells (DGCs), which are presynaptic to CA3 pyramidal neurons, induces IGF2 in the DGCs. IGF2, in turn, localizes to DGC presynaptic terminals and stabilizes them in an activity-dependent manner. IGF2 application rescues presynaptic defects of Fgf22(-/-) cultures. IGF2 is dispensable for the initial presynaptic differentiation, but is required for the following presynaptic stabilization both in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal a novel feedback signal that is critical for the activity-dependent stabilization of presynaptic terminals in the mammalian hippocampus. PMID:27083047

  6. Retrograde fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22) signaling regulates insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) expression for activity-dependent synapse stabilization in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Akiko; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M; Bullock, Brenna; Lehtinen, Maria K; Umemori, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Communication between pre- and postsynaptic cells promotes the initial organization of synaptic specializations, but subsequent synaptic stabilization requires transcriptional regulation. Here we show that fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22), a target-derived presynaptic organizer in the mouse hippocampus, induces the expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) for the stabilization of presynaptic terminals. FGF22 is released from CA3 pyramidal neurons and organizes the differentiation of excitatory nerve terminals formed onto them. Local application of FGF22 on the axons of dentate granule cells (DGCs), which are presynaptic to CA3 pyramidal neurons, induces IGF2 in the DGCs. IGF2, in turn, localizes to DGC presynaptic terminals and stabilizes them in an activity-dependent manner. IGF2 application rescues presynaptic defects of Fgf22-/- cultures. IGF2 is dispensable for the initial presynaptic differentiation, but is required for the following presynaptic stabilization both in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal a novel feedback signal that is critical for the activity-dependent stabilization of presynaptic terminals in the mammalian hippocampus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12151.001 PMID:27083047

  7. Constraints on Feedback in the Local Universe: The Relation between Star Formation and AGN Activity in Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Whitmore, Samantha; Ahmed, Rabeea; Pierce, Katherine; Leary, Sara

    2016-02-01

    We address the relation between star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in a sample of 231 nearby (0.0002 < z < 0.0358) early-type galaxies by carrying out a multi-wavelength study using archival observations in the UV, IR, and radio. Our results indicate that early-type galaxies in the current epoch are rarely powerful AGNs, with P\\lt {10}22 {{WHz}}-1 for a majority of the galaxies. Only massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources while less massive galaxies are hosts to lower radio power sources. Evidence of ongoing star formation is seen in approximately 7% of the sample. The star formation rate (SFR) of these galaxies is less than 0.1 M⊙ yr-1. They also tend to be radio faint (P\\lt {10}22 {{WHz}}-1). There is a nearly equal fraction of star-forming galaxies in radio faint (P\\lt {10}22 {{WHz}}-1) and radio bright galaxies (P≥slant {10}22 {{WHz}}-1) suggesting that both star formation and radio mode feedback are constrained to be very low in our sample. We notice that our galaxy sample and the Brightest Cluster Galaxies follow similar trends in radio power versus SFR. This may be produced if both radio power and SFR are related to stellar mass.

  8. Neural activity in the medial parietal area V6A while grasping with or without visual feedback

    PubMed Central

    Breveglieri, Rossella; Bosco, Annalisa; Galletti, Claudio; Passarelli, Lauretta; Fattori, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Recent works have reported that grasping movements are controlled not only by the dorsolateral visual stream, as generally thought, but also by the dorsomedial visual stream, and in particular by the medial posterior parietal area V6A. To date, the grasping activity of V6A neurons has been studied only in darkness. Here we studied the effect of visual feedback on grasp-related discharges of V6A neurons while the monkey was preparing and executing the grasping of a handle. We found that V6A grasping activity could be excited or inhibited by visual information. The neural population was divided into Visual, Motor, and Visuomotor cells. The majority of Visual and Visuomotor neurons did not respond to passive observation of the handle, suggesting that vision of action, rather than object vision, is the most effective factor. The present findings highlight the role of the dorsomedial visual stream in integrating visual and motor signals to monitor and correct grasping. PMID:27381869

  9. Erbin loss promotes cancer cell proliferation through feedback activation of Akt-Skp2-p27 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hao; Song, Yuhua; Wu, Yan; Guo, Ning; Ma, Yuanfang; Qian, Lu

    2015-07-31

    Erbin localizes at the basolateral membrane to regulate cell junctions and polarity in epithelial cells. Dysregulation of Erbin has been implicated in tumorigenesis, and yet it is still unclear if and how disrupted Erbin regulates the biological behavior of cancer cells. We report here that depletion of Erbin leads to cancer cell excessive proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Erbin deficiency accelerates S-phase entry by down-regulating CDK inhibitors p21 and p27 via two independent mechanisms. Mechanistically, Erbin loss promotes p27 degradation by enhancing E3 ligase Skp2 activity though augmenting Akt signaling. Interestingly, we also show that Erbin is an unstable protein when the Akt-Skp2 signaling is aberrantly activated, which can be specifically destructed by SCF-Skp2 ligase. Erbin loss facilitates cell proliferation and migration in Skp2-dependent manner. Thus, our finding illustrates a novel negative feedback loop between Erbin and Akt-Skp2 signaling. It suggests disrupted Erbin links polarity loss, hyperproliferation and tumorigenesis. - Highlights: • Erbin loss leads to cancer cell excessive proliferation in vitro and in vivo. • Erbin loss accelerates cell cycle though down-regulating p21 and p27 expression. • Erbin is a novel negative modulator of Akt1-Skp2-p27 signaling pathway. • Our study suggests that Erbin loss contributes to Skp2 oncogenic function.

  10. Insights into the interactions between enzyme and co-solvents: stability and activity of stem bromelain.

    PubMed

    Rani, Anjeeta; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2015-02-01

    In present study, an attempt is made to elucidate the effects of various naturally occurring osmolytes and denaturants on BM at pH 7.0. The effects of the varying concentrations of glycerol, sorbitol, sucrose, trehalose, urea and guanidinium chloride (GdnHCl) on structure, stability and activity of BM are explored by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), UV-vis spectroscopy and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Our experimental observations reveal that glycerol and sorbitol are acting as stabilizers at all concentrations while sucrose and trehalose are found to be destabilizers at lower concentrations, however, acted as stabilizers at higher concentrations. On the other hand, urea and GdnHCl are denaturants except at lower concentrations. There is a direct relationship between activity and conformational stability as the activity data are found to be in accordance with conformational stability parameters (ΔGu, Tm, ΔCp) and BM profile on SDS-PAGE. PMID:25434803

  11. Activity and stability of catalase in nonionic micellar and reverse micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Gebicka, Lidia; Jurgas-Grudzinska, Monika

    2004-01-01

    Catalase activity and stability in the presence of simple micelles of Brij 35 and entrapped in reverse micelles of Brij 30 have been studied. The enzyme retains full activity in aqueous micellar solution of Brij 35. Catalase exhibits "superactivity" in reverse micelles composed of 0.1 M Brij 30 in dodecane, n-heptane or isooctane, and significantly lowers the activity in decaline. The incorporation of catalase into Brij 30 reverse micelles enhances its stability at 50 degrees C. However, the stability of catalase incubated at 37 degrees C in micellar and reverse micellar solutions is lower than that in homogeneous aqueous solution. PMID:15666551

  12. Impact of active material surface area on thermal stability of LiCoO2 cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geder, Jan; Hoster, Harry E.; Jossen, Andreas; Garche, Jürgen; Yu, Denis Y. W.

    2014-07-01

    Thermal stability of charged LiCoO2 cathodes with various surface areas of active material is investigated in order to quantify the effect of LiCoO2 surface area on thermal stability of cathode. Thermogravimetric analyses and calorimetry have been conducted on charged cathodes with different active material surface areas. Besides reduced thermal stability, high surface area also changes the active material decomposition reaction and induces side reactions with additives. Thermal analyses of LiCoO2 delithiated chemically without any additives or with a single additive have been conducted to elaborate the effect of particle size on side reactions. Stability of cathode-electrolyte system has been investigated by accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC). Arrhenius activation energy of cathode decomposition has been calculated as function of conversion at different surface area of active material.

  13. A state feedback electro-acoustic transducer for active control of acoustic impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samejima, Toshiya

    2003-03-01

    In this paper, a new control system in which the acoustic impedance of an electro-acoustic transducer diaphragm can be actively varied by modifying design parameters is presented and its effectiveness is theoretically investigated. The proposed control system is based on a state-space description of the control system derived from an electrical equivalent circuit of an electro-acoustic transducer to which a differentiating circuit is connected, and is designed using modern control theory. The optimal quadratic regulator is used in the control system design, with its quadratic performance index formulated for producing desired acoustic impedance. Computer simulations indicate that the acoustic impedance of the diaphragm can be significantly varied over a wide frequency range that includes the range below the resonance frequency of the electro-acoustic transducer. A computer model of the proposed control system is used to illustrate its application to semi-active noise control in a duct. It is demonstrated that the proposed control system provides substantial reductions in the noise radiating from the outlet of the duct, both in the stiffness control range and in the mass control range.

  14. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  15. From starburst to quiescence: testing active galactic nucleus feedback in rapidly quenching post-starburst galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S.; Wild, Vivienne; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2014-09-10

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M {sub ☉}) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies 'transiting' post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ∼0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ∼0.1% are QPSBs, and ∼0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (≳ 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of ≳ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as 'dust-obscured galaxies' (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of ≳ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during the post

  16. From Starburst to Quiescence: Testing Active Galactic Nucleus feedback in Rapidly Quenching Post-starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S.; Wild, Vivienne; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2014-09-01

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M ⊙) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies "transiting" post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ~0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ~0.1% are QPSBs, and ~0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (gsim 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of >~ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as "dust-obscured galaxies" (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of >~ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during the post-starburst phase.

  17. Automated Personalized Feedback for Physical Activity and Dietary Behavior Change With Mobile Phones: A Randomized Controlled Trial on Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pfammatter, Angela; Zhang, Mi; Spring, Bonnie; Choudhury, Tanzeem

    2015-01-01

    Background A dramatic rise in health-tracking apps for mobile phones has occurred recently. Rich user interfaces make manual logging of users’ behaviors easier and more pleasant, and sensors make tracking effortless. To date, however, feedback technologies have been limited to providing overall statistics, attractive visualization of tracked data, or simple tailoring based on age, gender, and overall calorie or activity information. There are a lack of systems that can perform automated translation of behavioral data into specific actionable suggestions that promote healthier lifestyle without any human involvement. Objective MyBehavior, a mobile phone app, was designed to process tracked physical activity and eating behavior data in order to provide personalized, actionable, low-effort suggestions that are contextualized to the user’s environment and previous behavior. This study investigated the technical feasibility of implementing an automated feedback system, the impact of the suggestions on user physical activity and eating behavior, and user perceptions of the automatically generated suggestions. Methods MyBehavior was designed to (1) use a combination of automatic and manual logging to track physical activity (eg, walking, running, gym), user location, and food, (2) automatically analyze activity and food logs to identify frequent and nonfrequent behaviors, and (3) use a standard machine-learning, decision-making algorithm, called multi-armed bandit (MAB), to generate personalized suggestions that ask users to either continue, avoid, or make small changes to existing behaviors to help users reach behavioral goals. We enrolled 17 participants, all motivated to self-monitor and improve their fitness, in a pilot study of MyBehavior. In a randomized two-group trial, investigators randomly assigned participants to receive either MyBehavior’s personalized suggestions (n=9) or nonpersonalized suggestions (n=8), created by professionals, from a mobile phone

  18. The feedback between active tectonics, fluid flow and mineralization in an Andean geotermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, M.; Arancibia, G.; Perez, P.; Sanchez, P.; Cembrano, J. M.; Stimac, J. A.; Lohmar, S.

