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Sample records for active filler metals

  1. Properties of vacuum brazed Si3N4/steel joint using active brazing filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Fanghan; Ren, Jialie; Zhou, Yunhong; Yan, Ping

    The influence of active element Ti in Ag-Cu-Ti filler metal on wettability and joint strength is studied. Filler metal with 3 percent Ti achieves good results in direct brazing of silicon nitride to steel. For improving joint strength different interlayers are synthetically investigated. Experiments showed that an interlayer of low yield strength material can reduce the residual stress in the joint and increase joint strength more effectively than that of an interlayer of low coefficient of expansion material. Active element Ti in the brazing alloy diffused into Si3N4, and chemical reactions occurred in ceramic-metal interface producing certain chemical compounds consist of N and Ti.

  2. Graphite to Inconel brazing using active filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.F.; Baity, F.W.; Walls, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) antennas are designed to supply large amounts of auxiliary heating power to fusion-grade plasmas in the Toroidal Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and Tore Supra fusion energy experiments. A single Faraday shield structure protects a pair of resonant double loops which are designed to launch up to 2 MW of power per loop. The shield consists of two tiers of actively cooled Inconel alloy tubes with the front tier being covered with semicircular graphite tiles. Successful operation of the antenna requires the making of high integrity bonds between the Inconel tubes and graphite tiles by brazing. This paper discusses this process.

  3. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  4. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  5. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  6. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  7. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal...

  8. Nickel-chromium-silicon brazing filler metal

    DOEpatents

    Martini, Angelo J.; Gourley, Bruce R.

    1976-01-01

    A brazing filler metal containing, by weight percent, 23-35% chromium, 9-12% silicon, a maximum of 0.15% carbon, and the remainder nickel. The maximum amount of elements other than those noted above is 1.00%.

  9. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  10. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  11. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  12. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  13. 46 CFR 57.02-5 - Filler metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Filler metals. 57.02-5 Section 57.02-5 Shipping COAST... Requirements § 57.02-5 Filler metals. (a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, when filler metal is used in a welded fabrication that is required to meet the requirements of this part the...

  14. Brazing diamond grits onto a steel substrate using copper alloys as the filler metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-M.; Lin, S.-T.

    1996-12-01

    Surface-set diamond tools were fabricated by an active metal brazing process, using bronze (Cu-8.9Sn) powder and 316L stainless steel powder mixed to various ratios as the braze filler metals. The diamond grits were brazed onto a steel substrate at 1050 °C for 30 min in a dry hydrogen atmosphere. After brazing practice, an intermediate layer rich in chromium formed between the braze filler metal and diamond. A braze filler metal composed of 70 wt % bronze powder and 30 wt % stainless steel powder was found to be optimum in that the diamond grits were strongly impregnated in the filler metal by both mechanical and chemical types of holding. The diamond tools thus fabricated performed better than conventional nickel-plated diamond tools. In service, the braze filler metal wore at almost the same rate as the diamond grits, and no pullout of diamond grits or peeling of the filler metal layer took place.

  15. Interfacial reaction between alumina and Cu-Ti filler metal during reactive metal brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, K.S. . Welding Research Center); Liu, S. . Center for Welding and Joining Research)

    1994-03-01

    If a chemical reaction at the interface can influence significantly the properties of a brazed joint using reactive filler metals, it is very important to understand which reaction occurs and how the reaction products grow at the interface. In this research, the interfacial reaction and the kinetics of reaction products growth in alumina brazing utilizing Cu-Ti filler metals were investigated. Cu-Ti filler metals reduced Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] to form TiO at the interface. Thermodynamically, reduction of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] is possible through the dissolution of the aluminum by the filler metal. At 1,300 K, for example, interfacial reaction can proceed until the activity of aluminum reaches about 0.02 in Cu-20 at.-% Ti filler metal. With time, the TiO layer grew toward the center of the brazing filler metal following a parabolic rate law, at the cost of another complex oxide, presumably Ti[sub 3]Cu[sub 3]O, which formed next to the TiO. The activation energy of TiO growth was 208 kJ/mol (50 kcal/mol), which corresponds to the activation energy of oxygen diffusion in the TiO. Therefore, it appears likely that the growth of TiO is controlled by oxygen diffusion.

  16. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  17. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  18. Amorphous Ti-Zr; Base Metglas brazing filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinkin, A.; Liebermann, H.; Pounds, S.; Taylor, T. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper is the first report on processing, properties and potential application of amorphous titanium/zirconium-base alloys produced in the form of a good quality continuous and ductile ribbon having up to 12.5 mm width. To date, the majority of titanium brazing is accomplished using cooper and aluminum-base brazing filler metals. The brazements produced with these filler metals have rather low ({approximately}300{degrees} C) service temperature, thus impeding progress in aircraft and other technologies and industries. The attempt to develop a generation of high temperature brazing filler metals was made in the late sixties-early seventies studies in detail were a large number of Ti-, Zr-Ti-Zr, Ti-V and Zr-V-Ti based alloys. The majority of these alloys has copper and nickel as melting temperature depressants. The presence of nickel and copper converts them into eutectic alloys having (Ti(Zr)) (Cu(Ni)), intermetallic phases as major structural constituents. This, in turn, results in high alloy brittleness and poor, if any, processability by means of conventional, i.e. melting-ingot casting-deformation technology. In spite of good wettability and high joint strength achieved in dozens of promising alloys, only Ti-15Cu-15Ni is now widely used as a brazing filler metal for high service temperature. Up until now this material could not be produced as a homogeneous foil and is instead applied as a clad strip consisting of three separate metallic layers.

  19. Weldability testing of Inconel{trademark} filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, B.B.; Lin, W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the findings of a research program aimed at quantifying the weld solidification cracking susceptibility and weld metal liquation cracking susceptibility of Inconel{trademark} filler materials 52, 82, 152 and 182 deposited on a variety of materials intended for pressurized water reactor applications. A cursory investigation on the repair weldability of Filler Metal 52 using the Gleeble{trademark} thermo-mechanical simulation technique is also included. The brittle temperature range (BTR) in the fusion zone and HAZ was determined using the longitudinal-Varestraint test and spot-Varestraint test, respectively, and used as a weldability index for quantification of susceptibility to weld solidification cracking and HAZ liquation cracking. Results from this study showed that Filler Metals 52 exhibited the best resistance to both weld solidification cracking and weld metal liquation cracking followed by 82, 152 and 182 for the base metal combinations tested in this study. Repair weldability study suggested that the resistance to weld metal liquation cracking of 52 all weld metal would not be significantly reduced after ten times of weld simulation at peak temperatures of 900 C and 1,300 C.

  20. Ductility dip cracking susceptibility of Inconel Filler Metal 52 and Inconel Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Kikel, J.M.; Parker, D.M.

    1998-06-01

    Alloy 690 and Filler Metal 52 have become the materials of choice for commercial nuclear steam generator applications in recent years. Filler Metal 52 exhibits improved resistance to weld solidification and weld-metal liquation cracking as compared to other nickel-based filler metals. However, recently published work indicates that Filler Metal 52 is susceptible to ductility dip cracking (DDC) in highly restrained applications. Susceptibility to fusion zone DDC was evaluated using the transverse varestraint test method, while heat affected zone (HAZ) DDC susceptibility was evaluated using a newly developed spot-on-spot varestraint test method. Alloy 690 and Filler Metal 52 cracking susceptibility was compared to the DDC susceptibility of Alloy 600, Filler Metal 52, and Filler Metal 625. In addition, the effect of grain size and orientation on cracking susceptibility was also included in this study. Alloy 690, Filler Metal 82, Filler Metal 52, and Filler Metal 625 were found more susceptible to fusion zone DDC than Alloy 600. Filler Metal 52 and Alloy 690 were found more susceptible to HAZ DDC when compared to wrought Alloy 600, Filler Metal 82 and Filler Metal 625. Filler Metal 52 exhibited the greatest susceptibility to HAZ DDC of all the weld metals evaluated. The base materials were found much more resistant to HAZ DDC in the wrought condition than when autogenously welded. A smaller grain size was found to offer greater resistance to DDC. For weld metal where grain size is difficult to control, a change in grain orientation was found to improve resistance to DDC.

  1. Wetting and spreading behavior of molten brazing filler metallic alloys on metallic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogi, Satoshi; Kajiura, Tetsurou; Hanada, Yukiakira; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki

    2014-08-01

    Wetting and spreading of molten brazing filler material are important factors that influence the brazing ability of a joint to be brazed. Several investigations into the wetting ability of a brazing filler alloy and its surface tension in molten state, in addition to effects of brazing time and temperature on the contact angle, have been carried out. In general, dissimilar-metals brazing technology and high-performance brazed joint are necessities for the manufacturing field in the near future. Therefore, to address this requirement, more such studies on wetting and spreading of filler material are required for a deeper understanding. Generally, surface roughness and surface conditions affect spreading of molten brazing filler material during brazing. Wetting by and interfacial reactions of the molten brazing filler material with the metallic substrate, especially, affect strongly the spreading of the filler material. In this study, the effects of surface roughness and surface conditions on the spreading of molten brazing filler metallic alloys were investigated. Ag-(40-x)Cu-xIn and Ag- (40-x)Cu-xSn (x=5, 10, 15, 20, 25) alloys were used as brazing filler materials. A mild-steel square plate (S45C (JIS); side: 30 mm; thickness: 3mm) was employed as the substrate. A few surfaces with varying roughness were prepared using emery paper. Brazing filler material and metallic base plate were first washed with acetone, and then a flux was applied to them. The filler, 50 mg, was placed on the center of the metallic base with the flux. A spreading test was performed under Ar gas using an electrically heated furnace, after which, the original spreading area, defined as the sessile drop area, and the apparent spreading area, produced by the capillary grooves, were both evaluated. It was observed that the spreading area decreased with increasing In and Sn content.

  2. Brazing of copper to stainless steel with a low-silver-content brazing filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukikoshi, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Yūki; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki; Kanasaki, Fumio

    2014-08-01

    The brazing of copper to stainless steel (SUS304 JIS) was performed using a low- silver-content brazing filler metal, Ag-50Cu, under an Ar gas atmosphere with a conventional furnace, owing to the potential economic benefits of using low-silver-content filler metals. The brazeability of the low-silver-content brazing filler metal to copper and SUS304 was investigated. A good joint was obtained, and a drastic dissolution reaction occurred at the copper side. Molten BAg8 penetrated along the crystal grain boundary of the copper base metal when BAg8 was used as the filler metal. This was caused by the dissolution of Ni from the stainless steel into the molten filler metal. Ag-50Cu, which was investigated in this work, can be used instead of BAg8 filler metal.

  3. Brazing of titanium by Cu-P brazing filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ariga, Tadashi; Matsu, Kotaro; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki

    1994-12-31

    Brazing of commercially pure titanium materials was made using the two types of the copper-phosphorus brazing filler metal foil. Two types of the brazing filler metal foils, BCuP-2 and -3 (AWS classification number), were used in this study. The chemical compositions of BCuP-2 and -3 were Cu-7.2P and Cu-6P-5Ag. Brazing was done in an argon gas atmosphere. After brazing, cutting, and polishing of the specimen, the mechanical properties of the specimen were estimated by shear strength test. And the cross-sectional microstructures at the brazed joint were observed by optical microscope and the elemental distributions at the brazed joint were analyzed by SENM and EPMA examinations. A sound brazed joint was obtained in this study. The maximum shear strength of the specimen was about 300 MPa in this study. According to observation of the cross-sectional microstructures, the reaction layer was formed at the base metal/brazed layer interface. The fracture during the shear test occurred in this reaction layer. And the phosphorus element was concentrated in this layer. Therefore, it appeared that the behavior of phosphorus element influenced the brazeability of these specimen.

  4. Corrosion behaviors of Al-Si-Cu-based filler metals and 6061-T6 brazements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, T. L.; Wang, S. S.; Tsao, L. C.; Chang, S. Y.; Chuang, T. H.; Yeh, M. S.

    2002-04-01

    The corrosion behaviors of a series of Al-Si-Cu-based filler metals and the 6061-T6 butt joints brazed with these filler metals are evaluated by polarization tests and immersion tests in a 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution. For comparison, a traditional Al-12Si filler metal is also employed. The results indicate that the Al-Si-Cu-based filler metals before brazing possess much higher corrosion current densities and pitting tendencies than the Al-12Si filler metal. However, brazing of the 6061-T6 alloy with an Al-12Si filler metal produces a wider butt joint, which, in this case, creates a more extensive corrosion region. Severe galvanic corrosion occurs at the 6061-T6 joints when brazed with Al-Si-Cu-based filler metals. However, in the case of the 6061-T6/Al-12Si brazements, selective corrosion of the Al-12Si eutectic phase can be observed. The bonding strengths of the 6061-T6 butt joints brazed with various filler metals are also measured before and after the immersion tests.

  5. Influence of Filler Metals in Welding Wires on the Phase and Chemical Composition of Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Osetkovskiy, I. V.; Kozyreva, O. A.; Zernin, E. A.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of filler metals used in welding wires on the phase and chemical composition of the metal, which is surfaced to mining equipment exposed to abrasive wear, has been investigated. Under a laboratory environment, samples of Mo-V-B and Cr-Mn-Mo-V wires were made. The performed experiments have revealed that fillers of the Cr-Mn-Mo-V system used in powder wire show better wear resistance of the weld metal than that of the Mn-Mo-V-B system; the absence of boron, which promotes grain refinement in the Mn-Mo-V-B system, significantly reduces wear resistance; the Mn-Mo-V-B weld metal has a finer structure than the Cr-Mn-Mo-V weld metal.

  6. Some possible filler alloys with low vapor pressures for refractory-metal brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    A compilation of eutectics and melting-point minima for binary combinations of metals having vapor pressures below 10 to the minus 10th power torr at 1500 degrees K and .00005 torr at 2000 degree K is presented. These compositions and others near them on their phase diagrams are potential special brazing fillers for refractory metals. Some possible problems and advantages for fusion bonds of such mixtures are indicated. Evaluations of brazing fillers containing refractory metals are reported.

  7. The use of Ni-Cr-Si-Be filler metals for brazing of stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivannikov, A.; Fedotov, V.; Suchkov, A.; Penyaz, M.; Fedotov, I.; Tarasov, B.

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline ribbon filler metal-alloys of system Ni-Cr-Si-Be are produced by the rapidly quenching of the melt method. By these filler metals carried out hight temperature vacuum brazing of austenitic steels (12Kh18N10T and Kh18N8G2) and austenitic-ferritic class EI-811 (12Kh21N5T). The basic laws of structure-phase state foundation of brazed joints are determined, features of the interaction of the molten filler metal to the brazed materials are identified, the optimal temperature and time parameters of the brazing process are determined.

  8. Several braze filler metals for joining an oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyorgak, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation was made of five braze filler metals for joining an aluminum-containing oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy, TD-NiCrAl. All five braze filler metals evaluated are considered suitable for joining TD-NiCrAl in terms of wettability and flow. Also, the braze alloys appear to be tolerant of slight variations in brazing procedures since joints prepared by three sources using three of the braze filler metals exhibited similar brazing characteristics and essentially equivalent 1100 C stress-rupture properties in a brazed butt-joint configuration. Recommendations are provided for brazing the aluminum-containing ODS alloys.

  9. Effect of stainless steel chemical composition on brazing ability of filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Kei; Nishiyama, Akira

    2014-08-01

    Many kinds of stainless steel have been used in the engineering field. So it is necessary to investigate the effect of SUS chemical compositions on the brazing ability of filler metal. In this study, SUS315J containing Cr, Ni, Si, Cu, and Mo was employed as a base metal. Excellent spreading ability of the molten nickel-based brazing filler on SUS315J was obtained as compared with that on SUS316. Copper and silicon influenced the significant spreading ability of the filler.

  10. [Determination of Ag, Cu, Zn and Cd in silver brazing filler metals by ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Yang, X

    1997-06-01

    A method of simultaneous and direct determination for Ag, Cu, Zn and Cd in silver brazing filler metals by ICP-AES is reported. The spectral interferences and effect of acidity have been investigated. Working conditions were optimized. The method has been applied to the analysis of silver brazing filler metals with RSD of 4-7% and recovery of 94-105%. This method was accurate, simple and rapid.

  11. Laser brazing of inconel 718 alloy with a silver based filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorram, A.; Ghoreishi, M.; Torkamany, M. J.; Bali, M. M.

    2014-03-01

    In the presented study laser brazing of an inconel 718 alloy with silver based filler metal using 400 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser is investigated. Laser brazing was performed with varying laser frequency, pulse width, process speed and gap distance. The effect of preheating on wetting and spreading also was studied. Brazing geometrical images were observed using an optical microscope. The composition analysis and microstructure of the filler metal and brazed joints were examined using X-ray diffraction analyzer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Micro-hardness and tensile test were performed for investigation of mechanical properties. The experimental observations show that filler metal consist of α-Ag solid solution, ά-Cu solid solution surround by the α-Ag solid solution and eutectic structure. Phases of the brazed joint are similar to the filler metal. The results indicate that the filler metal has adequate wetting and spreading on inconel 718 and the wetting angle depends on the heat input significantly. Interdiffusion occurs in laser brazing and the average thickness of reaction layer is approximately 2.5 μm. Whenever the gap is big, it is needed to use longer pulse width in order to have a better melting flow. Preheating has significant influence on wetting and spreading of the filler metal.

  12. Recommend design of filler metal to minimize carbon steel weld metal preferential corrosion in CO2-saturated oilfield produced water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongxin; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Feng, Zhicao; Xu, Lianyong

    2016-12-01

    The paper proposes a recommend design for the alloying elements in the filler metal to minimize preferential weld corrosion of carbon steel. The tensile and corrosion resistance properties of the weld metal are considerably improved by using a filler metal containing alloying elements according to the recommended design. Analysis of the morphology and composition of corrosion products on weld metals showed that the common weld metal suffered severe localized corrosion, whereas the weld metal with the alloying elements exhibited uniform corrosion. Based on these results, a tentative mechanism of CO2 corrosion resistance for both weld metals has been proposed.

  13. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  14. Copper-silver-titanium filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1987-01-01

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 atomic percent copper, 15 to 50 atomic percent silver and 10 to 45 atomic percent titanium. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  15. Copper-silver-titanium-tin filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1988-04-05

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another at about 800.degree. C. is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 at. % copper, 40 to 50 at. % silver, 1 to 15 at. % titanium, and 2 to 8 at. % tin. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  16. Brazeability of powder aluminum brazing filler metals with non-corrosive flux

    SciTech Connect

    Takemoto, T.; Matsunawa, A.; Ujie, T.

    1994-12-31

    Various brazed aluminum products, mainly heat exchangers, have been widely used especially in automobiles and electric power industries. They have been produced by using brazing sheet; however, recently the demand to braze the complicated shape is increasing, leading to the necessity for setting brazing filler metal at braze parts instead of using brazing sheet. Therefore, the present work aimed to investigated the brazeability of aluminum powder filler metal in nitrogen gas atmosphere using KAIF{sub 4}-K{sub 3}AIF{sub 6} system noncorrosive brazing flux. By considering the applicability of filler metal, brazing pastes were made of powder filler metal, flux and organic binder. AI-Si powder brazing filler metals were made by automization. T-type specimen was made by A3003 base metal with thickness of 2 mm. in the present experiment, fillet formabiltity, the percentage of the length of formed fillet against the length of vertical member wall at each side, was adopted to evaluate brazeability. The shape of the atomized powder depended on atomize atmosphere and atomizing gas. Sound fillet formation was achieved on the full length of both sides of the vertical member under the condition of appropriate surface treatment and sufficient flux content. Decrease in flux content gave partial fillet formation at the opposite side of the paste set side. Further decrease brought the partial fillet formation at the paste set side also. The paste made of air-atomized powder required more flux content to achieve 100% fillet formation at the opposite side. On the other hand, argon-atomized powders formed fillet in full length using paste with less flux content. powders sorted to remove fine particles and powders with low oxygen content were found to be suitable for brazing filler metal powders, because they required less flux content to obtain 100% fillet formation under the same amount of paste.

  17. Interfacial reactions between sapphire and silver-copper-titanium thin film filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Suenaga, Seiichi; Nakahashi, Masako; Maruyama, Miho; Fukasawa, Takayuki

    1997-02-01

    Wetting and brazing studies of sputtering-deposited, submicrometer thin film filler metal in an Ag-Cu-Ti/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system were performed. The interfacial reaction layer between the filler metal and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated. It is possible to make a brazing joint even with a reaction layer of less than 100 nm thickness. Different types of interfacial reaction layers were observed when the Ti content in the filler metal was varied. The Cu-Ti-O system compounds were observed in the samples with high wetting capabilities, but not in the sample with low wetting characteristics. It was found that these compounds are substances that promote effective brazing.

  18. Micro-nano filler metal foil on vacuum brazing of SiCp/Al composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Gao, Zeng; Niu, Jitai

    2016-06-01

    Using micro-nano (Al-5.25Si-26.7Cu)- xTi (wt%, x = 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0) foils as filler metal, the research obtained high-performance joints of aluminum matrix composites with high SiC particle content (60 vol%, SiCp/Al-MMCs). The effect of brazing process and Ti content on joint properties was investigated, respectively. The experimental results indicate that void free dense interface between SiC particle and metallic brazed seam with C-Al-Si-Ti product was readily obtained, and the joint shear strength enhanced with increasing brazing temperature from 560 to 580 °C or prolonging soaking time from 10 to 90 min. Sound joints with maximum shear strength of 112.5 MPa was achieved at 580 °C for soaking time of 90 min with (Al-5.25Si-26.7Cu)-2Ti filler, where Ti(AlSi)3 intermetallic is in situ strengthening phase dispersed in the joint and fracture occured in the filler metal layer. In this research, the beneficial effect of Ti addition into filler metal on improving wettability between SiC particle and metallic brazed seam was demonstrated, and capable welding parameters were broadened for SiCp/Al-MMCs with high SiC particle content.

  19. Substrate Effects on the High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of a Gold-Based Braze Filler Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Rice, Joseph P.

    2005-06-01

    Oxidation testing was conducted on a commercial gold-based braze alloy, Gold ABA®, and on zirconia/stainless steel couples joined using this filler metal. Preliminary results reveal that both substrates play a significant role in determining the overall oxidation behavior of the brazed joint.

  20. Substrate Effects on the High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of a Gold-Based Braze Filler Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Rice, Joseph P.

    2005-06-30

    Oxidation testing was conducted on a commercial gold-based braze alloy, Gold ABA, and on zirconia and stainless steel joining couples prepared using this braze filler metal. Preliminary results reveal that both substrates play a significant role in determining the overall oxidation resistance of the brazed joint.

  1. Improved Wetting of Mixed Ionic/Electronic Conductors Used in Electrochemical Devices with Ternary Reactive Air Braze Filler Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong Y; Thomsen, Ed C; Weil, K Scott

    2007-01-19

    This paper reports on the wetting behavior, reactivity, and long-term electrical conductance of a series of ternary filler metals being considered for brazing lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) based oxygen separation membranes. Mixed ionic/electronic conducting perovskite oxides such as LSCF and various doped barium cerates are currently being considered for use in high-temperature electrochemical devices such as oxygen and hydrogen concentrators and solid oxide fuel cells. However to take full advantage of the unique properties of these materials, reliable joining techniques need to be developed. Furthermore, if the proposed joining technique were to yield a hermetic ceramic-to-metal junction that was also electrically conductive, it would additionally benefit the device by allowing current to be drawn from or carried to the electrochemically active mixed conducting oxide component without requiring an separate current collector. A newly developed brazing technique known as air brazing is one such method of joining. In its present form, air brazing uses a silver-copper oxide based filler metal that can be melted directly in air to form a compliant joint that is electrically conductive. Recently, it has been shown that the addition of titania can enhance the wetting behavior of Ag-CuO filler metals on alumina. Here the effect of this wetting agent on the surface wettability, long-term electrical resistance at 750°C, and reactivity with La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3- (LSCF-6428 or LSCF) substrates is discussed.

  2. Oxidation resistant filler metals for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1986-01-01

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another is described using essentially pure trinickel aluminide and trinickel aluminide containing small amounts of carbon. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  3. Investigation of Pd-Modified Ag-CuO Air Braze Filler Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Kim, Jin Yong; Hardy, John S.; Darsell, Jens T.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects of palladium on the liquidus/solidus temperatures and wetting behavior of a series of Ag-CuOx air braze filler metals. Currently, the maximum operating temperature of the Ag-CuOx system is limited by its eutectic temperature of ~935°C. One strategy to increase the maximum operational temperature of this family of filler metals is to add a higher melting noble alloying element. In the current study, we examined the effects of palladium additions on the melting characteristics of the Ag-CuO materials and the wetting properties of the resulting air braze filler metals with respect to alumina. It was found that while the addition of Pd causes the anticipated increase in the melting temperature, it does so at a sacrifice in wetting properties. The extent of both effects and therefore the opportunity to trade-off the two properties in order to develop an optimized higher temperature air braze depends on concentrations of both the palladium and copper oxide.

  4. A new technique for the strengthening of aluminum tungsten inert gas weld metals: using carbon nanotube/aluminum composite as a filler metal.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Rashidkhani, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S; Arabian, N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the mechanical properties of aluminum multipass weld metal prepared by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was investigated. High energy ball milling was used to disperse MWCNT in the aluminum powder. Carbon nanotube/aluminum composite filler metal was fabricated for the first time by hot extrusion of ball-milled powders. After welding, the tensile strength, microhardness and MWCNT distribution in the weld metal were investigated. The test results showed that the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was greatly increased when using the filler metal containing 1.5 wt.% MWCNT. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the filler metal containing MWCNT can serve as a super filler metal to improve the mechanical properties of TIG welds of Al and its alloys.

  5. Microstructural Evolution of the Interface Between Pure Titanium and Low Melting Point Zr-Ti-Ni(Cu) Filler Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongmyoung; Sun, Juhyun; Kang, Donghan; Shin, Seungyoung; Hong, Juhwa

    2014-12-01

    Low melting point Zr-based filler metals with melting point depressants (MPDs) such as Cu and Ni elements are used for titanium brazing. However, the phase transition of the filler metals in the titanium joint needs to be explained, since the main element of Zr in the filler metals differs from that of the parent titanium alloys. In addition, since the MPDs easily form brittle intermetallics, that deteriorate joint properties, the phase evolution they cause needs to be studied. Zr-based filler metals having Cu content from 0 to 12 at. pct and Ni content from 12 to 24 at. pct with a melting temperature range of 1062 K to 1082 K (789 °C to 809 °C) were wetting-tested on a titanium plate to investigate the phase transformation and evolution at the interface between the titanium plate and the filler metals. In the interface, the alloys system with Zr, Zr2Ni, and (Ti,Zr)2Ni phases was easily changed to a Ti-based alloy system with Ti, Ti2Ni, and (Ti,Zr)2Ni phases, by the local melting of parent titanium. The dissolution depths of the parent metal were increased with increasing Ni content in the filler metals because Ni has a faster diffusion rate than Cu. Instead, slow diffusion of Cu into titanium substrate leads to the accumulation of Cu at the molten zone of the interface, which could form undesirable Ti x Cu y intermetallics. This study confirmed that Zr-based filler metals are compatible with the parent titanium metal with the minimum content of MPDs.

  6. Characterization of a sustainable sulfur polymer concrete using activated fillers

    DOE PAGES

    Moon, Juhyuk; Kalb, Paul D.; Milian, Laurence; ...

    2016-01-02

    Sulfur polymer concrete (SPC) is a thermoplastic composite concrete consisting of chemically modified sulfur polymer and aggregates. This study focused on the characterization of a new SPC that has been developed as a sustainable construction material. It is made from industrial by-product sulfur that is modified with activated fillers of fly ash, petroleum refinery residual oil, and sand. Unlike conventional sulfur polymer cements made using dicyclopentadiene as a chemical modifier, the use of inexpensive industrial by-products enables the new SPC to cost-effectively produce sustainable, low-carbon, thermoplastic binder that can compete with conventional hydraulic cement concretes. A series of characterization analysesmore » was conducted including thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and spatially-resolved Xray absorption spectroscopy to confirm the polymerization of sulfur induced from the presence of the oil. In addition, mechanical testing, internal pore structure analysis, and scanning electron microscope studies evaluate the performance of this new SPC as a sustainable construction material with a reduced environmental impact.« less

  7. Characterization of a sustainable sulfur polymer concrete using activated fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Juhyuk; Kalb, Paul D.; Milian, Laurence; Northrup, Paul A.

    2016-01-02

    Sulfur polymer concrete (SPC) is a thermoplastic composite concrete consisting of chemically modified sulfur polymer and aggregates. This study focused on the characterization of a new SPC that has been developed as a sustainable construction material. It is made from industrial by-product sulfur that is modified with activated fillers of fly ash, petroleum refinery residual oil, and sand. Unlike conventional sulfur polymer cements made using dicyclopentadiene as a chemical modifier, the use of inexpensive industrial by-products enables the new SPC to cost-effectively produce sustainable, low-carbon, thermoplastic binder that can compete with conventional hydraulic cement concretes. A series of characterization analyses was conducted including thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and spatially-resolved Xray absorption spectroscopy to confirm the polymerization of sulfur induced from the presence of the oil. In addition, mechanical testing, internal pore structure analysis, and scanning electron microscope studies evaluate the performance of this new SPC as a sustainable construction material with a reduced environmental impact.

  8. Application of amorphous filler metals in production of fusion reactor high heat flux components

    SciTech Connect

    Kalin, B.A.; Fedotov, V.T.; Grigoriev, A.E.

    1994-12-31

    The technology of Al-Si, Zr-Ti-Be and Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni amorphous filler metals for Be and graphite brazing with Cu, Mo and V was developed. The fusion reactor high heat flux components from Cu-Be, Cu-graphite, Mo-Be, Mo-graphite, V-Re and V-graphite materials were produced by brazing. Every component represents metallic base, to which Be or graphite plates are brazed. The distance between plates was equal 0.2 times the plate height. These components were irradiated by hydrogen plasma with 5 x 10{sup 6} W/m{sup 2} power. The microstructure and the element distribution in the brazed zone were investigated before and after heat plasma irradiation. Topography graphite plate surfaces and topography of metal surfaces between plates were also investigated after heat plasma irradiation. The results of microstructure investigation and material erosion are discussed.

  9. Interfacial characteristics for brazing of aluminum matrix composites with Al-12Si filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.P.; Chuang, T.H.

    1997-12-01

    Discussions concerning the interfacial reactions and characterizations in brazing aluminum matrix composites are documented in this study. Joints of alumina particulate reinforced 6061 aluminum matrix composites were made using an Al-12 (wt pct) Si filler metal by vacuum brazing. The resulted maximum bonding strengths were 75.4, 81.5, and 71.8 MPa for 10, 15, and 20 vol pct alumina reinforcement, respectively. The microstructural examinations revealed that the bonding strength was strictly related to the reinforced alumina particles and the reaction products presented at the joint interfaces. During brazing, Mg segregated at the joining interface and alumina/6061 Al interface. Further, reactions between alumina and 6061 Al matrix resulted in the formation of Mg-rich phases, such as MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MgO, near the joining interface and the alumina reinforcement. The Si in the filler material penetrated into the metal matrix composites (MMCs) matrix and segregated at the alumina/6061 Al interfaces. This phenomenon can be confirmed by a joint between two alumina bulk specimens.

  10. Brazing characteristics of a Zr-Ti-Cu-Fe eutectic alloy filler metal for Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung G.; Lim, C. H.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. S.; Lee, M. K.; Rhee, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    A Zr-Ti-Cu-Fe quaternary eutectic alloy was employed as a new Be-free brazing filler metal for Zircaloy-4 to supersede physically vapor-deposited Be coatings used conventionally with several disadvantages. The quaternary eutectic composition of Zr58Ti16Cu10Fe16 (at.%) showing a low melting temperature range from 832 °C to 853 °C was designed by a partial substitution of Zr with Ti based on a Zr-Cu-Fe ternary eutectic system. By applying an alloy ribbon with the determined composition, a highly reliable joint was obtained with a homogeneous formation of predominantly grown α-Zr phases owing to a complete isothermal solidification, exhibiting strength higher than that of Zircaloy-4. The homogenization of the joint was rate-controlled by the diffusion of the filler elements (Ti, Cu, and Fe) into the Zircaloy-4 base metal, and the detrimental segregation of the Zr2Fe phase in the central zone was completely eliminated by an isothermal holding at a brazing temperature of 920 °C for 10 min.

  11. High Temperature Strength of YSZ Joints Brazed with Palladium Silver Copper Oxide Filler Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2010-06-09

    The Ag-CuOx system is being investigated as potential filler metals for use in air brazing high-temperature electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells and gas concentrators. The current study examines the effects of palladium addition on the high temperature joint strength of specimens prepared from yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) bars brazed with the binary Ag-CuOx, and 15Pd-Ag-CuO. It was found that while the binary Ag-CuOx system exhibits stronger room temperature strength than the 15Pd system the strength is reduced to values equivalent of the 15Pd system at 800°C. The 15Pd system exhibits a lower ambient temperature strength that is retained at 800°C. In both systems the failure mechanism at high temperature appears to be peeling of the noble metal component from the oxide phases and tearing through the noble metal phase whereas sufficient adhesion is retained at lower temperatures to cause fracture of the YSZ substrate.

  12. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  13. Microstructural and phase evolution in metakaolin geopolymers with different activators and added aluminosilicate fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Madhuchhanda; Dana, Kausik; Das, Sukhen

    2015-10-01

    This work aims to investigate the microstructural and phase evolution of alkali activated metakaolin products with different activators and added aluminosilicate filler phases. The added filler phases have different reactivity to the alkali activated metakaolin system. Microstructural evolution in the alkali activated products has been investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). Variation in strength development in alkali activated metakaolin products was followed by compressive strength measurement test. Microstructural study shows that in case of metakaolin with NaOH activator crystalline sodalite formed in all the product samples irrespective of the added filler phases. The microstructure of these NaOH activated products investigated by FESEM showed crystalline and inhomogeneous morphology. Mixed activator containing both NaOH and sodium silicate in a fixed mass ratio formed predominantly amorphous phase. Microstructure of these samples showed more homogeneity than that of NaOH activated metakaolin products. The study further shows that addition of α-Al2O3 powder, non reactive phase to the alkali activated metakaolin system when used in larger amount increased crystalline phase in the matrix. α-Al2O3 powder addition increased the compressive strength of the product samples for both the activator compositions. Added phase of colloidal silica, reactive to the alkali activated metakaolin system when used in larger amount was found to increase amorphous nature of the matrix. Addition of colloidal silica influenced the compressive strength property differently with different activator compositions.

  14. Brazing microstructure of Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn with Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, K.C.; Kao, P.W.; Shu, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used in the aerospace industry since they have high specific strength and high corrosion resistance. The brazing of titanium is beneficial to join many contact areas simultaneously without severe distortion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the brazing microstructures under different brazing conditions with several Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni filler alloys. In our previous studies, the brazing microstructure of Ti-6Al-4V with Ti-Cu-Ni filler metal have been reported. Since Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn alloy has lower b-transus, the Ti-Cu-Ni filler alloy cannot successfully apply the brazing work. Several Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni alloys were prepared in powder form and pre-alloy form to perform the brazing of Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn at 870{degrees}C. The brazing microstructures are examined under optical metallograph, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray analysis. The contents of this report include (1) DTA and phase analysis of Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni filler metals, (2) the brazing microstructure, and (3) the shear test result.

  15. Improved TIG weld joint strength in aluminum alloy 2219-T87 by filler metal substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M.; Lovoy, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an investigation on weld joint characteristics of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are given. Five different alloys were utilized as filler material. The mechanical properties of the joints were determined at ambient and cryogenic temperatures for weldments in the as-welded condition and also, for weldments after elevated temperature exposures. Other evaluations included hardness surveys, stress corrosion susceptibility, and to a limited extent, the internal metallurgical weld structures. The overall results indicate that M-943 filler weldments are superior in strength to weldments containing either the standard 2319 filler or fillers 2014, 2020, and a dual wire feed consisting of three parts 2319 and one part 5652. In addition, no deficiencies were evident in M-934 filler weldments with regard to ductility, joint strength after elevated temperature exposure, weld hardness, metallographic structures, or stress corrosion susceptibility.

  16. Effect of filler metal composition on the strength of yttria stabilized zirconia joints brazed with Pd-Ag-CuOx

    SciTech Connect

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2008-09-08

    The Ag-CuOx system is of interest to be used to be used as an air braze filler metal for joining high temperature electrochemical devices. Previous work has shown that the melting temperatures can be increased by adding palladium to Ag-CuOx and it is expected that this may aid high temperature stability. This work compares the room temperature bend strength of joints made between yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) air brazed using Ag-CuOx without palladium and with 5 and 15mol% palladium additions. It has been found that in general palladium decreases joint strength, especially in low copper oxide compositions filler metals. At high copper oxide contents, brittle fracture through both copper oxide rich phases and the YSZ limits joint strength.

  17. Use of filler limestone and construction and demolition residues for remediating soils contaminated with heavy metals: an assessment by means of plant uptake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banegas, Ascension; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Agudo, Ines; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    A greenhouse trial was carried out to evaluate the assimilation of heavy metals by three types of horticultural plants (lettuce, broccoli and alfalfa), different parts of which are destined for human and animal consumption (leaves, roots, fruits). The plants were cultivated in four types of soil, one uncontaminated (T1), one soil collected in the surrounding area of Sierra Minera (T2), the third being remediated with residues coming from demolition and construction activities (T3) and the four remediated with filler limestone (T4). To determine the metal content, soil samples were first ground to a fine powder using an agate ball mill. Fresh vegetable samples were separated into root and aboveground biomass and then lyophilized. The DTPA-extractable content was also determined to calculate the bioavailable amount of metal. Finally, the translocation factor (TF) and bioconcentration factor (BCF) were calculated. Arsenic levels were obtained by using atomic fluorescence spectrometry with an automated continuous flow hydride generation (HG-AFS) spectrometer and Cd, Pb and Zn was determined by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) or flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Samples of the leached water were also obtained and analyzed. According to our results, the retention of the studied elements varies with the type of plant and is strongly decreased by the incorporation of filler limestone and/or construction and demolition residues to the soils. This practice represents a suitable way to reduce the risk posed to the biota by the presence of high levels of heavy metal in soil.

  18. Percolation behavior of polymer/metal composites on modification of filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, M.; Srinivas, V.; Thakur, A. K.

    2014-02-01

    Polymer-metal composites with different fillers, such as nanocrystalline nickel (n-Ni), core shell n-Ni and nickel oxide (NiO)[n-Ni@NiO] were prepared under the same processing conditions with polyvinyledene fluoride matrix. The larger value of critical exponents (s and s') and percolation threshold (fc 0.30) for n-Ni@NiO composites as compared to n-Ni composites (fc 0.07) and a comparable effective dielectric constant (ɛeff 300) with low loss tangent (tan δ 0.1) at 100 Hz in case of percolative n-Ni@NiO composite was observed. The core shell structure [n-Ni@NiO] also shows a very high value of ɛeff 6000 with tan δ 8 at 40 Hz. The results have been explained by using boundary layer capacitor effect and the percolation theory. The difference in fc and critical exponents is attributed to NiO insulating layer that gives rise to different extent of continuumness at fc and have been explained with the help of Swiss cheese model.

  19. Study on ductility dip cracking susceptibility in Filler Metal 82 during welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Qing; Lu, Hao; Cui, Wei

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, Ductility Dip Cracking (DDC) susceptibility in Inconel600 companion Filler Metal 82 (FM82) under different stress states is investigated. Inconel600 is a Ni-Cr-Fe alloy with excellent resistance to general corrosion, localized corrosion, and stress corrosion, which has been widely used in nuclear power plants. However, the companion FM82 has been shown to be susceptible to DDC in welding process. To resolve the problem, this work is mainly focused on evaluating DDC susceptibility in FM82 in welding process. First of all, Strain to Fracture (STF) test is used to achieve the DDC criterion under simple stress state, and the formation mechanism of DDC was explained. Real welding is a process with complex stress state. Later, to get the DDC susceptibility under complex stress state, models about multi-pass welding were built up by means of finite element method. According to numerical simulation results, relationship of deformation and temperature history is achieved. Moreover, susceptible locations and moments could be determined associated with STF results. The simulation results fairly agree with welding experiment from another research.

  20. Effects of Different Filler Metals on the Mechanical Behaviors of GTA Welded AA7A52(T6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Fengyuan; Lv, Yaohui; Liu, Yuxin; Lin, Jianjun; Sun, Zhe; Xu, Binshi; He, Peng

    2014-06-01

    ER4043, ER5356, and AA7A52 on behalf of the Al-Si, Al-Mg, and Al-Zn-Mg-based welding material, respectively, were chosen as the filler metal to weld AA7A52(T6) plates by GTAW. The variance in mechanical performances of the joints caused by the various filler materials was investigated with reference to the SEM and EDS test results for the weld seam and the fracture surface. Failure was found in the seam for all the welded joints. With regard to the joint obtained with ER4043 welding wire, the total elongation was limited by the brittle intergranular compound Mg2Si of which Mg was introduced by convection mass transfer. As for the other two welds, the content ratio of Zn and Mg was found to play the dominant role in deciding the mechanical properties of the intergranular Mg-Zn compounds which were responsible for the tensile behavior of the joints. The content ratio (wt.%) of beyond 2:1 gave birth to the strengthening phase MgZn2 leading to a ductile fracture. Cr in the seam obtained with AA7A52 filler metal was found to enhance the strength of the joint through isolated particles.

  1. Transverse-Weld Tensile Properties of a New Al-4Cu-2Si Alloy as Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, K.

    2009-12-01

    AA2195, an Al-Cu-Li alloy in the T8P4 age-hardened condition, is a candidate aluminum armor for future combat vehicles, as this material offers higher static strength and ballistic protection than current aluminum armor alloys. However, certification of AA2195 alloy for armor applications requires initial qualification based on the ballistic performance of welded panels in the as-welded condition. Currently, combat vehicle manufacturers primarily use gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process to meet their fabrication needs. Unfortunately, a matching GMAW consumable electrode is currently not commercially available to allow effective joining of AA2195 alloy. This initial effort focused on an innovative, low-cost, low-risk approach to identify an alloy composition suitable for effective joining of AA2195 alloy, and evaluated transverse-weld tensile properties of groove butt joints produced using the identified alloy. Selected commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) aluminum alloy filler wires were twisted to form candidate twisted filler rods. Representative test weldments were produced using AA2195 alloy, candidate twisted filler rods and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Selected GTA weldments produced using Al-4wt.%Cu-2wt.%Si alloy as filler metal consistently provided transverse-weld tensile properties in excess of 275 MPa (40 ksi) UTS and 8% El (over 25 mm gage length), thereby showing potential for acceptable ballistic performance of as-welded panels. Further developmental work is required to evaluate in detail GMAW consumable wire electrodes based on the Al-Cu-Si system containing 4.2-5.0 wt.% Cu and 1.6-2.0 wt.% Si.

  2. Al2O3/SUS304 Brazing via AgCuTi-W Composite as Active Filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Cherng-Yuh; Zhuang, Xie-Zongyang; Pan, Cheng-Tang

    2014-03-01

    Alumina ceramic (α-Al2O3) was brazed to stainless steel (SUS304) using an Ag-Cu-Ti + W composite filler and a traditional active brazing filler alloy (CuSil-ABA). Then, the effects of the presence of W particles and of the brazing parameters on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the brazed joints were investigated. The maximum tensile strength of the joints obtained using Ag-Cu-Ti + W composite filler was 13.2 MPa, which is similar to that obtained using CuSil-ABA filler (13.5 MPa). When the joint was brazed at 930 °C for 30 min, the tensile strengths decreased for both kinds of fillers, although the strength was slightly higher for the Ag-Cu-Ti + W composite filler than for the Ag-Cu-Ti filler. The interfacial microstructure results show that the Ti reacts with W to form a Ti-W-O compound in the brazing alloy. When there are more W particles in the brazing alloy, the thickness of the Ti X O Y reaction layer near the alumina ceramic decreases. Moreover, W particles added to the brazing alloy can reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion of the brazing alloy, which results in lower residual stress between the Al2O3 and SUS304 in the brazing joints and thus yields higher tensile strengths as compared to those obtained using the CuSil-ABA brazing alloy.

  3. Investigation of Pd-Modified Ag-CuO Air Braze Filler Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Darsell, Jens T.; Hardy, John S.; Kim, Jin Yong; Weil, K. Scott

    2006-01-10

    Palladium was added as a ternary component to a series of silver - copper oxide alloys in an effort to increase the use temperature of these materials for potential ceramic air brazing applications. Large portions of the silver component of the Ag-CuO system were substituted by palladium forming the following alloys: (100-y)[(100-z)Pd - (z)Ag] - (y)CuOx where y = 0 - 34 mol% CuOx, z = 50 - 100 mol% silver, and x = 0, 0.5, and 1, denoting copper metal, Cu2O, or CuO. From differential scanning calorimetry, it was determined that the addition of palladium causes an increase in the solidus and liquidus temperatures of the resulting Pd-Ag-CuO brazes. In general, the liquidus was found to increase by approximately 220°C for the (100-y)(25Pd - 75Ag) - (z)CuOx filler metal compositions relative to comparable Ag-CuOx alloys. Likewise, the solidus was found to increase for these alloys, respectively by 185°C and 60°C, respectively for CuOx contents of y = 0 - 1mol% and 4 - 10 mol%. For the (100-y)(50Pd - 50Ag) - (y)CuOx alloys, the solidus increased between 280 - 390°C over a copper oxide compositional range of x = 0 to 8 mol%. It was determined from sessile drop experiments that palladium causes an increase in the wetting angle for all of the samples tested. Alloy compositions of (100-y)(25Pd - 75Ag) - (y)CuOx displayed increased wetting angles of 5-20° relative to comparable binary compositions. (100-y)(50Pd - 50Ag) - (y)CuOx alloys exhibited an increase in contact angle of 10-60° and compositions containing less than 10 mol% CuOx were not able to wet the substrate. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the microstructure of the braze consists of Ag-Pd solid solution with CuOx precipitates. In general, a reaction layer consisting of CuAlO2 forms adjacent to the alumina substrate. However, the formation of this layer is apparently hindered by the addition of large amounts of palladium, causing poor wetting behavior, as denoted by substantial porosity found along

  4. Optical and analytical electron microscopy of ductility-dip cracking in Ni-base filler metal 52 -- Initial studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cola, M.J.; Teter, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    Microcharacterization studies were performed on weld-metal microstructures of a Ni-base filler metal. Specimens were taken from the fusion zone and the weld-metal heat-affected zone of transverse- and spot-Varestraint welds. The filler metal was first deposited onto a steel substrate by hot-wire, gas tungsten arc welding before specimen removal. Optical microscopy indicates the crack morphology is intergranular and is along high-angle, migrated grain boundaries. At low magnifications, scanning electron microscopy reveals a relatively smooth fracture surface. However, at higher magnifications the grain faces exhibit microductility. Analytical electron microscopy reveals high-angle, migrated grain boundaries decorated with MC (Ti, Cr) and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (Cr, Ni, Fe) precipitates ranging from 10 to 200 n. Auger electron spectroscopy of pre-strained Gleeble specimens fractured in situ revealed internal ductility-dip cracks decorated with magnesium aluminate (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel particles (1,000 nm).

  5. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  6. Formation of interfacial microstructure in brazing of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with Ti-activated Ag-Cu filler alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Paulasto, M.; Kivilahti, J.K.

    1995-04-15

    Advanced ceramics like silicon nitride are increasingly used as structural components in demanding applications such as turbine engines and heat exchangers. Owing to the difficulties in fabrication of complicated geometries from brittle ceramics, like Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, adequate joining techniques have to be provided. Brazing with active filler metals, most of which are based on the Ag-Cu-Ti system, is increasingly used for joining of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} to other ceramics and metals. The present work concentrates on the formation of the interfacial microstructures in the brazing of silicon nitride with AgCuTi alloys using both thermodynamic analysis and brazing experiments. This article is part of a larger program, in which the role of titanium in active brazing of ceramics has been studied. The interfacial reactions were investigated by brazing Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with two commercial filler alloys and with different binary AgCu filler alloys produced in the laboratory. Phases formed during joining were characterized with the SEM/EPMA and SIMS techniques. The thermodynamic information is obtained from the descriptions of the ternary Ti-Si-N and Ti-Cu-Ag systems assessed in previous studies and from the literature concerning the Ag-Si and Cu-Si systems.

  7. Improved Wetting Characteristics in TiO2–Modified Ag-CuO Air Braze Filler Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Hardy, John S.; Darsell, Jens T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report on the results of a series of sessile drop experiments designed to examine the effect of TiO2 on the wetting behavior of Ag-CuO air braze filler metals. It was found that TiO2 concentrations as small as 0.5 mol% can significantly decrease the contact angle of Ag-CuO on alumina over a compositional range of 1 – 34mol% CuO. The effect appears to maximize at a copper oxide concentration of ~4 mol% CuO regardless of the titania content.

  8. Life Assessment for Cr-Mo Steel Dissimilar Joints by Various Filler Metals Using Accelerated Creep Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petchsang, S.; Phung-on, I.; Poopat, B.

    2016-12-01

    Accelerated creep rupture tests were performed on T22/T91 dissimilar metal joints to determine the fracture location and rupture time of different weldments. Four configurations of deposited filler metal were tested using gas tungsten arc welding to estimate the service life for Cr-Mo steel dissimilar joints at elevated temperatures in power plants. Results indicated that failure in all configurations occurred in the tempered original microstructure and tempered austenite transformation products (martensite or bainite structure) as type IV cracking at the intercritical area of the heat-affected zone (ICHAZ) for both T22 and T91 sides rather than as a consequence of the different filler metals. Creep damage occurred with the formation of precipitations and microvoids. The correlation between applied stress and the Larson-Miller parameter (PLM) was determined to predict the service life of each material configuration. Calculated time-to-failure based on the PLM and test results for both temperature and applied stress parameters gave a reasonable fit. The dissimilar joints exhibited lower creep rupture compared to the base material indicating creep degradation of the weldment.

  9. Development of rapidly quenched nickel-based non-boron filler metals for brazing corrosion resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivannikov, A.; Kalin, B.; Suchkov, A.; Penyaz, M.; Yurlova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion-resistant steels are stably applied in modern rocket and nuclear technology. Creating of permanent joints of these steels is a difficult task that can be solved by means of welding or brazing. Recently, the use rapidly quenched boron-containing filler metals is perspective. However, the use of such alloys leads to the formation of brittle borides in brazing zone, which degrades the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of the compounds. Therefore, the development of non-boron alloys for brazing stainless steels is important task. The study of binary systems Ni-Be and Ni-Si revealed the perspective of replacing boron in Ni-based filler metals by beryllium, so there was the objective of studying of phase equilibrium in the system Ni-Be-Si. The alloys of the Ni-Si-Be with different contents of Si and Be are considered in this paper. The presence of two low-melting components is revealed during of their studying by methods of metallography analysis and DTA. Microhardness is measured and X-ray diffraction analysis is conducted for a number of alloys of Ni-Si-Be. The compositions are developed on the basis of these data. Rapidly quenched brazing alloys can be prepared from these compositions, and they are suitable for high temperature brazing of steels.

  10. Platable Filler And Sealant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heerman, Todd R.; Volkenant, Jerome G.

    1992-01-01

    Mixture of facsimile compound and silver powder forms positive seal in small hole in metal sheet. Filled hole plated over by standard electrodeposition. Compound does not deteriorate in high plating-bath temperatures, unlike wax and other fillers. Provides surface to which plated metals readily adhere.

  11. Microstructure and Performance of Kovar/Alumina Joints Made with Silver-Copper Base Active Metal Braze Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    STEPHENS, JOHN J.; VIANCO,PAUL T.; HLAVA,PAUL F.; WALKER,CHARLES A.

    1999-12-15

    Poor hermeticity performance was observed for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic-ceramic joints having a Kovar{trademark} alloy interlayer. The active Ag-Cu-Ti filler metal was used to braze the substrates together. The Ti active element was scavenged from the filler metal by the formation of a (Fe, Ni, Co){sub x}Ti phase (x= 2-3) that prevented development of a continuous Ti{sub x}O{sub y} layer at the filler metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. Altering the process parameters did not circumvent the scavenging of Ti. Molybdenum barrier layers 1000, 2500, or 5000 {angstrom} thick on the Kovar{trademark} surfaces successfully allowed Ti{sub x}O{sub y} formation at the filler metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface and hermetic joints. The problems with the Ag-Cu-Ti filler metal for Kovar{trademark}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} braze joints led to the evaluation of a Ag-Cu-Zr filler metal. The Zr (active element) in Ag-Cu-Zr filler metal was not susceptible to the scavenging problem.

  12. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld metal.

  13. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by super duplex filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    In the present paper, microstructural changes across an as-welded dissimilar austenitic/duplex stainless steel couple welded by a super duplex stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process is characterized with optical microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction techniques. Accordingly, variations of microstructure, texture, and grain boundary character distribution of base metals, heat affected zones, and weld metal were investigated. The results showed that the weld metal, which was composed of Widmanstätten austenite side-plates and allotriomorphic grain boundary austenite morphologies, had the weakest texture and was dominated by low angle boundaries. The welding process increased the ferrite content but decreased the texture intensity at the heat affected zone of the super duplex stainless steel base metal. In addition, through partial ferritization, it changed the morphology of elongated grains of the rolled microstructure to twinned partially transformed austenite plateaus scattered between ferrite textured colonies. However, the texture of the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone was strengthened via encouraging recrystallization and formation of annealing twins. At both interfaces, an increase in the special character coincident site lattice boundaries of the primary phase as well as a strong texture with <100> orientation, mainly of Goss component, was observed. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Weld metal showed local orientation at microscale but random texture at macroscale. • Intensification of <100> orientated grains was observed adjacent to the fusion lines. • The austenite texture was weaker than that of the ferrite in all duplex regions. • Welding caused twinned partially transformed austenites to form at SDSS HAZ. • At both interfaces, the ratio of special CSL boundaries of the primary phase increased.

  14. High-temperature compatibility between liquid metal as PWR fuel gap filler and stainless steel and high-density concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong; Jumpee, Chayanit; Jitpukdee, Manit

    2014-08-01

    In conventional nuclear fuel rods for light-water reactors, a helium-filled as-fabricated gap between the fuel and the cladding inner surface accommodates fuel swelling and cladding creep down. Because helium exhibits a very low thermal conductivity, it results in a large temperature rise in the gap. Liquid metal (LM; 1/3 weight portion each of lead, tin, and bismuth) has been proposed to be a gap filler because of its high thermal conductivity (∼100 times that of He), low melting point (∼100 °C), and lack of chemical reactivity with UO2 and water. With the presence of LM, the temperature drop across the gap is virtually eliminated and the fuel is operated at a lower temperature at the same power output, resulting in safer fuel, delayed fission gas release and prevention of massive secondary hydriding. During normal reactor operation, should an LM-bonded fuel rod failure occurs resulting in a discharge of liquid metal into the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel, it should not corrode stainless steel. An experiment was conducted to confirm that at 315 °C, LM in contact with 304 stainless steel in the PWR water chemistry environment for up to 30 days resulted in no observable corrosion. Moreover, during a hypothetical core-melt accident assuming that the liquid metal with elevated temperature between 1000 and 1600 °C is spread on a high-density concrete basement of the power plant, a small-scale experiment was performed to demonstrate that the LM-concrete interaction at 1000 °C for as long as 12 h resulted in no penetration. At 1200 °C for 5 h, the LM penetrated a distance of ∼1.3 cm, but the penetration appeared to stop. At 1400 °C the penetration rate was ∼0.7 cm/h. At 1600 °C, the penetration rate was ∼17 cm/h. No corrosion based on chemical reactions with high-density concrete occurred, and, hence, the only physical interaction between high-temperature LM and high-density concrete was from tiny cracks generated from thermal stress. Moreover

  15. Effect of mechanical milling on Ni-TiH{sub 2} powder alloy filler metal for brazing TiAl intermetallic alloy: The microstructure and joint's properties

    SciTech Connect

    He Peng Liu Duo; Shang Erjing; Wang Ming

    2009-01-15

    A TiH{sub 2}-50 wt.% Ni powder alloy was mechanically milled in an argon gas atmosphere using milling times up to 480 min. A TiAl intermetallic alloy was joined by vacuum furnace brazing using the TiH{sub 2}-50 wt.% Ni powder alloy as the filler metal. The effect of mechanical milling on the microstructure and shear strength of the brazed joints was investigated. The results showed that the grains of TiH{sub 2}-50 wt.% Ni powder alloy were refined and the fusion temperature decreased after milling. A sound brazing seam was obtained when the sample was brazed at 1140 deg. C for 15 min using filler metal powder milled for 120 min. The interfacial zones of the specimens brazed with the milled filler powder were thinner and the shear strength of the joint was increased compared to specimens brazed with non-milled filler powder. A sample brazed at 1180 deg. C for 15 min using TiH{sub 2}-50 wt.% Ni powder alloy milled for 120 min exhibited the highest shear strength at both room and elevated temperatures.

  16. Hybrid nanostructured Ag/ZnO decorated powder cellulose fillers for medical plastics with enhanced surface antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Bazant, Pavel; Kuritka, Ivo; Munster, Lukas; Machovsky, Michal; Kozakova, Zuzana; Saha, Petr

    2014-11-01

    Hybrid inorganic-organic fillers based on nanostructured silver/zinc oxide decorations on micro-cellulose carrier particles were prepared by stepwise microwave assisted hydrothermal synthesis using soluble salts as precursors of silver and zinc oxide. Hexamethylenetetramine was used as precipitating agent for zinc oxide and reducing agent for silver. The inorganics covered all available surfaces of the cellulose particles with a morphology resembling a coral reef. Prepared particulate fillers were compounded to medical grade poly(vinyl chloride) matrix. Scanning electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffractometry were used to investigate the morphology and crystalline phase structure of fillers. The scanning electron microscopy was used for morphological study of composites. With respect to prospective application, the composites were tested on electrical and antibacterial properties. A small effect of water absorption in polymer composites on their dielectric properties was observed but no adverse effect of water exposure on prepared materials was manifested. Electrical conductivity of fillers and composites was measured and no influence of water soaking of composites was found at all. The surface antibacterial activity of prepared composites was evaluated according to the standard ISO 22196. Excellent performance against Escherichia coli and very high against Staphylococcus aureus was achieved.

  17. Vacuum brazing of electroless Ni-P alloy-coated SiCp/Al composites using aluminum-based filler metal foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Xu, Dongxia; Niu, Jitai

    2016-12-01

    Using rapidly cooled (Al-10Si-20Cu-0.05Ce)-1Ti (wt%) foil as filler metal, the research obtained high-performance joints of electroless Ni-P alloy-coated aluminum matrix composites with high SiC particle content (60 vol%, SiCp/Al-MMCs). The effect of brazing process on joint properties and the formation of Al-Ni and Al-Cu-Ni intermetallic compounds were investigated, respectively. Due to the presence of Ni-P alloy coating, the wettability of liquid filler metal on the composites was improved obviously and its contact angle was only 21°. The formation of Al3Ni2 and Al3(CuNi)2 intermetallic compounds indicated that well metallurgical bonding occurred along the 6063Al matrix alloy/Ni-P alloy layer/filler metal foil interfaces by mutual diffusion and dissolution. And the joint shear strength increased with increasing the brazing temperature from 838 to 843 K or prolonging the soaking time from 15 to 35 min, while it decreased a lot because of corrosion occurring in the 6063Al matrix at high brazing temperature of 848 K. Sound joints with maximum shear strength of 112.5 MPa were obtained at 843 K for soaking time of 35 min. In this research, the beneficial effect of surface metallization by Ni-P alloy deposits on improving wettability on SiCp/Al-MMCs was demonstrated, and capable welding parameters were broadened as well.

  18. Waste oyster shell as a kind of active filler to treat the combined wastewater at an estuary.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongbing; Huang, Gu; Fu, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiaoling; Zheng, Daocai; Peng, Jian; Zhang, Ke; Huang, Bo; Fan, Liangqian; Chen, Fenghui; Sun, Xiubo

    2013-10-01

    Estuaries have been described as one of the most difficult environments on Earth. It is difficult to know how to treat the combined wastewater in tidal rivers at the estuary, where the situation is very different from ordinary fresh water rivers. Waste oyster shell was used as the active filler in this study in a bio-contact oxidation tank to treat the combined wastewater at the Fengtang Tidal River. With a middle-experimental scale of 360 m3/day, the average removal efficiency of COD, BOD, NH3-N, TP and TSS was 80.05%, 85.02%, 86.59%, 50.58% and 85.32%, respectively, in this bio-contact oxidation process. The living microbes in the biofilms on the waste oyster shell in this bio-contact oxidation tank, which were mainly composed of zoogloea, protozoa and micro-metazoa species, revealed that waste oyster shell as the filler was suitable material for combined wastewater degradation. This treatment method using waste oyster shell as active filler was then applied in a mangrove demonstration area for water quality improvement near the experiment area, with a treatment volume of 5 x 10(3) m3/day. Another project was also successfully applied in a constructed wetland, with a wastewater treatment volume of 1 x 10(3) m3/day. This technology is therefore feasible and can easily be applied on a larger scale.

  19. Vacuum brazing of alumina ceramic to titanium for biomedical implants using pure gold as the filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Mohammad S.

    One of the many promising applications of metal/ceramic joining is in biomedical implantable devices. This work is focused on vacuum brazing of C.P titanium to 96% alumina ceramic using pure gold as the filler metal. A novel method of brazing is developed where resistance heating of C.P titanium is done inside a thermal evaporator using a Ta heating electrode. The design of electrode is optimized using Ansys resistive heating simulations. The materials chosen in this study are biocompatible and have prior history in implantable devices approved by FDA. This research is part of Boston Retinal implant project to make a biocompatible implantable device (www.bostonretina.org). Pure gold braze has been used in the construction of single terminal feedthrough in low density hermetic packages utilizing a single platinum pin brazed to an alumina or sapphire ceramic donut (brazed to a titanium case or ferrule for many years in implantable pacemakers. Pure gold (99.99%) brazing of 96% alumina ceramic with CP titanium has been performed and evaluated in this dissertation. Brazing has been done by using electrical resistance heating. The 96% alumina ceramic disk was manufactured by high temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) processing while the Ti ferrule and gold performs were purchased from outside. Hermetic joints having leak rate of the order of 1.6 x 10-8 atm-cc/ sec on a helium leak detector were measured. Alumina ceramics made by HTCC processing were centreless grounded utilizing 800 grit diamond wheel to provide a smooth surface for sputtering of a thin film of Nb. Since pure alumina demonstrates no adhesion or wetting to gold, an adhesion layer must be used on the alumina surface. Niobium (Nb), Tantalum (Ta) and Tungsten (W) were chosen for evaluation since all are refractory (less dissolution into molten gold), all form stable oxides (necessary for adhesion to alumina) and all are readily thin film deposited as metals. Wetting studies are also performed to determine the

  20. Development and Brazing Ability of Cu-Si-Ti Filler Metals for Joining Si3N4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naka, Masaaki; Takase, Hideki; Scuster, J. C.

    Cu-5Si-xTi filler alloys for joining Si3N4 were developed, and the joining ability of the alloys was investigated by measuring contact angles on Si3N4 in vacuum and strength of Si3N4 joint brazed with the filler alloys. The addition of Ti content of 3 at% or more decreased the contact angle on Si3N4. The alloys containing Ti content of 5at% showed the lowest contact angle and good wettability. Si3N4 was brazed to Si3N4 with the filler alloys containing Ti content of 3 at% or more, and the strength of the Si3N4 joint increased with the Ti content in the filler alloys. The increase in the amount of TiN and Ti5Si3 which was formed by the reaction of Ti in the filler with Si3N4 raised the strength of the Si3N4 joint.

  1. Matrix-filler interfaces and physical properties of metal matrix composites with negative thermal expansion manganese nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Koshi; Kuzuoka, Kota; Sugimoto, Norihiro

    2015-08-01

    Copper matrix composites containing antiperovskite manganese nitrides with negative thermal expansion (NTE) were formed using pulsed electric current sintering. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the chemically reacted region extends over 10 μm around the matrix-filler interfaces. The small-size filler was chemically deteriorated during formation of composites and it lost the NTE property. Therefore, we produced the composites using only the nitride particles having diameter larger than 50 μm. The large-size filler effectively suppressed the thermal expansion of copper and improved the conductivity of the composites to the level of pure aluminum. The present composites, having high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion, are suitable for practical applications such as a heat radiation substrate for semiconductor devices.

  2. Matrix-filler interfaces and physical properties of metal matrix composites with negative thermal expansion manganese nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Takenaka, Koshi; Kuzuoka, Kota; Sugimoto, Norihiro

    2015-08-28

    Copper matrix composites containing antiperovskite manganese nitrides with negative thermal expansion (NTE) were formed using pulsed electric current sintering. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the chemically reacted region extends over 10 μm around the matrix–filler interfaces. The small-size filler was chemically deteriorated during formation of composites and it lost the NTE property. Therefore, we produced the composites using only the nitride particles having diameter larger than 50 μm. The large-size filler effectively suppressed the thermal expansion of copper and improved the conductivity of the composites to the level of pure aluminum. The present composites, having high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion, are suitable for practical applications such as a heat radiation substrate for semiconductor devices.

  3. Hierarchically-structured silver nanoflowers for highly conductive metallic inks with dramatically reduced filler concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammed Ajmal, C.; K. P., Faseela; Singh, Swati; Baik, Seunghyun

    2016-10-01

    Silver has long been employed as an electrically conductive component, and morphology-dependent properties have been actively investigated. Here we present a novel scalable synthesis method of flower-shaped silver nanoparticles (silver nanoflowers, Ag NFs). The preferential affinity of citrate molecules on (111) surface of silver enabled spontaneous anisotropic growth of Ag NFs (bud size: 250~580 nm, single crystalline petal thickness: 9~22 nm) with high reproducibility and a high yield of >99.5%. The unique hierarchical structure resulted in coalescence of petals over 80~120 °C which was practically employed in conductive inks to construct percolation pathways among Ag NFs. The ink with only 3 wt% of Ag NFs provided two orders of magnitude greater conductivity (1.008 × 105 Scm‑1), at a low curing temperature of 120 °C, compared with the silver nanoparticle ink with a much higher silver concentration (50 wt%). This extraordinary property may provide an excellent opportunity for Ag NFs for practical applications in printable and flexible electronics.

  4. Hierarchically-structured silver nanoflowers for highly conductive metallic inks with dramatically reduced filler concentration.

    PubMed

    C, Muhammed Ajmal; K P, Faseela; Singh, Swati; Baik, Seunghyun

    2016-10-07

    Silver has long been employed as an electrically conductive component, and morphology-dependent properties have been actively investigated. Here we present a novel scalable synthesis method of flower-shaped silver nanoparticles (silver nanoflowers, Ag NFs). The preferential affinity of citrate molecules on (111) surface of silver enabled spontaneous anisotropic growth of Ag NFs (bud size: 250~580 nm, single crystalline petal thickness: 9~22 nm) with high reproducibility and a high yield of >99.5%. The unique hierarchical structure resulted in coalescence of petals over 80~120 °C which was practically employed in conductive inks to construct percolation pathways among Ag NFs. The ink with only 3 wt% of Ag NFs provided two orders of magnitude greater conductivity (1.008 × 10(5) Scm(-1)), at a low curing temperature of 120 °C, compared with the silver nanoparticle ink with a much higher silver concentration (50 wt%). This extraordinary property may provide an excellent opportunity for Ag NFs for practical applications in printable and flexible electronics.

  5. Hierarchically-structured silver nanoflowers for highly conductive metallic inks with dramatically reduced filler concentration

    PubMed Central

    C., Muhammed Ajmal; K. P., Faseela; Singh, Swati; Baik, Seunghyun

    2016-01-01

    Silver has long been employed as an electrically conductive component, and morphology-dependent properties have been actively investigated. Here we present a novel scalable synthesis method of flower-shaped silver nanoparticles (silver nanoflowers, Ag NFs). The preferential affinity of citrate molecules on (111) surface of silver enabled spontaneous anisotropic growth of Ag NFs (bud size: 250~580 nm, single crystalline petal thickness: 9~22 nm) with high reproducibility and a high yield of >99.5%. The unique hierarchical structure resulted in coalescence of petals over 80~120 °C which was practically employed in conductive inks to construct percolation pathways among Ag NFs. The ink with only 3 wt% of Ag NFs provided two orders of magnitude greater conductivity (1.008 × 105 Scm−1), at a low curing temperature of 120 °C, compared with the silver nanoparticle ink with a much higher silver concentration (50 wt%). This extraordinary property may provide an excellent opportunity for Ag NFs for practical applications in printable and flexible electronics. PMID:27713510

  6. The structure and properties of filler metal-free laser beam welded joints in steel S700MC subjected to TMCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górka, Jacek; Stano, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    The research-related tests aimed to determine the effect of filer-metal free laser beam welding on the structure and properties of 10 mm thick steel S700MC subjected to the Thermo-Mechanical Control Process (TMCP). The nondestructive tests revealed that the welded joints represented quality level B according to the requirements of standard 13919-1. The destructive tests revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength being by approximately 5% lower than that of the base material. The tests of thin foils performed using a high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope revealed that filler metal-free welding led to the increased amount of alloying microagents (Ti and Nb) in the weld (particularly near fusion line) in comparison with welding performed using a filler metal. The significant content of hardening phases in the welds during cooling resulted in considerable precipitation hardening through finedispersive (Ti,Nb)(C,N) type precipitates (several nm in size) leading to the deterioration of plastic properties. The destructive tests revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength being by approximately 5% lower than that of the base material. The increase in the concentration of microagents responsible for steel hardening (Ti and Nb) also contributed to the decrease in weld toughness being below the allowed value of 25 J/cm2.

  7. Increasing Ti-6Al-4V brazed joint strength equal to the base metal by Ti and Zr amorphous filler alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ganjeh, E.; Sarkhosh, H.; Bajgholi, M.E.; Khorsand, H.; Ghaffari, M.

    2012-09-15

    Microstructural features developed along with mechanical properties in furnace brazing of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using STEMET 1228 (Ti-26.8Zr-13Ni-13.9Cu, wt.%) and STEMET 1406 (Zr-9.7Ti-12.4Ni-11.2Cu, wt.%) amorphous filler alloys. Brazing temperatures employed were 900-950 Degree-Sign C for the titanium-based filler and 900-990 Degree-Sign C for the zirconium-based filler alloys, respectively. The brazing time durations were 600, 1200 and 1800 s. The brazed joints were evaluated by ultrasonic test, and their microstructures and phase constitutions analyzed by metallography, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Since microstructural evolution across the furnace brazed joints primarily depends on their alloying elements such as Cu, Ni and Zr along the joint. Accordingly, existence of Zr{sub 2}Cu, Ti{sub 2}Cu and (Ti,Zr){sub 2}Ni intermetallic compounds was identified in the brazed joints. The chemical composition of segregation region in the center of brazed joints was identical to virgin filler alloy content which greatly deteriorated the shear strength of the joints. Adequate brazing time (1800 s) and/or temperature (950 Degree-Sign C for Ti-based and 990 Degree-Sign C for Zr-based) resulted in an acicular Widmanstaetten microstructure throughout the entire joint section due to eutectoid reaction. This microstructure increased the shear strength of the brazed joints up to the Ti-6Al-4V tensile strength level. Consequently, Ti-6Al-4V can be furnace brazed by Ti and Zr base foils produced excellent joint strengths. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature or time was the main factors of controlling braze joint strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developing a Widmanstaetten microstructure generates equal strength to base metal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brittle intermetallic compounds like (Ti,Zr){sub 2}Ni/Cu deteriorate shear strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti and Zr base filler alloys were the best choice for brazing Ti

  8. Joining of zirconia ceramic to stainless steel and to itself using Ag{sub 57}Cu{sub 38}Ti{sub 5} filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, H.; Wang, Y.; Jin, Z.; Wang, X.

    1995-08-01

    The brazing of ZrO{sub 2} ceramic to 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel and to itself was performed using Ag{sub 57}Cu{sub 38}Ti{sub 5} filler metal under a vacuum of t {times} 10{sup {minus}3} Pa. The effects o9f interlayer copper on the ceramic to stainless steel joint strength, and the brazing temperature (1,073 to 1,323 K) and holding time (0 to 60 min) on ceramic to ceramic joint strength were investigated. The joint strength was evaluated by shear testing. An interfacial reaction layer between the ceramic and the filler metal was found, and the reaction products were {delta}-TiO and {gamma}-AgTi{sub 3}. The joint strength of ZrO{sub 2} ceramic to stainless steel was improved by using a layer of copper of a suitable thickness. The brazing temperature and holding time had a strong influence on the joint strength of ceramic time had a strong influence on the joint strength of ceramic to ceramic, and the joint strength was mainly controlled by reaction layer thickness and the properties of the reaction products. The maximum shear strength was obtained for brazing at 1,123 K for 30 min and an interfacial reaction layer thickness of {approximately}4.4 {micro}m.

  9. Vacuum Brazing of WC-8Co Cemented Carbides to Carbon Steel Using Pure Cu and Ag-28Cu as Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Z.; Liu, G. W.; Tao, J. N.; Shao, H. C.; Fu, H.; Pan, T. Z.; Qiao, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    The wetting and spreading behavior of commercial pure Cu and Ag-28Cu alloy on WC-8Co cemented carbide were investigated by the sessile drop technique. The contact angle of both systems obviously decreases with moderately increasing the wetting temperature. Vacuum brazing of the WC-8Co cemented carbide to SAE1045 steel using the pure Cu or Ag-28Cu as filler metal was further carried out based on the wetting results. The interfacial interactions and joint mechanical behavior involving microhardness, shear strength and fracture were analyzed and discussed. An obvious Fe-Cu-Co transition layer is detected at the WC-8Co/Cu interface, while no obvious reaction layer is observed at the whole WC-8Co/Ag-28Cu/SAE1045 brazing seam. The microhardness values of the two interlayers and the steel substrate near the two interlayers increase more or less, while those of WC-8Co cemented carbide substrates adjacent to the two interlayers decrease. The WC-8Co/SAE1045 joints using pure Cu and Ag-28Cu alloy as filler metals obtain average shear strength values of about 172 and 136 MPa, and both of the joint fractures occur in the interlayers.

  10. Vacuum Brazing of WC-8Co Cemented Carbides to Carbon Steel Using Pure Cu and Ag-28Cu as Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Z.; Liu, G. W.; Tao, J. N.; Shao, H. C.; Fu, H.; Pan, T. Z.; Qiao, G. J.

    2017-02-01

    The wetting and spreading behavior of commercial pure Cu and Ag-28Cu alloy on WC-8Co cemented carbide were investigated by the sessile drop technique. The contact angle of both systems obviously decreases with moderately increasing the wetting temperature. Vacuum brazing of the WC-8Co cemented carbide to SAE1045 steel using the pure Cu or Ag-28Cu as filler metal was further carried out based on the wetting results. The interfacial interactions and joint mechanical behavior involving microhardness, shear strength and fracture were analyzed and discussed. An obvious Fe-Cu-Co transition layer is detected at the WC-8Co/Cu interface, while no obvious reaction layer is observed at the whole WC-8Co/Ag-28Cu/SAE1045 brazing seam. The microhardness values of the two interlayers and the steel substrate near the two interlayers increase more or less, while those of WC-8Co cemented carbide substrates adjacent to the two interlayers decrease. The WC-8Co/SAE1045 joints using pure Cu and Ag-28Cu alloy as filler metals obtain average shear strength values of about 172 and 136 MPa, and both of the joint fractures occur in the interlayers.

  11. Characterization of Mg/Al butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc filling with Zn–29.5Al–0.5Ti filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Hongyang; Liu, Liming

    2014-04-01

    The multivariate alloying design of a welding joint is used in the Mg to Al welding process. A Zn–29.5Al–0.5Ti alloy is added as filler metal in gas tungsten arc welding of Mg and Al alloy joint based on the analysis of Al and Mg alloy characteristics. The tensile strength, microstructure, and phase constitution of the weld seam are analyzed. The formation of brittle and hard Mg–Al intermetallic compounds is avoided because of the effects of Zn, Al, and Ti. The average tensile strength of the joint is 148 MPa. Al{sub 3}Ti is first precipitated and functions as the nucleus of heterogeneous nucleation during solidification. Moreover, the precipitated Al–MgZn{sub 2} hypoeutectic phase exhibited a feather-like structure, which enhances the property of the Mg–Al dissimilar joint. - Highlights: • Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are butt welded by fusion welding. • The effect of Ti in filler metal is investigated. • The formation of Mg–Al intermetallic compounds is avoided.

  12. Development of a High Chromium Ni-Base Filler Metal Resistant to Ductility Dip Cracking and Solidification Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, Adam T.

    Many nuclear reactor components previously constructed with Ni-based alloys containing 20 wt% Cr have been found to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. The nuclear power industry now uses high chromium (˜30wt%) Ni-based filler metals to mitigate stress corrosion cracking. Current alloys are plagued with weldability issues, either solidification cracking or ductility dip cracking (DDC). Solidification cracking is related to solidification temperature range and the DDC is related to the fraction eutectic present in the microstructure. It was determined that an optimal alloy should have a solidification temperature range less than 150°C and at least 2% volume fraction eutectic. Due to the nature of the Nb rich eutectic that forms, it is difficult to avoid both cracking types simultaneously. Through computational modeling, alternative eutectic forming elements, Hf and Ta, have been identified as replacements for Nb in such alloys. Compositions have been optimized through a combination of computational and experimental techniques combined with a design of experiment methodology. Small buttons were melted using commercially pure materials in a copper hearth to obtain the desired compositions. These buttons were then subjected to a gas tungsten arc spot weld. A type C thermocouple was used to acquire the cooling history during the solidification process. The cooling curves were processed using Single Sensor Differential Thermal Analysis to determine the solidification temperature range, and indicator of solidification cracking susceptibility. Metallography was performed to determine the fraction eutectic present, an indicator of DDC resistance. The optimal level of Hf to resist cracking was found to be 0.25 wt%. The optimal level of Ta was found to be 4 wt%. gamma/MC type eutectics were found to form first in all Nb, Ta, and Hf-bearing compositions. Depending on Fe and Cr content, gamma/Laves eutectic was sometimes found in Nb and Ta-bearing compositions, while

  13. Scalable plasticized polymer electrolytes reinforced with surface-modified sepiolite fillers - A feasibility study in lithium metal polymer batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía, Alberto; Devaraj, Shanmukaraj; Guzmán, Julio; Lopez del Amo, Juan Miguel; García, Nuria; Rojo, Teófilo; Armand, Michel; Tiemblo, Pilar

    2016-02-01

    Electrochemical properties of (polyethylene oxide) (PEO)/lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiTf)/ethylene carbonate (EC)/sepiolite extruded composite electrolytes were studied. Appreciable electrochemical stability of 4.5 V at 70 °C was observed for polymer composite membranes with D-α-tocopherol-polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-coated sepiolite fillers. Lithium plating/stripping analysis indicated no evidence of dendrite formation with good interfacial properties which were further confirmed by postmortem analysis of the cells. Solid state NMR studies show the presence of two Li+ population in the membranes. The feasibility of these electrolytes has been shown with LiFePO4 cathode materials. Initial discharge capacity of 142 mAh/g was observed remaining at 110 mAh/g after 25 cycles with a coulombic efficiency of 96%. The upscaling of these polymers can be easily achieved by extrusion technique and the capacity can be improved by varying the cathode architecture.

  14. Low-melting-point titanium-base brazing alloys. Part 1: Characteristics of two-, three-, and four-component filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, E.; Chen, C.H.

    1997-12-01

    The melting point, microstructure, phase, and electrochemical behavior of Ti-21Ni-15Cu alloy, together with two-, three-, and four-component low-melting-point titanium-base brazing alloys, are presented in this paper. Five filler metals were selected for the study, in which melting points were measured by differential thermal analysis, phases identified by x-ray diffractometry, and corrosion behaviors tested by potentiodynamic polarization. The experimental results show that the three-component Ti-15Cu-15Ni and the newly developed Ti-21Ni-14Cu alloys exhibit the combination of lower melting point and superior corrosion resistance compared to the two- and four-component titanium alloys, 316L stainless steel, and a Co-Cr-Mo alloy in Hank`s solution at 37 C. On a short time basis, the presence of Ti{sub 2}Ni and Ti{sub 2}Cu intermetallics in the Ti-15Cu-15Ni and Ti-21Ni-14Cu alloys should not be preferentially dissolved in galvanic corrosion with respect to the dissimilar Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

  15. Microstructure of Vacuum-Brazed Joints of Super-Ni/NiCr Laminated Composite Using Nickel-Based Amorphous Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qunshuang; Li, Yajiang; Wu, Na; Wang, Juan

    2013-06-01

    Vacuum brazing of super-Ni/NiCr laminated composite and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel was carried out using Ni-Cr-Si-B amorphous filler metal at 1060, 1080, and 1100 °C, respectively. Microstructure and phase constitution were investigated by means of optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and micro-hardness tester. When brazed at 1060-1080 °C, the brazed region can be divided into two distinct zones: isothermally solidified zone (ISZ) consisting of γ-Ni solid solution and athermally solidified zone (ASZ) consisting of Cr-rich borides. Micro-hardness of the Cr-rich borides formed in the ASZ was as high as 809 HV50 g. ASZ decreased with increase of the brazing temperature. Isothermal solidification occurred sufficiently at 1100 °C and an excellent joint composed of γ-Ni solid solution formed. The segregation of boron from ISZ to residual liquid phase is the reason of Cr-rich borides formed in ASZ. The formation of secondary precipitates in diffusion-affected zone is mainly controlled by diffusion of B.

  16. Microstructure and Shear Strength in Brazing Joint of Mo-Cu Composite with 304 Stainless Steel by Ni-Cr-P Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Jiteng; Li, Yajiang; Zheng, Deshuang

    2015-07-01

    The brazing of Mo-Cu composite and 304 stainless steel was carried out in vacuum with Ni-Cr-P filler metal at 980 °C for 20 min. Microstructure in Mo-Cu/304 stainless steel joint was investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and shear strength was measured by shearing test. The results indicate that shear strength of the Mo-Cu/304 stainless steel joint is about 155 MPa. There forms eutectic structure of γ-Ni solid solution with Ni3P in the braze seam. Ni-Cu(Mo) and Ni-Fe solid solution are at the interface beside Mo-Cu composite and 304 stainless steel, respectively. Shear fracture exhibits mixed ductile-brittle fracture feature with trans-granular fracture, ductile dimples and tearing edges. Fracture originates from the interface between brazing seam and Mo-Cu composite and it propagates to the braze seam due to the formation of brittle Ni5P2 and Cr3P precipitation.

  17. Polyurethane Filler for Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Polyurethane foam proves suitable as filler for slots in parts electroplated with copper or nickel. Polyurethane causes less contamination of plating bath and of cleaning and filtering tanks than wax fillers used previously. Direct cost of maintenance and indirect cost of reduced operating time during tank cleaning also reduced.

  18. Development of High-Temperature Air Braze Filler Metals for Use in Two-Step Joining and Sealing Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Weil, K. Scott

    2006-11-02

    Reactive air brazing (RAB) creates metallic braze joints between oxide surfaces. RAB can be performed in air and can undergo subsequent operation at temperatures up to 900ºC in oxidizing environments. This makes RAB an attractive joining method for creating seals in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) which operate at temperatures between 700 and 850ºC and comprise cathode materials which are intolerant of reducing environments. Many planar SOFC designs require a two-step sealing process. Thus the seal formed during the first step must not melt or soften at the firing temperature of the second step, otherwise its integrity could be compromised. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of adding Pd to a Ag-CuO RAB to produce a braze composition with a melting temperature high enough that it might be used in the first step of a two-step sealing process with unmodified Ag-CuO RAB used in the second step, thereby making possible a two step reactive air brazing process. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the substrate of choice in this study in order to simulate the initial sealing step in planar SOFCs which often involves sealing a yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte to a metallic support frame. RAB compositions containing a 15 mol% Pd : 85 mol% Ag alloy with 8 mol% Cu added were found to provide the best combination of wettability, mechanical strength, and melting characteristics for brazing YSZ.

  19. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  20. Studying Activity Series of Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoon, Tien-Ghun; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents teaching strategies that illustrate the linking together of numerous chemical concepts involving the activity of metals (quantitative analysis, corrosion, and electrolysis) through the use of deep-level processing strategies. Concludes that making explicit links in the process of teaching chemistry can lead effectively to meaningful…

  1. Shaping Lips with Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Amit

    2015-01-01

    The lips and the eyes enhance facial beauty, and they have been highlighted since time immemorial. Rejuvenating the lips with fillers, frequently hyaluronic acid (HA), is a common procedure but requires expertise. The objective of this text is to describe the procedure in detail and cover the practical aspects of injecting lips with fillers. An analysis of treating lips with needles and cannulae has been made with special emphasis on achieving optimum results. PMID:26644736

  2. Active Brazing of C/C Composite to Copper by AgCuTi Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kexiang; Xia, Lihong; Zhang, Fuqin; He, Lianlong

    2016-05-01

    Brazing between the carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) and copper has gained increasing interest because of its important application in thermal management systems in nuclear fusion reactors and in the aerospace industry. In order to examine the "interfacial shape effect" on the mechanical properties of the joint, straight and conical interfacial configurations were designed and machined on the surface of C/C composites before joining to copper using an Ag-68.8Cu-4.5Ti (wt pct) alloy. The microstructure and interfacial microchemistry of C/C composite/AgCuTi/Cu brazed joints were comprehensively investigated by using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the joint region of both straight and conical joints can be described as a bilayer. Reaction products of Cu3Ti3O and γ-TiO were formed near the copper side in a conical interface joint, while no reaction products were found in the straight case. The effect of Ag on the interfacial reaction was discussed, and the formation mechanism of the joints during brazing was proposed. On the basis of the detailed microstructure presented, the mechanical performance of the brazed joints was discussed in terms of reaction and morphology across the joint.

  3. Improvement of Scratch and Wear Resistance of Polymers by Fillers Including Nanofillers

    PubMed Central

    Brostow, Witold; Lobland, Haley E. Hagg; Hnatchuk, Nathalie; Perez, Jose M.

    2017-01-01

    Polymers have lower resistance to scratching and wear than metals. Liquid lubricants work well for metals but not for polymers nor for polymer-based composites (PBCs). We review approaches for improvement of tribological properties of polymers based on inclusion of fillers. The fillers can be metallic or ceramic—with obvious consequences for electrical resistivity of the composites. Distinctions between effectiveness of micro- versus nano-particles are analyzed. For example, aluminum nanoparticles as filler are more effective for property improvement than microparticles at the same overall volumetric concentration. Prevention of local agglomeration of filler particles is discussed along with a technique to verify the prevention. PMID:28336900

  4. Improvement of Scratch and Wear Resistance of Polymers by Fillers Including Nanofillers.

    PubMed

    Brostow, Witold; Lobland, Haley E Hagg; Hnatchuk, Nathalie; Perez, Jose M

    2017-03-16

    Polymers have lower resistance to scratching and wear than metals. Liquid lubricants work well for metals but not for polymers nor for polymer-based composites (PBCs). We review approaches for improvement of tribological properties of polymers based on inclusion of fillers. The fillers can be metallic or ceramic-with obvious consequences for electrical resistivity of the composites. Distinctions between effectiveness of micro- versus nano-particles are analyzed. For example, aluminum nanoparticles as filler are more effective for property improvement than microparticles at the same overall volumetric concentration. Prevention of local agglomeration of filler particles is discussed along with a technique to verify the prevention.

  5. Filler Wire Development for 2195 Aluminum-Lithium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cho, Alex; Russell, Carolyn; Zimmerman, Frank

    1998-01-01

    The presentation outline summarizes activities supporting the development of filler wire for 215 aluminum-lithium. The specific objective of the research was to identify an Al-Cu based filler wire chemistry which reduces weld susceptibility in 2195 Aluminum-Lithium welds and repairs welds along with providing adequate mechanical properties. This report is in viewgraph form.

  6. Effect of Filler and Heat Treatment on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of the Brazed Joint between Carbide Tip and Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winardi, Y.; Triyono; Wijayanta, A. T.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effect of filler and heat treatment on the physical and mechanical properties of the brazed joint carbide tip and steel was investigated. Tip carbide YG6 and low carbon steel (SS400) is joining by torch brazing with two filler metals, silver, and copper filler. Heat treatment was performed in induction furnace. Microstructure and shear strength of the brazed joint have been investigated. Many silver filler layer are formed on the surface of the base metal rather then using copper filler. The highest shear strength is achieved using a silver filler metal at temperatur 725°C. The highest shear load is 18.62 kN.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of the metals and metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dizaj, Solmaz Maleki; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Zarrintan, Mohammad Hossein; Adibkia, Khosro

    2014-11-01

    The ever increasing resistance of pathogens towards antibiotics has caused serious health problems in the recent years. It has been shown that by combining modern technologies such as nanotechnology and material science with intrinsic antimicrobial activity of the metals, novel applications for these substances could be identified. According to the reports, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles represent a group of materials which were investigated in respect to their antimicrobial effects. In the present review, we focused on the recent research works concerning antimicrobial activity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature indicated that the particle size was the essential parameter which determined the antimicrobial effectiveness of the metal nanoparticles. Combination therapy with the metal nanoparticles might be one of the possible strategies to overcome the current bacterial resistance to the antibacterial agents. However, further studies should be performed to minimize the toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to apply as proper alternatives for antibiotics and disinfectants especially in biomedical applications.

  8. What's new in fillers?

    PubMed

    Brown, Lance H; Frank, Paul J

    2003-06-01

    This article is an in-depth review of various materials and products that have been used for the augmentation of soft tissue in the past, and covers several new products, methods, and techniques that may provide new options for dermatologists who use fillers in their practice. Pros and cons of each are discussed, along with mechanisms of action, dosages, approved and off-label uses, as well as a look ahead at some prospective technology.

  9. Stable, Thermally Conductive Fillers for Bolted Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVesque, Raymond J., II; Jones, Cherie A.; Babel, Henry W.

    2003-01-01

    A commercial structural epoxy [Super Koropon (or equivalent)] has been found to be a suitable filler material for bolted joints that are required to have large thermal conductances. The contact area of such a joint can be less than 1 percent of the apparent joint area, the exact value depending on the roughnesses of the mating surfaces. By occupying the valleys between contact peaks, the filler widens the effective cross section for thermal conduction. In comparison with prior thermal joint-filler materials, the present epoxy offers advantages of stability, ease of application, and -- as a byproduct of its stability -- lasting protection against corrosion. Moreover, unlike silicone greases that have been used previously, this epoxy does not migrate to contaminate adjacent surfaces. Because this epoxy in its uncured state wets metal joint surfaces and has low viscosity, it readily flows to fill the gaps between the mating surfaces: these characteristics affect the overall thermal conductance of the joint more than does the bulk thermal conductivity of the epoxy, which is not exceptional. The thermal conductances of metal-to-metal joints containing this epoxy were found to range between 5 and 8 times those of unfilled joints.

  10. Metals distributions in activated sludge systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.W.; Kodukula, P.S.

    1984-05-01

    Despite extensive laboratory and field studies over the past 25 years, little advance has been made in prediction of metals distribution and removal in activated sludge treatment systems. This paper reports the results of carefully controlled pilot studies, from which empirical metals distribution models were developed. The models accurately predict the distribution of process stream metals at each point in the activated sludge process between the soluble and solids phases. The distribution models together with data on primary and secondary clarifier suspended solids removal efficiencies, are easily applied to predict the removals of influent metals in activated sludge systems. 36 references, 2 figures.

  11. Modified hydrotalcite-like compounds as active fillers of biodegradable polymers for drug release and food packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Umberto; Nocchetti, Morena; Tammaro, Loredana; Vittoria, Vittoria

    2012-11-01

    This review treats the recent patents and related literature, mainly from the Authors laboratories, on biomedical and food packaging applications of nano-composites constituted of biodegradable polymers filled with micro or nano crystals of organically modified Layered Double Hydroxides of Hydrotalcite type. After a brief outline of the chemical and structural aspects of Hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc) and of their manipulation via intercalation of functional molecular anions to obtain materials for numerous, sometime unexpected applications, the review approaches the theme in three separated parts. Part 1 deals with the synthetic method used to prepare the pristine Mg-Al and Zn-Al HTlc and with the procedures of their functionalization with anti-inflammatory (diclofenac), antibacterial (chloramphenicol hemisuccinate), antifibrinolytic (tranexamic acid) drugs and with benzoates with antimicrobial activity. Procedures used to form (nano) composites of polycaprolactone, used as an example of biodegradable polymer, and functionalized HTlc are also reported. Part 2 discusses a patent and related papers on the preparation and biomedical use of a controlled delivery system of the above mentioned pharmacologically active substances. After an introduction dealing with the recent progress in the field of local drug delivery systems, the chemical and structural aspects of the patented system constituted of a biodegradable polymer and HTlc loaded with the active substances will be presented together with an extensive discussion of the drug release in physiological medium. Part 3 deals with a recent patent and related papers on chemical, structural and release property of antimicrobial species of polymeric films containing antimicrobial loaded HTlc able to act as active packaging for food products prolonging their shelf life.

  12. Aluminum Lithium Alloy 2195 Fusion Welding Improvements with New Filler Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carolyn; Bjorkman, Gerry; McCool, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems, and McCook Metals' development an aluminum-copper weld filler wire for fusion welding 2195 aluminum lithium. The aluminum-copper based weld filler wire has been identified as B218, which is the result of six years of weld filler wire development funded by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and McCook Metals. The Super Lightweight External Tank for the NASA Space Shuttle Program consists of 2195 welded with 4043 aluminum-silicon weld filler wire. The B218 filler wire chemistry was developed to produce enhanced 2195 weld and repair weld mechanical properties. An initial characterization of the B218 weld filler wire was performed consisting of initial weld and repair weld evaluation comparing B218 and 4043. The testing involved room temperature and cryogenic tensile testing along with fracture toughness testing. B218 weld filler wire proved to produce enhanced initial and repair weld tensile and fracture properties over 4043. B218 weld filler wire has proved to be a superior weld filler wire for welding 2195 and other aluminum lithium alloys over 4043.

  13. More About Brazing Or Welding NiAl Without Filler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Kalinowski, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Two reports present additional information about two processes for joining, brazing, or welding workpieces made of nickel aluminide alloys, without use of filler metal. Joining processes involve uniform heating in vacuum-controlled furnace. Eliminates internal thermal gradients in workpieces joined and greatly reduces tendency toward cracking.

  14. Natural Rubber-Filler Interactions: What Are the Parameters?

    PubMed

    Chan, Alan Jenkin; Steenkeste, Karine; Canette, Alexis; Eloy, Marie; Brosson, Damien; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre

    2015-11-17

    Reinforcement of a polymer matrix through the incorporation of nanoparticles (fillers) is a common industrial practice that greatly enhances the mechanical properties of the composite material. The origin of such mechanical reinforcement has been linked to the interaction between the polymer and filler as well as the homogeneous dispersion of the filler within the polymer matrix. In natural rubber (NR) technology, knowledge of the conditions necessary to achieve more efficient NR-filler interactions is improving continuously. This study explores the important physicochemical parameters required to achieve NR-filler interactions under dilute aqueous conditions by varying both the properties of the filler (size, composition, surface activity, concentration) and the aqueous solution (ionic strength, ion valency). By combining fluorescence and electron microscopy methods, we show that NR and silica interact only in the presence of ions and that heteroaggregation is favored more than homoaggregation of silica-silica or NR-NR. The interaction kinetics increases with the ion valence, whereas the morphology of the heteroaggregates depends on the size of silica and the volume percent ratio (dry silica/dry NR). We observe dendritic structures using silica with a diameter (d) of 100 nm at a ∼20-50 vol % ratio, whereas we obtain raspberry-like structures using silica with d = 30 nm particles. We observe that in liquid the interaction is controlled by the hydrophilic bioshell, in contrast to dried conditions, where hydrophobic polymer dominates the interaction of NR with the fillers. A good correlation between the nanoscopic aggregation behavior and the macroscopic aggregation dynamics of the particles was observed. These results provide insight into improving the reinforcement of a polymer matrix using NR-filler films.

  15. Kinetics of pH and colour of meat emulsions containing various fillers during smokehouse cooking.

    PubMed

    Correia, L R; Mittal, G S

    1991-01-01

    The cooking kinetics of meat emulsions containing various fillers was determined by monitoring changes in pH and colour during smokehouse cooking. The fillers used were buttermilk powder, corn starch, microcrystallline cellulose, modified corn starch, modified wheat flour, soy-protein concentrate and whey-protein concentrate. The cooking process was modelled using reaction kinetics and Eyring's absolute reaction rate theory. Enthalpy and entropy changes of activation were calculated for various properties and fillers.

  16. Selective Metallization Induced by Laser Activation: Fabricating Metallized Patterns on Polymer via Metal Oxide Composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jihai; Zhou, Tao; Wen, Liang

    2017-02-28

    Recently, metallization on polymer substrates has been given more attention due to its outstanding properties of both plastics and metals. In this study, the metal oxide composite of copper-chromium oxide (CuO·Cr2O3) was incorporated into the polymer matrix to design a good laser direct structuring (LDS) material, and the well-defined copper pattern (thickness =10 μm) was successfully fabricated through selective metallization based on 1064 nm near-infrared pulsed laser activation and electroless copper plating. We also prepared polymer composites incorporated with CuO and Cr2O3; however, these two polymer composites both had very poor capacity of selective metallization, which has no practical value for LDS technology. In our work, the key reasons causing the above results were systematically studied and elucidated using XPS, UV-vis-IR, optical microscopy, SEM, contact angle, ATR FTIR, and so on. The results showed that 54.0% Cu(2+) in the polymer composite of CuO·Cr2O3 (the amount =5 wt %) is reduced to Cu(0) (elemental copper) after laser activation (irradiation); however, this value is only 26.8% for the polymer composite of CuO (the amount =5 wt %). It was confirmed that to achieve a successful selective metallization after laser activation, not only was the new formed Cu(0) (the catalytic seeds) the crucial factor, but the number of generated Cu(0) catalytic seeds was also important. These two factors codetermined the final results of the selective metallization. The CuO·Cr2O3 is very suitable for applications of fabricating metallic patterns (e.g., metal decoration, circuit) on the inherent pure black or bright black polymer materials via LDS technology, which has a prospect of large-scale industrial applications.

  17. Use of Fillers in Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyoung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Surgical rhinoplasty is the one of the most common cosmetic procedures in Asians. But there are limitations, such as down time, high cost, and a steep learning curve. Most complications are implant related. A safer and less invasive procedure is rhinoplasty using fillers. Good knowledge of the nasal anatomy is essential for rhinoplasty using fillers. Knowledge of nerves, blood supply, and injection plane allows avoiding complications. There are several planes in the nose. The deep fatty layer is recommended for injection, because it is wide and loose and there are less important neurovascular structures. Botulinum toxin also can be used for noninvasive rhinoplasty.

  18. Antitumor Activities of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vinardell, Maria Pilar; Mitjans, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have received much attention recently due to their use in cancer therapy. Studies have shown that different metal oxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells, but not in normal cells. In some cases, such anticancer activity has been demonstrated to hold for the nanoparticle alone or in combination with different therapies, such as photocatalytic therapy or some anticancer drugs. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been shown to have this activity alone or when loaded with an anticancer drug, such as doxorubicin. Other nanoparticles that show cytotoxic effects on cancer cells include cobalt oxide, iron oxide and copper oxide. The antitumor mechanism could work through the generation of reactive oxygen species or apoptosis and necrosis, among other possibilities. Here, we review the most significant antitumor results obtained with different metal oxide nanoparticles.

  19. The use of agar as a novel filler for monolithic matrices produced using hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Lyons, John G; Devine, Declan M; Kennedy, James E; Geever, Luke M; O'Sullivan, Patrick; Higginbotham, Clement L

    2006-08-01

    The use of filler materials in an extended release monolithic polymer matrix can lead to a vastly altered release profile for the active pharmaceutical ingredient. A range of excipients for use in monolithic matrices have been discussed in the literature. The body of work described in this research paper outlines the use of agar as a novel filler material in a hot melt extruded polymer matrix. Several batches of matrix material were prepared with Diclofenac sodium used as the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Agar and microcrystalline cellulose were used as the filler materials in varying ratios, to examine the effect of % filler content as well as filler type on the properties of the hot melt extruded matrix. The resultant extrudates were characterised using steady state parallel plate rheometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dissolution testing. The rheometry analysis concluded that the fillers used resulted in an increase in the matrix viscosity. The DSC scans obtained showed negligible effects on the melting behavior of the matrix as a result of the filler inclusion. Dissolution analysis showed that the presence of the fillers resulted in a slower release rate of API than for the matrix alone. The results detailed within this paper indicate that agar is a viable filler for extended release hot melt produced dosage forms.

  20. Silica Fillers for elastomer Reinforement

    SciTech Connect

    Kohls, D.J.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2009-08-26

    This article summarizes recent work on the structure of precipitated silica used in the reinforcement of elastomers. Silica has a unique morphology, consisting of multiple structural levels that can be controlled through processing. The ability to control and characterize the multiple structures of precipitated silica is an example of morphological engineering for reinforcement applications. In this summary of some recent research efforts using precipitated silica, small-angle scattering techniques are described and their usefulness for determining the morphology of silica in terms of primary particles, aggregates, and agglomerates are discussed. The structure of several different precipitated silica powders is shown as well as the mechanical properties of elastomers reinforced with these silica particles. The study of the mechanical properties of filled elastomer systems is a challenging and exciting topic for both fundamental science and industrial application. It is known that the addition of hard particulates to a soft elastomer matrix results in properties that do not follow a straightforward rule of mixtures. Research efforts in this area have shown that the properties of filled elastomers are influenced by the nature of both the filler and the matrix, as well as the interactions between them. Several articles have reviewed the influence of fillers like silica and carbon black on the reinforcement of elastomers. In general, the structure-property relationships developed for filled elastomers have evolved into the following major areas: Filler structure, hydrodynamic reinforcement, and interactions between fillers and elastomers.

  1. Silica Fillers for elastomer Reinforement

    SciTech Connect

    Kohls, D.J.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2012-09-10

    This article summarizes recent work on the structure of precipitated silica used in the reinforcement of elastomers. Silica has a unique morphology, consisting of multiple structural levels that can be controlled through processing. The ability to control and characterize the multiple structures of precipitated silica is an example of morphological engineering for reinforcement applications. In this summary of some recent research efforts using precipitated silica, small-angle scattering techniques are described and their usefulness for determining the morphology of silica in terms of primary particles, aggregates, and agglomerates are discussed. The structure of several different precipitated silica powders is shown as well as the mechanical properties of elastomers reinforced with these silica particles. The study of the mechanical properties of filled elastomer systems is a challenging and exciting topic for both fundamental science and industrial application. It is known that the addition of hard particulates to a soft elastomer matrix results in properties that do not follow a straightforward rule of mixtures. Research efforts in this area have shown that the properties of filled elastomers are influenced by the nature of both the filler and the matrix, as well as the interactions between them. Several articles have reviewed the influence of fillers like silica and carbon black on the reinforcement of elastomers. In general, the structure-property relationships developed for filled elastomers have evolved into the following major areas: Filler structure, hydrodynamic reinforcement, and interactions between fillers and elastomers.

  2. Dry bin filler for apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A unique dry bin filler for apples using a sequenced tray was developed to reduce bruising in packing operations. Research and commercial trials in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Washington State demonstrated the ability to fill bins evenly and with low damage. Cultivars with different bruising su...

  3. Breast milk metal ion levels in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Nelis, Raymond; de Waal Malefijt, Jan; Gosens, Taco

    2013-01-01

    Metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip has been used increasingly over the last 10 years in younger active patients. The dissolution of the metal wear particles results in measurable increases in cobalt and chromium ions in the serum and urine of patients with a metal-on-metal bearing. We measured the cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum ion levels in urine; serum; and breast milk in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis after a pathologic fracture of the femoral neck. Metal-on-metal hip prosthesis leads to increasing levels of molybdenum in breast milk in the short-term follow-up. There are no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt ions in breast milk. Besides the already known elevated concentrations in serum of chromium and cobalt after implantation of a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis, we found no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt in urine.

  4. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  5. Methane activation on supported transition metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, Jason Ned

    At present, there is considerable interest in utilizing methane more efficiently as both a fuel source and as a starting material for the production of other, more valuable products. However, methane is a very stable molecule with strong C-H bonds that are difficult to break. This makes methane combustion or the formation of carbon-carbon bonds quite difficult. The present work focuses on the use of supported transition metal catalysts as a means of activating methane (i.e. breaking C-H bonds) at low temperatures to produce valuable products or energy. The conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. A low temperature (<750 K), direct process to effectively convert methane into higher hydrocarbons would be quite desirable. Such a process is thermodynamically feasible if the reaction is broken up into two separate steps. The first step is the adsorption of methane onto a transition metal catalyst at temperatures above about 600 K to produce a surface carbon species. The second step is a low temperature (<373 K) hydrogenation to convert the carbon species into higher hydrocarbons. T. Koerts et al. have pursued this approach by dissociatively absorbing methane onto silica supported transition metal catalysts at temperatures ranging between 573 K and 773 K. The result was a surface carbonaceous species and hydrogen. In the second step, the carbonaceous intermediates produced small alkanes upon hydrogenation around 373 K. A maximum yield to higher hydrocarbons of 13% was obtained on a ruthenium catalyst. The present study was conducted to further investigate the nature of the carbonaceous species reported by Koerts. Methane combustion. This investigation was conducted in an effort to better understand the mechanism of methane combustion on Pd catalysts. In the first part of this study, temperature programmed reduction (TPR) was used to investigate the oxidation and reduction dynamics of a 10 wt% Pd/ZrOsb2 catalyst used for methane combustion. TPR experiments indicate

  6. Tailorable chiroptical activity of metallic nanospiral arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Junhong; Fu, Junxue; Ng, Jack; Huang, Zhifeng

    2016-02-01

    The engineering of the chiroptical activity of the emerging chiral metamaterial, metallic nanospirals, is in its infancy. We utilize glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to facilely sculpture the helical structure of silver nanospirals (AgNSs), so that the scope of chiroptical engineering factors is broadened to include the spiral growth of homochiral AgNSs, the combination of left- and right-handed helical chirality to create heterochiral AgNSs, and the coil-axis alignment of the heterochiral AgNSs. It leads to flexible control over the chiroptical activity of AgNS arrays with respect to the sign, resonance wavelength and amplitude of circular dichroism (CD) in the UV and visible regime. The UV chiroptical mode has a distinct response from the visible mode. Finite element simulation together with LC circuit theory illustrates that the UV irradiation is mainly adsorbed in the metal and the visible is preferentially scattered by the AgNSs, accounting for the wavelength-related chiroptical distinction. This work contributes to broadening the horizons in understanding and engineering chiroptical responses, primarily desired for developing a wide range of potential chiroplasmonic applications.The engineering of the chiroptical activity of the emerging chiral metamaterial, metallic nanospirals, is in its infancy. We utilize glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to facilely sculpture the helical structure of silver nanospirals (AgNSs), so that the scope of chiroptical engineering factors is broadened to include the spiral growth of homochiral AgNSs, the combination of left- and right-handed helical chirality to create heterochiral AgNSs, and the coil-axis alignment of the heterochiral AgNSs. It leads to flexible control over the chiroptical activity of AgNS arrays with respect to the sign, resonance wavelength and amplitude of circular dichroism (CD) in the UV and visible regime. The UV chiroptical mode has a distinct response from the visible mode. Finite element simulation

  7. Does moly improve hardfacing filler metals?

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, D.