    2012-12-01

    In the Andean Cordillera of Central-Southern Chile, geothermal resources occur in close spatial relationship with active volcanism. The nature of the relationship between tectonics and volcanism in this region is the result of interaction between the crustal structures of the basement and the ongoing regional stress field, which is primarily controlled by the oblique convergence of the Nazca and South America Plates. Between 39° and 46°S, the volcanic and geothermal activity is controlled by the NNE-trending, 1,000 km long Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ), an intra-arc dextral strike-slip fault system. Although there is consensus that volcanism (and hence geothermal activity) in southern Chile is largely controlled by the regional-scale tectonic stress field and architecture of the volcanic arc, there is limited scientific information about the role of local kinematic conditions on fluid flow and mineralization during the development and evolution of geothermal reservoirs. In this report, we present the preliminary results of an undergoing structural, mineralogical and geochemical study of the Tolhuaca geothermal system in southern Chile. The Tolhuaca geothermal reservoir formed as a liquid-dominated hydrothermal system, where shallow upflow resulted in near-boiling temperatures in a roughly horizontal liquid reservoir at 100-200 m depth (Melosh et al., 2010, 2012). In an early stage of evolution, hydrothermal brecciation and phase-separation (boiling) episodes penetrated at least 950 m depth into the deeper reservoir, and boiling was followed by steam-heated water invasion that cooled the reservoir. In a later stage, the preliminary conceptual model involves boiling and reheating of the reservoir, forming a system with deep hot brines that is connected to the shallow steam zone by an upflow conduit that is characterized by high-temperature mineralogy. The structural analysis of veins, fault-veins and faults of the Tol-1 drillcore (~1080 m depth) provide insights

  19. Tofacitinib regulates synovial inflammation in psoriatic arthritis, inhibiting STAT activation and induction of negative feedback inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, W; McGarry, T; Orr, C; McCormick, J; Veale, D J; Fearon, U

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, characterised by synovitis and destruction of articular cartilage/bone. Janus-kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signalling pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of PsA. Objectives To examine the effect of tofacitinib (JAK inhibitor) on proinflammatory mechanisms in PsA. Methods Primary PsA synovial fibroblasts (PsAFLS) and ex vivo PsA synovial explants were cultured with tofacitinib (1 µM). PhosphoSTAT3 (pSTAT3), phosphoSTAT1 (pSTAT1), suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3), protein inhibitor of activated Stat3 (PIAS3) and nuclear factor kappa B cells (NFκBp65) were quantified by western blot. The effect of tofacitinib on PsAFLS migration, invasion, Matrigel network formation and matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)2/9 was quantified by invasion/migration assays and zymography. Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, IL-17, IL-10, MMP3 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3) were assessed by ELISA. Results Tofacitinib significantly decreased pSTAT3, pSTAT1, NFκBp65 and induced SOCS3 and PIAS3 expression in PsAFLS and synovial explant cultures (p<0.05). Functionally, PsAFLS invasion, network formation and migration were inhibited by tofacitinib (all p<0.05). In PsA explant, tofacitinib significantly decreased spontaneous secretion of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, MMP9/MMP2, MMP3 (all p<0.05) and decreased the MMP3/TIMP3 ratio (p<0.05), with no effect observed for IP-10 or IL-10. Conclusions This study further supports JAK-STAT inhibition as a therapeutic target for the treatment of PsA. PMID:26353790

  20. RADIATIVE AND MOMENTUM-BASED MECHANICAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL GALAXY EVOLUTION CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ena; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H.

    2012-08-01

    We study the growth of black holes (BHs) in galaxies using three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations with new implementations of the momentum mechanical feedback, and restriction of accreted elements to those that are gravitationally bound to the BH. We also include the feedback from the X-ray radiation emitted by the BH, which heats the surrounding gas in the host galaxies, and adds radial momentum to the fluid. We perform simulations of isolated galaxies and merging galaxies and test various feedback models with the new treatment of the Bondi radius criterion. We find that overall the BH growth is similar to what has been obtained by earlier works using the Springel, Di Matteo, and Hernquist algorithms. However, the outflowing wind velocities and mechanical energy emitted by winds are considerably higher (v{sub w} {approx} 1000-3000 km s{sup -1}) compared to the standard thermal feedback model (v{sub w} {approx} 50-100 km s{sup -1}). While the thermal feedback model emits only 0.1% of BH released energy in winds, the momentum feedback model emits more than 30% of the total energy released by the BH in winds. In the momentum feedback model, the degree of fluctuation in both radiant and wind output is considerably larger than in standard treatments. We check that the new model of BH mass accretion agrees with analytic results for the standard Bondi problem.

  1. Balancing the stability and the catalytic specificities of OP hydrolases with enhanced V-agent activities.

    PubMed

    Reeves, T E; Wales, M E; Grimsley, J K; Li, P; Cerasoli, D M; Wild, J R

    2008-06-01

    Rational site-directed mutagenesis and biophysical analyses have been used to explore the thermodynamic stability and catalytic capabilities of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and its genetically modified variants. There are clear trade-offs in the stability of modifications that enhance catalytic activities. For example, the H254R/H257L variant has higher turnover numbers for the chemical warfare agents VX (144 versus 14 s(-1) for the native enzyme (wild type) and VR (Russian VX, 465 versus 12 s(-1) for wild type). These increases are accompanied by a loss in stability in which the total Gibb's free energy for unfolding is 19.6 kcal/mol, which is 5.7 kcal/mol less than that of the wild-type enzyme. X-ray crystallographic studies support biophysical data that suggest amino acid residues near the active site contribute to the chemical and thermal stability through hydrophobic and cation-pi interactions. The cation-pi interactions appear to contribute an additional 7 kcal/mol to the overall global stability of the enzyme. Using rational design, it has been possible to make amino acid changes in this region that restored the stability, yet maintained effective V-agent activities, with turnover numbers of 68 and 36 s(-1) for VX and VR, respectively. This study describes the first rationally designed, stability/activity balance for an OPH enzyme with a legitimate V-agent activity, and its crystal structure. PMID:18434422

  2. Stability and structure of activated macrocyles. Ligand with biological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Motekaitis, R.J.; Martell, A.E.

    1996-06-19

    Single p-toluic acid pendant groups were attached to 1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecane (15aneN5) and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (cyclam) to prepare bifunctional reagents for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies with {sup 64, 67}Cu. The ligands are 1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecane-1-({alpha}-1,4-toluic acid) (PCBA) and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1-({alpha}-1,4-toluic acid) (CPTA). For the parent macrocycles and their pendant arm derivatives, the 1:1 Cu{sup 2+} complexes dissociate only below pH 2. At pH 0.0 and 25 {degrees}C the CPTA-Cu complex has a half-life toward complete dissociation of 24 days. A new approach was developed for the estimation of the Cu{sup 2+} stability constant for the kinetically robust CPTA. All other formation constants were determined at 25.0 {degrees}C with batch spectrophotometric techniques. Potentiometric titrations were used to determine the protonation constants of the macrocyclic ligands as well as of the metal chelates. The protonation constants, stability constants, and pM`s are discussed in terms of both molecular mechanics calculations and the ligands` potential applicability as copper(II) radiopharmaceuticals.

  3. Live Soap: Stability, Order, and Fluctuations in Apolar Active Smectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhyapak, Tapan Chandra; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Toner, John

    2013-03-01

    We construct a hydrodynamic theory of noisy, apolar active smectics in bulk suspension or on a substrate. Unlike purely orientationally ordered active fluids, active apolar smectics can be dynamically stable in Stokesian bulk suspensions. Smectic order in these systems is quasilong ranged in dimension d=2 and long ranged in d=3. We predict reentrant Kosterlitz-Thouless melting to an active nematic in our simplest model in d=2, a nonzero second-sound speed parallel to the layers in bulk suspensions, and that there are no giant number fluctuations in either case. We also briefly discuss possible instabilities in these systems.

  4. Constraints on Feedback in the Local Universe: The Relation Between Star Formation and AGN Activity in Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi Alison

    2016-01-01

    We address the relation between star formation and AGN activity in a sample of 231 nearby (0.0002 < z < 0.0358) early type galaxies by carrying out a multi-wavelength study using archival observations in the UV, IR and radio. Our results indicate that early type galaxies in the current epoch are rarely powerful AGNs, with P < 1022 WHz-1 for a majority of the galaxies. Only massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources while less massive galaxies are hosts to lower radio power sources. Evidence of ongoing star formation is seen in approximately 7% of the sample. The SFR of these galaxies is less than 0.1 M⊙yr-1. They also tend to be radio faint (P < 1022 WHz-1). There is a nearly equal fraction of star forming galaxies in radio faint (P < 1022 WHz-1) and radio bright galaxies (P ≥ 1022 WHz-1) suggesting that both star formation and radio mode feedback are constrained to be very low in our sample. We notice that our galaxy sample and the Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) follow similar trends in radio power versus SFR. This may be produced if both radio power and SFR are related to stellar mass.

  5. Topical formulations with superoxide dismutase: influence of formulation composition on physical stability and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Di Mambro, Valéria M; Borin, Maria F; Fonseca, Maria J V

    2003-04-24

    Three different topical formulations were supplemented with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and evaluated concerning physical and chemical stabilities in order to determine the most stable formulation that would maintain SOD activity. Physical stability was evaluated by storing the formulation at room temperature, and at 37 and 45 degrees C for 28 days. Samples were collected at 7-day intervals for assessment of rheological behavior. Chemical stability was evaluated by the measurement of enzymatic activity in formulations stored at room temperature and at 45 degrees C for 75 days. The formulations showed a pseudoplastic behavior, with a flow index of less than 1. There was no significant difference in the initial values of flow index, hysteresis loop or minimum apparent viscosity. The simple emulsion and the one stabilized with hydroxyethylcellulose showed decreased viscosity by the 21st day and with higher temperature, but no significant changes concerning the presence of SOD. Although there were no significant changes concerning storage time or temperature, the formulation stabilized with hydroxyethylcellulose showed a marked loss of SOD activity. The addition of SOD to the formulations studied did not affect their physical stability. Simple emulsions or emulsions stabilized with carboxypolymethylene seem to be better bases for enzyme addition than emulsion stabilized with hydroxyethylcellulose. PMID:12852452

  6. Radio active galactic nuclei in galaxy clusters: Feedback, merger signatures, and cluster tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno-Mahler, Rachel Beth

    Galaxy clusters, the largest gravitationally-bound structures in the universe, are composed of 50-1000s of galaxies, hot X-ray emitting gas, and dark matter. They grow in size over time through cluster and group mergers. The merger history of a cluster can be imprinted on the hot gas, known as the intracluster medium (ICM). Merger signatures include shocks, cold fronts, and sloshing of the ICM, which can form spiral structures. Some clusters host double-lobed radio sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN). First, I will present a study of the galaxy cluster Abell 2029, which is very relaxed on large scales and has one of the largest continuous sloshing spirals yet observed in the X-ray, extending outward approximately 400 kpc. The sloshing gas interacts with the southern lobe of the radio galaxy, causing it to bend. Energy injection from the AGN is insufficient to offset cooling. The sloshing spiral may be an important additional mechanism in preventing large amounts of gas from cooling to very low temperatures. Next, I will present a study of Abell 98, a triple system currently undergoing a merger. I will discuss the merger history, and show that it is causing a shock. The central subcluster hosts a double-lobed AGN, which is evacuating a cavity in the ICM. Understanding the physical processes that affect the ICM is important for determining the mass of clusters, which in turn affects our calculations of cosmological parameters. To further constrain these parameters, as well as models of galaxy evolution, it is important to use a large sample of galaxy clusters over a range of masses and redshifts. Bent, double-lobed radio sources can potentially act as tracers of galaxy clusters over wide ranges of these parameters. I examine how efficient bent radio sources are at tracing high-redshift (z>0.7) clusters. Out of 646 sources in our high-redshift Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) sample, 282 are candidate new, distant clusters of galaxies based on

  7. Coress feedback

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This issue of CORESS feedback highlights yet again the importance of checking medications before administration and of adequate handover. Documentation of important medical data including drug allergies, as failed to happen in the case described below, is vital. We are grateful to the clinicians who have provided the material for these reports. The online reporting form is on our website (www.coress.org.uk), which also includes all previous feedback reports. Published contributions will be acknowledged by a ‘Certificate of Contribution’, which may be included in the contributor’s record of continuing professional development.