    1996-02-01

    This study involved two wear tests that simulated low-stress and high-stress abrasion. A typical example of low-stress abrasion (also called scratching), is encouraged when sand or other abrasive particles flow down a chute. High stress is also called three-body or grinding abrasion. It occurs when there are two surfaces with the abrasive particles between them. The force of the two surfaces fractures the abrasive particles. A typical place where high-stress abrasion is seen is on the outside flight of an auger or between the tracks and rollers on the undercarriage of heavy equipment. Because of the high cost of molybdenum, a study was undertaken to investigate the effects of additions into high-carbon, high-chromium weld deposits. The study was done with laboratory testing techniques intended to represent real-world applications. The results indicated there is little, if any, benefit in adding molybdenum to high-carbon, high-chromium weld deposits that are to be used in the as-welded condition to resist abrasion.

  8. Soy-based fillers for thermoset composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Paula

    Considerable work has been done with bio-based fillers in thermoplastics. Wood dust has been used for decades in wood plastic composites in conjunction with recycled high HDPE and PET. In recent years rapidly renewable fillers derived from dried distillery grains and from wood have been introduced commercially for thermoset polymers. These fillers provide bio-content and weight reduction to thermoset molding compounds but issues with moisture absorption and polymerization inhibition have limited their commercial acceptance. The intent of this research was to develop a bio-based filler suitable for thermoset composites. This filler would provide a low density alternative to mined mineral filler, such as CaCO3 or clay. Composites made with these fillers would be lighter in weight, which is desirable for many markets, particularly transportation. Cost parity to the mineral fillers, on a volume basis, was desirable and the use of green chemistry principles was a key objective of the project. This work provides a basis from which further development of modified soy flours as fillers for thermoset composites will continue. Biomass has been evaluated as fillers for thermoset composites since the early 1980s but failed to gain commercial acceptance due to excessive water absorption and inhibition issues with free radical curing. Biomass, with a large percentage of carbohydrates, are very hydrophilic due to their abundance of hydroxyl groups, while biomass, high in lignin, resulted in inhibition of the free radical cure of the unsaturated styrenated polyester matrix systems. Generally protein use as a filler is not desirable due to its food value. Torrefaction has proved to be a good, cost effective, process to reduce hydrophilicity of high cellulose feedstock. Surprising, however, some levels of torrefaction were found to induce the inhibition effect of the filler. Scientific inquiry into this problem proved that aromatics form during the torrefaction process and can

  9. Heavy metals testing in active pharmaceutical ingredients: an alternate approach.

    PubMed

    Raghuram, P; Soma Raju, I V; Sriramulu, J

    2010-01-01

    The principle of the pharmacopoeial heavy metals test is detection and estimation of the metallic impurities colored by sulfide ion by comparison against lead standard. The test suffers from a loss of analytes upon ashing and from having varied responses for various metals. An inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) for estimating 23 metals in active pharmaceutical ingredients is being proposed. The method covers the metals listed in USP, Ph. Eur and EMEA guidance on "Residues of Metal Catalysts or Metal Reagents".

  10. The Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: Current Understanding of the Tissue Device Interface.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jacqueline J; Sidle, Douglas M

    2015-11-01

    The article is a detailed update regarding cosmetic injectable fillers, specifically focusing on hyaluronic acid fillers. Hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are used extensively for soft tissue volumizing and contouring. Many different hyaluronic acid-injectable fillers are available on the market and differ in terms of hyaluronic acid concentration, particle size, cross-linking density, requisite needle size, duration, stiffness, hydration, presence of lidocaine, type of cross-linking technology, and cost. Hyaluronic acid is a natural component of many soft tissues, is identical across species minimizing immunogenicity has been linked to wound healing and skin regeneration, and is currently actively being studied for tissue engineering purposes. The biomechanical and biochemical effects of HA on the local microenvironment of the injected site are key to its success as a soft tissue filler. Knowledge of the tissue-device interface will help guide the facial practitioner and lead to optimal outcomes for patients.

  11. Brazing C-C composites to metals

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.Y.; Banerjee, P.; Chin, B.A.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon-carbon composites are attractive for use at high temperature because of their high strength, modulus, chemical stability and resistance to activation by radiation. In these applications, the C-C composite must be joined to itself and to metals. The research described in this paper has led to the invention of a new brazing filler metal from the Cu-Mu-Ti system and the development of a brazing process for joining CC composites to metals. The newly invented brazing filler metal compositions, with controllable melting points ranging from 800{emdash}920{degrees}C has excellent wettability on both C-C composites and metals (stainless steel, Nb, Mo, W, and Zr). Sound joints of C-C composite/metal were produced using the brazing filler metal and the specially developed brazing processes. Finite element analyses were used to predict the residual stress distribution in the brazed joints. Theoretical predictions were confirmed by interlayer experiments. The brazed joints were studied using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the microstructure and fractured brazed joints. The results showed 100% bonding was obtained using the developed braze metal and brazing procedure.

  12. 7 CFR 58.914 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fillers. 58.914 Section 58.914 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections... gravity and vacuum type fillers shall be of sanitary design and all product contact surfaces, if...

  13. 7 CFR 58.914 - Fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fillers. 58.914 Section 58.914 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections... gravity and vacuum type fillers shall be of sanitary design and all product contact surfaces, if...

  14. 7 CFR 58.514 - Container fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container fillers. 58.514 Section 58.514 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....514 Container fillers. Shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Equipment for Packaging...

  15. Intumescent-ablator coatings using endothermic fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An intumescent-ablator coating composition which contains the ammonium salt of 1,4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid or 4,4 dinitrosul fanilide, a polymeric binder system and about 5 to 30% weight of an endothermic filler is reported. The filler has a decomposition temperature about or within the exothermic region of the intumescent agent.

  16. Distinct Metal Isoforms Underlie Promiscuous Activity Profiles of Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Baier, Florian; Chen, John; Solomonson, Matthew; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2015-07-17

    Within a superfamily, functionally diverged metalloenzymes often favor different metals as cofactors for catalysis. One hypothesis is that incorporation of alternative metals expands the catalytic repertoire of metalloenzymes and provides evolutionary springboards toward new catalytic functions. However, there is little experimental evidence that incorporation of alternative metals changes the activity profile of metalloenzymes. Here, we systematically investigate how metals alter the activity profiles of five functionally diverged enzymes of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. Each enzyme was reconstituted in vitro with six different metals, Cd(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+), and assayed against eight catalytically distinct hydrolytic reactions (representing native functions of MBL enzymes). We reveal that each enzyme metal isoform has a significantly different activity level for native and promiscuous reactions. Moreover, metal preferences for native versus promiscuous activities are not correlated and, in some cases, are mutually exclusive; only particular metal isoforms disclose cryptic promiscuous activities but often at the expense of the native activity. For example, the L1 B3 β-lactamase displays a 1000-fold catalytic preference for Zn(2+) over Ni(2+) for its native activity but exhibits promiscuous thioester, phosphodiester, phosphotriester, and lactonase activity only with Ni(2+). Furthermore, we find that the five MBL enzymes exist as an ensemble of various metal isoforms in vivo, and this heterogeneity results in an expanded activity profile compared to a single metal isoform. Our study suggests that promiscuous activities of metalloenzymes can stem from an ensemble of metal isoforms in the cell, which could facilitate the functional divergence of metalloenzymes.

  17. Pharmacological activity of metal binding agents that alter copper bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Helsel, Marian E.

    2015-01-01

    Iron, copper and zinc are required nutrients for many organisms but also potent toxins if misappropriated. An overload of any of these metals can be cytotoxic and ultimately lead to organ failure, whereas deficiencies can result in anemia, weakened immune system function, and other medical conditions. Cellular metal imbalances have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and infection. It is therefore critical for living organisms to maintain careful control of both the total levels and subcellular distributions of these metals to maintain healthy function. This perspective explores several strategies envisioned to alter the bioavailability of metal ions by using synthetic metal-binding agents targeted for diseases where misappropriated metal ions are suspected of exacerbating cellular damage. Specifically, we discuss chemical properties that influence the pharmacological outcome of a subset of metal-binding agents known as ionophores, and review several examples that have shown multiple pharmacological activities in metal-related diseases, with a specific focus on copper. PMID:25797044

  18. Kinetics of hydration properties of meat emulsions containing various fillers during smokehouse cooking.

    PubMed

    Correia, L R; Mittal, G S

    1991-01-01

    The cooking kinetics of meat emulsions containing various fillers was determined by monitoring changes in hydration properties such as cooking loss and water-holding capacity during smokehouse cooking. Press juice, consumer cook test and emulsion stability of cooked product were also determined. The fillers used were buttermilk powder, corn starch, microcrystalline cellulose, modified corn starch, modified wheat flour, soy-protein concentrate and whey-protein concentrate. The cooking process was modelled using reaction kinetics and Eyring's absolute reaction rate theory. Enthalpy and entropy changes of activation were calculated for various properties and fillers.

  19. [Cutaneous ultrasound and dermal fillers].

    PubMed

    Villegas Fernández, C; Burón Álvarez, I; Fernández-Tresguerres Centeno, A; Alfageme Roldán, F; de Cabo Francés, F

    2015-11-01

    Requests for fillers or dermatological implants have dramatically increased in dermatology consultations in the last few years, either for the correction of superficial age-related wrinkles and cutaneous creases or to increase the volume of specific areas (cheeks, lips...). Dermatologists are often the first professionals to provide these treatments. Nevertheless, in other situations, the patients have already been treated, and many of them do not know the type of material that has been implanted or may even deny previous treatment, even when evident on clinical examination. In these occasions, cutaneous ultrasound is an effective and reliable tool for the real-time diagnosis of the kind of implant that has been used, its location, and the study of its possible complications.

  20. Characterization and activity of cephalosporin metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Auda, S H; Mrestani, Y; Fetouh, M I; Neubert, R H H

    2008-08-01

    Semi-synthetic cephalosporin antibiotics have structures similar to that of penicillins, and both groups of compounds are characterized by similar properties and determined by the same methods. Most antibiotics, including cephalosporins and their decomposition products, contain electron donor groups that can bind naturally occurring metal ions in vivo. Cephalosporin antibiotics exhibit a change in their toxicological properties and biological performance when they were tested as metal complexes. The proposed reason for such a behavior is the capability of chelate binding of the cephalosporins to the metals. In an attempt to understand the coordination mode of metals with cephalosporins, different spectroscopic techniques such as IR, UV-visible, NMR spectroscopy and voltammetric measurements were carried out to elucidate the structure of the metal-cephalosporin complexes. Synthesis, characterization and biological screening of the cephalosporins and of the cephalosporin-metal complexes are discussed in this review. However, little information is available on the influence of the metal ions on the pharmacokinetics of the cephalosporin derivatives.

  1. Electronically Active Cyclocarborane-Metal-Arene Assemblies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-31

    Boron," Organometallics, 1990, 9, 1177. J. H. Davis, Jr., M. A. Benvenuto , and R. N. Grimes, "Organotransition-Metal Metalla- carboranes. 18. rY6, nl...3061. M. A. Benvenuto and R. N. Grimes, "Organotransition-Metal Metallacarboranes. 20. Bu 4N*F Fluoride-Catalyzed C-Si Bond Cleavage in Cp*Co(MeSi...Organometallic Synthesis", Chem. Rev. 1992, 92 251. M. A. Benvenuto and R. N. Grimes, "Organotransition-Metal Metallacarboranes. 28. Controlled Substitution at

  2. [Biological activity of selenorganic compounds at heavy metal salts intoxication].

    PubMed

    Rusetskaya, N Y; Borodulin, V B

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of organoselenium compounds in heavy metal poisoning have been considered. Heavy metal toxicity associated with intensification of free radical oxidation, suppression of the antioxidant system, damage to macromolecules, mitochondria and the genetic material can cause apoptotic cell death or the development of carcinogenesis. Organic selenium compounds are effective antioxidants during heavy metal poisoning; they exhibit higher bioavailability in mammals than inorganic ones and they are able to activate antioxidant defense, bind heavy metal ions and reactive oxygen species formed during metal-induced oxidative stress. One of promising organoselenium compounds is diacetophenonyl selenide (DAPS-25), which is characterized by antioxidant and antitoxic activity, under conditions including heavy metal intoxication.

  3. Cosmetic Fillers: Perspectives on the Industry.

    PubMed

    Basta, Steven L

    2015-11-01

    The cosmetic filler industry has evolved substantially over the last 30 years. The market is characterized by multiple fillers and a competitive dynamic among major aesthetics companies. Marketing in the United States and Europe has been different owing to regulatory constraints. Differences have led to more rapid growth in the European market. The US market has evolved owing to growth of major companies with multiple product portfolios and leverage in consumer promotion and aesthetics office marketing owing to scale. The evolution of the filler market will include new materials, injection techniques, and facilitation devices, and new areas of injection.

  4. Design and fabrication of polymeric nanocomposites with conducting fillers as electronic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushibe, Eliud Kizito

    The growing demand for small, portable and high performance electronic devices has resulted in research activity for embedded electronic components. This offers prospects for the development of flexible electronic components that combines the use of organic and inorganic materials and can be produced on a roll-to-roll process. This dissertation presents advances in the fabrication and characterization of flexible polymeric nanocomposite thin films. Inorganic and synthetic metal nanostructures with high electrical and dielectric properties were employed as filler materials. The processability of these functional filler materials was achieved by dispersion in conventional polymer matrices such as polystyrene (PS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and poly(vinylidene fluoride) to afford electroactive polymeric composite materials. In the fabrication of inorganic nanostructures, a Tubes by Fiber Template technique was employed to afford submicron metal and metal oxide tubes. Silver and copper nanostructures were fabricated by electroless deposition on electrospun fiber templates. To obtain hollow, submicron tubes, the sacrificial polymer template materials were removed by a combination of solvent dissolution and thermal degradation under an inert atmosphere. Polyaniline thin film deposited on the fiber template was used as a binding interface to enhance uniform and continuous deposition of the metal. This was instrumental in fabricating tubes with varied wall thicknesses ranging from 50 to 300 nm obtained as a function of plating time. By doping electrically conducting polymers such as polyaniline, the conductivity can be modified. We describe the fabrication of highly conducting polyaniline nanostructures via template free synthesis. A novel approach that involves a combination of hydrochloric acid and camphorsulfonic acid dopant at low concentrations was adopted. This approach afforded nanofibers with diameters of 150 ± 50 nm and high electrical

  5. Filler Wire Development for 2195 Aluminum-Lithium. Pt. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerald W.; Cho, Alex

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the research was to determine the susceptibility of submitted welded 2195 plate in an AI (Alternate Immersion) environment. Forty-day AI exposure was completed on 8 welded 2195 stress corrosion samples. No stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was found on any of the samples tested. All 8 samples experienced exfoliation corrosion attack in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld. All samples were examined metallographically and showed varying degrees of intergranular corrosion (IG). The filler metal on all samples showed moderate to heavy pitting.

  6. Electronically Active Cyclocarborane-Metal-Arene Assemblies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-31

    Benvenuto , and R. N. Grimes, "Organotransition-Metal Metalla- carboranes. 18. Y16, _q5-Benzyltetramethylcyclopentadieneide(1-) as a Bridging Ligand in...Polyhedral Expansion of (Arene)Fe(Et 2CB 4 H4) Clusters", J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1991, 113 3061. M. A. Benvenuto and R. N. Grimes, "Organotransition-Metal...34, Organometallics 1992, 11, 2404. R. N. Grimes, "Boron-Carbon Ring Ligands in Organometallic Synthesis", Chem. Rev. 1992, 92. 251. M. A. Benvenuto and R

  7. Metal interactions with voltage- and receptor-activated ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Vijverberg, H P; Oortgiesen, M; Leinders, T; van Kleef, R G

    1994-01-01

    Effects of Pb and several other metal ions on various distinct types of voltage-, receptor- and Ca-activated ion channels have been investigated in cultured N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. Experiments were performed using the whole-cell voltage clamp and single-channel patch clamp techniques. External superfusion of nanomolar to submillimolar concentrations of Pb causes multiple effects on ion channels. Barium current through voltage-activated Ca channels is blocked by micromolar concentrations of Pb, whereas voltage-activated Na current appears insensitive. Neuronal type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-activated ion current is blocked by nanomolar concentrations of Pb and this block is reversed at micromolar concentrations. Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor-activated ion current is much less sensitive to Pb. In addition, external superfusion with micromolar concentrations of Pb as well as of Cd and aluminum induces inward current, associated with the direct activation of nonselective cation channels by these metal ions. In excised inside-out membrane patches of neuroblastoma cells, micromolar concentrations of Ca activate small (SK) and big (BK) Ca-activated K channels. Internally applied Pb activates SK and BK channels more potently than Ca, whereas Cd is approximately equipotent to Pb with respect to SK channel activation, but fails to activate BK channels. The results show that metal ions cause distinct, selective effects on the various types of ion channels and that metal ion interaction sites of ion channels may be highly selective for particular metal ions. PMID:7531139

  8. Mechanical properties of ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC) - lignocellulosic fillers biocomposites in dependence to filler content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova, Anna; Pantyukhov, Petr; Popov, Anatoly

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical properties of biocomposites based on ethylene-octene copolymer were studied. The aim of present work was to investigate the mechanical properties of composites based on ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC) in dependence to type of the filler, filler content and trade mark of EOC. Addition of fillers (wood flour or seed flax straw) decreases elongation at break and decreases unsignificantly tensile strenght of examined copolymers. Particles of filler increase the toughness of polymer chain, which leads to decline of elongation at break. Biocomposites with wood flour had higher tensile strength and elongation at break than the composites with flax straw.

  9. Epoxy coatings over latex block fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, L.D.

    1997-12-01

    Failures of polymerized epoxy coatings applied over latex/acrylic block fillers continue to plague owners of commercial buildings, particularly those with high architectural content such as condominiums, high rise offices, etc. Water treatment facilities in paper mills are especially prone to this problem. The types of failures include delamination of the topcoats, blisters in both the block fillers and the topcoats and disintegration of the block filler itself. While the problem is well known, the approach to a solution is not. A study of several coatings manufacturer`s Product Data Sheets shows a wide variance in the recommendations for what are purportedly generically equivalent block fillers. While one manufacturer might take an essentially architectural approach, another will take a heavy-duty industrial approach. To the specifying architect or engineer who has little training in the complexities of protective coating systems, this presents a dilemma. Who does he believe? What does he specify? To whom can he turn for independent advice?

  10. New Manufacturing Method for Paper filler and Fiber Material

    SciTech Connect

    Doelle, Klaus

    2011-11-22

    The study compares commercial available filler products with a new developed “Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material” and how main structural, optical and strength properties are affected by increasing the filler content of at least 5% over commercial values. The study consists of: (i) an overview of paper filler materials used in the paper production process, (ii) discusses the manufacturing technology of lime based filler materials for paper applications, (iii) gives an overview of new emerging paper filler technologies, (iv) discusses a filler evaluation of commercial available digital printing paper products, (v) reports from a detailed handsheet study and 12” pilot plant paper machine trial runs with the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material, and (vi) evaluates and compares commercial filler products and the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material with a life cycle analyses that explains manufacturing, economic and environmental benefits as they are applied to uncoated digital printing papers.

  11. Improved microstructure and mechanical properties in gas tungsten arc welded aluminum joints by using graphene nanosheets/aluminum composite filler wires.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Gholami, A R; Eynalvandpour, A; Ahmadi, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, different amounts of graphene nanosheets (GNSs) were added to the 4043 aluminum alloy powders by using the mechanical alloying method to produce the composite filler wires. With each of the produced composite filler wires, one all-weld metal coupon was welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture surface morphology of the weld metals have been evaluated and the results are compared. As the amount of GNSs in the composition of filler wire is increased, the microstructure of weld metal was changed from the dendritic structure to fine equiaxed grains. Furthermore, the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was improved, and is attributed to the augmented nucleation and retarded growth. From the results, it was seen that the GNSs/Al composite filler wire can be used to improve the microstructure and mechanical properties of GTA weld metals of aluminum and its alloys.

  12. Activation of carbon dioxide on metal and metal oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.D.; Chuang, S.S.C.

    1995-12-31

    The environmental concern about the impact of CO{sub 2} has grown recently due to its rapidly increasing concentration. Deforestation strongly affects the natural reduction of CO{sub 2} by water into carbohydrates by photosynthesis. Industrial utilization of CO{sub 2} by heterogeneous catalytic reactions can be one of the effective ways to cut the CO{sub 2} level. The first step in catalytic reaction of CO{sub 2} is the adsorption. The objective of this study is to investigate the adsorption of CO{sub 2} on the Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces. Rh is selected for this study because of its unique activity to catalyze a number of CO{sub 2} related reactions. In situ infrared results show that CO{sub 2} adsorbed on the alumina oxide support as bidentate carbonate and non-coordinated carbon which are the dominant species during the CO{sub 2} adsorption.

  13. How absorbed hydrogen affects the catalytic activity of transition metals.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Kozlov, Sergey M; Schauermann, Swetlana; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Neyman, Konstantin M

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is commonly governed by surface active sites. Yet, areas just below the surface can also influence catalytic activity, for instance, when fragmentation products of catalytic feeds penetrate into catalysts. In particular, H absorbed below the surface is required for certain hydrogenation reactions on metals. Herein, we show that a sufficient concentration of subsurface hydrogen, H(sub) , may either significantly increase or decrease the bond energy and the reactivity of the adsorbed hydrogen, H(ad) , depending on the metal. We predict a representative reaction, ethyl hydrogenation, to speed up on Pd and Pt, but to slow down on Ni and Rh in the presence of H(sub) , especially on metal nanoparticles. The identified effects of subsurface H on surface reactivity are indispensable for an atomistic understanding of hydrogenation processes on transition metals and interactions of hydrogen with metals in general.

  14. Efficiency of metal activators of accelerated sulfur vulcanization

    SciTech Connect

    Duchacek, V.; Kuta, A.; Pribyl, P. )

    1993-01-20

    The effects of copper, mercury, nickel, zinc, cadmium, indium, magnesium, and calcium stearates on the course of N-cyclohexyl-2-benzthiazylsulphenamide-accelerated sulfur vulcanization of natural rubber have been investigated on the basis of curemeter measurements at 145 C. The differences in the efficiencies of these metal activators of accelerated sulfur vulcanization have been discussed from the points of view of the electron configurations of the metals and their affinities to sulfur. The authors attempted to determine why zinc oxide is generally accepted as the best metal vulcanization activator.

  15. Elevated temperature creep properties for selected active metal braze alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Active metal braze alloys reduce the number of processes required for the joining of metal to ceramic components by eliminating the need for metallization and/or Ni plating of the ceramic surfaces. Titanium (Ti), V, and Zr are examples of active element additions which have been used successfully in such braze alloys. Since the braze alloy is expected to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch strains between the metal and ceramic materials, a knowledge of its elevated temperature mechanical properties is important. In particular, the issue of whether or not the creep strength of an active metal braze alloy is increased or decreased relative to its non-activated counterpart is important when designing new brazing processes and alloy systems. This paper presents a survey of high temperature mechanical properties for two pairs of conventional braze alloys and their active metal counterparts: (a) the conventional 72Ag-28Cu (Cusil) alloy, and the active braze alloy 62.2Ag- 36.2Cu-1.6Ti (Cusil ABA), and (b) the 82Au-18Ni (Nioro) alloy and the active braze alloy Mu-15.5M-0.75Mo-1.75V (Nioro ABA). For the case of the Cusil/Cusil ABA pair, the active metal addition contributes to solid solution strengthening of the braze alloy, resulting in a higher creep strength as compared to the non-active alloy. In the case of the Nioro/Nioro ABA pair, the Mo and V additions cause the active braze alloy to have a two-phase microstructure, which results in a reduced creep strength than the conventional braze alloy. The Garofalo sinh equation has been used to quantitatively describe the stress and temperature dependence of the deformation behavior. It will be observed that the effective stress exponent in the Garofalo sinh equation is a function of the instantaneous value of the stress argument.

  16. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, T.K.; Novak, R.F.

    1991-05-07

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined. 3 figures.

  17. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Thomas K.; Novak, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined.

  18. Rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber filled with electron beam modified surface treated dual phase fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugharaj, A. M.; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2004-01-01

    The rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) loaded with dual phase filler were measured using Monsanto Processability Tester (MPT) at three different temperatures (100°C, 110°C and 130°C) and four different shear rates (61.3, 306.3, 613, and 1004.5 s -1). The effect of electron beam modification of dual phase filler in absence and presence of trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) or triethoxysilylpropyltetrasulphide (Si-69) on melt flow properties of SBR was also studied. The viscosity of all the systems decreases with shear rate indicating their pseudoplastic or shear thinning nature. The higher shear viscosity for the SBR loaded with the electron beam modified filler is explained in terms of variation in structure of the filler upon electron beam irradiation. Die swell of the modified filler loaded SBR is slightly higher than that of the unmodified filler loaded rubber, which is explained by calculating normal stress difference for the systems. Activation energy of the modified filler loaded SBR systems is also slightly higher than that of the control filler loaded SBR system.

  19. Passive Cooling Enabled by Polymer Composite Coating: Dependence on Filler, Filler Size and Coating Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yue; Shi, Frank G.

    2017-02-01

    The effective passive radiation cooling that is enabled by silicone-based composites is investigated for its dependence on coating thickness and filler size in the range of nanometers to micrometers. It is established, contrary to prior reports, that the effective passive radiation cooling does not exhibit a filler size dependence, i.e., there is no optimal size at which a maximum cooling would be reached. However, the apparent cooling effect is filler type dependent and among the fillers investigated, Al2O3 exhibits the best apparent cooling effect. In addition, the apparent cooling effect is dependent on coating thickness: the thickness dependence is non-monotonic, and the maximum cooling occurs at an optimal thickness of 70 μm, regardless of filler type. Potential significant implications of the findings are also discussed.

  20. Plasma-modified graphene nanoplatelets and multiwalled carbon nanotubes as fillers for advanced rubber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, M.; Gozdek, T.; Bielinski, D. M.; Szymanowski, H.; Kleczewska, J.; Piatkowska, A.

    2015-07-01

    In modern rubber industry, there still is a room for new fillers, which can improve the mechanical properties of the composites, or introduce a new function to the material. Modern fillers like carbon nanotubes or graphene nanoplatelets (GnP), are increasingly applied in advanced polymer composites technology. However, it might be hard to obtain a well dispersed system for such systems. The polymer matrix often exhibits higher surface free energy (SFE) level with the filler, which can cause problems with polymer-filler interphase adhesion. Filler particles are not wet properly by the polymer, and thus are easier to agglomerate. As a consequence, improvement in the mechanical properties is lower than expected. In this work, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and GnP surface were modified with low-temperature plasma. Attempts were made to graft some functionalizing species on plasma-activated filler surface. The analysis of virgin and modified fillers’ SFE was carried out. MWCNT and GnP rubber composites were produced, and ultimately, their morphology and mechanical properties were studied.

  1. Monitorization of technosols in old mining sites treated with calcareous fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Sanchez, MJose; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen; Garcia-Lorenzo, MariLuz; Gonzalez, Eva; Perez-Espinosa, Victor; Martínez-Lopez, Salvadora; Hernandez, Carmen; Molina, Jose; Martínez, Lucia B.

    2014-05-01

    A large number of soils around the world are contaminated by heavy metals due to mining activities, generating adverse effects on human health and the environment. In response to these negative effects, a variety of technologies to remediate soils affected by heavy metals have been developed. Among them, in situ immobilization by means of soil amendment is a non-intrusive and cost effective alternative, that transforms the highly mobile toxic heavy metals to physico-chemically stable forms, reducing their mobility and environmental risks. Limestone filler is a good selection for such a purpose, because of its low permeability and low solubility, due to its high degree of physical-chemical stability and because is a non-toxic material with a high finely divided calcium carbonate content. In addition, the use of this amendment could revalorize the residues, reducing the costs of the process. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of a immobilization technique in sediments contaminated by heavy metals as a results of mining activities. The study area was Portman bay, located close to the mining region of La Unión and subjected to mining from the time of the Roman Empire to 1991. Wastes from mining activities mainly consisted in ore materials (galena, pyrite and sphalerite), phyllosilicates, in addition to siderite, iron oxides and sometimes alteration products such as jarosite, alunite, kaolinite and greenalite. These materials have suffered a concentration process by floatation with sea water and, as a result of the discharge, the whole of the bay has filled up with wastes which also extend into the Mediterranean Sea. Two experimental areas, approximately 1 Ha each one, were selected and technosols were developed as follows: original sediments from the bay, sediments mixed with limestone filler in a 1:1 proportion, gravel to avoid capillary and natural soil to allow plant growth. After the remediation technique was applied, monitorization of

  2. Metal chlorides loaded on activated carbon to capture elemental mercury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhemin; Ma, Jing; Mei, Zhijian; Zhang, Jianda

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) was considered to be an effective sorbent to control mercury in combustion systems. However, its capture capacity was low and it required a high carbon-to-mercury mass ratio. AC loaded with catalyst showed a high elemental mercury (Hg0) capture capacity due to large surface area of AC and high oxidization ability of catalyst. In this study, several metal chlorides and metal oxides were used to promote the sorption capacity of AC. As a result, metal chlorides were better than metal oxides loaded on AC to remove gaseous mercury. X-ray diffractometer (XRD), thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and specific surface area by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method (BET) analysis showed the main mechanisms: first, AC had an enormous surface area for loading enough MClx; second, Cl and MxOy were generated during pyrogenation of MClx; finally, there were lots of active elements such as Cl and MxOy which could react with elemental mercury and convert it to mercury oxide and mercury chloride. The HgO and HgCl2 might be released from AC's porous structure by thermo regeneration. A catalytic chemisorption mechanism predominates the sorption process of elemental mercury. As Co and Mn were valence variable metal elements, their catalytic effect on Hg0 oxidization may accelerate both oxidation and halogenation of Hg0. The sorbents loaded with metal chlorides possessed a synergistic function of catalytic effect of valence variable metal and chlorine oxidation.

  3. High-performance field emission of carbon nanotube paste emitters fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuning; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Lee, Sang Heon; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) paste emitters were fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler. The CNT paste emitters consist of CNTs as the emitting material, graphite nanopowder as the filler and a graphite rod as the cathode. Rather than metal or inorganic materials, graphite nanopowder was adapted as a filler material to make the CNT paste emitters. After fabricating the emitters, sandpaper treatment was applied to increase the density of emission sites. The CNT paste emitters showed a high field emission performance, for example a high emission current of 8.5 mA from a cylindrical emitter with a diameter of 0.7 mm (corresponding to a current density of 2.2 A cm-2) and an extremely stable emission current at 1 mA (260 mA cm-2 for 20 h). Interestingly, after a number of electrical arcing events, the emitters still showed a high emission current of 5-8 mA (higher than 1 A cm-2). In addition to the sound electrical and thermal properties of the graphite filler, effective mechanical adhesion of the CNTs onto the graphite cathode induced by the use of the graphite nanopowder filler contributed the excellent field emission properties of the CNT paste emitters.

  4. High-performance field emission of carbon nanotube paste emitters fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuning; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Lee, Sang Heon; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-02-10

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) paste emitters were fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler. The CNT paste emitters consist of CNTs as the emitting material, graphite nanopowder as the filler and a graphite rod as the cathode. Rather than metal or inorganic materials, graphite nanopowder was adapted as a filler material to make the CNT paste emitters. After fabricating the emitters, sandpaper treatment was applied to increase the density of emission sites. The CNT paste emitters showed a high field emission performance, for example a high emission current of 8.5 mA from a cylindrical emitter with a diameter of 0.7 mm (corresponding to a current density of 2.2 A cm(-2)) and an extremely stable emission current at 1 mA (260 mA cm(-2) for 20 h). Interestingly, after a number of electrical arcing events, the emitters still showed a high emission current of 5-8 mA (higher than 1 A cm(-2)). In addition to the sound electrical and thermal properties of the graphite filler, effective mechanical adhesion of the CNTs onto the graphite cathode induced by the use of the graphite nanopowder filler contributed the excellent field emission properties of the CNT paste emitters.

  5. Effect of electromagnetic Stirring on the Element Distribution in Laser Beam Welding of Aluminium with Filler Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatzen, M.; Tang, Z.; Vollertsen, F.

    Additional external electromagnetic fields are used in laser beam welding of aluminium with silicon containing filler wire to manipulate the flow of the liquid metal due to induced volume forces and hence to modify the element distribution. Aiming for a better understanding of the fluid-dynamic processes inside the meld pool, a CFD model has been implemented to simulate the melt flow. In this paper, simulation results on the resulting element distribution of filler wire material under a coaxial magnetic field with different frequencies is compared to experimental results for the same parameters. It is shown that in both cases the concentration of alloying elements of the filler material has a spatial periodicity. From the CFD model it can be concluded that the change of the distribution of the filler material results from a modulation of the melt flow due to the periodic induced electromagnetic volume forces.

  6. Temporal fossa defects: techniques for injecting hyaluronic acid filler and complications after hyaluronic acid filler injection.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Margit Lai Wun; Marmur, Ellen S

    2015-09-01

    Facial changes with aging include thinning of the epidermis, loss of skin elasticity, atrophy of muscle, and subcutaneous fat and bony changes, all which result in a loss of volume. As temporal bones become more concave, and the temporalis atrophies and the temporal fat pad decreases, volume loss leads to an undesirable, gaunt appearance. By altering the temporal fossa and upper face with hyaluronic acid filler, those whose specialty is injecting filler can achieve a balanced and more youthful facial structure. Many techniques have been described to inject filler into the fossa including a "fanned" pattern of injections, highly diluted filler injection, and the method we describe using a three-injection approach. Complications of filler in the temporal fossa include bruising, tenderness, swelling, Tyndall effect, overcorrection, and chewing discomfort. Although rare, more serious complications include infection, foreign body granuloma, intravascular necrosis, and blindness due to embolization into the ophthalmic artery. Using reversible hyaluronic acid fillers, hyaluronidase can be used to relieve any discomfort felt by the patient. Injectors must be aware of the complications that may occur and provide treatment readily to avoid morbidities associated with filler injection into this sensitive area.

  7. Thermal pretreatment of silica composite filler materials

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Quan; Ramsey, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Three different silica filler materials were thermally treated in order to effect dehydration, dehydroxylation, and rehydroxylation. Samples were characterized by thermogravimetry (TG), pycnometry, elemental analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For all fillers, our results indicate incremental removal of silanol groups at higher heating temperatures and irreversible dehydroxylation at over 673 K. To remove the organic content and maintain adequate silanol density for subsequent silanization on Stöber-type silica, we suggest heating at 673 K followed by overnight boiling in water. PMID:20445821

  8. High-Temperature Insulating Gap Filler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toombs, Gordon R.; Oyoung, Kevin K.; Stevens, Everett G.

    1991-01-01

    New inorganic, ceramic filler for gaps between refractory ceramic tiles offers high resistance to heat and erosion. Consists of ceramic-fiber fabric precoated with silica and further coated with silica containing small amount of silicon carbide powder to increase thermal emittance. Developed as replacement for organic filler used on thermal-protection system of Space Shuttle. Promises to serve for many missions and to reduce cost and delay of refurbishing aerospace craft. Used as sealing material in furnaces or as heat shield for sensitive components in automobiles, aircraft, and home appliances.

  9. Passive and active metasurface based on metal-insulator-metal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahara, Junichi; Liu, Tianji; Hatada, Hideaki; Nagasaki, Yusuke; Miyata, Masashi; Kaijima, Akira

    2016-11-01

    A metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure is a fundamental plasmonic structure that has been studied widely since the early stage of plasmonics. It enables us to confine surface plasmon polariton (SPP) and concentrate light into nano-space beyond the diffraction limit. A finite-length MIM structure is considered to be a Fabry-Perot resonator of SPP as a nanocavity. Here, we review our recent studies about active metasurface based on a reconfigurable metal-air-metal (MAM) nanocavity which modify reflection or absorption spectra in scattering by changing a gap distance. Such reconfigurable MAM nanocavity becomes promising candidate for various applications such as plasmonic color or sky radiator from visible to infrared range.

  10. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  11. Tuned by metals: the TET peptidase activity is controlled by 3 metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Matteo; Girard, Eric; Franzetti, Bruno

    2016-02-08

    TET aminopeptidases are dodecameric particles shared in the three life domains involved in various biological processes, from carbon source provider in archaea to eye-pressure regulation in humans. Each subunit contains a dinuclear metal site (M1 and M2) responsible for the enzyme catalytic activity. However, the role of each metal ion is still uncharacterized. Noteworthy, while mesophilic TETs are activated by Mn(2+), hyperthermophilic TETs prefers Co(2+). Here, by means of anomalous x-ray crystallography and enzyme kinetics measurements of the TET3 aminopeptidase from the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTET3), we show that M2 hosts the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while M1 stabilizes the TET3 quaternary structure and controls the active site flexibility in a temperature dependent manner. A new third metal site (M3) was found in the substrate binding pocket, modulating the PfTET3 substrate preferences. These data show that TET activity is tuned by the molecular interplay among three metal sites.

  12. Heavy metals and adsorbents effects on activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ong, S A; Lim, P E; Seng, C E

    2004-01-01

    The sorption of Cu(II) and Cd(II) from synthetic solution by powdered activated carbon (PAC), biomass, rice husk (RH) and activated rice husk (ARH) were investigate under batch conditions. After activated by concentrated nitric acid for 15 hours at 60-65 degrees C, the adsorption capacity for RH was increased. The adsorbents arranged in the increasing order of adsorption capacities to the Langmuir Q degree parameter were biomass > PAC > ARH > RH. The addition of adsorbents in base mix solution had increased the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) activated sludge microorganisms with and without the presence of metals. The increased of SOUR were due to the ability of PAC and RH in reducing the inhibitory effect of metals on microorganisms and provide a reaction site between activated sludge microorganisms and substrates.

  13. The filler revolution: a six-year retrospective.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Naissan O; Dover, Jeffrey S

    2009-10-01

    There are currently more than 20 FDA-approved fillers in the United States (U.S.), noteworthy considering that it was only six years ago that the first hyaluronic acid filler was approved. The pace of development of filler substances in the last few years has been extremely rapid. The authors review the development, advantages, and disadvantages of fillers currently available in the U.S.

  14. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A.; Woolman, Joseph N.; Petrovic, John J.

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of N-Halamine-based Antimicrobial Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhuni, Revathi V.; Luo, Jie; Cao, Zhengbing; Sun, Yuyu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that the surface of CaCO3 fillers could be coated with an N-halamine based fatty acid to make the filler surface organophilic and accomplish antibacterial activity simultaneously, rendering the resulting polymer-filler composites antimicrobial. Thus, a new bi-functional compound, 4, 4 -Dimethyl hydantoin-undecanoic acid (DMH-UA), was synthesized by treating the potassium salt of dimethyl hydantoin (DMH) with 11-bromoundecanoic acid (BUA). Upon chlorination treatment with diluted bleach, DMH-UA was transformed into 3-chloro-4, 4-dimethyl hydantoin- undecanoic acid (Cl-DMH-UA). Alternatively, DMH-UA could be coated onto the surface of CaCO3 to obtain the corresponding calcium salt, 4, 4-dimethyl hydantoin-undecanoic acid-calcium carbonate (DMH-UA-CaCO3). In the presence of diluted chlorine bleach, the coated DMH-UA on the surface of CaCO3 was transformed into Cl-DMH-UA, leading to the formation of Cl-DMH-UA-CaCO3. The reactions were characterized with FT-IR, NMR, UV, DSC and SEM analyses. Both Cl-DMH-UA and Cl-DMH-UA-CaCO3 were used as antimicrobial additives for cellulose acetate (CA). The antimicrobial efficacy of the resulting samples was evaluated against both Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacteria). It was found that with the same additive content, CA samples with Cl-DMH-UA-CaCO3 and Cl-DMH-UA had very similar antimicrobial and biofilm-controlling activity, but the former released less active chlorine into the surrounding environment than the latter. PMID:22942559

  16. 14 CFR 23.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 23.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must be marked as prescribed...

  17. 14 CFR 27.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 27.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of...

  18. 14 CFR 23.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 23.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.973 Fuel tank filler connection. (a) Each fuel tank filler connection must be marked as prescribed...

  19. 14 CFR 25.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 25.973 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.973 Fuel tank filler connection. Each fuel tank filler connection must prevent the entrance of fuel into any part of the...

  20. Process for recovering filler from polymer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Maurice L.; Smith, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a process for recovering filler material from a polymeric matrix by reacting the matrix at an elevated temperature in a gas atmosphere with a controlled oxidizing potential and thereafter separating and cleaning the residue from the reaction mixture.

  1. High Temperature Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Wang, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Gaps between ceramic tiles filled with ceramic-coated fabric that withstands temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees F (1,300 degrees C). Reusable high-temperature gap filler is made of fabric coated with ceramic slurry and bonded in place with room-temperature-vulcanized adhesive. Procedure used in kilns and furnaces.

  2. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  3. Activated Carbon Textile via Chemistry of Metal Extraction for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Lam, Do Van; Jo, Kyungmin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2016-12-27

    Carbothermic reduction in the chemistry of metal extraction (MO(s) + C(s) → M(s) + CO(g)) using carbon as a sacrificial agent has been used to smelt metals from diverse oxide ores since ancient times. Here, we paid attention to another aspect of the carbothermic reduction to prepare an activated carbon textile for high-rate-performance supercapacitors. On the basis of thermodynamic reducibility of metal oxides reported by Ellingham, we employed not carbon, but metal oxide as a sacrificial agent in order to prepare an activated carbon textile. We conformally coated ZnO on a bare cotton textile using atomic layer deposition, followed by pyrolysis at high temperature (C(s) + ZnO(s) → C'(s) + Zn(g) + CO(g)). We figured out that it leads to concurrent carbonization and activation in a chemical as well as mechanical way. Particularly, the combined effects of mechanical buckling and fracture that occurred between ZnO and cotton turned out to play an important role in carbonizing and activating the cotton textile, thereby significantly increasing surface area (nearly 10 times) compared with the cotton textile prepared without ZnO. The carbon textiles prepared by carbothermic reduction showed impressive combination properties of high power and energy densities (over 20-fold increase) together with high cyclic stability.

  4. An active metallic nanomatryushka with two similar super-resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. J.; Cheng, Y.; Wu, X. W.; Liu, X. J.

    2014-07-01

    The optical properties of a simple metallic nanomatryushka (nanosphere-in-a-nanoshell) with gain have been investigated theoretically. The spaser (surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) phenomena can be observed at two critical wavelengths in the active metallic nanomatryushkas. With increasing the gain coefficient of the middle layer, a similar super surface plasmon (SP) resonance is first found at the ω-+|1 mode of the active nanoparticles and then breaks down. With further increasing the gain coefficient, another similar super-resonance occurs at the ω--|1 mode. The near-field enhancements in the active nanomatryushkas also have been greatly amplified at the critical wavelengths for ω-+|1 and ω--|1 modes. It is further found that the amplifications of SPs in the active Ag-SiO2-Au nanoshell are strongest in four kinds of nanoshells and hence the largest near fields. The giant near-field enhancement can greatly enhance the Raman excitation and emission.

  5. Thermally conductive polyamide 6/carbon filler composites based on a hybrid filler system

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sung Min; Kwon, O Hwan; Oh, Yu Gyeong; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Sung-Goo; Won, Jong Chan; Cho, Kwang Soo; Kim, Byoung Gak; Yoo, Youngjae

    2015-01-01

    We explored the use of a hybrid filler consisting of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polyamide 6 (PA 6) matrix. The composites containing PA 6, powdered GNP, and SWCNT were melt-processed and the effect of filler content in the single filler and hybrid filler systems on the thermal conductivity of the composites was examined. The thermal diffusivities of the composites were measured by the standard laser flash method. Composites containing the hybrid filler system showed enhanced thermal conductivity with values as high as 8.8 W (m · K)−1, which is a 35-fold increase compared to the thermal conductivity of pure PA 6. Thermographic images of heat conduction and heat release behaviors were consistent with the thermal conductivity results, and showed rapid temperature jumps and drops, respectively, for the composites. A composite model based on the Lewis–Nielsen theory was developed to treat GNP and SWCNT as two separate types of fillers. Two approaches, the additive and multiplicative approaches, give rather good quantitative agreement between the predicted values of thermal conductivity and those measured experimentally. PMID:27877843

  6. Thermally conductive polyamide 6/carbon filler composites based on a hybrid filler system.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sung Min; Kwon, O Hwan; Oh, Yu Gyeong; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Sung-Goo; Won, Jong Chan; Cho, Kwang Soo; Kim, Byoung Gak; Yoo, Youngjae

    2015-12-01

    We explored the use of a hybrid filler consisting of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polyamide 6 (PA 6) matrix. The composites containing PA 6, powdered GNP, and SWCNT were melt-processed and the effect of filler content in the single filler and hybrid filler systems on the thermal conductivity of the composites was examined. The thermal diffusivities of the composites were measured by the standard laser flash method. Composites containing the hybrid filler system showed enhanced thermal conductivity with values as high as 8.8 W (m · K)(-1), which is a 35-fold increase compared to the thermal conductivity of pure PA 6. Thermographic images of heat conduction and heat release behaviors were consistent with the thermal conductivity results, and showed rapid temperature jumps and drops, respectively, for the composites. A composite model based on the Lewis-Nielsen theory was developed to treat GNP and SWCNT as two separate types of fillers. Two approaches, the additive and multiplicative approaches, give rather good quantitative agreement between the predicted values of thermal conductivity and those measured experimentally.

  7. Enhanced thermal conductivity of novel multifunctional polyphenylene sulfide composites embedded with heat transfer networks of hybrid fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Siu N.; Khan, Omer M.; Chan, Ellen; Naguib, Hani E.; Dawson, Francis; Adinkrah, Vincent; Lakatos-Hayward, Laszlo

    2011-04-01

    Today's smaller, more powerful electronic devices, communications equipment, and lighting apparatus required optimum heat dissipation solutions. Traditionally, metals are widely known for their superior thermal conductivity; however, their good electrical conductivity has limited their applications in heat management components for microelectronic applications. This prompts the requirement to develop novel plastic composites that satisfy multifunctional requirements thermally, electrically, and mechanically. Furthermore, the moldability of polymer composites would make them ideal for manufacturing three-dimensional, net-shape enclosures and/or heat management assembly. Using polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) as the matrix, heat transfer networks were developed and structured by embedding hexagonal boron nitride (BN) alone, blending BN fillers of different shapes and sizes, as well as hybridizing BN fillers with carbonaceous nano- and micro-fillers. Parametric studies were conducted to elucidate the effects of types, shapes, sizes, and hybridization of fillers on the composite's thermal and electrical properties. The use of hybrid fillers, with optimized material formulations, was found to effectively promote a composite's thermal conductivity. This was achieved by optimizing the development of an interconnected thermal conductive network through structuring hybrid fillers with appropriate shapes and sizes. The thermal conductive composite affords unique opportunities to injection mold three-dimensional, net-shape microelectronic enclosures with superior heat dissipation performance.

  8. Chemical interaction of polyethylene matrix with vegetable fillers in biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantyukhov, Petr; Monakhova, Tatiana; Popov, Anatoly; Zykova, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The paper studies the diffusion of low molecular weight components from vegetable fillers into polyethylene matrix during the preparation of biocomposites. In order to identify the diffusible substances a model experiment used where the hexadecane acted as a model of polyethylene. It was determined that polyphenolic compounds and chlorophyll penetrate from vegetable fillers to hexadecane to the maximum extent. There was found a correlation between the amount of polyphenolic compounds diffusible from the fillers to hexadecane and thermal oxidation kinetics of real biocomposites based on polyethylene and vegetable fillers. Thus, it has been assumed the diffusion of polyphenols and chlorophyll from vegetable fillers into polyethylene matrix during the preparation of biocomposites.

  9. Twelve Year Study of Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals

    SciTech Connect

    M. Kay Adler Flitton; Timothy S. Yoder

    2012-03-01

    The subsurface radioactive disposal facility located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho site contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term corrosion study is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The study uses non-radioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, two types of stainless steels, welded stainless steel, welded nickel-chromium steel alloy, zirconium alloy, beryllium, and aluminum. Additionally, carbon steel (the material used in cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and duplex stainless steel (high-integrity containers) are also included in the study. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the corrosion rate results through twelve years of underground exposure.

  10. Anticancer activity of Arkeshwara Rasa - A herbo-metallic preparation

    PubMed Central

    Nafiujjaman, Md; Nurunnabi, Md; Saha, Samir Kumar; Jahan, Rownak; Lee, Yong-kyu; Rahmatullah, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Though metal based drugs have been prescribed in Ayurveda for centuries to treat various diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and cancer, toxicity of these drugs containing heavy metal is a great drawback for practical application. So, proper scientific validation of herbo-metallic drugs like Arkeshwara Rasa (AR) have become one of the focused research arena of new drugs against cancers. Aim: To investigate the in vitro anticancer effects of AR. Materials and Methods: Anticancer activity of AR was investigated on two human cancer cell lines, which represent two different tissues (pancreas and skin). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay for enzyme activity and trypan blue assay for cell morphology were performed for further confirmation. Results: AR showed potent activity against pancreatic cancer cells (MIA-PaCa-2). LDH activity confirmed that AR was active against pancreatic cancer cells. Finally, it was observed that AR exhibited significant effects on cancer cells due to synergistic effects of different compounds of AR. Conclusion: The study strongly suggests that AR has the potential to be an anticancer drug against pancreatic cancer. PMID:27313425

  11. Select metal adsorption by activated carbon made from peanut shells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kermit; Yang, Hong; Seo, Chung W; Marshall, Wayne E

    2006-12-01

    Agricultural by-products, such as peanut shells, contribute large quantities of lignocellulosic waste to the environment each growing season; but few, if any, value-added uses exist for their disposal. The objective of this study was to convert peanut shells to activated carbons for use in adsorption of select metal ions, namely, cadmium (Cd2+), copper (Cu2+), lead (Pb2+), nickel (Ni2+) and zinc (Zn2+). Milled peanut shells were pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen gas, and then activated with steam at different activation times. Following pyrolysis and activation, the carbons underwent air oxidation. The prepared carbons were evaluated either for adsorption efficiency or adsorption capacity; and these parameters were compared to the same parameters obtained from three commercial carbons, namely, DARCO 12x20, NORIT C GRAN and MINOTAUR. One of the peanut shell-based carbons had metal ion adsorption efficiencies greater than two of the three commercial carbons but somewhat less than but close to Minotaur. This study demonstrates that peanut shells can serve as a source for activated carbons with metal ion-removing potential and may serve as a replacement for coal-based commercial carbons in applications that warrant their use.

  12. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL1 and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL2 derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML(1-2)2 have been synthesized, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate ? coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mn < Zn < Cu < Co < Ni. The ligands and their complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity at different concentrations against bacteria viz. Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina. A marked enhancement in biocidal activity of the ligands under similar experimental conditions was observed as a consequence of coordination with metal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu > Mn > Ni > Co > Zn.

  13. Surface and interfacial effect of filler particle on electrical properties of polyvinyledene fluoride/nickel composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Maheswar; Srinivas, V.; Thakur, A. K.

    2008-12-01

    The effect of processing conditions and filler particle size/surface area on the dielectric behavior of polyvinyledene fluoride/nickel composites is reported. Large enhancement of low frequency dielectric constant with reduction in metal particle size in a metal-polymer composite is observed. Enhancement in the dielectric constant has been attributed to increase in interfacial area and consequent interfacial polarization with reduction in metal particle size. The increased interparticle contacts from the nearest neighbors result in enhanced tunneling probability leading to lowering of percolation threshold for nanosized nickel/polyvinyledene fluoride composites as compared to micron nickel/polyvinyledene fluoride composites.

  14. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Meulepas, Roel J W; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Teshager, Fitfety Melese; Witharana, Ayoma; Saikaly, Pascal E; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342 μg g(-1) of copper, 487 μg g(-1) of lead, 793 μg g(-1) of zinc, 27 μg g(-1) of nickel and 2.3 μg g(-1) of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3 gdry weight L(-1) waste activated sludge, 80-85% of the copper, 66-69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94-99% of the nickel and 73-83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead.

  15. Biomechanical characteristics of polymeric UHMWPE composites with hybrid matrix and dispersed fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, Sergey; Kornienko, Lyudmila; Shilko, Sergey; Thuc, Nguyen Xuan; Korchagin, Mikhail; Chaikina, Marina

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop artificial joint implants some biomechanical properties of composites with UHMWPE and hybrid (polymer-polymeric) "UHMWPE+PTFE" matrix with dispersed fillers were studied. A comparative analysis of the effectiveness of adding hydroxyapatite micron- and nanopowders as a biocompatible filler was carried out. It was shown that under dry sliding friction the wear rate of nanocomposites with the hybrid matrix is lower as compared with composites with the non-hybrid one. Mechanical activation of components further enhances the durability of nano- and microcomposites to almost double it without any significant reduction in the strength characteristics.

  16. Rapid Polymer Concrete Repairs Using Available Fillers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    report was reviewed and cleared for public release by the Air Force Research Laboratory Tyndall Site (AFRL/MLQ) Public Affairs Office (PAO) and is...AFRL-ML-TY-TP-2005-4544 RAPID POLYMER CONCRETE REPAIRS USING AVAILABLE FILLERS David W. Fowler, Ph. D, P.E., Chul Suh, P.E., and...February 2006 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Air Force Research Laboratory Materials and

  17. Technical Considerations for Filler and Neuromodulator Refinements

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Anthony J.; Chang, Brian L.; Percec, Ivona

    2016-01-01

    Background: The toolbox for cosmetic practitioners is growing at an unprecedented rate. There are novel products every year and expanding off-label indications for neurotoxin and soft-tissue filler applications. Consequently, aesthetic physicians are increasingly challenged by the task of selecting the most appropriate products and techniques to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Methods: We employed a PubMed literature search of facial injectables from the past 10 years (2005–2015), with emphasis on those articles embracing evidence-based medicine. We evaluated the scientific background of every product and the physicochemical properties that make each one ideal for specific indications. The 2 senior authors provide commentary regarding their clinical experience with specific technical refinements of neuromodulators and soft-tissue fillers. Results: Neurotoxins and fillers are characterized by unique physical characteristics that distinguish each product. This results in subtle but important differences in their clinical applications. Specific indications and recommendations for the use of the various neurotoxins and soft-tissue fillers are reviewed. The discussion highlights refinements in combination treatments and product physical modifications, according to specific treatment zones. Conclusions: The field of facial aesthetics has evolved dramatically, mostly secondary to our increased understanding of 3-dimensional structural volume restoration. Our work reviews Food and Drug Administration–approved injectables. In addition, we describe how to modify products to fulfill specific indications such as treatment of the mid face, décolletage, hands, and periorbital regions. Although we cannot directly evaluate the duration or exact physical properties of blended products, we argue that “product customization” is safe and provides natural results with excellent patient outcomes. PMID:28018778

  18. Bio-inspired Fillers for Mechanical Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korley, Lashanda

    2012-02-01

    An examination of natural materials has offered a new perspective on the development of multi-functional materials with enhanced mechanical properties. One important lesson from nature is the utilization of composite structures to impart improved mechanical behavior and enhanced functionality using nanofillers. A relatively unexplored expansion of this bio-inspired, nanoscale filler approach to high performance materials is the incorporation of responsive, multi-functional reinforcing elements in polymeric composites with the goal of combining superior mechanical behavior that can be tuned with additional functionality, such as sensing and bioactivity. One approach is the use of self-assembling small molecules that form uniform, one-dimensional nanostructures as an emerging class of filler components. Another pathway toward mechanical enhancement is the incorporation of stimuli-responsive and high-modulus electrospun nanofibers. We have probed the utilization of high-aspect ratio, self-assembled small molecules and responsive electrospun nanofibers as all-organic nanofillers to achieve significant modulus changes within elastomeric matrices. The influence of matrix-filler interactions and the role of hierarchical organization in these nature-inspired composites will be discussed. Potential applications in barrier technology and drug delivery have also been explored.

  19. Metal Ions, Not Metal-Catalyzed Oxidative Stress, Cause Clay Leachate Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Caitlin C.; Koehl, Jennifer L.; Solanky, Dipesh; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous leachates prepared from natural antibacterial clays, arbitrarily designated CB-L, release metal ions into suspension, have a low pH (3.4–5), generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and H2O2, and have a high oxidation-reduction potential. To isolate the role of pH in the antibacterial activity of CB clay mixtures, we exposed three different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to 10% clay suspensions. The clay suspension completely killed acid-sensitive and acid-tolerant E. coli O157:H7 strains, whereas incubation in a low-pH buffer resulted in a minimal decrease in viability, demonstrating that low pH alone does not mediate antibacterial activity. The prevailing hypothesis is that metal ions participate in redox cycling and produce ROS, leading to oxidative damage to macromolecules and resulting in cellular death. However, E. coli cells showed no increase in DNA or protein oxidative lesions and a slight increase in lipid peroxidation following exposure to the antibacterial leachate. Further, supplementation with numerous ROS scavengers eliminated lipid peroxidation, but did not rescue the cells from CB-L-mediated killing. In contrast, supplementing CB-L with EDTA, a broad-spectrum metal chelator, reduced killing. Finally, CB-L was equally lethal to cells in an anoxic environment as compared to the aerobic environment. Thus, ROS were not required for lethal activity and did not contribute to toxicity of CB-L. We conclude that clay-mediated killing was not due to oxidative damage, but rather, was due to toxicity associated directly with released metal ions. PMID:25502790

  20. SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR ACTIVE CAPS - REMEDIATION OF METALS AND ORGANICS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A; Michael Paller, M; Danny D. Reible, D; Xingmao Ma, X; Ioana G. Petrisor, I

    2007-05-10

    This research evaluated organoclays, zeolites, phosphates, and a biopolymer as sequestering agents for inorganic and organic contaminants. Batch experiments were conducted to identify amendments and mixtures of amendments for metal and organic contaminants removal and retention. Contaminant removal was evaluated by calculating partitioning coefficients. Metal retention was evaluated by desorption studies in which residue from the removal studies was extracted with 1 M MgCl{sub 2} solution. The results indicated that phosphate amendments, some organoclays, and the biopolymer, chitosan, were very effective sequestering agents for metals in fresh and salt water. Organoclays were very effective sorbents for phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Partitioning coefficients for the organoclays were 3000-3500 ml g{sup -1} for benzo(a)pyrene, 400-450 ml g{sup -1} for pyrene, and 50-70 ml g{sup -1} for phenanthrene. Remediation of sites with a mixture of contaminants is more difficult than sites with a single contaminant because metals and organic contaminants have different fate and transport mechanisms in sediment and water. Mixtures of amendments (e.g., organoclay and rock phosphate) have high potential for remediating both organic and inorganic contaminants under a broad range of environmental conditions, and have promise as components in active caps for sediment remediation.

  1. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Crespo, José L

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis.

  2. A ferritin from Dendrorhynchus zhejiangensis with heavy metals detoxification activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenghua; Li, Zhen; Li, Ye; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Chundan; Su, Xiurong; Li, Taiwu

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin, an iron homeostasis protein, has important functions in transition and storage of toxic metal ions. In this study, the full-length cDNA of ferritin was isolated from Dendrorhynchus zhejiangensis by cDNA library and RACE approaches. The higher similarity and conserved motifs for ferritin were also identified in worm counterparts, indicating that it belonged to a new member of ferritin family. The temporal expression of worm ferritin in haemocytes was analyzed by RT-PCR, and revealed the ferritin could be induced by Cd(2+), Pb(2+) and Fe(2+). The heavy metal binding activity of recombinant ferritin was further elucidated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was observed that the ferritin protein could form a chain of beads with different size against three metals exposure, and the largest one with 35~40 nm in height was identified in the Cd(2+) challenge group. Our results indicated that worm ferritin was a promising candidate for heavy metals detoxification.

  3. A Ferritin from Dendrorhynchus zhejiangensis with Heavy Metals Detoxification Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenghua; Li, Zhen; Li, Ye; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Chundan; Su, Xiurong; Li, Taiwu

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin, an iron homeostasis protein, has important functions in transition and storage of toxic metal ions. In this study, the full-length cDNA of ferritin was isolated from Dendrorhynchus zhejiangensis by cDNA library and RACE approaches. The higher similarity and conserved motifs for ferritin were also identified in worm counterparts, indicating that it belonged to a new member of ferritin family. The temporal expression of worm ferritin in haemocytes was analyzed by RT-PCR, and revealed the ferritin could be induced by Cd2+, Pb2+ and Fe2+. The heavy metal binding activity of recombinant ferritin was further elucidated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was observed that the ferritin protein could form a chain of beads with different size against three metals exposure, and the largest one with 35∼40 nm in height was identified in the Cd2+ challenge group. Our results indicated that worm ferritin was a promising candidate for heavy metals detoxification. PMID:23284696

  4. DNA nuclease activity of Rev-coupled transition metal chelates.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Jeff C; Keuper, Kevin D; Cowan, J A

    2012-06-07

    Artificial nucleases containing Rev-coupled metal chelates based on combinations of the transition metals Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) and the chelators DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, NTA, tripeptide GGH, and tetrapeptide KGHK have been tested for DNA nuclease activity. Originally designed to target reactive transition metal chelates (M-chelates) to the HIV-1 Rev response element mRNA, attachment to the arginine-rich Rev peptide also increases DNA-binding affinity for the attached M-chelates. Apparent K(D) values ranging from 1.7 to 3.6 µM base pairs for binding of supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA by Ni-chelate-Rev complexes were observed, as a result of electrostatic attraction between the positively-charged Rev peptide and negatively-charged DNA. Attachment of M-chelates to the Rev peptide resulted in enhancements of DNA nuclease activity ranging from 1-fold (no enhancement) to at least 13-fold (for Cu-DTPA-Rev), for the rate of DNA nicking, with second order rate constants for conversion of DNA(supercoiled) to DNA(nicked) up to 6 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1), and for conversion of DNA(nicked) to DNA(linear) up to 1 × 10(5) M(-1) min(-1). Freifelder-Trumbo analysis and the ratios of linearization and nicking rate constants (k(lin)/k(nick)) revealed concerted mechanisms for nicking and subsequent linearization of plasmid DNA for all of the Rev-coupled M-chelates, consistent with higher DNA residency times for the Rev-coupled M-chelates. Observed rates for Rev-coupled M-chelates were less skewed by differing DNA-binding affinities than for M-chelates lacking Rev, as a result of the narrow range of DNA-binding affinities observed, and therefore relationships between DNA nuclease activity and other catalyst properties, such as coordination unsaturation, the ability to consume ascorbic acid and generate diffusible radicals, and the identity of the metal center, are now clearly illustrated in light of the similar DNA-binding affinities of all M-chelate-Rev complexes. This work

  5. Development of High Performance CFRP/Metal Active Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Hiroshi; Haga, Osamu; Imori, Masataka

    This paper describes development of high performance CFRP/metal active laminates mainly by investigating the kind and thickness of the metal. Various types of the laminates were made by hot-pressing of an aluminum, aluminum alloys, a stainless steel and a titanium for the metal layer as a high CTE material, a unidirectional CFRP prepreg as a low CTE/electric resistance heating material, a unidirectional KFRP prepreg as a low CTE/insulating material. The aluminum and its alloy type laminates have almost the same and the highest room temperature curvatures and they linearly change with increasing temperature up to their fabrication temperature. The curvature of the stainless steel type jumps from one to another around its fabrication temperature, whereas the titanium type causes a double curvature and its change becomes complicated. The output force of the stainless steel type attains the highest of the three under the same thickness. The aluminum type successfully increased its output force by increasing its thickness and using its alloys. The electric resistance of the CFRP layer can be used to monitor the temperature, that is, the curvature of the active laminate because the curvature is a function of temperature.

  6. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL(1) and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL(2) derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML((1-2)2) have been synthesized, where M=Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mnactivity at different concentrations against bacteria viz. Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina. A marked enhancement in biocidal activity of the ligands under similar experimental conditions was observed as a consequence of coordination with metal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu>Mn>Ni>Co>Zn.

  7. Metal concentration and antioxidant activity of edible mushrooms from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sarikurkcu, Cengiz; Tepe, Bektas; Kocak, Mehmet Sefa; Uren, Mehmet Cemil

    2015-05-15

    This study presents information on the antioxidant activity and heavy metal concentrations of Polyporus sulphureus, Macrolepiota procera, Lycoperdon perlatum and Gomphus clavatus mushrooms collected from the province of Mugla in the South-Aegean Region of Turkey. Antioxidant activities of mushroom samples were evaluated by four complementary tests. All tests showed L. perlatum and G. clavatus to possess extremely high antioxidant potential. Antioxidant activity of the samples was strongly correlated with total phenolic-flavonoid content. In terms of heavy metal content, L. perlatum exceeded the legal limits for daily intake of Pb, Fe, Mn, Cr, Ni and Co contents (0.461, 738.00, 14.52, 1.27, 1.65, 0.417 mg/day, respectively) by a 60-kg consumer. Co contents of M. procera (0.026 mg/day) and P. sulphureus (0.030 mg/day) and Cd contents of G. clavatus (0.071 mg/day) were also above the legal limits. According to these results, L. perlatum should not be consumed, despite the potentially beneficial antioxidant activity. Additionally, M. procera and G. clavatus should not be consumed daily due to their high levels of Cd and Co.

  8. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  9. X-ray study of Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk metallic glass brazing filler for Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, E.; Ice, Gene E; Specht, Eliot D; Pang, Judy; Kato, H.; Hisatsune, K.; Inoue, I.

    2007-01-01

    Crystalline precipitates in a bulk-metallic-glass (BMG) braze were investigated with an intense x-ray microbeam. The precipitates were found in the Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}P{sub 20}Ni{sub 10} BMG braze matrix after joining crystalline Ti-6Al-7Nb. However, the role (if any) played by the precipitates in improving the mechanical bond of the BMG/crystalline joint is unknown. X-ray microdiffraction and microfluorescence measurements from small sample volumes were made with an {approx} 0.5 x 0.5 {micro}m2 beam. Spatially-resolved Laue diffraction and x-ray fluorescence measurements were made on several second-phase crystals within the BMG matrix. Although precipitate crystals with the observed compositions were anticipated to be predominantly hexagonal, one of the crystals was found to be cubic or tetragonal. The instrumentation includes capabilities for 3D depth-resolved measurements of crystal structure and for fluorescence analysis of elemental composition. Depth profiling gave information about the grain distribution and morphology in the BMG matrix.

  10. X-ray Study of Pd[subscript 40]Cu[subscript 30]Ni[subscript 10]P[subscript 20] Bulk Metallic Glass Brazing Filler For Ti-6Al-7Nb Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, E.; Ice, G.E.; Specht, E.D.; Pang, J.W.L.; Kato, H.; Hisatsune, K.; Inoue, A.

    2007-10-02

    Crystalline precipitates in a bulk-metallic-glass (BMG) braze were investigated with an intense x-ray microbeam. The precipitates were found in the Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}P{sub 20}Ni{sub 10} BMG braze matrix after joining crystalline Ti-6Al-7Nb. However, the role (if any) played by the precipitates in improving the mechanical bond of the BMG/crystalline joint is unknown. X-ray microdiffraction and microfluorescence measurements from small sample volumes were made with an {approx} 0.5 x 0.5 {micro}m2 beam. Spatially-resolved Laue diffraction and x-ray fluorescence measurements were made on several second-phase crystals within the BMG matrix. Although precipitate crystals with the observed compositions were anticipated to be predominantly hexagonal, one of the crystals was found to be cubic or tetragonal. The instrumentation includes capabilities for 3D depth-resolved measurements of crystal structure and for fluorescence analysis of elemental composition. Depth profiling gave information about the grain distribution and morphology in the BMG matrix.

  11. Investigating Filler Reinforcement and Nonlinear Viscoelastic Behavior in Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Wang, Shi-Qing; von Meerwall, Ernst

    2004-03-01

    Solid fillers have been known to enhance the linear viscoelastic responses of polymer melts and elastomers. Nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of such systems is closely related to the reinforcement of the linear viscoelascity. Understanding such phenomena as the Payne effect (where the storage modulus is measured to decrease in oscillatory shear with the amplitude of the oscillation and with time for a fixed amplitude) requires a better understanding of the filler reinforcement mechanism. Recent publications, from two different groups (a) (b) prompted our present study. Using monodisperse 1,4-polybutadiene melts as the matrix and nano-silicon oxide particles of 15 nm diameter as the fillers, we carried out a variety of viscoelastic and NMR-spin-echo diffusion measurements to elucidate the important role of the filler-filler networking in controlling the observed linear and nonlinear behavior at temperatures over 100 degrees above the glass transition temperature of PBD. (a)S.S. Sternstein and A. Zhu, Macromolecules 35, 7262 (2002); Composites Sci. and Techn. 63, 1113 (2003). This work claims that the reinforcement arises primarily from the entrapped chain entanglement due to chain adsorption on filler surfaces instead of the filler-filler networking. (b) H. Montes, F. Lequeux and J. Berriot, Macromolecules, 36, 8107 (2003). This work advocates that a glassy layer formed around each filler is responsible for the enhanced linear viscoelascity and for the observed nonlinear viscoelastic behavior such as the Payne effect.

  12. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  13. Coaggregation of mineral filler particles and starch granules as a basis for improving filler-fiber interaction in paper production.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Fan, Jun; Chen, Wensen; Shu, Jiayan; Qian, Xueren; Wei, Haifeng; Wang, Qingwen; Shen, Jing

    2016-09-20

    The sustainable, efficient use of renewable bio-based additives in the production of various materials fits well into the concept of sustainability. Here, the concept of coaggregation of mineral filler particles and starch granules for improving filler-fiber interaction in paper-based cellulosic networks is presented. Coaggregation of precipitated calcium carbonate filler particles and uncooked, unmodified corn starch granules by cationic polyacrylamide (a cationic high molecular weight polymer flocculant) in combination with bentonite (an anionic microparticle) prior to addition to cellulosic fiber slurry delivered enhanced filler bondability with cellulosic fibers. For instance, under the conditions studied, preaggregation resulted in an increase in filler bondability factor from 9.24 to 15.21 at starch dosage of 1% (on the basis of the dry weight of papermaking stock). The swelling and gelatinization of the starch granules in starch-filler preaggregates or hybrids enabled the "bridging" of the gaps in cellulosic networks, leading to structural consolidation and strength enhancement.

  14. Biofilms Versus Activated Sludge: Considerations in Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Removal from Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Walden, Connie; Zhang, Wen

    2016-08-16

    The increasing application of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles [Me(O)NPs] in consumer products has led to a growth in concentration of these nanoparticles in wastewater as emerging contaminants. This may pose a threat to ecological communities (e.g., biological nutrient removal units) within treatment plants and those subject to wastewater effluents. Here, the toxicity, fate, and process implications of Me(O)NPs within wastewater treatment, specifically during activated sludge processing and biofilm systems are reviewed and compared. Research showed activated sludge achieves high removal rate of Me(O)NPs by the formation of aggregates through adsorption. However, recent literature reveals evidence that inhibition is likely for nutrient removal capabilities such as nitrification. Biofilm systems were much less studied, but show potential to resist Me(O)NP inhibition and achieve removal through possible retention by sorption. Implicating factors during bacteria-Me(O)NP interactions such as aggregation, surface functionalization, and the presence of organics are summarized. At current modeled levels, neither activated sludge nor biofilm systems can achieve complete removal of Me(O)NPs, thus allowing for long-term environmental exposure of diverse biological communities to Me(O)NPs in streams receiving wastewater effluents. Future research directions are identified throughout in order to minimize the impact of these nanoparticles released.

  15. Large Area Active Brazing of Multi-tile Ceramic-Metal Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    metal brazing . The active brazing alloys wet most materials (including ceramics and corrosion- resistant metals such as titanium alloys and stainless...bonding in ceramic-metal systems is active metal brazing . The active brazing alloys wet most materials (including ceramics and corrosion-resistant...an idea from the ‘50s by putting an “active” component, such as titanium, directly into a brazing alloy , typically a silver-copper eutectic, to

  16. Filler particles used in dental biomaterials induce production and release of inflammatory mediators in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ansteinsson, Vibeke E; Samuelsen, Jan Tore; Dahl, Jon E

    2009-04-01

    Although dental composites are in extensive use today, little is known about the biological effects of the filler particles. As composite materials are gradually broken down in the aggressive environment of the oral cavity, the filler particles may leak and induce toxic effects on the surrounding tissue and cells. The aim of this study was to elucidate possible adverse biological effects of commonly used dental filler particles; bariumaluminiumsilica (BaAlSi) and bariumaluminiumfluorosilica (BaAlFSi) with mean size of 1 microm. BEAS-2B cells were used as a model system. Particle morphology, mean particle size in solution, and particle surface charge were determined by scanning electron microscopy and Malvern zetasizer technology, respectively. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect secretion of cytokine and chemokine (IL-8 and IL-6) and quantitative PCR for detection of gene activity. Both types of particle increased the release of IL-6 and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. BaAlFSi particles induced a more marked IL-8 response compared to BaAlSi particles, whereas no significant difference was observed for the IL-6 response. Mechanistic studies using specific inhibitors and activators indicated that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A is partly involved in the observed IL-8 response. In conclusion, we consider dental filler particles to have potential to induce adverse biological response in cell cultures.

  17. Esthetic Reconstruction of Diastema with Adhesive Tooth-Colored Restorations and Hyaluronic Acid Fillers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective. This report presents a comprehensive esthetic treatment with adhesive tooth-colored restorations in a combination with hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers of diastema in an orthodontic patient with relapse. Case Report. A 36-year-old female patient consulted about 1.5–2 mm midline diastema after an orthodontic relapse of replacing missing central incisors with lateral incisors and dark-colored gingival tissue as a result of a metal post and core with porcelain fused to a metal (PFM) crown at the left lateral incisor. Restorative treatments included replacing the PFM with all-ceramic material and placing a ceramic veneer on the right lateral incisor. To close the space, crown forms of both lateral incisors were altered. A direct resin composite was then used to reform right and left canines to a more ideal lateral incisor shape. An HA fillers injection was used to fill the remaining open gingival embrasure. Eighteen months after treatment, the interdental papilla remained stable and the patient was satisfied with the result. Conclusion. Esthetic reconstruction of diastema and open gingival embrasure in this case can be accomplished without orthodontic retreatment. Tooth-colored restorations and HA filler injection appear as a promising modality to address this patient's esthetic concern. PMID:28386488

  18. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  19. Welding, bonding, and sealing of refractory metals by vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Plating process welds, bonds, and seals refractory metals without weakening or changing the structure of the base metals. A metal halide compound in the vapor phase is decomposed to deposit filler metal on the base metal. The resulting bond is a true metal-to-metal bond.

  20. Transition metal activation and functionalization of carbon-hydrogen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.D.

    1992-06-01

    We are investigating the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic factors that influence carbon-hydrogen bond activation at homogeneous transition metal centers and the conversion of hydrocarbons into functionalized products of potential use to the chemical industry. Advances have been made in both understanding the interactions of hydrocarbons with metals and in the functionalization of hydrocarbons. We have found that RhCl(PR{sub 3}){sub 2}(CNR) complexes can catalyze the insertion of isonitriles into the C-H bonds or arenes upon photolysis. The mechanism of these reactions was found to proceed by way of initial phosphine dissociation, followed by C-H activation and isonitrile insertion. We have also examined reactions of a series of arenes with (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})PhH and begun to map out the kinetic and thermodynamic preferences for arene coordination. The effects of resonance, specifically the differences in the Hueckel energies of the bound vs free ligand, are now believed to fully control the C-H activation/{eta}{sup 2}-coordination equilibria. We have begun to examine the reactions of rhodium isonitrile pyrazolylborates for alkane and arene C-H bond activation. A new, labile, carbodiimide precursor has been developed for these studies. We have completed studies of the reactions of (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})H{sub 2} with D{sub 2} and PMe{sub 3} that indicate that both {eta}{sup 5} {yields} {eta}{sup 3} ring slippage and metal to ring hydride migration occur more facilely than thermal reductive elimination of H{sub 2}. We have examined the reactions of heterocycles with (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})PhH and found that pyrrole and furan undergo C-H or N-H activation. Thiophene, however, undergoes C-S bond oxidative addition, and the mechanism of activation has been shown to proceed through sulfur coordination prior to C-S insertion.

  1. Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals, 6-Year Exposure Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder

    2006-03-01

    The subsurface radioactive disposal site located at the Idaho National Laboratory contains neutronactivated metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term underground corrosion test is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in the surrounding arid vadose zone environment. The test uses nonradioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated materials buried at the disposal location, namely, Type 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403), Type 316L stainless steel (S31603), nickel-chromium alloy (UNS NO7718), beryllium, aluminum 6061-T6 (A96061), and a zirconium alloy (UNS R60804). In addition, carbon steel (the material presently used in the cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and a duplex stainless steel (UNS S32550) are also included in the test. This paper briefly describes the ongoing test and presents the results of corrosion analysis from coupons exposed underground for 1, 3, and 6 years.

  2. Nitrification and Heavy Metal Removal in the Activated Sludge Treatment Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    parameters to heavy metal removal in the activated sludge waste treatment process. The heavy metals studied were chromium and silver. Analyses...performed on the influent, mixed liquor, return sludge, and effluent included heavy metal concentration, pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, suspended solids...related to heavy metal removal. Nitrification is only indirectly related. A theory for the mechanisms contributing to heavy metal removal is developed.

  3. TSCA Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Reporting Manufactured Chemical Substances from Metal Mining and Related Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet provides guidance on the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule requirements related to the reporting of mined metals, intermediates, and byproducts manufactured during metal mining and related activities.

  4. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry...

  5. Use of nut shells as fillers in polymer composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The three nutshell fillers including walnut, almond and pistachio nutshell were added to PLA. All the physical properties of samples deteriorated relative to PLA. When subjected to heat pre-treatment, although the physical properties of PLA-filler samples still deteriorated, the extent of deteriorat...

  6. Selecting fillers on emotional appearance improves lineup identification accuracy.

    PubMed

    Flowe, Heather D; Klatt, Thimna; Colloff, Melissa F

    2014-12-01

    Mock witnesses sometimes report using criminal stereotypes to identify a face from a lineup, a tendency known as criminal face bias. Faces are perceived as criminal-looking if they appear angry. We tested whether matching the emotional appearance of the fillers to an angry suspect can reduce criminal face bias. In Study 1, mock witnesses (n = 226) viewed lineups in which the suspect had an angry, happy, or neutral expression, and we varied whether the fillers matched the expression. An additional group of participants (n = 59) rated the faces on criminal and emotional appearance. As predicted, mock witnesses tended to identify suspects who appeared angrier and more criminal-looking than the fillers. This tendency was reduced when the lineup fillers matched the emotional appearance of the suspect. Study 2 extended the results, testing whether the emotional appearance of the suspect and fillers affects recognition memory. Participants (n = 1,983) studied faces and took a lineup test in which the emotional appearance of the target and fillers was varied between subjects. Discrimination accuracy was enhanced when the fillers matched an angry target's emotional appearance. We conclude that lineup member emotional appearance plays a critical role in the psychology of lineup identification. The fillers should match an angry suspect's emotional appearance to improve lineup identification accuracy.

  7. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  8. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  9. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  10. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  11. 7 CFR 29.6129 - Farm Filler (Y Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Farm Filler (Y Group). 29.6129 Section 29.6129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6129 Farm Filler (Y Group). This group consists...

  12. Fillers as Signals: Evidence from a Question-Answering Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Esther J.; Risko, Evan F.; Kingstone, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of a human or computer "partner" on the production of fillers ("um" and "uh") during a question and answer task. Experiment 1 investigated whether or not responding to a human partner as opposed to a computer partner results in a higher rate of filler production. Participants…

  13. Simulation of Polymer Physical Gel With Platelet Fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Di; Gerssape, Dilip

    Platelet filler such as clays have superior effects on the properties of polymer gels. We used molecular dynamic simulations to study platelet filled composite gels system, in which small hexagonal disks simulate the platelets and gelation is due to short-range attraction between end-monomers and platelets. The properties of platelet filled composites are studied as a function of filler concentration. The mechanism of gelation was found similar to those of pure polymer gels; the polymers and platelets formed organic-inorganic networks, which percolate at high enough filler concentration. It was observed platelets aggregated into local intercalation structure, which significantly differs from typical spherical fillers. This unique intercalation structure is examined by radial distribution function and ordering parameters. We discussed how intercalation would affect the properties of the platelet composites by comparing them with spherical fillers.

  14. Microvascular complications associated with injection of cosmetic facelift dermal fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Prendes, Mark; Chang, Shu-Hong; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-02-01

    Minimally-invasive cosmetic surgeries such as injection of subdermal fillers have become very popular in the past decade. Although rare, some complications may follow injections such as tissue necrosis and even blindness. There exist two hypothesis regarding source of these complications both of which include microvasculature. The first hypothesis is that fillers in between the tissue structures and compress microvasculature that causes blockage of tissue neutrition and oxygen exchange in the tissue. In another theory, it is hypothesized that fillers move inside major arteries and block the arteries/veins. In this paper, we study these hypotheses using optical coherence tomography and optical microangiography technologies with different hyaluronic-acid fillers in a mouse ear model. Based on our observations, the fillers eventually block arteries/veins if injected directly into them that eventually causes tissue necrosis.

  15. Managing Complications of Fillers: Rare and Not-So-Rare

    PubMed Central

    Haneke, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Fillers belong to the most frequently used beautifying products. They are generally well tolerated, but any one of them may occasionally produce adverse side effects. Adverse effects usually last as long as the filler is in the skin, which means that short-lived fillers have short-term side effects and permanent fillers may induce life-long adverse effects. The main goal is to prevent them, however, this is not always possible. Utmost care has to be given to the prevention of infections and the injection technique has to be perfect. Treatment of adverse effects is often with hyaluronidase or steroid injections and in some cases together with 5-fluorouracil plus allopurinol orally. Histological examination of biopsy specimens often helps to identify the responsible filler allowing a specific treatment to be adapted. PMID:26865784

  16. The effect of filler addition and oven temperature to the antioxidant quality in the drying of Physalis angulata leaf extract obtained by subcritical water extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanti, R. F.; Natalia, Desy

    2016-11-01

    In traditional medicine, Physalis angulata which is well known as ceplukan in Indonesia, has been utilized to cure several diseases by conventional extraction in hot water. The investigation of the Swietenia mahagoni extract activity in modern medicine typically utilized organic solvents such as ethanol, methanol, chloroform and hexane in extraction. In this research, subcritical water was used as a solvent instead of organic solvent to extract the Pysalis angulata leaf part. The focus of this research was the investigation of extract drying condition in the presence of filler to preserve the quality of antioxidant in Swietenia mahagoni extract. Filler, which is inert, was added to the extract during drying to help absorb the water while protect the extract from exposure in heat during drying. The effects of filler types, concentrations and oven drying temperatures were investigated to the antioxidant quality covering total phenol and antioxidant activity. Aerosil and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) were utilized as fillers with concentration was varied from 0-30 wt% for MCC and 0-15 wt% for aerosil. The oven drying temperature was varied from 40-60 oC. The results showed that compare to extract dried without filler, total phenol and antioxidant activity were improved upon addition of filler. The higher the concentration of filler, the better the antioxidant; however it was limited by the homogeneity of filler in the extract. Both of the variables (oven temperature and concentration) played an important role in the improvement of extract quality of Swietenia mahagoni leaf. It was related to the drying time which can be minimized to protect the deterioration of extract from heat. In addition, filler help to provide the powder form of extract instead of the typical extract form which is sticky and oily.

  17. Transition Metals Catalyzed Element-Cyano Bonds Activations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Falck, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Cyano group as a versatile functionalized intermediate has been explored for several decades, as it readily transfers to many useful functionalization groups such as amine, amide, acid, etc., which make it possess high popularization and use value in organic synthesis. Reactions involved with element-cyano bond cleavage can provide not only a new cyano group but also a freshly functionalized skeleton in one-pot, consequently making it of high importance. The highlights reviewed herein include H-CN, Si-CN, C-CN, B-CN, Sn-CN, Ge-CN, S-CN, Halo-CN, N-CN, and O-CN bonds cleavages and will summarize progress in such an important research area. This review article will focus on transition metal catalyzed reactions involving element-cyano bond activation. PMID:25558119

  18. Filler/ Polycarbosilane Systems as CMC Matrix Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrolytic conversion of polymeric precursors to ceramics is accompanied by loss of volatiles and large volume changes. Infiltration of a low viscosity polymer into a fiber preform will fill small spaces within fiber tows by capillary forces, but create large matrix cracks within large, intertow areas. One approach to minimizing shrinkage and reducing the number of required infiltration cycles is to use particulate fillers. In this study, Starfire allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS) was blended with a silicon carbide powder, with and without dispersant, using shear mixing. The polymer and polymer/particle interactions were characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis and rheometry. Polymer/particulate slurries and suspensions were used to infiltrate a figidized preform of an eight ply five harness satin CG Nicalon fiber having a dual layer BN/SiC interface coating, and the resulting composites characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Filler Materials for Polyphenylenesulphide Composite Coatings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Gawlik, K.

    2001-07-17

    Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have tested polymer-based coating systems to reduce the capital equipment and maintenance costs of heat exchangers in corrosive and fouling geothermal environments. These coating systems act as barriers to corrosion to protect low-cost carbon steel tubing; they are formulated to resist wear from hydroblasting and to have high thermal conductivity. Recently, new filler materials have been developed for coating systems that use polyphenylenesulphide as a matrix. These materials include boehmite crystals (orthorhombic aluminum hydroxide, which is grown in situ as a product of reaction with the geothermal fluid), which enhance wear and corrosion resistance, and carbon fibers, which improve mechanical, thermal, and corrosion-resistance properties of the composite.

  20. Inhibitory Activity Of Curcumin Derivatives Towards Metal-free And Metal-induced Amyloid-β Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kochi, Akiko; Lee, Hyuck Jin; Vithanarachchi, Sashiprabha M; Padmini, Vediappen; Allen, Matthew J; Lim, Mi Hee

    2015-01-01

    When Alzheimer's disease (AD) progresses, several pathological features arise including accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates [e.g., amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques], metal ion dyshomeostasis, and oxidative stress. These characteristics are recently suggested to be interconnected through a potential factor, metal-associated Aβ (metal-Aβ) species. The role of metal-Aβ species in AD pathogenesis remains unclear, however. To elucidate the contribution of metal-Aβ species to AD pathology, as well as to develop small molecules as chemical tools and/or theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic) agents for this disease, curcumin (Cur), a natural product from turmeric, and its derivatives have been studied towards both metal-free and metal-induced Aβ aggregation. Although Cur has indicated anti-amyloidogenic activities and antioxidant properties, its biological use has been hindered due to low solubility and stability in physiologically relevant conditions. Herein, we report the reactivity of Cur and its derivatives (Gd-Cur, a potential multimodal Aβ imaging agent; Cur-S, a water soluble derivative of Cur that has substitution at the phenolic hydroxyls) with metal-free Aβ and metal-Aβ species. Our results and observations indicate that Gd-Cur could modulate Cu(II)-triggered Aβ aggregation more noticeably over metal-free or Zn(II)-induced analogues; however, Cur-S was not observed to noticeably modulate Aβ aggregation with and without metal ions. Overall, our studies present information that could aid in optimizing the molecular scaffold of Cur for the development of chemical tools or theranostics for metal-Aβ species.

  1. Low filler volume concentration composite dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Lynell Joy

    One avenue for synthesizing a high energy density capacitor while circumventing the manufacturing problems and low breakdown strength associated with dense, sintered ceramics, is to incorporate low volume concentrations of well dispersed high permittivity filler, such as barium titanate, in conjunction with polymers, naturally high breakdown strength materials. The focus of this work was to examine the factors that influence the energy density of a composite: the breakdown strength and dielectric constant. First, the breakdown strength of composites synthesized with low filler volume concentrations of particles, barium titanate and titanium dioxide, in an epoxy matrix, was determined. The impact of commercial dispersants, phosphate esters and menhaden fish oil particle size, and solvent polarity on the electrical performance of the epoxy based composite was assessed by thermogravimetrie analysis, and Weibull distributions of the breakdown strength data. The surface of BaTiO3 was found to contain BaCO3 using X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Dispersion quality of acid washed BaTiO3 improved over as-received powder with comparable incorporation of dispersant and solvent system. T1O2 was used as a model to simulate the Ti-rich surface created after acid washing. A range of solids loading, from 5 to 40% volume, for a BaTiO3/epoxy composite system was used to determine the optimum trade-off in factors influencing energy density, dielectric constant or breakdown strength. The composites' components and electrical properties were characterized. Sample and electrode geometry were modified to impart a calculated dielectric constant without the influence of enhanced electric field lines.

  2. Orbiter Gap Filler Bending Model for Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    Pressure loads on a protruding gap filler during an Orbiter reentry are investigated to evaluate the likelihood of extraction due to pressure loads, and to ascertain how much bending will be induced by re-entry pressure loads. Oblique shock wave theory is utilized to develop a representation of the pressure loads induced on a gap filler for the ISSHVFW trajectory, representative of a heavy weight ISS return. A free body diagram is utilized to react the forces induced by the pressure forces. Preliminary results developed using these methods demonstrate that pressure loads, alone, are not likely causes of gap filler extraction during reentry. Assessment of the amount a gap filler will bend over is presented. Implications of gap filler bending during re-entry include possible mitigation of early boundary layer transition concerns, uncertainty in ground based measurement of protruding gap fillers from historical Orbiter flight history, and uncertainty in the use of Orbiter gap fillers for boundary layer prediction calibration. Authors will be added to the author list as appropriate.

  3. Microstructural and rheological analysis of fillers and asphalt mastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geber, R.; Simon, A.; Kocserha, I.; Buzimov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pavements are made of different grades of mineral aggregates and organic binder. The aggregates are sorted in different sizes and different amount which are mixed together with bitumen. The finest mineral fraction (d<0.063 mm) is called filler. This component has an important role in asphalt mixture - it fills the gaps between the aggregates and if mixed with bitumen (which is called asphalt mastics) it sticks the larger particles together. Particle size, microstructure and surface properties of fillers highly affect the cohesion with bitumen, therefore the aim of our research was to investigate the microstructure of mineral fillers (limestone, dolomite) which are used in Hungarian road constructions with the use of different techniques (particle size distribution, scanning electronmicroscopy tests, mercury intrusion porosimetry, BET specific surface tests, determination of hydrophobicity). After the tests of fillers, asphalt mastics were prepared and rheological examinations were obtained. These examinations served to observe the interaction and the effect of fillers. The stiffening effect of fillers and the causes of rutting were also investigated. Based on our results, it can be stated that particle size, hydrophobic properties and the amount of fillers highly affect the rheological properties of mastics.

  4. Wear of nanofilled dental composites at varying filler concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nanofiller concentration on the mechanisms of wear of a dental composite. Nanofilled composites were fabricated with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate polymer and 40 nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25, 50, and 65 wt %). The elastic modulus, flexural strength, and hardness of the composites and the unfilled resin were measured. The materials (n = 8) were tested in the modified wear testing device at 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles with 20N force at 1 Hz. A 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist were used. The worn composite and antagonist surfaces were analyzed with noncontact profilometry and SEM. The volumetric wear data indicated that there are significant differences between filler concentrations and cycles (p < 0.05). A trend was noted that increasing filler content beyond 25% decreased the wear resistance of the composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and modulus and increased flexural strength up to 50% fill. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the resin and 25% filled materials exhibited cracking and failed by fatigue and the 50 and 65% filled materials exhibited microcutting and failed by abrasive wear. Based on the results of this study, composite manufacturers are recommended to use a filler concentration between 25 and 50% when using nanosized filler particles.

  5. 77 FR 10544 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Nonferrous Metals Surveys (30...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... Geological Survey Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Nonferrous Metals Surveys... requirements for the Nonferrous Metals Surveys. This collection consists of 30 forms. The revision includes... Metals Surveys. Type of Request: Revision of a currently approved collection. Affected Public:...

  6. 76 FR 9810 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Ferrous Metals Surveys (17 Forms)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Geological Survey Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Ferrous Metals Surveys... to supply the USGS with domestic consumption data of 13 ores, concentrates, metals, and ferroalloys... OMB Control Number: 1028-0068. Form Number: Various (17 forms). Title: Ferrous Metals Surveys. Type...

  7. 76 FR 52686 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Nonferrous Metals Surveys (30...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... Geological Survey Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Nonferrous Metals Surveys.... II. Data OMB Control Number: 1028-0053. Form Number: Various (30 forms). Title: Nonferrous Metals....S. nonfuel minerals producers of nonferrous and related metals. Respondent Obligation:...

  8. Graphite-to-304SS Braze Joining by Active Metal-Brazing Technique: Improvement of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Ajoy K.; Kar, Abhijit; Kori, S. A.; Pathak, L. C.; Sonnad, A. N.

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to improve the mechanical strength of graphite-stainless steel-brazed joint. Due to high capillary action, the liquid filler alloy usually tends to percolate into the pores of graphite causing severe stress in the graphite near the joint interface resulting in poor joint strength of 10-15 MPa. In the present investigation, a thin coating of SiC was applied on graphite before the joining process to avoid the penetration of liquid filler alloy into the pores of the graphite. Active filler alloy Ag-Cu-Ti was used to braze the substrates. The brazing was carried out at 850, 900, 950, and 1000 °C. The characterization of the interfaces of the brazed joints was carried out using scanning electron microscopy attached with energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis. From the correlation between the microstructural and mechanical properties, shear strength of approximately 35 MPa for graphite-304SS-brazed joint produced at 900 °C was demonstrated. After the shear tests, the fracture surfaces were analyzed by SEM-EDS.

  9. Assessment of Trace Metals in Soil, Vegetation and Rodents in Relation to Metal Mining Activities in an Arid Environment.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Rodríguez, Lia C; Alvarez-Castañeda, Sergio Ticul

    2016-07-01

    Areas where abandoned metal-extraction mines are located contain large quantities of mineral wastes derived from environmentally unsafe mining practices. These wastes contain many pollutants, such as heavy metals, which could be released to the environment through weathering and leaching, hence becoming an important source of environmental metal pollution. This study evaluates differences in the levels of lead, iron, nickel, manganese, copper and cadmium in rodents sharing the same type of diet under different microhabitat use in arid areas with past mining activities. Samples of soil, roots, branches and seeds of Palo Adán (Fouquieria diguetii) and specimens of two rodent species (Chaetodipus arenarius and C. spinatus) were collected in areas with impact from past metal mining activities as well as from areas with no mining impact. Both rodent species mirrored nickel and iron levels in soil and seeds, as well as lead levels in soil; however, C. arenarius accumulated higher levels of manganese, copper and cadmium.

  10. Activity and diffusion of metals in binary aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jao, C. S.

    1980-12-01

    To determine the activity of zinc in Zn-Al alloys, the electromotive force (emf) of the cell: Zn/ZnCl/sub 2/-KC1 (eut)/Zn,Al was measured at temperatures between 569.5 K (296.5C) and 649.5 K (376.5C). The applicability of a two-suffix Margules equation was demonstrated, in good agreement with theoretical expectations. The diffusion coefficient of Zn in Al determined from a planar diffusion model for the experimental data was about 3 x 10/sup -10/ cm/sup 2//sec to 2 x 10/sup -9/ cm/sup 2//sec in the range of temperature studied. This is higher than that found in the literature. The most plausible reason appears to be the high alumina concentration in the working electrode because of partial oxidation. Oxidation of the alloying metals was the primary cause of poor alloying between calcium/or zinc and aluminum, thereby frustrating similar measurements at a Ca-Al/or Zn-Al alloy. The literature on the activity of calcium and zinc is aluminum is reviewed.

  11. Boosting catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles for 4-nitrophenol reduction: Modification of metal naoparticles with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride).

    PubMed

    You, Jyun-Guo; Shanmugam, Chandirasekar; Liu, Yao-Wen; Yu, Cheng-Ju; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2017-02-15

    Most of the previously reported studies have focused on the change in the size, morphology, and composition of metal nanocatalysts for improving their catalytic activity. Herein, we report poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) [PDDA]-stabilized nanoparticles (NPs) of platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) as highly active and efficient catalysts for hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in the presence of NaBH4. PDDA-stabilized Pt and Pd NPs possessed similar particle size and same facet with citrate-capped Pt and Pd NPs, making this study to investigate the inter-relationship between catalytic activity and surface ligand without the consideration of the effects of particle size and facet. Compared to citrate-capped Pt and Pd NPs, PDDA-stabilized Pt and Pd NPs exhibited excellent pH and salt stability. PDDA could serve as an electron acceptor for metal NPs to produce the net positive charges on the metal surface, which provide strong electrostatic attraction with negatively charged nitrophenolate and borohydride ions. The activity parameter and rate constant of PDDA-stabilized metal NPs were higher than those of citrate-capped metal NPs. Compared to the previously reported Pd nanomaterials for the catalysis of NaBH4-mediated reduction of 4-NP, PDDA-stabilized Pd NPs exhibited the extremely high activity parameter (195s(-1)g(-1)) and provided excellent scalability and reusability.

  12. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance: Resorbable Calcium Salt Bone Void Filler Device; Guidance...

  17. Asymmetric photoredox transition-metal catalysis activated by visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Haohua; Shen, Xiaodong; Wang, Chuanyong; Zhang, Lilu; Röse, Philipp; Chen, Liang-An; Harms, Klaus; Marsch, Michael; Hilt, Gerhard; Meggers, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Asymmetric catalysis is seen as one of the most economical strategies to satisfy the growing demand for enantiomerically pure small molecules in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. And visible light has been recognized as an environmentally friendly and sustainable form of energy for triggering chemical transformations and catalytic chemical processes. For these reasons, visible-light-driven catalytic asymmetric chemistry is a subject of enormous current interest. Photoredox catalysis provides the opportunity to generate highly reactive radical ion intermediates with often unusual or unconventional reactivities under surprisingly mild reaction conditions. In such systems, photoactivated sensitizers initiate a single electron transfer from (or to) a closed-shell organic molecule to produce radical cations or radical anions whose reactivities are then exploited for interesting or unusual chemical transformations. However, the high reactivity of photoexcited substrates, intermediate radical ions or radicals, and the low activation barriers for follow-up reactions provide significant hurdles for the development of efficient catalytic photochemical processes that work under stereochemical control and provide chiral molecules in an asymmetric fashion. Here we report a highly efficient asymmetric catalyst that uses visible light for the necessary molecular activation, thereby combining asymmetric catalysis and photocatalysis. We show that a chiral iridium complex can serve as a sensitizer for photoredox catalysis and at the same time provide very effective asymmetric induction for the enantioselective alkylation of 2-acyl imidazoles. This new asymmetric photoredox catalyst, in which the metal centre simultaneously serves as the exclusive source of chirality, the catalytically active Lewis acid centre, and the photoredox centre, offers new opportunities for the `green' synthesis of non-racemic chiral molecules.

  18. Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity Of Antibiotics Mixed With Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    Current producers of antimicrobial technology have a long lasting, environmentally safe, non-leaching, water soluble solution that will eventually replace all poisons and heavy metals. The transition metal ions inevitably exist as metal complexes in biological systems by interaction with the numerous molecules possessing groupings capable of complexation or chelation. Nanoparticles of metal oxides offer a wide variety of potential applications in medicine due to the unprecedented advances in nanobiotechnology research. the bacterial action of antibiotics like penicillin, erythryomycin, ampicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin etc. and that of a mixture of antibiotics and metal and metal oxide nanoparticles like zinc oxide, zirconium, silver and gold on microbes was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units (CFU) and turbidimetry.

  19. Active metal oxides and polymer hybrids as biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrell, John D.

    Bone anchored prosthetic attachments, like other percutaneous devices, suffer from poor soft tissue integration, seen as chronic inflammation, infection, epithelial downgrowth and regression. We looked at the use of metal oxides as bioactive agents that elicit different bioresponses, ranging from cell attachment, tissue integration and reduction of inflammation to modulation of cell proliferation, morphology and microbe killing. This study presents a novel method for creating titanium oxide and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) hybrid coated microplates for high throughput biological, bacterial and photocatalytic screening that overcomes several limitations of using bulk metal samples. Titanium oxide coatings were doped with silver, zinc, vanadium, aluminum, calcium and phosphorous, while PDMS was doped with titanium, vanadium and silver and subjected to hydrothermal heat treatment to determine the influence of chemistry and crystallinity on the viability, proliferation and adhesion of human fibroblasts, keratinocytes and Hela cells. Also explored was the influence of Ag and Zn doping on E. coli proliferation. We determined how titanium concentration in hybrids and silver doping influenced the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue by coatings. A combined sub/percutaneous, polyurethane device was developed and implanted into the backs of CD hairless rats to investigate how optimized coatings influenced soft tissue integration in vivo. We demonstrate that the bioresponse of cells to coatings is controlled by elemental doping (V & Ag) and that planktonic bacterial growth was greatly reduced or stopped by Ag, but not Zn doping. Hydrothermal heat treatments (65 °C and 121 °C) did not greatly influence cellular bioresponse to coatings. We discovered a range of temperature resistant (up to 400 °C), solid state dispersions with enhanced ability to block full spectrum photon transmission and degrade methylene using medical x-rays, UV, visible and infrared photons. We

  20. On the origin of high activity of hcp metals for ammonia synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Shideh; Kaghazchi, Payam

    2016-02-21

    Structure and activity of nanoparticles of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals are studied using first-principles calculations. Results show that, in contact with a nitrogen environment, high-index {134[combining macron]2} facets are formed on hcp metal nanoparticles. Nitrogen molecules dissociate easily at kink sites on these high-index facets (activation barriers of <0.2 eV). Analysis of the site blocking effect and adsorption energies on {134[combining macron]2} facets explains the order of activity of hcp metals for ammonia synthesis: Re < Os < Ru. Our results indicate that the high activity of hcp metals for ammonia synthesis is due to the N-induced formation of {134[combining macron]2} facets with high activity for the dissociation of nitrogen molecules. However, quite different behavior for adsorption of dissociated N atoms leads to distinctive activity of hcp metals.

  1. Dielectric properties of inorganic fillers filled epoxy thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norshamira, A.; Mariatti, M.

    2015-07-01

    The demand on the small size and high performance electronics has driven changes in the electronic packaging requirements from discrete capacitor to embedded capacitor. Embedded capacitor can improve electrical performance compared with discrete capacitor. This study aimed to achieve high dielectric of epoxy thin film composite that were targeted for application as embedded capacitor. In this study, inorganic fillers such as Calcium Copper Titanate (CCTO), Iron(III) Oxide (Fe2O3) and Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) were loaded in epoxy system at 5 and 20vol%. Morphology and dielectric properties were investigated to identify the effect of fillers loading and types of fillers on the properties of epoxy thin film composite. Based on the study, CCTO with 20vol% loading was found to have good dielectric properties compared to other type of fillers.

  2. Dielectric properties of inorganic fillers filled epoxy thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Norshamira, A. Mariatti, M.

    2015-07-22

    The demand on the small size and high performance electronics has driven changes in the electronic packaging requirements from discrete capacitor to embedded capacitor. Embedded capacitor can improve electrical performance compared with discrete capacitor. This study aimed to achieve high dielectric of epoxy thin film composite that were targeted for application as embedded capacitor. In this study, inorganic fillers such as Calcium Copper Titanate (CCTO), Iron(III) Oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Titanium Dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) were loaded in epoxy system at 5 and 20vol%. Morphology and dielectric properties were investigated to identify the effect of fillers loading and types of fillers on the properties of epoxy thin film composite. Based on the study, CCTO with 20vol% loading was found to have good dielectric properties compared to other type of fillers.

  3. Filler-polymer bonding and its role in elastomer reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ping, Mark, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    Iron oxide particles were blended into samples of cis-1,4-polybutadiene and polyisobutylene, and both the unfilled polymers and the resulting polymer-filler mixture were cured with benzoyl peroxide. The filled networks were cloudy, but strips extracted using a toluene-hydrochloric acid mixture became as clear as the unfilled networks, suggesting removal of the filler particles. Equilibrium swelling and stress-strain measurements in elongation were carried out the unfilled elastomer and on the filled ones, both before and after extraction. There were no significant differences between the stress-strain isotherms and degrees of equilibrium swelling of the unfilled networks and the corresponding properties of the previously-filled networks after the filler particles were removed. This suggests that for these systems, the bonding between the filler particles and the polymer chains is physical rather than chemical.

  4. Influence of silanization and filler fraction on aged dental composites.

    PubMed

    Lin, C T; Lee, S Y; Keh, E S; Dong, D R; Huang, H M; Shih, Y H

    2000-11-01

    The effect of silanization and filler fraction on the mechanical properties of aged dental composites was investigated. Experimental composites (75/25 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin reinforced with 0, 12.6, 30.0, and 56.5 vol% 8 microm silanized/unsilanized BaSiO6) were fabricated into 4.7 mm diameter x 2.2 mm thick discs and 3.5 mm diameter x 7.3 mm thick discs for diametral tensile and compressive tests, respectively. The effect of immersion in 75% ethanol at 37 degrees C for 0-30 days on the diametral tensile strength (DTS) and compressive strength (CS) of the samples was evaluated and analysed by ANOVA and Tukey LSD test. The fracture interface between filler and resin matrix was then examined by scanning electron microscope. Results and subsequent statistical evidence from DTS (18.6+/-7.6 MPa, silanized versus 11.7+/-2.6 MPa, unsilanized) and CS (85.1+/-29.7 MPa, silanized versus 56.0+/-11.3 MPa, unsilanized) strongly implies that silanization may greatly enhance the mechanical properties of the resin composites. Furthermore, it also shows that both DTS and CS increased proportionally as the filler fraction of the composites increased. However, in the unsilanized groups, DTS decreased (up to 40%) as the filler fraction increased, and CS showed no relevance to the filler fraction at all. As for the influence of aging, it was found that both DTS and CS showed a significant decrease after immersion in 75% ethanol, and silanization heavily correlated with the filler fraction of aged-resin composites. Microscopic examination of the fractured samples showed that failure primarily occurred within the resin matrix per se for silanized composites and adjacent to the filler particles for unsilanized composites. All the evidence points to the conclusion that mechanical properties of aged-resin composites can be greatly influenced by silanization and the filler fraction.

  5. Global Updates on the Future Directions of Neurotoxins and Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Heningburg, Jade

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Neurotoxins and fillers continue to remain in high demand, comprising a large part of the growing business of cosmetic minimally invasive procedures. Multiple Food and Drug Administration–approved safe yet different products exist within each category, and the role of each product continues to expand. The authors review the literature to provide an overview of the use of neurotoxins and fillers and their future directions. PMID:28018777

  6. Characterization of AN Actively Cooled Metal Foil Thermal Radiation Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, J. R.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Salerno, L. J.

    2010-04-01

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) or reduced boil-off (RBO) systems that involve active cooling of large cryogenic propellant tanks will most likely be required for future space exploration missions. For liquid oxygen or methane, such systems could be implemented using existing high technology readiness level (TRL) cryocoolers. However, for liquid hydrogen temperatures (˜20 K) no such coolers exist. In order to partially circumvent this technology gap, the concept of broad area cooling (BAC) has been developed, whereby a low mass thermal radiation shield could be maintained at temperatures around 100 K by steady circulation of cold pressurized gas through a network of narrow tubes. By this method it is possible to dramatically reduce the radiative heat leak to the 20 K tank. A series of experiments, designed to investigate the heat transfer capabilities of BAC systems, have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Results of the final experiment in this series, investigating heat transfer from a metal foil film to a distributed cooling line, are presented here.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ACTIVELY COOLED METAL FOIL THERMAL RADIATION SHIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, J. R.; Salerno, L. J.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.

    2010-04-09

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) or reduced boil-off (RBO) systems that involve active cooling of large cryogenic propellant tanks will most likely be required for future space exploration missions. For liquid oxygen or methane, such systems could be implemented using existing high technology readiness level (TRL) cryocoolers. However, for liquid hydrogen temperatures (approx20 K) no such coolers exist. In order to partially circumvent this technology gap, the concept of broad area cooling (BAC) has been developed, whereby a low mass thermal radiation shield could be maintained at temperatures around 100 K by steady circulation of cold pressurized gas through a network of narrow tubes. By this method it is possible to dramatically reduce the radiative heat leak to the 20 K tank. A series of experiments, designed to investigate the heat transfer capabilities of BAC systems, have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Results of the final experiment in this series, investigating heat transfer from a metal foil film to a distributed cooling line, are presented here.