  8. On the pH-optimum of activity and stability of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Kemper; Alexov, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Biological macromolecules evolved to perform their function in specific cellular environment (subcellular compartments or tissues); therefore, they should be adapted to the biophysical characteristics of the corresponding environment, one of them being the characteristic pH. Many macromolecular properties are pH dependent, such as activity and stability. However, only activity is biologically important, while stability may not be crucial for the corresponding reaction. Here we show that the pH-optimum of activity (the pH of maximal activity) is correlated with the pH-optimum of stability (the pH of maximal stability) on a set of 310 proteins with available experimental data. We speculate that such a correlation is needed to allow the corresponding macromolecules to tolerate small pH fluctuations that are inevitable with cellular function. Our findings rationalize the efforts of correlating the pH of maximal stability and the characteristic pH of subcellular compartments, since only pH of activity is subject of evolutionary pressure. In addition, our analysis confirmed the previous observation that pH-optimum of activity and stability are not correlated with the isoelectric point, pI, or with the optimal temperature. PMID:20589630

  9. Immobilisation of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts. Factors influencing activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Severn, John R; Chadwick, John C

    2013-07-01

    The activity and stability of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts, when immobilised on a support, are dependent on both chemical and physical effects. Chemical factors affecting catalyst activity include the ease of formation of the active species, which is strongly dependent on the transition metal. Catalyst productivity is dependent on the balance between activity and stability. Immobilisation can lead to a lower proportion of active species and therefore lower initial polymerisation activity, but nevertheless give higher polymer yields in cases where increased catalyst stability is obtained. Important physical factors are support porosity and the ability of a support to undergo progressive fragmentation during polymerisation, facilitating monomer diffusion through the growing catalyst/polymer particle. This article illustrates the importance of these factors in olefin polymerisation with both early- and late-transition metal catalysts, with particular reference to the use of silica and magnesium chloride supports as well as to effects of immobilisation on polymer structure and properties. PMID:23467461

  10. Simulation Results of a Feedback Control System to Damp Electron Cloud Single-Bunch Transverse Instabilities In The Cern SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Secondo, R.; Vay, J. L.; Venturini, M.; Fox, J. D.; Rivetta, C. H.; Hofle, W.

    2011-03-28

    Transverse Single-Bunch Instabilities due to the Electron Cloud effect are limiting the operation at high current of the SPS at CERN. Recently a high-bandwidth Feedback System has been proposed as a possible solution to stabilize the beam and is currently under study. We analyze the dynamics of the bunch actively damped with a simple model of the Feedback in the macro-particle code WARP, in order to investigate the limitations of the System such as the minimum amount of power required to maintain stability. We discuss the feedback model, report on simulation results and present our plans for further development of the numerical model.

  11. Modification of {Delta}{sup Prime} by magnetic feedback and kinetic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueqiang; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C.

    2012-09-15

    Two possible ways of modifying the linear tearing mode index, by active magnetic feedback and by drift kinetic effects of deeply trapped particles, are analytically investigated. Magnetic feedback schemes, studied in this work, are found generally stabilizing for {Delta}{sup Prime }. The drift kinetic effects from both thermal particles and hot ions tend to reduce the power of the large solution from the outer region. This generally leads to a destabilization of {Delta} Prime for the toroidal analytic equilibria considered here.

  12. Feedback control of waiting times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions.

  13. Feedback control of waiting times.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions. PMID:27176250

  14. Feedback: Theory and Accelerator Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himel, T.

    The use of feedback to stabilize the beam and improve the performance of accelerators is becoming more common. The methods used to design the feedback algorithms are introduced and some practical implementation details are described. The design of a PID loop using classical control techniques is covered as is the design of an optimal controller using modern control theory. Some adaptive control techniques are also briefly described. Examples are given of multiple-input-multiple-output loops and of how to handle systems of many interacting feedback loops.

  15. Enzyme-polymer composites with high biocatalytic activity and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungbae; Kosto, Timothy J.; Manimala, Joseph C.; Nauman, E B.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2004-08-22

    We have applied vacuum-spraying and electrospinning to incorporate an enzyme into a polymer matrix, creating a novel and highly active biocatalytic composite. As a unique technical approach, enzymes were co-dissolved in toluene with polymers, and the solvent was then rapidly removed by injecting the mixture into a vacuum chamber or by electrospinning. Subsequent crosslinking of the enzyme with glutaraldehyde resulted in stable entrapped enzyme within the polymeric matrices. For example, an amorphous composite of alpha-chymotrypsin and polyethylene showed no significant loss of enzymatic activity in aqueous buffer for one month. Nanofibers of alpha-chymotrypsin and polystyrene also showed no decrease in activity for more than two weeks. The normalized activity of amorphous composite in organic solvents was 3-13 times higher than that of native alpha-chymotrypsin. The activity of nanofibers was 5-7 times higher than that of amorphous composite in aqueous buffer solution. The composites of alpha-chymotrypsin and polymers demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining a wide variety of active and stable biocatalytic materials with many combinations of enzymes and polymers.

  16. HERC2/USP20 coordinates CHK1 activation by modulating CLASPIN stability.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Zhao, Hongchang; Liao, Ji; Xu, Xingzhi

    2014-12-01

    CLASPIN is an essential mediator in the DNA replication checkpoint, responsible for ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein)-dependent activation of CHK1 (checkpoint kinase 1). Here we found a dynamic signaling pathway that regulates CLASPIN turn over. Under unperturbed conditions, the E3 ubiquitin ligase HERC2 regulates the stability of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP20 by promoting ubiquitination-mediated proteasomal degradation. Under replication stress, ATR-mediated phosphorylation of USP20 results in the disassociation of HERC2 from USP20. USP20 in turn deubiquitinates K48-linked-polyubiquitinated CLASPIN, stabilizing CLASPIN and ultimately promoting CHK1 phosphorylation and CHK1-directed checkpoint activation. Inhibition of USP20 expression promotes chromosome instability and xenograft tumor growth. Taken together, our findings demonstrated a novel function of HERC2/USP20 in coordinating CHK1 activation by modulating CLASPIN stability, which ultimately promotes genome stability and suppresses tumor growth. PMID:25326330

  17. Femtosecond fiber-feedback optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Südmeyer, T; Aus der Au, J; Paschotta, R; Keller, U; Smith, P G; Ross, G W; Hanna, D C

    2001-03-01

    We demonstrate what is to our knowledge the first synchronously pumped high-gain optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with feedback through a single-mode fiber. This device generates 2.3-2.7 W of signal power in 700-900-fs pulses tunable in a wavelength range from 1429 to 1473 nm. The necessary high gain was obtained from a periodically poled LiTaO(3) crystal pumped with as much as 8.2 W of power at 1030 nm from a passively mode-locked Yb:YAG laser with 600-fs pulse duration and a 35-MHz repetition rate. The fiber-feedback OPO setup is compact because most of the resonator feedback path consists of a standard telecom fiber. Because of the high parametric gain, the fiber-feedback OPO is highly insensitive to intracavity losses. For the same reason, the synchronization of the cavity with the pump laser is not critical, so active stabilization of the cavity length is not required. PMID:18040309

  18. Beta activity in the premotor cortex is increased during stabilized as compared to normal walking

    PubMed Central

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Van Dieën, Jaap H.; Daffertshofer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Walking on two legs is inherently unstable. Still, we humans perform remarkable well at it, mostly without falling. To gain more understanding of the role of the brain in controlling gait stability we measured brain activity using electro-encephalography (EEG) during stabilized and normal walking. Subjects walked on a treadmill in two conditions, each lasting 10 min; normal, and while being laterally stabilized by elastic cords. Kinematics of trunk and feet, electro-myography (EMG) of neck muscles, as well as 64-channel EEG were recorded. To assess gait stability the local divergence exponent, step width, and trunk range of motion were calculated from the kinematic data. We used independent component (IC) analysis to remove movement, EMG, and eyeblink artifacts from the EEG, after which dynamic imaging of coherent sources beamformers were determined to identify cortical sources that showed a significant difference between conditions. Stabilized walking led to a significant increase in gait stability, i.e., lower local divergence exponents. Beamforming analysis of the beta band activity revealed significant sources in bilateral pre-motor cortices. Projection of sensor data on these sources showed a significant difference only in the left premotor area, with higher beta power during stabilized walking, specifically around push-off, although only significant around contralateral push-off. It appears that even during steady gait the cortex is involved in the control of stability. PMID:26578937

  19. Age-Specific Effects of Mirror-Muscle Activity on Cross-Limb Adaptations Under Mirror and Non-Mirror Visual Feedback Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reissig, Paola; Stöckel, Tino; Garry, Michael I; Summers, Jeffery J; Hinder, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Cross-limb transfer (CLT) describes the observation of bilateral performance gains due to unilateral motor practice. Previous research has suggested that CLT may be reduced, or absent, in older adults, possibly due to age-related structural and functional brain changes. Based on research showing increases in CLT due to the provision of mirror visual feedback (MVF) during task execution in young adults, our study aimed to investigate whether MVF can facilitate CLT in older adults, who are known to be more reliant on visual feedback for accurate motor performance. Participants (N = 53) engaged in a short-term training regime (300 movements) involving a ballistic finger task using their dominant hand, while being provided with either visual feedback of their active limb, or a mirror reflection of their active limb (superimposed over the quiescent limb). Performance in both limbs was examined before, during and following the unilateral training. Furthermore, we measured corticospinal excitability (using TMS) at these time points, and assessed muscle activity bilaterally during the task via EMG; these parameters were used to investigate the mechanisms mediating and predicting CLT. Training resulted in significant bilateral performance gains that did not differ as a result of age or visual feedback (both p > 0.1). Training also elicited bilateral increases in corticospinal excitability (p < 0.05). For younger adults, CLT was significantly predicted by performance gains in the trained hand (β = 0.47), whereas for older adults it was significantly predicted by mirror activity in the untrained hand during training (β = 0.60). The present study suggests that older adults are capable of exhibiting CLT to a similar degree to younger adults. The prominent role of mirror activity in the untrained hand for CLT in older adults indicates that bilateral cortical activity during unilateral motor tasks is a compensatory mechanism. In this particular task, MVF did not facilitate the

  20. Age-Specific Effects of Mirror-Muscle Activity on Cross-Limb Adaptations Under Mirror and Non-Mirror Visual Feedback Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reissig, Paola; Stöckel, Tino; Garry, Michael I.; Summers, Jeffery J.; Hinder, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-limb transfer (CLT) describes the observation of bilateral performance gains due to unilateral motor practice. Previous research has suggested that CLT may be reduced, or absent, in older adults, possibly due to age-related structural and functional brain changes. Based on research showing increases in CLT due to the provision of mirror visual feedback (MVF) during task execution in young adults, our study aimed to investigate whether MVF can facilitate CLT in older adults, who are known to be more reliant on visual feedback for accurate motor performance. Participants (N = 53) engaged in a short-term training regime (300 movements) involving a ballistic finger task using their dominant hand, while being provided with either visual feedback of their active limb, or a mirror reflection of their active limb (superimposed over the quiescent limb). Performance in both limbs was examined before, during and following the unilateral training. Furthermore, we measured corticospinal excitability (using TMS) at these time points, and assessed muscle activity bilaterally during the task via EMG; these parameters were used to investigate the mechanisms mediating and predicting CLT. Training resulted in significant bilateral performance gains that did not differ as a result of age or visual feedback (both p > 0.1). Training also elicited bilateral increases in corticospinal excitability (p < 0.05). For younger adults, CLT was significantly predicted by performance gains in the trained hand (β = 0.47), whereas for older adults it was significantly predicted by mirror activity in the untrained hand during training (β = 0.60). The present study suggests that older adults are capable of exhibiting CLT to a similar degree to younger adults. The prominent role of mirror activity in the untrained hand for CLT in older adults indicates that bilateral cortical activity during unilateral motor tasks is a compensatory mechanism. In this particular task, MVF did not facilitate the

  1. Elaboration, activity and stability of silica-based nitroaromatic sensors.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Dimitri; Pereira, Franck; Méthivier, Christophe; Montméat, Pierre; Hairault, Lionel; Pradier, Claire-Marie