  8. Spatial homogeneity criteria for active media of cataphoresis repetitively pulsed metal vapour lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chebotarev, Gennady D; Prutsakov, Oleg O; Latush, Evgeny L

    2005-07-31

    The formation of the transverse distribution of the metal vapour concentration in repetitively pulsed lasers is analysed. The criterion for the homogeneity of this distribution is found. The optimal conditions for excitation of the active media of cataphoresis repetitively pulsed metal vapour lasers are determined under which a high degree of both longitudinal and transverse homogeneity is achieved. (active media)

  9. Fillers for improved graphite fiber retention by polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, E. E.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a program designed to determine the extent to which elemental boron and boron containing fillers added to the matrix resin of graphite/epoxy composites prevent the release of graphite fibers when the composites are exposed to fire and impact conditions are described. The fillers evaluated were boron, boron carbide and aluminum boride. The conditions evaluated were laboratory simulations of those that could exist in the event of an aircraft crash and burn situation. The baseline (i.e., unfilled) laminates evaluated were prepared from commercially available graphite/epoxy. The baseline and filled laminates' mechanical properties, before and after isothermal and humidity aging, also were compared. It was found that a small amount of graphite fiber was released from the baseline graphite/epoxy laminates during the burn and impact conditions used in this program. However, the extent to which the fibers were released is not considered a severe enough problem to preclude the use of graphite reinforced composites in civil aircraft structure. It also was found that the addition of boron and boron containing fillers to the resin matrix eliminated this fiber release. Mechanical properties of laminates containing the boron and boron containing fillers were lower than those of the baseline laminates. These property degradations for two systems: boron (5 micron) at 2.5 percent filler loading, and boron (5 micron) at 5.0 percent filler loading do not appear severe enough to preclude their use in structural composite applications.

  10. Neutron Spectrometry for Identification of filler material in UXO - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary

    2007-09-12

    Unexploded ordnance (UXO)-contaminated sites often include ordnance filled with inert substances that were used in dummy rounds. During UXO surveys, it is difficult to determine whether ordnance is filled with explosives or inert material (e.g., concrete, plaster-of-paris, wax, etc.) or is empty. Without verification of the filler material, handling procedures often necessitate that the object be blown in place, which has potential impacts to the environment, personnel, communities and survey costs. The Department of Defense (DoD) needs a reliable, timely, non-intrusive and cost-effective way to identify filler material before a removal action. A new technology that serves this purpose would minimize environmental impacts, personnel safety risks and removal costs; and, thus, would be especially beneficial to remediation activities.

  11. Filler effect of fine particle sand on the compressive strength of mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Tangpagasit, Jatuphon; Songmue, Sawang; Kiattikomol, Kraiwood

    2011-04-01

    The river sand, which is a non-pozzolanic material, was ground into 3 different particle sizes. Portland cement type I was replaced by the ground river sands at 10wt%-40wt% of binder to cast mortar. Compressive strengths of mortar were investigated and the filler effect of different fine particles of sand on the compressive strength of mortar was evaluated. The results show that the compressive strength of mortar contributed from the filler effect of smaller particles is higher than that of the coarser ones. The difference in compressive strength of mortar tends to be greater as the difference in ground river sand fineness increases. The results also suggest that ASTM C618 specification is not practically suitable for specifying pozzolan in concrete since the strength activity index of mortar containing ground river sand (high crystalline phase) with 33.8wt% of particles retained on a 45-μm sieve can pass the strength requirement.

  12. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of the Femoral Head treated with Core Decompression and Bone Void Filler Support

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hiren; Kamath, Atul F.

    2016-01-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head (SIFFH) is characterized by acute onset hip pain without overt trauma. It appears as a low intensity band with bone marrow edema on T1-weighted MRI. The most common course of treatment is protected weight bearing for a period of several weeks. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been commonly used if the patient does not respond to the initial protected weight bearing treatment. We present a case of a 48-year-old male with SIFFH who was treated with core hip decompression and bone void filler as a hip-preserving alternative to THA. The patient has an excellent clinical and radiographic result at final follow up. Core hip decompression with bone void filler is a less invasive alternative to THA, and may be a preferred initial treatment strategy for SIFFH in the young and active patient who has failed conservative measures. PMID:27517074

  13. Stability Enhancement of Polymeric Sensing Films Using Fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Brian; Shevade, Abhijit; Ryan, Margaret Amy; Kisor, Adam; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Manatt, Kenneth; Homer, Margie; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Experiments have shown the stability enhancement of polymeric sensing films on mixing the polymer with colloidal filler particles (submicron-sized) of carbon black, silver, titanium dioxide, and fumed silicon dioxide. The polymer films are candidates for potential use as sensing media in micro/nano chemical sensor devices. The need for stability enhancement of polymer sensing films arises because such films have been found to exhibit unpredictable changes in sensing activity over time, which could result in a possible failure of the sensor device. The changes in the physical properties of a polymer sensing film caused by the sorption of a target molecule can be measured by any of several established transduction techniques: electrochemical, optical, calorimetric, or piezoelectric, for example. The transduction technique used in the current polymer stability experiments is based on piezoelectric principles using a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). The surface of the QCM is coated with the polymer, and the mass uptake by the polymer film causes a change in the oscillating frequency of the quartz crystal. The polymer used for the current study is ethyl cellulose. The polymer/ polymer composite solutions were prepared in 1,3 dioxolane solvent. The filler concentration was fixed at 10 weight percent for the composites. The polymer or polymer composite solutions were cast on the quartz crystal having a fundamental frequency of about 6 MHz. The coated crystal was subjected to a multistage drying process to remove all measurable traces of the solvent. In each experiment, the frequency of oscillation was measured while the QCM was exposed to clean, dry, flowing air for about 30 minutes, then to air containing a known concentration of isopropanol for about 30 minutes, then again to clean dry air for about 30 minutes, and so forth. This cycle of measurements for varying isopropanol concentrations was repeated at intervals for several months. The figure depicts some of the

  14. Adsorption of metal ions by pecan shell-based granular activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Bansode, R R; Losso, J N; Marshall, W E; Rao, R M; Portier, R J

    2003-09-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the adsorption effectiveness of pecan shell-based granular activated carbons (GACs) in removing metal ions (Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+)) commonly found in municipal and industrial wastewater. Pecan shells were activated by phosphoric acid, steam or carbon dioxide activation methods. Metal ion adsorption of shell-based GACs was compared to the metal ion adsorption of a commercial carbon, namely, Calgon's Filtrasorb 200. Adsorption experiments were conducted using solutions containing all three metal ions in order to investigate the competitive effects of the metal ions as would occur in contaminated wastewater. The results obtained from this study showed that acid-activated pecan shell carbon adsorbed more lead ion and zinc ion than any of the other carbons, especially at carbon doses of 0.2-1.0%. However, steam-activated pecan shell carbon adsorbed more copper ion than the other carbons, particularly using carbon doses above 0.2%. In general, Filtrasorb 200 and carbon dioxide-activated pecan shell carbons were poor metal ion adsorbents. The results indicate that acid- and steam-activated pecan shell-based GACs are effective metal ion adsorbents and can potentially replace typical coal-based GACs in treatment of metal contaminated wastewater.

  15. The effect of filler addition and oven temperature to the antioxidant quality in the drying of Physalis angulata fruit extract obtained by subcritical water extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanti, R. F.; Christianto, G.

    2016-01-01

    Physalis angulata or ceplukan is medicinal herb, which grows naturally in Indonesia. It has been used in traditional medicine to treat several diseases. It is also reported to have antimycobacterial, antileukemic, antipyretic. In this research, Pysalis angulata fruit was investigated for its antioxidant capacity. In order to avoid the toxic organic solvent commonly used in conventional extraction, subcritical water extraction method was used. During drying, filler which is inert was added to the extract. It can absorb water and change the oily and sticky form of extract to powder form. The effects of filler types, concentrations and drying temperatures were investigated to the antioxidant quality covering total phenol, flavonoid and antioxidant activity. The results showed that total phenol, flavonoid and antioxidant activity were improved by addition of filler because the drying time was shorter compared to extract without filler. Filler absorbs water and protects extract from exposure to heat during drying. The combination between high temperature and shorter drying time are beneficial to protect the antioxidant in extract. The type of fillers investigation showed that aerosil gave better performance compared to Microcrystalline Celullose (MCC).

  16. Poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxin; Qiu, Guannan; Song, Weiping

    2010-02-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a precursor material to manufacture activated carbon for treating heavy metal-contaminated water is a value-added strategy for recycling the organic waste. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate kinetics, isotherms, and capacity of poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water. It was revealed that poultry litter-based activated carbon possessed significantly higher adsorption affinity and capacity for heavy metals than commercial activated carbons derived from bituminous coal and coconut shell. Adsorption of metal ions onto poultry litter-based carbon was rapid and followed Sigmoidal Chapman patterns as a function of contact time. Adsorption isotherms could be described by different models such as Langmuir and Freundlich equations, depending on the metal species and the coexistence of other metal ions. Potentially 404 mmol of Cu2+, 945 mmol of Pb2+, 236 mmol of Zn2+, and 250-300 mmol of Cd2+ would be adsorbed per kg of poultry litter-derived activated carbon. Releases of nutrients and metal ions from litter-derived carbon did not pose secondary water contamination risks. The study suggests that poultry litter can be utilized as a precursor material for economically manufacturing granular activated carbon that is to be used in wastewater treatment for removing heavy metals.

  17. Role of Metal Ions on the Activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pyrazinamidase

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Patricia; Ferrer, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H.; Christiansen, Gina; Moreno-Román, Paola; Gutiérrez, Andrés H.; Sotelo, Jun; Evangelista, Wilfredo; Fuentes, Patricia; Rueda, Daniel; Flores, Myra; Olivera, Paula; Solis, José; Pesaresi, Alessandro; Lamba, Doriano; Zimic, Mirko

    2012-01-01

    Pyrazinamidase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyzes the conversion of pyrazinamide to the active molecule pyrazinoic acid. Reduction of pyrazinamidase activity results in a level of pyrazinamide resistance. Previous studies have suggested that pyrazinamidase has a metal-binding site and that a divalent metal cofactor is required for activity. To determine the effect of divalent metals on the pyrazinamidase, the recombinant wild-type pyrazinamidase corresponding to the H37Rv pyrazinamide-susceptible reference strain was expressed in Escherichia coli with and without a carboxy terminal. His-tagged pyrazinamidase was inactivated by metal depletion and reactivated by titration with divalent metals. Although Co2+, Mn2+, and Zn2+ restored pyrazinamidase activity, only Co2+ enhanced the enzymatic activity to levels higher than the wild-type pyrazinamidase. Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Mg2+ did not restore the activity under the conditions tested. Various recombinant mutated pyrazinamidases with appropriate folding but different enzymatic activities showed a differential pattern of recovered activity. X-ray fluorescence and atomic absorbance spectroscopy showed that recombinant wild-type pyrazinamidase expressed in E. coli most likely contained Zn. In conclusion, this study suggests that M. tuberculosis pyrazinamidase is a metalloenzyme that is able to coordinate several ions, but in vivo, it is more likely to coordinate Zn2+. However, in vitro, the metal-depleted enzyme could be reactivated by several divalent metals with higher efficiency than Zn. PMID:22764307

  18. Reuse of EAF Slag as Reinforcing Filler for Polypropylene Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornacchia, G.; Agnelli, S.; Gelfi, M.; Ramorino, G.; Roberti, R.

    2015-06-01

    Electric-arc furnace (EAF) slag, the by-product of steel fabricated at the EAF, is in most cases still sent to dumps, with serious environmental consequences. This work shows an innovative, economically convenient application for EAF slag: its use as reinforcing filler for polypropylene. Composites based on polypropylene containing 10-40 wt.% of EAF slag particles were prepared by melt compounding followed by injection molding. A physical-chemical analysis of the EAF slag was performed to determine microstructural features and main component phases. Leaching tests demonstrated that, although EAF slag can release small amounts of toxic elements, such as heavy metals, incorporating such material into the polymeric matrix immobilizes the heavy metals inside that matrix. The mechanical characterization of the polymer-based composites was performed. Incorporating EAF slag particles raises the Young's modulus and the tensile strength at yield, whereas elongation at break and the impact strength of the polymer-based composite are significantly reduced only when large amounts of filler are added, i.e., 30% or more.

  19. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  20. Polyamide/silver antimicrobials: effect of filler types on the silver ion release.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Radhesh; Howdle, Steve; Münstedt, Helmut

    2005-11-01

    The efficiency of various silver-based antimicrobial fillers (elementary silver and silver substituted materials) in polyamide (PA) toward their silver ion (Ag+) release characteristics in an aqueous medium was investigated and discussed. Anode stripping voltammetry (ASV) was used for the quantitative estimation of Ag+ release from these composites. The biocidal (Ag+) release from the composites was found to be dependent on the time of soaking in water and the nature of the filler. The long-term Ag+ release capability of the elementary silver-based PA/Ag composite is promising compared with the commercial counterparts. The silver ion release potential of polyamide composites where the silver filling was performed by using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) is also discussed. The composites release Ag+ at a concentration level capable of rendering antimicrobial efficacy and proved to be active against the microbes. A good agreement exists between the Ag+ release experiments and antimicrobial test results. The observed results on the influence of the nature of the filler and crystallinity on the biocidal release and the varying long-term release properties could be helpful in the design of industrially relevant biomaterials.

  1. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen . Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang . Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  2. Assessing microbial activities in metal contaminated agricultural volcanic soils--An integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Parelho, C; Rodrigues, A S; Barreto, M C; Ferreira, N G C; Garcia, P

    2016-07-01

    Volcanic soils are unique naturally fertile resources, extensively used for agricultural purposes and with particular physicochemical properties that may result in accumulation of toxic substances, such as trace metals. Trace metal contaminated soils have significant effects on soil microbial activities and hence on soil quality. The aim of this study is to determine the soil microbial responses to metal contamination in volcanic soils under different agricultural land use practices (conventional, traditional and organic), based on a three-tier approach: Tier 1 - assess soil microbial activities, Tier 2 - link the microbial activity to soil trace metal contamination and, Tier 3 - integrate the microbial activity in an effect-based soil index (Integrative Biological Response) to score soil health status in metal contaminated agricultural soils. Our results showed that microbial biomass C levels and soil enzymes activities were decreased in all agricultural soils. Dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase activities, soil basal respiration and microbial biomass C were the most sensitive responses to trace metal soil contamination. The Integrative Biological Response value indicated that soil health was ranked as: organic>traditional>conventional, highlighting the importance of integrative biomarker-based strategies for the development of the trace metal "footprint" in Andosols.

  3. Preparation of ceramic-corrosion-cell fillers and application for cyclohexanone industry wastewater treatment in electrobath reactor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Suqing; Qi, Yuanfeng; Gao, Yue; Xu, Yunyun; Gao, Fan; Yu, Huan; Lu, Yue; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Jinze

    2011-11-30

    As new media, ceramic-corrosion-cell fillers (Cathode Ceramic-corrosion-cell Fillers - CCF, and Anode Ceramic-corrosion-cell Fillers - ACF) employed in electrobath were investigated for cyclohexanone industry wastewater treatment. 60.0 wt% of dried sewage sludge and 40.0 wt% of clay, 40.0 wt% of scrap iron and 60.0 wt% of clay were utilized as raw materials for the preparation of raw CCF and ACF, respectively. The raw CCF and ACF were respectively sintered at 400°C for 20 min in anoxic conditions. The physical properties (bulk density, grain density and water absorption), structural and morphological characters and toxic metal leaching contents were tested. The influences of pH, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and the media height on removal of COD(Cr) and cyclohexanone were studied. The results showed that the bulk density and grain density of CCF and ACF were 869.0 kg m(-3) and 936.3 kg m(-3), 1245.0 kg m(-3) and 1420.0 kg m(-3), respectively. The contents of toxic metal (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Ba, Ni and As) were all below the detection limit. When pH of 3-4, HRT of 6h and the media height of 60 cm were applied, about 90% of COD(cr) and cyclohexanone were removed.

  4. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Composites for Highly Selective Oxygen Separation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen; Banerjee, Debasis; Liu, Jian; Schaef, Herbert T.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Nie, Zimin; Nune, Satish K.; Motkuri, Radha K.; Chapman, Karena W.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Hayes, James C.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Krishna, Rajamani; McGrail, B. Peter; Liu, Jun; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2016-03-08

    A redox-active metal-organic composite material shows improved and selective O-2 adsorption over N-2 with respect to individual components (MIL-101 and ferrocene). The O-2 sensitivity of the composite material arises due to the formation of maghemite nanoparticles with the pore of the metal-organic framework material.

  5. Preparation of functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon by a single-step activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastgheib, Seyed A.; Ren, Jianli; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud; Chang, Ramsay

    2014-01-01

    A rapid method to prepare functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon from coal is described in this paper. A mixture of ferric chloride and a sub-bituminous coal was used to demonstrate simultaneous coal activation, chlorine functionalization, and iron/iron oxides impregnation in the resulting porous carbon products. The FeCl3 concentration in the mixture, the method to prepare the FeCl3-coal mixture (solid mixing or liquid impregnation), and activation atmosphere and temperature impacted the surface area and porosity development, Cl functionalization, and iron species impregnation and dispersion in the carbon products. Samples activated in nitrogen or a simulated flue gas at 600 or 1000 °C for 1-2 min had surface areas up to ∼800 m2/g, bulk iron contents up to 18 wt%, and surface chlorine contents up to 27 wt%. Potential catalytic and adsorption application of the carbon materials was explored in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol and adsorption of ionic mercury from aqueous solutions. Results indicated that impregnated activated carbons outperformed their non-impregnated counterparts in both the CWAO and adsorption tests.

  6. Numbers or apologies? Customer reactions to telephone waiting time fillers.

    PubMed

    Munichor, Nira; Rafaeli, Anat

    2007-03-01

    The authors examined the effect of time perception and sense of progress in telephone queues on caller reactions to 3 telephone waiting time fillers: music, apologies, and information about location in the queue. In Study 1, conducted on 123 real calls, call abandonment was lowest, and call evaluations were most positive with information about location in the queue as the time filler. In Study 2, conducted with 83 participants who experienced a simulated telephone wait experience, sense of progress in the queue rather than perceived waiting time mediated the relationship between telephone waiting time filler and caller reactions. The findings provide insight for the management and design of telephone queues, as well as theoretical insight into critical cognitive processes that underlie telephone waiting, opening up an important new research agenda.

  7. The effects of hydrogen bonds on metal-mediated O2 activation and related processes

    PubMed Central

    Shook, Ryan L.; Borovik, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds stabilize and direct chemistry performed by metalloenzymes. With inspiration from enzymes, we will utilize an approach that incorporates intramolecular hydrogen bond donors to determine their effects on the stability and reactivity of metal complexes. Our premise is that control of secondary coordination sphere interactions will promote new function in synthetic metal complexes. Multidentate ligands have been developed that create rigid organic structures around metal ions. These ligands place hydrogen bond (H-bond) donors proximal to the metal centers, forming specific microenvironments. One distinguishing attribute of these systems is that site-specific modulations in structure can be readily accomplished, in order to evaluate correlations with reactivity. A focus of this research is consideration of dioxygen binding and activation by metal complexes, including developing structure–function relationships in metal-assisted oxidative catalysis. PMID:19082087

  8. Effects of filler composition on flexibility of microfilled resin composite.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Ori, T; Saimi, Y

    2005-07-01

    The effects of the filler composition on physical and mechanical properties of microfilled composites was investigated by measuring water absorption, solubility, compressive, flexural, and impact strength. A series of experimental composites, consisting of UDMA/TEGDMA comonomer matrix and prepolymerized fillers, was fabricated. The prepolymerized fillers were composed of hydrophobic colloidal silica and two monomers in varying ratios, trimethylolpropanetrimethacrylate (TMPT), and polyesterdiacrylate (PEDA). TMPT/PEDA ratios were 100:0, 64:36, 46:54, 18:82, and 0:100%. There were no significant differences in water sorption and solubility, regardless of the amount of PEDA monomer. Young's modulus and modulus of resilience increased with decreasing PEDA ratio. Fracture energy exhibited drastic changes (30.1 x 10(-5) J to 93.4 x 10(-5) J). The highest value of flexural strength (96.0 +/- 3.5 MPa) was obtained when the TMPT-PEDA filler was 46:54. The impact strengths of composites fabricated with TMPT-PEDA filler of 46:54 (11.2 +/- 1.4 kJ/m(2)), 18:82 (10.6 +/- 3.2 kJ/m(2)), and 0:100 (13.1 +/- 3.8 kJ/m(2)) were significantly higher than those with 100:0 (6.0 +/- 1.8 kJ/m(2)) or 64:36 (7.1 +/- 2.4 kJ/m(2)). Based upon the results, it was concluded that the mechanical properties of microfilled composites were improved by the modification of prepolymerized filler composition.

  9. Screening of active metals for reactive adsorption desulfurization adsorbent using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Chunming; Wang, Yuxian; Gao, Jinsen

    2017-03-01

    To explore characteristics of active metals for reactive adsorption desulfurization (RADS) technology, the adsorption of thiophene on M (100) (M = Cr, Mo, Co, Ni, Cu, Au, and Ag) surfaces was systematically studied by density functional theory with vdW correction (DFT + D3). We found that, in all case, the most stable molecular adsorption site was the hollow site and adsorptive capabilities of thiophene followed the order: Cr > Mo > Co ≈ Ni > Cu > Au ≈ Ag. By analyzing the nature of binding between thiophene and corresponding metals and the electronic structure of metals, the excessive activities of Cr and Mo were found to have a negative regeneration, the passive activities of Au and Ag were found to have an inactive adsorption for RADS adsorbent alone, while Ni and Co have appropriate characteristics as the active metals for RADS, followed by Cu.

  10. Rapidly assessing the activation conditions and porosity of metal-organic frameworks using thermogravimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, TM; Bloch, ED; Long, JR

    2015-01-01

    A methodology utilizing a thermogravimetric analyzer to monitor propane uptake following incremental increases of the temperature is demonstrated as a means of rapidly identifying porous materials and determining the optimum activation conditions of metal-organic frameworks.

  11. Gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal cations

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the search for ways of a more efficient usage of the large, unexploited resources of methane, recent progress in the gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal ions is discussed. Mass spectrometric experiments demonstrate that the ligands can crucially influence both reactivity and selectivity of transition-metal cations in bond-activation processes, and the most reactive species derive from combinations of transition metals with the electronegative elements fluorine, oxygen, and chlorine. Furthermore, the collected knowledge about intramolecular kinetic isotope effects associated with the activation of C–H(D) bonds of methane can be used to distinguish the nature of the bond activation as a mere hydrogen-abstraction, a metal-assisted mechanism or more complex reactions such as formation of insertion intermediates or σ-bond metathesis. PMID:18955709

  12. [Effect of heavy metals on wheat seedlings; activation of antioxidant enzymes].

    PubMed

    Murzaeva, S V

    2004-01-01

    Accumulation of heavy metals in wheat grain exposed to multicomponent pollutants (industrial waste-water) was studied. The absolute content of metals (Zn, Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, and Mn) was found to be determined by the extent of purification of wastewater. An increase in the degree of grain contamination with heavy metals was accompanied by activation of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, EC 1.15.1; catalase, EC 1.11.1.6; and peroxidase, EC 1.11.1.7) in leaves and activation of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase in roots. The ratio of activity of membrane enzymes to activity of cytosol enzymes was demonstrated to be high. It was concluded that the membrane-tropic effect of multicomponent contaminants was due to accumulation of heavy metals capable of inducing the antioxidant protection in the next generation of wheat seedlings.

  13. Influence of phytic acid and its metal complexes on the activity of pectin degrading polygalacturonase.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Uzma; Rehman, Haneef Ur; Qader, Shah Ali Ul; Maqsood, Zahida Tasneem

    2013-06-05

    Polygalacturonase is one of the important requirements of different microorganism to cause pathogenicity and spoilage of fruits and vegetables that involved in degradation of pectin during plant tissue infections. In current study, 20 mM phytic acid inhibited 70% activity of polygalacturonase. The effect of different concentration of metal ions such as Cu(+2), Al(+3) and V(+4) were studied separately and it was found that the 20 mM of these metal ions inhibited 37.2%, 79%, and 53% activity of polygalacturonase, respectively. Finally, the complexes of phytic acid and these metals ions were prepared and 1:1 ratio of phytic acid and metal ions complexes showed maximum inhibitory activity of enzyme as compared to complexes having 1:2 and 1:3 ratio except phytate-copper complexes which showed no inhibitory effect on the activity of polygalacturonase.

  14. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Einerson, Carolyn J.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1989-01-01

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

  15. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Dinitrogen activation in sterically-hindered three-coordinate transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Christian, Gemma; Driver, Jenni; Stranger, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Dinuclear metal systems based on sterically-hindered, three-coordinate transition metal complexes of the type ML3 where the ancillary ligands L comprise bulky organic substituents, hold great promise synthetically for the activation and scission of small, multiply-bonded molecules such as N2, NO and N2O. In this study we have employed density functional methods to identify the metal/ligand combinations which achieve optimum activation and/or cleavage of N2. Strong pi donor ligands such as NH2 and OH are found to produce the greatest level of activation based on N-N bond lengths in the intermediate dimer complex, L3Mo(mu-N2)MoL3, whereas systems containing the weak or non-pi donor ligands NH3, PH3, OH2 and SH2 are found to be thermodynamically unfavourable for N2 activation. In the case of the Mo-NH2 and W-NH2 systems, a fragment bonding analysis reveals that the orientation of the amide ligands around the metal is important in determining both the spin state and the extent of dinitrogen activation in the intermediate dimer. For both systems, an intermediate dimer structure where one of the NH2 ligands on each metal is rotated 90 degrees relative to the other ligands, is more activated than the structure in which the NH2 ligands are trigonally disposed around the metals. The level of activation is found to be very sensitive to the electronic configuration of the metal with d3 metal ions delivering the best activation along any one transition series. In particular, strong activation or cleavage of N2 was calculated for the third row d3 metals systems involving Ta(II), W(III) and Re(IV), with the level of activation decreasing as the nuclear charge on the metal increases. This trend in activation reflects the size of the valence 5d orbitals and consequently, the capacity of the metal to back donate into the dinitrogen pi* orbitals.

  17. Strong and coverage-independent promotion of catalytic activity of a noble metal by subsurface vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichl, Wolfgang; Hayek, Konrad

    2003-07-01

    While common bimetallic surfaces have a variable composition, the stable subsurface alloys of V/Rh and V/Pd are characterised by a purely noble metal-terminated surface and the second metal positioned in near-surface layers. The uniform composition of the topmost surface layer excludes conventional ensemble effects in catalysis, and the activity of the surface can be controlled by the metal loading and by the temperature of annealing. For example, the activity of a polycrystalline Rh surface in CO hydrogenation is significantly increased by promotion with subsurface vanadium. The modification of the subsurface layer with a different metal must be considered a promising approach to improve the catalytic properties of a metal surface.

  18. Predictive Modeling of Metal-Organic Chains with Active Metal Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ud Din, Naseem; Le, Duy; Rahman, Talat

    Creation, stabilization, characterization and control of single atom transition metal (TM) sites may lead to significant advancement of the next-generation catalyst. Motivated by the experimental results of Skomski et al., we have performed density functional theory based calculations of TM-dipyridyltetrazine (DT) chains in which TM atoms are stabilized and separated by the DT molecules. Our calculations show that the formation energies of the chains are high, suggesting that these chains can easily be synthesized and stabilized. Moreover, by calculating the adsorption energies of CO, O2 and O atom on the metal atom sites of the chains we found that these molecules/atoms strongly bond to TM atoms Mo, Cr, Fe and Co occupying these sites, suggesting that these TM-DT chains are potential candidates for CO oxidation catalyst. Details of reaction pathway (energetic and kinetic) of CO oxidation on the chains will be also presented and discussed.

  19. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. PMID:27621659

  20. [Activity of digestive enzymes during intraperitoneal intake of metal compounds].

    PubMed

    Zdol'nik, T D

    2001-01-01

    Digestive function was studied when three compounds from Group VIB of the Mendeleev periodic system of elements were intraperitoneally administered during 100 days. Potassium bichromate, ammonium molybdate in a dose of 0.2 mg/kg and sodium tungstate in a dose of 5.0 mg/kg (in terms of metal) were found to have a resorptive effect on pancreatic function and a local effect on the small intestinal mucosa.

  1. Active Metal Brazing of Carbon-Carbon Composites to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Morscher, G.; Asthana, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSil. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint which led to good wetting, spreading, and metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion.

  2. Spectroscopic study of molecular structure, antioxidant activity and biological effects of metal hydroxyflavonol complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonowicz, Mariola; Regulska, Ewa

    2017-02-01

    Flavonols with varied hydroxyl substitution can act as strong antioxidants. Thanks to their ability to chelate metals as well as to donate hydrogen atoms they have capacity to scavenge free radicals. Their metal complexes are often more active in comparison with free ligands. They exhibit interesting biological properties, e.g. anticancer, antiphlogistic and antibacterial. The relationship between molecular structure and their biological properties was intensively studied using spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis, IR, Raman, NMR, ESI-MS). The aim of this paper is review on spectroscopic analyses of molecular structure and biological activity of hydroxyflavonol metal complexes.

  3. Cloning and divalent-metal activation of a ß-xylosidase, RUM630-BX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene encoding RUM630-BX, a ß-xylosidase/arabinofuranosidase, was identified from activity-based screening of a cow rumen metagenomic library. The recombinant enzyme is activated as much as 14-fold (kcat) by divalent metals Mg2+, Mn2+ and Co2+ but not by Ca2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Activation of RUM6...

  4. Influences of filler content and size on the color adjustment potential of nonlayered resin composites.

    PubMed

    Suh, Yong-Rok; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Ju, Sung-Won; Kim, Kwang-Mahn

    2017-01-31

    The blending effect (BE) plays an important role in esthetics of the composite resin. The objective of this study was to determine the extents to which filler size and content affect the BE. Three types of fillers (0.7, 1.0, and 1.5 µm) were mixed at weight contents of 60, 70, 75, and 80%. This study simulated clinical class 3 or 4 cavities and quantitatively measured the color diffusion of the objects next to the cavities based on the CIELab color space. For each filler size, there was a trend of increasing BE as the filler content was increased. The translucency parameter (TP) exhibited the opposite trend of decreasing (p<0.05) with increases in filler content. The filler size did not affect the BE, and the different filler sizes produced statistically non-significant results in this study. Increases in filler content elevated the opacity of the composite resin and significantly influenced the BE.

  5. Effect of precipitated calcium carbonate--Cellulose nanofibrils composite filler on paper properties.

    PubMed

    He, Ming; Cho, Byoung-Uk; Won, Jong Myoung

    2016-01-20

    A new concept of composite filler was developed by using cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) and cationic starch (C-starch). In this study, cellulose nanofibrils were utilized in two different ways: a PCC-CNF composite filler and a papermaking additive in sheet forming. The aim was to elucidate their effects on flocculation, filler retention and the strength and optical properties of handsheets. The highest filler retention was obtained by using the PCC-CNF composite filler in paper sheets. The paper filled with the composite fillers had much higher bursting and tensile strengths than conventional PCC loading. It was also found that the paper prepared with PCC-CNF composite fillers became denser with increasing the filler content of paper.

  6. pH-Dependent Metal Ion Toxicity Influences the Antibacterial Activity of Two Natural Mineral Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Tanya M.; Koehl, Jennifer L.; Summers, Jack S.; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated that several mineral products sold for medicinal purposes demonstrate antimicrobial activity, but little is known about the physicochemical properties involved in antibacterial activity. Methodology/Principal Findings Using in vitro mineral suspension testing, we have identified two natural mineral mixtures, arbitrarily designated BY07 and CB07, with antibacterial activity against a broad-spectrum of bacterial pathogens. Mineral-derived aqueous leachates also exhibited antibacterial activity, revealing that chemical, not physical, mineral characteristics were responsible for the observed activity. The chemical properties essential for bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli were probed by testing antibacterial activity in the presence of metal chelators, the hydroxyl radical scavenger, thiourea, and varying pH levels. Chelation of the BY07 minerals with EDTA or desferrioxamine eliminated or reduced BY07 toxicity, respectively, suggesting a role of an acid-soluble metal species, particularly Fe3+ or other sequestered metal cations, in mineral toxicity. This conclusion was supported by NMR relaxation data, which indicated that BY07 and CB07 leachates contained higher concentrations of chemically accessible metal ions than leachates from non-bactericidal mineral samples. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the acidic environment of the hydrated minerals significantly contributes to antibacterial activity by increasing the availability and toxicity of metal ions. These findings provide impetus for further investigation of the physiological effects of mineral products and their applications in complementary antibacterial therapies. PMID:20209160

  7. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hubin, Timothy J.; Amoyaw, Prince N. -A.; Roewe, Kimberly D.; Simpson, Natalie C.; Maples, Randall D.; Carder Freeman, TaRynn N.; Cain, Amy N.; Le, Justin G.; Archibald, Stephen J.; Khan, Shabana I.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Khan, M. O. Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Using transition metals such as manganese(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), and zinc(II), several new metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic chelators namely, cyclen- and cyclam-analogs with benzyl groups, were synthesized and screened for in vitro antimalarial activity against chloroquine-resistant (W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (D6) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The metal-free chelators tested showed little or no antimalarial activity. All the metal complexes of the dibenzyl cross-bridged cyclam ligand exhibited potent antimalarial activity. The Mn2+ complex of this ligand was the most potent with IC50s of 0.127 and 0.157 µM against the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) P. falciparum strains, respectively. In general, the dibenzyl hydrophobic ligands showed better antimalarial activity compared to the activity of monobenzyl ligands, potentially because of their higher lipophilicity and thus better cell penetration ability. The higher antimalarial activity displayed by the manganese complex for the cyclam ligand in comparison to that of the cyclen, correlates with the larger pocket of cyclam compared to that of cyclen which produces a more stable complex with the Mn2+. Few of the Cu2+ and Fe2+ complexes also showed improvement in activity but Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ complexes did not show any improvement in activity upon the metal-free ligands for anti-malarial development. PMID:24857776

  8. Fillers used in papermaking. (Latest citations from the Paper and Board, Printing, and Packaging Industries Research Associations database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning organic and inorganic fillers used in paper products and their effect on the properties and manufacture of paper. The citations examine a variety of fillers, including natural calcium carbonate, bentonite, polymeric fillers, titanium dioxide, calcium carbonate, calcium silicate, barium sulphate, agalite, talc, clay, kaolin, limestone, mica, and ash. Filler effects on thermal strength, coloring, acidity, surface coatings, porosity, production efficiency, absorption, opacity, printability, and deposit control are presented. Also discussed are the microanalysis of fillers, recovery of fillers from wastes, availability of filler and pigment raw materials, and the determination of filler content in paper products. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Improved fiber retention by the use of fillers in graphite fiber/resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluyas, R. E.; Bowles, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A variety of matrix fillers were tested for their ability to prevent loss of fiber from graphite fiber/PMR polyimide and graphite fiber/epoxy composites in a fire. The fillers tested included powders of boron, boron carbide lime glass, lead glass, and aluminum. Boron was the most effective and prevented any loss of graphite fiber during burning. Mechanical properties of composites containing boron filler were measured and compared to those of composites containing no filler.

  10. Formation of nanostructured Group IIA metal activated sensors: The transformation of Group IIA metal compound sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tune, Travis C.; Baker, Caitlin; Hardy, Neil; Lin, Arthur; Widing, Timothy J.; Gole, James L.

    2015-05-01

    Trends in the Group IIA metal oxides and hydroxides of magnesium, calcium, and barium are unique in the periodic table. In this study we find that they display novel trends as decorating nanostructures for extrinsic semiconductor interfaces. The Group IIA metal ions are strong Lewis acids. We form these M2+ ions in aqueous solution and bring these solutions in contact with a porous silicon interface to form interfaces for conductometric measurements. Observed responses are consistent with the formation of MgO whereas the heavier elements display behaviors which suggest the effect of their more basic nature. Mg(OH)2, when formed, represents a weak base whereas the heavier metal hydroxides of Ca, Sr, and Ba are strong bases. However, the hydroxides tend to give up hydrogen and act as Brönsted acids. For the latter elements, the reversible interaction response of nanostructures deposited to the porous silicon (PS) interface is modified, as the formation of more basic sites appears to compete with M2+ Lewis acidity and hydroxide Brönsted acidity. Mg2+ forms an interface whose response to the analytes NH3 and NO is consistent with MgO and well explained by the recently developing Inverse Hard/Soft Acid/Base model. The behavior of the Ca2+ and Ba2+ decorated interfaces as they interact with the hard base NH3 follows a reversal of the model, indicating a decrease in acidic character as the observed conductometric response suggests the interaction with hydroxyl groups. A change from oxide-like to hydroxide-like constituents is supported by XPS studies. The changes in conductometric response is easily monitored in contrast to changes associated with the Group IIA oxides and hydroxides observed in XPS, EDAX, IR, and NMR measurements.

  11. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma treatment of cellulose based fillers for wood plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekobou, William; Englund, Karl; Pedrow, Patrick; Scudiero, Louis

    2011-10-01

    The main challenge of wood plastic composites (WPC) resides in the low interfacial adhesion due to incompatibility between the cellulose based filler that has a polar surface and most common matrixes, polyolefins which are non-polar. Plasma treatment is a promising technique for surface modification and its implementation into the processing of WPC would provide this industry with a versatile and nearly environmentally benign manufacturing tool. Our investigation aims at designing a cold atmospheric pressure plasma reactor for coating fillers with a hydrophobic material prior to compounding with the matrix. Deposition was achieved with our reactor that includes an array of high voltage needles, a grounded metal mesh, Ar as carrier gas and C2H2 as the precursor molecule. Parameters studied have included gas feed rates and applied voltage; FTIR, ESCA, AFM and SEM imaging were used for film diagnostics. We will also report on deposition rate and its dependence on radial and axial position as well as the effects of plasma-polymerized acetylene on the surface free energy of cellulose based substrates.

  12. Influence of several metal ions on the gelation activation energy of silicon tetraethoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of nine metal cations (Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Cu(2+), Al(3+), La(3+), and Y(3+) on silica gel formation has been investigated by studying the hydrolysis and polycondensation of silicon tetraethoxide (TEOS) in the presence of metal nitrates. The influence of water: TEOS mole ratio, metal ion concentration, and the reaction temperature has been investigated. The overall activation energy for gel formation has been determined from the temperature dependence of the time of gelation for each system. The activation energy for -Si-O-Si- network formation is found to be 54.5 kJ/mol. The gel formation time as well as the activation energy sharply increase in the presence of Cu(2+), Al(3+), La(3+) and Y(3+). In contrast, the presence of Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), or, Sr(2+) lowers the gelation time, but has no appreciable effect on the activation energy. This difference may be attributed to the participation or nonparticipation of the metal ions in the formation of the three-dimensional polymeric network during the polycondensation step. The concentration of metal ion (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Y(3+) or the water: TEOS mole ratio had no appreciable effect on the gelation activation energy. A simple test has been proposed to determine whether a metal ion would act as a network intermediate or modifier in silica and other glassy networks.

  13. Influence of several metal ions on the gelation activation energy of silicon tetraethoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nine metal cations Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Cu(2+), Al(3+), La(3+), and Y(3+) on silica gel formation has been investigated by studying the hydrolysis and polycondensation of silicon tetraethoxide (TEOS) in the presence of metal nitrates. The influence of water:TEOS mole ratio, metal ion concentration, and the reaction temperature has been investigated. The overall activation energy for gel formation has been determined from the temperature dependence of the time of gelation for each system. The activation energy for -Si-O-Si- network formation is found to be 54.5 kJ/mol. The gel formation time as well as the activation energy sharply increase in the presence of Cu(2+), Al(3+), La(3+) and Y(3+). In contrast, the presence of Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), or Sr(2+) lowers the gelation time, but has no appreciable effect on the activation energy. This difference may be attributed to the participation or nonparticipation of the metal ions in the formation of the three-dimensional polymeric network during the polycondensation step. The concentration of metal ion Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Y(3+) or the water:TEOS mole ratio had no appreaciable effect on the gelation activation energy. A simple test has been proposed to determine whether a metal ion would act as a network intermediate or modifier in silica and other glassy networks.

  14. Metal Ion Removal from Wastewaters by Sorption on Activated Carbon, Cement Kiln Dust, and Sawdust.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Eissa, Fawzy I; Ghanem, Khaled M; El-Din, Hala M Gamal; Al Anany, Fathia S

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed the efficiency of activated carbon, cement kiln dust (CKD), and sawdust for the removal of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) from aqueous solutions under mono-metal and competitive sorption systems and the removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn from different industrial wastewaters. Batch equilibrium experiments were conducted in a mono-metal and competitive sorption system. The efficiency of the sorbents in the removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn from industrial wastewaters was also investigated. Cement kiln dust expressed the highest affinity for the metals followed by activated carbon and sawdust. Competition among the metals changed their distribution coefficient (Kd) with the sorbents. Sorption of Pb and Cu was higher than Cd and Zn. The average metal removal from the wastewaters varied from 74, 61, and 60% for Cd, Cu, and Zn, respectively, to nearly 100%. The efficiencies of CKD and activated carbon in removing metals were higher than sawdust, suggesting their potential as low-cost sorbents for the removal of toxic metals from wastewaters.

  15. Activated Metal Oxide Surfaces as Highly Reactive Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-03

    underway. " Synthesis of Ultra-High Surface Area Fe203 by Precipitation Methods Yong-Xi Li A series of precipitations of Fe(OH) 3 (from FeCl 3) at...Progress was also made on developing new aerogel procedures for synthesis of ultra-high surface area magnesium oxide. Finally,’ome metal oxide molecules...were studied in chemical reactions and by theoretical methods .-) Three students earned Ph.D. degrees and one an M.S. degree. A visiting professor and

  16. Self-assembled biomimetic nanoreactors II: Noble metal active centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTaggart, Matt; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile; Jugroot, Manish

    2015-09-01

    The structure and stability of polymer-metal nanoreactors is detailed, including a complete characterization of the first successful synthesis of stable, dispersible, atomically thin gold nanosheets. Further developments in the synthesis of monodisperse, ∼2.5 nm platinum nanoclusters in aqueous solution and ambient conditions are described and pH stability of the composite material is established. The facile nanoreactor synthesis, environmentally friendly reaction conditions, and structural stability makes these biomimetic systems attractive for applications ranging from chemical detoxification to nanoelectronics.

  17. Characterization of the interactions between the active site of a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaofeng; Ayrapetov, Marina K; Sun, Gongqin

    2005-01-01

    Background Protein tyrosine kinases are important enzymes for cell signalling and key targets for anticancer drug discovery. The catalytic mechanisms of protein tyrosine kinase-catalysed phosphorylation are not fully understood. Protein tyrosine kinase Csk requires two Mg2+ cations for activity: one (M1) binds to ATP, and the other (M2) acts as an essential activator. Results Experiments in this communication characterize the interaction between M2 and Csk. Csk activity is sensitive to pH in the range of 6 to 7. Kinetic characterization indicates that the sensitivity is not due to altered substrate binding, but caused by the sensitivity of M2 binding to pH. Several residues in the active site with potential of binding M2 are mutated and the effect on metal activation studied. An active mutant of Asn319 is generated, and this mutation does not alter the metal binding characteristics. Mutations of Glu236 or Asp332 abolish the kinase activity, precluding a positive or negative conclusion on their role in M2 coordination. Finally, the ability of divalent metal cations to activate Csk correlates to a combination of ionic radius and the coordination number. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that M2 binding to Csk is sensitive to pH, which is mainly responsible for Csk activity change in the acidic arm of the pH response curve. They also demonstrate critical differences in the metal activator coordination sphere in protein tyrosine kinase Csk and a protein Ser/Thr kinase, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. They shed light on the physical interactions between a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator. PMID:16305747

  18. Quantitative assessment on soil enzyme activities of heavy metal contaminated soils with various soil properties.

    PubMed

    Xian, Yu; Wang, Meie; Chen, Weiping

    2015-11-01

    Soil enzyme activities are greatly influenced by soil properties and could be significant indicators of heavy metal toxicity in soil for bioavailability assessment. Two groups of experiments were conducted to determine the joint effects of heavy metals and soil properties on soil enzyme activities. Results showed that arylsulfatase was the most sensitive soil enzyme and could be used as an indicator to study the enzymatic toxicity of heavy metals under various soil properties. Soil organic matter (SOM) was the dominant factor affecting the activity of arylsulfatase in soil. A quantitative model was derived to predict the changes of arylsulfatase activity with SOM content. When the soil organic matter content was less than the critical point A (1.05% in our study), the arylsulfatase activity dropped rapidly. When the soil organic matter content was greater than the critical point A, the arylsulfatase activity gradually rose to higher levels showing that instead of harm the soil microbial activities were enhanced. The SOM content needs to be over the critical point B (2.42% in our study) to protect its microbial community from harm due to the severe Pb pollution (500mgkg(-1) in our study). The quantitative model revealed the pattern of variation of enzymatic toxicity due to heavy metals under various SOM contents. The applicability of the model under wider soil properties need to be tested. The model however may provide a methodological basis for ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in soil.

  19. Fibrous Fillers to Manufacture Ultra High Ash/Performance Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. VIjay K. Mathur

    2009-04-30

    The paper industry is one of the largest users of energy and emitters of CO2 in the US manufacturing industry. In addition to that, it is facing tremendous financial pressure due to lower cost imports. The fine paper industry has shrunk from 15 million tons per year production to 10 million tons per year in the last 5 years. This has resulted in mill closures and job loses. The AF&PA and the DOE formed a program called Agenda 2020 to help in funding to develop breakthrough technologies to provide help in meeting these challenges. The objectives of this project were to optimize and scale-up Fibrous Fillers technology, ready for commercial deployment and to develop ultra high ash/high performance paper using Fibrous Fillers. The goal was to reduce energy consumption, carbon footprint, and cost of manufacturing paper and related industries. GRI International (GRI) has been able to demonstrate the techno - economic feasibility and economic advantages of using its various products in both handsheets as well as in commercial paper mills. GRI has also been able to develop sophisticated models that demonstrate the effect of combinations of GRI's fillers at multiple filler levels. GRI has also been able to develop, optimize, and successfully scale-up new products for use in commercial paper mills.

  20. Photosensitive filler minimizes internal stresses in epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Photosensitive filler is added to curable epoxy resins to minimize stress from internal shrinkage during curing or polymerization. Cinnamic acid resins and cinnamal ketones may be added in the amount of 1 to 3 percent by weight of the resin mixture.

  1. Internal Filler-Wire Feed For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Dyer, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Tungsten electrode for gas/tungsten arc welding contains lengthwise channel for feeding filler wire to weld joint. Channel makes it unnecessary to feed wire through guides outside electrode, conserving valuable space near weld and protects wire from deformation by contact with other parts in vicinity of weld. Helpful in robotic or automatic welding.

  2. 14 CFR 29.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 29.973 Section 29.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.973 Fuel tank...

  3. 14 CFR 25.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 25.973 Section 25.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.973 Fuel tank...

  4. 14 CFR 25.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 25.973 Section 25.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.973 Fuel tank...

  5. 14 CFR 25.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 25.973 Section 25.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.973 Fuel tank...

  6. 14 CFR 29.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 29.973 Section 29.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.973 Fuel tank...

  7. 14 CFR 29.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 29.973 Section 29.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.973 Fuel tank...

  8. 14 CFR 25.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 25.973 Section 25.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.973 Fuel tank...

  9. 14 CFR 29.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 29.973 Section 29.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.973 Fuel tank...

  10. 14 CFR 29.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 29.973 Section 29.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.973 Fuel tank...

  11. Gap Filler Induced Transition on the Mars Science Laboratory Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Barnhardt, Michael D.; Tang, Chun Y.; Sozer, Emre; Candler, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Detached Eddy Simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of high-fidelity turbulence modeling on roughness-induced transition to turbulence during Mars entry. Chemically reacting flow solutions will be obtained for a gap filler of Mars Science Laboratory at the peak heating condition.

  12. Review of 3-dimensional Facial Anatomy: Injecting Fillers and Neuromodulators

    PubMed Central

    Sieber, David A.; Scheuer, Jack F.; Villanueva, Nathaniel L.; Pezeshk, Ronnie A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: To achieve consistent results utilizing facial injectables, practitioners must understand the pertinent anatomy of the forehead, temple, cheek, nose, and perioral areas. A detailed understanding of facial blood vessels, nerves, and musculature is essential for safe and effective placement of fillers and neuromodulators. PMID:28018775

  13. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION, GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR APPROVED PLANTS AND STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General... construction and all parts, including valves and filler heads accessible for cleaning. New or...

  14. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation using precious metal microparticles in redox-active polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Coche, L.; Ehui, B.; Limosin, D.; Moutet, J.C. )

    1990-11-09

    Glassy carbon felt electrodes have been modified by electrodeposition of poly(pyrrole-viologen) films (derived from N,N{prime}-dialkyl-4,4{prime}-bipyridinium salts), followed by electroprecipitation of precious metal (Pt, Pd, Rh, or Ru) microparticles. The resulting electrodes have been proved to be active for the electrocatalytic hydrogenation of conjugated enones (2-cyclohexen-1-one, cryptone, carvone, isophorone), styrene, and benzonitrile in aqueous media (pH 1). Despite low loadings of metal catalysts, high electric and products yields and a long term stability of these cathodes have been observed. The influence of the metal loading and the polymer structure on the catalytic efficiency as well as the selectivity obtained according to the metal catalyst used have been studied. Comparison with results previously reported for other catalytic cathodes like Pt/Pt, Pd/C, or Raney nickel electrodes proves the high efficiency of these metal microparticles within redox polymer film based electrodes.

  15. The highly synergistic, broad spectrum, antibacterial activity of organic acids and transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Zhitnitsky, Daniel; Rose, Jessica; Lewinson, Oded

    2017-01-01

    For millennia, transition metals have been exploited to inhibit bacterial growth. We report here the potentiation of the anti-bacterial activity of transition metals by organic acids. Strong synergy between low, non-toxic concentrations of transition metals and organic acids was observed with up to ~1000-fold higher inhibitory effect on bacterial growth. We show that organic acids shuttle transition metals through the permeability barrier of the bacterial membrane, leading to increased influx of transition metals into bacterial cells. We demonstrate that this synergy can be effectively used to inhibit the growth of a broad range of plant and human bacterial pathogens, and suggest that a revision of food preservation and crop protection strategies may be in order. These findings bear significant biomedical, agricultural, financial and environmental opportunities. PMID:28294164

  16. Energy-Dependent Electron Activated Dissociation of Metal-Adducted Permethylated Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiang; Huang, Yiqun; Lin, Cheng; Costello, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of varying the electron energy and cationizing agents on electron activated dissociation (ExD) of metal-adducted oligosaccharides were explored, using permethylated maltoheptaose as the model system. Across the examined range of electron energy, the metal-adducted oligosaccharide exhibited several fragmentation processes, including electron capture dissociation (ECD) at low energies, hot-ECD at intermediate energies, and electronic excitation dissociation (EED) at high energies. The dissociation threshold depended on the metal charge carrier(s), whereas the types and sequence spans of product ions were influenced by the metal-oligosaccharide binding pattern. Theoretical modeling contributed insight into the metal-dependent behavior of carbohydrates during low-energy ECD. When ExD was applied to a permethylated high mannose N-linked glycan, EED provided more structural information than either collision-induced dissociation (CID) or low-energy ECD, thus demonstrating its potential for oligosaccharide linkage analysis. PMID:22881449

  17. Metal-dependent inhibition of glyoxalase II: a possible mechanism to regulate the enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Campos-Bermudez, Valeria A; Morán-Barrio, Jorgelina; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Vila, Alejandro J

    2010-07-01

    Glyoxalase II (GLX2, EC 3.1.2.6., hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase) is a metalloenzyme involved in crucial detoxification pathways. Different studies have failed in identifying the native metal ion of this enzyme, which is expressed with iron, zinc and/or manganese. Here we report that GloB, the GLX2 from Salmonella typhimurium, is differentially inhibited by glutathione (a reaction product) depending on the bound metal ion, and we provide a structural model for this inhibition mode. This metal-dependent inhibition was shown to occur in metal-enriched forms of the enzyme, complementing the spectroscopic data. Based on the high levels of free glutathione in the cell, we suggest that the expression of the different metal forms of GLX2 during Salmonella infection could be exploited as a mechanism to regulate the enzyme activity.

  18. New Manufacturing Method for Paper Filler and Fiber Material

    SciTech Connect

    Doelle, Klaus

    2013-08-25

    The use of fillers in printing and writing papers has become a prerequisite for competing in a global market to reduce the cost of materials. Use of calcium carbonates (ranging from 18% to 30%) as filler is a common practice in the paper industry but the choices of fillers for each type of papers vary widely according to its use. The market for uncoated digital printing paper is one that continues to introduce exciting growth projections. and it is important to understand the effect that new manufacturing methods of calcium carbonates have on the energy efficiency and paper production. Research conducted under this award showed that the new fiber filler composite material has the potential to increase the paper filler content by up to 5% without losing mechanical properties. Benefits of the technology can be summarized as follows for a 1% filler increase per metric ton of paper produced: (i) production cost savings over $12, (ii) Energy savings of 100,900 btu, (iii) CO{sub 2} emission savings of 33 lbs, and additional savings for wood preparation, pulping, recovery of 203593 btu with a 46lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per 1% filler increase. In addition the technology has the potential to save: (i) additional $3 per ton of bleached pulp produced, (ii) bleaching energy savings of 170,000 btu, (iii) bleaching CO{sub 2} emission savings of 39 lbs, and (iv) additional savings for replacing conventional bleaching chemicals with a sustainable bleaching chemical is estimated to be 900,000 btu with a 205 lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per ton of bleached pulp produced. All the above translates to a estimated annual savings for a 12% filler increase of 296 trillion buts or 51 million barrel of oil equivalent (BOE) or 13.7% of the industries energy demand. This can lead to a increase of renewable energy usage from 56% to close to 70% for the industry sector. CO{sub 2} emission of the industry at a 12% filler increase could be lowered by over 39 million tons annually

  19. SEQUESTRATION OF METALS IN ACTIVE CAP MATERIALS: A LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Knox, A.

    2012-02-13

    Active capping involves the use of capping materials that react with sediment contaminants to reduce their toxicity or bioavailability. Although several amendments have been proposed for use in active capping systems, little is known about their long-term ability to sequester metals. Recent research has shown that the active amendment apatite has potential application for metals contaminated sediments. The focus of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of apatite in the sequestration of metal contaminants through the use of short-term laboratory column studies in conjunction with predictive, numerical modeling. A breakthrough column study was conducted using North Carolina apatite as the active amendment. Under saturated conditions, a spike solution containing elemental As, Cd, Co, Se, Pb, Zn, and a non-reactive tracer was injected into the column. A sand column was tested under similar conditions as a control. Effluent water samples were periodically collected from each column for chemical analysis. Relative to the non-reactive tracer, the breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite. Furthermore, breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite compared to the sand column. Finally, a simple 1-D, numerical model was created to qualitatively predict the long-term performance of apatite based on the findings from the column study. The results of the modeling showed that apatite could delay the breakthrough of some metals for hundreds of years under typical groundwater flow velocities.