    2013-08-21

    Functionalized silica-based thin films, modified with hydrophobic groups, were synthesized and used as sensors for nitroaromatic compound (NAC) specific detection. Their performance and behavior, in terms of stability, ageing and regeneration, have been fully characterized by combining chemical characterization techniques and electron microscopy. NAC was efficiently and specifically detected using these silica-based sensors, but showed a great degradation in the presence of humidity. Moreover, the sensor sensitivity seriously decreases with storage time. Methyl- and phenyl-functionalization helped to overcome this humidity sensitivity. Surface characterization enabled us to establish a direct correlation between the appearance, and increasing amount, of adsorbed carbonyl-containing species, and sensor efficiency. This contamination, appearing after only one month, was particularly important when sensors were stored in plastic containers. Rinsing with cyclohexane enables us to recover part of the sensor performance but does not yield a complete regeneration of the sensors. This work led us to the definition of optimized elaboration and storage conditions for nitroaromatic sensors. PMID:23812282

  2. ABCDEFG IS - the principle of constructive feedback.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, M

    2007-01-01

    Feedback is an integral part of any learning experience. Constructive feedback is a powerful instrument and facilitates the learner's professional and personal development. "ABCDEFG IS", a mnemonic for the principles of constructive feedback, stands for Amount of the information, Benefit of the trainees, Change behaviour, Descriptive language, Environment, Focused, Group check, Interpretation check, and Sharing information. The eight important steps of feedback are: Ensure prior information, Collect data, Make appropriate meeting arrangement, Begin by encouraging self assessment by the trainee, Highlight areas where the trainee is doing well, Give feedback, Handle reaction maintaining the dignity and Plan actions. Communication and reflection also share many of the principles and steps of constructive feedback and giving regular feedback, thus, helps to improve communication and reflection. The feedback provider would be able to provide genuine feedback by following the appropriate steps and principles of constructive feedback and realize how important and rewarding its role is in teaching learning activities. PMID:18274573

  3. Kinetics of Ion Transport in Perovskite Active Layers and Its Implications for Active Layer Stability.

    PubMed

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A; Adhikari, Ramesh Y; Karak, Supravat; Liu, Feng; Lahti, Paul M; Russell, Thomas P; Tuominen, Mark T; Venkataraman, D

    2015-10-14

    Solar cells fabricated using alkyl ammonium metal halides as light absorbers have the right combination of high power conversion efficiency and ease of fabrication to realize inexpensive but efficient thin film solar cells. However, they degrade under prolonged exposure to sunlight. Herein, we show that this degradation is quasi-reversible, and that it can be greatly lessened by simple modifications of the solar cell operating conditions. We studied perovskite devices using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with methylammonium (MA)-, formamidinium (FA)-, and MA(x)FA(1-x) lead triiodide as active layers. From variable temperature EIS studies, we found that the diffusion coefficient using MA ions was greater than when using FA ions. Structural studies using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) show that for MAPbI3 a structural change and lattice expansion occurs at device operating temperatures. On the basis of EIS and PXRD studies, we postulate that in MAPbI3 the predominant mechanism of accelerated device degradation under sunlight involves thermally activated fast ion transport coupled with a lattice-expanding phase transition, both of which are facilitated by absorption of the infrared component of the solar spectrum. Using these findings, we show that the devices show greatly improved operation lifetimes and stability under white-light emitting diodes, or under a solar simulator with an infrared cutoff filter or with cooling. PMID:26414066

  4. An HIV Feedback Resistor: Auto-Regulatory Circuit Deactivator and Noise Buffer

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Leor S; Shenk, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Animal viruses (e.g., lentiviruses and herpesviruses) use transcriptional positive feedback (i.e., transactivation) to regulate their gene expression. But positive-feedback circuits are inherently unstable when turned off, which presents a particular dilemma for latent viruses that lack transcriptional repressor motifs. Here we show that a dissipative feedback resistor, composed of enzymatic interconversion of the transactivator, converts transactivation circuits into excitable systems that generate transient pulses of expression, which decay to zero. We use HIV-1 as a model system and analyze single-cell expression kinetics to explore whether the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) uses a resistor to shut off transactivation. The Tat feedback circuit was found to lack bi-stability and Tat self-cooperativity but exhibited a pulse of activity upon transactivation, all in agreement with the feedback resistor model. Guided by a mathematical model, biochemical and genetic perturbation of the suspected Tat feedback resistor altered the circuit's stability and reduced susceptibility to molecular noise, in agreement with model predictions. We propose that the feedback resistor is a necessary, but possibly not sufficient, condition for turning off noisy transactivation circuits lacking a repressor motif (e.g., HIV-1 Tat). Feedback resistors may be a paradigm for examining other auto-regulatory circuits and may inform upon how viral latency is established, maintained, and broken. PMID:17194214

  5. Fiber distributed feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G. A.; Yeh, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Utilizing round optical fibers as communication channels in optical communication networks presents the problem of obtaining a high efficiency coupling between the optical fiber and the laser. A laser is made an integral part of the optical fiber channel by either diffusing active material into the optical fiber or surrounding the optical fiber with the active material. Oscillation within the active medium to produce lasing action is established by grating the optical fiber so that distributed feedback occurs.

  6. Metabolic stabilization of acetylcholine receptors in vertebrate neuromuscular junction by muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Rotzler, S; Brenner, H R

    1990-08-01

    The effects of muscle activity on the growth of synaptic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) accumulations and on the metabolic AChR stability were investigated in rat skeletal muscle. Ectopic end plates induced surgically in adult soleus muscle were denervated early during development when junctional AChR number and stability were still low and, subsequently, muscles were either left inactive or they were kept active by chronic exogenous stimulation. AChR numbers per ectopic AChR cluster and AChR stabilities were estimated from the radioactivity and its decay with time, respectively, of end plate sites whose AChRs had been labeled with 125I-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-butx). The results show that the metabolic stability of the AChRs in ectopic clusters is reversibly increased by muscle activity even when innervation is eliminated very early in development. 1 d of stimulation is sufficient to stabilize the AChRs in ectopic AChR clusters. Muscle stimulation also produced an increase in the number of AChRs at early denervated end plates. Activity-induced cluster growth occurs mainly by an increase in area rather than in AChR density, and for at least 10 d after denervation is comparable to that in normally developing ectopic end plates. The possible involvement of AChR stabilization in end plate growth is discussed. PMID:2380246

  7. Enhanced Enzyme Kinetic Stability by Increasing Rigidity within the Active Site*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; An, Jiao; Yang, Guangyu; Wu, Geng; Zhang, Yong; Cui, Li; Feng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important issue for protein engineers. Understanding how rigidity in the active site affects protein kinetic stability will provide new insight into enzyme stabilization. In this study, we demonstrated enhanced kinetic stability of Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) by mutating the structurally flexible residues within the active site. Six residues within 10 Å of the catalytic Ser105 residue with a high B factor were selected for iterative saturation mutagenesis. After screening 2200 colonies, we obtained the D223G/L278M mutant, which exhibited a 13-fold increase in half-life at 48 °C and a 12 °C higher T5015, the temperature at which enzyme activity is reduced to 50% after a 15-min heat treatment. Further characterization showed that global unfolding resistance against both thermal and chemical denaturation also improved. Analysis of the crystal structures of wild-type CalB and the D223G/L278M mutant revealed that the latter formed an extra main chain hydrogen bond network with seven structurally coupled residues within the flexible α10 helix that are primarily involved in forming the active site. Further investigation of the relative B factor profile and molecular dynamics simulation confirmed that the enhanced rigidity decreased fluctuation of the active site residues at high temperature. These results indicate that enhancing the rigidity of the flexible segment within the active site may provide an efficient method for improving enzyme kinetic stability. PMID:24448805

  8. Coq7p relevant residues for protein activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Busso, Cleverson; Ferreira-Júnior, José Ribamar; Paulela, Janaina A; Bleicher, Lucas; Demasi, Marilene; Barros, Mario H

    2015-12-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) is an isoprenylated benzoquinone electron carrier required for electronic transport in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, shuttling electrons from complexes I and II to complex III. Q synthesis requires proteins termed Coq (Coq1-Coq11). Coq7p is part of the multimeric complex involved in Q synthesis catalyzing the hydroxylation of demethoxy-Q6 (DMQ6), the last monooxygenase step in Q synthesis with a catalytic center containing a carboxylate-bridged di-iron at the active site of the enzyme. Here we indicate a group of Coq7p residues that modulate protein activity: D53, R57, V111 and S114. R57, V111 and S114 are very conserved residues; V111 and S114 are present in separated communities of amino acid correlation analysis. The coq7 double mutant V111G/S114A and S114E show respiratory deficiency at non permissive temperature, DMQ6 accumulation and lower content of Q6. Therefore we conclude that phosphomimetic S114E inhibit Coq7p activity, and propose that S114 phosphorylation is required to move a non-structured loop of 25 amino acids between helix 2 and 3, and that affects the di-iron coordination in Coq7p catalytic center. PMID:26497406

  9. Does Structured Quizzing with Process Specific Feedback Lead to Learning Gains in an Active Learning Geoscience Classroom?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palsole, S.; Serpa, L. F.

    2013-12-01

    There is a great realization that efficient teaching in the geosciences has the potential to have far reaching effects in outreach to decision and policy makers (Herbert, 2006; Manduca & Mogk, 2006). This research in turn informs educators that the geosciences by the virtue of their highly integrative nature play an important role in serving as an entry point into STEM disciplines and helping developing a new cadre of geoscientists, scientists and a general population with an understanding of science. Keeping these goals in mind we set to design introductory geoscience courses for non-majors and majors that move away from the traditional lecture models which don't necessarily contribute well to knowledge building and retention ((Handelsman et al., 2007; Hake, 1997) to a blended active learning classroom where basic concepts and didactic information is acquired online via webquests, lecturettes and virtual field trips and the face to face portions of the class are focused on problem solving exercises. The traditional way to ensure that students are prepared for the in-class activity is to have the students take a quiz online to demonstrate basic competency. In the process of redesign, we decided to leverage the technology to build quizzes that are highly structured and map to a process (formation of divergent boundaries for example) or sets of earth processes that we needed the students to know before in-class activities. The quizzes can be taken multiple times and provide process specific feedback, thus serving as a heuristic to the students to ensure they have acquired the necessary competency. The heuristic quizzes were developed and deployed over a year with the student data driving the redesign process to ensure synchronicity. Preliminary data analysis indicates a positive correlation between higher student scores on in-class application exercises and time spent on the process quizzes. An assessment of learning gains also indicate a higher degree of self

  10. FeedbackBetweenHumanActivitiesAndTerrestrialCarbonCyclesInSystemsOfShadeCoffeePro ductionInMexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena Del Valle, A. E.; Perez-Samayoa, I. A.

    2007-12-01

    , in the mid-term, rural farmers would have to incorporate a larger extent of land under shifting cultivation and pasture in order to obtain a similar income to that of one hectare of shade coffee. Consequently, the research points out feedback mechanisms between human activities and the natural environment, in order to gain insight into adaptive response mechanisms, which might enhance possibilities for socioeconomic viability in systems of shaded coffee production and proper maintenance of biophysical conditions, environmental services, and human activities.

  11. Real, Fast, Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To better comprehend the needs of your clientele and colleagues, it is essential to use survey website applications. Doing so will help you become more efficient in obtaining constructive, timely feedback in order to adjust programming, therefore optimizing the impacts of Extension activities. Citing the most influential survey experts both in and…

  12. Enhancing the stability and antibiofilm activity of DspB by immobilization on carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yulong; Ma, Su; Liu, Chenguang; Yu, Wengong; Han, Feng

    2015-09-01

    A β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (DspB) from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CU1000 has been proved to inhibit and detach the biofilms formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, the application of this enzyme is limited by its poor stability. In the present study, a β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase encoding gene, dspB, was cloned from A. actinomycetemcomitans HK1651 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant DspB was loaded on hydrogel nanoparticles, which was prepared by using linoleic acid (LA) modified carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) after sonication. The nanoparticles were almost saturated by DspB at 0.3 mg/ml, which gave a loading capacity of 76.7%. The immobilization enhanced thermal stability, storage stability and reusability of DspB significantly. Moreover, it also increased antibiofilm activity due to the dual mechanism, including the improvement of the enzyme stability and the antibiofilm activity of CMCS nanoparticles. PMID:26302845

  13. Reciprocal regulation of ERα and ERβ stability and activity by Diptoindonesin G

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zibo; Wang, Lu; Jung, Youngeun; Kim, Ikyon; Tan, Renxiang; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Summary ERβ is regarded as a “tumor suppressor” in breast cancer due to its anti-proliferative effects. However, unlike ERα, ERβ has not been developed as a therapeutic target in breast cancer due to loss of ERβ in aggressive cancers. In a small molecule library screen for ERβ stabilizers, we identified Diptoindonesin G (Dip G) which significantly increases ERβ protein stability, while decreasing ERα protein levesl. Dip G enhances the transcription and anti-proliferative activities of ERβ, while attenuating the transcription and proliferative effects of ERα. Further investigation revealed that instead of targeting ER, Dip G targets the CHIP E3 ubiquitin ligase shared by ERα and ERβ. Thus, Dip G is a dual functional moiety that reciprocally controls ERα and ERβ protein stability and activities via an indirect mechanism. The ERβ stabilization effects of Dip G may enable the development of ERβ-targeted therapies for human breast cancers. PMID:26670079

  14. ALD Functionalized Nanoporous Gold: Thermal Stability, Mechanical Properties, and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Wichmann, A; Wittstock, A; Baumann, T F; Baeumer, M; Hamza, A V

    2011-03-24

    Nanoporous metals have many technologically promising applications but their tendency to coarsen limits their long-term stability and excludes high temperature applications. Here, we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to stabilize and functionalize nanoporous metals. Specifically, we studied the effect of nanometer-thick alumina and titania ALD films on thermal stability, mechanical properties, and catalytic activity of nanoporous gold (np-Au). Our results demonstrate that even only one-nm-thick oxide films can stabilize the nanoscale morphology of np-Au up to 1000 C, while simultaneously making the material stronger and stiffer. The catalytic activity of np-Au can be drastically increased by TiO{sub 2} ALD coatings. Our results open the door to high temperature sensor, actuator, and catalysis applications and functionalized electrodes for energy storage and harvesting applications.

  15. Reciprocal Regulation of ERα and ERβ Stability and Activity by Diptoindonesin G.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zibo; Wang, Lu; James, Taryn; Jung, Youngeun; Kim, Ikyon; Tan, Renxiang; Hoffmann, F Michael; Xu, Wei

    2015-12-17

    ERβ is regarded as a "tumor suppressor" in breast cancer due to its anti-proliferative effects. However, unlike ERα, ERβ has not been developed as a therapeutic target in breast cancer due to loss of ERβ in aggressive cancers. In a small-molecule library screen for ERβ stabilizers, we identified Diptoindonesin G (Dip G), which significantly increases ERβ protein stability while decreasing ERα protein levels. Dip G enhances the transcription and anti-proliferative activities of ERβ, while attenuating the transcription and proliferative effects of ERα. Further investigation revealed that instead of targeting ER, Dip G targets the CHIP E3 ubiquitin ligase shared by ERα and ERβ. Thus, Dip G is a dual-functional moiety that reciprocally controls ERα and ERβ protein stability and activities via an indirect mechanism. The ERβ stabilization effects of Dip G may enable the development of ERβ-targeted therapies for human breast cancers. PMID:26670079

  16. Neural correlates of feedback processing in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marlene; Bekkering, Harold; Janssen, Denise J C; de Bruijn, Ellen R A; Hunnius, Sabine

    2014-07-01

    External feedback provides essential information for successful learning. Feedback is especially important for learning in early childhood, as toddlers strongly rely on external signals to determine the consequences of their actions. In adults, many electrophysiological studies have elucidated feedback processes using a neural marker called the feedback-related negativity (FRN). The neural generator of the FRN is assumed to be the ACC, located in medial frontal cortex. As frontal brain regions are the latest to mature during brain development, it is unclear when in early childhood a functional feedback system develops. Is feedback differentiated on a neural level in toddlers and in how far is neural feedback processing related to children's behavioral adjustment? In an EEG experiment, we addressed these questions by measuring the brain activity and behavioral performance of 2.5-year-old toddlers while they played a feedback-guided game on a touchscreen. Electrophysiological results show differential brain activity for feedback with a more negative deflection for incorrect than correct outcomes, resembling the adult FRN. This provides the first neural evidence for feedback processing in toddlers. Notably, FRN amplitudes were predictive of adaptive behavior: the stronger the differential brain activity for feedback, the better the toddlers' adaptive performance during the game. Thus, already in early childhood toddlers' feedback-guided performance directly relates to the functionality of their neural feedback processing. Implications for early feedback-based learning as well as structural and functional brain development are discussed. PMID:24392905

  17. Stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes with alkali-activated cements.

    PubMed

    Shi, Caijun; Fernández-Jiménez, A

    2006-10-11

    This paper reviews progresses on the use of alkali-activated cements for stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes. Alkali-activated cements consist of an alkaline activator and cementing components, such as blast furnace slag, coal fly ash, phosphorus slag, steel slag, metakaolin, etc., or a combination of two or more of them. Properly designed alkali-activated cements can exhibit both higher early and later strengths than conventional portland cement. The main hydration product of alkali-activated cements is calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) with low Ca/Si ratios or aluminosilicate gel at room temperature; CSH, tobmorite, xonotlite and/or zeolites under hydrothermal condition, no metastable crystalline compounds such as Ca(OH)(2) and calcium sulphoaluminates exist. Alkali-activated cements also exhibit excellent resistance to corrosive environments. The leachability of contaminants from alkali-activated cement stabilized hazardous and radioactive wastes is lower than that from hardened portland cement stabilized wastes. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-activated cements are better matrix for solidification/stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes than Portland cement. PMID:16787699

  18. Improved granular activated carbon for the stabilization of wastewater PH

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, R.W.; Dussert, B.W.; Kovacic, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory studies have identified the cause of the pH rise, which occurs during water treatment with activated carbon, as an interaction between the naturally occurring anions and protons in the water and the carbon surface. The interaction can be described as an ion exchange type of phenomenon, in which the carbon surface sorbs the anions and corresponding hydronium ions from the water. These studies have shown that the anion sorption and resulting pH increase is independent of the raw material used for the activated carbon production, e.g. bituminous or subbituminous coal, peat, wood or coconut. Also, the pH excursions occur with virgin, reactivated, and acid washed granular carbons. Current pH control technologies focus on adjustment of the wastewater pH prior to discharge or recycle of the initial effluent water until the pH increase abates. However, improved water pH control options have been realized by altering the carbon surface through controlled oxidation rather than the water chemistry or extended preprocessing at the treatment site.

  19. DISTRIBUTED AMPLIFIER INCORPORATING FEEDBACK

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R. Jr.

    1958-10-21

    An improved distributed amplifier system employing feedback for stabilization is presented. In accordance with the disclosed invention, a signal to be amplified is applled to one end of a suitable terminated grid transmission line. At intervals along the transmission line, the signal is fed to stable, resistance-capacitance coupled amplifiers incorporating feedback loops therein. The output current from each amplifier is passed through an additional tube to minimize the electrostatic capacitance between the tube elements of the last stage of the amplifier, and fed to appropriate points on an output transmission line, similar to the grid line, but terminated at the opposite (input) end. The output taken from the unterminated end of the plate transmission line is proportional to the input voltage impressed upon the grid line.

  20. The Development of a Mobile Monitoring and Feedback Tool to Stimulate Physical Activity of People With a Chronic Disease in Primary Care: A User-Centered Design

    PubMed Central

    Verwey, Renée; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Tange, Huibert; van der Weijden, Trudy; de Witte, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical activity is an important aspect in the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or type-2 diabetes. A monitoring and feedback tool combined with guidance by a primary care provider might be a successful method to enhance the level of physical activity in these patients. As a prerequisite for useful technology, it is important to involve the end-users in the design process from an early stage. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the user requirements for a tool to stimulate physical activity, embedded in primary care practice. The leading principle of this tool is to change behavior by self-monitoring, goal-setting, and feedback. Methods The research team collected qualitative data among 15 patients, 16 care professionals, and several experts. A prototype was developed in three stages. In stage 1, the literature was searched to identify end-users and context. In stage 2, the literature, experts and patient representatives were consulted to set up a use case with the general idea of the innovation. In stage 3, individual interviews and focus groups were held to identify the end-user requirements. Based on these requirements a prototype was built by the engineering team. Results The development process has led to a tool that generally meets the requirements of the end-users. A tri-axial activity sensor, worn on the hip, is connected by Bluetooth to a smartphone. In an app, quantitative feedback is given about the amount of activity and goals reached by means of graphical visualization, and an image shows a sun when the goal is reached. Overviews about activity per half an hour, per day, week, and month are provided. In the menu of the app and on a secured website, patients can enter information in individual sessions or read feedback messages generated by the system. The practice nurse can see the results of all patients on a secure webpage and can then discuss the results and set personalized goals in

  1. Perceptual stability during dramatic changes in olfactory bulb activation maps and dramatic declines in activation amplitudes

    PubMed Central

    Homma, R.; Cohen, L. B.; Kosmidis, E. K.; Youngentob, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the concentration dependence of the ability of rats to identify odorants with the calcium signals in the nerve terminals of the olfactory receptor neurons. Although identification performance decreased with concentrations both above and below the training stimuli it remained well above random at all concentrations tested (between 0.0006% and 35% of saturated vapor). In contrast, the calcium signals in the same awake animals were much smaller than their maximum values at odorant concentrations less than 1% of saturated vapor. In addition, maps of activated glomeruli changed dramatically as odorant concentration was reduced. Thus perceptual stability exists in the face of dramatic changes in both the amplitude and the maps of the input to the olfactory bulb. The data for the concentration dependence of the response of the most sensitive glomeruli for each of five odorants was fitted with a Michaelis-Menten (Hill) equation. The fitted curves were extrapolated to odorant concentrations several orders of magnitude lower the smallest observed signals and suggest that the calcium response at low odorant concentrations is more than 1000 times smaller than the response at saturating odorant concentrations. We speculate that only a few spikes in olfactory sensory neurons may be sufficient for correct odorant identification. PMID:19291227

  2. Stability of narrow emission line clouds in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, W.G.; Veilleux, S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the lateral flow and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities on clouds in the narrow-line region of active galaxies are considered using cloud densities and velocities based on observations. A simplified model for the lateral flow instability governed only by overpressures is discussed. The associated radiative acceleration is considered, and parameters describing the narrow-line region and the central nonstellar continuum are presented. It is shown that many otherwise acceptable narrow-line clouds are unstable to lateral flows, particularly if their column depths are small. It is argued that the most likely narrow-line clouds have column densities of about 10 to the 23rd/sq cm and that these clouds are accelerated by winds in the intercloud medium. Arguments are made against models in which narrow-line clouds move inward. 22 references.

  3. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-07-15

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of t{sub d}{approx_equal}10{tau}{sub w} is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system.

  4. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-07-01

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of td≈10τw is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system.

  5. Muscular activity of different shooting distances, different release techniques, and different performance levels, with and without stabilizers, in target archery.