  20. Market opportunities for fly ash fillers in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.; Harris, T.; Gledhill, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Direct Acid Leaching (DAL) processed fly ash is derived from treating raw and beneficiated coal fly ash with hydrochloric acid. The DAL process allows for the production of fly ash with greater chemical purity and consistency than raw fly ash alone. In addition, DAL fly ash is similar to various minerals used in a wide range of applications that require filler minerals. This project investigates the feasibility of using three grades of DAL fly ash ranging from 10 microns to 30 microns in diameter as an alternative filler material to mineral fillers. Six major applications in North America, requiring large volumes of filler minerals were investigated by region including: (1) asphalt roofing shingles (2) carpet backing (3) joint compound and wallboard (4) industrial coatings (5) plastics (6) vinyl flooring. It is determined that calcium carbonate was the primary mineral filler DAL fly ash would be competing with in the applications investigated. Calcium carbonate is used in all applications investigated. The application which demonstrated the greatest potential for using DAL fly ash is asphalt shingles. Asphalt shingles were the largest calcium carbonate consuming application identified, consuming 4.8 million tons in 1988, and is the least sensitive to the dark color of the DAL fly ash. Although the DAL fly ash typically has a smaller particle size, in comparison to calcium carbonate, the asphalt shingle manufacturers felt it would be a good substitute. Other promising applications for DAL fly ash were industrial coatings and plastics where the calcium carbonate particle size requirements of 3 to 6 microns very closely matches the particle size of the DAL fly ash considered in this project. 17 figs., 36 tabs.

  1. New Manufacturing Method for Paper Filler and Fiber Material

    SciTech Connect

    Doelle, Klaus

    2011-06-26

    The use of fillers in printing and writing papers has become a prerequisite for competing in a global market to reduce the cost of materials. Use of calcium carbonates (ranging from 18% to 30%) as filler is a common practice in the paper industry but the choices of fillers for each type of papers vary widely according to its use. The market for uncoated digital printing paper is one that continues to introduce exciting growth projections and it is important to understand the effect that different types of calcium carbonates have on the paper properties made of 100% eucalyptus pulp. The current study is focused on selecting the most suitable market available calcium carbonate for the production of uncoated Eucalyptus digital printing paper, targeting a potential filler increase of 5% above the currently used filler content. We made hand sheets using 13 different varieties of widely used calcium carbonates [Nine samples of PCC (two rhombic and seven scalenohedral, covering a wide particle size range from 1.2 {micro}m to 2.9 {micro}m), and four samples of GCC (three anionic and one cationic, with a particle size range from 0.7 {micro}m to 1.5 {micro}m)] available in the market followed by a 12” pilot plant paper machine run. The detailed analysis on the main structural, optical and strength properties of the hand sheets found that the most suitable calcium carbonate for uncoated Eucalyptus digital printing paper production is scalenohedral PCC, with a particle size of 1.9 {micro}m for its positive effects on thickness, stiffness, brightness and opacity of paper.

  2. Air Brazing: A New Method of Ceramic-Ceramic and Ceramic-Metal Joining

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Darsell, Jens T.; Kim, Jin Yong

    2011-10-01

    A new method of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal joining has emerged over the past several years. Referred to as air brazing, the technique was originally designed and developed for use in fabricating high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices such as planar SOFCs and oxygen and hydrogen concentrators. The primary advantage of air brazing is that a predominantly metallic joint can be formed directly in air without need of an inert cover gas or the use of surface reactive fluxes. The resulting bond is hermetic, offers excellent room temperature strength, and is inherently resistant to oxidation at high temperature. The key to developing a successful filler metal composition for air brazing is to identify a metal oxide wetting agent that is mutually soluble in a molten noble metal solvent. One particular oxide-metal combination that appears readily suited for this purpose is CuOx-Ag, a system originally of interest in the development of silver clad cuprate-based superconductors. Studies of the equilibrium phases studies in this system indicate that there are two invariant points in the pseudobinary CuOx-Ag phase diagram around which new braze compositions can be developed: 1) a monotectic reaction at 969±1°C, where CuO and a Ag-rich liquid L1 coexist with a second CuOx-rich liquid phase L2 at a composition of xAg/(xAg + xCu) = 0.10±0.03 Ag and 2) a eutectic reaction at 942±1°C, where CuO and Ag coexist with L1 at a composition of xAg/(xAg + xCu) = 0.99±0.005. Specifically, near-eutectic Ag-CuO filler metal compositions have shown good promise in joining electrochemically active ceramics such as yttria-stabilized zirconia, lanthanum strontium manganite, and barium strontium cobalt ferrite, as well as alumina and magnesia. More recently it has been found that various ternary additions can further improve the wetting characteristics of these filler metals, increase their potential operating temperatures, and/or increase the resulting strength of the

  3. An improved d-band model of the catalytic activity of magnetic transition metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Satadeep; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Lee, Seung-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The d-band center model of Hammer and Nørskov is widely used in understanding and predicting catalytic activity on transition metal (TM) surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that this model is inadequate for capturing the complete catalytic activity of the magnetically polarized TM surfaces and propose its generalization. We validate the generalized model through comparison of adsorption energies of the NH3 molecule on the surfaces of 3d TMs (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) determined with spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT)-based methods with the predictions of our model. Compared to the conventional d-band model, where the nature of the metal-adsorbate interaction is entirely determined through the energy and the occupation of the d-band center, we emphasize that for the surfaces with high spin polarization, the metal-adsorbate system can be stabilized through a competition of the spin-dependent metal-adsorbate interactions. PMID:27808100

  4. An improved d-band model of the catalytic activity of magnetic transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Satadeep; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Lee, Seung-Cheol

    2016-11-01

    The d-band center model of Hammer and Nørskov is widely used in understanding and predicting catalytic activity on transition metal (TM) surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that this model is inadequate for capturing the complete catalytic activity of the magnetically polarized TM surfaces and propose its generalization. We validate the generalized model through comparison of adsorption energies of the NH3 molecule on the surfaces of 3d TMs (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) determined with spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT)-based methods with the predictions of our model. Compared to the conventional d-band model, where the nature of the metal-adsorbate interaction is entirely determined through the energy and the occupation of the d-band center, we emphasize that for the surfaces with high spin polarization, the metal-adsorbate system can be stabilized through a competition of the spin-dependent metal-adsorbate interactions.

  5. Activation of methane by transition metal-substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    DOEpatents

    Iton, Lennox E.; Maroni, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminophosphate molecular sieves substituted with cobalt, manganese or iron and having the AlPO.sub.4 -34 or AlPO.sub.4 -5, or related AlPO.sub.4 structure activate methane starting at approximately 350.degree. C. Between 400.degree. and 500.degree. C. and at methane pressures .ltoreq.1 atmosphere the rate of methane conversion increases steadily with typical conversion efficiencies at 500.degree. C. approaching 50% and selectivity to the production of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons approaching 100%. The activation mechanism is based on reduction of the transition metal(III) form of the molecular sieve to the transition metal(II) form with accompanying oxidative dehydrogenation of the methane. Reoxidation of the - transition metal(II) form to the transition metal(III) form can be done either chemically (e.g., using O.sub.2) or electrochemically.

  6. The Origin of the Catalytic Activity of a Metal Hydride in CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Kerger, Philipp; Bernard, Laetitia; Battaglia, Corsin; Vogel, Dirk; Rohwerder, Michael; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-05-10

    Atomic hydrogen on the surface of a metal with high hydrogen solubility is of particular interest for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. In a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, methane was markedly formed on the metal hydride ZrCoHx in the course of the hydrogen desorption and not on the pristine intermetallic. The surface analysis was performed by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, for the in situ analysis. The aim was to elucidate the origin of the catalytic activity of the metal hydride. Since at the initial stage the dissociation of impinging hydrogen molecules is hindered by a high activation barrier of the oxidised surface, the atomic hydrogen flux from the metal hydride is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide and surface oxides at interfacial sites.

  7. Metal ion specificities for folding and cleavage activity in the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Boots, Jennifer L.; Canny, Marella D.; Azimi, Ehsan; Pardi, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The effects of various metal ions on cleavage activity and global folding have been studied in the extended Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer was used to probe global folding as a function of various monovalent and divalent metal ions in this ribozyme. The divalent metals ions Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, and Sr2+ have a relatively small variation (less than sixfold) in their ability to globally fold the hammerhead ribozyme, which contrasts with the very large difference (>10,000-fold) in apparent rate constants for cleavage for these divalent metal ions in single-turnover kinetic experiments. There is still a very large range (>4600-fold) in the apparent rate constants for cleavage for these divalent metal ions measured in high salt (2 M NaCl) conditions where the ribozyme is globally folded. These results demonstrate that the identity of the divalent metal ion has little effect on global folding of the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme, whereas it has a very large effect on the cleavage kinetics. Mechanisms by which the identity of the divalent metal ion can have such a large effect on cleavage activity in the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme are discussed. PMID:18755844

  8. Spectral, XRD, SEM and biological activities of transition metal complexes of polydentate ligands containing thiazole moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelakantan, M. A.; Marriappan, S. S.; Dharmaraja, J.; Jeyakumar, T.; Muthukumaran, K.

    2008-11-01

    Metal complexes of o-vanillidene-2-aminobenzothiazole have been prepared and characterized by elemental and spectral (vibrational, electronic, 1H NMR and EPR) data as well as magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermo gravimetric analysis (TG/DTA). The low molar conductance values reveal the non-electrolytic nature of these complexes. The elemental analysis suggests that the stoichiometry to be 1:2 (metal:ligand). Magnetic susceptibility data coupled with electronic spectra suggest that two ligands coordinate to each metal atom by phenolic oxygen and imino nitrogen to form high spin octahedral complex with Co(II), Mn(II) and Ni(II). The fifth and sixth position of metal ion is satisfied with water molecules. The thermal behaviour (TG/DTA) of the synthesised complexes shows that the complexes loss water molecules in the first step followed by decomposition of the ligand. Spin Hamiltonian parameters predict a distorted tetrahedral geometry for the copper complex. XRD and SEM analysis provide the crystalline nature and the morphology of the metal complexes. The in vitro biological activity of the metal chelates is tested against the Gram positive bacteria ( Bacillus amyloliquifacians) and gram negative bacteria ( Pseudomonas species), fungus ( Aspergillus niger) and yeast ( Sacchromyces cereviaceae). Most of the metal chelates exhibited higher biological activities.

  9. Activation of noble metals on metal-carbide surfaces: novel catalysts for CO oxidation, desulfurization and hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, José A; Illas, Francesc

    2012-01-14

    This perspective article focuses on the physical and chemical properties of highly active catalysts for CO oxidation, desulfurization and hydrogenation reactions generated by depositing noble metals on metal-carbide surfaces. To rationalize structure-reactivity relationships for these novel catalysts, well-defined systems are required. High-resolution photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and first-principles periodic density-functional (DF) calculations have been used to study the interaction of metals of Groups 9, 10 and 11 with MC(001) (M = Ti, Zr, V, Mo) surfaces. DF calculations give adsorption energies that range from 2 eV (Cu, Ag, Au) to 6 eV (Co, Rh, Ir). STM images show that Au, Cu, Ni and Pt grow on the carbide substrates forming two-dimensional islands at very low coverage, and three-dimensional islands at medium and large coverages. In many systems, the results of DF calculations point to the preferential formation of admetal-C bonds with significant electronic perturbations in the admetal. TiC(001) and ZrC(001) transfer some electron density to the admetals facilitating bonding of the adatom with electron-acceptor molecules (CO, O(2), C(2)H(4), SO(2), thiophene, etc.). For example, the Cu/TiC(001) and Au/TiC(001) systems are able to cleave both S-O bonds of SO(2) at a temperature as low as 150 K, displaying a reactivity much larger than that of TiC(001) or extended surfaces of bulk copper and gold. At temperatures below 200 K, Au/TiC is able to dissociate O(2) and perform the 2CO + O(2)→ 2CO(2) reaction. Furthermore, in spite of the very poor hydrodesulfurization performance of TiC(001) or Au(111), a Au/TiC(001) surface displays an activity for the hydrodesulfurization of thiophene higher than that of conventional Ni/MoS(x) catalysts. In general, the Au/TiC system is more chemically active than systems generated by depositing Au nanoparticles on oxide surfaces. Thus, metal carbides are excellent supports for enhancing the chemical

  10. Study of activation of metal samples from LDEF-1 and Spacelab-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The activation of metal samples and other material orbited onboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and Spacelab-2 were studied. Measurements of the radioactivities of spacecraft materials were made, and corrections for self-absorption and efficiency were calculated. Activation cross sections for specific metal samples were updated while cross sections for other materials were tabulated from the scientific literature. Activation cross sections for 200 MeV neutrons were experimentally determined. Linear absorption coefficients, half lives, branching ratios and other pertinent technical data needed for LDEF sample analyses were tabulated. The status of the sample counting at low background facilities at national laboratories is reported.

  11. Metal-Organic Frameworks derivatives for improving the catalytic activity of CO oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenlan; Xu, Zhiling; Liu, Pengfei; Zhang, Suoying; Zhou, Weiqiang; Li, Hongfeng; Zhang, Tao; Li, Linjie; Lu, Xiaohua; Wu, Jiansheng; Zhang, Weina; Huo, Fengwei

    2017-03-15

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) based derivatives have attracted an increasing interest in various research fields. However, most of reported papers mainly focused on the pristine MOFs-based derivatives, and researches on the functional MOFs-based derivatives composites are rare. Here, a simple strategy was reported to design the functional MOFs based derivatives composites by the encapsulation of the metal nanoparticles (MNPs) in MOFs matrixes (MNPs@MOFs) and the high-temperature calcination of MNPs@MOFs composites. The as-prepared MNPs@metal oxide composites with the hierarchical pore structure exhibited excellent catalytic activity and high stability for CO oxidation reaction.

  12. Regional distribution pattern of groundwater heavy metals resulting from agricultural activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, J.; Mahvi, A. H.; Jahed, G. R.; Babaei, A. A.

    2008-09-01

    Contaminations of groundwater by heavy metals due to agricultural activities are growing recently. The objective of this study was to evaluate and map regional patterns of heavy metals (Cd, Zn and Cu) in groundwater on a plain with high agricultural activities. The study was conducted to investigate the concentration of heavy metals and distribution in groundwater in regions of Shush Danial and Andimeshk aquifers in the southern part of Iran. Presently, groundwater is the only appropriate and widely used source of drinking water for rural and urban communities in this region. The region covers an area of 1,100 km2 between the Dez and Karkhe rivers, which lead to the Persian Gulf. For this study, the region was divided into four sub-regions A, B, C and D. Additionally, 168 groundwater samples were collected from 42 water wells during the earlier months of 2004. The flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS-Flame) was used to measure the concentration of heavy metals in water samples and the Surfer software was used for determination of the contour map of metal distribution. The results demonstrated that in all of the samples, Cd and Zn concentrations were below the EPA MCLG and EPA secondary standard, respectively. However, the Cu contents of 4.8 % of all samples were higher than EPA MCL. It is also indicated that the concentrations of metals were more pronounced at the southern part of the studied region than at the others. The analysis of fertilizers applied for agricultural activities at this region also indicated that a great majority of the above-mentioned heavy metals were discharged into the environment. Absence of confining layers, proximity to land surface, excess agricultural activities in the southern part and groundwater flow direction that is generally from the north to the southern parts in this area make the southern region of the Shush plain especially vulnerable to pollution by heavy metals than by other contaminants.

  13. X-ray crystal structure of divalent metal-activated ß-xyloisdase, RS223BX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the first X-ray structure of a glycoside hydrolase family 43 ß-xylosidase, RS223BX, which is strongly activated by the addition of divalent metal cations. The 2.69 Å structure reveals that the Ca2+ cation is located at the back of the active site pocket. The Ca2+ coordinates to H274 to sta...

  14. Plasma electrolytic oxide coatings on valve metals and their activity in CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukiyanchuk, I. V.; Rudnev, V. S.; Tyrina, L. M.; Chernykh, I. V.

    2014-10-01

    Two approaches have been examined for obtaining titanium- or aluminum-supported catalysts with transition and noble metals using the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique. Elemental compositions, distribution of active elements and catalytic activity in CO oxidation have been compared for composites formed by one-stage PEO technique and those obtained as a result of modification of PEO coatings by impregnation.

  15. ACTIVATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING PATHWAY IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that exposure to combustion-derived metals rapidly (within 20 min) activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), in the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS. To study the mechanisms respons...

  16. Influence of heavy metals on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in the metal resistant strains of Ochrobactrum and Bacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sanjeev; Barai, Prabir Kumar; Maiti, Tushar K

    2013-11-01

    Three bacterial strains, a cadmium resistant Ochrobactrum sp. designated as CdSP9 and two strains of Bacillus sp. named PbSP6 and AsSP9 resistant to lead and arsenate, respectively were characterized here with respect to their oxidative enzyme activities. The bacterial strains were grown in basal medium supplemented with 50 microg ml(-1) of respective elements to determine the changes in the level of oxidative enzymes. The superoxide dismutase activity increased in all three isolates, but the catalase activity and malondialdehyde concentration were relatively more in CdSP9 than PbSP6 and AsSP9. The glutathione peroxidase, however, remained almost uninduced in CdSP9 but was enhanced in PbSP6 and AsSP9. A possible role of these enzymes in metal tolerance is evident from these results.

  17. Effect of heavy metals ions on enzyme activity in the Mediterranean mussel, Donax trunculus

    SciTech Connect

    Mizrahi, L.; Achituv, Y. )

    1989-06-01

    Heavy metal ions strongly are bound by sulfhydryl groups of proteins. Sulfhydryl binding changes the structure and enzymatic activities of proteins and causes toxic effects evident at the whole organism level. Heavy metal ions like Cd, Cu, Hg, Zn, and Pb in sufficiently high concentrations might kill organisms or cause other adverse effects that changing aquatic community structures. Bivalves are known to be heavy metal accumulators. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of different concentrations of each of five heavy metal ions on the activity of four enzymes in D. trunculus. As it is known that heavy metals inhibit the activity of a wide range of enzymes, the authors chose representative examples of dehydrogenases (lactate and malate dehydrogenases), respiratory enzyme (cytochrome oxidase) and digestive enzyme ({alpha}-amylase). The acute effects of different concentrations of selected metals were examined. These concentrations were higher than those found usually in the locality where the animals occur, but might be encountered during a given event of pollution.

  18. Metal-VO2 hybrid grating structure for a terahertz active switchable linear polarizer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jun-Hwan; Moon, Kiwon; Lee, Eui Su; Lee, Il-Min; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2015-08-07

    An active terahertz (THz) wave hybrid grating structure of Au/Ti metallic grating on VO2/Al2O3 (0001) was fabricated and evaluated. In our structure, it is shown that the metallic gratings on the VO2 layer strengthen the metallic characteristics to enhance the contrast of the metallic and dielectric phases of a VO2-based device. Especially, the metal grating-induced optical conductivity of the device is greatly enhanced, three times more than that of a metallic phase of bare VO2 films in the 0.1-2.0 THz spectral range. As an illustrative example, we fabricated an actively on/off switchable THz linear polarizer. The fabricated device has shown commercially comparable values in degree of polarization (DOP) and extinction ratio (ER). A high value of 0.89 in the modulation depth (MD) for the transmission field amplitude, superior to other THz wave modulators, is achieved. The experimental results show that the fabricated device can be highly useful in many applications, including active THz linear polarizers, THz wave modulators and variable THz attenuators.

  19. Real-time active MR-tracking of metallic stylets in MR-guided radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Tse, Zion T. H.; Mehrtash, Alireza; Loew, Wolfgang; Norton, Isaiah; Tokuda, Junichi; Seethamraju, Ravi T.; Kapur, Tina; Damato, Antonio L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Schmidt, Ehud J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop an active MR-tracking system to guide placement of metallic devices for radiation therapy. Methods An actively tracked metallic stylet for brachytherapy was constructed by adding printed-circuit micro-coils to a commercial stylet. The coil design was optimized by electromagnetic simulation, and has a radio-frequency lobe pattern extending ~5 mm beyond the strong B0 inhomogeneity region near the metal surface. An MR-tracking sequence with phase-field dithering was used to overcome residual effects of B0 and B1 inhomogeneities caused by the metal, as well as from inductive coupling to surrounding metallic stylets. The tracking system was integrated with a graphical workstation for real-time visualization. 3T MRI catheter-insertion procedures were tested in phantoms and ex-vivo animal tissue, and then performed in three patients during interstitial brachytherapy. Results The tracking system provided high-resolution (0.6 × 0.6 × 0.6 mm3) and rapid (16 to 40 frames per second, with three to one phase-field dithering directions) catheter localization in phantoms, animals, and three gynecologic cancer patients. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of active tracking of the shaft of metallic stylet in MR-guided brachytherapy. It holds the promise of assisting physicians to achieve better targeting and improving outcomes in interstitial brachytherapy. PMID:24903165

  20. Biologically activated noble metal alloys at the nanoscale: for lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, Youjin; Oh, Dahyun; Chen, Tiffany; Ceder, Gerbrand; Belcher, Angela M

    2010-07-14

    We report the synthesis and electrochemical activity of gold and silver noble metals and their alloy nanowires using multiple virus clones as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Using two clones, one for specificity (p8#9 virus) and one versatility (E4 virus), noble metal nanowires of high-aspect ratio with diameters below 50 nm were successfully synthesized with control over particle sizes, morphologies, and compositions. The biologically derived noble metal alloy nanowires showed electrochemical activities toward lithium even when the electrodes were prepared from bulk powder forms. The improvement in capacity retention was accomplished by alloy formation and surface stabilization. Although the cost of noble metals renders them a less ideal choice for lithium ion batteries, these noble metal/alloy nanowires serve as great model systems to study electrochemically induced transformation at the nanoscale. Given the demonstration of the electrochemical activity of noble metal alloy nanowires with various compositions, the M13 biological toolkit extended its utility for the study on the basic electrochemical property of materials.

  1. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  2. Hybrid membranes of metal-organic molecule nanocages for aromatic/aliphatic hydrocarbon separation by pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cui; Wang, Naixin; Wang, Lin; Huang, Hongliang; Zhang, Rong; Yang, Fan; Xie, Yabo; Ji, Shulan; Li, Jian-Rong

    2014-11-21

    Hybrid membranes composed of porous metal-organic molecule nanocages as fillers embedded in a hyperbranched polymer (Boltorn W3000) were fabricated, which exhibit excellent pervaporation separation performances towards aromatic/aliphatic hydrocarbons. The unique nature of the molecule-based fillers and their good dispersion and compatibility in/with the polymer are responsible for the good membrane properties.

  3. Study on preparation of Luffa activated carbon and its adsorption of metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Kuilu; Li, Zichao; Li, Qun

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, loofah was used as raw material and alkali and hydrogen peroxide were used to pre-oxidize. The activated carbon was activated by zinc chloride, and the activated carbon was used to desorb the heavy metal ions nickel and copper. The removal efficiency of heavy metal ions was studied under different conditions. The effects of retinervus Luffae Fructus active carbon adsorption of metal ions on process conditions, including metal ion concentration, reaction temperature, loofah activated carbon types and activated carbon dosage. In the present study, in different strain rate on the loofah sponge material compression tests in a wide range of density from 24 to 64 kg cubic meters. Luffa fibers and followed by carbonization to prepare MCAC KOH activation. MCAC has dense in parallel channels 10 mm in diameter and 4 - 0.3 - 1 mm wall thickness, which is inherited from the native structure of Luffa. Micro and middle holes are formed on the inner surface of the channel wall to form a hierarchical porous structure.

  4. Autonomous Slat-Cove-Filler Device for Reduction of Aeroacoustic Noise Associated with Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Kidd, Reggie T. (Inventor); Lockard, David P (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Streett, Craig L. (Inventor); Weber, Douglas Leo (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A slat cove filler is utilized to reduce airframe noise resulting from deployment of a leading edge slat of an aircraft wing. The slat cove filler is preferably made of a super elastic shape memory alloy, and the slat cove filler shifts between stowed and deployed shapes as the slat is deployed. The slat cove filler may be configured such that a separate powered actuator is not required to change the shape of the slat cove filler from its deployed shape to its stowed shape and vice-versa. The outer contour of the slat cove filler preferably follows a profile designed to maintain accelerating flow in the gap between the slat cove filler and wing leading edge to provide for noise reduction.

  5. Thermal analysis of resin composites with ellipsoidal filler considering thermal boundary resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of composites with ellipsoidal fillers is analyzed by using a homogenization method that is able to represent the microstructure precisely. In this study, various parameters such as the volume fraction, shape, and distribution of the filler are quantitatively estimated to understand the mechanisms of heat transfer in the composite. First, thermal boundary resistance between resin and filler is important for obtaining composites with higher thermal conductivity. Second, the anisotropy of the effective thermal conductivity arises from contact between filler in the case of ellipsoidal filler and produces lower thermal resistance. Finally, the filler network and thermal resistance are essential for the heat transfer in composites because the path of thermal conduction is improved by contact between neighboring filler particles.

  6. Seasonal changes in antioxidant enzyme activities of freshwater biofilms in a metal polluted Mediterranean stream.

    PubMed

    Bonet, Berta; Corcoll, Natàlia; Acuňa, Vicenç; Sigg, Laura; Behra, Renata; Guasch, Helena

    2013-02-01

    While seasonal variations in fluvial communities have been extensively investigated, effects of seasonality on community responses to environmental and/or chemical stress are poorly documented. The aim of this study was to describe antioxidant enzyme activity (AEA) variability in fluvial biofilms over an annual cycle, under multi-stress scenarios due to environmental variability (e.g., light intensity, water flow, and temperature) and metal pollution (Zn, Mn and Fe). The annual monitoring study was performed at three sites according to their water and biofilm metal concentrations. Metal concentration was affected by water flow due to dilution. Low flow led to higher dissolved Zn concentrations, and thus to higher Zn accumulation in the biofilm. Water temperature, light intensity and phosphate concentration were the environmental factors which determined the seasonality of biofilm responses, whereas dissolved Zn and Zn accumulation in biofilms were the parameters linked to sites and periods of highest metal pollution. Community algal succession, from diatoms in cold conditions to green algae in warm conditions, was clearer in the non metal-polluted site than in those metal-polluted, presumably due to the selection pressure exerted by metals. Most AEA were related with seasonal environmental variability at the sites with low or no-metal pollution, except glutathione-S-transferase (GST) which was related with Zn (dissolved and accumulated in biofilm) pollution occurring at the most polluted site. We can conclude that seasonal variations of community composition and function are masked by metal pollution. From this study we suggest the use of a multi-biomarker approach, including AEA and a set of biological and physicochemical parameters as an effect-based field tool to assess metal pollution.

  7. Antibacterial activity of heavy metal-loaded natural zeolite.

    PubMed

    Hrenovic, Jasna; Milenkovic, Jelena; Ivankovic, Tomislav; Rajic, Nevenka

    2012-01-30

    The antibacterial activity of natural zeolitized tuffs containing 2.60wt.% Cu(2+), 1.47 Zn(2+) or 0.52 Ni(2+) were tested. Antibacterial activities of the zeolites against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were tested after 1h and 24h of exposure to 1g of the zeolite in 100mL of three different media, namely Luria Bertani, synthetic wastewater and secondary effluent wastewater. The antibacterial activities of the zeolites in Luria Bertani medium were significantly lower than those in the other media and negatively correlated with the chemical oxygen demand of the media. The Ni-loaded zeolite showed high leaching of Ni(2+) (3.44-9.13wt.% of the Ni(2+) loaded) and weak antibacterial activity in the effluent water. Since Cu-loaded zeolite did not leach Cu(2+) and the leaching of Zn(2+) from Zn-loaded zeolite was low (1.07-1.61wt.% of the Zn(2+) loaded), the strong antibacterial activity classified the Cu- and Zn-loaded zeolite as promising antibacterial materials for disinfection of secondary effluent water.

  8. Roles of metal/activated carbon hybridization on elemental mercury adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kyong-Min; Kim, Byung-Joo; Rhee, Kyong Yop; Park, Soo-Jin

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the elemental mercury removal behavior of metal (copper or nickel)/activated carbon hybrid materials were investigated. The pore structures and total pore volumes of the hybrid materials were analyzed using the N2/77 K adsorption isotherms. The microstructure and surface morphologies of the hybrid materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. In the experimental results, the elemental mercury adsorption capacities of all copper/activated carbon hybrid materials were higher than that of the as-received material despite the decrease in specific surface areas and total pore volumes after the metal loading. All the samples containing the metal particles showed excellent elemental mercury adsorption. The Ni/ACs exhibited superior elemental mercury adsorption to those of Cu/ACs. This suggests that Ni/ACs have better elemental mercury adsorption due to the higher activity of nickel.

  9. Bioremediation of heavy metal-contaminated effluent using optimized activated sludge bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestawy, Ebtesam El.; Helmy, Shacker; Hussien, Hany; Fahmy, Mohamed; Amer, Ranya

    2013-03-01

    Removal of heavy metals from contaminated domestic-industrial effluent using eight resistant indigenous bacteria isolated from acclimatized activated sludge was investigated. Molecular identification using 16S rDNA amplification revealed that all strains were Gram-negative among which two were resistant to each of copper, cadmium and cobalt while one was resistant to each of chromium and the heavy metal mixture. They were identified as Enterobacter sp. (Cu1), Enterobacter sp. (Cu2), Stenotrophomonas sp. (Cd1), Providencia sp. (Cd2), Chryseobacterium sp. (Co1), Comamonas sp. (Co2), Ochrobactrum sp. (Cr) and Delftia sp. (M1) according to their resistance pattern. Strains Cu1, Cd1, Co2 and Cr were able to resist 275 mg Cu/l, 320 mg Cd/l, 140 mg Co/l and 29 mg Cr/l respectively. The four resistant strains were used as a mixture to remove heavy metals (elevated concentrations) and reduce the organic load of wastewater effluent. Results revealed that using the proposed activated sludge with the resistant bacterial mixture was more efficient for heavy metal removal compared to the activated sludge alone. It is therefore recommended that the proposed activated sludge system augmented with the acclimatized strains is the best choice to ensure high treatment efficiency and performance under metal stresses especially when industrial effluents are involved.

  10. Size Effects in the Catalytic Activity of Unsupported Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Alfred P.; Seipenbusch, Martin; Kasper, Gerhard

    2003-08-01

    The influence of the size of nanoparticles on their catalytic activity was investigated for two systems on unsupported, i.e. gasborne nanoparticles. For the oxidation of hydrogen on Pt nanoparticle agglomerates, transport processes had to be taken into account to extract the real nanoparticle size effects. The results indicate an optimum particle size for the catalytic activity below 5nm which points clearly toward a real volume effect. In the case of the methanation reaction on gasborne Ni nanoparticles, no transport limitations were observed and the product concentration was directly proportional to the activity of the primary particles. We found an activity maximum for particles of about 19nm in diameter. This size is too large to be attributed to a real nanoparticle size effect induced by the electronic band structure. Therefore, we concluded that the particle size influences the adsorption behavior of the carbon monoxide molecules. In fact, it is known that intermediate adsorption enthalpies may favor dissociation processes, which is an essential step for the reaction, as manifested in the so called volcano-shaped curve. Then, in addition to the material dependence of the adsorption, we would also encounter a direct size dependence in the case of methanation on gasborne Ni nanoparticles.

  11. Metal dispersion resulting from mining activities in coastal environments: a pathways approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, Randolph A.

    2012-01-01

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) and disposal of tailings that result from mining activities impact coastal areas in many countries. The dispersion of metals from mine sites that are both proximal and distal to the shoreline can be examined using a pathways approach in which physical and chemical processes guide metal transport in the continuum from sources (sulfide minerals) to bioreceptors (marine biota). Large amounts of metals can be physically transported to the coastal environment by intentional or accidental release of sulfide-bearing mine tailings. Oxidation of sulfide minerals results in elevated dissolved metal concentrations in surface waters on land (producing ARD) and in pore waters of submarine tailings. Changes in pH, adsorption by insoluble secondary minerals (e.g., Fe oxyhydroxides), and precipitation of soluble salts (e.g., sulfates) affect dissolved metal fluxes. Evidence for bioaccumulation includes anomalous metal concentrations in bivalves and reef corals, and overlapping Pb isotope ratios for sulfides, shellfish, and seaweed in contaminated environments. Although bioavailability and potential toxicity are, to a large extent, functions of metal speciation, specific uptake pathways, such as adsorption from solution and ingestion of particles, also play important roles. Recent emphasis on broader ecological impacts has led to complementary methodologies involving laboratory toxicity tests and field studies of species richness and diversity.

  12. Current Status of Trace Metal Pollution in Soils Affected by Industrial Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Ehsanul; Ray, Sharmila; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Yoon, Hye-On; Jeon, Eui-Chan; Kim, Yoon Shin; Cho, Yong-Sung; Yun, Seong-Taek; Brown, Richard J. C.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing public concern over the potential accumulation of heavy metals in soil, owing to rapid industrial development. In an effort to describe the status of the pollutions of soil by industrial activities, relevant data sets reported by many studies were surveyed and reviewed. The results of our analysis indicate that soils were polluted most significantly by metals such as lead, zinc, copper, and cadmium. If the dominant species are evaluated by the highest mean concentration observed for different industry types, the results were grouped into Pb, Zn, Ni, Cu, Fe, and As in smelting and metal production industries, Mn and Cd in the textile industry, and Cr in the leather industry. In most cases, metal levels in the studied areas were found to exceed the common regulation guideline levels enforced by many countries. The geoaccumulation index (Igeo), calculated to estimate the enrichment of metal concentrations in soil, showed that the level of metal pollution in most surveyed areas is significant, especially for Pb and Cd. It is thus important to keep systematic and continuous monitoring of heavy metals and their derivatives to manage and suppress such pollution. PMID:22645468

  13. Effects of certain heavy metals on the growth, dye decolorization, and enzyme activity of Lentinula edodes.

    PubMed

    Hatvani, Nóra; Mécs, Imre

    2003-06-01

    Various physiological parameters of Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) in the presence of nine heavy metal salts were investigated. The mycelial growth was highly sensitive to cadmium and mercury, but less sensitive to zinc, copper, and lead. This resistance can be particularly dangerous to humans in the case of edible fungi such as Shiitake because of the possible heavy metal accumulation during growth and fruiting body production. All of the tested heavy metals inhibited decolorization of the dye Poly R-478 and the production of manganese peroxidase to a greater extent than they inhibited growth. Interestingly, with the exception of iron, the addition of all heavy metal salts investigated led to the increase of laccase production. Apart from cadmium and iron, none of the heavy metals inhibited the in vitro enzyme activities in concentrations up to 3mM. The results of this study indicated the applicability of L. edodes in biosorption technologies used in the removal of toxic metals from contaminated effluents and in bioremediation technologies designed to treat complex wastes contaminated with heavy metals in addition to other xenobiotics.

  14. Current status of trace metal pollution in soils affected by industrial activities.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Ehsanul; Ray, Sharmila; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Yoon, Hye-On; Jeon, Eui-Chan; Kim, Yoon Shin; Cho, Yong-Sung; Yun, Seong-Taek; Brown, Richard J C

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing public concern over the potential accumulation of heavy metals in soil, owing to rapid industrial development. In an effort to describe the status of the pollutions of soil by industrial activities, relevant data sets reported by many studies were surveyed and reviewed. The results of our analysis indicate that soils were polluted most significantly by metals such as lead, zinc, copper, and cadmium. If the dominant species are evaluated by the highest mean concentration observed for different industry types, the results were grouped into Pb, Zn, Ni, Cu, Fe, and As in smelting and metal production industries, Mn and Cd in the textile industry, and Cr in the leather industry. In most cases, metal levels in the studied areas were found to exceed the common regulation guideline levels enforced by many countries. The geoaccumulation index (I(geo)), calculated to estimate the enrichment of metal concentrations in soil, showed that the level of metal pollution in most surveyed areas is significant, especially for Pb and Cd. It is thus important to keep systematic and continuous monitoring of heavy metals and their derivatives to manage and suppress such pollution.

  15. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Genth, Harald; Schelle, Ilona; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL) and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB) belong to the family of the “Large clostridial glycosylating toxins.” These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB—together with Toxin A (TcdA)—is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn2+ > Co2+ > Mg2+ >> Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+. TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn2+ and 180 µM for Mg2+. TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K+ (not by Na+). Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K+ and Mg2+ (rather than Mn2+) in mammalian target cells. PMID:27089365

  16. Adsorption of valuable metals from leachates of mobile phone wastes using biopolymers and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zazycki, Maria A; Tanabe, Eduardo H; Bertuol, Daniel A; Dotto, Guilherme L

    2017-03-01

    In this work, chitin (CTN), chitosan (CTS) and activated carbon (AC) were used as adsorbents to recover valuable metals from leachates of mobile phone wastes. The mobile phone wastes (contactors) were collected and characterized. The valuable metals were extracted by thiourea leaching. The adsorption of valuable metals from leachates was studied according to the kinetic and equilibrium viewpoints. It was found that the contactors were composed by Au, Ni, Cu and Sn. The thiourea leaching provided extraction percentages of 68.6% for Au, 22.1% for Ni and 2.8% for Cu. Sn was not extracted. The leachate presented 17.5 mg L(-1) of Au, 324.9 mg L(-1) of Ni and 573.1 mg L(-1) of Cu. The adsorption was fast, being the equilibrium attained within 120 min. The adsorption of Au, Ni and Cu onto CTN and AC followed the Langmuir model, while, the adsorption of these metals onto CTS, followed the Freundlich model. Removal percentages higher than 95% were obtained for all metals, depending of the type and amount of adsorbent. It was demonstrated that the adsorption onto chitin, chitosan and activated carbon can be an alternative to recover valuable metals from leachates of mobile phone wastes.

  17. Removal of metals from landfill leachate by sorption to activated carbon, bone meal and iron fines.

    PubMed

    Modin, Hanna; Persson, Kenneth M; Andersson, Anna; van Praagh, Martijn

    2011-05-30

    Sorption filters based on granular activated carbon, bone meal and iron fines were tested for their efficiency of removing metals from landfill leachate. Removal of Al, As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn were studied in a laboratory scale setup. Activated carbon removed more than 90% of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni. Ca, Pb, Sr and Zn were removed but less efficiently. Bone meal removed over 80% of Cr, Fe, Hg, Mn and Sr and 20-80% of Al, Ca, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn. Iron fines removed most metals (As, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb, Sr and Zn) to some extent but less efficiently. All materials released unwanted substances (metals, TOC or nutrients), highlighting the need to study the uptake and release of a large number of compounds, not only the target metals. To remove a wide range of metals using these materials two or more filter materials may need to be combined. Sorption mechanisms for all materials include ion exchange, sorption and precipitation. For iron fines oxidation of Fe(0) seems to be important for metal immobilisation.

  18. Exposure to airborne metals and particulate matter and risk for youth adjudicated for criminal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Erin N.; Chen, Aimin; Ryan, Patrick; Succop, Paul; Wright, John; Dietrich, Kim N.

    2011-11-15

    Antisocial behavior is a product of multiple interacting sociohereditary variables, yet there is increasing evidence that metal exposure, particularly, manganese and lead, play a role in its epigenesis. Other metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and mercury, and exposure to traffic-related air pollution, such as fine particulate matter ({<=}2.5 {mu}m) have been associated with neurological deficits, yet largely unexplored with respect to their relationship with delinquent behavior. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ecological relationship between county-wide reported airborne emissions of air metals, particulate matter, and youth adjudicated for criminal activity. Metal exposure data were collected from the Environmental Protection Agency AirData. Population statistics were obtained from the United States Census 2000 and adjudication data was obtained from the Courts of Common Pleases from each Ohio County. Simple correlations were calculated with the percentage of adjudications, all covariates, and estimated metal air emissions. Separate negative binomial regression models for each pollutant were used to provide an estimated risk ratio of pollutant emissions on the risk of adjudication for all Ohio counties adjusting for urban-rural residence, percentage of African Americans, median family income, percentage of family below poverty, percentage of high school graduation in 25 years and older populations, and population density. Metal emissions and PM in 1999 were all correlated with adjudication rate (2003-2005 average). Metal emissions were associated with slightly higher risk of adjudication, with about 3-4% increased risk per natural log unit of metal emission except chromium. The associations achieved statistical significance for manganese and mercury. The particulate matter {<=}2.5 and {<=}10 {mu}m emissions had a higher risk estimate, with 12% and 19% increase per natural log unit emission, respectively, and also achieved statistical

  19. Activation and inhibition of rubber transferases by metal cofactors and pyrophosphate substrates.

    PubMed

    Scott, Deborah J; da Costa, Bernardo M T; Espy, Stephanie C; Keasling, Jay D; Cornish, Katrina

    2003-09-01

    Metal cofactors are necessary for the activity of alkylation by prenyl transfer in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Rubber transferase (RuT, a cis-prenyl transferase) associated with purified rubber particles from Hevea brasiliensis, Parthenium argentatum and Ficus elastica can use magnesium and manganese interchangably to achieve maximum velocity. We define the concentration of activator required for maximum velocity as [A](max). The [A](max)(Mg2+) in F. elastica (100 mM) is 10 times the [A](max)(Mg2+) for either H. brasiliensis (10 mM) or P. argentatum (8 mM). The [A](max)(Mn2+) in F. elastica (11 mM), H. brasiliensis (3.8 mM) and P. argentatum (6.8 mM) and the [A](max)(Mg2+) in H. brasiliensis (10 mM) and P. argentatum (8 mM) are similar. The differences in [A](max)(Mg2+) correlate with the actual endogenous Mg(2+) concentrations in the latex of living plants. Extremely low Mn(2+) levels in vivo indicate that Mg(2+) is the RuT cofactor in living H. brasiliensis and F. elastica trees. Kinetic analyses demonstrate that FPP-Mg(2+) and FPP-Mn(2+) are active substrates for rubber molecule initiation, although free FPP and metal cations, Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), can interact independently at the active site with the following relative dissociation constants K(d)(FPP) Metal) Metal). Similarly, IPP-Mg(2+) and IPP-Mn(2+) are active substrates for rubber molecule polymerization. Although metal cations can interact independently at the active site with the relative dissociation constant K(d)(IPP-Metal) Metal), unlike FPP, IPP alone does not interact independently. All three RuTs have similar characteristics-indeterminate sized products, high K(m)(IPP), high metal [A](max), metal cofactor requirements, and are membrane-bound enzymes.

  20. Metal doped carbon nanoneedles and effect of carbon organization with activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael A; Rubira, Adley F; Asefa, Tewodros; Silva, Rafael

    2016-02-10

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) from cotton, was prepared by acid hydrolysis and purified using a size selection process to obtain homogeneous samples with average particle size of 270 nm and 85.5% crystallinity. Purified CNW was used as precursor to carbon nanoneedles (CNN) synthesis. The synthesis of CNN loaded with different metals dopants were carried out by a nanoreactor method and the obtained CNNs applied as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In the carbon nanoneedles synthesis, Ni, Cu, or Fe worked as graphitization catalyst and the metal were found present as dopants in the final material. The used metal appeared to have direct influence on the degree of organization of the particles and also in the surface density of polar groups. It was evaluated the influence of the graphitic organization on the general properties and nickel was found as the more appropriate metal since it leads to a more organized material and also to a high activity toward HER.

  1. Chitosan nanocomposites based on distinct inorganic fillers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Moura, Duarte; Mano, João F; Paiva, Maria C; Alves, Natália M

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CHI), a biocompatible and biodegradable polysaccharide with the ability to provide a non-protein matrix for tissue growth, is considered to be an ideal material in the biomedical field. However, the lack of good mechanical properties limits its applications. In order to overcome this drawback, CHI has been combined with different polymers and fillers, leading to a variety of chitosan-based nanocomposites. The extensive research on CHI nanocomposites as well as their main biomedical applications are reviewed in this paper. An overview of the different fillers and assembly techniques available to produce CHI nanocomposites is presented. Finally, the properties of such nanocomposites are discussed with particular focus on bone regeneration, drug delivery, wound healing and biosensing applications.

  2. Properties of hybrid resin composite systems containing prepolymerized filler particles.

    PubMed

    Blackham, Jason T; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Lien, Wen

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the properties of newer hybrid resin composites with prepolymerized-filler particles to traditional hybrids and a microfill composite. The following properties were examined per composite: diametral tensile strength, flexural strength/modulus, Knoop microhardness and polymerization shrinkage. Physical properties were determined for each Jason T Blackham, DMD, USAF, General Dentistry, Tyndall composite group (n = 8), showing significant differences between groups per property (p < 0.001). In general, the traditional hybrid composites (Z250, Esthet-X) had higher strength, composites containing pre-polymerized fillers (Gradia Direct Posterior, Premise) performed more moderately and the microfill composite (Durafill VS) had lower strength. Premise and Durafill VS had the lowest polymerization shrinkage.

  3. Chitosan nanocomposites based on distinct inorganic fillers for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Duarte; Mano, João F.; Paiva, Maria C.; Alves, Natália M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chitosan (CHI), a biocompatible and biodegradable polysaccharide with the ability to provide a non-protein matrix for tissue growth, is considered to be an ideal material in the biomedical field. However, the lack of good mechanical properties limits its applications. In order to overcome this drawback, CHI has been combined with different polymers and fillers, leading to a variety of chitosan-based nanocomposites. The extensive research on CHI nanocomposites as well as their main biomedical applications are reviewed in this paper. An overview of the different fillers and assembly techniques available to produce CHI nanocomposites is presented. Finally, the properties of such nanocomposites are discussed with particular focus on bone regeneration, drug delivery, wound healing and biosensing applications. PMID:27877909

  4. Measuring the Noble Metal and Iodine Composition of Extracted Noble Metal Phase from Spent Nuclear Fuel Using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palomares, R. I.; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Biegalski, Steven R.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Casella, Amanda J.; Brady Raap, Michaele C.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-04-01

    Mass quantities of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA). Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and mass quantification is derived from standard gamma spectroscopy and radionuclide decay analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. Lastly, the implications of the rapid analytic speed of instrumental NAA are discussed in relation to potential nuclear forensics applications.

  5. Injectable carboxymethylcellulose hydrogels for soft tissue filler applications.

    PubMed

    Varma, Devika M; Gold, Gittel T; Taub, Peter J; Nicoll, Steven B

    2014-12-01

    Disease, trauma and aging all lead to deficits in soft tissue. As a result, there is a need to develop materials that safely and effectively restore areas of deficiency. While autogenous fat is the current gold standard, hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers are commonly used. However, the animal and bacterial origin of HA-based materials can induce adverse reactions in patients. With the aim of developing a safer and more affordable alternative, this study characterized the properties of a plant-derived, injectable carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) soft tissue filler. Specifically, methacrylated CMC was synthesized and crosslinked to form stable hydrogels at varying macromer concentrations (2-4% w/v) using an ammonium persulfate and ascorbic acid redox initiation system. The equilibrium Young's modulus was shown to vary with macromer concentration (ranging from ∼2 to 9.25kPa), comparable to values of native soft tissue and current surgical fillers. The swelling properties were similarly affected by macromer concentration, with 4% gels exhibiting the lowest swelling ratio and mesh size, and highest crosslinking density. Rheological analysis was performed to determine gelation onset and completion, and was measured to be within the ISO standard for injectable materials. In addition, hydrolytic degradation of these gels was sensitive to macromer concentration, while selective removal using enzymatic treatment was also demonstrated. Moreover, favorable cytocompatibility of the CMC hydrogels was exhibited by co-culture with human dermal fibroblasts. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the tunability of redox-crosslinked CMC hydrogels by varying fabrication parameters, making them a versatile platform for soft tissue filler applications.

  6. Using hyperbranched oligomer functionalized glass fillers to reduce shrinkage stress

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Sheng; Azarnoush, Setareh; Smith, Ian R.; Cramer, Neil B.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N

    2012-01-01

    Objective Fillers are widely utilized to enhance the mechanical properties of polymer resins. However, polymerization stress has the potential to increase due to the higher elastic modulus achieved upon filler addition. Here, we demonstrate a hyperbranched oligomer functionalized glass filler UV curable resin composite which is able to reduce the shrinkage stress without sacrificing mechanical properties. Methods A 16-functional alkene-terminated hyperbranched oligomer is synthesized by thiol-acrylate and thiol-yne reactions and the product structure is analyzed by 1H-NMR, mass spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography. Surface functionalization of the glass filler is measured by thermogravimetric analysis. Reaction kinetics, mechanical properties and shrinkage stress are studied via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis and a tensometer, respectively. Results Silica nanoparticles are functionalized with a flexible 16-functional alkene-terminated hyperbranched oligomer which is synthesized by multistage thiol-ene/yne reactions. 93% of the particle surface was covered by this oligomer and an interfacial layer ranging from 0.7 – 4.5 nm thickness is generated. A composite system with these functionalized silica nanoparticles incorporated into the thiol-yne-methacrylate resin demonstrates 30% reduction of shrinkage stress (from 0.9 MPa to 0.6 MPa) without sacrificing the modulus (3100 ± 300 MPa) or glass transition temperature (62 ± 3 °C). Moreover, the shrinkage stress of the composite system builds up at much later stages of the polymerization as compared to the control system. Significance Due to the capability of reducing shrinkage stress without sacrificing mechanical properties, this composite system will be a great candidate for dental composite applications. PMID:22717296

  7. Polymer Filler Aging and Failure Studied by Lateral Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratto, T; Saab, A P

    2009-05-27

    In the present work, we study, via force microscopy, the basic physical interactions of a single bead of silica filler with a PDMS matrix both before and after exposure to gamma radiation. Our goal was to confirm our results from last year, and to explore force microscopy as a means of obtaining particle-scale polymer/filler interactions suitable for use as empirical inputs to a computational model consisting of an ensemble of silica beads embedded in a PDMS matrix. Through careful calibration of a conventional atomic force microscope, we obtained both normal and lateral force data that was fitted to yield adhesion, surface shear modulus, and friction of a 1 {micro}m silica bead in contact with PDMS layers of various thickness. Comparison of these terms before and after gamma exposure indicated that initially, radiation exposure lead to softening of the PDMS, but eventually resulted in stiffening. Simultaneously, adhesion between the polymer and silica decreased. This could indicate a serious failure path for filled PDMS exposed to radiation, whereby stiffening of the bulk polymer leads to loss of compressive elastic behavior, while a decrease in polymer filler adhesion results in an increased likelihood of stress failure under load. In addition to further testing of radiation damaged polymers, we also performed FEA modeling of silica beads in a silicone matrix using the shear modulus and adhesion values isolated from the force microscopy experiments as model inputs. The resulting simulation indicated that as a polymer stiffens due to impinging radiation, it also undergoes weakening of adhesion to the filler. The implication is that radiation induces a compound failure mode in filled polymer systems.

  8. Metal-based biologically active azoles and β-lactams derived from sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Hossein Pasha; Hadi, Jabbar S; Almayah, Abdulelah A; Bolandnazar, Zeinab; Swadi, Ali G; Ebrahimi, Amirpasha

    2016-03-01

    Metal complexes of Schiff bases derived from sulfamethoxazole (SMZ) and sulfathiazole (STZ), converted to their β-lactam derivatives have been synthesized and experimentally characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and EI-mass), molar conductance measurements and thermal analysis techniques. The structural and electronic properties of the studied molecules were investigated theoretically by performing density functional theory (DFT) to access reliable results to the experimental values. The spectral and thermal analysis reveals that the Schiff bases act as bidentate ligands via the coordination of azomethine nitrogen to metal ions as well as the proton displacement from the phenolic group through the metal ions; therefore, Cu complexes can attain the square planner arrangement and Zn complexes have a distorted tetrahedral structure. The thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses confirm high stability for all complexes followed by thermal decomposition in different steps. In addition, the antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds have been screened in vitro against various pathogenic bacterial species. Inspection of the results revealed that all newly synthesized complexes individually exhibit varying degrees of inhibitory effects on the growth of the tested bacterial species, therefore, they may be considered as drug candidates for bacterial pathogens. The free Schiff base ligands (1-2) exhibited a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus spp., and Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus bacterial strains. The results also indicated that the β-lactam derivatives (3-4) have high antibacterial activities on Gram positive bacteria as well as the metal complexes (5-8), particularly Zn complexes, have a significant activity against all Gram negative bacterial strains. It has been shown that the metal complexes have significantly higher activity than corresponding

  9. Stable isolated metal atoms as active sites for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jun; Chen, Jian Fu; Li, Yu Hang; Yuan, Wen Tao; Zhou, Ying; Zheng, Li Rong; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P; Wang, Yun; Zhao, Hui Jun; Wang, Yong; Yang, Hua Gui

    2014-02-17

    The process of using solar energy to split water to produce hydrogen assisted by an inorganic semiconductor is crucial for solving our energy crisis and environmental problems in the future. However, most semiconductor photocatalysts would not exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity without loading suitable co-catalysts. Generally, the noble metals have been widely applied as co-catalysts, but always agglomerate during the loading process or photocatalytic reaction. Therefore, the utilization efficiency of the noble co-catalysts is still very low on a per metal atom basis if no obvious size effect exists, because heterogeneous catalytic reactions occur on the surface active atoms. Here, for the first time, we have synthesized isolated metal atoms (Pt, Pd, Rh, or Ru) stably by anchoring on TiO2 , a model photocatalystic system, by a facile one-step method. The isolated metal atom based photocatalysts show excellent stability for H2 evolution and can lead to a 6-13-fold increase in photocatalytic activity over the metal clusters loaded on TiO2 by the traditional method. Furthermore, the configurations of isolated atoms as well as the originality of their unusual stability were analyzed by a collaborative work from both experiments and theoretical calculations.