    PubMed

    Clarys, J P; Cabri, J; Bollens, E; Sleeckx, R; Taeymans, J; Vermeiren, M; Van Reeth, G; Voss, G

    1990-01-01

    The quadruple approach in the title refers to four different studies over a period of 3 years. The common factor in these studies is the methodology of the (Brussels) Electromyographic Signal Processing and Analysis System (ESPAS), a hardware and software EMG data acquisition system that has constantly been improved. Therefore, the ESPAS methodology is described extensively (i.e. the electrodes, amplifier, tape-recorder and processing hardware). Experiment 1 investigated muscular behaviour in target shooting, both indoors (18 and 25 m) and outdoors (50, 70 and 90 m). It was found (via iEMG) that a significant increase in activity only exists between 25 and 50 m, and that there is no linear increase of activity with increased distance. No differences in muscular pattern (IDANCO system: Clarys and Cabri, 1988) or activity between the indoor distances and between the outdoor distances were found. Experiment 2 investigated the muscular economy of four string grips: the three-finger grip, two-finger grip, thumb grip and reversed grip. The largest variations in activity were found for the two most unfamiliar grips, i.e. the thumb and reversed grips; however, low iEMG and the rapid precision improvement (over a limited number of shots) suggest that the thumb grip, if practised long enough, might be the most economical technique. Experiment 3 attempted to differentiate muscular activity and a number of performance variables in three different populations of archers--Olympic athletes, National competitors and beginners--in order to obtain feedback regarding improved performance. Apparently, overall muscle pattern, intensities and arrow speed were not discriminatory. The differences found between the groups (or levels of skill) were affected by the ability to reproduce identical patterns and arrow velocities in consecutive shots and by the constancy of neuromuscular control of the M. trapezius, M. biceps brachii and M. extensor digitorum. Finally, Experiment 4 investigated

  6. Active targets for the study of nuclei far from stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beceiro-Novo, S.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Mittig, W.

    2015-09-01

    Weakly bound nuclear systems can be considered to represent a good testing-ground of our understanding of non-perturbative quantum systems. Reactions leading to bound and unbound states in systems with very unbalanced neutron-to-proton ratios are used to understand the properties of these systems. Radioactive beams with energies from below the Coulomb barrier up to several hundreds MeV/nucleon are now available, and with these beams, a broad variety of studies of nuclei near the drip-line can be performed. To compensate for the low intensity of secondary beams as compared to primary beams, thick targets and high efficiency detection is necessary. In this context, a new generation of detectors was developed, called active target detectors: the detector gas is used as target, and the determination of the reaction vertex in three dimensions allows for good resolution even with thick targets. The reaction products can be measured over essentially 4 π. The physics explored with these detectors together with the technology developed will be described.

  7. Tonic 5nM DA stabilizes neuronal output by enabling bidirectional activity-dependent regulation of the hyperpolarization activated current via PKA and calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Krenz, Wulf-Dieter C; Rodgers, Edmund W; Baro, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Volume transmission results in phasic and tonic modulatory signals. The actions of tonic dopamine (DA) at type 1 DA receptors (D1Rs) are largely undefined. Here we show that tonic 5nM DA acts at D1Rs to stabilize neuronal output over minutes by enabling activity-dependent regulation of the hyperpolarization activated current (I h). In the presence but not absence of 5nM DA, I h maximal conductance (G max) was adjusted according to changes in slow wave activity in order to maintain spike timing. Our study on the lateral pyloric neuron (LP), which undergoes rhythmic oscillations in membrane potential with depolarized plateaus, demonstrated that incremental, bi-directional changes in plateau duration produced corresponding alterations in LP I hG max when preparations were superfused with saline containing 5nM DA. However, when preparations were superfused with saline alone there was no linear correlation between LP I hGmax and duty cycle. Thus, tonic nM DA modulated the capacity for activity to modulate LP I h G max; this exemplifies metamodulation (modulation of modulation). Pretreatment with the Ca2+-chelator, BAPTA, or the specific PKA inhibitor, PKI, prevented all changes in LP I h in 5nM DA. Calcineurin inhibitors blocked activity-dependent changes enabled by DA and revealed a PKA-mediated, activity-independent enhancement of LP I hG max. These data suggested that tonic 5nM DA produced two simultaneous, PKA-dependent effects: a direct increase in LP I h G max and a priming event that permitted calcineurin regulation of LP I h. The latter produced graded reductions in LP I hG max with increasing duty cycles. We also demonstrated that this metamodulation preserved the timing of LP's first spike when network output was perturbed with bath-applied 4AP. In sum, 5nM DA permits slow wave activity to provide feedback that maintains spike timing, suggesting that one function of low-level, tonic modulation is to stabilize specific features of a dynamic output. PMID

  8. Parental Rearing Behavior Prospectively Predicts Adolescents' Risky Decision-Making and Feedback-Related Electrical Brain Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euser, Anja S.; Evans, Brittany E.; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin; Huizink, Anja C.; Franken, Ingmar H. A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the role of parental rearing behavior in adolescents' risky decision-making and the brain's feedback processing mechanisms. Healthy adolescent participants ("n" = 110) completed the EMBU-C, a self-report questionnaire on perceived parental rearing behaviors between 2006 and 2008 (T1). Subsequently, after an average of…

  9. The Effect of Delayed Auditory Feedback on Activity in the Temporal Lobe while Speaking: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takaso, Hideki; Eisner, Frank; Wise, Richard J. S.; Scott, Sophie K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed auditory feedback is a technique that can improve fluency in stutterers, while disrupting fluency in many nonstuttering individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the neural basis for the detection of and compensation for such a delay, and the effects of increases in the delay duration. Method: Positron emission…

  10. Business Activity Monitoring: Real-Time Group Goals and Feedback Using an Overhead Scoreboard in a Distribution Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goomas, David T.; Smith, Stuart M.; Ludwig, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    Companies operating large industrial settings often find delivering timely and accurate feedback to employees to be one of the toughest challenges they face in implementing performance management programs. In this report, an overhead scoreboard at a retailer's distribution center informed teams of order selectors as to how many tasks were…

  11. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-01-01

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  12. Active stabilization of a fiber-optic two-photon interferometer using continuous optical length control.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Beom; Kim, Heonoh

    2016-05-16

    The practical realization of long-distance entanglement-based quantum communication systems strongly rely on the observation of highly stable quantum interference between correlated single photons. This task must accompany active stabilization of the optical path lengths within the single-photon coherence length. Here, we provide two-step interferometer stabilization methods employing continuous optical length control and experimentally demonstrate two-photon quantum interference using an actively stabilized 6-km-long fiber-optic Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. The two-step active control techniques are applied for measuring highly stable two-photon interference fringes by scanning the optical path-length difference. The obtained two-photon interference visibilities with and without accidental subtraction are found to be approximately 90.7% and 65.4%, respectively. PMID:27409920

  13. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-11-30

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  14. CORESS feedback

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This edition of CORESS feedback reinforces the very basic principles of obtaining and using an accurate history and examination to make an appropriate diagnosis in the face of equivocal or uninformative investigations and failing equipment. Case 126 illustrates once again the potential deleterious consequences of failing to check a drug correctly prior to administration. We are grateful to the clinicians who have provided the material for these reports. The online reporting form is on our website (www.coress.org.uk), which also includes all previous feedback reports. Published contributions will be acknowledged by a ‘Certificate of Contribution’, which may be included in the contributor’s record of continuing professional development. CORESS relies heavily on the expertise of the specialty members of the Advisory Board in the preparation of feedback reports and dissemination of safety information related to surgical practice. The organisation is grateful to the following members of the Advisory Board and Board of Directors who have contributed to published reports in 2010 and 2011: Board of Directors: Viscount Bridgeman, Mr Chris Chilton, Mr Martin Else, Professor Nicholas Gair, Mr Adam Lewis CVO, Miss Clare Marx, Mr Andrew May, Lord Bernard Ribeiro, Mr Frank Smith, Mr Peter Tait, Mr Denis Wilkins. Advisory Board: Ms E Baird, Mr Daryl I Baker, Mr Ken Catchpole, Dr Lauren Morgan, Mr Stephen Clark, Mr Robert Davies, Mr Mark Deakin, Ms D Eastwood, Mr Barry Ferris, Mr Mark Fordham, Mr Paul J Gibbs, Mr Grey Giddins, Mr Robert Greatorex, Mr Mervyn Griffiths, Mr John Hammond, Mr William Harkness, Mr M Hemadri, Mr Richard Holdsworth, Miss Claire Hopkins, Professor Zygmunt Krukowski, Mr N Mamode, Mr Ian Martin, Surgeon Commander Mark Midwinter, Mr J Richard Novell, Professor Gerald O’Sullivan, Dr Gerard Panting, Mr Mike Pittam, Dr Mike Powers QC, Ms Patricia Scott, Professor Alastair Thompson, Dr J P van Besouw, Mr Mark Vipond, Mr David Webster, Mr Michael Wyatt.

  15. PROBING THE EXTREME REALM OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK IN THE MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTER, RX J1532.9+3021

    SciTech Connect

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Allen, S. W.; Canning, R. E. A.; Werner, N.; Ehlert, S.; Von der Linden, A.; Taylor, G. B.; Grimes, C. K.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.

    2013-11-10

    We present a detailed Chandra, XMM-Newton, Very Large Array (VLA) and Hubble Space Telescope analysis of one of the strongest cool core clusters known, RX J1532.9+3021 (z = 0.3613). Using new, deep 90 ks Chandra observations, we confirm the presence of a western X-ray cavity or bubble, and report on a newly discovered eastern X-ray cavity. The total mechanical power associated with these active galactic nucleus (AGN) driven outflows is (22 ± 9) × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}, and is sufficient to offset the cooling, indicating that AGN feedback still provides a viable solution to the cooling flow problem even in the strongest cool core clusters. Based on the distribution of the optical filaments, as well as a jet-like structure seen in the 325 MHz VLA radio map, we suggest that the cluster harbors older outflows along the north to south direction. The jet of the central AGN is therefore either precessing or sloshing-induced motions have caused the outflows to change directions. There are also hints of an X-ray depression to the north aligned with the 325 MHz jet-like structure, which might represent the highest redshift ghost cavity discovered to date. We further find evidence of a cold front (r ≈ 65 kpc) that coincides with the outermost edge of the western X-ray cavity and the edge of the radio mini-halo. The common location of the cold front with the edge of the radio mini-halo supports the idea that the latter originates from electrons being reaccelerated due to sloshing-induced turbulence. Alternatively, its coexistence with the edge of the X-ray cavity may be due to cool gas being dragged out by the outburst. We confirm that the central AGN is highly sub-Eddington and conclude that a >10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} or a rapidly spinning black hole is favored to explain both the radiative-inefficiency of the AGN and the powerful X-ray cavities.

  16. Complex domain interactions regulate stability and activity of closely related proneural transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Gary S.; Hardwick, Laura J.A.; Philpott, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Characterising post-translational regulation of key transcriptional activators is crucial for understanding how cell division and differentiation are coordinated in developing organisms and cycling cells. One important mode of protein post-translational control is by regulation of half-life via ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Two key basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors, Neurogenin 2 (Ngn2) and NeuroD, play central roles in development of the central nervous system but despite their homology, Ngn2 is a highly unstable protein whilst NeuroD is, by comparison, very stable. The basis for and the consequences of the difference in stability of these two structurally and functionally related proteins has not been explored. Here we see that ubiquitylation alone does not determine Ngn2 or NeuroD stability. By making chimeric proteins, we see that the N-terminus of NeuroD in particular has a stabilising effect, whilst despite their high levels of homology, the most conserved bHLH domains of these proneural proteins alone can confer significant changes in protein stability. Despite widely differing stabilities of Ngn2, NeuroD and the chimeric proteins composed of domains of both, there is little correlation between protein half-life and ability to drive neuronal differentiation. Therefore, we conclude that despite significant homology between Ngn2 and NeuroD, the regulation of their stability differs markedly and moreover, stability/instability of the proteins is not a direct correlate of their activity. PMID:24998442

  17. Balancing Protein Stability and Activity in Cancer: A New Approach for Identifying Driver Mutations Affecting CBL Ubiquitin Ligase Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Kales, Stephen C; Ma, Ke; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Cangelosi, Andrew L; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-02-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the monomeric Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl) gene have been found in many tumors, but their significance remains largely unknown. Several human c-Cbl (CBL) structures have recently been solved, depicting the protein at different stages of its activation cycle and thus providing mechanistic insight underlying how stability-activity tradeoffs in cancer-related proteins-may influence disease onset and progression. In this study, we computationally modeled the effects of missense cancer mutations on structures representing four stages of the CBL activation cycle to identify driver mutations that affect CBL stability, binding, and activity. We found that recurrent, homozygous, and leukemia-specific mutations had greater destabilizing effects on CBL states than random noncancer mutations. We further tested the ability of these computational models, assessing the changes in CBL stability and its binding to ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, by performing blind CBL-mediated EGFR ubiquitination assays in cells. Experimental CBL ubiquitin ligase activity was in agreement with the predicted changes in CBL stability and, to a lesser extent, with CBL-E2 binding affinity. Two thirds of all experimentally tested mutations affected the ubiquitin ligase activity by either destabilizing CBL or disrupting CBL-E2 binding, whereas about one-third of tested mutations were found to be neutral. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that computational methods incorporating multiple protein conformations and stability and binding affinity evaluations can successfully predict the functional consequences of cancer mutations on protein activity, and provide a proof of concept for mutations in CBL. PMID:26676746

  18. Fe65 does not stabilize AICD during activation of transcription in a luciferase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Huysseune, Sandra; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noel . E-mail: octave@nchm.ucl.ac.be

    2007-09-21

    The APP intracellular domain (AICD) could be involved in signaling via interaction with the adaptor protein Fe65, and with the histone acetyl transferase Tip60. However, the real function of AICD and Fe65 in regulation of transcription remains controversial. In this study, the human APPGal4 fusion protein was expressed in CHO cells and the transcriptional activity of AICDGal4 was measured in a luciferase-based reporter assay. AICDGal4 was stabilized by expression of Fe65 and levels of AICDGal4 controlled luciferase activity. On the contrary, when human APP was expressed in CHO cells, coexpression of Fe65 increased luciferase activity without affecting the amount of AICD fragment. AICD produced from APP was protected from degradation by orthophenanthroline, but not by lactacystine, indicating that AICD is not a substrate of the chymotryptic activity of the proteasome. It is concluded that Fe65 can control luciferase activity without stabilizing the labile AICD fragment.