  10. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

    1996-09-24

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

  11. Innovative use of activated carbon for the removal of heavy metals from ground water sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T. III

    1996-12-31

    This report discusses the evaluation of the ENVIRO-CLEAN PROCESS, a technology developed by Lewis Environmental Services, Inc. for the recovery of metals such as chromium, mercury, copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc from surface and groundwater streams. This new heavy metal removal process (patent-pending) utilizes granular activated carbon with a proprietary conditioning pretreatment to enhance heavy metal adsorption combined with electrolytic metal recovery to produce a saleable metallic product. The process generates no sludge or hazardous waste and the effluent meets EPA limits. A 50 gpm system was installed for recovering hexavalent chromium from a ground water stream at a site located in Fresno, California. The effluent from the activated carbon system was reinjected into the ground water table with the hexavalent chromium concentration < 10 ppb. The system simultaneously removed trichloroethylene (TCE) to concentrations levels < 05 ppb. The activated carbon is regenerated off-site and the chromium electrolytically recovered. The full scale system has treated over 5 million gallons of ground water since installation. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  13. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Peng, Marcus Y.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    1996-01-01

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

  14. Activated phosphors having matrices of yttrium-transition metal compound

    DOEpatents

    De Kalb, E.L.; Fassel, V.A.

    1975-07-01

    A method is described for preparing a phosphor composition containing a lanthanide activator element with a host matrix having a transition element as a major component. The host matrix is composed of certain rare earth phosphates or vanadates such as YPO$sub 4$ with a portion of the rare earth replaced with one or more of the transition elements. On x-ray or other electromagnetic excitation, trace lanthanide impurities or additives within the phosphor are spectrometrically determined from their characteristic luminescence. (auth)

  15. Complications of injectable fillers, part 2: vascular complications.

    PubMed

    DeLorenzi, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    Accidental intra-arterial filler injection may cause significant tissue injury and necrosis. Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers, currently the most popular, are the focus of this article, which highlights complications and their symptoms, risk factors, and possible treatment strategies. Although ischemic events do happen and are therefore important to discuss, they seem to be exceptionally rare and represent a small percentage of complications in individual clinical practices. However, the true incidence of this complication is unknown because of underreporting by clinicians. Typical clinical findings include skin blanching, livedo reticularis, slow capillary refill, and dusky blue-red discoloration, followed a few days later by blister formation and finally tissue slough. Mainstays of treatment (apart from avoidance by meticulous technique) are prompt recognition, immediate treatment with hyaluronidase, topical nitropaste under occlusion, oral acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), warm compresses, and vigorous massage. Secondary lines of treatment may involve intra-arterial hyaluronidase, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and ancillary vasodilating agents such as prostaglandin E1. Emergency preparedness (a "filler crash cart") is emphasized, since early intervention is likely to significantly reduce morbidity. A clinical summary chart is provided, organized by complication presentation.

  16. Evaluation of rice husk ash as filler in tread compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, M. R. S.; Furtado, C. R. G. E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com; Sousa, A. M. F. de E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com

    2014-05-15

    Rice which is one of the largest agriculture crops produces around 22% of rice rusk during its milling process. This material is mainly used as fuel for energy generation, which results in an ash, which disposal represents an environmental issue. The rice husk ash (RHA) contains over than 70% of silica in an amorphous form and a lot of applications is being developed for it all over the world. The use of silica as a filler in the tire industry is growing since it contributes significantly to the reduction of fuel consumption of the automobiles, allowing at the same time better traction (safety). This paper presents an evaluation of the use of RHA as filler in rubber tread compounds prepared in lab scale and compares its performance with compounds prepared with commercial silica and carbon black, the fillers normally used in tire industry. Mechanical and rheological properties are evaluated, with emphasis for tan delta as an indicator of tread performance related with rolling resistance (fuel consumption) and wet grip/traction (safety)

  17. Fatigue strengths of particulate filler composites reinforced with fibers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji-Myung; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Hattori, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Koji; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamic fatigue strengths at 10(5) cycles and the strains of particulate filler composite resins with and without reinforcing fibers. An UHMWPE (Ribbond), a polyaromatic polyamide fiber (Fibreflex), and three glass fibers (GlasSpan, FibreKor, Vectris Frame) were used to reinforce the particulate filler composite resins. The fatigue properties were measured in three-point bending mode using a servohydraulic universal testing machine at a frequency of 5 Hz, until failure occurred or 10(5) cycles had been completed. The fatigue strengths at 10(5) cycles were determined by the staircase method. The fractured aspects of specimens were evaluated by an optical and scanning electron microscope. The fatigue strengths of particulate filler composite resins were 49-57 MPa, and those of fiber-reinforced were 90-209 MPa. Unidirectional glass fibers showed higher reinforcing effects on the fatigue strengths of composite resins. The strain of UHMWPE-reinforced composite was largest.

  18. Electrically insulating thermal nano-oils using 2D fillers.

    PubMed

    Taha-Tijerina, Jaime; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Gao, Guanhui; Rohde, Matthew; Tsentalovich, Dmitri A; Pasquali, Matteo; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2012-02-28

    Different nanoscale fillers have been used to create composite fluids for applications such as thermal management. The ever increasing thermal loads in applications now require advanced operational fluids, for example, high thermal conductivity dielectric oils in transformers. These oils require excellent filler dispersion, high thermal conduction, but also electrical insulation. Such thermal oils that conform to this thermal/electrical requirement, and yet remain in highly suspended stable state, have not yet been synthesized. We report here the synthesis and characterization of stable high thermal conductivity Newtonian nanofluids using exfoliated layers of hexagonal boron nitride in oil without compromising its electrically insulating property. Two-dimensional nanosheets of hexagonal boron nitride are liquid exfoliated in isopropyl alcohol and redispersed in mineral oil, used as standard transformer oil, forming stable nanosuspensions with high shelf life. A high electrical resistivity, even higher than that of the base oil, is maintained for the nano-oil containing small weight fraction of the filler (0.01 wt %), whereas the thermal conductivity was enhanced. The low dissipation factor and high pour point for this nano-oil suggests several applications in thermal management.

  19. Thermal Degradation of Filler/PP Composite and Its Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Hiroshi; Funami, Fumiyasu; Yasuda, Naoki; Nomura, Manabu; Yui, Hiroshi; Ikuta, Nobuo

    To examine thermal degradation accelerated by filling inorganic particles in polypropylene (PP), the composites were made with three types of inorganic powders : talc, magnesium hydroxide, and mica. They were easily degraded with the fillers in this order in the thermal aging test. A commercial heat resistance agent, ‘Plenlizer MK-400’, was added while making the composites. The degradation resistance of the agent remarkably appeared in the reverse order. That is, thermal degradation was most depressed in talc-filled composite with the agent. In another experience, soxhlet extraction was carried out to the filler with an organic solvent, o-xylene, that was able to dissolve PP. A lot of inorganic ions were detected in the extractant. In particular, the detected amount of aluminum ion increased in the order of talc, magnesium hydroxide, and mica. This order was the same as the fillers indicated by the degree of degradation. Infrared analysis of the agent with inorganic ions in chloroform showed that the peaks due to the agent were much stronger with aluminum ion than those with iron ion. These results suggested that a cause of degradation was aluminum ion dispersed from particles to PP matrix during the molding.

  20. Calcium polyphosphate particulates for bone void filler applications.

    PubMed

    Pilliar, Robert M; Kandel, Rita A; Grynpas, Marc D; Theodoropoulos, John; Hu, Youxin; Allo, Bedilu; Changoor, Adele

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of porous calcium polyphosphate particulates (CPPp) formed using two different processing treatments as bone void fillers in non- or minimally load-bearing sites. The two calcium polyphosphate particulate variants (grades) were formed using different annealing conditions during particulate preparation to yield either more slowly degrading calcium polyphosphate particulates (SD-CPPp) or faster degrading particulates (FD-CPPp) as suggested by a previous degradation study conducted in vitro (Hu et al., Submitted for publication 2016). The two CPPp grades were compared as bone void fillers in vivo by implanting particulates in defects created in rabbit femoral condyle sites (critical size defects). The SD-CPPp and FD-CPPp were implanted for 4- and 16-week periods. The in vivo study indicated a significant difference in amount of new bone formed in the prepared sites with SD-CPPp resulting in more new bone formation compared with FD-CPPp. The lower bone formation characteristic of the FD-CPPp was attributed to its faster degradation rate and resulting higher local concentration of released polyphosphate degradation products. The study results indicate the importance of processing conditions on preparing calcium polyphosphate particulates for potential use as bone void fillers in nonload-bearing sites. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  1. Nanostructures and dynamics of macromolecules bound to attractive filler surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Tad; Barkley, Deborah; Jiang, Naisheng; Endoh, Maya; Masui, Tomomi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Michihiro; Satija, Sushil; Taniguchi, Takashi

    We report in-situ nanostructures and dynamics of polybutadiene (PB) chains bound to carbon black (CB) fillers (the so-called ``bound polymer layer (BPL)'') in a good solvent. The BPL on the CB fillers were extracted by solvent leaching of a CB-filled PB compound and subsequently dispersed in deuterated toluene to label the BPL for small-angle neutron scattering and neutron spin echo techniques. Intriguingly, the results demonstrate that the BPL is composed of two regions regardless of molecular weights of PB: the inner unswollen region of ~ 0.5 nm thick and outer swollen region where the polymer chains display a parabolic profile with a diffuse tail. This two-layer formation on the filler surface is similar to that reported for polymer chains adsorbed on planar substrates from melts. In addition, the results show that the dynamics of the swollen bound chains can be explained by the so-called ``breathing mode'' and is generalized with the thickness of the swollen BPL. Furthermore, we will discuss how the breathing collective dynamics is affected by the presence of polymer chains in a matrix solution. We acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.

  2. Evaluation of rice husk ash as filler in tread compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, M. R. S.; Furtado, C. R. G.; de Sousa, A. M. F.

    2014-05-01

    Rice which is one of the largest agriculture crops produces around 22% of rice rusk during its milling process. This material is mainly used as fuel for energy generation, which results in an ash, which disposal represents an environmental issue. The rice husk ash (RHA) contains over than 70% of silica in an amorphous form and a lot of applications is being developed for it all over the world. The use of silica as a filler in the tire industry is growing since it contributes significantly to the reduction of fuel consumption of the automobiles, allowing at the same time better traction (safety). This paper presents an evaluation of the use of RHA as filler in rubber tread compounds prepared in lab scale and compares its performance with compounds prepared with commercial silica and carbon black, the fillers normally used in tire industry. Mechanical and rheological properties are evaluated, with emphasis for tan delta as an indicator of tread performance related with rolling resistance (fuel consumption) and wet grip/traction (safety).

  3. NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

  4. Design principles for oxygen-reduction activity on perovskite oxide catalysts for fuel cells and metal-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suntivich, Jin; Gasteiger, Hubert A.; Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Nakanishi, Haruyuki; Goodenough, John B.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-07-01

    The prohibitive cost and scarcity of the noble-metal catalysts needed for catalysing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells and metal-air batteries limit the commercialization of these clean-energy technologies. Identifying a catalyst design principle that links material properties to the catalytic activity can accelerate the search for highly active and abundant transition-metal-oxide catalysts to replace platinum. Here, we demonstrate that the ORR activity for oxide catalysts primarily correlates to σ*-orbital (eg) occupation and the extent of B-site transition-metal-oxygen covalency, which serves as a secondary activity descriptor. Our findings reflect the critical influences of the σ* orbital and metal-oxygen covalency on the competition between O22-/OH- displacement and OH- regeneration on surface transition-metal ions as the rate-limiting steps of the ORR, and thus highlight the importance of electronic structure in controlling oxide catalytic activity.

  5. Design principles for oxygen-reduction activity on perovskite oxide catalysts for fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Suntivich, Jin; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Nakanishi, Haruyuki; Goodenough, John B; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-06-12

    The prohibitive cost and scarcity of the noble-metal catalysts needed for catalysing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells and metal-air batteries limit the commercialization of these clean-energy technologies. Identifying a catalyst design principle that links material properties to the catalytic activity can accelerate the search for highly active and abundant transition-metal-oxide catalysts to replace platinum. Here, we demonstrate that the ORR activity for oxide catalysts primarily correlates to σ-orbital (e(g)) occupation and the extent of B-site transition-metal-oxygen covalency, which serves as a secondary activity descriptor. Our findings reflect the critical influences of the σ orbital and metal-oxygen covalency on the competition between O(2)(2-)/OH(-) displacement and OH(-) regeneration on surface transition-metal ions as the rate-limiting steps of the ORR, and thus highlight the importance of electronic structure in controlling oxide catalytic activity.

  6. Electro-active Polymer Actuator Based on Sulfonated Polyimide with Highly Conductive Silver Electrodes Via Self-metallization.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiangxuan; Jeon, Jin-Han; Oh, Il-Kwon; Park, K C

    2011-10-04

    We report here a facile synthesis of high performance electro-active polymer actuator based on a sulfonated polyimide with well-defined silver electrodes via self-metallization. The proposed method greatly reduces fabrication time and cost, and obviates a cation exchange process required in the fabrication of ionic polymer-metal composite actuators. Also, the self-metallized silver electrodes exhibit outstanding metal-polymer adhesion with high conductivity, resulting in substantially larger tip displacements compared with Nafion-based actuators.

  7. Exposure to airborne metals and particulate matter and risk for youth adjudicated for criminal activity.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Erin N; Chen, Aimin; Ryan, Patrick; Succop, Paul; Wright, John; Dietrich, Kim N

    2011-11-01

    Antisocial behavior is a product of multiple interacting sociohereditary variables, yet there is increasing evidence that metal exposure, particularly, manganese and lead, play a role in its epigenesis. Other metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and mercury, and exposure to traffic-related air pollution, such as fine particulate matter (≤2.5 μm) have been associated with neurological deficits, yet largely unexplored with respect to their relationship with delinquent behavior. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ecological relationship between county-wide reported airborne emissions of air metals, particulate matter, and youth adjudicated for criminal activity. Metal exposure data were collected from the Environmental Protection Agency AirData. Population statistics were obtained from the United States Census 2000 and adjudication data was obtained from the Courts of Common Pleases from each Ohio County. Simple correlations were calculated with the percentage of adjudications, all covariates, and estimated metal air emissions. Separate negative binomial regression models for each pollutant were used to provide an estimated risk ratio of pollutant emissions on the risk of adjudication for all Ohio counties adjusting for urban-rural residence, percentage of African Americans, median family income, percentage of family below poverty, percentage of high school graduation in 25 years and older populations, and population density. Metal emissions and PM in 1999 were all correlated with adjudication rate (2003-2005 average). Metal emissions were associated with slightly higher risk of adjudication, with about 3-4% increased risk per natural log unit of metal emission except chromium. The associations achieved statistical significance for manganese and mercury. The particulate matter≤2.5 and ≤10 μm emissions had a higher risk estimate, with 12% and 19% increase per natural log unit emission, respectively, and also achieved statistical significance

  8. Evaluation of metal concentration and antioxidant activity of three edible mushrooms from Mugla, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sarikurkcu, Cengiz; Tepe, Bektas; Semiz, Deniz Karsli; Solak, M Halil

    2010-05-01

    This study is designed for the determination of metal concentrations, antioxidant activity potentials and total phenolics of Amanita caesarea, Clitocybe geotropa and Leucoagaricus pudicus. Concentrations of four heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni) and five minor elements (Zn, Fe, Mn, Cu, Co) are determined. In the case of A. caesarea, Cr and Ni concentrations are found in a high level. Concentrations of the metals are found to be within safe limits for C. geotropa. In beta-carotene/linoleic acid test, L. pudicus showed the highest activity potential. In DPPH system, A. caesarea showed 79.4% scavenging ability. Additionally, reducing power and chelating capacity of the mushrooms increased with concentration. The strongest super-oxide anion scavenger was A. caesarea. In the case of total phenolics, L. pudicus found to have the highest content.

  9. XPS analysis of the effect of fillers on PTFE transfer film development in sliding contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchet, T. A.; Kennedy, F. E.; Jayne, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    The development of transfer films atop steel counterfaces in contact with unfilled and bronze-filled PTFE has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The sliding apparatus was contained within the vacuum of the analytical system, so the effects of the native oxide, hydrocarbon, and adsorbed gaseous surface layers of the steel upon the PTFE transfer behavior could be studied in situ. For both the filled and the unfilled PTFE, cleaner surfaces promoted greater amounts of transfer. Metal fluorides, which formed at the transfer film/counterface interface, were found solely in cases where the native oxide had been removed to expose the metallic surface prior to sliding. These fluorides also were found at clean metal/PTFE interfaces formed in the absence of frictional contact. A fraction of these fluorides resulted from irradiation damage inherent in XPS analysis. PTFE transfer films were found to build up with repeated sliding passes, by a process in which strands of transfer filled in the remaining counterface area. Under these reported test conditions, the transfer process is not expected to continue atop previously deposited transfer films. The bronze-filled composite generated greater amounts of transfer than the unfilled PTFE. The results are discussed relative to the observed increase in wear resistance imparted to PTFE by a broad range of inorganic fillers.

  10. Contribution of individual sorbents to the control of heavy metal activity in sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Weng, L; Temminghoff, E J; Van Riemsdijk, W H

    2001-11-15

    A multisurface model is used to evaluate the contribution of various sorption surfaces to the control of heavy metal activity in sandy soil samples at pH 3.7-6.1 with different sorbent contents. This multisurface model considers soil as a set of independent sorption surfaces, i.e. organic matter (NICA-Donnan), clay silicate (Donnan), and iron hydroxides (DDL, CD-MUSIC). The activities of Cu2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, and Pb2+ in equilibrium with the soil have been measured using a Donnan membrane technique. The metal activities predicted by the model agree with those measured reasonably well over a wide concentration range for all the metals of interest except for Pb. The modeling results suggest that soil organic matter is the most important sorbent that controls the activity of Cu2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+ in these sandy soils. When metal loading is high in comparison with soil organic matter content, the contribution of clay silicates to metal binding becomes more important. Adsorption to iron hydroxides is found not significant in these samples for Cu, Cd, Zn, and Ni. However, for Pb the model estimates strong adsorption on iron hydroxides. The model predicts that acidification will not only lead to increased solution concentrations but also to a shift toward more nonspecific cation-exchange type binding especially for the metals Cd, Zn, and Ni. Lowering the pH has led to a loss of 56% of Cd, 69% of Zn, and 66% of Ni during 16 years due to increased leaching.

  11. Effects of anthropogenic activities on the heavy metal levels in the clams and sediments in a tropical river.

    PubMed

    Wong, Koe Wei; Yap, Chee Kong; Nulit, Rosimah; Hamzah, Mohd Suhaimi; Chen, Soo Kien; Cheng, Wan Hee; Karami, Ali; Al-Shami, Salman Abdo

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of anthropogenic activities on the heavy metal levels in the Langat River by transplantation of Corbicula javanica. In addition, potential ecological risk indexes (PERI) of heavy metals in the surface sediments of the river were also investigated. The correlation analysis revealed that eight metals (As, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in total soft tissue (TST) while five metals (As, Cd, Cr, Fe and Mn) in shell have positively and significantly correlation with respective metal concentration in sediment, indicating the clams is a good biomonitor of the metal levels. Based on clustering patterns, the discharge of dam impoundment, agricultural activities and urban domestic waste were identified as three major contributors of the metals in Pangsun, Semenyih and Dusun Tua, and Kajang, respectively. Various geochemical indexes for a single metal pollutant (geoaccumulation index (I geo), enrichment factors (EF), contamination factor (C f) and ecological risk (Er)) all agreed that Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn are not likely to cause adverse effect to the river ecosystem, but As and Pb could pose a potential ecological risk to the river ecosystem. All indexes (degree of contamination (C d), combined pollution index (CPI) and PERI) showed that overall metal concentrations in the tropical river are still within safe limit. River metal pollution was investigated. Anthropogenic activities were contributors of the metal pollution. Geochemical indexes showed that metals are within the safe limit.

  12. ROS-generating/ARE-activating capacity of metals in roadway particulate matter deposited in urban environment.

    PubMed

    Shuster-Meiseles, Timor; Shafer, Martin M; Heo, Jongbae; Pardo, Michal; Antkiewicz, Dagmara S; Schauer, James J; Rudich, Assaf; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-04-01

    In this study we investigated the possible causal role for soluble metal species extracted from roadway traffic emissions in promoting particulate matter (PM)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and antioxidant response element (ARE) promoter activation. To this end, these responses have been evaluated in alveolar macrophage and epithelial lung cells that have been exposed to 'Unfiltered', 'Filtered' and 'Filtered+Chelexed' water extracts of PM samples collected from the roadway urban environments of Thessaloniki, Milan and London. Except for Thessaloniki, our results demonstrate that filtration resulted in a minor decrease in ROS activity of the fine PM fraction, suggesting that ROS activity is attributed mainly to water-soluble PM species. In contrast to ROS, ARE activity was mediated predominantly by the water-soluble component of PM present in both the fine and coarse extracts. Further removal of metals by Chelex treatment from filtered water extracts showed that soluble metal species are the major factors mediating ROS and ARE activities of the soluble fraction, especially in the London PM extracts. Finally, utilizing step-wise multiple-regression analysis, we show that 87% and 78% of the total variance observed in ROS and ARE assays, respectively, is accounted for by changes in soluble metal concentration. Using a statistical analysis we find that As, Zn and Fe best predict the ROS-generating/ARE-activating capacity of the near roadway particulate matter in the pulmonary cells studied. Collectively, our findings imply that soluble metals present in roadside PM are potential drivers of both pro- and anti-oxidative effects of PM in respiratory tract.

  13. Elucidating Oxygen Reduction Active Sites in Pyrolyzed Metal-Nitrogen Coordinated Non-Precious-Metal Electrocatalyst Systems.

    PubMed

    Tylus, Urszula; Jia, Qingying; Strickland, Kara; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Serov, Alexey; Atanassov, Plamen; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    Detailed understanding of the nature of the active centers in non-precious-metal-based electrocatalyst, and their role in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanistic pathways will have a profound effect on successful commercialization of emission-free energy devices such as fuel cells. Recently, using pyrolyzed model structures of iron porphyrins, we have demonstrated that a covalent integration of the Fe-N x sites into π-conjugated carbon basal plane modifies electron donating/withdrawing capability of the carbonaceous ligand, consequently improving ORR activity. Here, we employ a combination of in situ X-ray spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to identify the various structural and functional forms of the active centers in non-heme Fe/N/C catalysts. Both methods corroboratively confirm the single site 2e(-) × 2e(-) mechanism in alkaline media on the primary Fe(2+)-N4 centers and the dual-site 2e(-) × 2e(-) mechanism in acid media with the significant role of the surface bound coexisting Fe/Fe x O y nanoparticles (NPs) as the secondary active sites.

  14. Sorption of metal ions from multicomponent aqueous solutions by activated carbons produced from waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonova, L.P.; Goba, V.E.; Kovtun, M.F.; Tarasenko, Y.A.; Khavryuchenko, V.D.; Lyubchik, S.B.; Boiko, A.N.

    2008-08-15

    Activated carbons produced by thermal treatment of a mixture of sunflower husks, low-grade coal, and refinery waste were studied as adsorbents of transition ion metals from aqueous solutions of various compositions. The optimal conditions and the mechanism of sorption, as well as the structure of the sorbents, were studied.

  15. TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE OF AN INTACT LUNG PREPARATION TO METALLIC PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE OF AN INTACT LUNG PREPARATION TO METALLIC PARTICULATE MATTER

    James M. Samet1,2, Robert Silbajoris1, Tony Huang1 and Ilona Jaspers3

    1Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laborato...

  16. Overview of EU activities on DEMO liquid metal breeder blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Giancarli, L.; Proust, E.

    1994-12-31

    The European test-blanket development programme, started in 1988, is aiming at the selection by 1995 of two DEMO-relevant blanket lines to be tested in ITER. At present, four lines of blanket are under development, two of them using solid and the other two liquid breeder materials. As far as liquid breeders are concerned, two lines of blankets have been selected within the European Union, the water-cooled lithium-lead (the eutectic Pb-17Li) blankets and the dual-coolant Pb-17Li blankets. Designs have been developed considering an agreed set of DEMO specifications, such as, for instance, a fusion power of 2,200 MW, a neutron wall-loading of 2MW/m{sup 2}, a life-time of 20,000 hours, and the use of martensitic steel as a structural material. Moreover, an experimental program has been set up in order to address the main critical issues for each line. The present paper gives an overview of both design and experimental activities within the European Union concerning these two lines of liquid breeder blankets.

  17. Functionalized carbon nanotubes as a filler for dielectric elastomer composites with improved actuation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galantini, Fabia; Bianchi, Sabrina; Castelvetro, Valter; Gallone, Giuseppe

    2013-05-01

    Among the broad class of electro-active polymers, dielectric elastomer actuators represent a rapidly growing technology for electromechanical transduction. In order to further develop this applied science, the high driving voltages currently needed must be reduced. For this purpose, one of the most widely considered approaches is based on making elastomeric composites with highly polarizable fillers in order to increase the dielectric constant while maintaining both low dielectric losses and high-mechanical compliance. In this work, multi-wall carbon nanotubes were first functionalized by grafting either acrylonitrile or diurethane monoacrylate oligomers, and then dispersed into a polyurethane matrix to make dielectric elastomer composites. The procedures for the chemical functionalization of carbon nanotubes and proper characterizations of the obtained products are provided in detail. The consequences of the use of chemically modified carbon nanotubes as a filler, in comparison to using unmodified ones, were studied in terms of dielectric, mechanical and electromechanical response. In particular, an increment of the dielectric constant was observed for all composites throughout the investigated frequency spectrum, but only in the cases of modified carbon nanotubes did the loss factor remain almost unchanged with respect to the simple matrix, indicating that conductive percolation paths did not arise in such systems. An effective improvement in the actuation strain was observed for samples loaded with functionalized carbon nanotubes.

  18. Optimal Viscosity and Particle Shape of Hyaluronic Acid Filler as a Scaffold for Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Yeol; Namgoong, Sik; Han, Seung-Kyu; Won, Chang-Hoon; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    The authors previously reported that cultured human fibroblasts suspended in a hyaluronic acid filler can produce human dermal matrices with extended in vivo stability in animal and clinical studies. The present study was undertaken to determine the optimal viscosity and particle shape of hyaluronic acid filler as a scaffold for cultured human dermal fibroblasts to enhance the maximal viability of injected cells. The fibroblasts were suspended in either 1 of 3 hyaluronic acid viscosities at 2 different particle shapes. The viscosities used in this study were low (600,000-800,000 centipoises), moderate (2,000,000-4,000,000 centipoises), and high (8,000,000-12,000,000 centipoises). The particle shape was evaluated by testing round and irregular shapes. The fibroblast mixed bioimplants were injected into the back of individual athymic nude mice. The levels of type I collagen were measured using fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) and immunohistochemical staining at 16 weeks after the injections. Results of FACS demonstrated that the mean cell ratio with human collagens in the moderate viscosity group was greater than those of control, low, and high viscosity groups. An immunohistochemical study showed similar results. The moderate viscosity group demonstrated the highest positive staining of human collagens. However, there were no significant differences between groups of irregular and round shape particles. A hyaluronic acid bioimplant with moderate viscosity is superior to that with low or high viscosity in the viability for human fibroblasts. However, the particle shape does not influence the viability of the fibroblasts.

  19. Field-induced activation of metal oxide semiconductor for low temperature flexible transparent electronic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Noh, Joo Hyon; Wong, Anthony; Haglund, Amada; Ward, Thomas Zac; Mandrus, David; Rack, Philip

    Amorphous metal-oxide semiconductors have been extensively studied as an active channel material in thin film transistors due to their high carrier mobility, and excellent large-area uniformity. Here, we report the athermal activation of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor channels by an electric field-induced oxygen migration via gating through an ionic liquid. Using field-induced activation, a transparent flexible thin film transistor is demonstrated on a polyamide substrate with transistor characteristics having a current ON-OFF ratio exceeding 108, and saturation field effect mobility of 8.32 cm2/(V.s) without a post-deposition thermal treatment. This study demonstrates the potential of field-induced activation as an athermal alternative to traditional post-deposition thermal annealing for metal oxide electronic devices suitable for transparent and flexible polymer substrates. Materials Science and Technology Division, ORBL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  20. The inhibitory effect of metals and other ions on acid phosphatase activity from Vigna aconitifolia seeds.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pramod Kumar; Anand, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity of acid phosphatase from Vigna aconitifolia seeds to metal ions, fluoride, and phosphate was examined. All the effectors had different degree of inhibitory effect on the enzyme. Among metal ions, molybdate and ferric ion were observed to be most potent inhibitors and both exhibited mixed type of inhibition. Acid phosphatase activity was inhibited by Cu2+ in a noncompetitive manner. Zn and Mn showed mild inhibition on the enzyme activity. Inhibition kinetics analysis explored molybdate as a potent inhibitor for acid phosphatase in comparison with other effectors used in this study. Fluoride was the next most strong inhibitor for the enzyme activity, and caused a mixed type of inhibition. Phosphate inhibited the enzyme competitively, which demonstrates that inhibition due to phosphate is one of the regulatory factors for enzyme activity.

  1. Adsorption of aqueous metal ions on oxygen and nitrogen functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Xiao, B; Thomas, K M

    2005-04-26

    In this study, the adsorption characteristics of two series of oxygen and nitrogen functionalized activated carbons were investigated. These series were a low nitrogen content (approximately 1 wt % daf) carbon series derived from coconut shell and a high nitrogen content (approximately 8 wt % daf) carbon series derived from polyacrylonitrile. In both series, the oxygen contents were varied over the range approximately 2-22 wt % daf. The porous structures of the functionalized activated carbons were characterized using N(2) (77 K) and CO(2) (273 K) adsorption. Only minor changes in the porous structure were observed in both series. This allowed the effect of changes in functional group concentrations on metal ion adsorption to be studied without major influences due to differences in porous structure characteristics. The surface group characteristics were examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, acid/base titrations, and measurement of the point of zero charge (pH(PZC)). The adsorption of aqueous metal ion species, M(2+)(aq), on acidic oxygen functional group sites mainly involves an ion exchange mechanism. The ratios of protons displaced to the amount of M(2+)(aq) metal species adsorbed have a linear relationship for the carbons with pH(PZC) < or = 4.15. Hydrolysis of metal species in solution may affect the adsorption of metal ion species and displacement of protons. In the case of basic carbons, both protons and metal ions are adsorbed on the carbons. The complex nature of competitive adsorption between the proton and metal ion species and the amphoteric character of carbon surfaces are discussed in relation to the mechanism of adsorption.

  2. Abundance, composition and activity of denitrifier communities in metal polluted paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yongzhuo; Zhou, Huimin; Li, Lianqing; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Pan, Genxing

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is one of the most important soil microbial processes leading to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O). The potential changes with metal pollution in soil microbial community for N2O production and reduction are not well addressed. In this study, topsoil samples were collected both from polluted and non-polluted rice paddy fields and denitrifier communities were characterized with molecular fingerprinting procedures. All the retrieved nirK sequences could be grouped into neither α- nor β- proteobacteria, while most of the nosZ sequences were affiliated with α-proteobacteria. The abundances of the nirK and nosZ genes were reduced significantly in the two polluted soils. Thus, metal pollution markedly affected composition of both nirK and nosZ denitrifiers. While the total denitrifying activity and N2O production rate were both reduced under heavy metal pollution of the two sites, the N2O reduction rate showed no significant change. These findings suggest that N2O production activity could be sensitive to heavy metal pollution, which could potentially lead to a decrease in N2O emission in polluted paddies. Therefore, metal pollution could have potential impacts on soil N transformation and thus on N2O emission from paddy soils.

  3. Abundance, composition and activity of denitrifier communities in metal polluted paddy soils

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yongzhuo; Zhou, Huimin; Li, Lianqing; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Pan, Genxing

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is one of the most important soil microbial processes leading to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O). The potential changes with metal pollution in soil microbial community for N2O production and reduction are not well addressed. In this study, topsoil samples were collected both from polluted and non-polluted rice paddy fields and denitrifier communities were characterized with molecular fingerprinting procedures. All the retrieved nirK sequences could be grouped into neither α- nor β- proteobacteria, while most of the nosZ sequences were affiliated with α-proteobacteria. The abundances of the nirK and nosZ genes were reduced significantly in the two polluted soils. Thus, metal pollution markedly affected composition of both nirK and nosZ denitrifiers. While the total denitrifying activity and N2O production rate were both reduced under heavy metal pollution of the two sites, the N2O reduction rate showed no significant change. These findings suggest that N2O production activity could be sensitive to heavy metal pollution, which could potentially lead to a decrease in N2O emission in polluted paddies. Therefore, metal pollution could have potential impacts on soil N transformation and thus on N2O emission from paddy soils. PMID:26739424

  4. Ion activity and distribution of heavy metals in acid mine drainage polluted subtropical soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Tao; Becquer, Thierry; Dai, Jun; Quantin, Cécile; Benedetti, Marc F

    2009-04-01

    The oxidative dissolution of mine wastes gives rise to acidic, metal-enriched mine drainage (AMD) and has typically posed an additional risk to the environment. The poly-metallic mine Dabaoshan in South China is an excellent test site to understand the processes affecting the surrounding polluted agricultural fields. Our objectives were firstly to investigate metal ion activity in soil solution, distribution in solid constituents, and spatial distribution in samples, secondly to determine dominant environment factors controlling metal activity in the long-term AMD-polluted subtropical soils. Soil Column Donnan Membrane Technology (SC-DMT) combined with sequential extraction shows that unusually large proportion of the metal ions are present as free ion in the soil solutions. The narrow range of low pH values prevents any pH effects during the binding onto oxides or organic matter. The differences in speciation of the soil solutions may explain the different soil degradation observed between paddy and non-paddy soils.

  5. Similarities in the HIV-1 and ASV Integrease Active Site Upon Metal Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Straatsma, TP; Briggs, J. M.

    2000-04-05

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. We report here a fully hydrated 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation performed using parallel NWChem3.2.1 with the AMBER95 force field. The HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain previously determined by crystallography (1B9D) and modeling including two Mg2+ ions placed into the active site based on an alignment against an ASV integrase structure containing two divalent metals (1VSH), was used as the starting structure. The simulation reveals a high degree of flexibility in the region of residues 140-149 even in the presence of a second divalent metal ion and a dramatic conformational change of the side chain of E152 when the second metal ion is present. This study shows similarities in the behavior of the catalytic residues in the HIV-1 and ASV integrases upon metal binding. The present simulation also provides support to the hypothesis that the second metal ion is likely to be carried into the HIV-1 integrase active site by the substrate, a strand of DNA.

  6. Mycorrhizal fungi modulate phytochemical production and antioxidant activity of Cichorium intybus L. (Asteraceae) under metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rozpądek, P; Wężowicz, K; Stojakowska, A; Malarz, J; Surówka, E; Sobczyk, Ł; Anielska, T; Ważny, R; Miszalski, Z; Turnau, K

    2014-10-01

    Cichorium intybus (common chicory), a perennial plant, common in anthropogenic sites, has been the object of a multitude of studies in recent years due to its high content of antioxidants utilized in pharmacy and food industry. Here, the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the biosynthesis of plant secondary metabolites and the activity of enzymatic antioxidants under toxic metal stress was studied. Plants inoculated with Rhizophagus irregularis and non-inoculated were grown on non-polluted and toxic metal enriched substrata. The results presented here indicate that AMF improves chicory fitness. Fresh and dry weight was found to be severely affected by the fungi and heavy metals. The concentration of hydroxycinnamates was increased in the shoots of mycorrhizal plants cultivated on non-polluted substrata, but no differences were found in plants cultivated on metal enriched substrata. The activity of SOD and H2O2 removing enzymes CAT and POX was elevated in the shoots of mycorrhizal plants regardless of the cultivation environment. Photochemical efficiency of inoculated chicory was significantly improved. Our results indicate that R. irregularis inoculation had a beneficial role in sustaining the plants ability to cope with the deleterious effects of metal toxicity.

  7. Active Adoption of Void Formation in Metal-Oxide for All Transparent Super-Performing Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Malkeshkumar; Kim, Hong-Sik; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kim, Joondong

    2016-05-01

    Could ‘defect-considered’ void formation in metal-oxide be actively used? Is it possible to realize stable void formation in a metal-oxide layer, beyond unexpected observations, for functional utilization? Herein we demonstrate the effective tailoring of void formation of NiO for ultra-sensitive UV photodetection. NiO was formed onto pre-sputtered ZnO for a large size and spontaneously formed abrupt p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction device. To form voids at an interface, rapid thermal process was performed, resulting in highly visible light transparency (85–95%). This heterojunction provides extremely low saturation current (<0.1 nA) with an extraordinary rectifying ratio value of over 3000 and works well without any additional metal electrodes. Under UV illumination, we can observe the fast photoresponse time (10 ms) along with the highest possible responsivity (1.8 A W‑1) and excellent detectivity (2 × 1013 Jones) due to the existence of an intrinsic-void layer at the interface. We consider this as the first report on metal-oxide-based void formation (Kirkendall effect) for effective photoelectric device applications. We propose that the active adoption of ‘defect-considered’ Kirkendall-voids will open up a new era for metal-oxide based photoelectric devices.

  8. Active Adoption of Void Formation in Metal-Oxide for All Transparent Super-Performing Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Malkeshkumar; Kim, Hong-Sik; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kim, Joondong

    2016-01-01

    Could ‘defect-considered’ void formation in metal-oxide be actively used? Is it possible to realize stable void formation in a metal-oxide layer, beyond unexpected observations, for functional utilization? Herein we demonstrate the effective tailoring of void formation of NiO for ultra-sensitive UV photodetection. NiO was formed onto pre-sputtered ZnO for a large size and spontaneously formed abrupt p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction device. To form voids at an interface, rapid thermal process was performed, resulting in highly visible light transparency (85–95%). This heterojunction provides extremely low saturation current (<0.1 nA) with an extraordinary rectifying ratio value of over 3000 and works well without any additional metal electrodes. Under UV illumination, we can observe the fast photoresponse time (10 ms) along with the highest possible responsivity (1.8 A W−1) and excellent detectivity (2 × 1013 Jones) due to the existence of an intrinsic-void layer at the interface. We consider this as the first report on metal-oxide-based void formation (Kirkendall effect) for effective photoelectric device applications. We propose that the active adoption of ‘defect-considered’ Kirkendall-voids will open up a new era for metal-oxide based photoelectric devices. PMID:27151288

  9. Abundance, composition and activity of denitrifier communities in metal polluted paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yongzhuo; Zhou, Huimin; Li, Lianqing; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Pan, Genxing

    2016-01-07

    Denitrification is one of the most important soil microbial processes leading to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O). The potential changes with metal pollution in soil microbial community for N2O production and reduction are not well addressed. In this study, topsoil samples were collected both from polluted and non-polluted rice paddy fields and denitrifier communities were characterized with molecular fingerprinting procedures. All the retrieved nirK sequences could be grouped into neither α- nor β- proteobacteria, while most of the nosZ sequences were affiliated with α-proteobacteria. The abundances of the nirK and nosZ genes were reduced significantly in the two polluted soils. Thus, metal pollution markedly affected composition of both nirK and nosZ denitrifiers. While the total denitrifying activity and N2O production rate were both reduced under heavy metal pollution of the two sites, the N2O reduction rate showed no significant change. These findings suggest that N2O production activity could be sensitive to heavy metal pollution, which could potentially lead to a decrease in N2O emission in polluted paddies. Therefore, metal pollution could have potential impacts on soil N transformation and thus on N2O emission from paddy soils.

  10. One-pot synthesis of protein-embedded metal-organic frameworks with enhanced biological activities.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Fengjiao; Zhang, Yifei; Zare, Richard N; Ge, Jun; Liu, Zheng

    2014-10-08

    Protein molecules were directly embedded in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by a coprecipitation method. The protein molecules majorly embedded on the surface region of MOFs display high biological activities. As a demonstration of the power of such materials, the resulting Cyt c embedded in ZIF-8 showed a 10-fold increase in peroxidase activity compared to free Cyt c in solution and thus gave convenient, fast, and highly sensitive detection of trace amounts of explosive organic peroxides in solution.

  11. Battery plate containing filler with conductive coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The plate (10) comprises a matrix or binder resin phase (12) in which is dispersed particulate, conductive tin oxide such as tin oxide coated glass fibers (14). A monopolar plate (11) is prepared by coating a layer (18) of electrolytically active material onto a surface of the plate (10). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating a surface of the plate (10) with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (22) of lead adhered to the plate with a layer (21) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten dispersion from mixer (36) onto a sheet (30) of lead foil or by passing an assembly of a sheet (41) of resin, a sheet (43) of fiberglass and a sheet (45) of lead between the nip of heated rollers (48, 50).

  12. Battery plate containing filler with conductive coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The plate (10) comprises a matrix or binder resin phase (12) in which is dispersed particulate, conductive tin oxide such as tin oxide coated glass fibers (14). A monopolar plate (11) is prepared by coating a layer (18) of electrolytically active material onto a surface of the plate (10). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating a surface of the plate (10) with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (22) of lead adhered to the plate with a layer (21) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten dispersion from mixer (36) onto a sheet (30) of lead foil or by passing an assembly of a sheet (41) of resin, a sheet (43) of fiberglass and a sheet (45) of lead between the nip of heated rollers (48, 50).

  13. Structural basis for the metal-selective activation of the manganese transport regulator of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Kliegman, Joseph I; Griner, Sarah L; Helmann, John D; Brennan, Richard G; Glasfeld, Arthur

    2006-03-21

    The manganese transport regulator (MntR) of Bacillus subtilis is activated by Mn(2+) to repress transcription of genes encoding transporters involved in the uptake of manganese. MntR is also strongly activated by cadmium, both in vivo and in vitro, but it is poorly activated by other metal cations, including calcium and zinc. The previously published MntR.Mn(2+) structure revealed a binuclear complex of manganese ions with a metal-metal separation of 3.3 A (herein designated the AB conformer). Analysis of four additional crystal forms of MntR.Mn(2+) reveals that the AB conformer is only observed in monoclinic crystals at 100 K, suggesting that this conformation may be stabilized by crystal packing forces. In contrast, monoclinic crystals analyzed at room temperature (at either pH 6.5 or pH 8.5), and a second hexagonal crystal form (analyzed at 100 K), all reveal the shift of one manganese ion by 2.5 A, thereby leading to a newly identified conformation (the AC conformer) with an internuclear distance of 4.4 A. Significantly, the cadmium and calcium complexes of MntR also contain binuclear complexes with a 4.4 A internuclear separation. In contrast, the zinc complex of MntR contains only one metal ion per subunit, in the A site. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms the stoichiometry of Mn(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+) binding to MntR. We propose that the specificity of MntR activation is tied to productive binding of metal ions at two sites; the A site appears to act as a selectivity filter, determining whether the B or C site will be occupied and thereby fully activate MntR.

  14. Bivalent transition metal complexes of cetirizine: Spectroscopic, equilibrium studies and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A.; Shoukry, Mohamed M.; Abobakr, Lamis O.

    2013-08-01

    Metal complexes of cetirizineṡ2HCl (CTZ = 2-[2-[4-[(4-chlorophenyl)phenyl methyl]piperazine-1-yl]-ethoxy]acetic acid, dihydrochloride have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, and UV-Vis spectra. The analytical data of the complexes show the formation of 1:2 [M:L] ratio, where M represents Ni(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) ions, while L represents the deprotonated CTZ ligand. IR spectra show that CTZ is coordinated to the metal ions in a monodentate manner through carboxylate-O atom. Protonation equilibria of CTZ and its metal complexation by some divalent metal ions were determined in aqueous solution at constant ionic strength (0.1 M NaCl) using an automatic potentiometric technique. Thermodynamic parameters for the protonation equilibria of CTZ were calculated and discussed. The stability order of M(II)-CTZ complexes were found to obey Mn2+ < Co2+ < Ni2+ < Cu2+, in accordance with the Irving-Williams order. The concentration distribution of the complexes in solution is evaluated as a function of pH. The CTZ ligand and its metal complexes were screened for their biological activity against bacterial species (Bacillus subtillis RCMB 010067, Staphylococcus aureus RCMB 010028, Pseudomonas aeuroginosa RCMB 010043, and Escherichia coli RCMB 010052) and fungi as (Aspergillus flavus RCMB 02568, Pencicillium italicum RCMB 03924, Candida albicans RCMB 05031 and Geotricum candidum RCMB 05097). The activity data show that the metal complexes have antibacterial and antifungal activity more than the parent CTZ ligand against one or more bacterial or fungi species. MIC was evaluated for the isolated complexes.

  15. Bivalent transition metal complexes of cetirizine: spectroscopic, equilibrium studies and biological activity.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A; Shoukry, Mohamed M; Abobakr, Lamis O

    2013-08-01

    Metal complexes of cetirizine·2HCl (CTZ=2-[2-[4-[(4-chlorophenyl)phenyl methyl]piperazine-1-yl]-ethoxy]acetic acid, dihydrochloride have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, and UV-Vis spectra. The analytical data of the complexes show the formation of 1:2 [M:L] ratio, where M represents Ni(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) ions, while L represents the deprotonated CTZ ligand. IR spectra show that CTZ is coordinated to the metal ions in a monodentate manner through carboxylate-O atom. Protonation equilibria of CTZ and its metal complexation by some divalent metal ions were determined in aqueous solution at constant ionic strength (0.1 M NaCl) using an automatic potentiometric technique. Thermodynamic parameters for the protonation equilibria of CTZ were calculated and discussed. The stability order of M(II)-CTZ complexes were found to obey Mn(2+)metal complexes were screened for their biological activity against bacterial species (Bacillus subtillis RCMB 010067, Staphylococcus aureus RCMB 010028, Pseudomonas aeuroginosa RCMB 010043, and Escherichia coli RCMB 010052) and fungi as (Aspergillus flavus RCMB 02568, Pencicillium italicum RCMB 03924, Candida albicans RCMB 05031 and Geotricum candidum RCMB 05097). The activity data show that the metal complexes have antibacterial and antifungal activity more than the parent CTZ ligand against one or more bacterial or fungi species. MIC was evaluated for the isolated complexes.

  16. The influence of soil heavy metals pollution on soil microbial biomass, enzyme activity, and community composition near a copper smelter.

    PubMed

    Wang, YuanPeng; Shi, JiYan; Wang, Hui; Lin, Qi; Chen, XinCai; Chen, YingXu

    2007-05-01

    The environmental risk of heavy metal pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to large industrial complexes. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by heavy metals. We studied the potential effects of heavy metals on microbial biomass, activity, and community composition in soil near a copper smelter in China. The results showed that microbial biomass C was negatively affected by the elevated metal levels and was closely correlated with heavy metal stress. Enzyme activity was greatly depressed by conditions in the heavy metal-contaminated sites. Good correlation was observed between enzyme activity and the distance from the smelter. Elevated metal loadings resulted in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by changes in their metabolic profiles from correlation analysis. Significant decrease of soil phosphatase activities was found in the soils 200 m away from the smelter. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis demonstrated that heavy metals pollution had a significant impact on bacterial and actinomycetic community structure. There were negative correlations between soil microbial biomass, phosphatase activity, and NH(4)NO(3) extractable heavy metals. The soil microorganism activity and community composition could be predicted significantly using the availability of Cu and Zn. By combining different monitoring approaches from different viewpoints, the set of methods applied in this study were sensitive to site differences and contributed to a better understanding of heavy metals effects on the structure, size and activity of microbial communities in soils. The data presented demonstrate the role of heavy metals pollution in understanding the heavy metal toxicity to soil microorganism near a copper smelter in China.

  17. Effect of filler type and polishing on the discoloration of composite resin artificial teeth.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Soichiro; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Hayakawa, Iwao; Loyaga-Rendon, Paola G; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2008-11-01

    In this study, the effects of filler type and polishing on the discoloration of composite resin artificial teeth were examined. Four types of experimental resins were prepared: one was a matrix resin, while the others were composite resins containing three different types of fillers (nano-sized silica filler with or without silanization, and prepolymerized filler). Specimens were immersed in distilled water, coffee, red wine, or curry. Color change after immersion was measured using a colorimeter. Color difference values (delta E) and changes in translucency parameter (delta TP) were statistically analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's comparison. On the influence of the polishing factor, statistically significant differences were neither observed in delta E nor delta TP between polished and non-polished tooth surfaces. On the contrary, the influences of filler type and discoloration medium, and their interaction thereof, were significant. With unsilanized filler, the delta E value of composite resin artificial teeth was significantly increased.

  18. Effect of presilanization filler decontamination on aesthetics and degradation resistance of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Shirai, Kenichi; Shintani, Hideaki; Okazaki, Masayuki; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2002-12-01

    Filler-matrix coupling determines, to a large extent, the mechanical strength and clinical longevity of dental composites. The aim of this study was to examine how far a methodology to decontaminate filler prior to silanization may improve aesthetic performance in addition to physico-mechanical properties such as degradation resistance. It was reported that filler particles are surrounded and wrapped by a film that consists of multiple layers of silane molecules. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, however, revealed that silanization of filler particles largely depended upon siloxane bridge (Si-O-Si) formation between the silica surface and the silane molecule rather than on intermolecular bonding between adjacent silane molecules. In this study, we showed that filler decontamination resulted in a higher translucency, thereby providing a better aesthetic potential. In addition, experimental composites produced following presilanization decontamination of filler revealed a higher Vickers hardness value and a diametral tensile strength that was resistant to degradation by thermo-cycling.

  19. New fillers under consideration: what is the future of injectable aesthetics?

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Alexander

    2009-05-01

    The past 5 years in the United States have seen an explosion in the popularity of noninvasive aesthetic procedures. Not only have fillers and Botox turned out to be fantastically reliable and effective aesthetic tools, but also they have vastly expanded the accessibility of cosmetic procedures. Our cosmetic filler options are growing quickly as more and more fillers are coming before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), seeking entry into the lucrative U.S. market. This article outlines the approval process that foreign fillers go through in their home countries and gives an idea of the fillers that are currently under consideration by the FDA. As our armamentarium of injectable fillers grows, it will be essential to know each product's strengths and weaknesses so that we can provide our patients with the best possible aesthetic results.

  20. Physicochemical characteristics and sorption capacities of heavy metal ions of activated carbons derived by activation with different alkyl phosphate triesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Hai; Yang, Shaokun; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Chenglu; Wu, Haiming

    2014-10-01

    Five alkyl phosphate triesters (APTEs), including trimethyl phosphate (TMP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), triisopropyl phosphate (TPP), tributyl phosphate (TBP) and trioctyl phosphate (TOP), were used as activating agents for preparing activated carbons (AC-APTEs) with high surface acidity and metal ion sorption capacity. N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, surface morphologies, elemental compositions, results of Boehm's titration and sorption capacities of heavy metal ions of the carbons were investigated. AC-APTEs contained much more acidic groups and exhibited much less surface area (<500 m2/g) in comparison with activated carbon (AC-PPA, 1145 m2/g) obtained from phosphoric acid activation. For the AC-APTEs, AC-TOP had the highest surface area (488 m2/g), AC-TMP showed the highest yield (41.1%), and AC-TBP possessed the highest acidic groups (2.695 mmol/g), oxygen content (47.0%) and metal ion sorption capacities (40.1 mg/g for Ni(II) and 53.5 mg/g for Cd(II)). For the carbons, AC-APTEs showed much larger Ni(II) and Cd(II) sorption capacities than AC-PPA, except AC-TPP. The differences of the carbons in the physicochemical and sorption properties suggested surface chemistry of the carbons was the main factor influencing their sorption capacities whereas the pore structure played a secondary role.

  1. Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkemo, Harold; Goudarzi, Gus H.

    1978-01-01

    There has been a general lag in minerals-exploration activity in the past few years. Government concern is reviewed in this article, along with significant developments that included the discovery of additional bauxite, copper, and molybdenum deposits and the reopening of different mining operations. (MA)

  2. Effect of ZrO2 Nanoparticles on the Microstructure of Al-Si-Cu Filler for Low-Temperature Al Brazing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Roh, Myung-Hwan; Jung, Do-Hyun; Jung, Jae-Pil

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of ZrO2 nanoparticles on Al-12Si-20Cu alloy has been studied as a filler metal for aluminum brazing. The microstructural and thermal characterizations are performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The intermetallic compound (IMC) phases are identified by the energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis coupled with the SEM. The filler spreading test is performed according to JIS-Z-3197 standard. XRD and SEM analyses confirm the presence of Si particles, the CuAl2 ( θ) intermetallic, and the eutectic structures of Al-Si, Al-Cu, and Al-Si-Cu in the Al matrix in the monolithic and composite samples. It is observed that when the ZrO2 is added in the alloy, the CuAl2 IMCs and Si particles are found to be dispersed uniformly in the Al matrix up to 0.05 wt pct ZrO2. DTA results show that the liquidus temperature of Al-12Si-20Cu filler metal is dropped from ~806.78 K to 804.6 K (533.78 °C to 531.6 °C) with a lowering of 2 K (2 °C) in liquidus temperature, when the amount of ZrO2 is increased up to 0.05 wt pct. It is also shown that the presence of ZrO2 nanoparticles in the filler metal has no deleterious effect on wettability up to 0.05 wt pct of ZrO2. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation percentage are also found to improve with the addition of ZrO2 nanoparticles in the Al-12Si-20Cu alloy.

  3. Increasing the wear resistance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene by adding solid lubricating fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, S. V.; Kornienko, L. A.; Poltaranin, M. A.; Ivanova, L. R.; Suan, T. Nguen

    2014-11-14

    In order to compare effectiveness of adding solid lubricating fillers for polymeric composites based on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) with graphite, molybdenum disulfide and polytetrafluoroethylene, their tribotechnical characteristics under dry friction, boundary lubrication and abrasive wearing were investigated. The optimal weight fractions of fillers in terms of improving wear resistance have been determined. The supramolecular structure and topography of wear track surfaces of UHMWPE-based composites with different content of fillers have been studied.