  19. Antibacterial Activity of DNA-Stabilized Silver Nanoclusters Tuned by Oligonucleotide Sequence.

    PubMed

    Javani, Siamak; Lorca, Romina; Latorre, Alfonso; Flors, Cristina; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Somoza, Álvaro

    2016-04-27

    Silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) stabilized by DNA are promising materials with tunable fluorescent properties, which have been employed in a plethora of sensing systems. In this report, we explore their antimicrobial properties in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. After testing 9 oligonucleotides with different sequence and length, we found that the antibacterial activity depends on the sequence of the oligonucleotide employed. The sequences tested yielded fluorescent AgNCs, which can be grouped in blue, yellow, and red emitters. Interestingly, blue emitters yielded poor antibacterial activity, whereas yellow and red emitters afforded an activity similar to silver nitrate. Furthermore, structural studies using circular dichroism indicate the formation of complexes with different stability and structure, which might be one of the factors that modulate their activity. Finally, we prepared a trimeric structure containing the sequence that afforded the best antimicrobial activity, which inhibited the growth of Gram-positive and negative bacteria in the submicromolar range. PMID:27058628

  20. Postural stability of older female Scottish country dancers in comparison with physically active controls.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Susan; Peacock, Leslie; Bampouras, Theodoros M

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity assists older individuals' functional ability and postural stability. Recently, Scottish country dance (SCD) was reported as being a beneficial form of physical activity for functional ability in older females. This study aims to examine the effect of SCD on postural stability. Scottish country dancers (n = 20) were compared with physically active controls (n = 33) for static postural sway measured on a force platform. The Romberg and Tandem stances were used under 'eyes open' and 'eyes closed' conditions. Ninety-five percent ellipse area and sway velocity were calculated from the center of pressure displacement. Ninety-five percent ellipse area was the same for both groups in all tests. The control group had greater sway velocity for all tests (P < .01) except Tandem eyes closed. SCD participation resulted in similar postural sway as participation in other physical activities, however nondancers may need a greater amount of regulatory activity to maintain balance. PMID:24515979

  1. Stability of silanols and grafted alkylsilane monolayers on plasma-activated mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liberelle, Benoît; Banquy, Xavier; Giasson, Suzanne

    2008-04-01

    We investigated the effect of physical and chemical modifications of mica surfaces induced by water vapor-based plasma treatments on the stability of silanols and grafted alkylsilane monolayers. The plasma-activated substrates were characterized using XPS, TOF-SIMS, and contact angle measurements. They revealed a large surface coverage of silanol groups (Si-OH) and a loss of aluminum atoms compared to freshly cleaved mica surfaces. The stability of plasma-induced silanol groups was investigated by contact angle measurements using ethylene glycol as a probe liquid. The Si-OH surface coverage decreased rapidly under vacuum or thermal treatment to give rise to hydrophobic dehydrated surfaces. The stability of end-grafted monofunctionalized n-alkylsilanes was investigated in different solvents and at different pH using water contact angle measurements. The degrafting of alkylsilanes from the activated mica was promoted in acidic aqueous solutions. This detachment was associated with the hydrolysis of covalent bonds between the alkylsilanes and the mica surface. The monolayer stability was enhanced by increasing the length of the alkyl chains that probably act as a hydrophobic protective layer against hydrolysis reactions. Stable alkylsilane monolayers in water with pH greater than 5.5 were obtained on mica surfaces activated at low plasma pressure. We attributed this stability to the loss of surface Al atoms induced by the plasma treatment. PMID:18303926

  2. Placenta-specific methylation of the vitamin D 24-hydroxylase gene: implications for feedback autoregulation of active vitamin D levels at the fetomaternal interface.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Boris; Sibson, Mandy; Ng, Hong Kiat; Manuelpillai, Ursula; Rakyan, Vardhman; Down, Thomas; Beck, Stephan; Fournier, Thierry; Evain-Brion, Danielle; Dimitriadis, Eva; Craig, Jeffrey M; Morley, Ruth; Saffery, Richard

    2009-05-29

    Plasma concentrations of biologically active vitamin D (1,25-(OH)(2)D) are tightly controlled via feedback regulation of renal 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1; positive) and 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1; catabolic) enzymes. In pregnancy, this regulation is uncoupled, and 1,25-(OH)(2)D levels are significantly elevated, suggesting a role in pregnancy progression. Epigenetic regulation of CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 has previously been described in cell and animal models, and despite emerging evidence for a critical role of epigenetics in placentation generally, little is known about the regulation of enzymes modulating vitamin D homeostasis at the fetomaternal interface. In this study, we investigated the methylation status of genes regulating vitamin D bioavailability and activity in the placenta. No methylation of the VDR (vitamin D receptor) and CYP27B1 genes was found in any placental tissues. In contrast, the CYP24A1 gene is methylated in human placenta, purified cytotrophoblasts, and primary and cultured chorionic villus sampling tissue. No methylation was detected in any somatic human tissue tested. Methylation was also evident in marmoset and mouse placental tissue. All three genes were hypermethylated in choriocarcinoma cell lines, highlighting the role of vitamin D deregulation in this cancer. Gene expression analysis confirmed a reduced capacity for CYP24A1 induction with promoter methylation in primary cells and in vitro reporter analysis demonstrated that promoter methylation directly down-regulates basal promoter activity and abolishes vitamin D-mediated feedback activation. This study strongly suggests that epigenetic decoupling of vitamin D feedback catabolism plays an important role in maximizing active vitamin D bioavailability at the fetomaternal interface. PMID:19237542

  3. Conative Feedback in Computer-Based Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economides, Anastasios A.

    2009-01-01

    Feedback is an important educational tool that can support learning and assessment. This article describes types of conative feedback that can support the student's conation, will, volition, or motivation. Any of these types of feedback can be presented to the student before, during, or after an educational activity or a test question.…

  4. Long-latency muscle activity reflects continuous, delayed sensorimotor feedback of task-level and not joint-level error

    PubMed Central

    Safavynia, Seyed A.

    2013-01-01

    In both the upper and lower limbs, evidence suggests that short-latency electromyographic (EMG) responses to mechanical perturbations are modulated based on muscle stretch or joint motion, whereas long-latency responses are modulated based on attainment of task-level goals, e.g., desired direction of limb movement. We hypothesized that long-latency responses are modulated continuously by task-level error feedback. Previously, we identified an error-based sensorimotor feedback transformation that describes the time course of EMG responses to ramp-and-hold perturbations during standing balance (Safavynia and Ting 2013; Welch and Ting 2008, 2009). Here, our goals were 1) to test the robustness of the sensorimotor transformation over a richer set of perturbation conditions and postural states; and 2) to explicitly test whether the sensorimotor transformation is based on task-level vs. joint-level error. We developed novel perturbation trains of acceleration pulses such that perturbations were applied when the body deviated from the desired, upright state while recovering from preceding perturbations. The entire time course of EMG responses (∼4 s) in an antagonistic muscle pair was reconstructed using a weighted sum of center of mass (CoM) kinematics preceding EMGs at long-latency delays (∼100 ms). Furthermore, CoM and joint kinematic trajectories became decorrelated during perturbation trains, allowing us to explicitly compare task-level vs. joint feedback in the same experimental condition. Reconstruction of EMGs was poorer using joint kinematics compared with CoM kinematics and required unphysiologically short (∼10 ms) delays. Thus continuous, long-latency feedback of task-level variables may be a common mechanism regulating long-latency responses in the upper and lower limbs. PMID:23803325

  5. Long-latency muscle activity reflects continuous, delayed sensorimotor feedback of task-level and not joint-level error.

    PubMed

    Safavynia, Seyed A; Ting, Lena H

    2013-09-01

    In both the upper and lower limbs, evidence suggests that short-latency electromyographic (EMG) responses to mechanical perturbations are modulated based on muscle stretch or joint motion, whereas long-latency responses are modulated based on attainment of task-level goals, e.g., desired direction of limb movement. We hypothesized that long-latency responses are modulated continuously by task-level error feedback. Previously, we identified an error-based sensorimotor feedback transformation that describes the time course of EMG responses to ramp-and-hold perturbations during standing balance (Safavynia and Ting 2013; Welch and Ting 2008, 2009). Here, our goals were 1) to test the robustness of the sensorimotor transformation over a richer set of perturbation conditions and postural states; and 2) to explicitly test whether the sensorimotor transformation is based on task-level vs. joint-level error. We developed novel perturbation trains of acceleration pulses such that perturbations were applied when the body deviated from the desired, upright state while recovering from preceding perturbations. The entire time course of EMG responses (∼4 s) in an antagonistic muscle pair was reconstructed using a weighted sum of center of mass (CoM) kinematics preceding EMGs at long-latency delays (∼100 ms). Furthermore, CoM and joint kinematic trajectories became decorrelated during perturbation trains, allowing us to explicitly compare task-level vs. joint feedback in the same experimental condition. Reconstruction of EMGs was poorer using joint kinematics compared with CoM kinematics and required unphysiologically short (∼10 ms) delays. Thus continuous, long-latency feedback of task-level variables may be a common mechanism regulating long-latency responses in the upper and lower limbs. PMID:23803325

  6. Experimental study on active vibration control using genetic algorithm-based system identification and optimized positive position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszulik, Ryan R.; Shan, Jinjun

    2012-12-01

    A genetic algorithm is implemented to identify the transfer function of an experimental system consisting of a flexible manipulator with a collocated piezoelectric sensor/actuator pair. A multi-mode positive position feedback controller is then designed based upon the identified transfer function. To this end, the same iteratively implemented genetic algorithm is used to optimize all controller parameters by minimization of the closed loop H∞-norm. The designed controller is then applied for vibration suppression on the experimental system.

  7. Stabilization of a formate dehydrogenase by covalent immobilization on highly activated glyoxyl-agarose supports.

    PubMed

    Bolivar, Juan M; Wilson, Lorena; Ferrarotti, Susana Alicia; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisan, Jose M; Mateo, Cesar

    2006-03-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) is a stable enzyme that may be readily inactivated by the interaction with hydrophobic interfaces (e.g., due to strong stirring). This may be avoided by immobilizing the enzyme on a porous support by any technique. Thus, even if the enzyme is going to be used in an ultra-membrane reactor, the immobilization presents some advantages. Immobilization on supports activated with bromocianogen, polyethylenimine, glutaraldehyde, etc., did not promote any stabilization of the enzyme under thermal inactivation. However, the immobilization of FDH on highly activated glyoxyl agarose has permitted increasing the enzyme stability against any distorting agent: pH, T, organic solvent, etc. The time of support-enzyme reaction, the temperature of immobilization, and the activation of the support need to be optimized to get the optimal stability-activity properties. Optimized biocatalyst retained 50% of the offered activity and became 50 times more stable at high temperature and neutral pH. Moreover, the quaternary structure of this dimeric enzyme becomes stabilized by immobilization under optimized conditions. Thus, at acidic pH (conditions where the subunit dissociation is the first step in the enzyme inactivation), the immobilization of both subunits of the enzyme on glyoxyl-agarose has allowed the enzyme to be stabilized by hundreds of times. Moreover, the optimal temperature of the enzyme has been increased (even by 10 degrees C at pH 4.5). Very interestingly, the activity with NAD(+)-dextran was around 60% of that observed with free cofactor. PMID:16529396

  8. High viscosity to highly dispersed PtPd bimetallic nanocrystals for enhanced catalytic activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jie; Hu, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Xiao-Yu; Wei, Hao; Xiao, Yu-Xuan; Janiak, Christoph; Mu, Shi-Chun; Tian, Ge; Pan, Mu; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Su, Bao-Lian

    2016-07-01

    A facile high-viscosity-solvent method is presented to synthesize PtPd bimetallic nanocrystals highly dispersed in different mesostructures (2D and 3D structures), porosities (large and small pore sizes), and compositions (silica and carbon). Further, highly catalytic activity, stability and durability of the nanometals have been proven in different catalytic reactions. PMID:27222099

  9. Effect of active arm swing to local dynamic stability during walking.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Li, Yue; Liu, An-Min; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Yin-Zhi; Hu, Fei; Chen, Jin-Ling; Dai, Ke-Rong; Gu, Dong-Yun

    2016-02-01

    Arm swing is an essential component in regulating dynamic stability of the whole body during walking, while the contribution of active arm swing to local dynamic stability of different motion segments remains unclear. This study investigated the effects of arm swing under natural arm swing condition and active arm swing condition on local dynamic stability and gait variability of the trunk segments (C7 and T10 joint) and lower extremity joints (hip, knee and ankle joint). The local divergence exponents (λs) and mean standard deviation over strides (MeanSD) of 24 young healthy adults were calculated while they were walking on treadmill with two arm swing conditions at their preferred walking speed (PWS). We found that in medial-lateral direction, both λs and MeanSD values of the trunk segments (C7 and T10 joint) in active arm swing condition were significantly lower than those in natural arm swing condition (p<0.05), while no significant difference of λs or MeanSD in lower extremity joints (hip, knee and ankle joint) was found between two arm swing conditions (p>0.05, respectively). In anterior-posterior and vertical direction, neither λs nor MeanSD values of all body segments showed significant difference between two arm swing conditions (p>0.05, respectively). These findings indicate that active arm swing may help to improve the local dynamic stability of the trunk segments in medial-lateral direction. PMID:26615477

  10. Cellulase variants with improved expression, activity and stability, and use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Aehle, Wolfgang; Bott, Richard R; Bower, Benjamin; Caspi, Jonathan; Estell, David A; Goedegebuur, Frits; Hommes, Ronaldus W.J.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley; Kralj, Slavko; Van Lieshout, Johan; Nikolaev, Igor; Van Stigt Thans, Sander; Wallace, Louise; Vogtentanz, Gudrun; Sandgren, Mats

    2014-03-25

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having improved expression, activity and/or stability. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase variants, compositions comprising the cellulase variants, and methods of use thereof.

  11. 17 CFR 242.104 - Stabilizing and other activities in connection with an offering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stabilizing and other activities in connection with an offering. 242.104 Section 242.104 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS M, SHO, ATS, AC, AND NMS AND CUSTOMER...

  12. The study of the antimicrobial activity of colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles prepared using food stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Balandin, G V; Suvorov, O A; Shaburova, L N; Podkopaev, D O; Frolova, Yu V; Ermolaeva, G A

    2015-06-01

    The bactericidal effect of colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles based on food stabilizers, gum arabic and chitosan, against bacterial cultures of microorganisms in food production is described. The antibacterial activity of nanotechnology products containing different amounts of stabilizing additives when applied to solid pH-neutral substrates is studied. For its evaluation a method making it possible to take into account the capability of nanoparticles to diffuse in solid media was applied. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of nanoparticles used against Erwinia herbicola, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bacillus subtilis, Sarcina flava were found. A suggestion was made concerning the influence of the spatial structure of bacteria on the antibacterial activity of colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles. The data concerning the antibacterial activity and minimal inhibiting concentrations of nanoparticles may be used for development of products suppressing activity of microorganisms hazardous for food production. PMID:26028773

  13. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  14. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  15. Synthesis of a correcting filter with phase stabilization of the angular velocity of a synchronous motor by the feedback system method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazlauskas, K. A.; Kurlavichus, A. I.

    1973-01-01

    The operating characteristics of a synchronous electric motor are discussed. A system of phase stabilization of the instantaneous angular velocity of rotation of a synchronous-reaction motor is diagrammed. A mathematical model is developed to show the parameters which affect the operation of the motor. The selection of a correcting filter to use with the motor in order to reduce the reaction of the system to interference is explained.

  16. Optical sensor feedback assistive technology to enable patients to play an active role in the management of their body dynamics during radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhurst, J. M.; Price, G. J.; Sharrock, P. J.; Stratford, J.; Moore, C. J.

    2013-04-01

    Patient motion during treatment is well understood as a prime factor limiting radiotherapy success, with the risks most pronounced in modern safety critical therapies promising the greatest benefit. In this paper we describe a real-time visual feedback device designed to help patients to actively manage their body position, pose and motion. In addition to technical device details, we present preliminary trial results showing that its use enables volunteers to successfully manage their respiratory motion. The device enables patients to view their live body surface measurements relative to a prior reference, operating on the concept that co-operative engagement with patients will both improve geometric conformance and remove their perception of isolation, in turn easing stress related motion. The device is driven by a real-time wide field optical sensor system developed at The Christie. Feedback is delivered through three intuitive visualization modes of hierarchically increasing display complexity. The device can be used with any suitable display technology; in the presented study we use both personal video glasses and a standard LCD projector. The performance characteristics of the system were measured, with the frame rate, throughput and latency of the feedback device being 22.4 fps, 47.0 Mbps, 109.8 ms, and 13.7 fps, 86.4 Mbps, 119.1 ms for single and three-channel modes respectively. The pilot study, using ten healthy volunteers over three sessions, shows that the use of visual feedback resulted in both a reduction in the participants' respiratory amplitude, and a decrease in their overall body motion variability.

  17. Anti-Oxidative Activity of Pectin and Its Stabilizing Effect on Retinyl Palmitate

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Jieun; Kim, Yeongseok; Kim, Hyeongmin; Jang, Soung Baek; Lee, Hyun Joo; Chakma, Suharto

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the anti-oxidative activity of pectin and other polysaccharides in order to develop a cosmeceutical base having anti-oxidative effects towards retinyl palmitate (RP). The anti-oxidative stabilizing effects of pectin and other polysaccharides on RP were evaluated by DPPH assay and then the stabilizing effect of pectin on RP was examined as a function of time. Among the polysaccharides we examined, pectin exhibited a considerably higher anti-oxidative activity, with an approximately 5-fold greater DPPH radical scavenging effect compared to other polysaccharides. The DPPH radical scavenging effect of pectin increased gradually with increasing concentrations of pectin. At two different RP concentrations, 0.01 and 0.1% in ethanol, addition of pectin improved the stability of RP in a concentration dependent manner. The stabilizing effect of pectin on RP was more effective for the lower concentration of RP (0.01%, v/v). Further, degradation of RP was reduced following the addition of pectin as measured over 8 hours. From the results obtained, it can be suggested that pectin may be a promising ingredient for cosmeceutical bases designed to stabilize RP or other pharmacological agents subject to degradation by oxidation. PMID:23776395

  18. Stability and in vitro antiproliferative activity of bioactive "Vitamin E" fortified parenteral lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Alayoubi, Alaadin; Kanthala, Shanthi; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama D; Anderson, John F; Sylvester, Paul W; Nazzal, Sami

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this work were to engineer physically stable "Vitamin E" rich intravenous lipid emulsions and to evaluate their in vitro antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 (human mammary adenocarcinoma) and SW-620 (human colon adenocarcinoma) cell lines. Emulsions loaded with 70% vitamin E by total weight of the oil phase were stabilized with secondary emulsifiers and tested for their hemolytic effect and their plasma and electrolyte stability. Emulsions stabilized with sodium oleate and sodium deoxycholate were sensitive to electrolytes and exhibited significant hemolytic effect. On the other hand, addition of 2.5% poloxamer was found to stabilize the emulsions against electrolytes and physical stress, which was attributed to the steric effect of their polyoxyethylene (POE) head group. When tested for their antiproliferative effects, poloxamer-stabilized tocotrienol lipid emulsions were found to exhibit significantly higher anticancer activity than lipid emulsions enriched with tocopherol alone. The half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of tocotrienols lipid emulsions against MCF-7 and SW-620 were 14 and 12 μM, respectively, whereas the IC(50s) of tocopherol lipid emulsions were approximately 69 and 78 μM against MCF-7 and SW-620 cells, respectively. PMID:23201715

  19. Mre11 Nuclease Activity has Essential Roles in DNA Repair and Genomic Stability Distinct from ATM Activation

    PubMed Central

    Buis, Jeffrey; Wu, Yipin; Deng, Yibin; Leddon, Jennifer; Westfield, Gerwin; Eckersdorff, Mark; Sekiguchi, JoAnn M.; Chang, Sandy; Ferguson, David O.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The Mre11/Rad50/NBS1 complex (MRN) maintains genomic stability by bridging DNA ends and initiating DNA damage signaling through activation of the ATM kinase. Mre11 possesses DNA nuclease activities that are highly conserved in evolution, but play unknown roles in mammals. To define functions of Mre11 we engineered targeted mouse alleles which either abrogate nuclease activities or inactivate the entire MRN complex. Mre11 nuclease deficiency causes a striking array of phenotypes indistinguishable from absence of MRN, including early embryonic lethality and dramatic genomic instability. We identify a crucial role for the nuclease activities in homology directed double strand break repair, and a contributing role in activating the ATR kinase. However, nuclease activities are not required to activate ATM after DNA damage or telomere deprotection. Therefore, nucleolytic processing by Mre11 is an essential function of fundamental importance in DNA repair distinct from MRN control of ATM signaling. PMID:18854157

  20. Apoferritin Nanoparticle: A Novel and Biocompatible Carrier for Enzyme Immobilization with Enhanced Activity and Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youyu; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong J.; Lin, Chiann Tso; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-01

    Apoferritin is a nanostructured material with a uniform size and spherical structure, and it has excellent bio-compatibility. In this work, we report the use of apoferritin as a novel and biocompatible carrier for stabilizing enzymes and their activities. We used glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme. GOx was immobilized on the surface of the apoferritin through a green synthetic approach taking advantage of bioaffinity binding between streptavidin and biotin. As a result, a glucose oxidase-biotin/streptavidin/biotin-apoferritin conjugate (Apo-GOx) was prepared using streptavidin as a bridge. The synthesized Apo-GOx was characterized with transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The activity and stability of GOx on the surface of the apoferritin were studied in different environments, such as temperature, chemicals, and pH, in comparison with the biotinylated GOx (B-GOx). The results showed that the activity of GOx on the apoferritin surface was significantly enhanced. The thermal and chemical stability of the GOx on the apoferritin was also greatly improved compared to free B-GOx in a solution. It was found that the activity of the GOx on the apoferritin only lost 30% in comparison to a 70% loss of free B-GOx after a 2 h incubation at 50oC. There was almost no decrease in activity for the GOx on the apoferritin as compared to an 80% activity decrease for free B-GOx after 30 min incubation in a 5 M urea solution. Glucose detection was used as a model application for the enzyme immobilization method developed in this work. The GOx immobilized apoferritin nanoparticles exhibited high sensitivity for glucose detection with a detection limit of 3 nM glucose. This work offers a novel approach for immobilizing enzymes with enhanced stability and activity, and this method may find a number of applications, such as in enzyme catalysis, DNA assays and immunoassays.