  4. A Langevin dynamics study of mobile filler particles in phase-separating binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laradji, Mohamed

    2004-05-01

    The dynamics of phase separation in a simple binary mixture containing mobile filler particles that are preferentially wet by one of the two components is investigated systematically via Langevin simulations in two dimensions. We found that while the filler particles reduce the growth rate of spinodal decomposition, the domain growth remains essentially identical to that of the pure binary mixture. The growth rate diminishes as either the filler particles concentration is increased or their diffusivity is decreased.

  5. Modeling of heavy metals removal from aqueous solution using activated carbon produced from cotton stalk.

    PubMed

    El Zayat, Mohamed; Smith, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbon produced from cotton stalks was examined for the removal of heavy metal contaminants. Adsorption studies in completely mixed batch reactors were used to generate equilibrium pH adsorption edges. Continuous flow experiments using the activated carbon in fixed beds were conducted to determine heavy metal breakthrough versus bed volumes treated. At given pH value in the range 5-7, the adsorption capacity was similar for copper and lead and clearly greater than for cadmium. A surface titration experiment indicated negative surface charge of the activated carbon at pH > 6, meaning that electrostatic attraction of the divalent heavy metals can occur below the pH required for precipitation. Substantive metal removal below the pH of zero charge might be due to surface complexation. Accordingly, a surface complexation model approach that utilizes an electrostatic term in the double-layer description was used to estimate equilibrium constants for the protolysis interactions of the activated carbon surface as well as equilibria between background ions used to establish ionic strength and the sorbent surface. Pb(II) adsorption edges were best modeled using inner-layer surface complexation of Pb(2+), while Cd(II) and Cu(II) data were best fit by outer-layer complexes with Me(2+). The full set of equilibrium constants were used as input in a dual-rate dynamic model to simulate the breakthrough curves of the target metals (Pb, Cu and Cd) from fixed bed experiments and to estimate external (or film) diffusion and internal (surface) diffusion coefficients.

  6. Biphasic catalysis using amphiphilic polyphenols-chelated noble metals as highly active and selective catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Hui; Yu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Liao, Xuepin

    2013-01-01

    In the field of catalysis, it is highly desired to develop novel catalysts that combine the advantages of both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. Here we disclose that the use of plant pholyphenol as amphiphilic large molecule ligand/stabilizer allows for the preparation of noble metal complex and noble metal nanoparticle catalysts. These catalysts are found to be highly selective and active in aqueous-organic biphasic catalysis of cinnamaldehyde and quinoline, and can be reused at least 3 times without significant loss of activity. Moreover, the catalytic activity and reusability of the catalysts can be rationally controlled by simply adjusting the content of polyphenols in the catalysts. Our strategy may be extended to design a wide range of aqueous-organic biphasic catalysis system. PMID:23863916

  7. A metal switch for controlling the activity of molecular motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Jared C; Zhao, Yu Cheng; Wilcox, Dean E; Kull, F Jon

    2011-12-25

    Kinesins are molecular motors that require a divalent metal ion (for example, Mg(2+)) to convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into directed force production along microtubules. Here we present the crystal structure of a recombinant kinesin motor domain bound to Mn(2+) and ADP and report on a serine-to-cysteine substitution in the switch 1 motif of kinesin that allows its ATP hydrolysis activity to be controlled by adjusting the ratio of Mn(2+) to Mg(2+). This mutant kinesin binds ATP similarly in the presence of either metal ion, but its ATP hydrolysis activity is greatly diminished in the presence of Mg(2+). In human kinesin-1 and kinesin-5 as well as Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-10 and kinesin-14, this defect is rescued by Mn(2+), providing a way to control both the enzymatic activity and force-generating ability of these nanomachines.

  8. Start-up procedures and analysis of heavy metals inhibition on methanogenic activity in EGSB reactor.

    PubMed

    Colussi, I; Cortesi, A; Della Vedova, L; Gallo, V; Robles, F K Cano

    2009-12-01

    The effectiveness of operating an industrial UASB reactor, treating wastewater from the beer industry, with flows containing heavy metals was evaluated. A pilot-scale UASB reactor, already used to simulate the industrial reactor, was unsuccessfully employed. An easy start-up was obtained arranging it as an EGSB reactor. Considerations about this modification are reported. The effects of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Cr(III) ions on the anaerobic activity were analyzed by measurements of methane production rate and COD removal. The employed biomass was the sludge of the industrial UASB reactor, while a solution of ethanol and sodium acetate with COD of 3000 mg/L and a heavy metal concentration of 50 mg/L were continuously fed. Experimental results proved higher biomass sensitivity for copper and much slighter for nickel and chromium. Moreover, copper inhibition has been demonstrated to be less significant if a metal-free feed was provided to the system before copper addition.

  9. Tunable catalytic activity of solid solution metal-organic frameworks in one-pot multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Gándara, Felipe; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles

    2015-05-20

    The aim of this research is to establish how metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) composed of more than one metal in equivalent crystallographic sites (solid solution MOFs) exhibit catalytic activity, which is tunable by virtue of the metal ions ratio. New MOFs with general formula [InxGa1-x(O2C2H4)0.5(hfipbb)] were prepared by the combination of Ga and In. They are isostructural with their monometal counterparts, synthesized with Al, Ga, and In. Differences in their behavior as heterogeneous catalysts in the three-component, one pot Strecker reaction illustrate the potential of solid solution MOFs to provide the ability to address the various stages involved in the reaction mechanism.

  10. Synthesis, Characterization, Antibacterial and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Enoxacin Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Arayne, Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Haroon, Urooj; Mesaik, M. Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    The present work comprises the synthesis of enoxacin (Heno) complexes with various transition metals. Two types of complexes [M(eno)2(H2O)2]3H2O(M = CuII, NiII or MnII) and [M(eno)(H2O)2]Cl · 4H2O (M = FeIII) were obtained. The complexes were characterized by different physicochemical, spectroscopic, and elemental analysis. Results suggest that enoxacin interacts with the metals as a monoanionic bidentate ligand. These complexes were also tested for their antibacterial activity against eleven (11) different microorganisms, and the results were compared with the parent drug. Moreover all the metal complexes were also tested for their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species where by MnII and CuII complexes exhibited potential to mediate anti-inflammatory response. PMID:19657456

  11. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

  12. Angstrom-resolved real-time dissection of electrochemically active noble metal interfaces.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Buddha R; Baimpos, Theodoros; Raman, Sangeetha; Valtiner, Markus

    2014-06-24

    Electrochemical solid|liquid interfaces are critically important for technological applications and materials for energy storage, harvesting, and conversion. Yet, a real-time Angstrom-resolved visualization of dynamic processes at electrified solid|liquid interfaces has not been feasible. Here we report a unique real-time atomistic view into dynamic processes at electrochemically active metal interfaces using white light interferometry in an electrochemical surface forces apparatus. This method allows simultaneous deciphering of both sides of an electrochemical interface-the solution and the metal side-with microsecond resolution under dynamically evolving reactive conditions that are inherent to technological systems in operando. Quantitative in situ analysis of the potentiodynamic electrochemical oxidation/reduction of noble metal surfaces shows that Angstrom thick oxides formed on Au and Pt are high-ik materials; that is, they are metallic or highly defect-rich semiconductors, while Pd forms a low-ik oxide. In contrast, under potentiostatic growth conditions, all noble metal oxides exhibit a low-ik behavior. On the solution side, we reveal hitherto unknown strong electrochemical reaction forces, which are due to temporary charge imbalance in the electric double layer caused by depletion/generation of charged species. The real-time capability of our approach reveals significant time lags between electron transfer, oxide reduction/oxidation, and solution side reaction during a progressing electrode process. Comparing the kinetics of solution and metal side responses provides evidence that noble metal oxide reduction proceeds via a hydrogen adsorption and subsequent dissolution/redeposition mechanism. The presented approach may have important implications for designing emerging materials utilizing electrified interfaces and may apply to bioelectrochemical processes and signal transmission.

  13. Applied anatomy of the temporal region and forehead for injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Jonathan M

    2009-10-01

    Injectable fillers allow for augmentation of soft tissue deficiencies caused by aging, trauma or other scarring. Placement of injectable fillers can be performed in the office, safely and with minimal patient downtime. In order to avoid complications from injection of filler substances, the injector must have a thorough knowledge of the applied anatomy. The temple and forehead are often associated with aging changes. This article describes the anatomic layers of the forehead and temple, and discusses the various planes for safe injection of fillers.

  14. PIM-1 mixed matrix membranes for gas separations using cost-effective hypercrosslinked nanoparticle fillers.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Tamoghna; Bhavsar, Rupesh S; Adams, Dave J; Budd, Peter M; Cooper, Andrew I

    2016-04-25

    High-free-volume glassy polymers, such as polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) and poly(trimethylsilylpropyne), have attracted attention as membrane materials due to their high permeability. However, loss of free volume over time, or aging, limits their applicability. Introduction of a secondary filler phase can reduce this aging but either cost or instability rules out scale up for many fillers. Here, we report a cheap, acid-tolerant, nanoparticulate hypercrosslinked polymer 'sponge' as an alternative filler. On adding the filler, permeability is enhanced and aging is strongly retarded. This is accompanied by a CO2/N2 selectivity that increases over time, surpassing the Robeson upper bound.

  15. Artificial sweeteners and salts producing a metallic taste sensation activate TRPV1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Riera, Céline E; Vogel, Horst; Simon, Sidney A; le Coutre, Johannes

    2007-08-01

    Throughout the world many people use artificial sweeteners (AS) for the purpose of reducing caloric intake. The most prominently used of these molecules include saccharin, aspartame (Nutrasweet), acesulfame-K, and cyclamate. Despite the caloric advantage they provide, one key concern in their use is their aversive aftertaste that has been characterized on a sensory level as bitter and/or metallic. Recently, it has been shown that the activation of particular T2R bitter taste receptors is partially involved with the bitter aftertaste sensation of saccharin and acesulfame-K. To more fully understand the biology behind these phenomena we have addressed the question of whether AS could stimulate transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors, as these receptors are activated by a large range of structurally different chemicals. Moreover, TRPV1 receptors and/or their variants are found in taste receptor cells and in nerve terminals throughout the oral cavity. Hence, TRPV1 activation could be involved in the AS aftertaste or even contribute to the poorly understood metallic taste sensation. Using Ca(2+) imaging on TRPV1 receptors heterologously expressed in the human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and on dissociated primary sensory neurons, we find that in both systems, AS activate TRPV1 receptors, and, moreover, they sensitize these channels to acid and heat. We also found that TRPV1 receptors are activated by CuSO(4), ZnSO(4), and FeSO(4), three salts known to produce a metallic taste sensation. In summary, our results identify a novel group of compounds that activate TRPV1 and, consequently, provide a molecular mechanism that may account for off tastes of sweeteners and metallic tasting salts.

  16. Curcumin derivatives as metal-chelating agents with potential multifunctional activity for pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Erika; Benassi, Rois; Sacchi, Stefania; Pignedoli, Francesca; Asti, Mattia; Saladini, Monica

    2014-10-01

    Curcuminoids represent new perspectives for the development of novel therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease (AD), one probable mechanism of action is related to their metal complexing ability. In this work we examined the metal complexing ability of substituted curcuminoids to propose new chelating molecules with biological properties comparable with curcumin but with improved stability as new potential AD therapeutic agents. The K2T derivatives originate from the insertion of a -CH2COOC(CH3)3 group on the central atom of the diketonic moiety of curcumin. They retain the diketo-ketoenol tautomerism which is solvent dependent. In aqueous solution the prevalent form is the diketo one but the addition of metal ion (Ga(3+), Cu(2+)) causes the dissociation of the enolic proton creating chelate complexes and shifting the tautomeric equilibrium towards the keto-enol form. The formation of metal complexes is followed by both NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations on K2T21 complexes with Ga(3+) and Cu(2+) are performed and compared with those on curcumin complexes. [Ga(K2T21)2(H2O)2](+) was found more stable than curcumin one. Good agreement is detected between calculated and experimental (1)H and (13)C NMR data. The calculated OH bond dissociation energy (BDE) and the OH proton dissociation enthalpy (PDE), allowed to predict the radical scavenging ability of the metal ion complexed with K2T21, while the calculated electronic affinity (EA) and ionization potential (IP) represent yardsticks of antioxidant properties. Eventually theoretical calculations suggest that the proton-transfer-associated superoxide-scavenging activity is enhanced after binding metal ions, and that Ga(3+) complexes display possible superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity.

  17. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-11-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment.

  18. Gill ATPase activity in Procambarus clarkii as an indicator of heavy metal pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Torreblanca, A.; Del Ramo, J.; Diaz-Mayans, J. )

    1989-06-01

    Lake Albufera and the surrounding rice field waters are subjected to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues, including heavy metals, from the many urban and waste waters of this area. The American red crayfish, Procambarus clarkii have a high resistance to toxic effects of heavy metals. The sublethal effects of heavy metals on gills of fish and aquatic invertebrates have been extensively studied. Some metabolic disturbances and histologic damages have been reported, as well as osmoregulation alterations. However, little work has been done about the effect of heavy metals on Na,K and Mg-ATPases of freshwater invertebrate gills. Na,K-ATPase is the prime mediator of ion transport across cellular membranes and plays a central role in whole body ion regulation in marine and estuarine animals. Na,K-ATPase has been reviewed and assessed as a potentially useful indicator of pollution stress in aquatic animals. The purpose of this study is look for the relation, if any, between crayfish gill ATP-ase activity changes and metal exposure in laboratory. This find would allow the authors to assay this potential indicator in the field.

  19. Effect of the chelation of metal cation on the antioxidant activity of chondroitin sulfates.

    PubMed

    Ajisaka, Katsumi; Oyanagi, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The antioxidant potencies of chondroitin sulfates (CSs) from shark cartilage, salmon cartilage, bovine trachea, and porcine intestinal mucosa were compared by three representative methods for the measurement of the antioxidant activity; DPPH radical scavenging activity, superoxide radical scavenging activity, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. CSs from salmon cartilage and bovine trachea showed higher potency in comparison with CSs from shark cartilage and porcine intestinal mucosa. Next, CS from salmon cartilage chelating with Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), or Zn(2+) were prepared, and their antioxidant potencies were compared. CS chelating with Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ions showed rather decreased DPPH radical scavenging activity in comparison with CS of H(+) form. In contrast, CS chelating with Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ion showed remarkably enhanced superoxide radical scavenging activity than CS of H(+) or Na(+) form. Moreover, CS chelating with divalent metal ions, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), or Zn(2+), showed noticeably higher hydroxyl radical scavenging activity than CS of H(+) or Na(+) form. The present results revealed that the scavenging activities of, at least, superoxide radical and hydroxyl radical were enhanced by the chelation with divalent metal ions.

  20. Short-time effect of heavy metals upon microbial community activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Yao, Jun; Si, Yang; Chen, Huilun; Russel, Mohammad; Chen, Ke; Qian, Yiguang; Zaray, Gyula; Bramanti, Emilia

    2010-01-15

    Microcalorimetry was applied to assess and compare the toxic effect of heavy metals, such as As, Cu, Cd, Cr, Co, Pb and Zn, on the soil microbial activities and community. About 1.0 g soil spiked 5.0mg glucose and 5.0mg ammonium sulfate, the microbial activities were recorded as power-time curves, and their indices, microbial growth rate constant k, total heat evolution Q(T), metabolic enthalpy Delta H(met) and mass specific heat rate J(Q/S), were calculated. Comparing these thermodynamic parameters associated with growth yield, a general order of toxicity to the soil was found to be Cr>Pb>As>Co>Zn>Cd>Cu. When soil was exposed to heavy metals, the amount of bacteria and fungi decreased with the incubation time, and the bacterial number diminished sharply. It illustrates that fungi are more tolerant, and bacteria-fungi ratio would be altered under metal stress. To determine the status of the glucose consumed, a glucose biosensor with eggshell membrane was used to measure the remaining glucose in soil sample. Results showed that the time at which glucose was consumed completely was agreed with the microcalorimetric time to a large extent, and depended on the toxicity of heavy metals as well.

  1. Effects of electrokinetic treatment of a heavy metal contaminated soil on soil enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Cang, Long; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Wang, Quan-Ying; Wu, Dan-Ya

    2009-12-30

    There is a growing concern on the potential application of a direct current (DC) electric field to soil for removing contaminants, but little is known about its impact on soil enzyme activities. This study investigated the change of enzyme activities of a heavy metal contaminated soil before and after electrokinetic (EK) treatments at lab-scale and the mechanisms of EK treatment to affect soil enzyme activities were explored. After treatments with 1-3 V cm(-1) of voltage gradient for 420 h, soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), soil organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), soil heavy metal concentration and enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that the average removal efficiencies of soil copper were about 65% and 83% without and with pH control of catholyte, respectively, and all the removal efficiencies of cadmium were above 90%. The soil invertase and catalase activities increased and the highest invertase activity was as 170 times as the initial one. The activities of soil urease and acidic phosphatase were lower than the initial ones. Bivariate correlation analyses indicated that the soil invertase and acidic phosphatase activities were significantly correlated with soil pH, EC, and DOC at P<0.05, but the soil urease activities had no correlation with the soil properties. On the other hand, the effects of DC electric current on solution invertase and catalase enzyme protein activities indicated that it had negative effect on solution catalase activity and little effect on solution invertase activity. From the change of invertase and catalase activities in soil and solution, the conclusion can be drawn that the dominant effect mechanism is the change of soil properties by EK treatments.

  2. Development of a novel catalytic amyloid displaying a metal-dependent ATPase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, Octavio; Nova, Esteban; Diaz-Espinoza, Rodrigo

    2017-01-22

    Amyloids are protein aggregates of highly regular structure that are involved in diverse pathologies such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Recent evidence has shown that under certain conditions, small peptides can self-assemble into amyloids that exhibit catalytic reactivity towards certain compounds. Here we report a novel peptide with a sequence derived from the active site of RNA polymerase that displays hydrolytic activity towards ATP. The catalytic reaction proceeds in the presence of the divalent metal manganese and the products are ADP and AMP. The kinetic data shows a substrate-dependent saturation of the activity with a maximum rate achieved at around 1 mM ATP. At higher ATP concentrations, we also observed substrate inhibition of the activity. The self-assembly of the peptide into amyloids is strictly metal-dependent and required for the catalysis. Our results show that aspartate-containing amyloids can also be catalysts under conditions that include interactions with metals. Moreover, we show for the first time an amyloid that exerts reactivity towards a biologically essential molecule.

  3. Metal-Induced Stabilization and Activation of Plasmid Replication Initiator RepB

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Masó, José A.; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, Lorena; Sanz, Marta; Menéndez, Margarita; del Solar, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Initiation of plasmid rolling circle replication (RCR) is catalyzed by a plasmid-encoded Rep protein that performs a Tyr- and metal-dependent site-specific cleavage of one DNA strand within the double-strand origin (dso) of replication. The crystal structure of RepB, the initiator protein of the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, constitutes the first example of a Rep protein structure from RCR plasmids. It forms a toroidal homohexameric ring where each RepB protomer consists of two domains: the C-terminal domain involved in oligomerization and the N-terminal domain containing the DNA-binding and endonuclease activities. Binding of Mn2+ to the active site is essential for the catalytic activity of RepB. In this work, we have studied the effects of metal binding on the structure and thermostability of full-length hexameric RepB and each of its separate domains by using different biophysical approaches. The analysis of the temperature-induced changes in RepB shows that the first thermal transition, which occurs at a range of temperatures physiologically relevant for the pMV158 pneumococcal host, represents an irreversible conformational change that affects the secondary and tertiary structure of the protein, which becomes prone to self-associate. This transition, which is also shown to result in loss of DNA binding capacity and catalytic activity of RepB, is confined to its N-terminal domain. Mn2+ protects the protein from undergoing this detrimental conformational change and the observed protection correlates well with the high-affinity binding of the cation to the active site, as substituting one of the metal-ligands at this site impairs both the protein affinity for Mn2+and the Mn2+-driven thermostabilization effect. The level of catalytic activity of the protein, especially in the case of full-length RepB, cannot be explained based only on the high-affinity binding of Mn2+ at the active site and suggests the existence of additional, lower-affinity metal binding site

  4. Thin-walled composite tubes using fillers subjected to quasistatic axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Qrimli, Haidar F.; Mahdi, Fadhil A.; Ismail, Firas B.; Alzorqi, Ibrahim S.

    2015-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that composites are lightweight, fatigue resistant and easily melded, a seemingly attractive alternative to metals. However, there has been no widespread switch from metals to composites in the automotive sector. This is because there are a number of technical issues relating to the use of composite materials that still need to be resolved including accurate material characterization, manufacturing and joining process. The total of 36 specimens have been fabricated using the fibre-glass and resin (epoxy) with a two different geometries (circular and corrugated) each one will be filled with five types of filler (Rice Husk, Wood Chips, Aluminium Chips, Coconut Fibre, Palm Oil Fibre) all these type will be compared with empty Tubes for circular and corrugated in order to comprehend the crashworthiness parameters (initial failure load, average load, maximum crushing load, load ratio, energy absorption, specific energy absorption, volumetric energy absorption, crushing force efficiency and crush strain relation) which are considered very sufficient parameters in the design of automotive industry parts. All the tests have been done using the “INSTRON Universal machine” which is computerized in order to simply give a high precision to the collection of the results, along with the use of quasi-static load to test and observe the behaviour of the fabricated specimens.

  5. Influence of traffic activity on heavy metal concentrations of roadside farmland soil in mountainous areas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Yan, Xuedong; Zeng, Chen; Zhang, Man; Shrestha, Suraj; Devkota, Lochan Prasad; Yao, Tandong

    2012-05-01

    Emission of heavy metals from traffic activities is an important pollution source to roadside farmland ecosystems. However, little previous research has been conducted to investigate heavy metal concentrations of roadside farmland soil in mountainous areas. Owing to more complex roadside environments and more intense driving conditions on mountainous highways, heavy metal accumulation and distribution patterns in farmland soil due to traffic activity could be different from those on plain highways. In this study, design factors including altitude, roadside distance, terrain, and tree protection were considered to analyze their influences on Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations in farmland soils along a mountain highway around Kathmandu, Nepal. On average, the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb at the sampling sites are lower than the tolerable levels. Correspondingly, pollution index analysis does not show serious roadside pollution owing to traffic emissions either. However, some maximum Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations are close to or higher than the tolerable level, indicating that although average accumulations of heavy metals pose no hazard in the region, some spots with peak concentrations may be severely polluted. The correlation analysis indicates that either Cu or Cd content is found to be significantly correlated with Zn and Pb content while there is no significant correlation between Cu and Cd. The pattern can be reasonably explained by the vehicular heavy metal emission mechanisms, which proves the heavy metals' homology of the traffic pollution source. Furthermore, the independent factors show complex interaction effects on heavy metal concentrations in the mountainous roadside soil, which indicate quite a different distribution pattern from previous studies focusing on urban roadside environments. It is found that the Pb concentration in the downgrade roadside soil is significantly lower than that in the upgrade soil while the Zn concentration in the

  6. Automatic Submerged ARC Welding With Metal Power Additions to Increase Productivity and Maintain Quality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Manager of Welding Engineering PROPOSAL WELDING OF CARBON STEEL AND HY80 UTILIZING THE BULK WELDING PROCESS May 9, 1983 PREPARED BY: NEWPORT NEwS...12 joints with carbon steel and 12 with HY80 , utilizing three The joints will requirements of Benefits 1. Deposition times that different size double...of Joint Variations and Deposition Rates Filler Metal/Base Material Chemical Analyses; Carbon Steel /HIS Filler Metal/Base Material Chemical Analyses

  7. Biosurfactant activity, heavy metal tolerance and characterization of Joostella strain A8 from the Mediterranean polychaete Megalomma claparedei (Gravier, 1906).

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Carmen; Michaud, Luigi; Graziano, Marco; De Domenico, Emilio; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf; Lo Giudice, Angelina

    2015-08-01

    The effect of heavy metals on the activity of biosurfactants produced by Joostella strain A8 from the polychaete Megalomma claparedei was investigated. Biosurfactant activity was first improved by evaluating the influence of abiotic parameters. Higher E(24) indices were achieved at 25 °C in mineral salt medium supplemented with 2 % glucose, 3 % sodium chloride (w/v) and 0.1 % ammonium chloride (w/v). Considerable surface tension reduction was never recorded. Heavy metal tolerance was preliminarily assayed by plate diffusion method resulting in the order of toxicity Cd > Cu > Zn. The activity of biosurfactants was then evaluated in the presence of heavy metals at different concentrations in liquid cultures that were incubated under optimal conditions for biosurfactant activity. The production of stable emulsions resulted generally higher in the presence of metals. These findings suggest that biosurfactant production could represent a bacterial adaptive strategy to defend cells from a stress condition derived from heavy metals in the bulk environment.

  8. Metals--Endangered Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowder, William W.

    1979-01-01

    Suggests activities for elementary teachers to use in teaching about metals and their use. Specific areas addressed include: history of metals, metal use, consumption statistics, beauty of metals, sources of metals, conservation, and other projects. (JMB)

  9. System compliance dictates the effect of composite filler content on polymerization shrinkage stress☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengzhi; Chiang, Martin Y.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The effect of filler content in dental restorative composites on the polymerization shrinkage stress (PS) is not straightforward and has caused much debate in the literature. Our objective in this study was to clarify the PS/filler content relationship based on analytical and experimental approaches, so that guidelines for materials comparison in terms of PS and clinical selection of dental composites with various filler content can be provided. Methods Analytically, a simplified model based on linear elasticity was utilized to predict PS as a function of filler content under various compliances of the testing system, a cantilever beam-based instrument used in this study. The predictions were validated by measuring PS of composites synthesized using 50/50 mixtures of two common dimethacrylate resins with a variety of filler contents. Results Both experiments and predictions indicated that the influence of filler content on the PS highly depended on the compliance of the testing system. Within the clinic-relevant range of compliances and for the specific sample configuration tested, the PS increased with increasing filler content at low compliance of instrument, while increasing the compliance caused the effect of filler content on the PS to gradually diminish. Eventually, at high compliance, the PS inverted and decreased with increasing filler content. Significance This compliance-dependent effect of filler content on PS suggests: (1) for materials comparison in terms of PS, the specific compliance at which the comparison being done should always be reported and (2) clinically, composites with relatively lower filler content could be selected for such cavities with relatively lower compliance (e.g. a Class-I cavity with thick tooth walls or the basal part in a cavity) and vice versa in order to reduce the final PS. PMID:26916062

  10. Sparfloxacin-metal complexes as antifungal agents - Their synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Najma; Arayne, M. Saeed; Gul, Somia; Shamim, Sana

    2010-06-01

    Metal complexes with the third-generation quinolone antibacterial agent sparfloxacin (SPFX) or 5-amino-1-cyclopropyl-7-(cis-3,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-6,8,di-fluoro-1-4-dihydro-4-oxo-3-quinocarboxylic acid have been synthesized and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques such as TLC, IR, NMR and elemental analyses. In these complexes, sparfloxacin acts as bidentate deprotonated ligands bound to the metal through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylate oxygen. The antimicrobial activity of these complexes has been evaluated against four Gram-positive and seven Gram-negative bacteria. Antifungal activity against five different fungi has been evaluated and compared with reference drug sparfloxacin. Fe 2+-SPFX and Cd 2+-SPFX complexes showed remarkable potency as compared to the parent drug.

  11. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry. PMID:26286479

  12. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  13. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-19

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  14. In-vitro antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic activities of some coumarins and their metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Saeed U; Chohan, Zahid H; Gulnaz, Farzana; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2005-08-01

    A series of new antibacterial and antifungal coumarin-derived compounds and their transition metal complexes [cobalt (II), copper (II), nickel (II) and zinc (II)] have been synthesized, characterized and screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Shigella dysenteriae, Bacillus cereus, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes bacterial strains and for in vitro antifungal activity against Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani, Candida glaberata. The results of these studies show the metal complexes to be more antibacterial and antifungal as compared to the uncomplexed coumarins. The brine shrimp bioassay was also carried out to study their in vitro cytotoxic properties.

  15. Thermostable alkaline phytase from Bacillus sp. MD2: effect of divalent metals on activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thuy Thi; Hashim, Suhaila Omar; Gaber, Yasser; Mamo, Gashaw; Mattiasson, Bo; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2011-07-01

    Phytate, the major source of phosphorus in seeds, exists as a complex with different metal ions. Alkaline phytases are known to dephosphorylate phytate complexed with calcium ions in contrast to acid phytases that act only on phytic acid. A recombinant alkaline phytase from Bacillus sp. MD2 has been purified and characterized with respect to the effect of divalent metal ions on the enzyme activity and stability. The presence of Ca(2+) on both the enzyme and the substrate is required for optimal activity and stability. Replacing Ca(2+) with Ba(2+), Mn(2+), Mg(2+) and Sr(2+) in the phytase resulted in the expression of >90% of the maximal activity with calcium-phytate as the substrate, while Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) rendered the enzyme inactive. On the other hand, the calcium loaded phytase showed significant activity (60%) with sodium phytate and lower activity (17-20%) with phytate complexed with only Mg(2+), Sn(2+) and Sr(2+), respectively. On replacing Ca(2+) on both the enzyme and the substrate with other metal ions, about 20% of the maximal phytase activity was obtained only with Mg(2+) and Sr(2+), respectively. Only Ca(2+) resulted in a marked increase in the melting temperature (T(m)) of the enzyme by 12-21°C, while Ba(2+), Mn(2+), Sr(2+) or Cu(2+) resulted in a modest (2-3.5°C) increase in T(m). In the presence of 1-5mM Ca(2+), the optimum temperature of the phytase activity was increased from 40°C to 70°C, while optimum pH of the enzyme shifted by 0.4-1 pH unit towards the acidic region.

  16. The biological effect of metal ions on the granulation of aerobic granular activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wen; Li, Yaochen; Lv, Junping; Chen, Lisha; Zhu, Jianrong

    2016-06-01

    As a special biofilm structure, microbial attachment is believed to play an important role in the granulation of aerobic granular activated sludge (AGAS). This experiment was to investigate the biological effect of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Zn(2+), and K(+) which are the most common ions present in biological wastewater treatment systems, on the microbial attachment of AGAS and flocculent activated sludge (FAS), from which AGAS is always derived, in order to provide a new strategy for the rapid cultivation and stability control of AGAS. The result showed that attachment biomass of AGAS was about 300% higher than that of FAS without the addition of metal ions. Different metal ions had different effects on the process of microbial attachment. FAS and AGAS reacted differently to the metal ions as well, and in fact, AGAS was more sensitive to the metal ions. Specifically, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and K(+) could increase the microbial attachment ability of both AGAS and FAS under appropriate concentrations, Cu(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) were also beneficial to the microbial attachment of FAS at low concentrations, but Cu(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) greatly inhibited the attachment process of AGAS even at extremely low concentrations. In addition, the acylated homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing system, the content of extracellular polymeric substances and the relative hydrophobicity of the sludges were greatly influenced by metal ions. As all these parameters had close relationships with the microbial attachment process, the microbial attachment may be affected by changes of these parameters.

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Nano-filler Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.; Working, Dennis C.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    To improve the thermal conductivity of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, Elvax 260 was compounded with three carbon based nano-fillers. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNF) and expanded graphite (EG) were investigated. In an attempt to improve compatibility between the Elvax and nanofillers, MWCNTs and EGs were modified through non covalent and covalent attachment of alkyl groups. Ribbons were extruded to form samples in which the nanofillers were aligned, and samples were also fabricated by compression molding in which the nano-fillers were randomly oriented. The thermal properties were evaluated by DSC and TGA, and mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing. The degree of dispersion and alignment of the nanoparticles were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Thermal conductivity measurements were performed using a Nanoflash technique. The thermal conductivity of the samples was measured in both the direction of alignment as well as perpendicular to that direction. The results of this study will be presented.

  18. Ionic conductivity enhancement of polymer electrolytes with ceramic nanowire fillers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Nian; Sun, Jie; Hsu, Po-Chun; Li, Yuzhang; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Cui, Yi

    2015-04-08

    Solid-state electrolytes provide substantial improvements to safety and electrochemical stability in lithium-ion batteries when compared with conventional liquid electrolytes, which makes them a promising alternative technology for next-generation high-energy batteries. Currently, the low mobility of lithium ions in solid electrolytes limits their practical application. The ongoing research over the past few decades on dispersing of ceramic nanoparticles into polymer matrix has been proved effective to enhance ionic conductivity although it is challenging to form the efficiency networks of ionic conduction with nanoparticles. In this work, we first report that ceramic nanowire fillers can facilitate formation of such ionic conduction networks in polymer-based solid electrolyte to enhance its ionic conductivity by three orders of magnitude. Polyacrylonitrile-LiClO4 incorporated with 15 wt % Li0.33La0.557TiO3 nanowire composite electrolyte exhibits an unprecedented ionic conductivity of 2.4 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at room temperature, which is attributed to the fast ion transport on the surfaces of ceramic nanowires acting as conductive network in the polymer matrix. In addition, the ceramic-nanowire filled composite polymer electrolyte shows an enlarged electrochemical stability window in comparison to the one without fillers. The discovery in the present work paves the way for the design of solid ion electrolytes with superior performance.

  19. Facial Rejuvenation with Fillers: The Dual Plane Technique

    PubMed Central

    Salti, Giovanni; Rauso, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial aging is characterized by skin changes, sagging and volume loss. Volume is frequently addressed with reabsorbable fillers like hyaluronic acid gels. Materials and Methods: From an anatomical point of view, the deep and superficial fat compartments evolve differently with aging in a rather predictable manner. Volume can therefore be restored following a technique based on restoring first the deep volumes and there after the superficial volumes. We called this strategy “dual plane”. A series of 147 consecutive patients have been treated with fillers using the dual plane technique in the last five years. Results: An average of 4.25 session per patient has been carried out for a total of 625 treatment sessions. The average total amount of products used has been 12 ml per patient with an average amount per session of 3.75 ml. We had few and limited adverse events with this technique. Conclusion: The dual plane technique is an injection technique based on anatomical logics. Different types of products can be used according to the plane of injection and their rheology in order to obtain a natural result and few side effects. PMID:26644734

  20. Polymethylmethacrylate dermal fillers: evaluation of the systemic toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, C C G; Borghetti, R L; Nicoletti, N; da Silva, V D; Cherubini, K; Salum, F G; de Figueiredo, M A Z

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated local and systemic reactions after an intravascular injection of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) at two concentrations in a murine model. Thirty rats were divided equally into three groups: 2% PMMA, 30% PMMA, and a control group (normal saline only injection). The filler was injected into the ranine vein. The rats were sedated at 7 and 90 days and a clinical evaluation performed. After euthanasia, the right lung, liver, and right kidney were removed, weighed, and microscopically analyzed. The submandibular lymph nodes and tongue were removed and examined microscopically. Serum was subjected to liver and kidney function tests. No groups showed clinical alterations. Microspheres were not observed at any distant organ. Two samples from the 2% PMMA group showed a local inflammatory response at day 7 and another two samples from the 30% PMMA group at day 90. The group injected with 30% PMMA presented higher levels of alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.047) after 90 days when compared with the other groups. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that intravascular injections of PMMA fillers show potential health risks such as chronic inflammation at the implantation site.

  1. Oil removal from runoff with natural sorbing filter fillers.

    PubMed

    Mažeikienė, Aušra; Vaiškūnaitė, Rasa; Vaišis, Vaidotas

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the ability of Lithuanian sheep wool waste and reeds (Phragmites australis) to absorb oil from runoff when it flows through filters filled with these materials. The third material that was analysed, the synthetic sorbent Fibroil, was chosen for comparing the results. The laboratory experiments were performed in several stages, with the following being filtrated: tap water with a diesel admixture, road runoff contaminated with oils, and also suspended solids. The significance of this work is due to the high runoff filtering rate (∼10 m/h) and high oil concentrations in the runoff (50-230 mg/L) used in the experiment. In these cases the use of sorbents is limited. Wool waste and reed (Phragmites australis) fillers are quite efficient (98-99%) in oil removal from runoff at a 10 m/h filtering rate. However, wool fillers clog up quickly. Reeds of the genus Phragmites australis are a natural source for the production of oil sorbents. The results obtained in this experimental work can be used in the design of equipment for the treatment of oil-contaminated runoff from gas stations as well as sullage from roads and tunnels.

  2. Patient factors influencing dermal filler complications: prevention, assessment, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    De Boulle, Koenraad; Heydenrych, Izolda

    2015-01-01

    While rare, complications do occur with the esthetic use of dermal fillers. Careful attention to patient factors and technique can do much to avoid these complications, and a well-informed practitioner can mitigate problems when they do occur. Since cosmetic surgery is usually an elective process, requested by the patient, clinical trials are complex to organize and run. For this reason, an international group of practicing physicians in the field of esthetics came together to share knowledge and to try and produce some informed guidance for their colleagues, considering the literature and also pooling their own extensive clinical experience. This manuscript aims to summarize the crucial aspects of patient selection, including absolute contraindications as well as situations that warrant caution, and also covers important considerations for the pre- and posttreatment periods as well as during the procedure itself. Guidance is given on both immediate and long-term management of adverse reactions. The majority of complications are related to accepting patients inappropriate for treatment or issues of sterility, placement, volume, and injection technique. It is clear that esthetic practitioners need an in-depth knowledge of all aspects of treatment with dermal fillers to achieve optimal outcomes for their patients. PMID:25926750

  3. Spectroscopic analysis, DNA binding and antimicrobial activities of metal complexes with phendione and its derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdus Subhan, Md; Saifur Rahman, Md.; Alam, Khyrul; Mahmud Hasan, Md.

    2014-01-01

    A novel ligand (E)-2-styryl-1H-imidazo [4, 5-f] [1, 10] phenanthroline(L) has been synthesized from 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione. Its transition metal complexes, [FeLCl4][L-H] and [CuL2](NO3)2 have also been synthesized. Besides, three mixed ligand lanthanide metal complexes of Phendione and β-diketones have been synthesized, namely [Eu(TFN)3(Phendione)] (TFN = 4,4,4-trifluoro-1(2-napthyl)-1,3-butanedione), [Eu(HFT)3(Phendione)] (HFT = 4,4,5,5,6,6,6-heptafluoro-1-(2-thienyl)-1,3-hexanedione), [Yb(HFA)3(Phendione)] (hfa = hexafluoroacetylacetonate). The synthesized ligands and metal complexes have been characterized by FTIR, UV-Visible spectroscopy and PL spectra. DNA binding activities of the complexes and the ligands have been studied by DNA gel electrophoresis. DNA binding studies showed that Fe complex of the synthesized ligand is more potent DNA binding and damaging agent compare to others under study. The synthesized compounds were also screened for their antimicrobial activities by disc diffusion method against three microbes, namely Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus penneri. The lanthanide complexes of phendione showed great antibacterial activities.

  4. Evaluation of heavy metals, cytotoxicity, and antioxidant activity of tomatoes grown in toxic muddy soils.

    PubMed

    Tommonaro, Giuseppina; Nicolaus, Barbara; De Prisco, Rocco; Pergamo, Rita; Marra, Nancy; Caporale, Angelamaria; Popolo, Ada; Saturnino, Carmela

    2015-04-01

    This research studies tomatoes grown in polluted soils to ascertain their phytochemical and nutritive features. Pulp and seeds from tomatoes grown in muddy soils were analyzed for their antioxidant power and their toxicity because of the possibility that heavy metals were present in the soils. An antioxidant assay on methanol extracts was made by using DDPH, while an ABTS [2,2'-Azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] assay was used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of lipophilic fractions. Results of the antioxidant assay showed that the tomatoes maintained a high level of antioxidant activity especially in the lipophilic fractions which contain the most representative compounds. Cytotoxic activity was performed on HeLa, PDAC, and A375 cell lines by [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-phenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] (MTT) assay. Results showed that neither the seeds, nor the pulp, of the extracts was cytotoxic. The presence of heavy metals was evaluated by using spectroscopy of atomic absorption with a graphite oven. Test results show the absence of heavy metals and these results have an interesting scientific role because they provide useful information for promoting food safety.

  5. Metal-mediated dihydrogen activation. What determines the transition-state geometry?

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Deepa; Ess, Daniel H

    2012-06-04

    Density functional theory and absolutely localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis calculations were used to calculate and analyze dihydrogen activation transition states and reaction pathways. Analysis of a variety of transition-metal complexes with d(0), d(6), d(8), and d(10) orbital occupation with a diverse range of metal ligands reveals that for transition states, akin to dihydrogen σ complexes, there is a continuum of activated H-H bond lengths that can be classified as "dihydrogen" (0.8-1.0 Å), "stretched or elongated" (1.0-1.2 Å), and "compressed dihydride" (1.2-1.6 Å). These calculations also quantitatively for the first time reveal that the extent to which H(2) is activated in the transition-structure geometry depends on back-bonding orbital interactions and not forward-bonding orbital interactions. This is true regardless of the mechanism or whether the metal ligand complex acts as an electrophile, ambiphile, or nucleophile toward dihydrogen.

  6. Comparative study of antioxidant, metal chelating and antiglycation activities of Momordica charantia flesh and pulp fractions.

    PubMed

    Ghous, Tahseen; Aziz, Nouman; Mehmood, Zahid; Andleeb, Saiqa

    2015-07-01

    Momordica charantia is commonly used as a vegetable and folk medicine in most parts of South Asia. This study aims to determine and compare the antioxidant, metal chelating and antiglycation activities of aqueous extracts of M. charantia fruit flesh (MCF) and fruit pulp (MCP) fractions. Our results show that MCP has pronounced DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging potential compared to MCF. In the antiglycation assay both fractions illustrated considerable inhibitory activities against the formation of AGEs induced by glucose with an efficacy of 75 and 67% with 150 μl of MCP and MCF extracts respectively, almost equal to 0.3mM amino guanidine. Results for metal catalysed protein fragmentation and autoxidative and glycoxidation assays demonstrate that MCF and MCP inhibited metal catalysed protein fragmentation. The percentage of relative standard deviation for three replicate measurements of 150 μl of MCF and MCP was < 3.0% for antiglycation. The antioxidant assays with regression values of MCP (0.981 and 0.991) and MCF (0.967 and 0.999) were also recorded. We conclude that both extracts possess high antioxidant and antiglycation activities and are equally good sources of antioxidant and antiglycating agents.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of transition metal acid MoO(3) prevents microbial growth on material surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zollfrank, Cordt; Gutbrod, Kai; Wechsler, Peter; Guggenbichler, Josef Peter

    2012-01-01

    Serious infectious complications of patients in healthcare settings are often transmitted by materials and devices colonised by microorganisms (nosocomial infections). Current strategies to generate material surfaces with an antimicrobial activity suffer from the consumption of the antimicrobial agent and emerging multidrug-resistant pathogens amongst others. Consequently, materials surfaces exhibiting a permanent antimicrobial activity without the risk of generating resistant microorganisms are desirable. This publication reports on the extraordinary efficient antimicrobial properties of transition metal acids such as molybdic acid (H(2)MoO(4)), which is based on molybdenum trioxide (MoO(3)). The modification of various materials (e.g. polymers, metals) with MoO(3) particles or sol-gel derived coatings showed that the modified materials surfaces were practically free of microorganisms six hours after contamination with infectious agents. The antimicrobial activity is based on the formation of an acidic surface deteriorating cell growth and proliferation. The application of transition metal acids as antimicrobial surface agents is an innovative approach to prevent the dissemination of microorganisms in healthcare units and public environments.

  8. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ``ligands`` with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ``ligands``. These ``complexes`` are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ``ligands`` attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  9. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ligands'' with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ligands''. These complexes'' are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ligands'' attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  10. Origin of photogenerated carrier recombination at the metal-active layer interface in polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Dubey, Ashish; Reza, Khan Mamun; Adhikari, Nirmal; Qiao, Qiquan; Bommisetty, Venkat

    2015-11-07

    The role of the metal-active layer interface in photogenerated recombination has been investigated using nanoscale current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) and intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) in as-deposited, pre-annealed and post-annealed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Aluminum (Al) confined post-annealed BHJ solar cells exhibited a significantly improved device efficiency compared to pre-annealed BHJ solar cells having similar photocarrier harvesting ability in the active layer. The nanoscale topography and CS-AFM results indicate a uniform PCBM rich phase at the metal-active layer interface in the post-annealed cells, but PCBM segregation in the pre-annealed cells. These two different annealing processes showed different carrier dynamics revealed using IMPS under various light intensities. The IMPS results suggest reduced photo generated carrier recombination in uniform PCBM rich post-annealed BHJ solar cells. This study reveals the importance of the metal-bend interface in BHJ solar cells in order to obtain efficient charge carrier extraction for high efficiency.

  11. Non-precious metal electrocatalysts with high activity for hydrogen oxidation reaction in alkaline electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Bivens, AP; Myint, M; Zhuang, ZB; Forest, RV; Fang, QR; Chen, JG; Yan, YS

    2014-05-01

    A ternary metallic CoNiMo catalyst is electrochemically deposited on a polycrystalline gold (Au) disk electrode using pulse voltammetry, and characterized for hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activity by temperature-controlled rotating disk electrode measurements in 0.1 M potassium hydroxide (KOH). The catalyst exhibits the highest HOR activity among all non-precious metal catalysts (e.g., 20 fold higher than Ni). At a sufficient loading, the CoNiMo catalyst is expected to outperform Pt and thus provides a promising low cost pathway for alkaline or alkaline membrane fuel cells. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and parallel H-2-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments on structurally much simpler model alloy systems show a trend that CoNiMo has a hydrogen binding energy (HBE) similar to Pt and much lower than Ni, suggesting that the formation of multi-metallic bonds modifies the HBE of Ni and is likely a significant contributing factor for the enhanced HOR activity.

  12. Logical regulation of the enzyme-like activity of gold nanoparticles by using heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Chia-Wen; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2013-08-01

    In this study we employed self-deposition and competitive or synergistic interactions between metal ions and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) to develop OR, AND, INHIBIT, and XOR logic gates through regulation of the enzyme-like activity of Au NPs. In the presence of various metal ions (Ag+, Bi3+, Pb2+, Pt4+, and Hg2+), we found that Au NPs (13 nm) exhibited peroxidase-, oxidase-, or catalase-like activity. After Ag+, Bi3+, or Pb2+ ions had been deposited on the Au NPs, the particles displayed strong peroxidase-like activity; on the other hand, they exhibited strong oxidase- and catalase-like activities after reactions with Ag+/Hg2+ and Hg2+/Bi3+ ions, respectively. The catalytic activities of these Au NPs arose mainly from the various oxidation states of the surface metal atoms/ions. Taking advantage of this behavior, we constructed multiplex logic operations--OR, AND, INHIBIT, and XOR logic gates--through regulation of the enzyme-like activity after the introduction of metal ions into the Au NP solution. When we deposited Hg2+ and/or Bi3+ ions onto the Au NPs, the catalase-like activities of the Au NPs were strongly enhanced (>100-fold). Therefore, we could construct an OR logic gate by using Hg2+/Bi3+ as inputs and the catalase-like activity of the Au NPs as the output. Likewise, we constructed an AND logic gate by using Pt4+ and Hg2+ as inputs and the oxidase-like activity of the Au NPs as the output; the co-deposition of Pt and Hg atoms/ions on the Au NPs was responsible for this oxidase-like activity. Competition between Pb2+ and Hg2+ ions for the Au NPs allowed us to develop an INHIBIT logic gate--using Pb2+ and Hg2+ as inputs and the peroxidase-like activity of the Au NPs as the output. Finally, regulation of the peroxidase-like activity of the Au NPs through the two inputs Ag+ and Bi3+ enabled us to construct an XOR logic gate.In this study we employed self-deposition and competitive or synergistic interactions between metal ions and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs

  13. Analysis of the activation routes induced by different metal oxide nanoparticles on human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Simón-Vázquez, Rosana; Lozano-Fernández, Tamara; Dávila-Grana, Angela; González-Fernández, África

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles (Nps) can induce toxicity in the lung by accidental or intentional exposure. The main objective of the study reported here was to characterize the effect that four metal oxide Nps (CeO2, TiO2, Al2O3 and ZnO) had at the cellular level on a human lung epithelial cell line. This goal was achieved by studying the capacity of the Nps to activate the main mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the nuclear factor NFκB. Only ZnO Nps were able to activate all of the MAPKs and the release of Zn2+ ions was the main cause of activation. ZnO and Al2O3 Nps activated the NFκB pathway and induced the release of inflammatory cytokines. CeO2 and TiO2 Nps were found to have safer profiles. The graphical abstract was obtained using Servier Medical Art. PMID:28031965

  14. Molecular Level Coating for Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); Saint Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar aprotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper, making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  15. Molecular Level Coating of Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar osmotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing, synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper. making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  16. Influence of Traffic Activity on Heavy Metal Concentrations of Roadside Farmland Soil in Mountainous Areas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Yan, Xuedong; Zeng, Chen; Zhang, Man; Shrestha, Suraj; Devkota, Lochan Prasad; Yao, Tandong

    2012-01-01

    Emission of heavy metals from traffic activities is an important pollution source to roadside farmland ecosystems. However, little previous research has been conducted to investigate heavy metal concentrations of roadside farmland soil in mountainous areas. Owing to more complex roadside environments and more intense driving conditions on mountainous highways, heavy metal accumulation and distribution patterns in farmland soil due to traffic activity could be different from those on plain highways. In this study, design factors including altitude, roadside distance, terrain, and tree protection were considered to analyze their influences on Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations in farmland soils along a mountain highway around Kathmandu, Nepal. On average, the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb at the sampling sites are lower than the tolerable levels. Correspondingly, pollution index analysis does not show serious roadside pollution owing to traffic emissions either. However, some maximum Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations are close to or higher than the tolerable level, indicating that although average accumulations of heavy metals pose no hazard in the region, some spots with peak concentrations may be severely polluted. The correlation analysis indicates that either Cu or Cd content is found to be significantly correlated with Zn and Pb content while there is no significant correlation between Cu and Cd. The pattern can be reasonably explained by the vehicular heavy metal emission mechanisms, which proves the heavy metals’ homology of the traffic pollution source. Furthermore, the independent factors show complex interaction effects on heavy metal concentrations in the mountainous roadside soil, which indicate quite a different distribution pattern from previous studies focusing on urban roadside environments. It is found that the Pb concentration in the downgrade roadside soil is significantly lower than that in the upgrade soil while the Zn concentration in the

  17. Dioxygen activation by non-adiabatic oxidative addition to a single metal center [O2 activation by non-adiabatic oxidative addition to a single metal center

    DOE PAGES

    Akturk, Eser S.; Yap, Glenn P. A.; Theopold, Klaus H.

    2015-10-16

    A chromium(I) dinitrogen complex reacts rapidly with O2 to form the mononuclear dioxo complex [TptBu,MeCrV(O)2] (TptBu,Me=hydrotris(3-tert-butyl-5-methylpyrazolyl)borate), whereas the analogous reaction with sulfur stops at the persulfido complex [TptBu,MeCrIII(S2)]. The transformation of the putative peroxo intermediate [TptBu,MeCrIII(O2)] (S=3/2) into [TptBu,MeCrV(O)2] (S=1/2) is spin-forbidden. The minimum-energy crossing point for the two potential energy surfaces has been identified. Finally, although the dinuclear complex [(TptBu,MeCr)2(μ-O)2] exists, mechanistic experiments suggest that O2 activation occurs on a single metal center, by an oxidative addition on the quartet surface followed by crossover to the doublet surface.

  18. Study of the Photo-oxidation and Photolysis of Unsaturated and Cross-linked Polyesters (UP) in the Presence of Photoactive or not Inorganic Fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Zahi; Koubaissy, Bachar; Akil, Mariam

    Disturbances of the photochemical evolution involved in the photolysis and in the photo-oxidation at long wavelengths (ë?300 nm) of poly(propylene glycol-maleatophtalate cross-linked by the styrene (UP),caused by the addition of photo-active pigment such as zinc sulphide or black iron oxides,and no photoactive inorganic fillers such as calcium carbonate have been analysed by means of FTIR and U.V. spectrophotometry. The photo-oxidation observed by FTIR of the polymer UP in the presence of inorganic fillers leads to the same photoproducts such as ones of the photo-oxidation of the virgin polymer, but the oxidation rate is greatly affected by the nature and the percentage of the inorganic filler. Zinc sulfide and black iron are incorporated in the film of polymers, the absorption spectra of ZnS reveals that this pigment is not as absorbent as titanium oxide in a more limited field. On the other hand, with a very low inner filter effect, black iron oxides promote the formation of absorbing photoproducts. The addition of Calcium carbonate non- absorbing filler to the UP, causes a slight decrease in the evolution of the I.R

  19. Accumulation of fossil fuels and metallic minerals in active and ancient rift lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, E.I.

    1983-01-01

    A study of active and ancient rift systems around the world suggests that accumulations of fossil fuels and metallic minerals are related to the interactions of processes that form rift valleys with those that take place in and around rift lakes. The deposition of the precursors of petroleum, gas, oil shale, coal, phosphate, barite, Cu-Pb-Zn sulfides, and uranium begins with erosion of uplifted areas, and the consequent input of abundant nutrients and solute loads into swamps and tectonic lakes. Hot springs and volcanism add other nutrients and solutes. The resulting high biological productivity creates oxidized/reduced interfaces, and anoxic and H2S-rich bottom waters which preserves metal-bearing organic tissues and horizons. In the depositional phases, the fine-grained lake deposits are in contact with coarse-grained beach, delta, river, talus, and alluvial fan deposits. Earthquake-induced turbidites also are common coarse-grained deposits of rift lakes. Postdepositional processes in rifts include high heat flow and a resulting concentration of the organic and metallic components that were dispersed throughout the lakebeds. Postdepositional faulting brings organic- and metal-rich sourcebeds in contact with coarse-grained host and reservoir rocks. A suite of potentially economic deposits is therefore a characteristic of rift valleys. ?? 1983.

  20. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING

    SciTech Connect

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-03-26

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems.