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Sample records for active fluid venting

  1. Aqueous Volatiles in Hydrothermal fluids from the Main Endeavour Vent Field: Temporal Variability Following Earthquake Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seewald, J. S.; Cruse, A. M.; Saccocia, P. J.

    2001-12-01

    Volatile species play a critical role in a broad spectrum of physical, chemical, and biological processes associated with hydrothermal circulation at oceanic spreading centers. Earthquake activity at the Main Endeavour vent field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge in June 1999 [1] provided and opportunity to assess factors that regulate the flux of volatile species from the oceanic crust to the water column following a rapid change in subsurface reaction zone conditions. High temperature vent fluids were collected in gas-tight samplers at the Main Endeavour field in September 1999, approximately four months after the earthquakes, and again in July 2000, and were analyzed for the abundance of aqueous volatile and non-volatile species. Measured concentrations of aqueous H2, H2S, and CO2 increased substantially in September 1999 relative to pre-earthquake values [2,3], and subsequently decreased in July 2000, while aqueous Cl concentrations initially decreased in 1999 and subsequently increased in 2000. Concentrations of Cl in all fluids were depleted relative to seawater values. Aqueous CH4 and NH3 concentrations decreased in both the 1999 and 2000 samples relative to pre- earthquake values. Variations in Cl concentration of Endeavour fluids reflect varying degrees of phase separation under near critical temperature and pressure conditions. Because volatile species efficiently partition into the vapor phase, variations in their abundance as a function of Cl concentration can be used to constrain conditions of phase separation and fluid-rock interaction. For example, concentrations of volatile species that are not readily incorporated into minerals (CH4 and NH3) correlated weakly with Cl suggesting phase separation was occurring under supercritical conditions after the earthquake activity. In contrast, compositional data for fluids prior to the earthquakes indicate a strong negative correlation between these species and Cl suggesting phase separation under subcritical

  2. First hydroacoustic evidence of marine, active fluid vents in the Naples Bay continental shelf (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Salvatore; Genovese, Simona; Sacchi, Marco; Barra, Marco; Rumolo, Paola; Tamburrino, Stella; Mazzola, Salvatore; Basilone, Gualtiero; Placenti, Francesco; Aronica, Salvatore; Bonanno, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of a multidisciplinary research aimed at the detection and mapping of Active Fluid Vents (AFVs) at the seafloor of the Naples Bay, Italy. This segment of the Campania continental margin is characterised by severe Quaternary extension and intense volcanism at Ischia and Procida islands, the Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complexes. High resolution hydroacoustic profilers were used to identify and localize fluid emission from the seafloor. ROV direct observation showed that each emission centre is generally composed by the coalescence of several emitting points. CTD probes showed that there are no significant gradients in temperature profiles. The results of this study include the detection and mapping of 54 fluid emission points all located in the - 71/- 158 m depth range, and spatially distributed into four main clusters. Three of the described clusters are located along the margin of a complex, toe-shaped seafloor morphology southwest of the Somma-Vesuvius, representing the shallow expression of partly buried, coalesced depositional features (namely, two flank collapses and one pyroclastic flow) associated with the Late Pleistocene activity of the volcano. The fourth AFV cluster was detected at the morphological - high, located about 8 km south of Naples (Banco della Montagna), represented by a field of volcaniclastic diapirs composed of massive pumiceous deposits originated from the Campi Flegrei intruding rising through the latest Quaternary-Holocene marine deposits. Our study suggests that the occurrence of AFV in this area could be genetically linked to the interaction between volcanic related seafloor morphologies and the main, NE striking faults present in the area, i.e. the Magnaghi-Sebeto line and the Vesuvian fault.

  3. Linking geology, fluid chemistry, and microbial activity of basalt- and ultramafic-hosted deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

    PubMed

    Perner, M; Hansen, M; Seifert, R; Strauss, H; Koschinsky, A; Petersen, S

    2013-07-01

    Hydrothermal fluids passing through basaltic rocks along mid-ocean ridges are known to be enriched in sulfide, while those circulating through ultramafic mantle rocks are typically elevated in hydrogen. Therefore, it has been estimated that the maximum energy in basalt-hosted systems is available through sulfide oxidation and in ultramafic-hosted systems through hydrogen oxidation. Furthermore, thermodynamic models suggest that the greatest biomass potential arises from sulfide oxidation in basalt-hosted and from hydrogen oxidation in ultramafic-hosted systems. We tested these predictions by measuring biological sulfide and hydrogen removal and subsequent autotrophic CO2 fixation in chemically distinct hydrothermal fluids from basalt-hosted and ultramafic-hosted vents. We found a large potential of microbial hydrogen oxidation in naturally hydrogen-rich (ultramafic-hosted) but also in naturally hydrogen-poor (basalt-hosted) hydrothermal fluids. Moreover, hydrogen oxidation-based primary production proved to be highly attractive under our incubation conditions regardless whether hydrothermal fluids from ultramafic-hosted or basalt-hosted sites were used. Site-specific hydrogen and sulfide availability alone did not appear to determine whether hydrogen or sulfide oxidation provides the energy for primary production by the free-living microbes in the tested hydrothermal fluids. This suggests that more complex features (e.g., a combination of oxygen, temperature, biological interactions) may play a role for determining which energy source is preferably used in chemically distinct hydrothermal vent biotopes.

  4. Geochemical constraints on the diversity and activity of H2 -oxidizing microorganisms in diffuse hydrothermal fluids from a basalt- and an ultramafic-hosted vent.

    PubMed

    Perner, Mirjam; Petersen, Jillian M; Zielinski, Frank; Gennerich, Hans-Hermann; Seifert, Richard

    2010-10-01

    Mixing processes of reduced hydrothermal fluids with oxygenated seawater and fluid-rock reactions contribute to the chemical signatures of diffuse venting and likely determine the geochemical constraints on microbial life. We examined the influence of fluid chemistry on microbial diversity and activity by sampling diffuse fluids emanating through mussel beds at two contrasting hydrothermal vents. The H(2) concentration was very low at the basalt-hosted Clueless site, and mixing models suggest O(2) availability throughout much of the habitat. In contrast, effluents from the ultramafic-hosted Quest site were considerably enriched in H(2) , while O(2) is likely limited to the mussel layer. Only two different hydrogenase genes were identified in clone libraries from the H(2) -poor Clueless fluids, but these fluids exhibited the highest H(2) uptake rates in H(2) -spiked incubations (oxic conditions, at 18 °C). In contrast, a phylogenetically diverse H(2) -oxidizing potential was associated with distinct thermal conditions in the H(2) -rich Quest fluids, but under oxic conditions, H(2) uptake rates were extremely low. Significant stimulation of CO(2) fixation rates by H(2) addition was solely illustrated in Quest incubations (P-value <0.02), but only in conjunction with anoxic conditions (at 18 °C). We conclude that the factors contributing toward differences in the diversity and activity of H(2) oxidizers at these sites include H(2) and O(2) availability.

  5. The geochemical controls on vent fluids from the Lucky Strike vent field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Damm, K. L.; Bray, A. M.; Buttermore, L. G.; Oosting, S. E.

    1998-08-01

    Hydrothermal vent fluids were collected from the Lucky Strike site at 37°17'N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in both 1993 and 1996. Seven vents were sampled with the DSV Alvin in 1993 and six vents were sampled in 1996 using the ROV Jason during the LUSTRE '96 Cruise. As three of the vents were sampled in both 1993 and in 1996, a time series of vent fluid chemistry is also reported. Measured temperatures ranged from 202 to 333°C at the 1618-1726 m depth of the vent field, which is located on Lucky Strike Seamount. These fluids are either equal to or less than the local bottom seawater in chlorinity. While the range in fluid compositions at Lucky Strike is generally within that observed elsewhere, the unusual aspects of the fluid chemistries are the relatively high pH and low Fe, Mn, Li and Zn. We attribute this, as well as an usually low Sr/Ca ratio, to reaction with a highly altered substrate. The high Si and Cu contents suggest a deep, as well as hot, source for these fluids. The fluid compositions therefore suggest formation by super-critical phase separation at a depth not less than 1300 m below the seafloor, and reaction with a relatively oxic, and previously altered, substrate. There is temporal variability in some of the vent fluid compositions as Li, K, Ca and Fe concentrations have increased in some of the vents, as has the Fe/Mn (molar) ratio, although the chlorinities have remained essentially constant from 1993 to 1996. While there is not a simple relationship between vent fluid compositions (or temperatures) and distance from the lava lake at the summit of the seamount, the vent fluids from many of the vents can be shown to be related to others, often at distances >200 m. The most southeasterly vents (Eiffel Tower and the Marker/Mounds vents) are distinct in chlorinity and other chemical parameters from the rest of the vents, although closely related to each other within the southeastern area. Similarly all of the vents not in this one area, appear

  6. Fluid dynamics in explosive volcanic vents and craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Darcy

    2011-12-01

    Explosive volcanic jets can transition to buoyant plumes or collapse to form pyroclastic density currents depending on their ability to entrain and heat the ambient air. Recent one-dimensional (1D) analysis shows that fluid acceleration through volcanic vents and craters changes the velocity and pressures within these jets sufficiently enough to be a first order control on plume dimensions and therefore air entrainment and column stability (Koyaguchi et al., 2010). These 1D studies are only applicable to craters and vents with angles of less than about 30° to vertical. Using analytical formulations and numerical simulations, this study describes 2D effects of shallowly dipping vents and craters on volcanic eruptions. The effect of vents on acceleration and expansion of eruptive mixtures of ash and gas is described as a force imparted on the fluid by the vent wall, the wall force ( Fw). This force is a measure of the momentum coupling between an eruption and the solid earth that takes place in the vent. Rapid divergence of supersonic eruptive fluid within shallowly dipping vents occurs via Prandtl-Meyer expansion, which results in different pressure and velocity fields than those predicted by 1D analysis. This expansion decreases Fw and the vertical acceleration experienced by the eruptive fluid in the vent. For jets predicted by 1D analysis to exit the vent at supersonic velocities and at atmospheric pressure, this decrease in Fw will cause an increase in the predicted plume area, decreasing column stability. The complex 2D shape of volcanic vents can change jet structure (presence and location of shock waves) and preclude the development of jets that exit the vent supersonically with no internal standing shock waves (i.e., perfectly expanded or pressure balanced jets). These significant complications in jet structure and increase in plume radius may result in changes to air entrainment, plume stability, and tephra distribution.

  7. Isolated communities of Epsilonproteobacteria in hydrothermal vent fluids of the Mariana Arc seamounts.

    PubMed

    Huber, Julie A; Cantin, Holly V; Huse, Susan M; Welch, David B Mark; Sogin, Mitchell L; Butterfield, David A

    2010-09-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal vent fluids represent access points to diverse microbial communities living in oceanic crust. This study examined the distribution, relative abundance, and diversity of Epsilonproteobacteria in 14 low-temperature vent fluids from five volcanically active seamounts of the Mariana Arc using a 454 tag sequencing approach. Most vent fluids were enriched in cell concentrations compared with background seawater, and quantitative PCR results indicated that all fluids were dominated by bacteria. Operational taxonomic unit-based statistical tools applied to 454 data show that all vents from the northern end of the Mariana Arc grouped together, to the exclusion of southern arc seamounts, which were as distinct from one another as they were from northern seamounts. Statistical analysis also showed a significant relationship between seamount and individual vent groupings, suggesting that community membership may be linked to geographical isolation and not geochemical parameters. However, while there may be large-scale geographic differences, distance is not the distinguishing factor in the microbial community composition. At the local scale, most vents host a distinct population of Epsilonproteobacteria, regardless of seamount location. This suggests that there may be barriers to exchange and dispersal for these vent endemic microorganisms at hydrothermal seamounts of the Mariana Arc.

  8. The influence of vent fluid chemistry on trophic structure at two deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields on the Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Sarah; Van Dover, Cindy; Coleman, Max

    2014-05-01

    The two known deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields along the Mid-Cayman Rise are separated by a distance of only 21 km, yet their chemistry and faunal diversity are distinct. The deeper of the two vent fields, Piccard (with active venting from Beebe Vents, Beebe Woods and Beebe Sea), at 4980 m is basalt hosted. The shallower vent field, Von Damm, at 2300 m appears to have an ultramafic influence. The Von Damm vent field can be separated into two sites: The Spire and The Tubeworm Field. The dominant vent fluids at the Tubeworm Field are distinct from those at the Spire, as a result of fluid modification in the sub-surface. Von Damm and Piccard vent fields support abundant invertebrates, sharing the same biomass-dominant shrimp species, Rimicaris hybisae. Although there are some other shared species (squat lobsters (Munidopsis sp.) and gastropods (Provanna sp. and Iheyaspira sp.)) between the vent fields, they are much more abundant at one site than the other. In this study we have examined the bulk carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope composition of microbes and fauna at each vent field. With these data we have deduced the trophic structure of the communities and the influence of vent fluid chemistry. From stable isotope data and end-member vent fluid chemistry, we infer that the basis of the trophic structure at Piccard is dominated by sulfur, iron, and hydrogen-oxidizing microbial communities. In comparison, the basis of the Von Damm trophic structure is dominated by microbial communities of sulfur and hydrogen oxidizers, sulfate reducers and methanotrophs. This microbial diversity at the base of the trophic structure is a result of chemical variations in vent fluids and processes in the sub-surface that alter the vent fluid chemistry. These differences influence higher trophic levels and can be used to explain some of the variability as well as similarity in fauna at the vent sites. Part of this work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California

  9. Post-drilling hydrothermal vent and associated biological activities seen through artificial hydrothermal vents in the Iheya North field, Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, K.; Kawagucci, S.; Miyazaki, J.; Watsuji, T.; Ishibashi, J.; Yamamoto, H.; Nozaki, T.; Kashiwabara, T.; Shibuya, T.

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, IODP Expedition 331 was conducted in the Iheya North Field, the Okinawa Trough and drilled several sites in hydrothermally active subseafloor. In addition, during the IODP Expedition 331, four new hydrothermal vents were created. These post-drilling artificial hydrothermal vents provide excellent opportunities to investigate the physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of the previously unexplored subseafloor hydrothermal fluid reservoirs, and to monitor and estimate how the anthropogenic drilling behaviors affect the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem. We were very much interested in the difference of hydrothermal fluid chemistry between the natural hydrothermal vents and the artificial hydrothermal vents. The IODP porewater chemistry of the cores pointed to the density-driven stratification of the phase-separated hydrothermal fluids and the natural vent fluids were likely derived only from the shallower vapor-enriched phases. However, the artificial hydrothermal vents had deeper fluid sources in the subseafloor hydrothermal fluid reservoirs composed of vapor-lost (Cl-enriched) phases. The fluids from the artificial hydrothermal vents were sampled by ROV at 5, 12 and 18 months after the IODP expedition. The artificial hydrothermal vent fluids were slightly enriched with Cl as compared to the natural hydrothermal vent fluids. Thus, the artificial hydrothermal vents successfully entrained the previously unexplored subseafloor hydrothermal fluids. The newly created hydrothermal vents also hosted the very quickly grown, enormous chimney structures, of which mineral compositions were highly variable among the vents. However, the quickly grown C0016B and C0016D vent chimneys were found to be typical Kuroko ore even though the chimney growth rates in the artificial vents were extremely faster than those in the natural vents. In addition, the IODP drilling operation not only created new hydrothermal vents by deep drilling but also induced the

  10. Fluid and gas fluxes from the Logatchev hydrothermal vent area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmale, Oliver; Walter, Maren; Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Sültenfuß, Jürgen; Walker, Sharon; Rehder, Gregor; Keir, Robin

    2012-07-01

    The Logatchev hydrothermal field at 14°45'N on the MAR is characterized by gas plumes that are enriched in methane and helium compared to the oceanic background. We investigated CH4 concentration and δ13C together with δ3He in the water column of that region. These data and turbidity measurements indicate that apart from the known vent fields, another vent site exists northeast of the vent field Logatchev 1. The distribution of methane and 3He concentrations along two sections were used in combination with current measurements from lowered acoustic Doppler current profilers (LADCP) to calculate the horizontal plume fluxes of these gases. According to these examinations 0.02 μmol s-1 of 3He and 0.21 mol s-1 of methane are transported in a plume that flows into a southward direction in the central part of the valley. Based on 3He measurements of vent fluid (22 ± 6 pM), we estimate a total vent flux in this region of about 900 L s-1 and a total flux of CH4 of 3.2 mol s-1.

  11. Phylogenetic diversity and functional gene patterns of sulfur-oxidizing subseafloor Epsilonproteobacteria in diffuse hydrothermal vent fluids

    PubMed Central

    Akerman, Nancy H.; Butterfield, David A.; Huber, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms throughout the dark ocean use reduced sulfur compounds for chemolithoautotrophy. In many deep-sea hydrothermal vents, sulfide oxidation is quantitatively the most important chemical energy source for microbial metabolism both at and beneath the seafloor. In this study, the presence and activity of vent endemic Epsilonproteobacteria was examined in six low-temperature diffuse vents over a range of geochemical gradients from Axial Seamount, a deep-sea volcano in the Northeast Pacific. PCR primers were developed and applied to target the sulfur oxidation soxB gene of Epsilonproteobacteria. soxB genes belonging to the genera Sulfurimonas and Sulfurovum are both present and expressed at most diffuse vent sites, but not in background seawater. Although Sulfurovum-like soxB genes were detected in all fluid samples, the RNA profiles were nearly identical among the vents and suggest that Sulfurimonas-like species are the primary Epsilonproteobacteria responsible for actively oxidizing sulfur via the Sox pathway at each vent. Community patterns of subseafloor Epsilonproteobacteria 16S rRNA genes were best matched to methane concentrations in vent fluids, as well as individual vent locations, indicating that both geochemistry and geographical isolation play a role in structuring subseafloor microbial populations. The data show that in the subseafloor at Axial Seamount, Epsilonproteobacteria are expressing the soxB gene and that microbial patterns in community distribution are linked to both vent location and chemistry. PMID:23847608

  12. Interrelationship of fluid venting and structural evolution: Alvin observations from the frontal accretionary prism, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.C.; Orange, D. ); Kulm, L.D. )

    1990-06-10

    Seismic reflection and Sea Beam bathymetric data plus submarine geological measurements define a ramp anticline at the deformatoin front of the central Oregon subduction zone. At its northern termination the ramp anticline is deeply incised by a large 500-m-deep submarine canyon and cut by a probable backthrust. To the south along the strike of the fold, a smaller submarine canyon shallowly erodes the anticline, and backthrusting is not apparent in the submersible observations. Two Alvin dives along a transect through the southern canyon show active fluid vents demarked by biological communities at the frontal thrust and at the breached crest of the anticline. Along a northern transect, encompassing the large submarine canyon, 10 Alvin dives indicated no venting on the formal thrust, limited venting in the canyon, but numerous biological communities along a scarp interpreted as the surface trace of the backthrust. These observations suggest a scenario of vent and structural-geomorphic development consisting of (1) frontal thrust faulting and associated venting, facilitated by high fluid pressure; (2) erosion of the oversteepened seaward flank of the ramp anticline assisted by seepage forces and leading to fluid flow out of stratigraphically controlled conduits in the limbs of the overthrust deposits; (3) locking of the frontal thrust due to dewatering or a local decrease in wedge taper associated with development of the large canyon, leading to failure along the backthrust; and (4) redirection of fluid flow by the backthrust. Thus, within {le}0.3 m.y., deformation of the relatively permeable sediments of the Oregon margin results in stratigraphically controlled flow being partially captured by faults.

  13. Cryogenic fluid management technologies for space transportation. Zero G thermodynamic vent system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Long term storage of subcritical cryogens in space must address the problem of thermal stratification in the storage tanks, liquid acquisition devices, and associated feed systems. Due to the absence of gravity induced body forces, thermal stratification in zero-g is more severe than commonly experienced in a one-g environment. If left uncontrolled, the thermal gradients result in excessive tank pressure rise and the formation of undesirable liquid/vapor mixtures within the liquid bulk, liquid acquisition system, and propellant transfer lines. Since external heat leakage cannot be eliminated, a means of minimizing the thermal stratification in the ullage gas, liquid, and feed system is required. A subsystem which minimizes the thermal stratification and rejects the environmental heat leakage in an efficient manner is therefore needed for zero-g subcritical cryogenic systems. In ground based storage systems the ullage gas location is always known (top of the tank) and therefore direct venting of gases as a means of heat rejection is easily accomplished. In contrast, because the ullage location in a zero-g environment is not easily predictable, heat rejection through direct gaseous venting is difficult in space (requires liquid settling, or surface tension devices). A means of indirect venting through the use of a thermodynamic vent system (TVS) is therefore required. A thermodynamic vent system allows indirect venting of vapor through heat exchange between the vented fluid and the stored fluid. The objective is to ensure that only gas and not liquid is vented, in order to minimize the propellant losses. Consequently, the design of a TVS is a critical enabling technology for future applications such as solar thermal and electric propulsion, single-stage-to-orbit vertical landers and upper stages, and any space based operations involving subcritical cryogenics. To bridge this technology gap NASA MSFC initiated an effort to build and verify through ground tests a zero

  14. Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at Hydrothermal Vents Using Osmotically Driven Continuous Fluid Samplers

    SciTech Connect

    Robidart, Julie C.; Callister, Stephen J.; Song, Peng F.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wheat, Charles G.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-05-07

    Microbes play a key role in mediating all aquatic biogeochemical cycles, and ongoing efforts are aimed at better understanding the relationships between microbial phylogenetic and physiological diversity, and habitat physical and chemical characteristics. Establishing such relationships is facilitated by sampling and studying microbiology and geochemistry at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales, to access information on the past and current environmental state that contributes to observed microbial abundances and activities. A modest number of sampling systems exist to date, few of which can be used in remote, harsh environments such as hydrothermal vents, where the ephemeral nature of venting underscores the necessity for higher resolution sampling. We have developed a robust, continuous fluid sampling system for co-registered microbial and biogeochemical analyses. The osmosis-powered bio-osmosampling system (BOSS) use no electricity, collects fluids with daily resolution or better, can be deployed in harsh, inaccessible environments and can sample fluids continuously for up to five years. Here we present a series of tests to examine DNA, RNA and protein stability over time, as well as material compatability, via lab experiments. We also conducted two field deployments at deep-sea hydrothermal vents to assess changes in microbial diversity and protein expression as a function of the physico-chemical environment. Our data reveal significant changes in microbial community composition co-occurring with relatively modest changes in the geochemistry. These data additionally provide new insights into the distribution of an enigmatic sulfur oxidizing symbiont in its free-living state. Data from the second deployment reveal differences in the representation of peptides over time, underscoring the utility of the BOSS in meta-proteomic studies. In concert, these data demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, and illustrate the value of using this method to study

  15. 210Po and 210Pb disequilibrium in the hydrothermal vent fluids and chimney deposits from Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, N.; Church, T. M.; Luther, G. W., III; Moore, W. S.

    Significantly deficient 210Po/210Pb activity ratios (0.14±0.14) are measured in the hydrothermal vent fluids collected from Juan de Fuca Ridge. Chimney deposits generally showed <5 dpm of excess 210Po. However, one sample from the outermost layer of a sealed spire yielded >1200 dpm g-1 of excess 210Po.If the observed 210Po-210Pb disequilibrium in vent fluids is a result of 210Po removal by the precipitates, residence time of polonium with respect to its irreversible removal from hot fluids is estimated to be of the order of a few minutes. Alternatively, if the disequilibrium is a result of an insufficient growth of 210Po from in-situ 210Pb following heating, the residence time of hot fluids within the hydrothermal system can be shown to be less than 30 days, which is considerably lower than previously reported values.

  16. An authoritative global database for active submarine hydrothermal vent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.; Maffei, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    The InterRidge Vents Database is available online as the authoritative reference for locations of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields. Here we describe the revision of the database to an open source content management system and conduct a meta-analysis of the global distribution of known active vent fields. The number of known active vent fields has almost doubled in the past decade (521 as of year 2009), with about half visually confirmed and others inferred active from physical and chemical clues. Although previously known mainly from mid-ocean ridges (MORs), active vent fields at MORs now comprise only half of the total known, with about a quarter each now known at volcanic arcs and back-arc spreading centers. Discoveries in arc and back-arc settings resulted in an increase in known vent fields within exclusive economic zones, consequently reducing the proportion known in high seas to one third. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. The purpose of the database now extends beyond academic research and education and into marine policy and management, with at least 18% of known vent fields in areas granted or pending applications for mineral prospecting and 8% in marine protected areas.

  17. Deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals seek cool fluids in a highly variable thermal environment.

    PubMed

    Bates, Amanda E; Lee, Raymond W; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Lamare, Miles D

    2010-05-04

    The thermal characteristics of an organism's environment affect a multitude of parameters, from biochemical to evolutionary processes. Hydrothermal vents on mid-ocean ridges are created when warm hydrothermal fluids are ejected from the seafloor and mixed with cold bottom seawater; many animals thrive along these steep temperature and chemical gradients. Two-dimensional temperature maps at vent sites have demonstrated order of magnitude thermal changes over centimetre distances and at time intervals from minutes to hours. To investigate whether animals adapt to this extreme level of environmental variability, we examined differences in the thermal behaviour of mobile invertebrates from aquatic habitats that vary in thermal regime. Vent animals were highly responsive to heat and preferred much cooler fluids than their upper thermal limits, whereas invertebrates from other aquatic environments risked exposure to warmer temperatures. Avoidance of temperatures well within their tolerated range may allow vent animals to maintain a safety margin against rapid temperature fluctuations and concomitant toxicity of hydrothermal fluids.

  18. Extraordinary phase separation and segregation in vent fluids from the southern East Pacific Rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Damm, Karen L.; Lilley, M.D.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Brockington, M.; Bray, A.M.; O'Grady, K. M.; Olson, E.; Graham, A.; Proskurowski, G.

    2003-01-01

    The discovery of Brandon vent on the southern East Pacific Rise is providing new insights into the controls on midocean ridge hydrothermal vent fluid chemistry. The physical conditions at the time ofsampling (287 bar and 405??C) place the Brandon fluids very close to the critical point of seawater (298 bar and 407??C). This permits in situ study of the effects of near criticalphenomena, which are interpreted to be the primary cause of enhanced transition metal transport in these fluids. Of the five orifices on Brandon sampled, three were venting fluids with less than seawater chlorinity, and two were venting fluids with greater than seawater chlorinity. The liquid phase orifices contain 1.6-1.9 times the chloride content of the vapors. Most other elements, excluding the gases, have this same ratio demonstrating the conservative nature of phase separation and the lack of subsequent water-rock interaction. The vapor and liquid phases vent at the same time from orifices within meters of each other on the Brandon structure. Variations in fluid compositions occur on a time scale of minutes. Our interpretation is that phase separation and segregation must be occurring 'real time' within the sulfide structure itself. Fluids from Brandon therefore provide an unique opportunity to understand in situ phase separation without the overprinting of continued water-rock interaction with the oceanic crust, as well as critical phenomena. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mineralogical and Fluid Inclusion Studies on Seafloor Hydrothermal Vents at TA25 Caldera, Tonga Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. K.; Pak, S. J.; Choi, S. H.; Lee, K. Y.; Kim, H. S.; Lee, I. K.

    2015-12-01

    The extensive hydrothermal vent field was discovered at TA25("V18s-HR" in the SO-167 cruise) caldera in the Tonga arc, southwest Pacific. The TA25 caldera is a submarine volcano of dacitic composition and hosts the NE- and NW-trending hydrothermal vent on the western caldera wall. These active hydrothermal crusters are mostly small (chimney: <0.5m in tall; sulfide mound: <3m in diameter) and immature, and emit the transparent fluids of which temperature range from 150℃ to 242℃ (average = 203℃). The hydrothermal sulfide ores, recovered by ROV and/or TV-grab, are mainly composed of sphalerite, pyrite, marcasite, galena, chalcopyrite, covellite, tennantite, enargite and sulfates such as barite, gypsum/anhydrite. It is observed that three distinct mineralogical zonation from exterior to interior of the chimneys: (1) barite-gypsum/anhydrite-pyrite-sphalerite; (2) sphalerite-pyrite-galena±chalcopyrite; (3) sphaleirte-pyrite-chalcopyrite-enargite-tennantite±galena±covellite. FeS content in sphalerite increases from chimney exterior to interior. Chalcopyrite is more abundant in the mound than in the chimney, implying fluid temperatures in mound are greater than in the chimney. The enargite assemblage (pyrite-chalcopyrite-enargite-tennantite) is indicative of high-sulfidation epithermal deposits. Fluid inclusions on barite crystals from mound samples show mono-type inclusion (two-phase liquid-rich inclusions) which is less than 20㎛ in diameter. Homogenization temperatures and salinities from fluid inclusion study range from 148℃ to 341℃ (average = 213℃) and 0.4 to 3.6 equiv. wt.% NaCl, respectively. The main mineralization temperature in mound might be greater than 200℃ since barite on fluid inclusion is early stage mineral.

  20. Metal Transport in Hydrothermal Vent Fluids Across an Eruption: 9°46'-9°52'N East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meana Prado, M. F.; Bryce, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Elements carried in hydrothermal fluids circulating within the oceanic crust constitute an important component of marine geochemical budgets and a significant mechanism for supporting unique chemosynthetic ecosystems along ridge axes. Temporal variabilities in hydrothermal fluid compositions are well documented and linked with proximity to magmatic activity [1]. In fast spreading ridges, such as the East Pacific Rise, eruptions can change hydrothermal fluid pathways, significantly and temporarily influencing metal transport if phase separation increases. Metal transport in fluids may be enhanced as well if hydrothermal fluid circulation occurs through freshly emplaced basalt. A well documented magmatic eruption in late 2005/early 2006 disrupted the hydrothermal system and offered the ideal opportunity to study how metal transport would be impacted and how long it would take for the hydrothermal metal transport to return to pre-eruptive rates. Accordingly, we have carried out analyses of transition metals across the eruptive cycle on a time series of fluids collected from 10 hydrothermal vent sites spanning ~8 km of ridge segment trending north-south along the axial summit trough. Hydrothermal fluids were sampled from the same vents in November 2004 (pre-eruptive) and then (post-eruptive) June 2006, November 2006, and December 2007. Analyses of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn were carried out for all three hydrothermal fluid fractions: dissolved via flame atomic adsorption, filtered particulates and 'dregs' via HR-ICP-MS. Resulting data, coupled with existing data (exit temperature, major elemental, and modeled peak pressure and temperature), allow for the identification of the key factors influencing metal abundance in high temperature fluids. Briefly, phase separation was the most significant process influencing metal abundance in dissolved fluids. Exceptions to this generalization were for the immediate post-eruptive fluids issued from BioVent, the northernmost of the studied

  1. Fluid Flow and Sound Generation at Hydrothermal Vent Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    weeks or, the Ellen B. Scripps, to rendezvous with the Glomar Challenger and conduct the borehole seismic experiment south of the Costa Rica Rift in...H.P. Johnson, S.K. Juniper, J.L. Karsten, J.E. Lupton , S.D. Scott and V. Tunnicliffe. North caldera hydrothermal vent field, Axial Seamount, Juan de...Aikman, R. Embley, S. Hammond, A. Malahoff, and J. Lupton , The distribution of geothermal fields on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. J. Geophys, Res., 90, 727

  2. Fluid Geochemistry of the Capelinhos Vent Site. A Key to Understand the Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Vent Field (37°N, MAR).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leleu, T.; Chavagnac, V.; Cannat, M.; Ceuleneer, G.; Castillo, A.; Menjot, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Lucky Strike hydrothermal field is situated at the mid-Atlantic ridge, south of the Azores, on top of a central volcano within the axial valley. The volcano is composed of a fossil lava lake surrounded by three volcanic cones. An Axial Magma Chamber (AMC) is reported 3.4km below the seafloor. The active venting sites are situated around the fossil lava lake and are directly linked to the heat supplied by the AMC. High temperature fluids from the Lucky Strike field were sampled in 2013, 2014 and 2015 in order to document the depth of the reaction zone, subsurface mixing, geographical control and magmatic degassing. A new active site named Capelinhos was discovered approximately 1.5km eastward from the lava lake, during exploration by ROV Victor6000 - MoMARsat cruise, 2013. It is composed of 10m-high chimneys discharging black smoker-type fluid. Fluid temperatures were 328°C in 2013 and decreased to 318°C in 2014 and 2015. Capelinhos fluids are Cl-depleted by 55% compared to seawater indicating phase separation at depth. In comparison, the other sites range from 6% enrichment (2608/Y3 site) to 22% depletion (Eiffel tower site). Si geothermobarometry of Y3 site estimates quartz equilibration at P=300 bars and T=360-380°C, coherent with Fe/Mn geothermometer (T=370±10°C). For Capelinhos, Fe/Mn suggests 398°C (±10°C) which is close to the critical point of seawater (P=300 bars and T=407°C). Other geothermobarometer uses Si/Cl vapor-like fluid to constrain depth of the top of reaction zone and predicts significant bias due to mixing along the up-flow zone. Application gives P=~370 bars, T=~435°C at Capelinhos and P=~390 bars, T=~440°C at Eiffel tower. This is further sustained by end-member 87Sr/86Sr=0.7038, which indicates little interaction of Capelinhos vent fluids with seawater-derived fluid, compared to other vapor-like sites with 87Sr/86Sr=0.7043. Because of its external location, Capelinhos site isn't influenced by the complex tectonic context of the

  3. Controls of surface topography on submarine and subaerial hydrothermal fluid flow and vent-site location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani Hassan, N.; Rupke, L.; Iyer, K. H.; Borgia, A.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrothermal convection is an important process that occurs in the oceanic lithosphere as well as within continents where the geothermal gradient is high enough to drive fluid flow. This process efficiently mines heat from the lithosphere, sustains life in the otherwise bleak settings at oceanic depths and is associated with mineral deposits. Although recent focus on hydrothermal systems has greatly improved our understanding on how they work, the detailed effects of topography on these systems has largely been ignored. While the qualitative effects of topography on hydrothermal flow are largely known (e.g. Ingebritsen 2006), we here present results from systematic numerical modeling on the importance of topography for both, subaerial and submarine hydrothermal convection. The model is based on a 2-D Finite Element Method (FEM) solver for fully compressible, single-phase, porous media fluid flow and is used to simulate hydrothermal convection in a number of synthetic studies as well as for two case studies for the Lucky Strike vent field (submarine) and the Amiata volcano (subaerial). The results of synthetic studies using sinusoidal topography variations show that topography indeed has a profound effect on the distribution and flow field of the convection cells. In the submarine case, fluid venting occurs at the topographic highs while the recharge zones are restricted to the lows. For the subaerial scenarios, the opposite occurs where groundwater flow focuses venting at flank regions and the recharge zones are situated at the highs. For example, in the submarine case, ~90% of the hydrothermal fluids vent at upper 50% of topographic highs if the number of topographic highs equals the number of plumes in a flat-top reference simulation. The results show that the focusing effect into topographic highs (submarine) and lows (subaerial) is highly dependent on the wavelength and amplitude of topography, i.e. wavelengths that are too high or low result in venting at

  4. Constraints on hydrocarbon and organic acid abundances in hydrothermal fluids at the Von Damm vent field, Mid-Cayman Rise (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. M.; Seewald, J.; German, C. R.; Sylva, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of organic compounds in vent fluids has been of interest since the discovery of seafloor hydrothermal systems, due to implications for the sustenance of present-day microbial populations and their potential role in the origin of life on early Earth. Possible sources of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems include microbial production, thermogenic degradation of organic material, and abiotic synthesis. Abiotic organic synthesis reactions may occur during active circulation of seawater-derived fluids through the oceanic crust or within olivine-hosted fluid inclusions containing carbon-rich magmatic volatiles. H2-rich end-member fluids at the Von Damm vent field on the Mid-Cayman Rise, where fluid temperatures reach 226°C, provide an exciting opportunity to examine the extent of abiotic carbon transformations in a highly reducing system. Our results indicate multiple sources of carbon compounds in vent fluids at Von Damm. An ultramafic-influenced hydrothermal system located on the Mount Dent oceanic core complex at 2350 m depth, Von Damm vent fluids contain H2, CH4, and C2+ hydrocarbons in high abundance relative to basalt-hosted vent fields, and in similar abundance to other ultramafic-hosted systems, such as Rainbow and Lost City. The CO2 content and isotopic composition in end-member fluids are virtually identical to bottom seawater, suggesting that seawater DIC is unchanged during hydrothermal circulation of seawater-derived fluids. Accordingly, end-member CH4 that is present in slightly greater abundance than CO2 cannot be generated from reduction of aqueous CO2 during hydrothermal circulation. We postulate that CH4 and C2+ hydrocarbons that are abundantly present in Von Damm vent fluids reflect leaching of fluids from carbon- and H2-rich fluid inclusions hosted in plutonic rocks. Geochemical modeling of carbon speciation in the Von Damm fluids suggests that the relative abundances of CH4, C2+ hydrocarbons, and CO2 are consistent with

  5. Geochemistry of reduced fluids from shallow cold vents hosting chemosynthetic communities (Comau Fjord, Chilean Patagonia, ∼42°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Práxedes; Sellanes, Javier; Villalobos, Katherine; Zapata-Hernández, Germán; Mayr, Christoph; Araya, Karen

    2014-12-01

    Reduced fluids from shallow-marine vents sustain chemosynthetic bacterial mats located at the base of the volcano Barranco Colorado in Comau Fjord (X-Huinay; 42°23.279‧S, 72°27.635‧W). We characterized the chemical environment in which these bacteria thrive. To this end, we analyzed CH4, ∑H2S, O2, DIC, and stable isotopes (δ13C, δ2H and δ18O) and compared them with readings taken at a control station (which lacks evidence of fluid venting and mat-forming bacteria). In addition, CTD measurements, chlorophyll-a, and nutrient analyses were performed. At depths of approximately 5-7 m, the water column exhibited a pycnocline that formed under the influence of fresh water discharges, especially during the summer season, which also affected the surface temperature. Bacterial mats and elemental sulfur flocs were observed in the vicinity of the vents (X-Huinay station), and higher concentrations of reduced compounds (CH4 and ∑H2S) were found in the vent fluids, in particular at a depth of 36 m. No significant differences in the temperatures of vent and ambient waters were detected. The bottom water close to the vents possessed notably low concentrations of reduced compounds, indicating a rapid and large-quantity dilution of the chemicals from vents. The surface water featured light isotopic values of δ2H and 18O due to the freshwater input from melting ice and precipitation. A linear mixing trend was observed between the freshwater (negative isotopic values) and the fjord bottom water (positive values) that was not influenced by vent fluid. This trend suggests that the venting water corresponds to the mixing among local meteoric water, spring water, and seawater. This result is relevant to understanding how freshwater and meteoric water influence the chemical composition of seawater and how this mixing could impact the marine biota in the vicinities of the vents.

  6. Recent Investigation of In-Situ pH in Hydrothermal Vent Fluids at Main Endeavour Field (MEF) and ASHES Vent Field (ASHES): Implications for Dynamic Changes in Subseafloor Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Tan, C.; Schaen, A. T.; Luhmann, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    In-situ pH is among the key factors affecting chemical reactions involved with fluid-rock interaction and metal transport in hydrothermal systems. A small variation in pH will often result in a large difference in dissolved metal concentrations. For instance, at 400oC, a decrease of ~0.15 pH unit will cause dissolved Fe concentration to double in fluid coexisting with a Fe-bearing mineral assemblage. This parameter also offers us an opportunity to better understand processes controlling the temporal evolution of hydrothermal vent fluid chemistry at mid-ocean ridges. During our recent cruise AT 26-17 with newly upgraded DSV2 Alvin, in-situ measurements of pH were carried out along with gas-tight sampling of vent fluids. Our efforts were focused at MEF and ASHES on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These hydrothermal systems have been shown to be particularly responsive to subseafloor seismic and magmatic events. The measured fluid temperature was approximately 333˚C and 300˚C at Dante vent orifice of MEF and Inferno vent orifice of ASHES, respectively. The corresponding measured in-situ pH values for both vents are: 4.94 and 4.88, respectively. Dissolved gases and other species were also measured from gas-tight fluid samples providing a means of comparison with the in-situ data. As we have known the earthquake and magmatic activity often places the system at higher temperature and more reducing conditions in connection with a new evolutionary cycle. Comparing these relatively low in-situ pH values with those measured in the past, especially with the ones obtained at MEF in 1999 after an intense swarm of earthquakes, we see the system trending towards more acidic conditions along with decreasing temperature and dissolved H2 and H2S. Taking an example from Dante vent site, in-situ pH value of 5.15 was recorded with a measured temperature of 363oC two month after the event in 1999, which gives 0.2 pH unit greater than the more recent data. Measured dissolved H2 and H2S

  7. Investigation of extractable organic compounds in deep-sea hydrothermal vent fluids along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-05-01

    The possibility that deep-sea hydrothermal vents may contain organic compounds produced by abiotic synthesis or by microbial communities living deep beneath the surface has led to numerous studies of the organic composition of vent fluids. Most of these studies have focused on methane and other light hydrocarbons, while the possible occurrence of more complex organic compounds in the fluids has remained largely unstudied. To address this issue, the presence of higher molecular weight organic compounds in deep-sea hydrothermal fluids was assessed at three sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that span a range of temperatures (51 to >360 °C), fluid compositions, and host-rock lithologies (mafic to ultramafic). Samples were obtained at several sites within the Lucky Strike, Rainbow, and Lost City hydrothermal fields. Three methods were employed to extract organic compounds for analysis, including liquid:liquid extraction, cold trapping on the walls of a coil of titanium tubing, and pumping fluids through cartridges filled with solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents. The only samples to consistently yield high amounts of extractable organic compounds were the warm (51-91 °C), highly alkaline fluids from Lost City, which contained elevated concentrations of C8, C10, and C12n-alkanoic acids and, in some cases, trithiolane, hexadecanol, squalene, and cholesterol. Collectively, the C8-C12 acids can account for about 15% of the total dissolved organic carbon in the Lost City fluids. The even-carbon-number predominance of the alkanoic acids indicates a biological origin, but it is unclear whether these compounds are derived from microbial activity occurring within the hydrothermal chimney proximal to the site of fluid discharge or are transported from deeper within the system. Hydrothermal fluids from the Lucky Strike and Rainbow fields were characterized by an overall scarcity of extractable dissolved organic compounds. Trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons including

  8. Vented Tank Resupply Experiment Demonstrated Vane Propellant Management Device for Fluid Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    1998-01-01

    The Vented Tank Resupply Experiment (VTRE) flown on STS-77 confirmed the design approaches presently used in the development of vane-type propellant management devices (PMD) for use in resupply and tank-venting situations, and it provided the first practical demonstration of an autonomous fluid transfer system. All the objectives were achieved. Transfers were more stable than drop tower testing indicated. Liquid was retained successfully at the highest flow rate tested (2.73 gal/min), demonstrating that rapid fills could be achieved. Liquid-free vents were achieved for two different tanks, although the flow rate was higher for the spherical tank (0.1591 cu ft/min) than for the tank with a short barrel section (0.0400 cu ft/min). Recovery from a thruster firing, which moved the liquid to the opposite end of the tank from the PMD, was achieved in 30 sec, showing that liquid rewicked more quickly into the PMD after thruster firing than pretest projections had predicted. In addition, researchers obtained great insights into the PMD behavior from the video footage provided, and discovered new considerations for future PMD designs that would not have been seen without this flight test.

  9. Fluid flow and sound generation at hydrothermal vent fields. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Little, S.A.

    1988-04-01

    Several experiments in this thesis examine methods to measure and monitor fluid flow from hydrothermal vent fields. Simultaneous velocity temperature, and conductivity data were collected in the convective flow emanating from a hydrothermal vent field located on the East Pacific rise. The horizontal profiles obtained indicate that the flow field approaches an ideal plume in the temperature and velocity distribution. Such parameters as total heat flow and maximum plume height can be estimated using either the velocity or the temperature information. The results of these independent calculations are in close agreement, yielding a total heat capacity and volume changes slightly alter the calculations applied to obtain these values. In Guaymas Basin, a twelve day time series of temperature data was collected from a point three centimeters above a diffuse hydrothermal flow area. Using concurrent tidal gauge data from the town of Guaymas it is shown that the effects of tidal currents can be strong enough to dominate the time variability of a temperature signal at a fixed point in hydrothermal flow and are a plausible explanation for the variations seen in the Guaymas Basin temperature data. The increase in power due to convected flow inhomogeneities, however, was lower in the near field than expected. Indirect evidence of hydrothermal sound fields showing anomalous high power and low frequency noise associated with vents is due to processes other than jet noise.

  10. Hydrothermal fluids vented at shallow depths at the Aeolian islands: relationships with volcanic and geothermal systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Italiano, Francesco; Caracausi, Antonio; Longo, Manfredi; Maugeri, Roberto; Paonita, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    lower values detected in venting gases from active volcanoes (e.g. Vulcano and Panarea). The explanation of such a difference is not related to the volcanic activity at all, but to the parent mantle that in the western side looks to be less contaminated compared to the eastern side. Crustal contamination has been invoked by several authors as the main factor that caused the dramatic 3He/4He decrease. Although the parent mantle produced magmas with different isotopic signature, the gas phase looks similar. To explain the results of the chemical analyses it is proposed that similar deep boundary conditions (pressure, temperature, oxidation level) act as buffers for the chemical composition of the venting gases. With the aim of investigating their origin, estimations of the deep equilibration conditions have been carried out. The reactive compounds detected in the sampled gases, largely used for geothermometric and geobarometric considerations of hydrothermal fluids were used in a system based on the CH4-CO-CO2 contents assuming the presence of a boiling aqueous solution. The equilibrium constants of the adopted reactions are a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity, being the latter buffered by the mineral assemblage of the host rocks. Due to the similarity in the chemical composition of the gases vented at all the islands, a theoretical model developed to interpret the chemical composition of the gases released at Panarea during the last volcanic crisis is here applied. The results have shown that geothermal boiling systems are detectable at all the islands with temperatures up to 350°C. The adopted geo-thermobarometric system is more sensitive to the contents of CO and CH4 than that of CO2, implying that although GWI induce modifications in the chemical composition, the estimated equilibrium temperatures do not change very much for variations of the CO2 content in the range of several volume percent, thus, whether or not the gaseous mixture underwent GWI. Moreover

  11. No Vent Tank Fill and Transfer Line Chilldown Analysis by Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present the analytical capability developed to model no vent chill and fill of cryogenic tank to support CPST (Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer) program. Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) was adapted to simulate charge-holdvent method of Tank Chilldown. GFSSP models were developed to simulate chilldown of LH2 tank in K-site Test Facility and numerical predictions were compared with test data. The report also describes the modeling technique of simulating the chilldown of a cryogenic transfer line and GFSSP models were developed to simulate the chilldown of a long transfer line and compared with test data.

  12. In situ Raman-based detections of the hydrothermal vent and cold seep fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Du, Zengfeng; Zheng, Ronger; Luan, Zhendong; Qi, Fujun; Cheng, Kai; Wang, Bing; Ye, Wangquan; Liu, Xiaorui; Chen, Changan; Guo, Jinjia; Li, Ying; Yan, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, and their associated biological communities play an important role in global carbon and sulphur biogeochemical cycles. Most of the studies of fluid composition geochemistry are based on recovered samples, both with gas-tight samplers and as open specimens, but the in situ conditions are difficult to maintain in recovered samples. Determination in situ of the chemical signals of the emerging fluids are challenging due to the high pressure, often strongly acidic and temperature in which few sensors can survive. Most of those sensors used so far are based on electrochemistry, and can typically detect only a few chemical species. Here we show that direct measurement of critical chemical species of hydrothermal vents and cold seeps can be made rapidly and in situ by means of a new hybrid version of earlier deep-sea pore water Raman probe carried on the ROV (Remote Operated Vehicle) Faxian. The fluid was drawn through the probe by actuating a hydraulic pump on the ROV, and measured at the probe optical cell through a sapphire window. We have observed the concentrations of H2S, HS-, SO42-, HSO4-, CO2, and H2 in hydrothermal vent fluids from the Pacmanus and Desmos vent systems in the Manus back-arc basin, Papua New Guinea. Two black smokers (279° C and 186° C) at the Pacmanus site showed the characteristic loss of SO42-, and the increase of CO2 and well resolved H2S and HS- peaks. At the white smoker of Onsen site the strong HSO4-peak observed at high temperature quickly dropped with strong accompanying increase of SO42-and H2 peaks when the sample contained in the Raman sensing cell was removed from the hot fluid due to rapid thermal deprotonation. We report here also the finding of a new lower temperature (88° C) white smoker "Kexue" field at the Desmos site with strong H2S, HS- and CO2 signals. We also have detected the concentrations of CH4,H2S, HS-, SO42-, and S8 in cold seep fluids and the surrounding sediment pore water from

  13. Subseafloor microbial communities in hydrogen‐rich vent fluids from hydrothermal systems along the Mid‐Cayman Rise

    PubMed Central

    Reveillaud, Julie; Reddington, Emily; McDermott, Jill; Algar, Christopher; Meyer, Julie L.; Sylva, Sean; Seewald, Jeffrey; German, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Warm fluids emanating from hydrothermal vents can be used as windows into the rocky subseafloor habitat and its resident microbial community. Two new vent systems on the Mid‐Cayman Rise each exhibits novel geologic settings and distinctively hydrogen‐rich vent fluid compositions. We have determined and compared the chemistry, potential energy yielding reactions, abundance, community composition, diversity, and function of microbes in venting fluids from both sites: Piccard, the world's deepest vent site, hosted in mafic rocks; and Von Damm, an adjacent, ultramafic‐influenced system. Von Damm hosted a wider diversity of lineages and metabolisms in comparison to Piccard, consistent with thermodynamic models that predict more numerous energy sources at ultramafic systems. There was little overlap in the phylotypes found at each site, although similar and dominant hydrogen‐utilizing genera were present at both. Despite the differences in community structure, depth, geology, and fluid chemistry, energetic modelling and metagenomic analysis indicate near functional equivalence between Von Damm and Piccard, likely driven by the high hydrogen concentrations and elevated temperatures at both sites. Results are compared with hydrothermal sites worldwide to provide a global perspective on the distinctiveness of these newly discovered sites and the interplay among rocks, fluid composition and life in the subseafloor. PMID:26663423

  14. Genomic variation of subseafloor archaeal and bacterial populations from venting fluids at the Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Eren, A. M.; Stepanauskas, R.; Huber, J. A.; Reveillaud, J.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems serve as windows to a dynamic, gradient-dominated deep biosphere that is home to a wide diversity of archaea, bacteria, and viruses. Until recently the majority of these microbial lineages were uncultivated, resulting in a poor understanding of how the physical and geochemical context shapes microbial evolution in the deep subsurface. By comparing metagenomes, metatranscriptomes and single-cell genomes between geologically distinct vent fields, we can better understand the relationship between the environment and the evolution of subsurface microbial communities. An ideal setting in which to use this approach is the Mid-Cayman Rise, located on the world's deepest and slowest-spreading mid-ocean ridge, which hosts both the mafic-influenced Piccard and ultramafic-influenced Von Damm vent fields. Previous work has shown that Von Damm has higher taxonomic and metabolic diversity than Piccard, consistent with geochemical model expectations, and the fluids from all vents are enriched in hydrogen (Reveillaud et al., submitted). Mapping of both metagenomes and metatranscriptomes to a combined assembly showed very little overlap among the Von Damm samples, indicating substantial variability that is consistent with the diversity of potential metabolites in this ultramafic vent field. In contrast, the most consistently abundant and active lineage across the Piccard samples was Sulfurovum, a sulfur-oxidizing chemolithotroph that uses nitrate or oxygen as an electron acceptor. Moreover, analysis of point mutations within individual lineages suggested that Sulfurovumat Piccard is under strong selection, whereas microbial genomes at Von Damm were more variable. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the subsurface environment at Piccard supports the emergence of a dominant lineage that is under strong selection pressure, whereas the more geochemically diverse microbial habitat at Von Damm creates a wider variety of stable

  15. Microbial biofilms associated with fluid chemistry and megafaunal colonization at post-eruptive deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Charles E.; Giovannelli, Donato; Govenar, Breea; Luther, George W.; Lutz, Richard A.; Shank, Timothy M.; Vetriani, Costantino

    2015-11-01

    At deep-sea hydrothermal vents, reduced, super-heated hydrothermal fluids mix with cold, oxygenated seawater. This creates temperature and chemical gradients that support chemosynthetic primary production and a biomass-rich community of invertebrates. In late 2005/early 2006 an eruption occurred on the East Pacific Rise at 9°50‧N, 104°17‧W. Direct observations of the post-eruptive diffuse-flow vents indicated that the earliest colonizers were microbial biofilms. Two cruises in 2006 and 2007 allowed us to monitor and sample the early steps of ecosystem recovery. The main objective of this work was to characterize the composition of microbial biofilms in relation to the temperature and chemistry of the hydrothermal fluids and the observed patterns of megafaunal colonization. The area selected for this study had local seafloor habitats of active diffuse flow (in-flow) interrupted by adjacent habitats with no apparent expulsion of hydrothermal fluids (no-flow). The in-flow habitats were characterized by higher temperatures (1.6-25.2 °C) and H2S concentrations (up to 67.3 μM) than the no-flow habitats, and the microbial biofilms were dominated by chemosynthetic Epsilonproteobacteria. The no-flow habitats had much lower temperatures (1.2-5.2 °C) and H2S concentrations (0.3-2.9 μM), and Gammaproteobacteria dominated the biofilms. Siboglinid tubeworms colonized only in-flow habitats, while they were absent at the no-flow areas, suggesting a correlation between siboglinid tubeworm colonization, active hydrothermal flow, and the composition of chemosynthetic microbial biofilms.

  16. A deep sea Hydrothermal Vent Bio-sampler for large volume in-situ filtration of hydrothermal vent fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Matthews, Jaret; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Bruckner, James; Basic, Goran; So, Edmond; Rivadeneyra, Cesar

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a physical description of the current system, as well as a summary of the preliminary tests conducted in 2005: a pressure chamber test, a dive test in a 30 foot dive pool, and a dive operation at a hydrothermal vent off the northern coast of Iceland.

  17. Temporal evolution of magmatic-hydrothermal systems in the Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea: Insights from vent fluid chemistry and bathymetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, E. P.; Thal, J.; Schaen, A.; Ono, S.; Seewald, J.; Bach, W.

    2015-12-01

    The temporal evolution of hydrothermal fluids from back-arc systems is poorly constrained, despite growing evidence for dynamic magmatic-hydrothermal activity, and imminent commercial mining. Here we discuss surveys of diverse vent fluids from multiple hydrothermal fields in the Manus back-arc basin, Papua New Guinea, sampled in 2006 and 2011. Effects of host rock composition, and dynamic magmatic volatile inputs on fluid chemistry are evaluated to understand changes in these systems. Highly acidic and SO4-rich moderate temperature fluids (~48-215°C), as well as SO4-poor black smoker fluids (up to 358°C), were collected at the PACMANUS, SuSu Knolls and DESMOS areas in 2006 and 2011. Acidic, milky white SuSu and DESMOS fluids, rich in elemental S and SO4, exit the seafloor with Na, K, Mg, and Ca diluted conservatively up to 30% relative to seawater, implying subsurface mixing of seawater with SO2-rich aqueous fluids exsolved from magma, analogous to subaerial fumarole discharge. SO2 disproportionation during cooling and mixing of magmatic fluids contributes acidity, SO4, H2S and S(0)(s), as well as widespread S outcrops on the seafloor. Nearby black smoker fluids indicate entrainment and reaction of magmatic fluid into convecting fluids at depth, and additional hybrid-type fluids appear to consist of evolved seawater and unreacted magmatic fluid SO2 derivatives. Fluids at DESMOS in 2006 indicate increased magmatic SO2 relative to 1995, despite constant low venting temperatures (~120°C). In contrast, dramatic changes in bathymetry and seafloor morphology point to substantial continuous eruption of volcaniclastic material between 2006 and 2011 at SuSu Knolls, burying fumarolic vents from 2006. Compositions of new 2011 acidic, sulfate-rich fluids there suggest reaction with less altered, fresher rock. At the PACMANUS area, farther from the arc, direct magmatic degassing to the seafloor is not occurring presently, but entrainment and reaction of similar acid

  18. Fluid composition of the sediment-influenced Loki's Castle vent field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, Tamara; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Hamelin, Cédric; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Okland, Ingeborg E.; Pedersen, Rolf B.

    2016-08-01

    The hydrothermal vent field Loki's Castle is located in the Mohns-Knipovich bend (73°N) of the ultraslow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) close to the Bear Island sediment fan. The hydrothermal field is venting up to 320° C hot black smoker fluids near the summit of an axial volcanic ridge. Even though the active chimneys have grown on a basaltic ridge, geochemical fluid data show a strong sedimentary influence into the hydrothermal circulation at Loki's Castle. Compelling evidence for a sediment input is given by high alkalinity, high concentrations of NH4+, H2, CH4, C2+ hydrocarbons as well as low Mn and Fe contents. The low δ13C values of CO2 and CH4 and the thermogenic isotopic pattern of the C2+ hydrocarbons in the high-temperature vent fluids clearly point to thermal degradation of sedimentary organic matter and illustrate diminution of the natural carbon sequestration in sediments by hydrothermal circulation. Thus, carbon-release to the hydrosphere in Arctic regions is especially relevant in areas where the active Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge system is in contact with the organic matter rich detrital sediment fans.

  19. Characterizing microbial community and geochemical dynamics at hydrothermal vents using osmotically driven continuous fluid samplers.

    PubMed

    Robidart, Julie; Callister, Stephen J; Song, Pengfei; Nicora, Carrie D; Wheat, Charles G; Girguis, Peter R

    2013-05-07

    Microbes play a key role in mediating aquatic biogeochemical cycles. However, our understanding of the relationships between microbial phylogenetic/physiological diversity and habitat physicochemical characteristics is restrained by our limited capacity to concurrently collect microbial and geochemical samples at appropriate spatial and temporal scales. Accordingly, we have developed a low-cost, continuous fluid sampling system (the Biological OsmoSampling System, or BOSS) to address this limitation. The BOSS does not use electricity, can be deployed in harsh/remote environments, and collects/preserves samples with daily resolution for >1 year. Here, we present data on the efficacy of DNA and protein preservation during a 1.5 year laboratory study as well as the results of two field deployments at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, wherein we examined changes in microbial diversity, protein expression, and geochemistry over time. Our data reveal marked changes in microbial composition co-occurring with changes in hydrothermal fluid composition as well as the temporal dynamics of an enigmatic sulfide-oxidizing symbiont in its free-living state. We also present the first data on in situ protein preservation and expression dynamics highlighting the BOSS's potential utility in meta-proteomic studies. These data illustrate the value of using BOSS to study relationships among microbial and geochemical phenomena and environmental conditions.

  20. Vent fluid chemistry of the Rainbow hydrothermal system (36°N, MAR): Phase equilibria and in situ pH controls on subseafloor alteration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Pester, Nicholas J.; Ding, Kang; Rough, Mikaella

    2011-03-01

    The Rainbow hydrothermal field is located at 36°13.8'N-33°54.15'W at 2300 m depth on the western flank of a non-volcanic ridge between the South AMAR and AMAR segments of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The hydrothermal field consists of 10-15 active chimneys that emit high-temperature (˜365 °C) fluid. In July 2008, vent fluids were sampled during cruise KNOX18RR, providing a rich dataset that extends in time information on subseafloor chemical and physical processes controlling vent fluid chemistry at Rainbow. Data suggest that the Mg concentration of the hydrothermal end-member is not zero, but rather 1.5-2 mmol/kg. This surprising result may be caused by a combination of factors including moderately low dissolved silica, low pH, and elevated chloride of the hydrothermal fluid. Combining end-member Mg data with analogous data for dissolved Fe, Si, Al, Ca, and H 2, permits calculation of mineral saturation states for minerals thought appropriate for ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems at temperatures and pressures in keeping with constraints imposed by field observations. These data indicate that chlorite solid solution, talc, and magnetite achieve saturation in Rainbow vent fluid at a similar pH (T,P) (400 °C, 500 bar) of approximately 4.95, while higher pH values are indicated for serpentine, suggesting that serpentine may not coexist with the former assemblage at depth at Rainbow. The high Fe/Mg ratio of the Rainbow vent fluid notwithstanding, the mole fraction of clinochlore and chamosite components of chlorite solid solution at depth are predicted to be 0.78 and 0.22, respectively. In situ pH measurements made at Rainbow vents are in good agreement with pH (T,P) values estimated from mineral solubility calculations, when the in situ pH data are adjusted for temperature and pressure. Calculations further indicate that pH (T,P) and dissolved H 2 are extremely sensitive to changes in dissolved silica owing to constraints imposed by chlorite solid solution-fluid

  1. Uniformity and diversity in the composition of mineralizing fluids from hydrothermal vents on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Philpotts, J.A.; Aruscavage, P.J.; Von Damm, K.L.

    1987-10-10

    Abundances of Li, Ni, K, Rb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Fe, Zn, and Si have been determined in fluid samples from seven vents located in three areas on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The hydrothermal component estimated from the Mg contents of the samples ranges from 7% to 76%. Concentrations of Fe and Si, among the other elements, in acid-stabilized solutions appear to be generally representative of the parental hydrothermal fluids, but some Zn determinations and most Ba values appear to be too low. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the acidified samples remain supersaturated with respect to silica, barite, and pyrite; unacidified samples are supersaturated, in addition with respect to ZnS, FeS, and many silicate phases. Within the constraints of limited sampling there appear to be differences in fluid compositions both within and between the three vent areas. Some uniform differences in the elemental abundances predicted for hydrothermal end-member fluids might be due to inmixing of fresh seawater at depth in the hydrothermal system. The Juan de Fuca hydrothermal fluids contain more Fe but otherwise have relative elemental abundances fairly similar to those in 13 /sup 0/N (East Pacific Rise) fluids, albeit at higher levels. In contrast, fluids from 21 /sup 0/N (East Pacific Rise) and Galapagos have lower K/Rb and much lower Sr and Na abundances; these compositional features probably result from interaction of these fluids with a different mineral assemblage, possibly more mature greenstone. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  2. Gas hydrates and fluid venting in ultradeep large scale pockmarks at the southwest african margin off Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, V.; Kasten, S.; Schneider, R.; Zuehlsdorff, L.; Bohrmann, G.; Sahling, H.; Breitzke, M.; Bialas, J.; Ivanov, M.; Meteor Shipboard Scientific Party, M56.

    2003-04-01

    As a project in the framework of the German gas hydrate inititiave, funded through the Geotechnologien programme of the German Minister of Education and Research (BMBF) and the German Science Foundation (DFG), investigations at the southwest african continental margin off the Congo river were planned to study the occurrence, evolution and properties of gas hydrates and fluid flow in hemipelagic sediments. R/V Meteor Cruise M56, carried out in 2 legs in November and December 2002 from Douala (Cameroon) and Libreville (Gabon) to Capetown (South Africa), combined an extended geophysical survey program, using high and very high resolution multi-channel seismics, digital sediment echosounding, swath sounding, deep tow side scan sonar, deep tow reflection seismics and tomography with ocean bottom instruments with ocean floor video surveying and sediment and water column sampling with gravity corer, tv-guided multicorer and tv grab, CTD and rosette. 3D seismic data reveal the complex nature of fluid upflow zones and gas hydrate occurrences, which produce acoustic blanking and high amplitude reflections, respectively, in the vicinity of sea floor depressions from a few to several tens of meters depth and a few tens to a few hundred meters diameter. Side Scan data reveal high backscatter patches, which are not completely correlated to the morphology, and which also show pronounced lateral variations. This is in agreement with OFOS video surveys, which confirm patchiness of vent indications as clam fields, tube worm occurrences and the distristribution and amount of carbonate precipitates at the sea floor. Furthermore, video tracks confirmed complex small scale tectonics on the inner flanks of the pockmarks, indicating the collapse of the surrounding hemipelagic sediments. Local enhancements of reflector amplitudes seem to indicate the distribution of shallow gas hydrates, allowing the reconstruction of fluid flow and methane supply as well as gas hydrate growth patterns

  3. The Influence of Eruptive Fluid Pressure and Vent Radius on the Eruption Style of High- Pressure Supersonic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, D. E.; Wohletz, K. H.; Brodsky, E. E.; Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    Through observations, experiments, and modeling much has been learned about the effects of fluid pressure and vent radius on the dynamics of large, explosive volcanic eruptions. The standard semi-analytic model suggests that increasing radius results in less stable columns while the effect of overpressure is neglected by simply assuming a choked flow condition at the base of the thermal plume or a shock-free compressible flow (A.W. Woods, Rev. Geophys. v33, 1995). However, the standing shock waves that may develop in high- pressure supersonic volcanic eruptions complicate the connection between the fluid dynamics of the conduit and the stability of the buoyant plume, and in some cases can result in the inverse dependencies. The strength and position of these standing shock waves (and therefore their effect on energies and column collapse) are dependent on a number of factors including eruptive fluid pressure and vent radius. Here, using computational simulations, we examine the influence of these two parameters on the energy supplied to a buoyant column from a supersonic vent. We use a pseudogas approximation for a rhyolitic ash-gas composite flow to show that increasing the overpressure results in wider plumes at the top of the gas thrust region with slower interior velocities. This effect can be significant at overpressure ratios as low as 10. Since a 1 km deep magma chamber at lithostatic pressure results in an overpressure ratio of 300, most moderate to large eruptions will be affected by the shocks and therefore will likely have these inverse dependencies. For instance, estimates for overpressure at the vent based on petrological evidence and conduit models for many explosive eruptions (e.g. the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo) are of the same order of magnitude as the overpressure ratio in our strongly affected simulations. By combining the results from our simulations with values of overpressures and vent radii from petrologic and field methods, we constrain

  4. Low-molecular weight hydrocarbons in vent fluids from the Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, Anna M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2010-11-01

    Despite its location on sediment-free basalt, vent fluids from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) contain chemical species that indicate fluids have interacted with sediments during circulation. We report on the distribution and isotopic abundances of organic compounds ( C1- C3 alkanes and alkenes, benzene and toluene) in fluids collected from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) in July, 2000, to understand the processes that regulate their abundances and characterize fluid sources. Aqueous organic compounds are derived from the thermal alteration of sedimentary organic matter and subsequently undergo further oxidation reactions during fluid flow. Fluid:sediment mass ratios calculated using ΣNH 4 concentrations indicate that the sediments are distal to the MEF, resulting in a common reservoir of fluids for all of the vents. Following the generation from sediment alteration, aqueous organic compounds undergo secondary alteration reactions via a stepwise oxidation reaction mechanism. Alkane distributions and isotopic compositions indicate that organic compounds in MEF fluids have undergone a greater extent of alteration as compared to Middle Valley fluids, either due to differences in subsurface redox conditions or the residence time of fluids at subsurface conditions. The distributions of the aromatic compounds benzene and toluene are qualitatively consistent with the subsurface conditions indicated by equilibration of aqueous alkanes and alkanes. However, benzene and toluene do not achieve chemical equilibrium in the subsurface. Methane and CO 2 also do not equilibrate chemically or isotopically at reaction zone temperatures, a likely result of an insufficient reaction time after addition of CO 2 from magmatic sources during upflow. The organic geochemistry supports the assumption that the sediments with which MEF fluids interact has the same composition as sediments present in Middle Valley itself, and highlight differences in subsurface reaction zone conditions and fluid

  5. Observations of Seafloor Deformation and Methane Venting within an Active Fault Zone Offshore Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.; Brewer, P. G.; Vrijenhoek, R.; Lundsten, L.

    2013-12-01

    Detailed mapping surveys of the floor and flanks of the Santa Monica Basin, San Pedro Basin, and San Diego Trough were conducted during the past seven years using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) built and operated by MBARI specifically for seafloor mapping. The AUV collected data provide up to 1 m resolution multibeam bathymetric grids with a vertical precision of 0.15 m. Along with high-resolution multibeam, the AUV also collects chirp seismic reflection profiles. Structures within the uppermost 10-20 m of the seafloor, which in the surveys presented here is composed of recent sediment drape, can typically be resolved in the sub-bottom reflectors. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives allowed for ground-truth observations and sampling within the surveyed areas. The objectives of these dives included finding evidence of recent seafloor deformation and locating areas where chemosynthetic biological communities are supported by fluid venting. Distinctive seafloor features within an active fault zone are revealed in unprecedented detail in the AUV generated maps and seismic reflection profiles. Evidence for recent fault displacements include linear scarps which can be as small as 20 cm high but traceable for several km, right lateral offsets within submarine channels and topographic ridges, and abrupt discontinuities in sub-bottom reflectors, which in places appear to displace seafloor sediments. Several topographic highs that occur within the fault zone appear to be anticlines related to step-overs in these faults. These topographic highs are, in places, topped with circular mounds that are up to 15 m high and have ~30° sloping sides. The crests of the topographic highs and the mounds both have distinctive rough morphologies produced by broken pavements of irregular blocks of methane-derived authigenic carbonates, and by topographic depressions, commonly more than 2 m deep. These areas of distinctive rough topography are commonly associated with living

  6. An analysis of flaring and venting activity in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew R; Coderre, Adam R

    2011-02-01

    Alberta, Canada, is an important global producer of petroleum resources. In association with this production, large amounts of gas (1.14 billion m3 in 2008) are flared or vented. Although the amount of flaring and venting has been measurably reduced since 2002, data from 2005 reveal sharp increases in venting, which have important implications in terms of resource conservation and greenhouse gas emissions (which exceeded 8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2008). With use of extensive monthly production data for 18,203 active batteries spanning the years 2002-2008 obtained in close cooperation with the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board, a detailed analysis has been completed to examine activity patterns of flaring and venting and reasons behind these trends in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry. In any given year, approximately 6000 batteries reported flaring and/or venting, but the distribution of volumes flared and vented at individual sites was highly skewed, such that small numbers of sites handled large fractions of the total gas flaring and venting in the Province. Examination of month-to-month volume variability at individual sites, cast in terms of a nominal turndown ratio that would be required for a compressor to capture that gas and direct it into a pipeline, further revealed that volumes at a majority of sites were reasonably stable and there was no evidence that larger or more stable sites had been preferentially reduced, leaving potential barriers to future mitigation. Through linking of geospatial data with production data coupled with additional statistical analysis, the 31.2% increase in venting volumes since 2005 was revealed to be predominantly associated with increased production of heavier oils and bitumen in the Lloydminster region of the Province. Overall, the data suggest that quite significant reductions in flaring and venting could be realized by seeking mitigation solutions for only the largest batteries in

  7. Lithium isotopic systematics of submarine vent fluids from arc and back-arc hydrothermal systems in the western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araoka, Daisuke; Nishio, Yoshiro; Gamo, Toshitaka; Yamaoka, Kyoko; Kawahata, Hodaka

    2016-10-01

    The Li concentration and isotopic composition (δ7Li) in submarine vent fluids are important for oceanic Li budget and potentially useful for investigating hydrothermal systems deep under the seafloor because hydrothermal vent fluids are highly enriched in Li relative to seawater. Although Li isotopic geochemistry has been studied at mid-ocean-ridge (MOR) hydrothermal sites, in arc and back-arc settings Li isotopic composition has not been systematically investigated. Here we determined the δ7Li and 87Sr/86Sr values of 11 end-member fluids from 5 arc and back-arc hydrothermal systems in the western Pacific and examined Li behavior during high-temperature water-rock interactions in different geological settings. In sediment-starved hydrothermal systems (Manus Basin, Izu-Bonin Arc, Mariana Trough, and North Fiji Basin), the Li concentrations (0.23-1.30 mmol/kg) and δ7Li values (+4.3‰ to +7.2‰) of the end-member fluids are explained mainly by dissolution-precipitation model during high-temperature seawater-rock interactions at steady state. Low Li concentrations are attributable to temperature-related apportioning of Li in rock into the fluid phase and phase separation process. Small variation in Li among MOR sites is probably caused by low-temperature alteration process by diffusive hydrothermal fluids under the seafloor. In contrast, the highest Li concentrations (3.40-5.98 mmol/kg) and lowest δ7Li values (+1.6‰ to +2.4‰) of end-member fluids from the Okinawa Trough demonstrate that the Li is predominantly derived from marine sediments. The variation of Li in sediment-hosted sites can be explained by the differences in degree of hydrothermal fluid-sediment interactions associated with the thickness of the marine sediment overlying these hydrothermal sites.

  8. Approximating Fluid Flow from Ambient to Very Low Pressures: Modeling ISS Experiments that Vent to Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Two ISS (International Space Station) experiment payloads will vent a volume of gas overboard via either the ISS Vacuum Exhaust System or the Vacuum Resource System. A system of ducts, valves and sensors, under design, will connect the experiments to the ISS systems. The following tasks are required: Create an analysis tool that will verify the rack vacuum system design with respect to design requirements, more specifically approximate pressure at given locations within the vacuum systems; Determine the vent duration required to achieve desired pressure within the experiment modules; Update the analysis as systems and operations definitions mature.

  9. Cu- and Zn-isotope systematics of seafloor hydrothermal vent fluids from a back-arc setting (Manus Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekov, V.; Rouxel, O.

    2012-04-01

    Unique seafloor hydrothermal processes combine in back-arc basins (BAB) to produce a wide range of vent fluid chemistry and mineral deposits, which are generally considered as critically important for the genesis of volcanogenic massive sulfide ore deposits. While it has become apparent that volatile-rich magmatic fluids play a crucial role in many BAB hydrothermal systems, the source of metals to the vent fluids, including ore-forming metals such as Cu, Zn and precious metals such as Ag and Au, has been a matter of debate [1]. Here, we applied coupled Cu and Zn stable isotopes to delineate if metal enrichment patterns in back-arc hydrothermal systems reflect (1) water-rock reactions with felsic host rock at low pH, (2) direct input of metal-rich magmatic volatiles, (3) remobilization from previously deposited sulfide or enriched source rock compositions. We measured Cu and Zn isotope composition of hydrothermal fluids from ten vents located in the eastern Manus BAB, Papua New Guinea (cruise MLGN06MV, R/V Melville, ROV Jason II). Purified samples were measured by MC-ICP-MS (Neptune) at IFREMER and data were corrected from instrumental mass bias using internal normalization [2], with an overall precision of 0.03‰ (2s). Cu isotopic ratios were reported relative to the NIST SRM 976 standard while Zn isotopic ratios were reported relative to IRMM 3702, having a δ66Zn value of 0.3‰ relative to Lyon-JMC standard. For the first time, Cu isotope composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids were investigated and results show systematic enrichment in heavy Cu isotopes relative to basalt values (δ65CuNIST976= 0.3‰ +/- 0.2‰, n=30). In general, the variations of δ65Cu values in hydrothermal fluids are consistent with δ65Cu values in chalcopyrite lining hydrothermal chimneys. In some case, heavier δ65Cu values of Cu-sulfides related to Cu in the fluids are interpreted to result from Cu-isotope fractionation during Cu oxidation and precipitation within local chimney

  10. Sill intrusion driven fluid flow and vent formation in volcanic basins: Modeling rates of volatile release and paleoclimate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of mass extinction events in conjunction with climate change occur throughout the geological record and may be accompanied by pronounced negative carbon isotope excursions. The processes that trigger such globally destructive changes are still under considerable debate. These include mechanisms such as poisoning from trace metals released during large volcanic eruptions (Vogt, 1972), CO2 released from lava degassing during the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) (Courtillot and Renne, 2003) and CH4 release during the destabilization of sub-seafloor methane (Dickens et al., 1995), to name a few. Thermogenic methane derived from contact metamorphism associated with magma emplacement and cooling in sedimentary basins has been recently gaining considerable attention as a potential mechanism that may have triggered global climate events in the past (e.g. Svensen and Jamtveit, 2010). The discovery of hydrothermal vent complexes that are spatially associated with such basins also supports the discharge of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g. Jamtveit et al., 2004; Planke et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2006). A previous study that investigated this process using a fluid flow model (Iyer et al., 2013) suggested that although hydrothermal plume formation resulting from sill emplacement may indeed release large quantities of methane at the surface, the rate at which this methane is released into the atmosphere is too slow to trigger, by itself, some of the negative δ13C excursions observed in the fossil record over short time scales observed in the fossil record. Here, we reinvestigate the rates of gas release during sill emplacement in a case study from the Harstad Basin off-shore Norway with a special emphasis on vent formation. The presented study is based on a seismic line that crosses multiple sill structures emplaced around 55 Ma within the Lower Cretaceous sediments. A single well-defined vent complex is interpreted above the termination of the

  11. Development and field application of a 6-bottle serial gas-tight fluid sampler for collecting seafloor cold seep and hydrothermal vent fluids with autonomous operation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Ding, K.; Yang, C.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Tan, C.; Schaen, A. T.; Luhmann, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    A 6-bottle serial gas-tight sampler (so-called "six-shooter") was developed for application with deep-sea vent fluids. The new device is composed of a custom-made 6-channel valve manifold and six sampling bottles which are circularly distributed around the valve manifold. Each valve channel consists of a high-pressure titanium cartridge valve and a motor-driven actuator. A sampling snorkel is connected to the inlet of the manifold that delivers the incoming fluid to different bottles. Each sampling bottle has a 160 ml-volume chamber and an accumulator chamber inside where compressed nitrogen is used to maintain the sample at near in-situ pressure. An electronics chamber that is located at the center of the sampler is used to carry out all sampling operations, autonomously, if desired. The sampler is of a compact circular configuration with a diameter of 26 cm and a length of 54 cm. During the SVC cruise AT 26-12, the sampler was deployed by DSV2 Alvin at a cold seep site MC036 with a depth of 1090 m in the Gulf of Mexico. The sampler collected fluid samples automatically following the tidal cycle to monitor the potential impact of the tide cycle on the fluid chemistry of cold seep in a period of two day. During the cruise AT 26-17, the sampler was used with newly upgraded DSV2 Alvin three times at the hydrothermal vent sites along Axial Seamount and Main Endeavor Field on Juan de Fuca Ridge. During a 4-day deployment at Anemone diffuse site (Axial Caldera), the sampler was set to work in an autonomous mode to collect fluid samples according to the preset interval. During other dives, the sampler was manually controlled via ICL (Inductively Coupled Link) communication through the hull. Gas-tight fluid samples were collected from different hydrothermal vents with temperatures between 267 ℃ and 335 ℃ at the depth up to 2200 m. The field results indicate unique advantages of the design. It can be deployed in extended time period with remote operation or working

  12. The study of active submarine volcanoes and hydrothermal vents in the Southernmost Part of Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Tsai, C.; Lee, C.

    2004-12-01

    The study area is located in the Southernmost Part of Okinawa Trough (SPOT), which is a back-arc basin formed by extension of Eurasian plate. Previous research indicated two extensional stages in SPOT area. Many normal-fault structures were come into existence during both extensional processes. The SPOT is presently in an activity tectonic episode. Therefore, the area becomes a frequent earthquake and abundant magmatism. The purpose of this study is to discuss which relationship between tectonics, submarine volcanoes and hydrothermal vents in SPOT area. The investigations are continued from 1998 to 2004, we have found at least twelve active hydrothermal vents in study area. Compare the locations hydrothermal vents with fault systems, we find both of them have highly correlated. We can distinguish them into two shapes, pyramidal shape and non-pyramidal shape. According to plumes height, we are able to divide these vents into two groups near east longitude 122.5° . East of this longitude, the hydrothermal plumes are more powerful and west of it are the weaker. This is closely related to the present extensional axis (N80° E) of the southern part of the Okinawa Trough. This can be explained the reason of why the more powerful vents coming out of the east group. The east group is associated with the present back-arc spreading system. West of 122.5° , the spreading system are in a primary stage. The andesitic volcanic island, the Turtle Island, is a result of N60° E extensional tectonism with a lot of faults. Besides the pyramidal shape, this can be proved indirectly. The vents located in the west side were occurred from previous extensional faults and are weaker than the eastern. Therefore, we suggest that if last the extension keeps going on, the hydrothermal vents located at the west side of the longitude 122.5° will be intensified.

  13. Stable isotopes in seafloor hydrothermal systems: Vent fluids, hydrothermal deposits, hydrothermal alteration, and microbial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, Wayne C.

    2001-01-01

    The recognition of abundant and widespread hydrothermal activity and associated unique life-forms on the ocean floor is one of the great scientific discoveries of the latter half of the twentieth century. Studies of seafloor hydrothermal processes have led to revolutions in understanding fluid convection and the cooling of the ocean crust, the chemical and isotopic mass balance of the oceans, the origin of stratiform and statabound massive-sulfide ore-deposits, the origin of greenstones and serpentinites, and the potential importance of the subseafloor biosphere. Stable isotope geochemistry has been a critical and definitive tool from the very beginning of the modern era of seafloor exploration.

  14. Venting formation fluids from deep-sea boreholes in a ridge flank setting: ODP Sites 1025 and 1026

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Jannasch, Hans W.; Kastner, Miriam; Plant, Josh N.; Decarlo, Eric H.; Lebon, Geoff

    2004-08-01

    During ODP Leg 168, two of ten boreholes, ODP Holes 1025C and 1026B, were cased through the sediment section, penetrated basaltic crust that is overpressured, and sealed. In 1999 and 2000 the seals were removed, allowing crustal formation fluids to vent and be sampled. The composition of these fluids is compared to those of basal deep-sea pore waters, which have been the basis for estimating geochemical fluxes from low-temperature ridge flank hydrothermal systems. Estimates for the composition of the major ions in formation fluids based on basal pore waters are within 5% of the values measured in borehole fluids. Similar comparisons for minor and trace elements are not as good; some are reactive in the sediment section, resulting in large uncertainties in the pore water extrapolation, while others are influenced by a variety of contaminants, including steel, grease, drilling muds, and basal sediment. Evidence for contamination includes high dissolved and particulate concentrations of several metals (e.g., Fe, Cu, Co, Zn, and Pb) and measurable changes in concentration during the past four years in response to reaction with basal sediment. This new confidence in estimating the primary composition of formation fluids, coupled with advances in thermodynamic and kinetic models, reveals the possibility of anhydrite precipitation in ridge flank hydrothermal systems at temperatures of ˜70°C. Such new insights allow us to address the timing and conditions under which seawater-crustal reactions occur, leading to more accurate models of crustal evolution.

  15. Evidence of sub-vent biosphere: enzymatic activities in 308 °C deep-sea hydrothermal systems at Suiyo seamount, Izu Bonin Arc, Western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshinori; Edazawa, Yae; Kobayashi, Kensei; Urabe, Tetsuro; Marumo, Katsumi

    2005-01-01

    A high-temperature deep-sea hydrothermal system related to dacitic arc-volcanism was drilled using a tethered, submarine rock-drill system as a part of the Archaean Park Project. The benthic multi-coring system (BMS) employed allowed for direct sampling of microorganisms, rocks and fluids beneath hydrothermal vents. The samples examined in this study were from sites APSK 05 and APSK 07 on the Suiyo Seamount of the Izu-Bonin Arc in the Pacific Ocean. Based on the vertical distribution of samples derived from this vigorous sub-vent environment, a model of deep-sea subterranean chemistry and biology was determined detailing optimal microbial activities. Deep-sea hydrothermal sub-vent core samples of dacitic arc-volcanism obtained at the Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Western Pacific Ocean were analyzed for acid and alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activities. Useful biomarkers of acid phosphatase (ACP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzymatic activities were positively correlated against each other and was greatest at the partial middle core sequences; ACP and ALP activities determined were as high as 5.10 and 6.80 nmol/min/g rock, respectively. Biochemical indicators of ACP and ALP were consistent with the origin of biogenic amino acids occupied in the sub-vent region and microbial cell number in the fluid. The significant enzymatic activities demonstrated in this study provides crucial evidence that sub-vent regions represent part of the previously unknown extreme-environment biosphere, extending the known subterranean habitable spaces of, for example, extremophilic microbes. This boring trial was first example of discharging high temperature hydrothermal activities at the frontal arc volcanoes.

  16. Ecology of deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, R.A.; Kennish, M.J. )

    1993-08-01

    The present article reviews studies of the past 15 years of active and inactive hydrothermal vents. The focus of the discussion is on the ecology of the biological communities inhabiting hydrothermal vents. These communities exhibit high densities and biomass, low species diversity, rapid growth rates, and high metabolic rates. The authors attempt to relate the biology of hydrothermal vent systems to geology. Future directions for hydrothermal vent research are suggested. Since many vent populations are dependent on hydrothermal fluids and are consequently unstable, both short- and long-term aspects of the ecology of the vent organisms and the influence of chemical and geological factors on the biology of vent systems need to be established. 200 refs., 28 figs.

  17. Discovery of Nascent Vents and Recent Colonization Associated with(Re)activated Hydrothermal Vent Fields by the GALREX 2011 Expedition on the Galápagos Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shank, T. M.; Holden, J. F.; Herrera, S.; Munro, C.; Muric, T.; Lin, J.; Stuart, L.

    2011-12-01

    GALREX 2011 was a NOAA OER telepresence cruise that explored the diverse habitats and geologic settings of the deep Galápagos region. The expedition made12 Little Hercules ROV dives in July 2011.Abundant corals and a strong depth zonation of species (including deepwater coral communities) were found near 500 m depth on Paramount Seamount, likely influenced by past low sea level states, wave-cut terrace processes, and the historical presence of shallow reef structures. At fresh lava flows with associated (flocculent) hydrothermal venting near 88° W, now known as Uka Pacha and Pegasus Vent Fields, rocks were coated with white microbial mat and lacked sessile fauna, with few mobile fauna (e.g., bythograeid crabs, alvinocarid shrimp, polynoid worms, zoarcid fish, and dirivultid copepods). This suggests a recent creation of hydrothermal habitats through volcanic eruptions and/or diking events, which may have taken place over a 15 km span separating the two vent fields. The Rosebud vent field at 86°W was not observed and may have been covered with lava since last visited in 2005. A hydrothermal vent field near 86°W was discovered that is one of the largest vent fields known on the Rift (120m by 40m). Low-temperature vent habitats were colonized by low numbers of tubeworms including Riftia, Oasisia, and a potential Tevnia species (the latter not previously observed on the Galapagos Rift). Patches of tubeworms were observed with individuals less than 2cm in length, and the relatively few large Riftia had tube lengths near 70cm long. Large numbers of small (< 3cm long) bathymodiolin mussels lined cracks and crevices throughout the active part of the field. Live clams, at least four species of gastropod limpets, three species of polynoid polychaetes, juvenile and adult alvinocarid shrimp, actinostolid anemones, and white microbial communities were observed on the underside and vertical surfaces of basalt rock surfaces. There were at least 13 species of vent-endemic fauna

  18. A Search for Biomarkers in Microbial Origin in Hydrothermal Fluids From Hydrothermal Vents at the Suiyo Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, F.; Yamanaka, T.

    2002-12-01

    We tried to search biomarkers in microbial origin in hot fluids from hydrothermal vents. Hot water samples were collected from three natural hydrothermal vents (Tmax. = 310, 221, and 48°\\ C) and a drilled core (APSK05, Tmax. = 21°\\ C) located in a seafloor hydrothermal system developed on atop of the Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Ogasawara island-arc, western Pasific, using a ROV Hakuyo 2000, during the Shinsei-Maru cruise in July-August 2001 and the Shinryu-Maru cruise in August 2002. Hot water passed through a ODS disk (Empore Extraction Disk 90mmφ ) with a pre-filter (pore size 1μm), and dissolved organic matter was adsorbed on the ODS disk. The adsorbed organic matter was eluted with toluene using Soxhlet extractor for 12h. After the eluents were concentrated, they were analyzed by GCMS. Some hydrocarbons that show basepeak at M/Z = 69 were found in hot water from APSK05, and these compounds may indicate the existence of alkylcyclopentanes that are characteristic for some thermoacidophilic bacteria, and that have been reported from the seafloor deposits of the Suiyo Seamount.

  19. Molecular Diversity and Activity of Methanogens in the Subseafloor at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents of the Pacific Ocean (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Merkel, A.; Holden, J. F.; Lilley, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Methanogenesis is thought to represent one of the most ancient metabolic pathways on Earth, and methanogens may serve as important primary producers in warm crustal habitats at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Many of these obligate chemolithoautotrophs depend solely on geochemically-derived energy and carbon sources and grow at high temperatures under strictly anaerobic conditions. A combined geochemical and microbiological approach was used to determine the distribution and molecular diversity of methanogens in low temperature diffuse vent fluids from the Endeavour Segment R2K ISS site, as well as Axial Seamount and volcanoes of the Mariana Arc. Geochemical data from hot and adjacent warm diffuse vent fluids provided chemical indicators to guide sample selection for detailed polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis of the key enzyme for methane formation, methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA), as well as archaeal 16S rRNA genes. At most Endeavour vent sites, hydrogen concentrations were too low to support hydrogenotrophic methanogensis directly and only one diffuse site, Easter Island, had a positive signal for the mcrA gene. These sequences were most closely related to members of the order Methanococcales, as well as anaerobic methane oxidizers (ANME-1). The presence of ANME, which are rarely found in non-sedimented marine environments, is another line of evidence supporting the occurrence of buried sediments at Endeavour. At Axial, a number of diffuse vents have strong chemical indicators of methanogenesis. Methanogenic communities were detected at 3 sites on the southeast side of the caldera: the northern end of the 1998 lava flow, the International District, and on the pre-1987 lava flow. Time series work at Marker 113 showed that in 4 different years over the last 6 years methanogenic communities are active and abundant, suggesting a stable anaerobic, warm subseafloor habitat. Results show that members of the order Methanococcales dominate at this site

  20. Quantifying diffuse and discrete venting at the Tour Eiffel vent site, Lucky Strike hydrothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstaedt, Eric; EscartíN, Javier; Gracias, Nuno; Olive, Jean-Arthur; Barreyre, Thibaut; Davaille, Anne; Cannat, Mathilde; Garcia, Rafael

    2012-04-01

    The relative heat carried by diffuse versus discrete venting of hydrothermal fluids at mid-ocean ridges is poorly constrained and likely varies among vent sites. Estimates of the proportion of heat carried by diffuse flow range from 0% to 100% of the total axial heat flux. Here, we present an approach that integrates imagery, video, and temperature measurements to accurately estimate this partitioning at a single vent site, Tour Eiffel in the Lucky Strike hydrothermal field along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Fluid temperatures, photographic mosaics of the vent site, and video sequences of fluid flow were acquired during the Bathyluck'09 cruise (Fall, 2009) and the Momarsat'10 cruise (Summer, 2010) to the Lucky Strike hydrothermal field by the ROV Victor6000 aboard the French research vessel the "Pourquoi Pas"? (IFREMER, France). We use two optical methods to calculate the velocities of imaged hydrothermal fluids: (1) for diffuse venting, Diffuse Flow Velocimetry tracks the displacement of refractive index anomalies through time, and (2) for discrete jets, Particle Image Velocimetry tracks eddies by cross-correlation of pixel intensities between subsequent images. To circumvent video blurring associated with rapid velocities at vent orifices, exit velocities at discrete vents are calculated from the best fit of the observed velocity field to a model of a steady state turbulent plume where we vary the model vent radius and fluid exit velocity. Our results yield vertical velocities of diffuse effluent between 0.9 cm s-1 and 11.1 cm s-1 for fluid temperatures between 3°C and 33.5°C above that of ambient seawater, and exit velocities of discrete jets between 22 cm s-1 and 119 cm s-1 for fluid temperatures between 200°C and 301°C above ambient seawater. Using the calculated fluid velocities, temperature measurements, and photo mosaics of the actively venting areas, we calculate a heat flux due to diffuse venting from thin fractures of 3.15 ± 2.22 MW, discrete venting of

  1. In-Situ pH Measurements in Mid-Ocean Ridge Hydrothermal Vent Fluids: Constraints on Subseafloor Alteration Processes at Crustal Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaen, A. T.; Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Developments in electrochemistry and material science have facilitated the construction of ceramic (YSZ) based chemical sensor systems that can be used to measure and monitor pH and redox in aqueous fluids at elevated temperatures and pressures. In recent years, these sensor systems have been deployed to acquire real-time and time series in-situ data for high-temperature hydrothermal vent fluids at the Main Endeavour Field (Juan de Fuca Ridge), 9oN (East Pacific Rise), and at the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow field (36oN, Mid-Atlantic Ridge). Here we review in-situ pH data measured at these sites and apply these data to estimate the pH of fluids ascending to the seafloor from hydrothermal alteration zones deeper in the crust. In general, in-situ pH measured at virtually all vent sites is well in excess of that measured shipboard owing to the effects of temperature on the distribution of aqueous species and the solubility of metal sulfides, especially Cu and Zn, originally dissolved in the vent fluids. In situ pH measurements determined at MEF (Sully vent) and EPR 9oN (P-vent) in 2005 and 2008 were 4.4 ×0.02 and 5.05×0.05, respectively. The temperature and pressure (seafloor) of the vent fluids at each of the respective sites were 356oC and 220 bar, and 380oC and 250 bar. Plotting these data with respect to fluid density reveals that the in-situ pH of each vent fluid is approximately 1.5 pH units below neutrality. The density-pH (in-situ) correlation, however, is important because it provides a means from which the vent fluids were derived. Using dissolved silica and chloride from fluid samples at the MEF (Sully) suggest T/P conditions of approximately 435oC, 380 bar, based on quartz-fluid and NaCl-H2O systems. At the fluid density calculated for these conditions, pH (in-situ) is predicted to be ~6.2. Attempts are presently underway to assess the effect of the calculated pH on metal sulfide and silicate (e.g., plagioclase, chlorite) solubility in comparison with

  2. Hydrothermal activity on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Tectonically- and volcanically-controlled venting at 4 5°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Bennett, S. A.; Connelly, D. P.; Evans, A. J.; Murton, B. J.; Parson, L. M.; Prien, R. D.; Ramirez-Llodra, E.; Jakuba, M.; Shank, T. M.; Yoerger, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Nakamura, K.

    2008-09-01

    We report results from an investigation of the geologic processes controlling hydrothermal activity along the previously-unstudied southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (3-7°S). Our study employed the NOC (UK) deep-tow sidescan sonar instrument, TOBI, in concert with the WHOI (USA) autonomous underwater vehicle, ABE, to collect information concerning hydrothermal plume distributions in the water column co-registered with geologic investigations of the underlying seafloor. Two areas of high-temperature hydrothermal venting were identified. The first was situated in a non-transform discontinuity (NTD) between two adjacent second-order ridge-segments near 4°02'S, distant from any neovolcanic activity. This geologic setting is very similar to that of the ultramafic-hosted and tectonically-controlled Rainbow vent-site on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The second site was located at 4°48'S at the axial-summit centre of a second-order ridge-segment. There, high-temperature venting is hosted in an ˜ 18 km 2 area of young lava flows which in some cases are observed to have flowed over and engulfed pre-existing chemosynthetic vent-fauna. In both appearance and extent, these lava flows are directly reminiscent of those emplaced in Winter 2005-06 at the East Pacific Rise, 9°50'N and reference to global seismic catalogues reveals that a swarm of large (M 4.6-5.6) seismic events was centred on the 5°S segment over a ˜ 24 h period in late June 2002, perhaps indicating the precise timing of this volcanic eruptive episode. Temperature measurements at one of the vents found directly adjacent to the fresh lava flows at 5°S MAR (Turtle Pits) have subsequently revealed vent-fluids that are actively phase separating under conditions very close to the Critical Point for seawater, at ˜ 3000 m depth and 407 °C: the hottest vent-fluids yet reported from anywhere along the global ridge crest.

  3. Reduction of Carbon Dioxide in Filtering Facepiece Respirators with an Active-Venting System: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Birgersson, Erik; Tang, Ee Ho; Lee, Wei Liang Jerome; Sak, Kwok Jiang

    2015-01-01

    During expiration, the carbon dioxide (CO2) levels inside the dead space of a filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) increase significantly above the ambient concentration. To reduce the CO2 concentration inside the dead space, we attach an active lightweight venting system (AVS) comprising a one-way valve, a blower and a battery in a housing to a FFR. The achieved reduction is quantified with a computational-fluid-dynamics model that considers conservation of mass, momentum and the dilute species, CO2, inside the FFR with and without the AVS. The results suggest that the AVS can reduce the CO2 levels inside the dead space at the end of expiration to around 0.4% as compared to a standard FFR, for which the CO2 levels during expiration reach the same concentration as that of the expired alveolar air at around 5%. In particular, during inspiration, the average CO2 volume fraction drops to near-to ambient levels of around 0.08% with the AVS. Overall, the time-averaged CO2 volume fractions inside the dead space for the standard FFR and the one with AVS are around 3% and 0.3% respectively. Further, the ability of the AVS to vent the dead-space air in the form of a jet into the ambient - similar to the jets arising from natural expiration without a FFR - ensures that the expired air is removed and diluted more efficiently than a standard FFR.

  4. Reduction of Carbon Dioxide in Filtering Facepiece Respirators with an Active-Venting System: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Birgersson, Erik; Tang, Ee Ho; Lee, Wei Liang Jerome; Sak, Kwok Jiang

    2015-01-01

    During expiration, the carbon dioxide (CO2) levels inside the dead space of a filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) increase significantly above the ambient concentration. To reduce the CO2 concentration inside the dead space, we attach an active lightweight venting system (AVS) comprising a one-way valve, a blower and a battery in a housing to a FFR. The achieved reduction is quantified with a computational-fluid-dynamics model that considers conservation of mass, momentum and the dilute species, CO2, inside the FFR with and without the AVS. The results suggest that the AVS can reduce the CO2 levels inside the dead space at the end of expiration to around 0.4% as compared to a standard FFR, for which the CO2 levels during expiration reach the same concentration as that of the expired alveolar air at around 5%. In particular, during inspiration, the average CO2 volume fraction drops to near-to ambient levels of around 0.08% with the AVS. Overall, the time-averaged CO2 volume fractions inside the dead space for the standard FFR and the one with AVS are around 3% and 0.3% respectively. Further, the ability of the AVS to vent the dead-space air in the form of a jet into the ambient – similar to the jets arising from natural expiration without a FFR – ensures that the expired air is removed and diluted more efficiently than a standard FFR. PMID:26115090

  5. The roar of Yasur: Handheld audio recorder monitoring of Vanuatu volcanic vent activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Howell, Robert; Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.

    2016-08-01

    We describe how near-field audio recording using a pocket digital sound recorder can usefully document volcanic activity, demonstrating the approach at Yasur, Vanuatu in May 2014. Prominent emissions peak at 263 Hz, interpreted as an organ-pipe mode. High-pass filtering was found to usefully discriminate volcano vent noise from wind noise, and autocorrelation of the high pass acoustic power reveals a prominent peak in exhalation intervals of 2.5, 4 and 8 s, with a number of larger explosive events at 200 s intervals. We suggest that this compact and inexpensive audio instrumentation can usefully supplement other field monitoring such as seismic or infrasound. A simple estimate of acoustic power interpreted with a dipole jet noise model yielded vent velocities too low to be compatible with pyroclast emission, suggesting difficulties with this approach at audio frequencies (perhaps due to acoustic absorption by volcanic gases).

  6. The Lost City hydrothermal system: Constraints imposed by vent fluid chemistry and reaction path models on subseafloor heat and mass transfer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, W. E.; Pester, Nicholas J.; Tutolo, Benjamin M.; Ding, Kang

    2015-08-01

    Since the first reported discovery of the Lost City hydrothermal system in 2001, it was recognized that seawater alteration of ultramafic rocks plays a key role in the composition of the coexisting vent fluids. The unusually high pH and high concentrations of H2 and CH4 provide compelling evidence for this. Here we report the chemistry of hydrothermal fluids sampled from two vent structures (Beehive: ∼90-116 °C, and M6: ∼75 °C) at Lost City in 2008 during cruise KNOX18RR using ROV Jason 2 and R/V Revelle assets. The vent fluid chemistry at both sites reveals considerable overlap in concentrations of dissolved gases (H2, CH4), trace elements (Cs, Rb, Li, B and Sr), and major elements (SO4, Ca, K, Na, Cl), including a surprising decrease in dissolved Cl, suggesting a common source fluid is feeding both sites. The absence of Mg and relatively high concentrations of Ca and sulfate suggest solubility control by serpentine-diopside-anhydrite, while trace alkali concentrations, especially Rb and Cs, are high, assuming a depleted mantle protolith. In both cases, but especially for Beehive vent fluid, the silica concentrations are well in excess of those expected for peridotite alteration and the coexistence of serpentine-brucite at all reasonable temperatures. However, both the measured pH and silica values are in better agreement with serpentine-diopside-tremolite-equilibria. Geochemical modeling demonstrates that reaction of plagioclase with serpentinized peridotite can shift the chemical system away from brucite and into the tremolite stability field. This is consistent with the complex intermingling of peridotite and gabbroic bodies commonly observed within the Atlantis Massif. We speculate the existence of such plagioclase bearing peridotite may also account for the highly enriched trace alkali (Cs, Rb) concentrations in the Lost City vent fluids. Additionally, reactive transport modeling taking explicit account of temperature dependent rates of mineral

  7. Cinnabar, arsenian pyrite and thallium-enrichment in active shallow submarine hydrothermal vents at Paleochori Bay, Milos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kati, Marianna; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Magganas, Andreas; Baltatzis, Emmanouil; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Mavrogonatos, Constantinos

    2015-04-01

    We herein report the discovery of active cinnabar-depositing hydrothermal vents in a submarine setting at Paleochori Bay, within the offshore southeastern extension of the Milos Island Geothermal Field, South Aegean Active Volcanic Arc. Active, low temperature (up to 115 °C) hydrothermal venting through volcaniclastic material has led to a varied assemblage of sulfide and alteration mineral phases in an area of approximately 1 km2. Our samples recovered from Paleochori Bay are hydrothermal edifices composed of volcaniclastic detrital material cemented by pyrite, or pure sulfide (mainly massive pyrite) mounts. Besides pyrite and minor marcasite, the hydrothermal minerals include cinnabar, amorphous silica, hydrous ferric oxides, carbonates (aragonite and calcite), alunite-jarosite solid solution and Sr-rich barite. Among others, growth textures, sieve-textured pyrite associated with barite, alunite-jarosite solid solution and hydrous ferric oxides rims colloform-banded pyrite layers. Overgrowths of arsenian pyrite layers (up to 3.2 wt. % As and/or up to 1.1 wt. % Mn) onto As-free pyrite indicate fluctuation in As content of the hydrothermal fluid. Mercury, in the form of cinnabar, occurs in up to 5 μm grains within arsenian pyrite layers, usually forming distinct cinnabar-enriched micro-layers. Hydrothermal Sr-rich barite (barite-celestine solid solution), pseudocubic alunite-jarosite solid solution and Mn- and Sr-enriched carbonates occur in various amounts and closely associated with pyrite and/or hydrous ferric oxides. Thallium-bearing sulfides and/or sulfosalts were not detected during our study; however, hydrous ferric oxides show thallium content of up to 0.5 wt. % Tl. The following scenarios may have played a role in pyrite precipitation at Paleochori: (a) H2S originally dissolved in the deep fluid but separated upon boiling could have reacted with oxygenated seawater under production of sulphuric acid, thus causing leaching and dissolution of primary iron

  8. Fluid venting and seepage at accretionary ridges: the Four Way Closure Ridge offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaucke, Ingo; Berndt, Christian; Crutchley, Gareth; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lin, Saulwood; Muff, Sina

    2016-06-01

    Within the accretionary prism offshore SW Taiwan, widespread gas hydrate accumulations are postulated to occur based on the presence of a bottom simulating reflection. Methane seepage, however, is also widespread at accretionary ridges offshore SW Taiwan and may indicate a significant loss of methane bypassing the gas hydrate system. Four Way Closure Ridge, located in 1,500 m water depth, is an anticlinal ridge that would constitute an ideal trap for methane and consequently represents a site with good potential for gas hydrate accumulations. The analysis of high-resolution bathymetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar imagery, high-resolution seismic profiling and towed video observations of the seafloor shows that Four Way Closure Ridge is and has been a site of intensive methane seepage. Continuous seepage is mainly evidenced by large accumulations of authigenic carbonate precipitates, which appear to be controlled by the creation of fluid pathways through faulting. Consequently, Four Way Closure Ridge is not a closed system in terms of fluid migration and seepage. A conceptual model of the evolution of gas hydrates and seepage at accretionary ridges suggests that seepage is common and may be a standard feature during the geological development of ridges in accretionary prisms. The observation of seafloor seepage alone is therefore not a reliable indicator of exploitable gas hydrate accumulations at depth.

  9. Relationship Between Subduction Erosion, Seamount Subduction, Fluid Venting and Mound Formation on the Slope of the Costa Rican Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, C.; Klaucke, I.; Weinrebe, W.

    2006-12-01

    The oceanic crust off central Costa Rica northwest of the Cocos Ridge is dominated by chains of seamounts rising 1-2 km above the seafloor with diameters of up to 20 km. The subduction of these seamounts leads to strong indentations, scars and slides on the continental margin. A smoother segment of about 80 km width is located offshore Nicoya peninsula. The segment ends at a fracture zone which marks the transition of oceanic crust created at the Cocos-Nazca spreading center (CNS) and at the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Offshore Nicaragua the incoming EPR crust is dominated by bending related faults. To investigate the relationship between subduction erosion, fluid venting and mound formation, multibeam bathymetry and high-resolution deep-tow sidescan sonar and sediment echosounder data were acquired during R/V Sonne cruises SO163 and SO173 (2002/2003). The deep-tow system consisted of a dual-frequency 75/410 kHz sidescan sonar and a 2-12 kHz chirp sub-bottom profiler. The connection of the observed seafloor features to deeper subduction related processes is obtained by analysis of multi-channel streamer (MCS) data acquired during cruises SO81 (1992) and BGR99 (1999). Data examples and interpretations for different settings along the margin are presented. Near the Fisher seamount the large Nicoya slump failed over the flank of a huge subducted seamount. The sidescan and echosounder data permit a detailed characterization of fault patterns and fluid escape structures around the headwall of the slump. Where the fracture zone separating CNS and EPR crust subducts, the Hongo mound field was mapped in detail. Several mounds of up to 100 m height are located in line with a scar possibly created by a subducting ridge of the fracture zone. MCS data image a topographic high on the subducting oceanic crust beneath the mound field which lead to uplift and possibly enabled ascent of fluids from the subducting plate. The combined analysis of geoacoustic and seismic MCS data

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of Marine Bacterial Symbionts Retrieved from Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Eythorsdottir, Arnheidur; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Einarsson, Hjorleifur

    2016-06-01

    Marine sponges and other sessile macro-organisms were collected at a shallow water hydrothermal site in Eyjafjörður, Iceland. Bacteria were isolated from the organisms using selective media for actinomycetes, and the isolates were screened for antimicrobial activity. A total of 111 isolates revealed antimicrobial activity displaying different antimicrobial patterns which indicates production of various compounds. Known test strains were grown in the presence of ethyl acetate extracts from one selected isolate, and a clear growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus was observed down to 0.1 % extract concentration in the medium. Identification of isolates shows different species of Actinobacteria with Streptomyces sp. playing the largest role, but also members of Bacilli, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Sponges have an excellent record regarding production of bioactive compounds, often involving microbial symbionts. At the hydrothermal vents, however, the majority of active isolates originated from other invertebrates such as sea anemones or algae. The results indicate that antimicrobial assays involving isolates in full growth can detect activity not visible by other methods. The macro-organisms inhabiting the Eyjafjörður hydrothermal vent area host diverse microbial species in the phylum Actinobacteria with antimicrobial activity, and the compounds responsible for the activity will be subject to further research.

  11. Chemosynthetic microbial activity at Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirsen, Carl O.; Jannasch, Holger W.; Molyneaux, Stephen J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemosynthetic production of microbial biomass, determined by 14CO2 fixation and enzymatic (RuBisCo) activity, at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) 23° and 26°N vent sites was found in various niches: warm water emissions, loosely rock-attached flocculent material, dense morphologically diverse bacterial mats covering the surfaces of polymetal sulfide deposits, and filamentous microbes on the carapaces of shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata). The bacterial mats on polymetal sulfide surfaces contained unicellular and filamentous bacteria which appeared to use as their chemolithotrophic electron or energy source either dissolved reduced minerals from vent emissions, mainly sulfur compounds, or solid metal sulfide deposits, mainly pyrite. Moderately thermophilic Chemosynthetic activity was observed in carbon dioxide fixation experiments and in enrichments, but no thermophilic aerobic sulfur oxidizers could be isolated. Both obligate and facultative chemoautotrophs growing at mesophilic temperatures were isolated from all chemosynthetically active surface scrapings. The obligate autotrophs could oxidize sterilized MAR natural sulfide deposits as well as technical pyrite at near neutral pH, in addition to dissolved reduced sulfur compounds. While the grazing by shrimp on the surface mats of MAR metal sulfide deposits was observed and deemed important, the animals' primary occurrence in dense swarms near vent emissions suggests that they were feeding at these sites, where conditions for Chemosynthetic growth of their filamentous microbial epiflora were optimal. The data show that the transformation of geothermal energy at the massive polymetal sulfide deposits of the MAR is based on the lithoautotrophic oxidation of soluble sulfides and pyrites into microbial biomass.

  12. Coupled RNA-SIP and metatranscriptomics of active chemolithoautotrophic communities at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Huber, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic microbial community of the rocky subseafloor potentially provides a large amount of organic carbon to the deep ocean, yet our understanding of the activity and metabolic complexity of subseafloor organisms remains poorly described. A combination of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) analyses were used to identify the metabolic potential, expression patterns, and active autotrophic bacteria and archaea and their pathways present in low-temperature hydrothermal fluids from Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic results showed the presence of genes and transcripts for sulfur, hydrogen, and ammonium oxidation, oxygen respiration, denitrification, and methanogenesis, as well as multiple carbon fixation pathways. In RNA-SIP experiments across a range of temperatures under reducing conditions, the enriched 13C fractions showed differences in taxonomic and functional diversity. At 30 °C and 55 °C, Epsilonproteobacteria were dominant, oxidizing hydrogen and primarily reducing nitrate. Methanogenic archaea were also present at 55 °C, and were the only autotrophs present at 80 °C. Correspondingly, the predominant CO2 fixation pathways changed from the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle to the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway with increasing temperature. By coupling RNA-SIP with meta-omics, this study demonstrates the presence and activity of distinct chemolithoautotrophic communities across a thermal gradient of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. PMID:26872039

  13. Coupled RNA-SIP and metatranscriptomics of active chemolithoautotrophic communities at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Huber, Julie A

    2016-08-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic microbial community of the rocky subseafloor potentially provides a large amount of organic carbon to the deep ocean, yet our understanding of the activity and metabolic complexity of subseafloor organisms remains poorly described. A combination of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) analyses were used to identify the metabolic potential, expression patterns, and active autotrophic bacteria and archaea and their pathways present in low-temperature hydrothermal fluids from Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic results showed the presence of genes and transcripts for sulfur, hydrogen, and ammonium oxidation, oxygen respiration, denitrification, and methanogenesis, as well as multiple carbon fixation pathways. In RNA-SIP experiments across a range of temperatures under reducing conditions, the enriched (13)C fractions showed differences in taxonomic and functional diversity. At 30 °C and 55 °C, Epsilonproteobacteria were dominant, oxidizing hydrogen and primarily reducing nitrate. Methanogenic archaea were also present at 55 °C, and were the only autotrophs present at 80 °C. Correspondingly, the predominant CO2 fixation pathways changed from the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle to the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway with increasing temperature. By coupling RNA-SIP with meta-omics, this study demonstrates the presence and activity of distinct chemolithoautotrophic communities across a thermal gradient of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

  14. The vent microbiome: patterns and drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachiadaki, M.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial processes within deep-sea hydrothermal vents affect the global biogeochemical cycles. Still, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the microbiology and the biogeochemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal systems. Vents differ in temperature, host rock composition and fluid chemistry; factors that are hypothesized to shape the distribution of the microbial communities, their metabolic capabilities and their activities. Using large-scale single cell genomics, we obtained insights into the genomic content of several linkages of a diffuse flow vent. The genomes show high metabolic versatility. Sulfur oxidation appears to be predominant but there is the potential of using a variety of e- donors and acceptors to obtain energy. To further assess the ecological importance of the vent auto- and heterotrophs, the global biogeography of the analyzed lineages will be investigated by fragment recruitment of metagenomes produced from the same site as well as other hydrothermal systems. Metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic data will be integrated to examine the expression of the predominant metabolic pathways and thus the main energy sources driving chemoautotrophic production. The comparative analysis of the key players and associated pathways among various vent sites that differ in physicochemical characteristics is anticipated to decipher the patterns and drivers of the global dispersion and the local diversification of the vent microbiome.

  15. Chemical controls on the composition of vent fluids at 13°-11°N and 21°N, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Teresa Suter; Campbell, Andrew C.; Measures, Chris I.; Spivack, Arthur J.; Khadem, Mitra; Edmond, John M.

    1988-05-01

    Six vent fields sampled at 13°-11°N, East Pacific Rise (EPR) in May 1984 exhibit large interfield variations and a much wider range of chemical compositions than previously observed at 21°N. Measured pH at 25°C are acidic, ranging from 3.1 to 3.7. Sodium and chloride vary from 40% lower to 30% higher than seawater. Iron concentrations range from 2 to 10 mmol/kg, compared with 0.7-2.5 mmol/kg at 21°N. Other sulfide-forming metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) are generally lower at 11°-13°N than at 21°N. Reliable temperature measurements were obtained at only two of the six vents and both were 350° ± 5°C. The vent fields at 21°N, EPR were resampled in August 1985, thus extending to almost 6 years the time period over which they have been monitored (previous expeditions were made in November 1979 and November 1981). Campbell et al. (this issue) have shown that the chemistry of the hydrothermal fluids from these fields has been very stable over the period of repeated observation. Equilibrium calculations for the fluids from the fields at 13°N and 21°N, using a greatly improved thermodynamic data base, are described in this report. They indicate that the chemistry is rock buffered and that the stability of these systems over time is a result of equilibrium control with respect to a greenschist-type mineral assemblage at depth. Calculated high-temperature pH of the fluids range from 4.1 to 4.7 with those from 13°-11°N at the more acidic end of the range. Calculated affinities show that the fluids are close to, or at, saturation with respect to quartz, albite, muscovite, smectite/chlorite, epidote, and pyrrhotite. The computations imply that lower-temperature vents such as National Geographic Smoker (NGS) (273°C) may have their silica concentrations controlled by equilibrium with respect to a phase other than quartz. A comparison of fluid chemistry between NGS and vent 5 at 11°N suggests that the latter vent may also have a temperature < 300°C. While the fluid

  16. Active seafloor gas vents on the Shelf and upper Slope in Canadian Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, C. K.; Dallimore, S. R.; Hughes Clarke, J. E.; Blasco, S.; Taylor, A. E.; Melling, H.; Vagle, S.; Conway, K.; Riedel, M.; Lundsten, E.; Gwiazda, R.

    2012-12-01

    seafloor topographic features on the continental slope suggests these are also active vent sites. Vigorous degassing of methane and pore water freshening in cores from features suggest the presence of near seafloor gas hydrate accumulations. If correct, a feature at 290m depth hosts the shallowest known marine gas hydrate occurrence. Here a layer of very cold ocean waters (-1.7°C) extends to ~200m depths, below which the temperature increases slowly with depth. A consequence of the exceptionally low upper water column temperatures is that the top of the methane hydrate stability zone is only slightly shallower that the 290m seafloor feature. Thus, gas hydrate harbored within seafloor sediments at 290m is vulnerable to decomposition with even subtle climatically-induced warming of the overlying water. Further geoscience studies are planned for 2012 and 2013 to study geological processes, geohazards and the sensitivity of the shelf / slope setting to climate change in the Arctic.

  17. Passive vs. active degassing modes at an open-vent volcano (Stromboli, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, G.; Aiuppa, A.; Kantzas, E. P.; McGonigle, A. J. S.; Ripepe, M.

    2012-12-01

    We report here on a UV-camera based field experiment performed on Stromboli volcano during 7 days in 2010 and 2011, aimed at obtaining the very first simultaneous assessment of all the different forms (passive and active) of SO2 release from an open-vent volcano. Using the unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution of the UV camera, we obtained a 0.8 Hz record of the total SO2 flux from Stromboli over a timeframe of ∼14 h, which ranged between 0.4 and 1.9 kg s-1 around a mean value of 0.7 kg s-1 and we concurrently derived SO2 masses for more than 130 Strombolian explosions and 50 gas puffs. From this, we show erupted SO2 masses have a variability of up to one order of magnitude, and range between 2 and 55 kg (average ∼20 kg), corresponding to a time integrated flux of 0.05±0.01 kg s-1. Our experimental constraints on individual gas puff mass (0.03-0.42 kg of SO2, averaging 0.19 kg) are the first of their kind, equating to an emission rate ranging from 0.02 to 0.27 kg s-1. On this basis, we conclude that puffing is two times more efficient than Strombolian explosions in the magmatic degassing process, and that active degassing (explosions+puffing) accounts for ∼23% (ranging from 10% to 45%) of the volcano's total SO2 flux, e.g., passive degassing between the explosions contributes the majority (∼77%) of the released gas. We furthermore integrate our UV camera gas data for the explosions and puffs, with independent geophysical data (infrared radiometer data and very long period seismicity), to offer key and novel insights into the degassing dynamics within the shallow conduit systems of this open-vent volcano.

  18. Decline of a Hydrothermal Vent Field - Escanaba Trough 12 Years Later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Davis, A. S.; Lilley, M. D.; McClain, J. S.; Olson, E. S.; Ross, S. L.; Von Damm, K. L.

    2001-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting was discovered in Escanaba Trough, the southern sediment-covered portion of the Gorda Ridge, in 1988. Large pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide mounds are abundant at each of the volcanic/intrusive centers that have been investigated in Escanaba Trough, but the only area of known hydrothermal venting is the NESCA site along the ridge axis at 41\\deg N. Hydrothermal fluids venting at 217\\deg C and 108\\deg C were sampled in 1988 on two sulfide mounds separated by about 275 m. The end-member fluid compositions were indistinguishable within analytical errors. Several sulfide mounds were observed in 1988 which had diffusely venting low temperature (< 20\\deg C) fluids that supported extensive vent communities dominated by fields of Ridgia. Nine holes were drilled in the NESCA area in 1996 on ODP Leg 169, including Hole 1036I that penetrated to basaltic basement at 405 m below sea floor (mbsf). Surveys of the area using the drill string camera located only one area of active venting at the same mound where 217\\deg C vent fluids were sampled from two active vents in 1988. Drill hole 1036A was spudded between the two active vents on this sulfide mound (approximately 4 and 8 m away) and penetrated to 115 mbsf. The NESCA site was revisited in 2000 using MBARI's R/V Western Flyer and ROV Tiburon. The hydrothermal vents appeared essentially identical to observations made from the drill string camera in 1996 despite the presence of a drill hole within meters of the two vents. The maximum vent temperature measured in 2000 was 212\\deg C. Fluid samples have major element and isotopic compositions very similar to those collected in 1988. The vent fluids have higher methane ( ~19 mmol/kg) than those from the geologically similar Middle Valley vent field, but lower values than those at Guaymas Basin. Drill hole 1036A was weakly venting, but the diffuse hydrothermal fluids could not be sampled with the equipment available. The walls of the drill hole were

  19. The thermal and chemical evolution of hydrothermal vent fluids in shale hosted massive sulphide (SHMS) systems from the MacMillan Pass district (Yukon, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnall, J. M.; Gleeson, S. A.; Blamey, N. J. F.; Paradis, S.; Luo, Y.

    2016-11-01

    At Macmillan Pass (YT, Canada), the hydrothermal vent complexes beneath two shale-hosted massive sulphide (SHMS) deposits (Tom, Jason) are well preserved within Late Devonian strata. These deposits provide a unique opportunity to constrain key geochemical parameters (temperature, salinity, pH, fO2, ΣS) that are critical for metal transport and deposition in SHMS systems, and to evaluate the interaction between hydrothermal fluids and the mudstone host rock. This has been achieved using a combination of detailed petrography, isotopic techniques (δ34S, δ13C and δ18O values), carbonate rare earth element analysis (LA-ICP-MS), fluid inclusion analysis (microthermometry, gas analysis via incremental crush fast scan mass spectrometry), and thermodynamic modelling. Two main paragenetic stages are preserved in both vent complexes: Stage 1 comprises pervasive ankerite alteration of the organic-rich mudstone host rock and crosscutting stockwork ankerite veining (±pyrobitumen, pyrite and quartz) and; Stage 2 consists of main stage massive sulphide (galena-pyrrhotite-pyrite ± chalcopyrite-sphalerite) and siderite (±quartz and barytocalcite) mineralisation. Co-variation of δ18O and δ13C values in ankerite can be described by temperature dependent fractionation and fluid rock interaction. Together with fluid inclusion microthermometry, this provides evidence of a steep thermal gradient (from 300 to ∼100 °C) over approximately 15 m stratigraphic depth, temporally and spatially constrained within the paragenesis of both vent complexes and developed under shallow lithostatic (<1 km; 250 bars) to hydrostatic (<400 m; 40 bars) conditions. There is evidence of mixing between diagenetic and hydrothermal fluids recorded in chondrite-normalised rare earth element (REE) profiles of ankerite and siderite. Middle REE enrichments and superchondritic Y/Ho ratios (>28), characteristic of diagenetic fluids, are coupled with positive europium anomalies and variable light REE

  20. New boron isotopic evidence for sedimentary and magmatic fluid influence in the shallow hydrothermal vent system of Milos Island (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shein-Fu; You, Chen-Feng; Lin, Yen-Po; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Baltatzis, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Magmatic sources may contribute a significant amount of volatiles in geothermal springs; however, their role is poorly understood in submarine hydrothermal systems worldwide. In this study, new results of B and δ11B in 41 hydrothermal vent waters collected from the shallow hydrothermal system of Milos island in the Aegean Sea were combined with previously published data from other tectonic settings and laboratory experiments to quantify the effects of phase separation, fluid/sediment interaction and magmatic contribution. Two Cl-extreme solutions were identified, high-Cl waters (Cl as high as 2000 mM) and low-Cl waters (Cl < 80 mM). Both sets of waters were characterized by high B/Cl (~ 1.2-5.3 × 10- 3 mol/mol) and extremely low δ11B (1.4-6.3‰), except for the waters with Mg content of near the seawater value and δ11B = 10.3-17.4‰. These high-Cl waters with high B/Cl and low δ11B plot close to the vent waters in sediment-hosted hydrothermal system (i.e., Okinawa Trough) or fumarole condensates from on-land volcanoes, implying B addition from sediment or magmatic fluids plays an important role. This is in agreement with fluid/sediment interactions resulting in the observed B and δ11B, as well as previously reported Br/I/Cl ratios, supporting a scenario of slab-derived fluid addition with elevated B, 11B-rich, and low Br/Cl and I/Cl, which is derived from the dehydration of subducted-sediments. The slab fluid becomes subsequently mixed with the parent magma of Milos. The deep brine reservoir is partially affected by injections of magmatic fluid/gases during degassing. The results presented here are crucial for deciphering the evolution of the brine reservoirs involved in phase separation, fluid/sediment interaction and magmatic contribution in the deep reaction zone of the Milos hydrothermal system; they also have implications in the understanding of the formation of metallic vein mineralization.

  1. Activity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria in the subsurface biosphere of diffuse hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Juniper, S. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Devol, A. H.; Kuypers, M. M. M.; Lavik, G.; Hallam, S. J.; Wenk, C. B.; Chang, B. X.; Murdock, S. A.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known about nitrogen (N) transformations in general, and the elimination of N in particular, at diffuse vents where anoxic hydrothermal fluids have mixed with oxygenated crustal seawater prior to discharge. Oceanic N sinks that remove bio-available N ultimately affect chemosynthetic primary productivity in these ecosystems. Using 15N paired isotope techniques, we determined potential rates of fixed N-loss pathways (denitrification, anammox) and dissimilative nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in sulfidic hydrothermal vent fluids discharging from the subsurface at several sites at Axial Volcano and the Endeavour Segment on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We also measured physico-chemical parameters (i.e. temperature, pH, nutrients, H2S and N2O concentrations) as well as the biodiversity and abundance of chemolithotrophic nitrate-reducing, sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria (SUP05 cluster) using sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes in combination with taxon-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Denitrification was the dominant N-loss pathway in the subsurface biosphere of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, with rates of up to ~1000 nmol N l-1 day-1. In comparison, anammox rates were always <5 nmol N l-1 day-1 and below the detection limit at most of the sites. DNRA rates were up to 152 nmol N l-1 day-1. These results suggest that bacterial denitrification out-competes anammox in sulfidic hydrothermal vent waters. Taxon-specific qPCR revealed that γ-proteobacteria of the SUP05 cluster sometimes dominated the microbial community (SUP05/total bacteria up to 38%). Significant correlation existed between fixed N-loss (i.e., denitrification, anammox) rates and in-situ nitrate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) deficits in the fluids, indicating that DIN availability may ultimately regulate N-loss in the subsurface. Based on our rate measurements, and on published data on hydrothermal fluid fluxes and residence

  2. Activity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria in the subsurface biosphere of diffuse hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, A.; Juniper, S. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Devol, A. H.; Kuypers, M. M. M.; Lavik, G.; Hallam, S. J.; Wenk, C. B.; Chang, B. X.; Murdock, S. A.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2012-11-01

    Little is known about fixed nitrogen (N) transformation and elimination at diffuse hydrothermal vents where anoxic fluids are mixed with oxygenated crustal seawater prior to discharge. Oceanic N sinks that remove bio-available N ultimately affect chemosynthetic primary productivity in these ecosystems. Using 15N paired isotope techniques, we determined potential rates of fixed N loss pathways (denitrification, anammox) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in sulfidic hydrothermal vent fluids discharging from the subsurface at several sites at Axial Volcano and the Endeavour Segment on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We also measured physico-chemical parameters (i.e., temperature, pH, nutrients, H2S and N2O concentrations) as well as the biodiversity and abundance of chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-reducing, sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria (SUP05 cluster) using sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes in combination with taxon-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Denitrification was the dominant N loss pathway in the subsurface biosphere of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, with rates of up to ~1000 nmol N l-1 day-1. In comparison, anammox rates were always < 5 nmol N l-1 day-1 and below the detection limit at most of the sites. DNRA rates were up to ~150 nmol N l-1 day-1. These results suggest that bacterial denitrification out-competes anammox in sulfidic hydrothermal vent waters. Taxon-specific qPCR revealed that γ-proteobacteria of the SUP05 cluster sometimes dominated the microbial community (SUP05/total bacteria up to 38%). Significant correlations were found between fixed N loss (i.e., denitrification, anammox) rates and in situ nitrate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) deficits in the fluids, indicating that DIN availability may ultimately regulate N loss in the subsurface. Based on our rate measurements, and on published data on hydrothermal fluid fluxes and residence times, we estimated

  3. Immersed Boundary Simulations of Active Fluid Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of active fluid droplets immersed in an external fluid in 2-dimensions using an Immersed Boundary method to simulate the fluid droplet interface as a Lagrangian mesh. We present results from two example systems, firstly an active isotropic fluid boundary consisting of particles that can bind and unbind from the interface and generate surface tension gradients through active contractility. Secondly, a droplet filled with an active polar fluid with homeotropic anchoring at the droplet interface. These two systems demonstrate spontaneous symmetry breaking and steady state dynamics resembling cell motility and division and show complex feedback mechanisms with minimal degrees of freedom. The simulations outlined here will be useful for quantifying the wide range of dynamics observable in these active systems and modelling the effects of confinement in a consistent and adaptable way. PMID:27606609

  4. A biogeographic network reveals evolutionary links between deep-sea hydrothermal vent and methane seep faunas.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Steffen

    2016-12-14

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents and methane seeps are inhabited by members of the same higher taxa but share few species, thus scientists have long sought habitats or regions of intermediate character that would facilitate connectivity among these habitats. Here, a network analysis of 79 vent, seep, and whale-fall communities with 121 genus-level taxa identified sedimented vents as a main intermediate link between the two types of ecosystems. Sedimented vents share hot, metal-rich fluids with mid-ocean ridge-type vents and soft sediment with seeps. Such sites are common along the active continental margins of the Pacific Ocean, facilitating connectivity among vent/seep faunas in this region. By contrast, sedimented vents are rare in the Atlantic Ocean, offering an explanation for the greater distinction between its vent and seep faunas compared with those of the Pacific Ocean. The distribution of subduction zones and associated back-arc basins, where sedimented vents are common, likely plays a major role in the evolutionary and biogeographic connectivity of vent and seep faunas. The hypothesis that decaying whale carcasses are dispersal stepping stones linking these environments is not supported.

  5. A reduced crustal magnetization zone near the first observed active hydrothermal vent field on the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Lin, Jian; Chen, Yongshun J.; Tao, Chunhui; German, Christopher R.; Yoerger, Dana R.; Tivey, Maurice A.

    2010-09-01

    Inversion of near-bottom magnetic data reveals a well-defined low crustal magnetization zone (LMZ) near a local topographic high (37°47‧S, 49°39‧E) on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). The magnetic data were collected by the autonomous underwater vehicle ABE on board R/V DaYangYiHao in February-March 2007. The first active hydrothermal vent field observed on the SWIR is located in Area A within and adjacent to the LMZ at the local topographic high, implying that this LMZ may be the result of hydrothermal alteration of magnetic minerals. The maximum reduction in crustal magnetization is 3 A/M. The spatial extent of the LMZ is estimated to be at least 6.7 × 104 m2, which is larger than that of the LMZs at the TAG vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), as well as the Relict Field, Bastille, Dante-Grotto, and New Field vent-sites on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdF). The calculated magnetic moment, i.e., the product of the spatial extent and amplitude of crustal magnetization reduction is at least -3 × 107 Am2 for the LMZ on the SWIR, while that for the TAG field on the MAR is -8 × 107 Am2 and that for the four individual vent fields on the JdF range from -5 × 107 to -3 × 107 Am2. Together these results indicate that crustal demagnetization is a common feature of basalt-hosted hydrothermal vent fields at mid-ocean ridges of all spreading rates. Furthermore, the crustal demagnetization of the Area A on the ultraslow-spreading SWIR is comparable in strength to that of the TAG area on the slow-spreading MAR.

  6. Hydrothermal Vents in Yellowstone Lake: Chemical Fluxes, Siliceous Deposits, and Collapse Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanks, W. P.; Morgan, L. A.; Balistrieri, L.; Alt, J.; Meeker, G.

    2002-12-01

    The geochemistry of Yellowstone Lake is strongly influenced by sublacustrine hydrothermal vent activity. The hydrothermal source fluid is identified using Cl and dD data on water column and sublacustrine hydrothermal vent fluid samples. Silica-rich hydrothermal deposits occur on the lake bottom near active and presently inactive hydrothermal vents. Pipe- and flange-like deposits contain cemented and recrystallized diatoms and represent pathways for hydrothermal fluid migration. Another major type of hydrothermal deposit comprises hard, porous siliceous spires up to 7 m tall that occur in 15 m of water in Bridge Bay. Bridge Bay spires are hydrothermal silica deposits formed in place by growth of chimney-like features from lake-bottom hydrothermal vents. The Cl concentrations indicate that Yellowstone Lake water is about 1 percent hydrothermal source fluid and 99 percent inflowing stream water and that the flux is about 10 percent of the total hydrothermal water flux in Yellowstone National Park. With recent swath-sonar mapping studies that show numerous new hydrothermal features, Yellowstone Lake should now be considered one of the most significant hydrothermal basins in the Park. Many lake-bottom hydrothermal vents occur in small depressions that are clearly imaged on multibeam sonar, some of which are interpreted as collapse structures based on seismic reflection data. Sediments collected from such vents show chemical evidence of leaching of 60-70 wt. percent SiO2, which may result in volume reductions up to 80 percent and provides a mechanism for vent structure formation.

  7. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  8. An active particle in a complex fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datt, Charu; Natale, Giovanniantonio; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2016-11-01

    Active particles are self-driven units capable of converting stored or ambient free-energy into systematic movement. We discuss here the case when such particles move through non-Newtonian fluids. Neglecting inertial forces, we employ the reciprocal theorem to calculate the propulsion velocity of a single swimmer in a weakly non-Newtonian fluid with background flow. We also derive a general expression for the velocity of an active particle modelled as a squirmer in a second-order fluid. We then discuss how active colloids are affected by the medium rheology, namely viscoelasticity and shear-thinning.

  9. Biogeography and biodiversity in sulfide structures of active and inactive vents at deep-sea hydrothermal fields of the Southern Mariana Trough.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shingo; Takano, Yoshinori; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Oba, Hironori; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Chiyori; Utsumi, Motoo; Marumo, Katsumi; Kobayashi, Kensei; Ito, Yuki; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2010-05-01

    The abundance, diversity, activity, and composition of microbial communities in sulfide structures both of active and inactive vents were investigated by culture-independent methods. These sulfide structures were collected at four hydrothermal fields, both on- and off-axis of the back-arc spreading center of the Southern Mariana Trough. The microbial abundance and activity in the samples were determined by analyzing total organic content, enzymatic activity, and copy number of the 16S rRNA gene. To assess the diversity and composition of the microbial communities, 16S rRNA gene clone libraries including bacterial and archaeal phylotypes were constructed from the sulfide structures. Despite the differences in the geological settings among the sampling points, phylotypes related to the Epsilonproteobacteria and cultured hyperthermophilic archaea were abundant in the libraries from the samples of active vents. In contrast, the relative abundance of these phylotypes was extremely low in the libraries from the samples of inactive vents. These results suggest that the composition of microbial communities within sulfide structures dramatically changes depending on the degree of hydrothermal activity, which was supported by statistical analyses. Comparative analyses suggest that the abundance, activity and diversity of microbial communities within sulfide structures of inactive vents are likely to be comparable to or higher than those in active vent structures, even though the microbial community composition is different between these two types of vents. The microbial community compositions in the sulfide structures of inactive vents were similar to those in seafloor basaltic rocks rather than those in marine sediments or the sulfide structures of active vents, suggesting that the microbial community compositions on the seafloor may be constrained by the available energy sources. Our findings provide helpful information for understanding the biogeography, biodiversity and

  10. Venting of carbon dioxide-rich fluid and hydrate formation in mid-okinawa trough backarc basin.

    PubMed

    Sakai, H; Gamo, T; Kim, E S; Tsutsumi, M; Tanaka, T; Ishibashi, J; Wakita, H; Yamano, M; Oomori, T

    1990-06-01

    Carbon dioxide-rich fluid bubbles, containing approximately 86 percent CO(2), 3 percent H(2)S, and 11 percent residual gas (CH(4) + H(2)), were observed to emerge from the sea floor at 1335- to 1550-m depth in the JADE hydrothermal field, mid-Okinawa Trough. Upon contact with seawater at 3.8 degrees C, gas hydrate immediately formed on the surface of the bubbles and these hydrates coalesced to form pipes standing on the sediments. Chemical composition and carbon, sulfur, and helium isotopic ratios indicate that the CO(2)-rich fluid was derived from the same magmatic source as dissolved gases in 320 degrees C hydrothermal solution emitted from a nearby black smoker chimney. The CO(2)-rich fluid phase may be separated by subsurface boiling of hydrothermal solutions or by leaching of CO(2)-rich fluid inclusion during posteruption interaction between pore water and volcanogenic sediments.

  11. Hydrothermal vents of Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplinski, M.A.; Morgan, P. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Hydrothermal vent systems within Yellowstone Lake are located within the Yellowstone caldera in the northeastern and West Thumb sections of the lake. The vent systems lie within areas of extremely high geothermal gradients (< 1,000 C/km) in the lake sediments and occur as clusters of individual vents that expel both hydrothermal fluids and gas. Regions surrounding the vents are colonized by unique, chemotropic biologic communities and suggest that hydrothermal input plays an important role in the nutrient dynamics of the lake's ecosystem. The main concentration of hydrothermal activity occurs in the northeast region of the main lake body in a number of locations including: (1) along the shoreline from the southern edge of Sedge Bay to the inlet of Pelican Creek; (2) the central portion of the partially submerged Mary Bay phreatic explosion crater, within deep (30--50 m) fissures; (3) along the top of a 3 km long, steep-sided ridge that extends from the southern border of Mary Bay, south-southeast into the main lake basin; and (4) east of Stevenson Island along the lower portion of the slope (50--107 m) into the lake basin, within an anastomosing series of north to northwest trending, narrow troughs or fissures. Hydrothermal vents were also located within, and surrounding the West Thumb of Yellowstone Lake, with the main concentration occurring the offshore of the West Thumb and Potts Geyser Basin. Hydrothermal vents in Yellowstone Lake occur along fractures that have penetrated the lake sediments or along the tops of ridges and near shore areas. Underneath the lake, rising hydrothermal fluids encounter a semi-permeable cap of lake sediments. Upwardly convecting hydrothermal fluid flow may be diverted by the impermeable lake sediments along the buried, pre-existing topography. These fluids may continue to rise along topography until fractures are encountered, or the lake sediment cover is thinned sufficiently to allow egress of the fluids.

  12. Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens sp. nov., a hyperthermophilic methanogen isolated from a volcanically active deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lucy C; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, You-Tae; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Park, Cheon-Seok; Holden, James F

    2015-04-01

    A hyperthermophilic methanogen, strain JH146(T), was isolated from 26 °C hydrothermal vent fluid emanating from a crack in basaltic rock at Marker 113 vent, Axial Seamount in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. It was identified as an obligate anaerobe that uses only H2 and CO2 for growth. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain is more than 97% similar to other species of the genus Methanocaldococcus . Therefore, overall genome relatedness index analyses were performed to establish that strain JH146(T) represents a novel species. For each analysis, strain JH146(T) was most similar to Methanocaldococcus sp. FS406-22, which can fix N2 and also comes from Marker 113 vent. However, strain JH146(T) differs from strain FS406-22 in that it cannot fix N2. The average nucleotide identity score for strain JH146(T) was 87%, the genome-to-genome direct comparison score was 33-55% and the species identification score was 93%. For each analysis, strain JH146(T) was below the species delineation cut-off. Full-genome gene synteny analysis showed that strain JH146(T) and strain FS406-22 have 97% genome synteny, but strain JH146(T) was missing the operons necessary for N2 fixation and assimilatory nitrate reduction that are present in strain FS406-22. Based on its whole genome sequence, strain JH146(T) is suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Methanocaldococcus for which the name Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens is proposed. The type strain is JH146(T) ( = DSM 27223(T) = KACC 18232(T)).

  13. Evidence for a chemoautotrophically based food web at inactive hydrothermal vents (Manus Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, K. L.; Macko, S. A.; Van Dover, C. L.

    2009-09-01

    Hydrothermal vents are ephemeral systems. When venting shuts down, sulfide-dependent taxa die off, and non-vent taxa can colonize the hard substrata. In Manus Basin (Papua New Guinea), where hydrothermally active and inactive sites are interspersed, hydroids, cladorhizid sponges, barnacles, bamboo corals, and other invertebrate types may occupy inactive sites. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of animals occupying inactive sites are consistent with nutritional dependence on either chemoautotrophically or photosynthetically produced organic material, but sulfur isotopic compositions of these animals point to a chemoautotrophic source of sulfur from dissolved sulfide in vent fluids rather than sulfur derived from seawater sulfate through photosynthesis. Given that suspension-feeding and micro-carnivorous invertebrates are the biomass dominants at inactive sites, the primary source of chemoautotrophic nutrition is likely suspended particulates and organisms delivered from nearby active vents.

  14. Evidence for a Chemoautotrophically Based Food Web at Inactive Hydrothermal Vents (Manus Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dover, C. L.; Erickson, K.; Macko, S.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrothermal vents are ephemeral systems. When venting shuts down, sulfide-dependent taxa die off, and non-vent taxa can colonize the hard substrata. In Manus Basin (Papua New Guinea), where active and inactive sulfide mounds are interspersed, hydroids, cladorhizid sponges, barnacles, and bamboo sponges, and other invertebrate types may occupy inactive sulfide mounds. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of animals occupying inactive sulfide mounds are consistent with nutritional dependence on either chemoautotrophically or photosynthetically produced organic material, but sulfur isotopic compositions of these animals point to a chemoautotrophic source of sulfur from dissolved sulfide in vent fluids rather than sulfur derived from seawater sulfate through photosynthesis. Given that suspension-feeding and micro- carnivorous invertebrates are the biomass dominants at inactive sulfide mounds, the primary source of chemoautotrophic nutrition is likely suspended particulates and organisms delivered from nearby active vents.

  15. Vented Capacitor

    DOEpatents

    Brubaker, Michael Allen; Hosking, Terry Alan

    2006-04-11

    A technique of increasing the corona inception voltage (CIV), and thereby increasing the operating voltage, of film/foil capacitors is described. Intentional venting of the capacitor encapsulation improves the corona inception voltage by allowing internal voids to equilibrate with the ambient environment.

  16. Dynamic Patterns in Active Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jülicher, Frank

    2012-02-01

    Biological matter is inherently dynamic and exhibits active properties. A key example is the force generation by molecular motors in the cell cytoskeleton. Such active processes give rise to the generation of active mechanical stresses and spontaneous flows in gel-like cytoskeletal networks. Active material behaviors play a key role for the dynamics of cellular processes such as cell locomotion and cell division. We will discuss intracellular flow patterns that are created by active processes in the cell cortex. By combining theory with quantitative experiments we show that observed flow patterns result from profiles of active stress generation in the system. We will also consider the situation where active stress is regulated by a diffusing molecular species. In this case, spatial concentration patterns are generated by the interplay of stress regulation and self-generated flow fields.

  17. Hydrothermal fluid venting in the offshore sector of Campi Flegrei caldera: A geochemical, geophysical, and volcanological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Napoli, R.; Aiuppa, A.; Sulli, A.; Caliro, S.; Chiodini, G.; Acocella, V.; Ciraolo, G.; Di Vito, M. A.; Interbartolo, F.; Nasello, C.; Valenza, M.

    2016-10-01

    The ongoing unrest at the Campi Flegrei caldera (CFc) in southern Italy is prompting exploration of its poorly studied offshore sector. We report on a multidisciplinary investigation of the Secca delle Fumose (SdF), a submarine relief known since antiquity as the largest degassing structure of the offshore sector of CFc. We combined high-resolution morphobathymetric and seismostratigraphic data with onshore geological information to propose that the present-day SdF morphology and structure developed during the initial stages of the last CFc eruption at Monte Nuovo in AD 1538. We suggest that the SdF relief stands on the eastern uplifted border of a N-S-trending graben-like structure formed during the shallow emplacement of the Monte Nuovo feeding dike. We also infer that the high-angle bordering faults that generated the SdF relief now preferentially allow the ascent of hot brines (with an equilibrium temperature of 179°C), thereby sustaining hydrothermal degassing on the seafloor. Systematic vertical seawater profiling shows that hydrothermal seafloor venting generates a sizeable CO2, pH, and temperature anomaly in the overlying seawater column. Data for the seawater vertical profile can be used to estimate the CO2 and energy (heat) outputs from the SdF area at ˜50 tons/d (˜0.53 kg/s) and ˜80 MW, respectively. In view of the cause-effect relationship with the Monte Nuovo eruption, and the substantial gas and energy outputs, we consider that the SdF hydrothermal system needs to be included in monitoring programs of the ongoing CFc unrest.

  18. Violent Gas Venting on the Heng-Chun Mud Volcano, South China Sea Active Continental Margin offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Cheng, W. Y.; Tseng, Y. T.; Chen, N. C.; Hsieh, I. C.; Yang, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of methane as gas hydrate under the sea floor has been considered a major trap for both thermal and biogenic gas in marine environment. Aided by rapid AOM process near the sea floor, fraction of methane escaping the sea floor has been considered at minuscule. However, most studies focused mainly on deepwater gas hydrate systems where gas hydrate remain relatively stable. We have studied methane seeps on the active margin offshore Taiwan, where rapid tectonic activities occur. Our intention is to evaluate the scale and condition of gas seeps in the tectonic active region. Towcam, coring, heat probe, chirp, multibeam bathymetric mapping and echo sounding were conducted at the study areas. Our results showed that gas is violently venting at the active margin, not only through sediments, but also through overlying sea water, directly into the atmosphere. Similar ventings, but, not in this scale, have also been identified previously in the nearby region. High concentrations of methane as well as traces of propane were found in sediments and in waters with flares. In conjunction, abundant chemosynthetic community, life mussel, clams, tube worms, bacterial mats together with high concentrations of dissolve sulfide, large authigenic carbonate buildups were also found. Our results indicate that methane could be another major green house gas in the shallow water active margin region.

  19. Antibacterial activity of the pancreatic fluid.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, E; Mark, Z; Haspel, J; Ben-Ari, G; Dreznik, Z; Mirelman, D; Tadmor, A

    1985-04-01

    The antibacterial activity of canine pancreatic fluid was investigated in an attempt to understand the resistance of this organ, when intact, to ascending bacterial infections. The pancreatic fluid demonstrated bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli, Shigella species, Salmonella species, and Klebsiella pneumoniae; bacteriostatic activity against coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and fungistatic activity against Candida albicans. There was no demonstrable antibacterial activity against Bacteroides fragilis and Streptococcus faecalis. The antibacterial activity was dialyzable and pH dependent, but independent of heat, the activity of several digestive pancreatic enzymes, and the bacterial inoculum. Electron micrographs of Escherichia coli exposed to pancreatic fluid did not demonstrate changes in the bacterial cell wall. Tracer studies of susceptible bacteria demonstrated decreased leucine uptake when briefly exposed to pancreatic fluid. The antibacterial activity was found by column chromatography to be a small molecular peptide. It is likely that pancreatic antibacterial factors protect the pancreas from ascending bacterial infections and operate along with other factors in the homeostasis of the upper small bowel flora.

  20. A ubiquitous thermoacidophilic archaeon from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reysenbach, A.-L.; Liu, Yajing; Banta, A.B.; Beveridge, T.J.; Kirshtein, J.D.; Schouten, S.; Tivey, M.K.; Von Damm, Karen L.; Voytek, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are important in global biogeochemical cycles, providing biological oases at the sea floor that are supported by the thermal and chemical flux from the Earth's interior. As hot, acidic and reduced hydrothermal fluids mix with cold, alkaline and oxygenated sea water, minerals precipitate to form porous sulphide-sulphate deposits. These structures provide microhabitats for a diversity of prokaryotes that exploit the geochemical and physical gradients in this dynamic ecosystem. It has been proposed that fluid pH in the actively venting sulphide structures is generally low (pH < 4.5), yet no extreme thermoacidophile has been isolated from vent deposits. Culture-independent surveys based on ribosomal RNA genes from deep-sea hydrothermal deposits have identified a widespread euryarchaeotal lineage, DHVE2 (deep-sea hydrothermal vent euryarchaeotic 2). Despite the ubiquity and apparent deep-sea endemism of DHVE2, cultivation of this group has been unsuccessful and thus its metabolism remains a mystery. Here we report the isolation and cultivation of a member of the DHVE2 group, which is an obligate thermoacidophilic sulphur- or iron-reducing heterotroph capable of growing from pH 3.3 to 5.8 and between 55 and 75??C. In addition, we demonstrate that this isolate constitutes up to 15% of the archaeal population, providing evidence that thermoacidophiles may be key players in the sulphur and iron cycling at deep-sea vents. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. Distribution, activity and function of short-chain alkane degrading phylotypes in hydrothermal vent sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Joye, S. B.; Hoarfrost, A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Global geochemical analyses suggest that C2-C4 short chain alkanes are a common component of the utilizable carbon pool in deep-sea sediments worldwide and have been found in diverse ecosystems. From a thermodynamic standpoint, the anaerobic microbial oxidation of these aliphatic hydrocarbons is more energetically yielding than the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Therefore, the preferential degradation of these hydrocarbons may compete with AOM for the use of oxidants such as sulfate, or other potential oxidants. Such processes could influence the fate of methane in the deep-sea. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) from hydrocarbon seep sediments of the Gulf of Mexico and Guaymas Basin have previously been enriched that anaerobically oxidize short chain alkanes to generate CO2 with the preferential utilization of 12C-enriched alkanes (Kniemeyer et al. 2007). Different temperature regimens along with multiple substrates were tested and a pure culture (deemed BuS5) was isolated from mesophilic enrichments with propane or n-butane as the sole carbon source. Through comparative sequence analysis, strain BuS5 was determined to cluster with the metabolically diverse Desulfosarcina / Desulfococcus cluster, which also contains the SRB found in consortia with anaerobic, methane-oxidizing archaea in seep sediments. Enrichments from a terrestrial, low temperature sulfidic hydrocarbon seep also corroborated that propane degradation occurred with most bacterial phylotypes surveyed belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, particularly Desulfobacteraceae (Savage et al. 2011). To date, no microbes capable of ethane oxidation or anaerobic C2-C4 alkane oxidation at thermophilic temperature have been isolated. The sediment-covered, hydrothermal vent systems found at Middle Valley (Juan de Fuca Ridge, eastern Pacific Ocean) are a prime environment for investigating mesophilic to thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved

  2. High Resolution Seismic Survey off the Pacific Shore of Costa Rica - Detailed Imaging of Deformational Patterns, Fluid Venting and Carbonate Mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, N.; Spiess, V.; Heidersdorf, F.; v. Lom, H.; Zuehlsdorff, L.; Denil, D.; Huguen, C.; Schnabel, M.

    2003-04-01

    R/V METEOR Research Cruise M54/1 in summer 2002 from Balboa (Panama) to Caldera (Costa Rica) aimed at imaging the near sea floor sedimentary structures of both the continental and oceanic plates of the Costa Rican Subduction Zone with the high resolution seismic method. The cruise evolved from a cooperation of the Marine Seismics Group of the University of Bremen with the DFG funded Special Research Project 574 - Fluids and Volatiles in Subduction Zones - and is intended to supplement the marine geophysical, geological and geochemical as well as oceanographic data collected during R/V SONNE cruises in the area, as well as subsequent R/V METEOR cruises M54/2 and /3. The objectives of SFB 574 are the investigation of shallow and deep processes in subduction zones through near surface sampling of fluid vent sites and gas hydrate occurrences, as well as through detailed seismic and acoustic imaging of related structures. The main objectives of the cruise were to study 1) the volatile and material input into the sedimentary system on the oceanic plate, 2) the distribution of gas hydrates within the sediments, and 3) possible pathways and resulting structures of fluid/gas escape. Several working areas were selected, which had been identified as highly fractured sediment packages above subducting seamounts (Jaco Scar, Parrita Scar, Rio Bongo, Hongo area), areas of pronounced decollement reflection, major slump masses (Nicoya slide), regions of major fracturing of the oceanic crust, or carbonate mounds (Hongo area, Mound Culebra) during previous cruises. For calibration of seismic data, survey lines were also shot in the vicinity of ODP Leg 170 drill sites. Several seismic examples from various survey sites will be shown. Closely spaced profiles, allowing the acquisition of 3D and 2.5D seismic data in the Hongo area and near Mound Culebra, respectively, reveal the complex internal structure of fluid pathways, the distribution of gas hydrates, and the tectonic framework of

  3. Prokaryote diversity and virus abundance in shallow hydrothermal vents of the Mediterranean Sea (Panarea Island) and the Pacific Ocean (north Sulawesi-Indonesia).

    PubMed

    Manini, E; Luna, G M; Corinaldesi, C; Zeppilli, D; Bortoluzzi, G; Caramanna, G; Raffa, F; Danovaro, R

    2008-05-01

    Despite their ubiquitous distribution in tectonically active coastal zones, shallow water hydrothermal vents have been less investigated than deep-sea vents. In the present study, we investigated the role of viral control and fluid emissions on prokaryote abundance, diversity, and community structure (total Archaea, total Bacteria, and sulphate-reducing bacteria) in waters and sediments surrounding the caldera of four different shallow-water hydrothermal vents (three located in the Mediterranean Sea and one in the Pacific Ocean). All vents, independent of their location, generally displayed a significant decrease of benthic prokaryote abundance, as well as its viable fraction, with increasing distance from the vent. Prokaryote assemblages were always dominated by Bacteria. Benthic Archaea accounted for 23-33% of total prokaryote abundance in the Mediterranean Sea and from 13 to 29% in the Pacific Ocean, whereas in the water column they accounted for 25-38%. The highest benthic bacterial ribotype richness was observed in close proximity of the vents (i.e., at 10-cm distance from the emissions), indicating that vent fluids might influence bacterial diversity in surrounding sediments. Virioplankton and viriobenthos abundances were low compared to other marine systems, suggesting that temperature and physical-chemical conditions might influence viral survival in these vent systems. We thus hypothesize that the high bacterial diversity observed in close proximity of the vents is related with the highly variable vent emissions, which could favor the coexistence of several prokaryotic species.

  4. Speciation of dissolved copper within an active hydrothermal edifice on the Lucky Strike vent field (MAR, 37 degrees N).

    PubMed

    Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Waeles, Matthieu; Bernagout, Solène; Le Gall, Christian; Sarrazin, Jozée; Riso, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of different fractions of dissolved copper (after filtration at 0.45 microm) along the cold part of the hydrothermal fluid-seawater mixing zone on the Tour Eiffel edifice (MAR). Dissolved copper was analyzed by stripping chronopotentiometry (SCP) after chromatographic C(18) extraction. Levels of total dissolved copper (0.03 to 5.15 microM) are much higher than those reported for deep-sea oceanic waters but in accordance with data previously obtained in this area. Speciation measurements show that the hydrophobic organic fraction (C(18)Cu) is very low (2+/-1%). Dissolved copper is present mainly as inorganic and hydrophilic organic complexes (nonC(18)Cu). The distribution of copper along the pH gradient shows the same pattern for each fraction. Copper concentrations increase from pH 5.6 to 6.5 and then remain relatively constant at pH>6.5. Concentrations of oxygen and total sulphides demonstrate that the copper anomaly corresponds to the transition between suboxic and oxic waters. The increase of dissolved copper should correspond to the oxidative redissolution of copper sulphide particles formed in the vicinity of the fluid exit. The presence of such a secondary dissolved copper source, associated with the accumulation of metal sulphide particles, could play a significant role in the distribution of fauna in the different habitats available at vents.

  5. Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Gilberto E.; Campbell, James H.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Meneghin, Jennifer; Podar, Mircea; Steinberg, Joshua I.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Tivey, Margaret Kingston; Voytek, Mary A.; Yang, Zamin K.; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37°17'N, 32°16.3'W, depth 1600-1750m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36°13'N, 33°54.1'W, depth 2270-2330m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

  6. Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, Gilberto E; Campbell, James H; Kirshtein, Julie D; Meneghin, Jennifer; Podar, Mircea; Steinberg, Joshua; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Tivey, Margaret Kingston; Voytek, Mary A; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Yang, Zamin Koo

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37 17'N, 32 16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36 13'N, 33 54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

  7. Risk-Free Volcano Observations Using an Unmanned Autonomous Helicopter: seismic observations near the active vent of Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohminato, T.; Kaneko, T.; Koyama, T.; Yasuda, A.; Watanabe, A.; Takeo, M.; Honda, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Kanda, W.; Iguchi, M.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2010-12-01

    Observations in the vicinity of summit area of active volcanoes are important not only for understanding physical processes in the volcanic conduit but also for eruption prediction and volcanic hazards mitigation. It is, however, challenging to install observation sensors near active vents because of the danger of sudden eruptions. We need safe and efficient ways of installing sensors near the summit of active volcanoes. We have been developing an volcano observation system based on an unmanned autonomous vehicle (UAV) for risk-free volcano observations. Our UAV is an unmanned autonomous helicopter manufactured by Yamaha-Motor Co., Ltd. The UAV is 3.6m long and weighs 84kg with maximum payload of 10kg. The UAV can aviate autonomously along a previously programmed path within a meter accuracy using real-time kinematics differential GPS equipment. The maximum flight time and distance from the operator are 90 minutes and 5km, respectively. We have developed various types of volcano observation techniques adequate for the UAV, such as aeromagnetic survey, taking infrared and visible images from onboard high-resolution cameras, volcanic ash sampling in the vicinity of active vents. Recently, we have developed an earthquake observation module (EOM), which is exclusively designed for the UAV installation in the vicinity of active volcanic vent. In order to meet the various requirements for UAV installation, the EOM is very compact, light-weight (5-6kg), and is solar-powered. It is equipped with GPS for timing, a communication device using cellular-phone network, and triaxial accelerometers. Our first application of the EOM installation using the UAV is one of the most active volcanoes in Japan, Sakurajima volcano. Since 2006, explosive eruptions have been continuing at the reopened Showa crater at the eastern flank near the summit of Sakurajima. Entering the area within 2 km from the active craters is prohibited, and thus there were no observation station in the vicinity

  8. Electricity generation from hydrothermal vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryadi, Y.; Rizal, I. S.; Fadhli, M. N.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrothermal vent is a kind of manifestation of geothermal energy on seabed. It produces high temperature fluid through a hole which has a diameter in various range between several inches to tens of meters. Hydrothermal vent is mostly found over ocean ridges. There are some 67000 km of ocean ridges, 13000 of them have been already studied discovering more than 280 sites with geothermal vents. Some of them have a thermal power of up to 60 MWt. These big potential resources of energy, which are located over subsea, have a constraint related to environmental impact to the biotas live around when it becomes an object of exploitation. Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is a method of exploiting heat energy to become electricity using organic fluid. This paper presents a model of exploitation technology of hydrothermal vent using ORC method. With conservative calculation, it can give result of 15 MWe by exploiting a middle range diameter of hydrothermal vent in deep of 2000 meters below sea level. The technology provided here really has small impact to the environment. With an output energy as huge as mentioned before, the price of constructing this technology is low considering the empty of cost for drilling as what it should be in conventional exploitation. This paper also presents the comparison in several equipment which is more suitable to be installed over subsea.

  9. Detection of diffuse sea floor venting using structured light imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis, G.; Smart, C.; Roman, C.; Carey, S.

    2011-12-01

    Efficiently identifying and localizing diffuse sea floor venting at hydrothermal and cold seep sites is often difficult. Actively venting fluids are usually identified by a temperature induced optical shimmering seen during direct visual inspections or in video data collected by vehicles working close to the sea floor. Relying on such direct methods complicates establishing spatial relations between areas within a survey covering a broad area. Our recent work with a structured light laser system has shown that venting can also be detected in the image data in an automated fashion. A structured light laser system consists of a camera and sheet laser projected at the sea floor. The camera and laser are fixed to a rigid calibrated mount such that the optical axis of the camera and the laser plane intersect at some distance away from the camera, typically 2 to 5 meters. The position of the laser line, visible on the sea floor in the image, can be extracted using standard computer vision techniques (Fig. 1) and used to determine the height of the bottom along the laser line. By collecting images in a survey pattern at a high frame rate, typically 20 to 30 Hz, a bathymetric map can be produced using the individual profiles. In the presence of venting, temperature anomalies refract the laser sheet such that it does not project a crisp and clear line on the sea floor. The laser will instead appear blurred and visible over a larger section of the image. By processing the images to segment out clear laser lines from refracted lines it is possible to identify areas of venting. Our initial approach uses calculated image moments relative to the peak intensity level detected in each column of the image matrix. In the presence of venting the calculated moments differ from those of the undistorted laser shining on the sea floor. Test results from the Kolumbo submarine volcano near Santorini, Greece demonstrate this approach and show the utility of the method for survey work. Test

  10. Vent Field Distribution and Evolution Along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Lilley, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    Five major vent fields have now been discovered along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. From the north to the south they include Sasquatch, Salty Dawg, High Rise, Main Endeavour, and Mothra. Spacing between the distinct, high-temperature fields increases from the north to the south. For example Sasquatch is located 1.6 km north of Salty Dawg and Mothra is 2.7 km south of the Main Endeavour Field. In addition to changes in spacing of the vent fields along axis there are also dramatic changes in the style, intensity, and thermal-chemical characteristics of venting. The newly discovered Sasquatch field extends for >200 m in length, and venting is limited to a few isolated, small structures that reach 284° C. Active venting is confined to the northern portion of the field. In contrast, extinct, massive sulfide edifices and oxidized sulfide talus can be followed continuously for over 200 m along a 25-30 m wide, 020 trending ridge indicating that this field was very active in the past. In contrast to the delicate active structures, older extinct structures reach at least 25 m in height and the aspect ratios are similar to active pillars in the Mothra Field 7.5 km, to the south. It is unclear if venting at this site represents rejuvenation of the field, or whether it is in a waning stage. Within Salty Dawg, vent fluid temperatures reach 296° C and vigorous venting is constrained to a few, multi-flanged edifices that reach 25 m in height and 25 m in length. The field hosts over 25 structures, oxidized sulfide is abundant, and diffuse flow is dominant. Fluid compositions and temperatures are consistent with Salty Dawg being in a waning stage of evolution. Venting intensity and incidence of venting increase dramatically at High Rise where numerous multi-flanged structures are active; temperatures reach 343° C. The most intense and active of the fields is the Main Endeavour, with at least 21 actively venting, multi-flanged edifices that contain at least 100

  11. A Reactive-Transport Model Describing Methanogen Growth and Methane Production in Diffuse Flow Vents at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algar, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is an important mode of metabolism in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Diffuse vent fluids often show a depletion in hydrogen with a corresponding increase in methane relative to pure-mixing of end member fluid and seawater, and genomic surveys show an enrichment in genetic sequences associated with known methanogens. However, because we cannot directly sample the subseafloor habitat where these organisms are living, constraining the size and activity of these populations remains a challenge and limits our ability to quantify the role they play in vent biogeochemistry. Reactive-transport modeling may provide a useful tool for approaching this problem. Here we present a reactive-transport model describing methane production along the flow-path of hydrothermal fluid from its high temperature end-member to diffuse venting at the seafloor. The model is set up to reflect conditions at several diffuse vents in the Axial Seamount. The model describes the growth of the two dominant thermophilic methanogens, Methanothermococcus and Methanocaldococcus, observed at Axial seamount. Monod and Arrhenius constants for Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii were obtained for the model using chemostat and bottle experiments at varying temperatures. The model is used to investigate the influence of different mixing regimes on the subseafloor populations of these methanogens. By varying the model flow path length and subseafloor cell concentrations, and fitting to observed hydrogen and methane concentrations in the venting fluid, the subseafloor biomass, fluid residence time, and methane production rate can be constrained.

  12. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, James K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  13. Relationships between lava types, seafloor morphology, and the occurrence of hydrothermal venting in the ASHES vent field of Axial Volcano. [Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emission Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, S.R. )

    1990-08-10

    Deep-towed and submersible photographic surveys within the caldera of Axial Volcano have been integrated with high-resolution bathmetry to produce a geological map of the most active vent field in the caldera. Locations for over 2,000 photographs in and near the vent field were determined using a seafloor transponder network. Then each photograph was described utilizing a classification system which provides detailed information concerning lava type, hydrothermal activity, sediment cover, geological structure, and biology. Resulting data were entered into a digital data base, and computer-generated maps were created that portray spatial relationships between selected geological variables. In general, the entire ASHES field is characterized by pervasive low-temperature venting. The most vigorous venting is concentrated in an approximately 80 m {times} 80 m area where there are several high-temperature vents including some which are producing high-temperature vapor-phase fluids derived from a boiling hydrothermal system. Lava types within the ASHES vent field are grouped into three distinct morphologies: (1) smooth (flat-surfaced, ropy, and whorled) sheet flows, (2) lobate flows, and (3) jumbled-sheet flows. The most intense hydrothermal venting is concentrated in the smooth sheet flows and the lobate flows. The location of the ASHES field is mainly attributable to faulting which defines the southwest caldera wall, but the concentration of intense venting appears to be related also to the spatial distribution of lava types in the vent field and their contrasting permeabilities. Other structural trends of faults and fissures within the field also influence the location of individual events.

  14. Pattern formation in Active Polar Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Hagan, Michael; Baskaran, Aparna

    2011-03-01

    Systems such as bacterial suspensions or cytoskeletal filaments and motility assays can be described within the paradigm of active polar fluids. These systems have been shown to exhibit pattern formation raging from asters and vortices to traveling stripes. A coarse-grained description of such a fluid is given by a scalar density field and a vector polarization field. We study such a macroscopic description of the system using weakly nonlinear analysis and numerical simulations to map out the emergent pattern formation as a function of the hydrodynamic parameters in the context of two specific microscopic models - a quasi-2D suspension of cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins and a system of self propelled hard rods that interact through excluded volume interactions. The authors thank the Brandeis MRSEC center for financial support.

  15. Hot vents in an ice-cold ocean: Indications for phase separation at the southernmost area of hydrothermal activity, Bransfield Strait, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dählmann, A.; Wallmann, K.; Sahling, H.; Sarthou, G.; Bohrmann, G.; Petersen, S.; Chin, C. S.; Klinkhammer, G. P.

    2001-12-01

    During the expeditions ANT-XV/2 with R/V Polarstern in 1997/98 and NBP 99-04 with R/V IB N.B. Palmer in 1999, the first samples of hydrothermally influenced sediments of Bransfield Strait were obtained at Hook Ridge, a volcanic edifice in the Central Basin of the Strait. The vent sites are characterized by white siliceous crusts on top of the sediment layer and temperatures measured immediately on deck are up to 48.5°C. The shallow depth of these vent sites (1050 m) particularly controls the chemistry of the pore fluids that are enriched in silica and sulfide and show low pH values. Chloride is depleted up to 20% and the calculated hydrothermal endmember concentration is in the range of 1-84 mM. Since other mechanisms for Cl depletion can be ruled out clearly, the composition of this fluid is attributed to phase separation. While the Cl-depleted fluid is emanating at Hook Ridge, a Cl-enriched fluid can be identified in the adjacent King George Basin. Using a p,x diagram the two corresponding endmember concentrations reveal that the phase separation takes place at subcritical conditions (total depth: ˜2500 m), probably along the whole volcanic edifice.

  16. Dynamics and Emergent Structures in Active Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, Aparna

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we consider an active fluid of colloidal sized particles, with the primary manifestation of activity being a self-replenishing velocity along one body axis of the particle. This is a minimal model for varied systems such as bacterial colonies, cytoskeletal filament motility assays vibrated granular particles and self propelled diffusophoretic colloids, depending on the nature of interaction among the particles. Using microscopic Brownian dynamics simulations, coarse-graining using the tools of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and analysis of macroscopic hydrodynamic theories, we characterize emergent structures seen in these systems, which are determined by the symmetry of the interactions among the active units, such as propagating density waves, dense stationary bands, asters and phase separated isotropic clusters. We identify a universal mechanism, termed ``self-regulation,'' as the underlying physics that leads to these structures in diverse systems. Support from NSF through DMR-1149266 and DMR-0820492.

  17. New class of turbulence in active fluids.

    PubMed

    Bratanov, Vasil; Jenko, Frank; Frey, Erwin

    2015-12-08

    Turbulence is a fundamental and ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, occurring from astrophysical to biophysical scales. At the same time, it is widely recognized as one of the key unsolved problems in modern physics, representing a paradigmatic example of nonlinear dynamics far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Whereas in the past, most theoretical work in this area has been devoted to Navier-Stokes flows, there is now a growing awareness of the need to extend the research focus to systems with more general patterns of energy injection and dissipation. These include various types of complex fluids and plasmas, as well as active systems consisting of self-propelled particles, like dense bacterial suspensions. Recently, a continuum model has been proposed for such "living fluids" that is based on the Navier-Stokes equations, but extends them to include some of the most general terms admitted by the symmetry of the problem [Wensink HH, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109:14308-14313]. This introduces a cubic nonlinearity, related to the Toner-Tu theory of flocking, which can interact with the quadratic Navier-Stokes nonlinearity. We show that as a result of the subtle interaction between these two terms, the energy spectra at large spatial scales exhibit power laws that are not universal, but depend on both finite-size effects and physical parameters. Our combined numerical and analytical analysis reveals the origin of this effect and even provides a way to understand it quantitatively. Turbulence in active fluids, characterized by this kind of nonlinear self-organization, defines a new class of turbulent flows.

  18. Active Polar Two-Fluid Macroscopic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2014-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria (in a solvent, shoals of fish (moving in water currents), flocks of birds and migrating insects (flying in windy air). Because the preferred direction only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the macroscopic velocity associated with the motion of the active units. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this second velocity. We find a normal mode structure quite different compared to the static descriptions, as well as linear couplings between (active) flow and e.g. densities and concentrations due to the genuine two-fluid transport derivatives. On the other hand, we get, quite similar to the static case, a direct linear relation between the stress tensor and the structure tensor. This prominent ``active'' term is responsible for many active effects, meaning that our approach can describe those effects as well. In addition, we also deal with explicitly chiral systems, which are important for many active systems. In particular, we find an active flow-induced heat current specific for the dynamic chiral polar order.

  19. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Shadden, Shawn C; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here, we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport.

  20. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  1. Hydrothermal vents is Lake Tanganyika, East African Rift system

    SciTech Connect

    Tiercelin, J.J.; Pflumio, C.; Castrec, M.

    1993-06-01

    Sublacustrine hydrothermal vents with associated massive sulfides were discovered during April 1987 at Pemba and Cape Banza on the Zaire side of the northern basin of Lake Tanganyika, East African Rift system. New investigations by a team of ten scuba divers during the multinational (France, Zaire, Germany, and Burundi) TANGANYDRO expedition (August-October 1991) found hydrothermal vents down to a depth of 46 m along north-trending active faults bounding the Tanganyika rift on the western side. Temperatures from 53 to 103 {degrees}C were measured in hydrothermal fluids and sediments. Veins of massive sulfides 1-10 cm thick (pyrite and marcasite banding) were found associated with vents at the Pemba site. At Cape Banza, active vents are characterized by 1-70-cm-high aragonite chimneys, and there are microcrystalline pyrite coatings on the walls of hydrothermal pipes. Hydrothermal fluid end members show distinctive compositions at the two sites. The Pemba end member is a NaHCO{sub 3}-enriched fluid similar to the NaHCO{sub 3} thermal fluids form lakes Magadi and Bogoria in the eastern branch of the rift. The Cape Banza end member is a solution enriched in NaCl. Such brines may have a deep-seated basement origin, as do the Uvinza NaCl brines on the eastern flank of the Tanganyika basin. Geothermometric calculations have yielded temperatures of fluid-rock interaction of 219 and 179 {degrees}C in the Pemba and Cape Banza systems, respectively. Abundant white or reddish-brown microbial colonies resembling Beggiatoa mats were found surrounding the active vents. Thermal fluid circulation is permitted by opening of cracks related to 130{degrees}N normal-dextral faults that intersect the north-south major rift trend. The sources of heat for such hydrothermal systems may relate to the existence of magmatic bodies under the rift, which is suggested by the isotopic composition of carbon dioxide released at Pemba and Cape Banza. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Geological and hydrothermal controls on the distribution of megafauna in Ashes Vent Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arquit, Anne M.

    1990-08-01

    A computerized data base was constructed to aid in the interpretation of biological and geological observations recorded from 7662 photographs taken of Ashes vent field (located along the SW wall of the summit caldera of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge) during 1985-1986 using the Pisces IV submersible and a towed camera system. The transition region between the locus of high-temperature vents in Ashes vent field (i.e., Inferno, 326°C; Hell, 301°C; and Virgin Mound, 298°C) and more typical environmental conditions for the summit caldera of Axial Volcano as a whole is zoned spatially with respect to sediment type and organism assemblage. Three general ecological zones are identified within the vent field: (1) the central vent zone (within 100 m of a high-temperature vent), dominated by vent-associated organisms (vestimentiferan tube worms, clams, bacterial mats) and sedimentation (high-temperature, plume-derived and low-temperature, in situ deposits); (2) the distal vent zone (100-725 m from any high-temperature vent), characterized by extensive fields of iron oxide, iron silicate and silica chimneys and sediment (nontronite assemblage material), as well as maximum densities of most nonvent fauna; and (3) the nonvent impact zone (725-1300 m), indicated by elevated densities of nonvent organisms relative to regional (i.e., caldera-wide) values and maximum Bathydorus sp. sponge densities. The distribution of vestimentiferan tube worms is limited to within 90 m of known high-temperature venting (central vent zone); and anemones were observed only between 30 and 40 m from hot vents. Clams and microbial mats are concentrated in the central vent zone, as well, but occur sporadically up to 1250 m from the hot vents in association with hydrothermal nontronite that is probably precipitating in situ from <60°C vent fluid; thus megafaunal distributions are a useful indicator of poorly defined, often diffuse low-temperature hydrothermal activity on the seafloor. Maximum

  3. New class of turbulence in active fluids

    PubMed Central

    Bratanov, Vasil; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is a fundamental and ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, occurring from astrophysical to biophysical scales. At the same time, it is widely recognized as one of the key unsolved problems in modern physics, representing a paradigmatic example of nonlinear dynamics far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Whereas in the past, most theoretical work in this area has been devoted to Navier–Stokes flows, there is now a growing awareness of the need to extend the research focus to systems with more general patterns of energy injection and dissipation. These include various types of complex fluids and plasmas, as well as active systems consisting of self-propelled particles, like dense bacterial suspensions. Recently, a continuum model has been proposed for such “living fluids” that is based on the Navier–Stokes equations, but extends them to include some of the most general terms admitted by the symmetry of the problem [Wensink HH, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109:14308–14313]. This introduces a cubic nonlinearity, related to the Toner–Tu theory of flocking, which can interact with the quadratic Navier–Stokes nonlinearity. We show that as a result of the subtle interaction between these two terms, the energy spectra at large spatial scales exhibit power laws that are not universal, but depend on both finite-size effects and physical parameters. Our combined numerical and analytical analysis reveals the origin of this effect and even provides a way to understand it quantitatively. Turbulence in active fluids, characterized by this kind of nonlinear self-organization, defines a new class of turbulent flows. PMID:26598708

  4. Motility of active fluid drops on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoromskaia, Diana; Alexander, Gareth P.

    2015-12-01

    Drops of active liquid crystal have recently shown the ability to self-propel, which was associated with topological defects in the orientation of active filaments [Sanchez et al., Nature 491, 431 (2013), 10.1038/nature11591]. Here, we study the onset and different aspects of motility of a three-dimensional drop of active fluid on a planar surface. We analyze theoretically how motility is affected by orientation profiles with defects of various types and locations, by the shape of the drop, and by surface friction at the substrate. In the scope of a thin drop approximation, we derive exact expressions for the flow in the drop that is generated by a given orientation profile. The flow has a natural decomposition into terms that depend entirely on the geometrical properties of the orientation profile, i.e., its bend and splay, and a term coupling the orientation to the shape of the drop. We find that asymmetric splay or bend generates a directed bulk flow and enables the drop to move, with maximal speeds achieved when the splay or bend is induced by a topological defect in the interior of the drop. In motile drops the direction and speed of self-propulsion is controlled by friction at the substrate.

  5. Observations and coupled models of flow, salinity, and hydrate formation in deepwater Gulf of Mexico vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. J.; Flemings, P. B.; Fulton, P. M.

    2010-12-01

    Natural vents in the Gulf of Mexico are actively expelling water, and hydrocarbons. They are ubiquitous across the deepwater and we characterize them in 3 locations: the Auger Basin, the Popeye Basin, and the Ursa Basin. In seismic data, they look like volcanic edifices. Vents are elevated as much as 100 meters relative to the surrounding area and their cores have negative amplitudes that record lower impedance than the overlying water column: this low impedance is interpreted to record the presence of gas. The bottom simulating reflector, which is interpreted to record the boundary between hydrate above and gas and water below, rises toward to the seafloor at the center of the vent. Studies of these vents at Ursa have documented significant temperature anomalies, flow, and high salinities (Paull et al., 2005; Ruppel et al. 2005). We model the coexistence of high salinity fluids, elevated temperatures, and an uplifted bottom simulating reflector with two approaches. First, we assume that high salinity fluids are generated by dissolution of salt bodies at depth and that these hot, saline, fluids are expelled vertically. Second, we model the solidification of gas hydrate during upward flow of gas and water. In this model, free gas combines with water to generate hydrate: salt is excluded, resulting in the generation of a high salinity brine. The two models result in predictable differences of salinity and possibly temperature. A better understanding of the hydrogeological processes at vent zones is important for understanding the fluxes of heat and mass from submarine vents, and it is important for understanding the conditions under which deep sea biological communities exist at these vent locations.

  6. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  7. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tuff vents in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy): Toward a new chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the Holocene volcanic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedele, L.; Insinga, D.D.; Calvert, A.T.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Campi Flegrei hosts numerous monogenetic vents inferred to be younger than the 15 ka Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. Sanidine crystals from the three young Campi Flegrei vents of Fondi di Baia, Bacoli and Nisida were dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. These vents, together with several other young edifices, occur roughly along the inner border of the Campi Flegrei caldera, suggesting that the volcanic conduits are controlled by caldera-bounding faults. Plateau ages of ∼9.6 ka (Fondi di Baia), ∼8.6 ka (Bacoli) and ∼3.9 ka (Nisida) indicate eruptive activity during intervals previously interpreted as quiescent. A critical revision, involving calendar age correction of literature 14C data and available 40Ar/39Ar age data, is presented. A new reference chronostratigraphic framework for Holocene Phlegrean activity, which significantly differs from the previously adopted ones, is proposed. This has important implications for understanding the Campi Flegrei eruptive history and, ultimately, for the evaluation of related volcanic risk and hazard, for which the inferred history of its recent activity is generally taken into account.

  8. Major and trace element distributions around active volcanic vents determined by analyses of grasses: implications for element cycling and bio-monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. S.; Mather, T. A.; Pyle, D. M.; Day, J. A.; Witt, M. L. I.; Collins, S. J.; Hilton, R. G.

    2010-10-01

    Samples of grass were collected at Masaya Volcano (Nicaragua; Rhynchelytrum repens and Andropogon angustatus) and the Piton de La Fournaise (around the April 2007 eruptive vent, La Réunion; Vetiveria zizanioides) to investigate the controls on major and trace element concentrations in plants around active volcanic vents. Samples were analysed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for a wide range of elements, and atomic absorption spectroscopy for Hg. At Masaya, As, Cu, Mo, Tl and K concentrations in both grass species showed a simple pattern of variability consistent with exposure to the volcanic plume. Similar variability was found in A. angustatus for Al, Co, Cs, Hg and Mg. At the Piton de La Fournaise, the patterns of variability in V. zizanioides were more complex and related to variable exposures to emissions from both the active vent and lava flow. These results suggest that exposure to volcanic emissions is, for many elements, the main control on compositional variability in vegetation growing on active volcanoes. Thus, vegetation may be an important environmental reservoir for elements emitted by volcanoes and should be considered as part of the global biogeochemical cycles.

  9. Hydrothermal vents and methane seeps: Rethinking the sphere of influence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levin, Lisa A.; Baco, Amy; Bowden, David; Colaco, Ana; Cordes, Erik E.; Cunha, Marina; Demopoulos, Amanda; Gobin, Judith; Grupe, Ben; Le, Jennifer; Metaxas, Anna; Netburn, Amanda; Rouse, Greg; Thurber, Andrew; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Vanreusel, Ann; Watling, Les

    2016-01-01

    Although initially viewed as oases within a barren deep ocean, hydrothermal vent and methane seep communities are now recognized to interact with surrounding ecosystems on the sea floor and in the water column, and to affect global geochemical cycles. The importance of understanding these interactions is growing as the potential rises for disturbance from oil and gas extraction, seabed mining and bottom trawling. Here we synthesize current knowledge of the nature, extent and time and space scales of vent and seep interactions with background systems. We document an expanded footprint beyond the site of local venting or seepage with respect to elemental cycling and energy flux, habitat use, trophic interactions, and connectivity. Heat and energy are released, global biogeochemical and elemental cycles are modified, and particulates are transported widely in plumes. Hard and biotic substrates produced at vents and seeps are used by “benthic background” fauna for attachment substrata, shelter, and access to food via grazing or through position in the current, while particulates and fluid fluxes modify planktonic microbial communities. Chemosynthetic production provides nutrition to a host of benthic and planktonic heterotrophic background species through multiple horizontal and vertical transfer pathways assisted by flow, gamete release, animal movements, and succession, but these pathways remain poorly known. Shared species, genera and families indicate that ecological and evolutionary connectivity exists among vents, seeps, organic falls and background communities in the deep sea; the genetic linkages with inactive vents and seeps and background assemblages however, are practically unstudied. The waning of venting or seepage activity generates major transitions in space and time that create links to surrounding ecosystems, often with identifiable ecotones or successional stages. The nature of all these interactions is dependent on water depth, as well as

  10. 30,000 years of hydrothermal activity at the lost city vent field.

    PubMed

    Früh-Green, Gretchen L; Kelley, Deborah S; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Karson, Jeffrey A; Ludwig, Kristin A; Butterfield, David A; Boschi, Chiara; Proskurowski, Giora

    2003-07-25

    Strontium, carbon, and oxygen isotope data and radiocarbon ages document at least 30,000 years of hydrothermal activity driven by serpentinization reactions at Lost City. Serpentinization beneath this off-axis field is estimated to occur at a minimum rate of 1.2 x 10(-4) cubic kilometers per year. The access of seawater to relatively cool, fresh peridotite, coupled with faulting, volumetric expansion, and mass wasting processes, are crucial to sustain such systems. The amount of heat produced by serpentinization of peridotite massifs, typical of slow and ultraslow spreading environments, has the potential to drive Lost City-type systems for hundreds of thousands, possibly millions, of years.

  11. Diverse styles of submarine venting on the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise

    PubMed Central

    German, C. R.; Bowen, A.; Coleman, M. L.; Honig, D. L.; Huber, J. A.; Jakuba, M. V.; Kinsey, J. C.; Kurz, M. D.; Leroy, S.; McDermott, J. M.; de Lépinay, B. Mercier; Nakamura, K.; Seewald, J. S.; Smith, J. L.; Sylva, S. P.; Van Dover, C. L.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Yoerger, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty years after the first discovery of high-temperature submarine venting, the vast majority of the global mid-ocean ridge remains unexplored for hydrothermal activity. Of particular interest are the world’s ultraslow spreading ridges that were the last to be demonstrated to host high-temperature venting but may host systems particularly relevant to prebiotic chemistry and the origins of life. Here we report evidence for previously unknown, diverse, and very deep hydrothermal vents along the ∼110 km long, ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR). Our data indicate that the MCR hosts at least three discrete hydrothermal sites, each representing a different type of water-rock interaction, including both mafic and ultramafic systems and, at ∼5,000 m, the deepest known hydrothermal vent. Although submarine hydrothermal circulation, in which seawater percolates through and reacts with host lithologies, occurs on all mid-ocean ridges, the diversity of vent types identified here and their relative geographic isolation make the MCR unique in the oceans. These new sites offer prospects for an expanded range of vent-fluid compositions, varieties of abiotic organic chemical synthesis and extremophile microorganisms, and unparalleled faunal biodiversity—all in close proximity. PMID:20660317

  12. Diverse styles of submarine venting on the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise.

    PubMed

    German, C R; Bowen, A; Coleman, M L; Honig, D L; Huber, J A; Jakuba, M V; Kinsey, J C; Kurz, M D; Leroy, S; McDermott, J M; de Lépinay, B Mercier; Nakamura, K; Seewald, J S; Smith, J L; Sylva, S P; Van Dover, C L; Whitcomb, L L; Yoerger, D R

    2010-08-10

    Thirty years after the first discovery of high-temperature submarine venting, the vast majority of the global mid-ocean ridge remains unexplored for hydrothermal activity. Of particular interest are the world's ultraslow spreading ridges that were the last to be demonstrated to host high-temperature venting but may host systems particularly relevant to prebiotic chemistry and the origins of life. Here we report evidence for previously unknown, diverse, and very deep hydrothermal vents along the approximately 110 km long, ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR). Our data indicate that the MCR hosts at least three discrete hydrothermal sites, each representing a different type of water-rock interaction, including both mafic and ultramafic systems and, at approximately 5,000 m, the deepest known hydrothermal vent. Although submarine hydrothermal circulation, in which seawater percolates through and reacts with host lithologies, occurs on all mid-ocean ridges, the diversity of vent types identified here and their relative geographic isolation make the MCR unique in the oceans. These new sites offer prospects for an expanded range of vent-fluid compositions, varieties of abiotic organic chemical synthesis and extremophile microorganisms, and unparalleled faunal biodiversity--all in close proximity.

  13. Mud volcano venting induced gas hydrate formation at the upper slope accretionary wedge, offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Saulwood; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Cheng, Wan-Yen; Chou, Cheng-Tien; Chen, NeiChen; Hsieh, I.-Chih

    2016-04-01

    TsanYao Mud Volcano (TYMV) is the largest mud volcano cone in the Hengchun Mud Volcano Group (HCMVG), located at the upper slope of the accrretionary wedge, southwest of Taiwan. The region is under active tectonic activity with the Philippine Plate, moving northwestward at a rate of ~8 cm/year. This region also receives huge quantity of suspended particle load of ~100 mT/year at present time from adjacent small rivers of the Island of Taiwan. Large loads of suspended sediments influx become a major source of organic carbon and later gas and other hydrocarbon. Gas and fluid in the mud volcano are actively venting from deep to the sea floor on the upper slope of the accretionary wedge. In order to understand venting on the HCMVG, echo sounder, towcam and coring were carried out. Pore water sulfate, chloride, potassium, calcium, stable isotope O-18, gas compositions, dissolved sulfide were analysed. The HCMVG consists of 12 volcano cones of different sizes. Large quantity of gas and fluid are venting directly from deep to the TYMV structure high, as well as 50+ other vents as appeared as flares on the echo sounder. Some flares are reaching to the atmosphere and likely a source of green house gases to the atmosphere. Venting fluids include gas bubbles, suspended particle, mud, and breccia. Breccia size could reach more than 12 cm in diameter. Circular bands in different color appeared around the cone may represent stages of vent eruptions. Compositions of vent gas include methane, ethane and propane. High proportions of ethane and propane in the vent gas demonstrated that source of gas are thermogenic in origin. Patchy authigenic carbonate, bacterial mats, bivalves, tube worms and other chemosynthesis organisms were supported by venting gas AOM process near the sea floor. Pore water chloride concentrations show distinct variation pattern from center cone to the side of the volcano, with low in the center and high away from the cone. Pore water with higher than seawater

  14. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  15. Niche partitioning of diverse sulfur-oxidizing bacteria at hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Meier, Dimitri V; Pjevac, Petra; Bach, Wolfgang; Hourdez, Stephane; Girguis, Peter R; Vidoudez, Charles; Amann, Rudolf; Meyerdierks, Anke

    2017-04-04

    At deep-sea hydrothermal vents, primary production is carried out by chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms, with the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds being a major driver for microbial carbon fixation. Dense and highly diverse assemblies of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) are observed, yet the principles of niche differentiation between the different SOB across geochemical gradients remain poorly understood. In this study niche differentiation of the key SOB was addressed by extensive sampling of active sulfidic vents at six different hydrothermal venting sites in the Manus Basin, off Papua New Guinea. We subjected 33 diffuse fluid and water column samples and 23 samples from surfaces of chimneys, rocks and fauna to a combined analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, metagenomes and real-time in situ measured geochemical parameters. We found Sulfurovum Epsilonproteobacteria mainly attached to surfaces exposed to diffuse venting, while the SUP05-clade dominated the bacterioplankton in highly diluted mixtures of vent fluids and seawater. We propose that the high diversity within Sulfurimonas- and Sulfurovum-related Epsilonproteobacteria observed in this study derives from the high variation of environmental parameters such as oxygen and sulfide concentrations across small spatial and temporal scales.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 4 April 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.37.

  16. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    TD64, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, is one of several groups with high-fidelity fluids design and analysis expertise in the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). TD64 assists personnel working on other programs. The group participates in projects in the following areas: turbomachinery activities, nozzle activities, combustion devices, and the Columbia accident investigation.

  17. Detection of active hydrothermal vent fields in the Pescadero Basin and on the Alarcon Rise using AUV multibeam and CTD data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caress, D. W.; Troni, G.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.; Thomas, H. J.; Thompson, D.; Conlin, D.; Martin, E. J.; meneses-Quiroz, E.; Nieves-Cardoso, C.; Angel Santa Rosa del Rio, M.

    2015-12-01

    The MBARI AUV D. Allan B. collected high resolution bathymetry, sidescan, and subbottom profiles along the neovolcanic zone of the Alarcon Rise and across the southern Pescadero Basin during 2012 and 2015 MBARI expeditions to the Gulf of California (GOC). The combination of high resolution multibeam bathymetry and seawater temperature data has proven effective in identifying active high temperature vent fields, as validated by inspection and sampling during ROV dives. The AUV carries a 200 kHz multibeam sonar, 110 kHz chirp sidescan sonar, a 1-6 kHz chirp subbottom profiler, and a conductivity, temperature and depth (CTD) sensor for ~17-hour duration missions. Flying at 5.4 km/hr at 50 m altitude, the processed AUV bathymetry has a 0.1 m vertical precision and a 1 m lateral resolution. Chimneys taller than 1.5 m are sufficiently distinctive to allow provisional identification. The CTD temperature data have a nominal 0.002°C accuracy. Following calculation of potential temperature and correcting for average local variation of potential temperature with depth, anomalies greater than 0.05 °C can be reliably identified using a spike detection filter. MBARI AUV mapping surveys are typically planned using a 150 m survey line spacing, so the CTD data may be collected as much as 75 m away from any vent plume source. Five active high temperature vent fields were discovered in the southern GOC, with the Auka Field in the southern Pescadero Basin, and the Ja Sít, Pericú, Meyibó, and Tzab-ek Fields along the Alarcon Rise. In all five cases, hydrothermal vent chimneys are readily identifiable in the multibeam bathymetry, and temperature anomalies are observed above background variability. Other apparent hydrothermal chimneys were observed in the bathmetry that did not exhibit water temperature anomalies; most of these were visited during ROV dives and confirmed to be inactive sites. The maximum water column anomalies are 0.13°C observed above the Meyibó field and 0.25

  18. Discovery of a black smoker vent field and vent fauna at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Rolf B; Rapp, Hans Tore; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Lilley, Marvin D; Barriga, Fernando J A S; Baumberger, Tamara; Flesland, Kristin; Fonseca, Rita; Früh-Green, Gretchen L; Jorgensen, Steffen L

    2010-11-23

    The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) represents one of the most slow-spreading ridge systems on Earth. Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting, as well as the provenance of vent fauna at this northern and insular termination of the global ridge system, have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the first discovery of a black smoker vent field at the AMOR. The field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) and is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting and long-lived hydrothermal systems exist at ultraslow-spreading ridges, despite their strongly reduced volcanic activity. The vent field hosts a distinct vent fauna that differs from the fauna to the south along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The novel vent fauna seems to have developed by local specialization and by migration of fauna from cold seeps and the Pacific.

  19. Discovery of a black smoker vent field and vent fauna at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Rolf B.; Rapp, Hans Tore; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Barriga, Fernando J. A. S.; Baumberger, Tamara; Flesland, Kristin; Fonseca, Rita; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Jorgensen, Steffen L.

    2010-01-01

    The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) represents one of the most slow-spreading ridge systems on Earth. Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting, as well as the provenance of vent fauna at this northern and insular termination of the global ridge system, have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the first discovery of a black smoker vent field at the AMOR. The field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) and is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting and long-lived hydrothermal systems exist at ultraslow-spreading ridges, despite their strongly reduced volcanic activity. The vent field hosts a distinct vent fauna that differs from the fauna to the south along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The novel vent fauna seems to have developed by local specialization and by migration of fauna from cold seeps and the Pacific. PMID:21119639

  20. Sulfur isotope systematics of microbial mats in shallow-sea hydrothermal vents, Milos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilhooly, W. P.; Fike, D. A.; Amend, J. P.; Price, R. E.; Druschel, G.

    2011-12-01

    Milos is an island arc volcano venting submarine magmatic fluids directly into overlying seawater. Our study sites are located in an extensive shallow-water hydrothermal vent field less than 200 m offshore of Paleochori Bay in 5 m water depth. The vent fluids are highly sulfidic (> 3mM), at high-temperature (50-115C), and acidic (pH 5). The seafloor vent features include large patches (> 1 m2) of white microbial mats, patches of yellow elemental sulfur, and sediments stained orange by arsenic sulfides. The microbial communities that populate the shallow-sea hydrothermal vents stand in stark contrast to other nearshore environments typically found at wave base and within the photic zone. We explore sulfur isotope patterns along sharp environmental gradients established between ambient seawater and the efflux of vent fluids in the effort to better understand resource exploitation by microbial mat communities living in extreme conditions. Pore water samples, push-cores, biofilms, and water column samples were collected by SCUBA along sampling transects radiating out from the center of white mats into background sediments. We analyzed these samples for δ34S of dissolved sulfate, sulfide, elemental sulfur, and mineral sulfides (iron monosulfides and pyrite). Free gas sulfides collected directly from vents had δ34S values ranging +2.1 to +2.8%. Pore water sulfide, collected from below white mats with δ34S values ranging +1.9 to +2.9%, was isotopically similar to free gas samples. High pore water sulfate concentrations (8-25 mM) coupled with 34S-enriched pore water sulfides are not geochemical signatures indicative of dissimilatory sulfate reduction (where δ34Ssulfide <<0%). The δ34S of pore water sulfates collected across one dive site show a mixing trend, ranging from +18% in the center, +20% mid-transect, and +21% in sediments outside of the mat. This trend may be caused by oxidation of vent sulfides by entrained seawater (δ34S = +21.2%). We continue to target

  1. Implications of an ultramafic body in a basalt-dominated oceanic hydrothermal system on the vent fluid composition and on processes within sediments overlying a hydrothermal discharge zone: results of reactive-transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt-Epping, P.; Diamond, L. W.

    2009-04-01

    We use 2D reactive transport simulations to assess the hydraulic, thermal and chemical implications of an ultramafic body of lherzolitic composition within a basalt-dominated oceanic hydrothermal system. The simulations are fully coupled and hence account for the progressive serpentinization and the associated porosity/permeability reduction of the model lherzolite over time. We focus on the chemical fingerprints that reveal the presence of the ultramafic body at depth and that may be detected by direct seafloor exploration. These are the vent fluid composition and the porewater and mineral alteration within the rock column overlying a hydrothermal discharge zone. We compare ocean crust sections with and without sedimentary cover. Simulations suggest that the boundary between the basalt and the lherzolite constitutes a sharp reaction front. The type and distribution of alteration phases that form at the reaction front are a result of fluid flow across the basalt-lherzolite interface and thus are determined by the geometry and rate of hydrothermal fluid flow. Consequently, observations of the occurrence and extent of alteration phases, such as Fe-rich chlorite in the lherzolite or of rodingitization of the basalt, may be interpreted in terms of the reactive-transport model to reconstruct paleo-fluid flow in the permeable oceanic basement. The alteration of the lherzolite produces a fluid that is strongly reducing and depleted in silica. The most important chemical indicator of this rock-water interaction is an elevated H2 concentration. Under reducing (i.e. SO4-2 and CO2 free) conditions the enrichment in H2 is proportional to the extent of reaction between the fluid and the ultramafic rock. Under these conditions H2 behaves conservatively and the fluid remains enriched in H2 even though the concentration of all other major aqueous species is quickly buffered to new values when the fluid subsequently passes through basalt. This produces a vent fluid which is

  2. Dynamics of an open basaltic magma system: The 2008 activity of the Halema‘uma‘u Overlook vent, Kīlauea Caldera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eychenne, Julia; Houghton, Bruce; Swanson, Don; Carey, Rebecca; Swavely, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    On March 19, 2008 a small explosive event accompanied the opening of a 35-m-wide vent (Overlook vent) on the southeast wall of Halema‘uma‘u Crater in Kīlauea Caldera, initiating an eruptive period that extends to the time of writing. The peak of activity, in 2008, consisted of alternating background open-system outgassing and spattering punctuated by sudden, short-lived weak explosions, triggered by collapses of the walls of the vent and conduit. Near-daily sampling of the tephra from this open system, along with exceptionally detailed observations, allow us to study the dynamics of the activity during two eruptive sequences in late 2008. Each sequence includes background activity preceding and following one or more explosions in September and October 2008 respectively. Componentry analyses were performed for daily samples to characterise the diversity of the ejecta. Nine categories of pyroclasts were identified in all the samples, including wall-rock fragments. The six categories of juvenile clasts can be grouped in three classes based on vesicularity: (1) poorly, (2) uniformly highly to extremely, and (3) heterogeneously highly vesicular. The wall-rock and juvenile clasts show dissimilar grainsize distributions, reflecting different fragmentation mechanisms. The wall-rock particles formed by failure of the vent and conduit walls above the magma free surface and were then passively entrained in the eruptive plume. The juvenile componentry reveals consistent contrasts in degassing and fragmentation processes before, during and after the explosive events. We infer a crude ‘layering’ developed in the shallow melt, in terms of both rheology and bubble and volatile contents, beneath a convecting free surface during background activity. A tens-of-centimetres thick viscoelastic surface layer was effectively outgassed and relatively cool, while at depths of less than 100 m, the melt remained slightly supersaturated in volatiles and actively vesiculating

  3. [Oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis].

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, O F; Abramova, E S

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of examination of oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral mucosa disbiosis was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients were included in complex clinical and laboratory studies. The patients were divided in two groups: main group (30 patients exhibiting various grades of oral mucosa disbiosis) and control group (7 patients with no signs of oral disbiosis). The oral fluid bacteriocidal activity was examined by means of laser flow cytometry. Study results proved oral fluid bacteriocidal activity increase to correlate with the grade of oral mucosa disbiosis thus confirming the usefulness of the method in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis.

  4. Preliminary results on the reproduction of a deep-sea snailfish Careproctus rhodomelas around the active hydrothermal vent on the Hatoma Knoll, Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Takemura, A; Tamotsu, S; Miwa, T; Yamamoto, H

    2010-11-01

    Deep-sea snailfish Careproctus rhodomelas were collected from an active hydrothermal vent using a remotely operated vehicle (R.O.V. Hyper-dolphin) and a pressurized device (Deep-Aquarium). Careproctus rhodomelas exhibited a cystovarian-type ovary containing a small number of developing oocytes at different stages, suggesting that the fish is a batch-spawner that spawns large eggs (c. 6·0 mm) several times within its life span. In vitro culture of the oocytes in the presence of human chorionic gonadotropin showed that oestradiol-17β production fluctuated with oocyte development, suggesting that the oocytes were at the vitellogenic stage.

  5. Neutron-induced prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) of metalsand non-metals in ocean floor geothermal vent-generated samples

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.L.; Firestone, R.B.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.; Kasztovszky, Zs.; Gatti, R.C.; Wilde, P.

    2002-12-05

    Neutron-induced prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) hasbeen used to analyze ocean floor geothermal vent-generated samples thatare composed of mixed metal sulfides, silicates, and aluminosilicates.The modern application of the PGAA technique is discussed, and elementalanalytical results are given for 25 elements observed in the samples. Theelemental analysis of the samples is consistent with the expectedmineralogical compositions, and very consistent results are obtained forcomparable samples. Special sensitivity to trace quantities of hydrogen,boron, cadmium, dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium isdiscussed.

  6. Battery Vent Mechanism And Method

    DOEpatents

    Ching, Larry K. W.

    2000-02-15

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  7. Battery venting system and method

    DOEpatents

    Casale, Thomas J.; Ching, Larry K. W.; Baer, Jose T.; Swan, David H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  8. Battery venting system and method

    DOEpatents

    Casale, T.J.; Ching, L.K.W.; Baer, J.T.; Swan, D.H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve. 8 figs.

  9. Active mixing of complex fluids at the microscale

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, Thomas J.; Foresti, Daniele; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2015-09-22

    Mixing of complex fluids at low Reynolds number is fundamental for a broad range of applications, including materials assembly, microfluidics, and biomedical devices. Of these materials, yield stress fluids (and gels) pose the most significant challenges, especially when they must be mixed in low volumes over short timescales. New scaling relationships between mixer dimensions and operating conditions are derived and experimentally verified to create a framework for designing active microfluidic mixers that can efficiently homogenize a wide range of complex fluids. As a result, active mixing printheads are then designed and implemented for multimaterial 3D printing of viscoelastic inks with programmable control of local composition.

  10. Active mixing of complex fluids at the microscale

    DOE PAGES

    Ober, Thomas J.; Foresti, Daniele; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2015-09-22

    Mixing of complex fluids at low Reynolds number is fundamental for a broad range of applications, including materials assembly, microfluidics, and biomedical devices. Of these materials, yield stress fluids (and gels) pose the most significant challenges, especially when they must be mixed in low volumes over short timescales. New scaling relationships between mixer dimensions and operating conditions are derived and experimentally verified to create a framework for designing active microfluidic mixers that can efficiently homogenize a wide range of complex fluids. As a result, active mixing printheads are then designed and implemented for multimaterial 3D printing of viscoelastic inks withmore » programmable control of local composition.« less

  11. Active mixing of complex fluids at the microscale

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Thomas J.; Foresti, Daniele; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Mixing of complex fluids at low Reynolds number is fundamental for a broad range of applications, including materials assembly, microfluidics, and biomedical devices. Of these materials, yield stress fluids (and gels) pose the most significant challenges, especially when they must be mixed in low volumes over short timescales. New scaling relationships between mixer dimensions and operating conditions are derived and experimentally verified to create a framework for designing active microfluidic mixers that can efficiently homogenize a wide range of complex fluids. Active mixing printheads are then designed and implemented for multimaterial 3D printing of viscoelastic inks with programmable control of local composition. PMID:26396254

  12. Increased digitalis-like activity in human cerebrospinal fluid after expansion of the extracellular fluid volume

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, J.A.; Martin, A.M.; Malave, S.

    1985-08-12

    The present study was designed to determine whether acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume influenced the digitalis-like activity of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), previously described. Human CSF samples, drawn before and 30 minutes after the intravenous infusion of 1 liter of either saline or glucose solutions, were assayed for digitalis-like activity by inhibition of either the /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake into human erythrocytes or by the activity of a purified Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ ATPase. The CSF inhibitory activity on both systems significantly increased after the infusion of sodium solutions but did not change after the infusion of glucose. These results indicate that the digitalis-like factor of human CSF might be involved in the regulation of the extracellular fluid volume and electrolyte content and thereby in some of the physiological responses to sodium loading. 31 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  13. Instabilities, motion and deformation of active fluid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, Carl A.; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-12-01

    We consider two minimal models of active fluid droplets that exhibit complex dynamics including steady motion, deformation, rotation and oscillating motion. First we consider a droplet with a concentration of active contractile matter adsorbed to its boundary. We analytically predict activity driven instabilities in the concentration profile, and compare them to the dynamics we find from simulations. Secondly, we consider a droplet of active polar fluid of constant concentration. In this system we predict, motion and deformation of the droplets in certain activity ranges due to instabilities in the polarisation field. Both these systems show spontaneous transitions to motility and deformation which resemble dynamics of the cell cytoskeleton in animal cells.

  14. Opsonic activity of blister fluid from burn patients.

    PubMed Central

    Deitch, E A

    1983-01-01

    The combination of skin loss and immune depression after thermal injury predisposes burn patients to an increased risk of infection. Since the commonest site of infection in the burn patient is the burn wound itself, we elected to study the opsonic activity of locally produced blister fluid, from 18 thermally injured patients, for the two most common organisms colonizing the burn wound (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus). Blister fluid was as good an opsonin source for staphylococcus as normal serum. In contrast, the blister fluid did not support either the phagocytosis of the intracellular killing of P. aeruginosa. The poor opsonic activity of blister fluid for P. aeruginosa did not appear to be due to the presence of an inhibitory factor(s) since the addition of normal serum restored the opsonic activity of the blister fluid to normal. The concentrations of immunoglobulins and the complement components C3 and C4 in the blister fluid samples were less than half the level of those in normal serum. The opsonic activity of the blister fluid could not be restored to normal by the addition of either immunoglobulin or heat-inactivated serum (56 degrees C for 30 min). Thus, the opsonic factor(s) missing from the blister fluid was heat labile and thus probably represents complement components. That blister fluid had impaired opsonic activity for P. aeruginosa but not for S. aureus indicated that a local humoral defect may be responsible, at least in part, for the high incidence of gram-negative organisms, especially pseudomonads, colonizing the burn wound after thermal injury. PMID:6411619

  15. Implementation and evaluation of an inexpensive low-power low-noise infrasound sensor and its use in a dense sensor network around an active volcanic vent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcillo, O. E.; Johnson, J. B.; Hart, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The development and evaluation of a low-cost infrasound sensor, the infraNMT, and its use as part of a dense (45-element) sensor network around an active volcanic vent, are described. This sensor is based on a commercial micro-machined piezo-resistive differential pressure transducer that uses a mechanical high-pass filter to reject low-frequency out-band energy. The sensor features low noise, 2.02 mPa rms (0.5-2 Hz), 5.47 mPa RMS (0.1-20 Hz), or 5.62 mPa rms (0.05-20 Hz), flat response between 0.01 Hz to at least 40 Hz, inband sensitivity of 45.13 +/-0.23 μV/Pa, and nominal linear range of -124.5 to +124.5 Pa. The sensor consumes a minimum of 24 mW, and operates with voltages above 8V while drawing 3mA of current. The infraNMT specifications described above were independently verified using the infrasound test chamber at the Sandia National Laboratories' Facility for Acceptance, Calibration, and Testing (SNL-FACT) and following procedures for comparison calibration against traceable reference stands in voltage and pressure. Due to the intended broad frequency response of this sensor the testing chamber was configured in a double reference sensor scheme. A well-characterized MB2000 micro-barometer (with a flat amplitude response between 0.01 and 8 Hz) and microphone (with a flat amplitude response above 8Hz) were used simultaneously in this double reference test configuration. The characteristics of the infraNMT, including small size, low power consumption, high dynamic range, and low cost, favor its use in array or network configurations for near source and/or higher noise environments. This sensor has been used for infrasound array studies associated with various sources, including volcanic and chemical explosions, glacier earthquakes, and thunder. In this study we report on the Summer 2010 deployment of a network of 45 infraNMT sensors at Kilauea volcano to study the infrasound generated by degassing of the active Halema'uma'u vent. For this experiment, the

  16. Variable explosive energy partitioning during open vent activity at Fuego volcano, Guatemala 2007-2009: constraining explosion source processes and implications for monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. J.; Waite, G. P.; Rose, W. I.

    2009-12-01

    Fuego volcano, Guatemala is a 3800 m-high stratovolcano that has displayed open vent behavior since 1999, and has had several periods of historic open vent activity as well as more than 60 historical subplinian eruptions. Two years of continuous visual observations (2005-2007) and six months of seismic and acoustic data (2007) showed a repeating cycle of eruptive behavior that consisted of 1) passive lava effusion and minor strombolian explosions, 2) paroxysmal eruptions lasting 24-48 hours, and 3) degassing explosions with no associated effusion. The strombolian explosions that occurred during periods of passive lava effusion are characteristically distinct from degassing explosions. In this study, we quantify the ratio of radiated infrasound to seismic energy for each class of eruption during study periods in 2007, 2008 and 2009 to distinguish between potential models for the events. More than 25,000 people inhabit the high hazard zone around Fuego volcano, and the potential to track activity using explosive energy partitioning has monitoring and hazard implications. Strombolian explosions during passive effusion typically occur several times per hour, eject incandescent bombs, and produce ash-poor eruptive clouds. Degassing explosions characteristically occur once per hour, produce ash-rich eruptive clouds, and eject primarily lithic blocks. Two general types of degassing explosions are observed, 1) impulsive events with high excess pressure and 2) emergent, lower pressure transients in the acoustic traces without clear ground-coupled airwaves in the seismic data. On the other hand, strombolian explosions are nearly always impulsive in the acoustic traces but the seismic expressions of these events are variable. During the 2007 experiment, degassing explosions recorded at ~7 km from the vent show stable seismic-to-acoustic amplitude ratios ranging over less than an order of magnitude, while the energy partitioning during strombolian explosions varies widely with

  17. Active microrheology of fluids inside developing zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Mike; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-03-01

    Biological fluids are a source of diverse and interesting behavior for the soft matter physicist. Since their mechanical properties must be tuned to fulfill functional roles important to the development and health of living things, they often display complex behavior on length and time scales spanning many orders of magnitude. For microbes colonizing an animal host, for example, the mechanical properties of the host environment are of great importance, affecting mobility and hence the ability to establish a stable population. Indeed, some species possess the ability to affect the fluidity of their environment, both directly by chemically modifying it, and indirectly by influencing the host cells' secretion of mucus. Driving magnetically doped micron-scale probes which have been orally micro-gavaged into the intestinal bulb of a larval zebrafish allows the rheology of the mucosal layer within the fish to be measured over three decades of frequency, complementing ecological data on microbial colonization with physical information about the gut environment. Here, we describe the technique, provide the first measurement of mucosal viscosity in a developing animal, and explore the technique's applicability to other small-volume or spatially inhomogeneous fluid samples.

  18. Mercury accumulation in hydrothermal vent mollusks from the southern Tonga Arc, southwestern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seyong; Kim, Se-Joo; Ju, Se-Jong; Pak, Sang-Joon; Son, Seung-Kyu; Yang, Jisook; Han, Seunghee

    2015-05-01

    We provide the mercury (Hg) and monomethylmercury (MMHg) levels of the plume water, sulfide ore, sediment, and mollusks located at the hydrothermal vent fields of the southern Tonga Arc, where active volcanism and intense seismic activity occur frequently. Our objectives were: (1) to address the potential release of Hg from hydrothermal fluids and (2) to examine the distribution of Hg and MMHg levels in hydrothermal mollusks (mussels and snails) harboring chemotrophic bacteria. While high concentrations of Hg in the sediment and Hg, As, and Sb in the sulfide ore indicates that their source is likely hydrothermal fluids, the MMHg concentration in the sediment was orders of magnitude lower than the Hg (<0.001%). It suggests that Hg methylation may have not been favorable in the vent field sediment. In addition, Hg concentrations in the mollusks were much higher (10-100 times) than in other hydrothermal vent environments, indicating that organisms located at the Tonga Arc are exposed to exceedingly high Hg levels. While Hg concentration was higher in the gills and digestive glands than in the mantles and residues of snails and mussels, the MMHg concentrations in the gills and digestive glands were orders of magnitude lower (0.004-0.04%) than Hg concentrations. In summary, our results suggest that the release of Hg from the hydrothermal vent fields of the Tonga Arc and subsequent bioaccumulation are substantial, but not for MMHg.

  19. Submarine venting of magmatic volatiles in the Eastern Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Bach, Wolfgang; Saccocia, Peter J.; Craddock, Paul R.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Sylva, Sean P.; Pichler, Thomas; Rosner, Martin; Walsh, Emily

    2015-08-01

    The SuSu Knolls and DESMOS hydrothermal fields are located in the back-arc extensional transform zone of the Eastern Manus Basin. In 2006, highly acidic and ΣSO4-rich vent fluids were collected at both sites and analyzed for the chemical and isotopic composition of major and trace species. Fluids exiting the seafloor have measured temperatures from 48 to 215 °C and are milky white in appearance due to precipitation of elemental S0. Vent fluid concentrations of Na, K, and Mg are depleted by as much as 30% relative to seawater, but have the same relative abundance. In contrast, the fluids are highly enriched in dissolved ΣCO2, Cl, SiO2(aq), Fe, and Al relative to seawater. Measured pH (25 °C) ranged from 0.95 to 1.87 and aqueous ΣSO4 ranged from 35 to 135 mmol/kg. The chemical and isotopic composition points to formation via subsurface mixing of seawater with a Na-, K-, Mg-, and Ca-free, volatile-rich magmatic fluid exsolved from subsurface magma bodies during a process analogous to subaerial fumarole discharge. Estimates of the magmatic end-member composition indicate a fluid phase where H2O > SO2 > CO2 ≈ Cl > F. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of H2O and carbon isotopic composition of ΣCO2 in the vent fluids strongly suggest a contribution of slab-derived H2O and CO2 to melts generated in the mantle beneath the Eastern Manus volcanic zone. Abundant magmatically-derived SO2 undergoes disproportionation during cooling in upflow zones and contributes abundant acidity, SO42-, and S0 to the venting fluids. Interaction of these highly acidic fluids with highly altered mineral assemblages in the upflow zone are responsible for extensive aqueous mobilization of SiO2(aq), Fe, and Al. Temporal variability in the speciation and abundance of aqueous S species between 1995 and 2006 at the DESMOS vent field suggests an increase in the relative abundance of SO2 in the magmatic end-member that has mixed with seawater in the subsurface. Results of this study

  20. Effects of Hemagglutination Activity in the Serum of a Deep-Sea Vent Endemic Crab, Shinkaia Crosnieri, on Non-Symbiotic and Symbiotic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fujiyoshi, So; Tateno, Hiroaki; Watsuji, Tomoo; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Daisuke; Mino, Sayaka; Sugimura, Makoto; Sawabe, Tomoo; Takai, Ken; Sawayama, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    In deep-sea hydrothermal environments, most invertebrates associate with dense populations of symbiotic microorganisms in order to obtain nutrition. The molecular interactions between deep-sea animals and environmental microbes, including their symbionts, have not yet been elucidated in detail. Hemagglutinins/lectins, which are carbohydrate-binding proteins, have recently been reported to play important roles in a wide array of biological processes, including the recognition and control of non-self materials. We herein assessed hemagglutination activity in the serum of a deep-sea vent endemic crab, Shinkaia crosnieri, which harbors chemosynthetic epibionts on its plumose setae. Horse and rabbit erythrocytes were agglutinated using this serum (opt. pH 7.5 and opt. temperature 15°C). Agglutinating activity was inhibited by eight kinds of sugars and several divalent cations, did not require any divalent metal ions, and remained detectable even after heating the serum at 100°C for 30 min. By using fluorescently labeled serum, we demonstrated that deep-sea crab serum components bound to the epibionts even in the presence of sugars. This study represents the first immunological assessment of a deep-sea vent endemic crab and demonstrated the possibility of a non-lectin-mediated symbiont-host interaction.

  1. Effects of Hemagglutination Activity in the Serum of a Deep-Sea Vent Endemic Crab, Shinkaia Crosnieri, on Non-Symbiotic and Symbiotic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, So; Tateno, Hiroaki; Watsuji, Tomoo; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Daisuke; Mino, Sayaka; Sugimura, Makoto; Sawabe, Tomoo; Takai, Ken; Sawayama, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    In deep-sea hydrothermal environments, most invertebrates associate with dense populations of symbiotic microorganisms in order to obtain nutrition. The molecular interactions between deep-sea animals and environmental microbes, including their symbionts, have not yet been elucidated in detail. Hemagglutinins/lectins, which are carbohydrate-binding proteins, have recently been reported to play important roles in a wide array of biological processes, including the recognition and control of non-self materials. We herein assessed hemagglutination activity in the serum of a deep-sea vent endemic crab, Shinkaia crosnieri, which harbors chemosynthetic epibionts on its plumose setae. Horse and rabbit erythrocytes were agglutinated using this serum (opt. pH 7.5 and opt. temperature 15°C). Agglutinating activity was inhibited by eight kinds of sugars and several divalent cations, did not require any divalent metal ions, and remained detectable even after heating the serum at 100°C for 30 min. By using fluorescently labeled serum, we demonstrated that deep-sea crab serum components bound to the epibionts even in the presence of sugars. This study represents the first immunological assessment of a deep-sea vent endemic crab and demonstrated the possibility of a non-lectin-mediated symbiont-host interaction. PMID:26212518

  2. Surface activity of Janus particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces: Theoretical and experimental aspects.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel; Rodriguez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, Miguel Angel; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2016-07-01

    Since de Gennes coined in 1992 the term Janus particle (JP), there has been a continued effort to develop this field. The purpose of this review is to present the most relevant theoretical and experimental results obtained so far on the surface activity of amphiphilic JPs at fluid interfaces. The surface activity of JPs at fluid-fluid interfaces can be experimentally determined using two different methods: the classical Langmuir balance or the pendant drop tensiometry. The second method requires much less amount of sample than the first one, but it has also some experimental limitations. In all cases collected here the JPs exhibited a higher surface or interfacial activity than the corresponding homogeneous particles. This reveals the significant advantage of JPs for the stabilization of emulsions and foams.

  3. How many vent fields? New estimates of vent field populations on ocean ridges from precise mapping of hydrothermal discharge locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; Resing, Joseph A.; Haymon, Rachel M.; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Lavelle, J. William; Martinez, Fernando; Ferrini, Vicki; Walker, Sharon L.; Nakamura, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Decades of exploration for venting sites along spreading ridge crests have produced global datasets that yield estimated mean site spacings of ∼ 12- 220 km. This conclusion demands that sites where hydrothermal fluid leaks from the seafloor are improbably rare along the 66 000 km global ridge system, despite the high bulk permeability of ridge crest axes. However, to date, exploration methods have neither reliably detected plumes from isolated low-temperature, particle-poor, diffuse sources, nor differentiated individual, closely spaced (clustered within a few kilometers) sites of any kind. Here we describe a much lower mean discharge spacing of 3-20 km, revealed by towing real-time oxidation-reduction-potential and optical sensors continuously along four fast- and intermediate-rate (>55 mm/yr) spreading ridge sections totaling 1470 km length. This closer spacing reflects both discovery of isolated sites discharging particle-poor plumes (25% of all sites) and improved discrimination (at a spatial resolution of ∼1 km) among clustered discrete and diffuse sources. Consequently, the number of active vent sites on fast- and intermediate-rate spreading ridges may be at least a factor of 3-6 higher than now presumed. This increase provides new quantitative constraints for models of seafloor processes such as dispersal of fauna among seafloor and crustal chemosynthetic habitats, biogeochemical impacts of diffuse venting, and spatial patterns of hydrothermal discharge.

  4. Investigations Into Tank Venting for Propellant Resupply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, H. C.; Harrison, Robert A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Models and simulations have been developed and applied to the evaluation of propellant tank ullage venting, which is integral to one approach for propellant resupply. The analytical effort was instrumental in identifying issues associated with resupply objectives, and it was used to help develop an operational procedure to accomplish the desired propellant transfer for a particular storable bipropellant system. Work on the project was not completed, and several topics have been identified as requiring further study; these include the potential for liquid entrainment during the low-g and thermal/freezing effects in the vent line and orifice. Verification of the feasibility of this propellant venting and resupply approach still requires additional analyses as well as testing to investigate the fluid and thermodynamic phenomena involved.

  5. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  6. Dynamic character of the hydrothermal vent habitat and the nature of sulphide chimney fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnicliffe, Verena; Kim Juniper, S.

    A major substratum for vent organisms on Juan de Fuca and Explorer Ridges of the northeast Pacific is the polymetallic sulphide chimney. The deposition processes and subsequent growth of such chimneys provide a dynamic and extreme habitat that changes rapidly. During initial venting stages, colonization must await stabilization of the chimney structure. As the porous anhydrite shell accumulates sulphide minerals, protection from direct hot water contact increases for organisms colonizing the outer walls while sufficient vent water still diffuses for the support of chemosynthesis. Vestimentiferan worms are found on small sulphide mounds but the active growth and collapse of anhydrite spires is a major source of disruption and mortality. High temperature venting and spire growth appear to attract alvinellid polychaetes which may be implicated in the process of strengthening and sealing the anhydrite spires. Fauna on the growing chimney is subject to changes in fluid flow patterns that can make the structure uninhabitable. Large chimneys are inhabited by more species indicating that a diversification of habitat results from variations in mineralization and fluid availability. Chimney fauna has become specialized in exploiting an unpredictable and unstable habitat in an extreme example of the control of biotic development by the physical environment.

  7. Biodiversity and biogeography of hydrothermal vent species in the western Pacific: a biological perspective of TAIGA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, M.; Watanabe, H.; Nakamura, M.; Sasaki, T.; Ogura, T.; Yahagi, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Ishibashi, J.; Kojima, S.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are scientifically interesting environments where strong interactions of geology, chemistry, and biology can be observed. The hydrothermal vents are geologically controlled in association with magmatic activities while diversity of chemicals (such as hydrogen sulfide) contained in hydrothermal fluid is controlled by geochemical interaction between heated seawater and surrounding rocks. In addition to those geological and chemical characters of hydrothermal vents, high biomasses of chemosynthetic community have been known around many vents since the first discovery in the 1970s. To understand the unique system and diversity of biological communities associated with vents is highly valuable in geological, chemical, and biological sciences. As an activity of the research project "TAIGA (Trans-crustal Advection & In-situ bio-geochemical processes of Global sub-seafloor Aquifer)" (Representative: Tetsuro Urabe, Department of Earth & Planetary Science, the University of Tokyo), we analyzed population structures and connectivity as well as larval ecology of various hydrothermal vent species in the Okinawa Trough and the Mariana Trough in an attempt to estimate faunal transitional history associated with hydrothermal activities. The specimens analyzed in the present study were collected by R/V Yokosuka with manned submersible Shinkai6500 and R/V Natsushima with ROV Hyper-Dolphin during YK10-11 and NT11-20 cruises, respectively. In the Mariana Trough (YK10-11), benthic and planktonic faunas were investigated by multiple sampling and use of plankton samplers in three hydrothermal vents (Snail, Archaean, and Urashima-Pika fields). Faunal compositions were then compared as well as size compositions and genetic diversities of major vent species among local populations. In the Okinawa Trough (NT11-20), multiple quantitative sampling was made with simultaneous environmental measurements at more than two sites in five hydrothermal vents (Minami

  8. ACTIVATION OF HAGEMAN FACTOR IN SOLID AND FLUID PHASES

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, C. G.; Revak, S. D.; Wuepper, K. D.

    1973-01-01

    The activation of Hageman factor in solid and fluid phase has been analyzed. Activation of highly purified Hageman factor occurred after it interacted with and became bound to a negatively charged surface. Activation was observed in the absence of enzymes that are inhibitable with diisopropylfluorophosphate, phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride and ε-amino-n-caproic acid. The binding of [125I]Hageman factor to the negatively charged surface was markedly inhibited by plasma or purified plasma proteins. Activation of Hageman factor in solution (fluid phase) was obtained with kallikrein, plasmin, and Factor XI (plasma thromboplastin antecedent). Kallikrein was greater than 10 times more active in its ability to activate Hageman factor than plasmin and Factor XI. The data offer a plausible explanation for the finding that highly purified kallikrein promotes clotting of normal plasma. In addition, the combined results of this and previously reported data from this laboratory indicate that the reciprocal activation of Hageman factor by kallikrein in fluid phase is essential for normal rate of activation of the intrinsic-clotting, kinin-forming, and fibrinolytic systems. Activation of Hageman factor was associated with three different structural changes in the molecule: (a) Purified Hageman factor, activated on negatively charged surfaces retained its native mol wt of 80–90,000. Presumably a conformational change accompanied activation. (b) In fluid phase, activation with kallikrein and plasmin did not result in cleavage of large fragments of rabbit Hageman factor, although the activation required hydrolytic capacity of the enzymes. (c) Activation of human Hageman factor with kallikrein or plasmin was associated with cleavage of the molecule to 52,000, 40,000, and 28,000 mol wt fragments. Activation of rabbit Hageman factor with trypsin resulted in cleavage of the molecule into three fragments, each of 30,000 mol wt as noted previously. This major cleavage occurred

  9. Modeling microbial reaction rates in a submarine hydrothermal vent chimney wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRowe, Douglas E.; Dale, Andrew W.; Aguilera, David R.; L'Heureux, Ivan; Amend, Jan P.; Regnier, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The fluids emanating from active submarine hydrothermal vent chimneys provide a window into subseafloor processes and, through mixing with seawater, are responsible for steep thermal and compositional gradients that provide the energetic basis for diverse biological communities. Although several models have been developed to better understand the dynamic interplay of seawater, hydrothermal fluid, minerals and microorganisms inside chimney walls, none provide a fully integrated approach to quantifying the biogeochemistry of these hydrothermal systems. In an effort to remedy this, a fully coupled biogeochemical reaction-transport model of a hydrothermal vent chimney has been developed that explicitly quantifies the rates of microbial catalysis while taking into account geochemical processes such as fluid flow, solute transport and oxidation-reduction reactions associated with fluid mixing as a function of temperature. The metabolisms included in the reaction network are methanogenesis, aerobic oxidation of hydrogen, sulfide and methane and sulfate reduction by hydrogen and methane. Model results indicate that microbial catalysis is generally fastest in the hottest habitable portion of the vent chimney (77-102 °C), and methane and sulfide oxidation peak near the seawater-side of the chimney. The fastest metabolisms are aerobic oxidation of H2 and sulfide and reduction of sulfate by H2 with maximum rates of 140, 900 and 800 pmol cm-3 d-1, respectively. The maximum rate of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is just under 0.03 pmol cm-3 d-1, the slowest of the metabolisms considered. Due to thermodynamic inhibition, there is no anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate (AOM). These simulations are consistent with vent chimney metabolic activity inferred from phylogenetic data reported in the literature. The model developed here provides a quantitative approach to describing the rates of biogeochemical transformations in hydrothermal systems and can be used to constrain the

  10. Active Learning in Fluid Mechanics: Youtube Tube Flow and Puzzling Fluids Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrenya, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Active-learning exercises appropriate for a course in undergraduate fluid mechanics are presented. The first exercise involves an experiment in gravity-driven tube flow, with small groups of students partaking in a contest to predict the experimental flow rates using the mechanical energy balance. The second exercise takes the form of an…

  11. Video Observations by Telepresence Reveal Two Types of Hydrothermal Venting on Kawio Barat Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D. A.; Holden, J. F.; Shank, T. M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Sherrin, J.; Herrera, S.; Baker, E. T.; Lovalvo, D.; Makarim, S.; Malik, M. A.; Wirasantosa, S.; Hammond, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    The INDEX-SATAL 2010 expedition began an international exploration of the seafloor in Indonesian waters using the methodology of telepresence, conducting EM302 multibeam mapping, water column CTD, and ROV high-definition video operations and sending data back to Exploration Command Centers in Indonesia and Seattle. Science observers in other locations in the US and Canada were engaged in real-time observations and interpretation of results. One mission goal was to locate hydrothermal or volcanic activity. Intense light scattering and redox potential measurements in the water column over Kawio Barat (KB)indicated a high level of hydrothermal activity, and direct video observations confirmed venting near the summit. None of the other volcanic features west of the Sangihe arc that were investigated during the mission had confirmed hydrothermal activity. ROV capabilities did not include physical sampling or temperature measurement, so our interpretation is based on visual comparison to other known sites. The steep western flank of KB from 2000 m depth to the summit (1850 m) has many areas of white and orange staining on exposed rocks, with some elemental sulfur, and broad areas covered with dark volcaniclastic sand, but no active venting was seen. KB has a summit ridge running WNW-ESE, with a major cross-cutting ridge on the western portion of the summit. Hydrothermal activity is concentrated near the eastern side of this intersection, on both the northern and southern sides of the summit ridge. Venting on the northern side of the summit ridge is characterized by intense white particle-rich fluids emanating directly from the rocky substrate with frozen flows of elemental sulfur down slope. This type of venting is visually very similar to the venting seen on NW Rota-1, an actively erupting volcano in the Mariana arc, and suggests that KB is actively releasing magmatic gases rich in sulfur dioxide to produce the elemental sulfur flows, inferred fine particulate sulfur

  12. Edge states in confined active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souslov, Anton; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    Recently, topologically protected edge modes have been proposed and realized in both mechanical and acoustic metamaterials. In one class of such metamaterials, Time-Reversal Symmetry is broken, and, to achieve this TRS breaking in mechanical and acoustic systems, an external energy input must be used. For example, motors provide a driving force that uses energy and, thus, explicitly break TRS. As a result, motors have been used as an essential component in the design of topological metamaterials. By contrast, we explore the design of topological metamaterials that use a class of far-from-equilibrium liquids, called polar active liquids, that spontaneously break TRS. We thus envision the confinement of a polar active liquid to a prescribed geometry in order to realize topological order with broken time-reversal symmetry. We address the design of the requisite geometries, for example a regular honeycomb lattice composed of annular channels, in which the active liquid may be confined. We also consider the physical character of the active liquid that, when introduced into the prescribed geometry, will spontaneously form the flow pattern of a metamaterial with topologically protected edge states. Finally, we comment on potential experimental realizations of such metamaterials.

  13. Hydrothermal Activity on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Tectonically- and Volcanically-Hosted High Temperature Venting at 2-7 Degrees S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Parson, L. M.; Murton, B. J.; Bennett, S. A.; Connelly, D. P.; Evans, A. J.; Prien, R. D.; Ramirez-Llodra, E. Z.; Shank, T. M.; Yoerger, D. R.; Jakuba, M.; Bradley, A. M.; Baker, E. T.; Nakamura, K.

    2005-12-01

    We have conducted a systematic investigation for hydrothermal activity along the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 2°30-6°50 S. Our initial approach was to use a combination of multi-beam swath mapping, deep-tow sidescan sonar imaging and water column plume-detection using MAPRs and CTD-rosette system to locate new sites of hydrothermal activity immediately south of the Romanche and Chain Fracture zones. We wanted to test whether these geologic features represent a significant barrier to gene-flow along-axis away from northern MAR vent ecosystems. During the first leg of our research cruise (RRS Charles Darwin cruise CD169, Feb-Mar 2005) we used this approach to identify two hydrothermally active regions, one in a non-transform discontinuity near 4°S and the other in a segment centre characterised by very fresh sheet-flows near 5°S. During Leg 2 we returned to the second of these areas and deployed ABE, WHOI's autonomous underwater vehicle, in a three-phase strategy to prospect for, locate, and image new hydrothermal fields. During Phase 1 two discrete target areas were located ca. 1km apart along strike within the segment centre. During Phase 2 these two areas were each mapped in detail using an SM2000 system while in situ optical back scatter, Eh, temperature, Mn and Fe(II) sensors were used to confirm the interception of buoyant hydrothermal plumes rising from the seafloor. Finally we redeployed ABE (Phase 3) to collect photo-mosaics of each of two new vent-areas whilst simultaneously sampling their buoyant plumes by CTD-rosette for TDMn, Fe and CH4 analyses.

  14. Community Structure of Macrobiota and Environmental Parameters in Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents off Kueishan Island, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Benny Kwok Kan; Wang, Teng-Wei; Chen, Pin-Chen; Lin, Chia-Wei; Chan, Tin-Yam; Tsang, Ling Ming

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents represent a unique habitat in the marine ecosystem characterized with high water temperature and toxic acidic chemistry. Vents are distributed at depths ranging from a few meters to several thousand meters. The biological communities of shallow-water vents have, however, been insufficiently studied in most biogeographic areas. We attempted to characterize the macrofauna and macroflora community inhabiting the shallow-water vents off Kueishan Island, Taiwan, to identify the main abiotic factors shaping the community structure and the species distribution. We determined that positively buoyant vent fluid exhibits a more pronounced negative impact to species on the surface water than on the bottom layer. Species richness increased with horizontal distance from the vent, and continuing for a distance of 2000 m, indicating that the vent fluid may exert a negative impact over several kilometers. The community structure off Kueishan Island displayed numerous transitions along the horizontal gradient, which were broadly congruent with changes in environmental conditions. Combination of variation in Ca2+, Cl-, temperature, pH and depth were revealed to show the strongest correlation with the change in benthic community structure, suggesting multiple factors of vent fluid were influencing the associated fauna. Only the vent crabs of Kueishan Island may have an obligated relationship with vents and inhabit the vent mouths because other fauna found nearby are opportunistic taxa that are more tolerant to acidic and toxic environments. PMID:26849440

  15. Community Structure of Macrobiota and Environmental Parameters in Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents off Kueishan Island, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chan, Benny Kwok Kan; Wang, Teng-Wei; Chen, Pin-Chen; Lin, Chia-Wei; Chan, Tin-Yam; Tsang, Ling Ming

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents represent a unique habitat in the marine ecosystem characterized with high water temperature and toxic acidic chemistry. Vents are distributed at depths ranging from a few meters to several thousand meters. The biological communities of shallow-water vents have, however, been insufficiently studied in most biogeographic areas. We attempted to characterize the macrofauna and macroflora community inhabiting the shallow-water vents off Kueishan Island, Taiwan, to identify the main abiotic factors shaping the community structure and the species distribution. We determined that positively buoyant vent fluid exhibits a more pronounced negative impact to species on the surface water than on the bottom layer. Species richness increased with horizontal distance from the vent, and continuing for a distance of 2000 m, indicating that the vent fluid may exert a negative impact over several kilometers. The community structure off Kueishan Island displayed numerous transitions along the horizontal gradient, which were broadly congruent with changes in environmental conditions. Combination of variation in Ca2+, Cl-, temperature, pH and depth were revealed to show the strongest correlation with the change in benthic community structure, suggesting multiple factors of vent fluid were influencing the associated fauna. Only the vent crabs of Kueishan Island may have an obligated relationship with vents and inhabit the vent mouths because other fauna found nearby are opportunistic taxa that are more tolerant to acidic and toxic environments.

  16. Individual hydrothermal vents at Axial Seamount harbor distinct subseafloor microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Opatkiewicz, Andrew D; Butterfield, David A; Baross, John A

    2009-12-01

    The microbial community structure of five geographically distinct hydrothermal vents located within the Axial Seamount caldera, Juan de Fuca Ridge, was examined over 6 years following the 1998 diking eruptive event. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses were used to determine the bacterial and archaeal diversity, and the statistical software primer v6 was used to compare vent microbiology, temperature and fluid chemistry. Statistical analysis of vent fluid temperature and composition shows that there are significant differences between vents in any year, but that the fluid composition changes over time such that no vent maintains a chemical composition completely distinct from the others. In contrast, the subseafloor microbial communities associated with individual vents changed from year to year, but each location maintained a distinct community structure (based on TRFLP and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses) that was significantly different from all other vents included in this study. Epsilonproteobacterial microdiversity is shown to be important in distinguishing vent communities, while archaeal microdiversity is less variable between sites. We propose that persistent venting at diffuse flow vents over time creates the potential to isolate and stabilize diverse microbial community structures between vents.

  17. Cemented mounds and hydrothermal sediments on the detachment surface at Kane Megamullion: A new manifestation of hydrothermal venting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucholke, Brian E.; Humphris, Susan E.; Dick, Henry J. B.

    2013-09-01

    Long-lived detachment faults are now known to be important in tectonic evolution of slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges, and there is increasing evidence that fluid flow plays a critical role in development of detachment systems. Here we document a new manifestation of low-temperature hydrothermal venting associated with the detachment fault that formed Kane Megamullion ˜3.3-2.1 m.y. ago in the western rift-valley wall of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Hydrothermal effects on the detachment surface include (1) cemented mounds of igneous rock and chalk debris containing hydrothermal Mn oxides and Fe oxyhydroxides, and (2) layered deposits of similar Fe-Mn minerals ± interbedded chalks. Mounds are roughly conical, ˜1-10 m high, and contain primarily basalts with lesser gabbro, serpentinite, and polymict breccia. The layered Fe-Mn-rich sediments are flat-bedded to contorted and locally are buckled into low-relief linear or polygonal ridges. We propose that the mounds formed where hydrothermal fluids discharged through the detachment hanging wall near the active fault trace. Hydrothermal precipitates cemented hanging-wall debris and welded it to the footwall, and this debris persisted as mounds as the footwall was exhumed and surrounding unconsolidated material sloughed off the sloping detachment surface. Some of the layered Fe-Mn-rich deposits may have precipitated from fluids discharging from the hanging-wall vents, but they also precipitated from low-temperature fluids venting from the exposed footwall through overlying chalks. Observed natural disturbance and abnormally thin hydrogenous Fe-Mn crusts on some contorted, hydrothermal Fe-Mn-rich chalks on ˜2.7 Ma crust suggest diffuse venting that is geologically recent. Results of this study imply that there are significant fluid pathways through all parts of detachment systems and that low-temperature venting through fractured detachment footwalls may continue for several million years off-axis.

  18. Arsenic concentrations and species in three hydrothermal vent worms, Ridgeia piscesae, Paralvinella sulficola and Paralvinella palmiformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, W. A.; Duncan, E.; Dilly, G.; Foster, S.; Krikowa, F.; Lombi, E.; Scheckel, K.; Girguis, P.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrothermal vents are surficial expressions of subsurface geological and hydrological processes. Fluids emitting from active vents are chemically distinct from bottom seawater, and are enriched in dissolved metals and metalloids, including arsenic. Vent organisms accumulate arsenic but the arsenic speciation in these non-photosynthetic organisms is largely unknown. Here, arsenic concentrations and chemical species were measured in three deep sea hydrothermal vent worms (Ridgeia piscesae, Paralvinella sulfincola and Paralvinella palmiformis) from the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Northwest pacific. R. piscesae has similar arsenic concentrations (3.8-35 μg g-1) to shallow water polychaetes while P. sulfincola and P. palmiformis have significantly higher arsenic concentrations (420-1417 and 125-321 μg g-1 respectively). R. piscesae contains appreciable quantities of inorganic arsenic (36±14%), monomethyl arsenic (2±2%), dimethyl arsenic (34±21%), an unknown methyl arsenical (7±16%), OSO3-arsenosugar (5±9%), TETRA (4±5%), ThioPO4/ThioDMAE (1±2%) and an unknown thio-arsenical (12±14%). These results suggests that host and symbionts are either involved in the methylation of arsenic, or are bathed in fluids enriched in methylated arsenic as a result of free-living microbial activity. The host carrying out methylation, however, cannot be ruled out. In contrast, 96-97% of the arsenic in P. sulfincola and P. palmiformis is inorganic arsenic, likely the result of arsenic precipitation within and upon the mucus they ingest while feeding. While all worms have oxo- and thio arsenosugars (2-30%), Paralvinella also have small amounts of arsenobetaine (<0.001-0.21%). The presence of arsenosugars, arsenobetaine and other minor arsenic species in the absence of photosynthesising algae/bacteria indicates that they may be formed by vent animals in the absence of sunlight, but at this time their formation cannot be explained.

  19. Microbial colonization of post eruptive vents on the EPR at 9N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetriani, C.

    2008-12-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to understand the role of microbial colonists at newly formed vents as "mediators" in the transfer of energy from the geothermal source to the higher trophic levels, and their role in altering fluid chemistry and in "conditioning" the vent environment for metazoans to settle. Following the 2005-06 volcanic eruption along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) ridge crest between 9°N and 9°N, we had several opportunities to investigate the microbial colonization of the post-eruptive vents: in 2006 (about six months after the eruption), in January 2007 (one year after the eruption), and in December 2007/January 2008 (two years after the eruption). In order to investigate microbial colonization, we designed and deployed several experimental microbial colonizers on active diffuse flow vents characterized by different temperatures (approximate range 20-60°C) chemical (different redox conditions), and biological (e.g., presence or absence of metazoan colonists) regimes. Analyses of the 16S rRNA and fuctional gene transcripts from the colonizing communities indicated that Epsilonproteobacteria represented the dominant and active fraction of the chemosynthetic early microbial colonists, and that they expressed in-situ the genes involved in carbon dioxide fixation and nitrate respiration. However, data from our semi quantitative culture experiments indicated that Epsilonproteobacteria were not the only microorganisms that attached to basalts or to the experimental colonizers during the early phases of colonization. Sulfur dependent, chemosynthetic members of the Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria were isolated from up to 10-5 dilutions of original samples along with heterotrophic Gammaproteobacteria capable of growth on n-alkanes as their sole carbon source. We propose a model that links the chemistry of hydrothermal fluids to the colonization of newly formed vents and suggests a role for chemosynthetic and heterotrophic bacteria in the

  20. Three-dimensional structure of fluid conduits sustaining an active deep marine cold seep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hornbach, M.J.; Ruppel, C.; Van Dover, C.L.

    2007-01-01

    Cold seeps in deep marine settings emit fluids to the overlying ocean and are often associated with such seafloor flux indicators as chemosynthetic biota, pockmarks, and authigenic carbonate rocks. Despite evidence for spatiotemporal variability in the rate, locus, and composition of cold seep fluid emissions, the shallow subseafloor plumbing systems have never been clearly imaged in three dimensions. Using a novel, high-resolution approach, we produce the first three-dimensional image of possible fluid conduits beneath a cold seep at a study site within the Blake Ridge gas hydrate province. Complex, dendritic features diverge upward toward the seafloor from feeder conduits at depth and could potentially draw flow laterally by up to 103 m from the known seafloor seep, a pattern similar to that suggested for some hydrothermal vents. The biodiversity, community structure, and succession dynamics of chemosynthetic communities at cold seeps may largely reflect these complexities of subseafloor fluid flow.

  1. Coil spring venting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-10-21

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

  2. Thermodynamic Vent System Test in a Low Earth Orbit Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanOverbeke, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    A thermodynamic vent system for a cryogenic nitrogen tank was tested in a vacuum chamber simulating oxygen storage in low earth orbit. The nitrogen tank was surrounded by a cryo-shroud at -40 F. The tank was insulated with two layers of multi-layer insulation. Heat transfer into cryogenic tanks causes phase change and increases tank pressure which must be controlled. A thermodynamic vent system was used to control pressure as the location of vapor is unknown in low gravity and direct venting would be wasteful. The thermodynamic vent system consists of a Joule-Thomson valve and heat exchanger installed on the inlet side of the tank mixer-pump. The combination is used to extract thermal energy from the tank fluid, reducing temperature and ullage pressure. The system was sized so that the tank mixer-pump operated a small fraction of the time to limit motor heating. Initially the mixer used sub-cooled liquid to cool the liquid-vapor interface inducing condensation and pressure reduction. Later, the thermodynamic vent system was used. Pressure cycles were performed until steady-state operation was demonstrated. Three test runs were conducted at tank fills of 97, 80, and 63 percent. Each test was begun with a boil-off test to determine heat transfer into the tank. The lower tank fills had time averaged vent rates very close to steady-state boil-off rates showing the thermodynamic vent system was nearly as efficient as direct venting in normal gravity.

  3. Evaluation of Soil Venting Application

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ability of soil venting to inexpensively remove large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated soils is well established. However, the time required using venting to remediate soils to low contaminant levels often required by..

  4. Activity of antioxidant enzymes in response to atmospheric pressure induced physiological stress in deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus.

    PubMed

    Martins, Inês; Romão, Célia V; Goulart, Joana; Cerqueira, Teresa; Santos, Ricardo S; Bettencourt, Raul

    2016-03-01

    Deep sea hydrothermal Bathymodiolus azoricus mussels from Portuguese EEZ Menez Gwen hydrothermal field possess the remarkable ability to overcome decompression and survive successfully at atmospheric pressure conditions. We investigated the potential use of antioxidant defense enzymes in mussel B. azoricus as biomarkers of oxidative stress induced by long term acclimatization to atmospheric pressure conditions. Mussels collected at Menez Gwen hydrothermal field were acclimatized for two weeks in three distinct conditions suitable of promoting physiological stress, (i) in plain seawater for concomitant endosymbiont bacteria loss, (ii) in plain seawater under metal iron exposure, (iii) constant bubbling methane and pumped sulfide for endosymbiont bacteria survival. The enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and iron storage proteins in addition to electrophoretic profiles were examined in vent mussel gills and digestive gland. Gills showed approximately 3 times more SOD specific activity than digestive glands. On the other hand, digestive glands showed approximately 6 times more CAT specific activity than gills. Iron storage proteins were identified in gill extracts from all experimental conditions mussels. However, in digestive gland extracts only fresh collected mussels and after 2 weeks in FeSO4 showed the presence of iron storage proteins. The differences between SOD, CAT specific activities and the presence of iron storage proteins in the examined tissues reflect dissimilar metabolic and antioxidant activities, as a result of tissue specificities and acclimatization conditions influences on the organism.

  5. The Evaluation of Antibacterial, Antifungal and Antioxidant Activity of Methanolic Extract of Mindium Laevigatum (Vent.) Rech. F., From Central Part of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Modaressi, Masoud; Shahsavari, Roia; Ahmadi, Farhad; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Abiri, Ramin; Mikaeli, Ali; Batoli, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Mindium laevigatum (Vent.) Rech. F. plant grows in central part of Iran. And used by local people as medical plant. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activities of the methanolic extracts of aerial and flower parts of plant. Materials and Methods The leaves and stem and flower of bark from M. laevigatum were separately collected, air-dried and powdered. Then the plant species extracts were prepared with methanol, water 80:20 and two polar and non-polar subfractions were realized. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by scavenging the radicals 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), β-Carotene linoleic acid assay and reducing power methods. The antifungal and antibacterial evaluation was performed by disc diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration methods. Results The total phenolic analysis of subfractions found 182 ± 4.2 µg.gr-1 for polar and 158 ± 3.9 µg.gr-1 for non-polar extracts. The antifungal activity of the extracts against the various fungal varied from 14.0 to 34 mm. MIC values from 50 to 400 µg.mL-1 were satisfactory when compared with other plant products. The antibacterial results revealed that the subfraction extracts are mostly effective against Staphylococcus aureus. The antioxidant results showed polar subfraction has more activity against non-polar subfraction. Conclusion These findings demonstrated that the extract of Mindium laevigatum has remarkable in vitro antifungal and antioxidant activity. PMID:24624184

  6. Scientists as stakeholders in conservation of hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Godet, Laurent; Zelnio, Kevin A; VAN Dover, Cindy L

    2011-04-01

    Hydrothermal vents are deep-sea ecosystems that are almost exclusively known and explored by scientists rather than the general public. Continuing scientific discoveries arising from study of hydrothermal vents are concommitant with the increased number of scientific cruises visiting and sampling vent ecosystems. Through a bibliometric analysis, we assessed the scientific value of hydrothermal vents relative to two of the most well-studied marine ecosystems, coral reefs and seagrass beds. Scientific literature on hydrothermal vents is abundant, of high impact, international, and interdisciplinary and is comparable in these regards with literature on coral reefs and seagrass beds. Scientists may affect hydrothermal vents because their activities are intense and spatially and temporally concentrated in these small systems. The potential for undesirable effects from scientific enterprise motivated the creation of a code of conduct for environmentally and scientifically benign use of hydrothermal vents for research. We surveyed scientists worldwide engaged in deep-sea research and found that scientists were aware of the code of conduct and thought it was relevant to conservation, but they did not feel informed or confident about the respect other researchers have for the code. Although this code may serve as a reminder of scientists' environmental responsibilities, conservation of particular vents (e.g., closures to human activity, specific human management) may effectively ensure sustainable use of vent ecosystems for all stakeholders.

  7. Measure Guideline: Passive Vents

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, David; Neri, Robin

    2016-02-05

    This document addresses the use of passive vents as a source of outdoor air in multifamily buildings. The challenges associated with implementing passive vents and the factors affecting performance are outlined. A comprehensive design methodology and quantified performance metrics are provided. Two hypothetical design examples are provided to illustrate the process. This document is intended to be useful to designers, decision-makers, and contractors implementing passive ventilation strategies. It is also intended to be a resource for those responsible for setting high-performance building program requirements, especially pertaining to ventilation and outdoor air. To ensure good indoor air quality, a dedicated source of outdoor air is an integral part of high-performance buildings. Presently, there is a lack of guidance pertaining to the design and installation of passive vents, resulting in poor system performance. This report details the criteria necessary for designing, constructing, and testing passive vent systems to enable them to provide consistent and reliable levels of ventilation air from outdoors.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of the Rising Portion of a Seafloor Hydrothermal Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Breier, J. A.; Dick, G.; Toner, B.

    2011-12-01

    Within a region of < 100 m horizontal spans and at most a few hundred meters above the vent orifice, detailed hydrodynamics due to convection and turbulent entrainment in the vicinity of a seafloor hydrothermal vent plays a significant role in controlling the initial transport and chemical reactions of vent chemicals with surrounding seawater and the entrainment of ambient seawater, organic matter, and microbes into the rising plume. For hydrothermal plumes this is a critical scale of organized motion that has been understudied. We develop a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of this near-field plume region by numerically solving both the Navier-Stokes equations and the heat equation, which jointly govern such buoyancy driven flow system. In our simulation, we include the vent orifice as a velocity inlet that issues hot vent fluid, we apply a sophisticated k-omega turbulence closure model to describe the turbulence, and we use seawater properties in the temperature range of 0-400 °C as fluid material properties. Therefore, we can explicitly simulate mixing and entrainment between the vent fluid and the ambient seawater under a prescribed background stratification. Our simulation outputs the flow velocity vector field, turbulence fields, temperature and density fields, mixing ratio field, and heat and material fluxes that are issued from the vent orifice. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our simulation approach, we will show the simulation results for a typical vent at the ABE1 chimney site with a combined orifice area of ~ 150 square centimeter, exit fluid velocity of ~ 0.2 m/s and exit fluid temperature of ~ 309 °C. We are validating our simulation approach using existing theoretical models and available field data and by conducting sensitivity tests to explore the parameter space. Our goal is to couple the present detailed hydrodynamic model with biogeochemistry models at a similar scale to investigate questions pertaining to geochemical reactions

  9. Food-Web Complexity in Guaymas Basin Hydrothermal Vents and Cold Seeps.

    PubMed

    Portail, Marie; Olu, Karine; Dubois, Stanislas F; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Gelinas, Yves; Menot, Lénaick; Sarrazin, Jozée

    In the Guaymas Basin, the presence of cold seeps and hydrothermal vents in close proximity, similar sedimentary settings and comparable depths offers a unique opportunity to assess and compare the functioning of these deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems. The food webs of five seep and four vent assemblages were studied using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses. Although the two ecosystems shared similar potential basal sources, their food webs differed: seeps relied predominantly on methanotrophy and thiotrophy via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle and vents on petroleum-derived organic matter and thiotrophy via the CBB and reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycles. In contrast to symbiotic species, the heterotrophic fauna exhibited high trophic flexibility among assemblages, suggesting weak trophic links to the metabolic diversity of chemosynthetic primary producers. At both ecosystems, food webs did not appear to be organised through predator-prey links but rather through weak trophic relationships among co-occurring species. Examples of trophic or spatial niche differentiation highlighted the importance of species-sorting processes within chemosynthetic ecosystems. Variability in food web structure, addressed through Bayesian metrics, revealed consistent trends across ecosystems. Food-web complexity significantly decreased with increasing methane concentrations, a common proxy for the intensity of seep and vent fluid fluxes. Although high fluid-fluxes have the potential to enhance primary productivity, they generate environmental constraints that may limit microbial diversity, colonisation of consumers and the structuring role of competitive interactions, leading to an overall reduction of food-web complexity and an increase in trophic redundancy. Heterogeneity provided by foundation species was identified as an additional structuring factor. According to their biological activities, foundation species may have the potential to partly release the

  10. Food-Web Complexity in Guaymas Basin Hydrothermal Vents and Cold Seeps

    PubMed Central

    Olu, Karine; Dubois, Stanislas F.; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Gelinas, Yves; Menot, Lénaick; Sarrazin, Jozée

    2016-01-01

    In the Guaymas Basin, the presence of cold seeps and hydrothermal vents in close proximity, similar sedimentary settings and comparable depths offers a unique opportunity to assess and compare the functioning of these deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems. The food webs of five seep and four vent assemblages were studied using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses. Although the two ecosystems shared similar potential basal sources, their food webs differed: seeps relied predominantly on methanotrophy and thiotrophy via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle and vents on petroleum-derived organic matter and thiotrophy via the CBB and reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycles. In contrast to symbiotic species, the heterotrophic fauna exhibited high trophic flexibility among assemblages, suggesting weak trophic links to the metabolic diversity of chemosynthetic primary producers. At both ecosystems, food webs did not appear to be organised through predator-prey links but rather through weak trophic relationships among co-occurring species. Examples of trophic or spatial niche differentiation highlighted the importance of species-sorting processes within chemosynthetic ecosystems. Variability in food web structure, addressed through Bayesian metrics, revealed consistent trends across ecosystems. Food-web complexity significantly decreased with increasing methane concentrations, a common proxy for the intensity of seep and vent fluid fluxes. Although high fluid-fluxes have the potential to enhance primary productivity, they generate environmental constraints that may limit microbial diversity, colonisation of consumers and the structuring role of competitive interactions, leading to an overall reduction of food-web complexity and an increase in trophic redundancy. Heterogeneity provided by foundation species was identified as an additional structuring factor. According to their biological activities, foundation species may have the potential to partly release the

  11. Evidence for Hydrothermal Vents as "Biogeobatteries" (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M. E.; Girguis, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrothermal vents are unique systems that play an important role in oceanic biogeochemical cycles. As chemically reduced hydrothermal fluid mixes with cold oxic seawater, minerals precipitate out of solution resulting in chimney structures composed largely of metal sulfides and anhydrite. Pyrite, which is a natural semi-conductor, is the primary sulfide mineral, but other minerals within chimneys are also conductive (e.g. chalcopyrite, wurtzite, and some iron oxides). Sulfide chimneys are also known to host an extensive endolithic microbial community. Accordingly, submarine hydrothermal systems appear to be examples of biogeobatteries, wherein conductive mineral assemblages span naturally occuring redox gradients and enable anaerobic microbes to access oxygen as an oxidant via extracellular electron transfer (or EET). To test this hypothesis, we ran a series of electrochemical laboratory experiments in which pyrite was used as an anode (in a vessel flushed with hydrothermal-like fluid). When placed in continuity with a carbon fiber cathode, pyrite was found to accept and conduct electrons from both abiotic and biological processes (microbial EET). Specifically, electrical current increased 4-fold (5 nA/m2 to 20 nA/m2) in response to inoculation with a slurry prepared from a hydrothermal vent sample. Inspection of the pyrite anode with SEM revealed ubiquitous coverage by microbes. DNA was extracted from the anodes and the inoculum, and was subjected to pyrosequencing to examine prokaryotic diversity. These data suggest that key microbial phylotypes were enriched upon the pyrite, implicating them in EET. In addition, we deployed an in situ experiment based on microbial fuel cell architecture with a graphite anode inserted into a vent wall coupled to a carbon fiber cathode outside the vent. We observed current production over the course of one year, implying microbial EET in situ. Via pyrosequencing, we observed that the microbial community on the anode was

  12. Hydrothermal vent yields multitude of manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A rising plume of water from an active submarine hydrothermal spring discovered 500 km west of Newport, Ore., contains the highest concentrations of manganese yet reported, according to researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park and at the University of Washington in Seattle. The vent, one of many submarine springs that have deposited large deposits of zinc- and silver-rich metals along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, may be a source of renewable minerals.‘The discovery of the active water discharge from the vent sites is particularly significant because it indicates that the polymetallic deposits are still being deposited and may represent a renewable mineral deposit,’ according to William R. Normark, a marine geologist with the USGS and chief scientist aboard the S. P. Lee, the USGS research ship that was used to collect water samples above the hydrothermal vent.

  13. Assessing Microbial Activity in Marcellus Shale Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishart, J. R.; Morono, Y.; Itoh, M.; Ijiri, A.; Hoshino, T.; Inagaki, F.; Verba, C.; Torres, M. E.; Colwell, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) produces millions of gallons of waste fluid which contains a microbial community adapted to harsh conditions such as high temperatures, high salinities and the presence of heavy metals and radionuclides. Here we present evidence for microbial activity in HF production fluids. Fluids collected from a Marcellus shale HF well were supplemented with 13C-labeled carbon sources and 15N-labeled ammonium at 25°C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Samples were analyzed for 13C and 15N incorporation at sub-micrometer scale by ion imaging with the JAMSTEC NanoSIMS to determine percent carbon and nitrogen assimilation in individual cells. Headspace CO2 and CH4 were analyzed for 13C enrichment using irm-GC/MS. At 32 days incubation carbon assimilation was observed in samples containing 1 mM 13C-labeled glucose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with a maximum of 10.4 and 6.5% total carbon, respectively. Nitrogen assimilation of 15N ammonium observed in these samples were 0.3 and 0.8% of total nitrogen, respectively. Head space gas analysis showed 13C enrichment in CH4 in anaerobic samples incubated with 1mM 13C-labeled bicarbonate (2227 ‰) or methanol (98943 ‰). Lesser 13C enrichment of CO2 was observed in anaerobic samples containing 1 mM 13C-labeled acetate (13.7 ‰), methanol (29.9 ‰) or glucose (85.4 ‰). These results indicate metabolic activity and diversity in microbial communities present in HF flowback fluids. The assimilation of 13C-labeled glucose demonstrates the production of biomass, a critical part of cell replication. The production of 13CO2 and 13CH4 demonstrate microbial metabolism in the forms of respiration and methanogenesis, respectively. Methanogenesis additionally indicates the presence of an active archaeal community. This research shows that HF production fluid chemistry does not entirely inhibit microbial activity or growth and encourages further research regarding biogeochemical processes occurring in

  14. Microbial diversity in deep-sea sediments from the Menez Gwen hydrothermal vent system of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Teresa; Pinho, Diogo; Egas, Conceição; Froufe, Hugo; Altermark, Bjørn; Candeias, Carla; Santos, Ricardo S; Bettencourt, Raul

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal sediments are known to support remarkably diverse microbial consortia. Cultureindependent sequence-based technologies have extensively been used to disclose the associated microbial diversity as most of the microorganisms inhabiting these ecosystems remain uncultured. Here we provide the first description of the microbial community diversity found on sediments from Menez Gwen vent system. We compared hydrothermally influenced sediments, retrieved from an active vent chimney at 812 m depth, with non-hydrothermally influenced sediments, from a 1400 m depth bathyal plain. Considering the enriched methane and sulfur composition of Menez Gwen vent fluids, and the sediment physicochemical properties in each sampled area, we hypothesized that the site-associated microbes would be different. To address this question, taxonomic profiles of bacterial, archaeal and micro-eukaryotic representatives were studied by rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing. Communities were shown to be significantly different and segregated by sediment geographical area. Specific mesophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic archaeal (e.g., Archaeoglobus, ANME-1) and bacterial (e.g., Caldithrix, Thermodesulfobacteria) taxa were highly abundant near the vent chimney. In contrast, bathyal-associated members affiliated to more ubiquitous phylogroups from deep-ocean sediments (e.g., Thaumarchaeota MGI, Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria). This study provides a broader picture of the biological diversity and microbial biogeography, and represents a preliminary approach to the microbial ecology associated with the deep-sea sediments from the Menez Gwen hydrothermal vent field.

  15. Magnetorheological effect in a suspension with an active carrier fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kashevskii, B.E.; Kordonskii, V.I.; Prokhorov, I.V.

    1988-07-01

    The main quantitative laws governing the magnetorheological effect in a magnetorheological suspension with an active carrier liquid were established. The family of flow curves obtained for several samples of suspensions of one type of nonmagnetic particle was analyzed. Particles were suspended in a magnetic fluid of the magnetite-kerosite type. The main goal was to establish the law governing rheological similarity by generalizing experimental data with a universal relation while employing a small amount of initial data on the system. The data included the law of magnetization of the magnetic carrier fluid, the law of change in its viscosity in the field, and the law of change in the viscosity of the magnetorheological suspension/active carrier liquid system with an increase in the concentration of nonmagnetic particles in a zero field.

  16. Peptic ulcer perforation: sonographic imaging of active fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Minardos, Ioannis; Ioannis, Minardos; Ziogana, Dimitra; Dimitra, Ziogana; Hristopoulos, Hristos; Hristos, Hristopoulos; Dermitzakis, Ioannis; Ioannis, Dermitzakis

    2006-01-01

    Sonography is not the method of choice for the evaluation of suspected peptic ulcer perforation (PUP). However, indirect sonographic signs and direct visualization of PUP have been reported by several authors in recent years. We report a case of an elderly woman who presented with severe abdominal pain and positive rebound sign, in whom abdominal sonography demonstrated indirect signs of PUP, the site of perforation, and active air fluid leakage through the perforated anterior prepyloric antral wall.

  17. Enabling Novel Minimally-Actuated Robotic Capabilities Through Active Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-25

    journals : 1. Ahmed Helal. Society of Rheology Meeting, Feb 2013, "Design of Integrated ER valves" 2. Boston Dynamics Active Fluids Program: IEEE RAS...adhesive climbers. (a) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of papers submitted or published that acknowledge ARO support...from the start of the project to the date of this printing. List the papers, including journal references, in the following categories: Received

  18. Alpha-mannosidase activity in stallion epididymal fluid and spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Retamal, C A; Dias, A J B; Brasil, F C; Lanzana, F R; López, M L

    2012-07-15

    The expression of α-D-mannosidase activity was fluorometrically and electrophoretically assessed in spermatozoa, epididymal fluid and homogenates of stallion epididymal tissue. Enzyme activity had regional differences; it was higher (P<0.05) in samples from the cauda epididymal region than in samples from the proximal caput region (largely composed of efferent ducts). Based on enzyme activity, as a function of pH of the assay substrate, electrophoretic analysis in native and native/SDS-PAGE conditions, and the effect of inhibitors or activators, we inferred the presence of at least two catalytically active forms of α-D-mannosidase. The neutral form of the enzyme (α-mannosidase II) was activated by Co2+, whereas the acid form (optimum pH 3.5 to 4.0) was sensitive to swainsonine (an inhibitor of α-mannosidase I), stabilized or stimulated by Zn2+, and not activated by Co2+ (activator of the neutral form). The activity of the acid form of the enzyme was highest in the epididymal fluid, where it seemed to be mainly in a secretory form. This form of the enzyme may have a role in plasma membrane remodeling associated with sperm maturation. In contrast, the activity of α-mannosidase II was higher in mature spermatozoa. It has been postulated that α-mannosidase II may act as a receptor in the recognition and binding of the complementary carbohydrate moieties present on the zona pellucida. With non-denaturing electrophoresis, α-D-mannosidase had an electrophoretic mobility of 0.35 and 0.24. When resolved by 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE (under denaturing conditions) the enzyme had a major protein band of molecular weight 154 kDa in spermatozoa and epididymal samples. Based on its properties under native conditions, we inferred that this enzyme might interact with other proteins and form transitory aggregates.

  19. The Origin of Life in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Sojo, Victor; Herschy, Barry; Whicher, Alexandra; Camprubí, Eloi; Lane, Nick

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 70 years, prebiotic chemists have been very successful in synthesizing the molecules of life, from amino acids to nucleotides. Yet there is strikingly little resemblance between much of this chemistry and the metabolic pathways of cells, in terms of substrates, catalysts, and synthetic pathways. In contrast, alkaline hydrothermal vents offer conditions similar to those harnessed by modern autotrophs, but there has been limited experimental evidence that such conditions could drive prebiotic chemistry. In the Hadean, in the absence of oxygen, alkaline vents are proposed to have acted as electrochemical flow reactors, in which alkaline fluids saturated in H2 mixed with relatively acidic ocean waters rich in CO2, through a labyrinth of interconnected micropores with thin inorganic walls containing catalytic Fe(Ni)S minerals. The difference in pH across these thin barriers produced natural proton gradients with equivalent magnitude and polarity to the proton-motive force required for carbon fixation in extant bacteria and archaea. How such gradients could have powered carbon reduction or energy flux before the advent of organic protocells with genes and proteins is unknown. Work over the last decade suggests several possible hypotheses that are currently being tested in laboratory experiments, field observations, and phylogenetic reconstructions of ancestral metabolism. We analyze the perplexing differences in carbon and energy metabolism in methanogenic archaea and acetogenic bacteria to propose a possible ancestral mechanism of CO2 reduction in alkaline hydrothermal vents. Based on this mechanism, we show that the evolution of active ion pumping could have driven the deep divergence of bacteria and archaea.

  20. Potential biomass in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Takai, K.

    2012-12-01

    Since the first discovery of black smoker vents hosting chemosynthetic macrofaunal communities (Spiess et al., 1980), submarine hydrothermal systems and associated biota have attracted interest of many researchers (e.g., Humphris et al., 1995; Van Dover, 2000; Wilcock et al., 2004). In the past couple of decades, particular attention has been paid to chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms that sustain the hydrothermal vent-endemic animal communities as the primary producer. This type of microorganisms obtains energy from inorganic substances (e.g., sulfur, hydrogen, and methane) derived from hydrothermal vent fluids, and is often considered as an important modern analogue to the early ecosystems of the Earth as well as the extraterrestrial life in other planets and moons (e.g., Jannasch and Mottl, 1985; Nealson et al., 2005; Takai et al., 2006). Even today, however, the size of this type of chemosynthetic deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem is largely unknown. Here, we present geophysical and geochemical constraints on potential biomass in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem. The estimation of the potential biomass in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem is based on hydrothermal fluid flux calculated from heat flux (Elderfield and Schltz, 1996), maximum chemical energy available from metabolic reactions during mixing between hydrothermal vent fluids and seawater (McCollom, 2007), and maintenance energy requirements of the chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms (Hoehler, 2004). The result shows that the most of metabolic energy sustaining the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem is produced by oxidation reaction of reduced sulfur, although some parts of the energy are derived from hydrogenotrophic and methanotrophic reactions. The overall total of the potential biomass in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem is calculated to be much smaller than that in terrestrial ecosystems including terrestrial plants. The big difference in biomass between the

  1. The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP): (IV) Interpretations of Black Smoker Fluid Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, M. H.; Palandri, J. L.; Elders, W.; Fridleifsson, G. O.

    2008-12-01

    One scientific goal of the IDDP is to understand high-temperature reaction zones such as those that feed hydrothermal fluids to active mid-ocean ridge black smoker vents. Smoker fluids emerge from a reservoir of composition, pressure and temperature resembling those expected in a supercritical IDDP well in the Reykjanes geothermal system. We have reconstructed black smoker fluids based on published analyses, and then computed mineral saturation indices, log(Q/K), for a wide range of P-T conditions, from which we identify a pressure and temperature where a group of probable alteration minerals equilibrated with the fluid. The estimated reservoir conditions commonly reflect approximately 60°C of cooling at the vent in excess of that from adiabatic decompression. Saturation index surfaces distinctly converge to zero in a narrow range of pressure and temperature, but the small angle of intersection of most curves yield substantial uncertainty, especially in pressure. Feldspars, quartz, garnet, actinolite, wairakite and chlorite have a stronger pressure dependence than do others, so they become the principal indicators of pressure, which is especially reflected in pH and silica solubility. An accurate reconstructed in situ pH is essential. In reconstructing fluids, we recompute pH to high P-T starting from the pH measured on shipboard in cooled fluid samples. Aside from temperature effects, the pH in such samples is elevated by mixing with cold seawater and lowered by precipitation of vent sulfides. To examine our understanding of pH, we scrutinized the saturation states of sulfides in the reconstructed vent fluids. For example, in 21°N EPR HG vent, we find that sphalerite, chalcopyrite, and pyrrhotite are approximately saturated at the vent conditions (350°C, 260bar), and that pyrite is supersaturated and bornite is undersaturated. The former three are common vent sulfides. In the same fluid, silicates indicate reservoir conditions of approximately 450°C and 600

  2. 3D structure and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjoberg, Sigurd; Schmiedel, Tobias; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik H.; Galland, Oliver; Jerram, Dougal A.

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Norwegian Møre margin is regarded as a type example of a volcanic rifted margin, with its formation usually related to the influence of the Icelandic plume activity. The area is characterized by the presence of voluminous basaltic complexes such as extrusive lava sequences, intrusive sills and dikes, and hydrothermal vent complexes within the Møre Basin. Emplacement of hydrothermal vent complexes is accommodated by deformation of the host rock. The edges of igneous intrusions mobilize fluids by heat transfer into the sedimentary host rock (aureoles). Fluid expansion may lead to formation of piercing structures due to upward fluid migration. Hydrothermal vent complexes induce bending of overlying strata, leading to the formation of dome structures at the paleo-surface. These dome structures are important as they indicate the accommodation created for the intrusions by deformation of the upper layers of the stratigraphy, and may form important structures in many volcanic margins. Both the morphological characteristics of the upper part and the underlying feeder-structure (conduit-zone) can be imaged and studied on 3D seismic data. Seismic data from the Tulipan prospect located in the western part of the Møre Basin have been used in this study. The investigation focusses on (1) the vent complex geometries, (2) the induced surface deformation patterns, (3) the relation to the intrusions (heat source), as well as (4) the emplacement depth of the hydrothermal vent complexes. We approach this by doing a detailed 3D seismic interpretation of the Tulipan seismic data cube. The complexes formed during the initial Eocene, and are believed to be a key factor behind the rapid warming event called the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). The newly derived understanding of age, eruptive deposits, and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin enables us to contribute to the general understanding of the igneous plumbing system in volcanic basins and

  3. Airbag vent valve and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Leslie D. (Inventor); Zimmermann, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An energy absorbing airbag system includes one or more vent valve assemblies for controlling the release of airbag inflation gases to maintain inflation gas pressure within an airbag at a substantially constant pressure during a ride-down of an energy absorbing event. Each vent valve assembly includes a cantilever spring that is flat in an unstressed condition and that has a free end portion. The cantilever spring is secured to an exterior surface of the airbag housing and flexed to cause the second free end portion of the cantilever spring to be pressed, with a preset force, against a vent port or a closure covering the vent port to seal the vent port until inflation gas pressure within the airbag reaches a preselected value determined by the preset force whereupon the free end portion of the cantilever spring is lifted from the vent port by the inflation gases within the airbag to vent the inflation gases from within the airbag. The resilience of the cantilever spring maintains a substantially constant pressure within the airbag during a ride-down portion of an energy absorbing event by causing the cantilever spring to vent gases through the vent port whenever the pressure of the inflation gases reaches the preselected value and by causing the cantilever spring to close the vent port whenever the pressure of the inflation gases falls below the preselected value.

  4. Where are the undiscovered hydrothermal vents on oceanic spreading ridges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-11-01

    In nearly four decades since the discovery of deep-sea vents, one-third of the length of global oceanic spreading ridges has been surveyed for hydrothermal activity. Active submarine vent fields are now known along the boundaries of 46 out of 52 recognized tectonic plates. Hydrothermal survey efforts over the most recent decade were sparked by national and commercial interests in the mineral resource potential of seafloor hydrothermal deposits, as well as by academic research. Here we incorporate recent data for back-arc spreading centers and ultraslow- and slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (MORs) to revise a linear equation relating the frequency of vent fields along oceanic spreading ridges to spreading rate. We apply this equation globally to predict a total number of vent fields on spreading ridges, which suggests that ~900 vent fields remain to be discovered. Almost half of these undiscovered vent fields (comparable to the total of all vent fields discovered during 35 years of research) are likely to occur at MORs with full spreading rates less than 60 mm/yr. We then apply the equation regionally to predict where these hydrothermal vents may be discovered with respect to plate boundaries and national jurisdiction, with the majority expected to occur outside of states' exclusive economic zones. We hope that these predictions will prove useful to the community in the future, in helping to shape continuing ridge-crest exploration.

  5. Microbial anaerobic methane cycling in the subseafloor at the Von Damm hydrothermal vent field, Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Reveillaud, J. C.; Stepanauskas, R.; McDermott, J. M.; Sylva, S. P.; Seewald, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR) is Earth's deepest and slowest spreading mid-ocean ridge located in the western Caribbean. With an axial rift valley floor at a depth of ~4200-6500 m, it represents one of the deepest sections of ridge crest worldwide. In 2009, the world's deepest hydrothermal vents (Piccard at 4960 m) and an ultramafic-influenced system only 20 km away on top of an oceanic core complex (Von Damm at 2350 m) were discovered along the MCR. Each site is hosted in a distinct geologic setting with different thermal and chemical regimes. The Von Damm site is a particularly interesting location to examine chemolithoautotrophic subseafloor microbial communities due to the abundant hydrogen, methane, and organic compounds in the venting fluids. Here, we used a combination of stable isotope tracing, next-generation sequencing, and single cell techniques to determine the identity, activity, and genomic repertoire of subseafloor anaerobic archaea involved in methane cycling in hydrothermal fluids venting at the Von Damm site. Molecular sequencing of phylogenetic marker genes revealed the presence of diverse archaea that both generate and consume methane across a geochemical and thermal spectrum of vents. Stable isotope tracing experiments were used to detect biological utilization of formate and dissolved inorganic carbon, and methane generation at 70 °C under anaerobic conditions. Results indicate that methanogenesis with formate as a substrate is occurring at 70 °C at two Von Damm sites, Ginger Castle and the Main Orifice. The results are consistent with thermodynamic predictions for carbon speciation at the temperatures encountered at the ultramafic-hosted Von Damm, where formate is predicted to be thermodynamically stable, and may thus serve as a an important source of carbon. Diverse thermophilic methanogenic archaea belonging to the genera Methanothermococcus were detected at all vent sites with both 16S rRNA tag sequencing and single cell sorting. Other

  6. Spontaneous and specific activation of chemical bonds in macromolecular fluids.

    PubMed

    Park, Insun; Shirvanyants, David; Nese, Alper; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S

    2010-09-08

    Mechanical activation of chemical bonds typically involves the application of external forces, which implies a broad distribution of bond tensions. We demonstrate that controlling the flow profile of a macromolecular fluid generates and delineates mechanical force concentration, enabling a hierarchical activation of chemical bonds on different length scales from the macroscopic to the molecular. Bond tension is spontaneously generated within brushlike macromolecules as they spread on a solid substrate. The molecular architecture creates an uneven distribution of tension in the covalent bonds, leading to spatially controlled bond scission. By controlling the flow rate and the gradient of the film pressure, one can sever the flowing macromolecules with high precision. Specific chemical bonds are activated within distinct macromolecules located in a defined area of a thin film. Furthermore, the flow-controlled loading rate enables quantitative analysis of the bond activation parameters.

  7. Time Series Studies of Faunal Colonization and Temperature Variations at Diffuse-Flow Hydrothermal Vent Sites Near 9° 50'N, EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shank, T. M.; Scheirer, D.; Fornari, D. J.

    2001-12-01

    The April 1991 discovery of newly-formed hydrothermal vents in areas of intense volcanic activity along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) between 9\\deg 45' and 9\\deg 52'N provided a unique opportunity to follow temporal changes in biological community structure and vent fluid temperature and chemistry since the birth of numerous deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Discrete high resolution biological imaging and fluid chemistry samples have been collected in conjunction with autonomous temperature probe arrays that have monitored the fluid temperature at 10-15 minute intervals since 1993, within four diffuse-flow regions of the BioTransect at 9\\deg 50'N on the EPR. During ~1 year deployments between 1993 and 2000, active vent invertebrate colonization by greater than 500 individuals (representing 8 species) occurred on more than 60 recovered temperature probes comprising 12 arrays. On each temperature probe, the position and length of individual organisms were mapped to correlate the position of settlement and growth rates with the environmental temperatures experienced by these colonists. Regressions of colonization parameters with temperature measures (such as average, minimum, and maximum T) from multiple communities, along with size-frequency histograms and growth rates, indicate that the abundance of the vestimentiferan Tevnia jerichonana was greater than Riftia pachyptila tube worms and bathymodiolid mussels on temperature probes bathed in significantly higher average and maximum temperatures. Results strongly suggest that Tevnia has a greater physiological tolerance to higher temperatures and elevated geochemical concentrations (e.g., sulfide species) than Riftia and mussels. Significant differential colonization onto probes within an array demonstrates thermal and chemical habitat preferences by vestimentiferan tubeworms and mussels. Thus, patterns of active faunal colonization in hydrothermal areas vary with differing temperature regimes and associated environmental

  8. Safe venting of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Enhanced Emergency Smoke Venting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    Boeing Airworthiness Offices in both Renton and Everett. The search disclosed at least 26 letters between Boeing and the FAA on the subject of smoke...the ventilation airflow rates and utilizing the effect of the additional outflow valve. .-. 12 FAA Report No. DOT/ FAA /CT-86/41-I, " Aircraft ...lTr !r DOT/ FAA !CT-88/22 Enhanced Emergency FAA Technical Center Sm oke Atlantic City International Airport Venting N.J. 08405 T.DTIC, Q\\SEP 0 21988

  10. Tornado protection by venting

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the ability to protect a modern nuclear power plant from the effects of a tornado by the use of a system of venting in all safety-related structures outside of the containment. The paper demonstrates this by presenting a method of analysis and of equipment selection that fully complies with the intent and the letter of applicable federal regulatory guides. A report of an actual tornado in the City of Kalamazoo, Michigan, suggests that the concept of sealing a plant during a tornado may not always be applicable.

  11. Anti-arthritic activity of root bark of Oroxylum indicum (L.) vent against adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karnati, Mamatha; Chandra, Rodda H; Veeresham, Ciddi; Kishan, Bookya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oroxylum indicum (Bignoniaceae) also known as Sonapatha is an indigenous medicinal plant widely used in Ayurvedic medicine for over thousands of years. It is an active ingredient of well-known Ayurvedic formulations such as Chyawanprash and Dasamula. Root bark of this plant has tonic and astringent properties and it is also used in rheumatism. Objective: The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the anti-arthritic activity of different extracts of root bark of Oroxylum indicum against adjuvant - induced arthritis in rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were used in this study. Arthritis was induced by injecting 0.1 ml Freund's complete adjuvant intra-dermally into the left hind paw of the rats. The paw volume, hematological, biochemical, radiographic and histopathological aspects were evaluated. Results: The relative percentage inhibition potential of paw volume in rats treated with various extracts of Oroxylum indicum was found to be ethyl acetate extract (67.69%) >chloroform extract (64.61%) >n-butanol extract (58.46%) respectively. The hematological parameters like RBC count, hemoglobin content showed significant increase while there was a significant decrease in total WBC count and ESR in all the groups of animals pretreated with root bark extracts. The biochemical parameters such as catalase, glutathione contents showed a significant increase while the lipid peroxide and Cathepsin-D content decreased significantly only in case of ethyl acetate pretreated rats when compared to others. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts of root bark of Oroxylum indicum exhibit anti-arthritic activity. The order of activity of extracts was found to be ethyl acetate >chloroform >n-butanol respectively. PMID:23798888

  12. 24 CFR 3280.611 - Vents and venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Case Iron Soil Pipe and Fittings, or, Silicone Rubber, Low and High Temperature and Tear Resistant... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vents and venting. 3280.611 Section 3280.611 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  13. 24 CFR 3280.611 - Vents and venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... this section and as otherwise required by this standard. (b) Materials—(1) Pipe. Vent piping shall be... listed materials. (2) Fittings. Appropriate fittings shall be used for all changes in direction or size and where pipes are joined. The material and design of vent fittings shall conform to the type...

  14. Reliable activation to novel stimuli predicts higher fluid intelligence.

    PubMed

    Euler, Matthew J; Weisend, Michael P; Jung, Rex E; Thoma, Robert J; Yeo, Ronald A

    2015-07-01

    The ability to reliably respond to stimuli could be an important biological determinant of differences in fluid intelligence (Gf). However, most electrophysiological studies of Gf employ event-related potential (ERP) measures that average brain activity over trials, and hence have limited power to quantify neural variability. Time-frequency analyses can capture cross-trial variation in the phase of neural activity, and thus can help address the importance of neural reliability to differences in Gf. This study recruited a community sample of healthy adults and measured inter-trial phase clustering (ITPC), total spectral power, and ERP amplitudes elicited by Repeated and Novel non-target stimuli during two visual oddball tasks. Condition effects, relations among the EEG measures, and relations with Gf were assessed. Early visual responses to Repeated stimuli elicited higher ITPC, yet only ITPC elicited by Novel stimuli was associated with Gf. Analyses of spectral power further highlighted the contribution of phase consistency to the findings. The link between Gf and reliable responding to changing inputs suggests an important role for flexible resource allocation in fluid intellectual skills.

  15. Evolution and biogeography of deep-sea vent and seep invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Van Dover, C L; German, C R; Speer, K G; Parson, L M; Vrijenhoek, R C

    2002-02-15

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents and cold seeps are submarine springs where nutrient-rich fluids emanate from the sea floor. Vent and seep ecosystems occur in a variety of geological settings throughout the global ocean and support food webs based on chemoautotrophic primary production. Most vent and seep invertebrates arrive at suitable habitats as larvae dispersed by deep-ocean currents. The recent evolution of many vent and seep invertebrate species (<100 million years ago) suggests that Cenozoic tectonic history and oceanic circulation patterns have been important in defining contemporary biogeographic patterns.

  16. Prolonged effect of fluid flow stress on the proliferative activity of mesothelial cells after abrupt discontinuation of fluid streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Shigehisa; Ikeda, Satoshi; Takezawa, Toshiaki; Kishi, Tomoya; Makino, Junichi; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Matsunobu, Aki; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Sugihara, Hajime; Toda, Shuji

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Late-onset peritoneal fibrosis leading to EPS remains to be elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluid streaming is a potent factor for peritoneal fibrosis in PD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focused on the prolonged effect of fluid streaming on mesothelial cell kinetics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A history of fluid streaming exposure promoted mesothelial proliferative activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have thus identified a potent new factor for late-onset peritoneal fibrosis. -- Abstract: Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) often develops after transfer to hemodialysis and transplantation. Both termination of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and transplantation-related factors are risks implicated in post-PD development of EPS, but the precise mechanism of this late-onset peritoneal fibrosis remains to be elucidated. We previously demonstrated that fluid flow stress induced mesothelial proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Therefore, we speculated that the prolonged bioactive effect of fluid flow stress may affect mesothelial cell kinetics after cessation of fluid streaming. To investigate how long mesothelial cells stay under the bioactive effect brought on by fluid flow stress after removal of the stress, we initially cultured mesothelial cells under fluid flow stress and then cultured the cells under static conditions. Mesothelial cells exposed to fluid flow stress for a certain time showed significantly high proliferative activity compared with static conditions after stoppage of fluid streaming. The expression levels of protein phosphatase 2A, which dephosphorylates MAPK, in mesothelial cells changed with time and showed a biphasic pattern that was dependent on the duration of exposure to fluid flow stress. There were no differences in the fluid flow stress-related bioactive effects on mesothelial cells once a certain time had passed

  17. Young asteroidal fluid activity revealed by absolute age from apatite in carbonaceous chondrite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Cheng; Li, Qiu-Li; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Li, Xian-Hua; Hu, Sen; Lin, Yang-Ting; Wang, Ru-Cheng

    2016-09-29

    Chondritic meteorites, consisting of the materials that have formed in the early solar system (ESS), have been affected by late thermal events and fluid activity to various degrees. Determining the timing of fluid activity in ESS is of fundamental importance for understanding the nature, formation, evolution and significance of fluid activity in ESS. Previous investigations have determined the relative ages of fluid activity with short-lived isotope systematics. Here we report an absolute (207)Pb/(206)Pb isochron age (4,450±50 Ma) of apatite from Dar al Gani (DaG) 978, a type ∼3.5, ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite. The petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical features suggest that the apatite in DaG 978 should have formed during metamorphism in the presence of a fluid. Therefore, the apatite age represents an absolute age for fluid activity in an asteroidal setting. An impact event could have provided the heat to activate this young fluid activity in ESS.

  18. Young asteroidal fluid activity revealed by absolute age from apatite in carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-Cheng; Li, Qiu-Li; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Li, Xian-Hua; Hu, Sen; Lin, Yang-Ting; Wang, Ru-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Chondritic meteorites, consisting of the materials that have formed in the early solar system (ESS), have been affected by late thermal events and fluid activity to various degrees. Determining the timing of fluid activity in ESS is of fundamental importance for understanding the nature, formation, evolution and significance of fluid activity in ESS. Previous investigations have determined the relative ages of fluid activity with short-lived isotope systematics. Here we report an absolute 207Pb/206Pb isochron age (4,450+/-50 Ma) of apatite from Dar al Gani (DaG) 978, a type ~3.5, ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite. The petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical features suggest that the apatite in DaG 978 should have formed during metamorphism in the presence of a fluid. Therefore, the apatite age represents an absolute age for fluid activity in an asteroidal setting. An impact event could have provided the heat to activate this young fluid activity in ESS.

  19. Fluid dynamics of active heterogeneities in a mantle plume conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnetani, C. G.; Limare, A.; Hofmann, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations indicate that the flow of a purely thermal plume preserves the azimuthal zonation of the source region, thus providing a framework to attribute a deep origin to the isotopic zonation of Hawaiian lavas. However, previous studies were limited to passive heterogeneities not affecting the flow. We go beyond this simplification by considering active heterogeneities which are compositionally denser, or more viscous, and we address the following questions: (1) How do active heterogeneities modify the axially symmetric velocity field of the plume conduit? (2) Under which conditions is the azimuthal zonation of the source region no longer preserved in the plume stem? (3) How do active heterogeneities deform during upwelling and what is their shape once at sublithospheric depths? We conducted both laboratory experiments, using a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to calculate the velocity field, and high resolution three-dimensional simulations where millions of tracers keep track of the heterogeneous fluid. For compositionally denser heterogeneities we cover a range of buoyancy ratios 0fluid and η is viscosity. The initial heterogeneity has the arbitrary shape of a sphere and we vary its volume and its distance from the plume axis. We find that by increasing λ, the shape of the heterogeneity changes from filament-like to blob-like characterized by internal rotation and little stretching. By increasing B the heterogeneity tends to spread at the base of the plume stem and to rise as a tendril close to the axis, so that the initial zonation may be poorly preserved. We also find that the plume velocity field can be profoundly modified by active heterogeneities, and we explore the relation between strain rates and the evolving shape of the upwelling heterogeneity.

  20. 46 CFR 151.15-5 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vents must penetrate into tanks at the top of the vapor space, the following methods of venting and the... the vent shall terminate in a gooseneck bend and shall be located at a reasonable height above...

  1. Water vent design for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, Janie H.; Worden, Edson A.; Bedard, John E.; Lieu, Bing H.

    1992-07-01

    Space Stadon Freedom (SSF) will be required to vent water during non-quiescent periods. During Man Tended Configuration (MTC), before the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) water loop is closed, humidity condensate will be periodically vented. At Permanently Manned Configuration (PMC), water will be vented on contingency if there is excess water on SSF. The thrust due to venting must be minimized to be considered non-propulsive. Also, ice formation and clogging of the vent nozzle must be avoided. Many aspects of the Space Shuttle water vent design were utilized in development of the preliminary SSF water vent design presented in this paper. Design modifications which improved the shuttle vent as well as those necessary for SSF are discussed. The exterior vent location, direction and environment on SSF are unique compared to previous space water vent designs. From data collected in the vent tests and analyses, a finalized SSF water vent design will be developed.

  2. Current Results and Proposed Activities in Microgravity Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polezhaev, V. I.

    1996-01-01

    The Institute for Problems in Mechanics' Laboratory work in mathematical and physical modelling of fluid mechanics develops models, methods, and software for analysis of fluid flow, instability analysis, direct numerical modelling and semi-empirical models of turbulence, as well as experimental research and verification of these models and their applications in technological fluid dynamics, microgravity fluid mechanics, geophysics, and a number of engineering problems. This paper presents an overview of the results in microgravity fluid dynamics research during the last two years. Nonlinear problems of weakly compressible and compressible fluid flows are discussed.

  3. EVALUATION OF SOIL VENTING APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of soil venting to inexpensively remove large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated soils is well established. However, the time required using venting to remediate soils to low contaminant levels often required by state and federal regulators...

  4. Genomic Reconstruction of an Uncultured Hydrothermal Vent Gammaproteobacterial Methanotroph (Family Methylothermaceae) Indicates Multiple Adaptations to Oxygen Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Skennerton, Connor T.; Ward, Lewis M.; Michel, Alice; Metcalfe, Kyle; Valiente, Chanel; Mullin, Sean; Chan, Ken Y.; Gradinaru, Viviana; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are an important contributor to marine biogeochemistry, producing large volumes of reduced fluids, gasses, and metals and housing unique, productive microbial and animal communities fueled by chemosynthesis. Methane is a common constituent of hydrothermal vent fluid and is frequently consumed at vent sites by methanotrophic bacteria that serve to control escape of this greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. Despite their ecological and geochemical importance, little is known about the ecophysiology of uncultured hydrothermal vent-associated methanotrophic bacteria. Using metagenomic binning techniques, we recovered and analyzed a near-complete genome from a novel gammaproteobacterial methanotroph (B42) associated with a white smoker chimney in the Southern Lau basin. B42 was the dominant methanotroph in the community, at ∼80x coverage, with only four others detected in the metagenome, all on low coverage contigs (7x–12x). Phylogenetic placement of B42 showed it is a member of the Methylothermaceae, a family currently represented by only one sequenced genome. Metabolic inferences based on the presence of known pathways in the genome showed that B42 possesses a branched respiratory chain with A- and B-family heme copper oxidases, cytochrome bd oxidase and a partial denitrification pathway. These genes could allow B42 to respire over a wide range of oxygen concentrations within the highly dynamic vent environment. Phylogenies of the denitrification genes revealed they are the result of separate horizontal gene transfer from other Proteobacteria and suggest that denitrification is a selective advantage in conditions where extremely low oxygen concentrations require all oxygen to be used for methane activation. PMID:26779119

  5. Genomic Reconstruction of an Uncultured Hydrothermal Vent Gammaproteobacterial Methanotroph (Family Methylothermaceae) Indicates Multiple Adaptations to Oxygen Limitation.

    PubMed

    Skennerton, Connor T; Ward, Lewis M; Michel, Alice; Metcalfe, Kyle; Valiente, Chanel; Mullin, Sean; Chan, Ken Y; Gradinaru, Viviana; Orphan, Victoria J

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are an important contributor to marine biogeochemistry, producing large volumes of reduced fluids, gasses, and metals and housing unique, productive microbial and animal communities fueled by chemosynthesis. Methane is a common constituent of hydrothermal vent fluid and is frequently consumed at vent sites by methanotrophic bacteria that serve to control escape of this greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. Despite their ecological and geochemical importance, little is known about the ecophysiology of uncultured hydrothermal vent-associated methanotrophic bacteria. Using metagenomic binning techniques, we recovered and analyzed a near-complete genome from a novel gammaproteobacterial methanotroph (B42) associated with a white smoker chimney in the Southern Lau basin. B42 was the dominant methanotroph in the community, at ∼80x coverage, with only four others detected in the metagenome, all on low coverage contigs (7x-12x). Phylogenetic placement of B42 showed it is a member of the Methylothermaceae, a family currently represented by only one sequenced genome. Metabolic inferences based on the presence of known pathways in the genome showed that B42 possesses a branched respiratory chain with A- and B-family heme copper oxidases, cytochrome bd oxidase and a partial denitrification pathway. These genes could allow B42 to respire over a wide range of oxygen concentrations within the highly dynamic vent environment. Phylogenies of the denitrification genes revealed they are the result of separate horizontal gene transfer from other Proteobacteria and suggest that denitrification is a selective advantage in conditions where extremely low oxygen concentrations require all oxygen to be used for methane activation.

  6. Microbiological characterization of post-eruption "snowblower" vents at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Julie L; Akerman, Nancy H; Proskurowski, Giora; Huber, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial processes within the subseafloor can be examined during the ephemeral and uncommonly observed phenomena known as snowblower venting. Snowblowers are characterized by the large quantity of white floc that is expelled from the seafloor following mid-ocean ridge eruptions. During these eruptions, rapidly cooling lava entrains seawater and hydrothermal fluids enriched in geochemical reactants, creating a natural bioreactor that supports a subseafloor microbial "bloom." Previous studies hypothesized that the eruption-associated floc was made by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria; however, the microbes involved were never identified. Here we present the first molecular analysis combined with microscopy of microbial communities in snowblower vents from samples collected shortly after the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount, an active volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We obtained fluid samples and white flocculent material from active snowblower vents as well as orange flocculent material found on top of newly formed lava flows. Both flocculent types revealed diverse cell types and particulates when examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distinct archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in each sample type through Illumina tag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and through sequencing of the sulfide oxidation gene, soxB. In fluids and white floc, the dominant bacteria were sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and the dominant archaea were thermophilic Methanococcales. In contrast, the dominant organisms in the orange floc were Gammaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I. In all samples, bacteria greatly outnumbered archaea. The presence of anaerobic methanogens and microaerobic Epsilonproteobacteria in snowblower communities provides evidence that these blooms are seeded by subseafloor microbes, rather than from microbes in bottom seawater. These eruptive events thus provide a unique opportunity to observe subseafloor microbial

  7. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with seizures.

    PubMed

    Chai, Orit; Sommer, Adi; Zimmerman, Gabriel; Soreq, Hermona; Friedman, Alon; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Aroch, Itamar; Shamir, Merav H

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies in animal models have focused on the role of cholinergic elements, mainly acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the 'readthrough' acetylcholinesterase isoform (AChE-R), in seizures. A prospective double-masked study was conducted to assess the activity of AChE and AChE-R in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 26 dogs post-seizure, 28 dogs with intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) and 16 healthy dogs. AChE was also measured in the serum in the post-seizure and IVDD groups. The results showed no significant differences in CSF AChE among the three groups. AChE-R was not detected in any dog and AChE in the serum was similar between groups. This preliminary study provides new information on AChE and AChE-R in the CSF and sera of dogs following naturally-occurring seizures.

  8. Venting of a Water/Inhibited Propylene Glycol Mixture in a Vacuum Environment-Characterization and Representative Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Erickson, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    A planned use of the Orion space vehicle involves its residence at the International Space Station for six months at a time. One concept of operations involves temporarily venting portions of the idle Orion active thermal control system (ATCS) during the docked phase, preventing freezing. The venting would have to be reasonably complete with few, if any, completely filled pockets of frozen liquid. Even if pockets of frozen liquid did not damage the hardware during the freezing process, they could prevent the system from filling completely prior to its reactivation. The venting of single component systems in a space environment has been performed numerous times and is well understood. Local nucleation occurs at warm, relatively massive parts of the system, which creates vapor and forces the bulk liquid out of the system. The remnants of the liquid will freeze, then evaporate over time through local heating. Because the Orion ATCS working fluid is a 50/50 mixture of water and inhibited propylene glycol, its boiling behavior was expected to differ from that of a pure fluid. It was thought that the relatively high vapor pressure water might evaporate preferentially, leaving behind a mixture enriched with the low vapor pressure propylene glycol, which would be vaporization ]resistant. Owing to this concern, a test was developed to compare the evaporation behavior of pure water, a 50/50 mixture of water and inhibited propylene glycol, and inhibited propylene glycol. The test was performed using room temperature fluids in an instrumented thin walled stainless steel vertical tube. The 1 in x 0.035 in wall tube was instrumented with surface thermocouples and encased in closed cell polyurethane foam. Reticulated polyurethane foam was placed inside the tube to reduce the convection currents. A vacuum system connected to the top of the tube set the pressure boundary condition. Tests were run for the three fluids at back pressures ranging from 1 to 18 torr. During each test

  9. Sustained volcanically-hosted venting at ultraslow ridges: Piccard Hydrothermal Field, Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, James C.; German, Christopher R.

    2013-10-01

    At slow spreading mid-ocean ridges sustained submarine venting and the deposition of large seafloor massive sulfide deposits have previously been ascribed to tectonically-controlled hydrothermal circulation unrelated to young volcanic activity. Here, by contrast, we show that the Piccard Hydrothermal Field (PHF), on the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise, represents a site of sustained fluid flow and sulfide formation hosted in a neovolcanic setting. The lateral extent and apparent longevity associated with the PHF are comparable to some of the largest tectonically-hosted vent sites known along the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge. If such systems recur along all ultraslow ridges, which comprise ˜20% of the ˜55,000 km global ridge crest, potential implications would include (i) a higher probability of locating large, economically valuable, mineral deposits along ultraslow ridges together with (ii) larger fluxes than previously anticipated of chemicals released from high-temperature venting entering the oceans along the Atlantic-Indian Ocean sectors of the deep-ocean thermohaline conveyor.

  10. How Disturbance Influences Community Composition at Hydrothermal Vents: a Theoretical Model of Macrofaunal Coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. D.; Hsing, P.; Roxburgh, S. H.; Shea, K.; Fisher, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Biological communities at spreading centers experience a continuum of disturbance regimes, with fast spreading ridges characterized by relatively frequent tectonic and magmatic events, and slow spreading ridges displaying more stable environmental conditions. We develop a theoretical model to show how disturbance (or lack thereof) can influence the composition of biological communities at hydrothermal vents. Our model assumptions are based on empirical data, which show that macrofaunal species of interest (Riftia pachyptila, Bathymodiolus thermophilus, Calyptogena magnifica) establish in distinct microhabitats, based on availability of vent fluids that nourish endosymbiotic chemoautotrophs. We focus on how these establishment strategies interact with species fecundity, and with disturbance frequency and intensity, to determine what types of strategies can coexist in the system. We find that species must adopt sufficiently different fecundity-establishment strategies to coexist in the community, though strict tradeoffs between fecundity and establishment ability are not required. Additionally, we describe how the strategies that lead to coexistence depend on habitat availability and disturbance regime. Though other coexistence mechanisms may also play a role, our findings suggest why communities within a single biogeographic province may vary with spreading rate (as from N to S along the East Pacific Rise), and what strategies will allow coexistence under different disturbance regimes. Understanding how changes to disturbance regimes influence community composition is very important, as commercial mining interests are rapidly developing plans to exploit the rich mineral resources associated with hydrothermal vents and their activities will change the disturbance regime.

  11. Diagnostic value of creatine kinase activity in canine cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether creatine kinase (CK) activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has diagnostic value for various groups of neurological conditions or for different anatomical areas of the nervous system (NS). The age, breed, results of CSF analysis, and diagnosis of 578 canine patients presenting with various neurological conditions between January 2009 and February 2015 were retrospectively collected. The cases were divided according to anatomical areas of the nervous system, i.e., brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nervous system, and into groups according to the nature of the condition diagnosed: vascular, immune/inflammatory/infectious, traumatic, toxic, anomalous, metabolic, idiopathic, neoplastic, and degenerative. Statistical analysis showed that CSF-CK alone cannot be used as a diagnostic tool and that total proteins in the CSF and red blood cells (RBCs) do not have a significant relationship with the CSF-CK activity. CSF-CK did not have a diagnostic value for different disease groups or anatomical areas of the nervous system. PMID:27708448

  12. Minimal continuum theories of structure formation in dense active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Bär, Markus; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-04-01

    Self-sustained dynamical phases of living matter can exhibit remarkable similarities over a wide range of scales, from mesoscopic vortex structures in microbial suspensions and motility assays of biopolymers to turbulent large-scale instabilities in flocks of birds or schools of fish. Here, we argue that, in many cases, the phenomenology of such active states can be efficiently described in terms of fourth- and higher-order partial differential equations. Structural transitions in these models can be interpreted as Landau-type kinematic transitions in Fourier (wavenumber) space, suggesting that microscopically different biological systems can share universal long-wavelength features. This general idea is illustrated through numerical simulations for two classes of continuum models for incompressible active fluids: a Swift-Hohenberg-type scalar field theory, and a minimal vector model that extends the classical Toner-Tu theory and appears to be a promising candidate for the quantitative description of dense bacterial suspensions. We discuss how microscopic symmetry-breaking mechanisms can enter macroscopic continuum descriptions of collective microbial motion near surfaces, and conclude by outlining future applications.

  13. Abundance of volatile and organic species in intermediate temperature fluids from the Von Damm and Piccard deep sea hydrothermal fields, Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. M.; Seewald, J.; Reeves, E. P.; German, C. R.; Sylva, S. P.; Klein, F.

    2012-12-01

    Two recently discovered submarine hydrothermal systems at the ultra-slow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise provide a unique opportunity to investigate how mixing and cooling influence hydrothermal fluid chemistry at the deepest-yet discovered, basalt-hosted Piccard vent field (4960m) and at the Von Damm vent field (2300m), postulated to be ultramafic-hosted. Vent fluids were collected in January 2012 during R/V Atlantis cruise AT18-16 with gas-tight samplers deployed by the ROV Jason II, allowing the characterization and quantification of redox-reactive volatile species and organic compounds. Von Damm vent fluids ranged in temperature from 21 to 226°C, whereas Piccard fluids ranged from 45 to 398°C. A key feature of these systems is the variety of fluids that were actively venting from the seafloor at 100 to 200°C, substantially cooler than the hottest fluids observed at either site. The lower temperatures reflect subsurface seawater mixing and/or conductive heat loss. Fluids venting within this temperature range have rarely been sampled at other systems, and the Cayman fluids thus present an excellent opportunity to study the effect of cooling and mixing processes on enriched volatile species such as H2, H2S, CO2 and CH4. Three dominant processes are thought to affect volatile and organic species in intermediate temperature fluids. These include microbial consumption or production, thermal alteration of biomass, and abiotic reactions. The effect of these processes on fluid compositions carries implications for carbon utilization and metabolic activity of modern microbial populations hosted within hydrothermal mineral deposits and ascending plumes, carbon cycling within hydrothermal systems, and net geochemical fluxes to the ocean. Endmember CO2 concentrations at Von Damm range from slightly enriched relative to seawater in the highest temperature fluids, to measurably depleted in the cooler fluids. Such CO2 depletions have not been previously observed in other acidic

  14. Hydrothermal vent fields and chemosynthetic biota on the world's deepest seafloor spreading centre.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Douglas P; Copley, Jonathan T; Murton, Bramley J; Stansfield, Kate; Tyler, Paul A; German, Christopher R; Van Dover, Cindy L; Amon, Diva; Furlong, Maaten; Grindlay, Nancy; Hayman, Nicholas; Hühnerbach, Veit; Judge, Maria; Le Bas, Tim; McPhail, Stephen; Meier, Alexandra; Nakamura, Ko-Ichi; Nye, Verity; Pebody, Miles; Pedersen, Rolf B; Plouviez, Sophie; Sands, Carla; Searle, Roger C; Stevenson, Peter; Taws, Sarah; Wilcox, Sally

    2012-01-10

    The Mid-Cayman spreading centre is an ultraslow-spreading ridge in the Caribbean Sea. Its extreme depth and geographic isolation from other mid-ocean ridges offer insights into the effects of pressure on hydrothermal venting, and the biogeography of vent fauna. Here we report the discovery of two hydrothermal vent fields on the Mid-Cayman spreading centre. The Von Damm Vent Field is located on the upper slopes of an oceanic core complex at a depth of 2,300 m. High-temperature venting in this off-axis setting suggests that the global incidence of vent fields may be underestimated. At a depth of 4,960 m on the Mid-Cayman spreading centre axis, the Beebe Vent Field emits copper-enriched fluids and a buoyant plume that rises 1,100 m, consistent with >400 °C venting from the world's deepest known hydrothermal system. At both sites, a new morphospecies of alvinocaridid shrimp dominates faunal assemblages, which exhibit similarities to those of Mid-Atlantic vents.

  15. Hydrothermal vent fields and chemosynthetic biota on the world's deepest seafloor spreading centre

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Douglas P.; Copley, Jonathan T.; Murton, Bramley J.; Stansfield, Kate; Tyler, Paul A.; German, Christopher R.; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Amon, Diva; Furlong, Maaten; Grindlay, Nancy; Hayman, Nicholas; Hühnerbach, Veit; Judge, Maria; Le Bas, Tim; McPhail, Stephen; Meier, Alexandra; Nakamura, Ko-ichi; Nye, Verity; Pebody, Miles; Pedersen, Rolf B.; Plouviez, Sophie; Sands, Carla; Searle, Roger C.; Stevenson, Peter; Taws, Sarah; Wilcox, Sally

    2012-01-01

    The Mid-Cayman spreading centre is an ultraslow-spreading ridge in the Caribbean Sea. Its extreme depth and geographic isolation from other mid-ocean ridges offer insights into the effects of pressure on hydrothermal venting, and the biogeography of vent fauna. Here we report the discovery of two hydrothermal vent fields on the Mid-Cayman spreading centre. The Von Damm Vent Field is located on the upper slopes of an oceanic core complex at a depth of 2,300 m. High-temperature venting in this off-axis setting suggests that the global incidence of vent fields may be underestimated. At a depth of 4,960 m on the Mid-Cayman spreading centre axis, the Beebe Vent Field emits copper-enriched fluids and a buoyant plume that rises 1,100 m, consistent with >400 °C venting from the world's deepest known hydrothermal system. At both sites, a new morphospecies of alvinocaridid shrimp dominates faunal assemblages, which exhibit similarities to those of Mid-Atlantic vents. PMID:22233630

  16. Islands in the Sea: the Patchy Distribution and Physiological Poise of Vent Microbes and the Implications for Carbon Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girguis, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The last thirty-five years have been a watershed for deep-sea microbiology. The discovery of hydrothermal vents and their extraordinarily productive communities, along with the discovery of the deep subsurface biosphere and their slow-growing, energy-starved microbial communities have changed our ideas about the nature and extent of microbial life in the deep sea. Moreover, the avent of genomics and other -omics further reshaped our understanding of microbial evolution and ecology. Nevertheless, after decades of research, there remain a number of long-standing questions regarding the distribution and activity of microbes in situ. For example, we know that hydrothermal vents are energy-rich environments, and the energy for microbial primary productivity at hydrothermal vents is primarily derived from compounds that are in disequilibria between hot, reduced thermal fluids and the ambient, oxidized bottom seawater. However, we have a rudimentary understanding of how microbes are distributed within this geochemical gradient, and how temporal variability in fluid flow and even eruptions influences primary and secondary productivity. At the other extreme, deep subsurface environs can be very energy limiting, and microbes are seemingly limited in their access to either electron donors (e.g. dissolved organic matter, or DOM) or electron acceptors (e.g. oxygen). Yet here, recent data revealed patterns of microbial activity in the deep subsurface that are inconsistent with our conventional wisdom, and suggest that the availability of electron donors/acceptors may be greater than previously thought. Here we present our latest data, as well as the technologies and methods that allow us to synoptically measure geochemistry and microbial processes (community composition and gene expression) over space and time. Our findings reveal striking patterns of microbial distribution, gene expression and activity within a vent field and in the deep subsurface that begin to shed some light

  17. S-33 constraints on the seawater sulfate contribution in modern seafloor hydrothermal vent sulfides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ono, Shuhei; Shanks, Wayne C.; Rouxel, O.J.; Rumble, D.

    2007-01-01

    Sulfide sulfur in mid-oceanic ridge hydrothermal vents is derived from leaching of basaltic-sulfide and seawater-derived sulfate that is reduced during high temperature water rock interaction. Conventional sulfur isotope studies, however, are inconclusive about the mass-balance between the two sources because 34S/32S ratios of vent fluid H2S and chimney sulfide minerals may reflect not only the mixing ratio but also isotope exchange between sulfate and sulfide. Here, we show that high-precision analysis of S-33 can provide a unique constraint because isotope mixing and isotope exchange result in different ??33S (?????33S-0.515 ??34S) values of up to 0.04??? even if ??34S values are identical. Detection of such small ??33S differences is technically feasible by using the SF6 dual-inlet mass-spectrometry protocol that has been improved to achieve a precision as good as 0.006??? (2??). Sulfide minerals (marcasite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite) and vent H2S collected from four active seafloor hydrothermal vent sites, East Pacific Rise (EPR) 9-10??N, 13??N, and 21??S and Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) 37??N yield ??33S values ranging from -0.002 to 0.033 and ??34S from -0.5??? to 5.3???. The combined ??34S and ??33S systematics reveal that 73 to 89% of vent sulfides are derived from leaching from basaltic sulfide and only 11 to 27% from seawater-derived sulfate. Pyrite from EPR 13??N and marcasite from MAR 37??N are in isotope disequilibrium not only in ??34S but also in ??33S with respect to associated sphalerite and chalcopyrite, suggesting non-equilibrium sulfur isotope exchange between seawater sulfate and sulfide during pyrite precipitation. Seafloor hydrothermal vent sulfides are characterized by low ??33S values compared with biogenic sulfides, suggesting little or no contribution of sulfide from microbial sulfate reduction into hydrothermal sulfides at sediment-free mid-oceanic ridge systems. We conclude that 33S is an effective new tracer for interplay among

  18. Macrofauna of shallow hydrothermal vents on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge at 71N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schander, C.; Rapp, H. T.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2007-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are usually associated with a highly specialized fauna and since their discovery in 1977, more than 400 species of animals have been described. Specialized vent fauna includes various animal phyla, but the most conspicuous and well known are annelids, mollusks and crustaceans. We have investigated the fauna collected around newly discovered hydrothermal vents on the Mohns Ridge north of Jan Mayen. The venting fields are located at 71°N and the venting takes place within two main areas separated by 5 km. The shallowest vent area is at 500-550 m water depth and is located at the base of a normal fault. This vent field stretches approximately 1 km along the strike of the fault, and it is composed of 10-20 major vent sites each with multiple chimney constructions discharging up to 260°C hot fluids. A large area of diffuse, low- temperature venting occurs in the area surrounding the high-temperature field. Here, partly microbial mediated iron-oxide-hydroxide deposits are abundant. The hydrothermal vent sites do not show any high abundance of specialized hydrothermal vent fauna. Single groups (i.e. Porifera and Mollusca) have a few representatives but groups otherwise common in hydrothermal vent areas (e.g. vestimentifera, Alvinellid worms, mussels, clams, galathaeid and brachyuran crabs) are absent. Up until now slightly more than 200 species have been identified from the vent area. The macrofauna found in the vent area is, with few exceptions, an assortment of bathyal species known in the area. One endemic, yet undescribed, species of mollusc has been found so far, an gastropod related to Alvania incognita Warén, 1996 and A. angularis Warén, 1996 (Rissoidae), two species originally described from pieces of sunken wood north and south of Iceland. It is by far the most numerous mollusc species at the vents and was found on smokers, in the bacterial mats, and on the ferric deposits. A single specimen of an undescribed tanaidacean has also

  19. Active microchannel fluid processing unit and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Wendy D [Kennewick, WA; Martin, Peter M [Kennewick, WA; Matson, Dean W [Kennewick, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Stewart, Donald C [Richland, WA; Tonkovich, Annalee Y [Pasco, WA; Zilka, Jennifer L [Pasco, WA; Schmitt, Stephen C [Dublin, OH; Werner, Timothy M [Columbus, OH

    2002-12-10

    The present invention is an active microchannel fluid processing unit and method of making, both relying on having (a) at least one inner thin sheet; (b) at least one outer thin sheet; (c) defining at least one first sub-assembly for performing at least one first unit operation by stacking a first of the at least one inner thin sheet in alternating contact with a first of the at least one outer thin sheet into a first stack and placing an end block on the at least one inner thin sheet, the at least one first sub-assembly having at least a first inlet and a first outlet; and (d) defining at least one second sub-assembly for performing at least one second unit operation either as a second flow path within the first stack or by stacking a second of the at least one inner thin sheet in alternating contact with second of the at least one outer thin sheet as a second stack, the at least one second sub-assembly having at least a second inlet and a second outlet.

  20. Active microchannel fluid processing unit and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Wendy D [Kennewick, WA; Martin, Peter M [Kennewick, WA; Matson, Dean W [Kennewick, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Stewart, Donald C [Richland, WA; Tonkovich, Annalee Y [Pasco, WA; Zilka, Jennifer L [Pasco, WA; Schmitt, Stephen C [Dublin, OH; Werner, Timothy M [Columbus, OH

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel fluid processing unit and method of making, both relying on having (a) at least one inner thin sheet; (b) at least one outer thin sheet; (c) defining at least one first sub-assembly for performing at least one first unit operation by stacking a first of the at least one inner thin sheet in alternating contact with a first of the at least one outer thin sheet into a first stack and placing an end block on the at least one inner thin sheet, the at least one first sub-assembly having at least a first inlet and a first outlet; and (d) defining at least one second sub-assembly for performing at least one second unit operation either as a second flow path within the first stack or by stacking a second of the at least one inner thin sheet in alternating contact with second of the at least one outer thin sheet as a second stack, the at least one second sub-assembly having at least a second inlet and a second outlet.

  1. Active fluid mixing with magnetic microactuators for capture of salmonella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, S.; Owen, D.; Ballard, M.; Mills, Z.; Xu, J.; Erickson, M.; Hesketh, P. J.; Alexeev, A.

    2016-05-01

    Detection of low concentrations of bacteria in food samples is a challenging process. Key to this process is the separation of the target from the food matrix. We demonstrate magnetic beads and magnetic micro-cilia based microfluidic mixing and capture, which are particularly useful for pre-concentrating the target. The first method we demonstrate makes use of magnetic microbeads held on to NiFe discs on the surface of the substrate. These beads are rotated around the magnetic discs by rotating the external magnetic field. The second method we demonstrate shows the use of cilia which extends into the fluid and is manipulated by a rotating external field. Magnetic micro-features were fabricated by evaporating NiFe alloy at room temperature, on to patterned photoresist. The high magnetic permeability of NiFe allows for maximum magnetic force on the features. The magnetic features were actuated using an external rotating magnet up to frequencies of 50Hz. We demonstrate active mixing produced by the microbeads and the cilia in a microchannel. Also, we demonstrate the capture of target species in a sample using microbeads.

  2. Locomotion in fluids using shape-changing active materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Michael; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter; Comacho-Lopez, Miguel; Malacarne, Luis; Finkelmann, Heino

    2004-11-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are rubbers made up of liquid crystal molecules, and can exhibit large and fast shape deformations when exposed to external fields. We discuss recent experiments in which an LCE sample floating on water is illuminated by a laser. Upon illumination the sample simultaneously changes both its shape and position, ``swimming'' away from the laser light. In this system, energy from the light is used to effect momentum transfer between the LCE body and the surrounding fluid. We discuss the origins of the shape change, the resulting LCE/fluid interaction, and the modeling of such fluid/materials systems.

  3. Fake ballistics and real explosions: field-scale experiments on the ejection and emplacement of volcanic bombs during vent-clearing explosive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Valentine, G.; Gaudin, D.; Graettinger, A. H.; Lube, G.; Kueppers, U.; Sonder, I.; White, J. D.; Ross, P.; Bowman, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ballistics - bomb-sized pyroclasts that travel from volcanic source to final emplacement position along ballistic trajectories - represent a prime source of volcanic hazard, but their emplacement range, size, and density is useful to inverse model key eruption parameters related to their initial ejection velocity. Models and theory, however, have so far focused on the trajectory of ballistics after leaving the vent, neglecting the complex dynamics of their initial acceleration phase in the vent/conduit. Here, we use field-scale buried explosion experiments to study the ground-to-ground ballistic emplacement of particles through their entire acceleration-deceleration cycle. Twelve blasts were performed at the University at Buffalo Large Scale Experimental Facility with a range of scaled depths (burial depth divided by the cubic root of the energy of the explosive charge) and crater configurations. In all runs, ballistic analogs were placed on the ground surface at variable distance from the vertical projection of the buried charge, resulting in variable ejection angle. The chosen analogs are tennis and ping-pong balls filled with different materials, covering a limited range of sizes and densities. The analogs are tracked in multiple high-speed and high-definition videos, while Particle Image Velocimetry is used to detail ground motion in response to the buried blasts. In addition, after each blast the emplacement position of all analog ballistics was mapped with respect to the blast location. Preliminary results show the acceleration history of ballistics to be quite variable, from very short and relatively simple acceleration coupled with ground motion, to more complex, multi-stage accelerations possibly affected not only by the initial ground motion but also by variable coupling with the gas-particle mixture generated by the blasts. Further analysis of the experimental results is expected to provide new interpretative tools for ballistic deposits and better

  4. [Research activities in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period April 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995.

  5. Chemistry of hydrothermal solutions from Pele's Vents, Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Sedwick, P.N.; McMurtry, G.M. ); Macdougall, J.D. )

    1992-10-01

    Hydrothermal fluids were sampled from Pele's Vents on the summit of Loihi Seamount, an intraplate, hotspot volcano, on four occasions from February 1987 to September 1990. The warm ([le]31C) vent solutions are enriched in dissolved Si, CO[sub 2], H[sub 2]S, alkalinity, K[sup +], Li[sup +], Rb[sup +], Ca[sup 2+], Ba[sup 2+], Fe[sup 2+], Mn[sup 2+], NH[sup +][sub 4], and possibly Ni[sup 2+], and depleted in SO[sup 2-][sub 4], O[sub 2], Mg[sup 2+], [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr, NO[sup -][sub 3], and sometimes Cl[sup -] and Na[sup +] (calculated), relative to ambient seawater. Dissolved Si correlates linearly with sample temperature, suggesting that the solutions sampled from numerous vents in the [approximately]20 m diameter field have a common source and that Si can be used as a conservative tracer for mixing of the vent fluids with ambient seawater. These juvenile inputs likely reflect the shallow, hotspot setting of this hydrothermal system. A simple quantitative fluid-history model is considered and shown to be consistent with mass-balance constraints and saturation-state calculations, which suggest that the Si concentration of the fluids may be controlled by amorphous silica saturation at [approximately]31C. Observed temporal variations in fluid composition between expeditions - specifically, in Cl[sup -], A[sub T], C[sub T], Na[sup +] (calculated), Mg[sup 2+], Ca[sup 2+], Sr[sup 2+], [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr, Fe[sup 2+], Mn[sup 2+] and perhaps NH[sup +][sub 4], relative to Si - are, excepting Mg[sup 2+], [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr, and Mn[sup 2+], consistent with the effects of variable phase segregation at the proposed high-temperature endmember.

  6. Microbial life in cold, hydrologically active oceanic crustal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J. L.; Jaekel, U.; Girguis, P. R.; Glazer, B. T.; Huber, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is estimated that at least half of Earth's microbial biomass is found in the deep subsurface, yet very little is known about the diversity and functional roles of these microbial communities due to the limited accessibility of subseafloor samples. Ocean crustal fluids, which may have a profound impact on global nutrient cycles given the large volumes of water moving through the crustal aquifer, are particularly difficult to sample. Access to uncontaminated ocean crustal fluids is possible with CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories, installed through the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). Here we present the first microbiological characterization of the formation fluids from cold, oxygenated igneous crust at North Pond on the western flank of the Mid Atlantic Ridge. Fluids were collected from two CORKs installed at IODP boreholes 1382A and 1383C and include fluids from three different depth horizons within oceanic crust. Collection of borehole fluids was monitored in situ using an oxygen optode and solid-state voltammetric electrodes. In addition, discrete samples were analyzed on deck using a comparable lab-based system as well as a membrane-inlet mass spectrometer to quantify all dissolved volatiles up to 200 daltons. The instruments were operated in parallel and both in situ and shipboard geochemical measurements point to a highly oxidized fluid, revealing an apparent slight depletion of oxygen in subsurface fluids (~215μM) relative to bottom seawater (~245μM). We were unable to detect reduced hydrocarbons, e.g. methane. Cell counts indicated the presence of roughly 2 x 10^4 cells per ml in all fluid samples, and DNA was extracted and amplified for the identification of both bacterial and archaeal community members. The utilization of ammonia, nitrate, dissolved inorganic carbon, and acetate was measured using stable isotopes, and oxygen consumption was monitored to provide an estimate of the rate of respiration per cell per day

  7. Effect of cadmium, copper and mercury on antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation in the gills of the hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus.

    PubMed

    Company, R; Serafim, A; Bebianno, M J; Cosson, R; Shillito, B; Fiala-Médioni, A

    2004-01-01

    Metals are known to influence lipid peroxidation and oxidative status of marine organisms. Hydrothermal vent mussels Bathymodiolus azoricus live in deep-sea environments with anomalous conditions, including high metal concentrations. Although B. azoricus are aerobic organisms they possess abundant methano and thioautotrophic symbiotic bacteria in the gills. The enzymatic defences (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total glutathione peroxidase (Total GPx) and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPx)) and lipid peroxidation were determined in the gills of B. azoricus exposed to Cd (0.9 microM), Cu (0.4 microM) and Hg (0.1 microM) with different times of exposure. The experiments were performed in pressurized containers at 9+/-1 degrees C and 85 bars. Results show that vent mussels possess antioxidant enzymatic protection in the gills. Cd and Cu had an inhibitory effect in the enzymatic defence system, contrarily to Hg. These enzymatic systems are not completely understood in the B. azoricus, since reactive oxygen species might be produced through other processes than natural redox cycling, due to hydrogen sulphide and oxygen content present. Also the symbiotic bacteria may play an important contribution in the antioxidant protection of the gills.

  8. Bacterial Diets of Primary Consumers at Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govenar, B.; Shank, T. M.

    2008-12-01

    Chemical energy produced by mixing hydrothermal fluids and seawater supports dense biological communities on mid-ocean ridges. The base of the food web at deep-sea hydrothermal vents is formed by chemolithoautotrophic bacteria that use the energy from the oxidation of reduced chemicals to fix inorganic carbon into simple sugars. With the exception of a few species that have chemolithoautotropic bacterial symbionts, most of the vent-endemic macrofauna are heterotrophs that feed on free-living bacteria, protists, and other invertebrates. The most abundant and diverse group of primary consumers in hydrothermal vent communities belong to the Gastropoda, particularly the patellomorph limpets. Gastropod densities can be as high as 2000 individuals m-2, and there can be as many as 13 species of gastropods in a single aggregation of the siboglinid tubeworm Riftia pachyptila and more than 40 species along the East Pacific Rise. Some gastropods are ubiquitous and others are found in specific microhabitats, stages of succession, or associated with different foundation species. To determine the mechanisms of species coexistence (e.g. resource partitioning or competition) among hydrothermal vent primary consumers and to track the flow of energy in hydrothermal vent communities, we employed molecular genetic techniques to identify the gut contents of four species of co-occurring hydrothermal vent gastropods, Eulepetopsis vitrea, Lepetodrilus elevatus, Lepetodrilus ovalis and Lepetodrilus pustulosus, collected from a single diffuse-flow hydrothermal vent site on the East Pacific Rise. Unique haplotypes of the 16S gene that fell among the epsilon-proteobacteria were found in the guts of every species, and two species had gut contents that were similar only to epsilon-proteobacteria. Two species had gut contents that also included haplotypes that clustered with delta-proteobacteria, and one species had gut contents that clustered with alpha- proteobacteria. Differences in the diets

  9. Magnetic fluid poly(ethylene glycol) with moderate anticancer activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závišová, Vlasta; Koneracká, Martina; Múčková, Marta; Lazová, Jana; Juríková, Alena; Lancz, Gábor; Tomašovičová, Natália; Timko, Milan; Kováč, Jozef; Vávra, Ivo; Fabián, Martin; Feoktystov, Artem V.; Garamus, Vasil M.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Kopčanský, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-containing magnetic fluids - magnetite (Fe 3O 4) stabilized by sodium oleate - were prepared. Magnetic measurements confirmed superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature. The structure of that kind of magnetic fluid was characterized using different techniques, including electron microscopy, photon cross correlation spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering, while the adsorption of PEG on magnetic particles was analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. From the in vitro toxicity tests it was found that a magnetic fluid containing PEG (MFPEG) partially inhibited the growth of cancerous B16 cells at the highest tested dose (2.1 mg/ml of Fe 3O 4 in MFPEG).

  10. Heat and Volume Fluxes at the Turtle Pits Vent Site, southern Mid Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Janna; Walter, Maren; Mertens, Christian; Sültenfuß, Jürgen; Rhein, Monika

    2010-05-01

    The Turtle Pits vent site consists of eight known high temperature vents and several diffuse vent sites which are distributed over three hydrothermal fields: Turtle Pits, Comfortless Cove, and Red Lion. These vent fields are located in a north-south orientated rift valley at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) near 5°S. The total volume and heat emissions of the entire Turtle Pits site have been calculated with three different approaches using data collected during a Meteor cruise in May 2006 and a L'Atalante cruise in January 2008. The data sets consist of vertical profiles and towed transects of temperature, salinity, and turbidity, as well as direct velocity measurements with a lowered acoustic Doppler current profiler (LADCP) and water samples for Helium isotope analysis. Vent fluid samples for noble gas analysis where taken with ROVs. Since the vent fluid is highly enriched in primordial 3He this noble gas can be used as a conservative tracer for vent fluid. The geographical setting of the vent site confines the particle plume to the rift valley since the depth of the valley exceeds the rise height of the plume. Therefore the fluxes of heat and volume can be estimated from the horizontal helium transport in the valley in combination with a mean 3He endmember concentration determined from the water samples taken with the ROVs. The comparison of the 3He concentrations measured south of the hydrothermal vents with the 3He signal north of the hydrothermal vents suggests a rather strong northward flow. This is confirmed by the tide corrected velocities observed with the LADCP during the Meteor cruise. The northward volume transport has been calculated using the local bathymetry and tide corrected velocities from the Meteor cruise. In combination with the 3He concentrations and the average 3He endmember concentration a flux of 1000 l/s is estimated, which corresponds to a heat flux of 1400 MW. The measured temperature anomalies within the plume combined with the known

  11. Modeling of zero gravity venting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The venting of cylindrical containers partially filled with initially saturated liquids was conducted under zero gravity conditions and compared with an analytical model which determined the effect of interfacial mass transfer on the ullage pressure response during venting. A model is proposed to improve the estimation of the interfacial mass transfer. Duhammel's superposition integral is incorporated in this analysis to approximate the transient temperature response of the interface, treating the liquid as a semiinfinite solid with conduction heat transfer. This approach to estimating interfacial mass transfer gives improved response when compared to previous models. The model still predicts a pressure decrease greater than those in the experiments reported.

  12. Comparative study of vent and seep macrofaunal communities in the Guaymas Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portail, M.; Olu, K.; Escobar-Briones, E.; Caprais, J. C.; Menot, L.; Waeles, M.; Cruaud, P.; Sarradin, P. M.; Godfroy, A.; Sarrazin, J.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the ecological processes and connectivity of chemosynthetic deep-sea ecosystems requires comparative studies. In the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico), the presence of seeps and vents in the absence of a biogeographic barrier, and comparable sedimentary settings and depths offers a unique opportunity to assess the role of ecosystem-specific environmental conditions on macrofaunal communities. Six seep and four vent assemblages were studied, three of which were characterised by common major foundation taxa: vesicomyid bivalves, siboglinid tubeworms and microbial mats. Macrofaunal community structure at the family level showed that density, diversity and composition patterns were primarily shaped by seep- and vent-common abiotic factors including methane and hydrogen sulfide concentrations, whereas vent environmental specificities (higher temperature, higher metal concentrations and lower pH) were not significant. The type of substratum and the heterogeneity provided by foundation species were identified as additional structuring factors and their roles were found to vary according to fluid regimes. At the family level, seep and vent similarity reached at least 58 %. All vent families were found at seeps and each seep-specific family displayed low relative abundances (< 5 %). Moreover, 85 % of the identified species among dominant families were shared between seep and vent ecosystems. This study provides further support to the hypothesis of continuity among deep-sea seep and vent ecosystems.

  13. Integrated thermal and geochemical export from a single vent-site: new constraints on axial hydrothermal fluxes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Amores Theme 1 Science Team

    2003-04-01

    During the first 25 years of hydrothermal research, more than 100 different sites of hydrothermal activity have been located, in all ocean basins and at all ridge-spreading rates. What has remained elusive, however, has been calculation of the total thermal and chemical fluxes emitted to the deep-ocean from any one vent-site. Here we combine long-term physical oceanographic investigations with detailed plume-process studies to calculate integrated physical and biogeochemical fluxes from the Rainbow hydrothermal field, 36N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The Rainbow vent-site is situated at a water depth of ca. 2300 m close to the NE limit of the S.AMAR segment, near 36^o12'N (ca.200nm SW of the Azores). This site, which is located at the intersection between the MAR rift-valley and a cross-cutting non-transform discontinuity, exhibits high-temperature venting hosted in serpentinised ultramafic rocks resulting in chemically distinctive fluid compositions (Douville et al., 2002). Our calculated fluxes from this study allow new constraints to be placed upon the partitioning of axial hydrothermal flow between focussed (geochemically enriched) high-temperature discharge and more "spent" diffuse axial flow. In terms of heat-flow, the global axial hydrothermal flux of ˜2.8 TW (Elderfield &Schultz, 1996) could be accommodated by ge1000 Rainbow-size vents at a net spacing of ca. 50-60 km around the global ridge-crest. By contrast, global geochemical fluxes of Fe, CH_4 and Cu could all be balanced if as little as ˜10% of the global axial heat-flux were provided by Rainbow-like systems. Because those tracers are all unusually enriched in vent-fluids at Rainbow, however, a more representative value is probably that obtained from a consideration of Mn, P, V &U fluxes. Those data all indicate balance if ˜33% of the global axial heat-flux occurs as Rainbow-like focussed flow. This would imply a total of ca. 400 large high-temperature vent-fields, worldwide, at spacings of 100-600 km

  14. Hydrothermal Fluxes at the Turtle Pits Vent Site, southern MAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Walter, M.; Mertens, C.; Sültenfuß, J.; Rhein, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Turtle Pits vent fields are located in a north-south orientated rift valley at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) near 5oS. The site consists of three known hydrothermal fields: Turtle Pits, Comfortless Cove, and Red Lion. Data collected during a Meteor cruise in May 2006 and a L' Atalante cruise in January 2008 are used to calculate the total emission of volume, heat, and helium of the site. The data sets consist of vertical profiles and towed transsects of temperature, salinity, and turbidity, as well as direct velocity measurements with a lowered acoustic Doppler current profiler (LADCP) and water samples for Helium isotope analysis. Vent fluid samples for noble gas analysis where taken with an ROV. The particle plume is confined to the rift valley since the depth of the valley exceeds the rise height of the plume. Therefore the fluxes of heat and volume can be estimated from the helium fluxes at the vent sites in comparison with the horizontal helium transport in the valley. The comparison of the 3He concentration measured south of the hydrothermal vents with the 3He signal north of the hydrothermal vents suggests a rather strong northward flow. This is confirmed by the tide corrected velocities observed with the LADCP during the Meteor cruise. The northward volume transport has been calculated using the local bathymetry and tide corrected velocities from the Meteor cruise. In combination with the 3He concentrations and an average 3He end member concentration a flux of 900 l/s is estimated, which corresponds to a heat flux of 450 MW. The rise height of the particle plume estimated from the turbidity data combined with the known background stratification yields an estimate of the total flux of the hydrothermal vents which is one order of magnitude lower.

  15. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, Robin H.; Holt, James B.; Hastings, Leon J.

    1999-01-01

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube, heat exchanger, and a spray bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy is required. a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point. the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating, boil-off losses.

  16. TRANSPORT OF WASTE SIMULANTS IN PJM VENT LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, Z

    2007-02-21

    The experimental work was conducted to determine whether there is a potential for waste simulant to transport or 'creep' up the air link line and contaminate the pulse jet vent system, and possibly cause long term restriction of the air link line. Additionally, if simulant creep occurred, establish operating parameters for washing down the line. The amount of the addition of flush fluids and mixer downtime must be quantified.

  17. Young asteroidal fluid activity revealed by absolute age from apatite in carbonaceous chondrite

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ai-Cheng; Li, Qiu-Li; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Li, Xian-Hua; Hu, Sen; Lin, Yang-Ting; Wang, Ru-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Chondritic meteorites, consisting of the materials that have formed in the early solar system (ESS), have been affected by late thermal events and fluid activity to various degrees. Determining the timing of fluid activity in ESS is of fundamental importance for understanding the nature, formation, evolution and significance of fluid activity in ESS. Previous investigations have determined the relative ages of fluid activity with short-lived isotope systematics. Here we report an absolute 207Pb/206Pb isochron age (4,450±50 Ma) of apatite from Dar al Gani (DaG) 978, a type ∼3.5, ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite. The petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical features suggest that the apatite in DaG 978 should have formed during metamorphism in the presence of a fluid. Therefore, the apatite age represents an absolute age for fluid activity in an asteroidal setting. An impact event could have provided the heat to activate this young fluid activity in ESS. PMID:27682449

  18. Google Earth locations of USA and seafloor hydrothermal vents with associated rare earth element data

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Fowler

    2016-02-10

    Google Earth .kmz files that contain the locations of geothermal wells and thermal springs in the USA, and seafloor hydrothermal vents that have associated rare earth element data. The file does not contain the actual data, the actual data is available through the GDR website in two tier 3 data sets entitled "Compilation of Rare Earth Element Analyses from US Geothermal Fields and Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR) Hydrothermal Vents" and "Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California"

  19. Fill and vent quick disconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerner, R. Y.; Hedrick, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Hydraulic disconnect coupling on ground serving half of spacecraft refrigeration cooling system employs movable center stem for venting and closing nipple poppet. Self sealing poppet quickly connects cooling system to spacecraft without manual work. Recessed sealing surface insures open poppet when stem retracts.

  20. 46 CFR 151.15-5 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Venting. 151.15-5 Section 151.15-5 Shipping COAST GUARD...) Pressure-vacuum venting. A normally closed venting system fitted with a device to automatically limit the pressure or vacuum in the tank to design limits. Pressure-vacuum relief valves shall comply with...

  1. 33 CFR 159.61 - Vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vents. 159.61 Section 159.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.61 Vents. Vents must be designed and...

  2. 33 CFR 159.61 - Vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vents. 159.61 Section 159.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.61 Vents. Vents must be designed and...

  3. 33 CFR 159.61 - Vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vents. 159.61 Section 159.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.61 Vents. Vents must be designed and...

  4. 33 CFR 159.61 - Vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vents. 159.61 Section 159.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.61 Vents. Vents must be designed and...

  5. 33 CFR 159.61 - Vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vents. 159.61 Section 159.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.61 Vents. Vents must be designed and...

  6. Microbiological characterization of post-eruption “snowblower” vents at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Julie L.; Akerman, Nancy H.; Proskurowski, Giora; Huber, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial processes within the subseafloor can be examined during the ephemeral and uncommonly observed phenomena known as snowblower venting. Snowblowers are characterized by the large quantity of white floc that is expelled from the seafloor following mid-ocean ridge eruptions. During these eruptions, rapidly cooling lava entrains seawater and hydrothermal fluids enriched in geochemical reactants, creating a natural bioreactor that supports a subseafloor microbial “bloom.” Previous studies hypothesized that the eruption-associated floc was made by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria; however, the microbes involved were never identified. Here we present the first molecular analysis combined with microscopy of microbial communities in snowblower vents from samples collected shortly after the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount, an active volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We obtained fluid samples and white flocculent material from active snowblower vents as well as orange flocculent material found on top of newly formed lava flows. Both flocculent types revealed diverse cell types and particulates when examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distinct archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in each sample type through Illumina tag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and through sequencing of the sulfide oxidation gene, soxB. In fluids and white floc, the dominant bacteria were sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and the dominant archaea were thermophilic Methanococcales. In contrast, the dominant organisms in the orange floc were Gammaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I. In all samples, bacteria greatly outnumbered archaea. The presence of anaerobic methanogens and microaerobic Epsilonproteobacteria in snowblower communities provides evidence that these blooms are seeded by subseafloor microbes, rather than from microbes in bottom seawater. These eruptive events thus provide a unique opportunity to observe subseafloor microbial

  7. Fluid relief and check valve

    DOEpatents

    Blaedel, K.L.; Lord, S.C.; Murray, I.

    1986-07-17

    A passive fluid pressure relief and check valve allows the relief pressure to be slaved to a reference pressure independently of the exhaust pressure. The pressure relief valve is embodied by a submerged vent line in a sealing fluid, the relief pressure being a function of the submerged depth. A check valve is embodied by a vertical column of fluid (the maximum back pressure being a function of the height of the column of fluid). The pressure is vented into an exhaust system which keeps the exhaust out of the area providing the reference pressure.

  8. Influence of hydrothermal venting on water column properties in the crater of the Kolumbo submarine volcano, Santorini volcanic field (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulou, Maria E.; Mertzimekis, Theo J.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steven; Mandalakis, Manolis

    2016-02-01

    The Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast of the island of Santorini, is part of Santorini's volcanic complex in the south Aegean Sea, Greece. Kolumbo's last eruption was in 1650 AD. However, a unique and active hydrothermal vent field has been revealed in the northern part of its crater floor during an oceanographic survey by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) in 2006. In the present study, conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data collected by ROV Hercules during three oceanographic surveys onboard E/V Nautilus in 2010 and 2011 have served to investigate the distribution of physicochemical properties in the water column, as well as their behavior directly over the hydrothermal field. Additional CTD measurements were carried out in volcanic cone 3 (VC3) along the same volcanic chain but located 3 km northeast of Kolumbo where no hydrothermal activity has been detected to date. CTD profiles exhibit pronounced anomalies directly above the active vents on Kolumbo's crater floor. In contrast, VC3 data revealed no such anomalies, essentially resembling open-sea (background) conditions. Steep increases of temperature (e.g., from 16 to 19 °C) and conductivity near the maximum depth (504 m) inside Kolumbo's cone show marked spatiotemporal correlation. Vertical distributions of CTD signatures suggest a strong connection to Kolumbo's morphology, with four distinct zones identified (open sea, turbid flow, invariable state, hydrothermal vent field). Additionally, overlaying the near-seafloor temperature measurements on an X-Y coordinate grid generates a detailed 2D distribution of the hydrothermal vent field and clarifies the influence of fluid discharges in its formation.

  9. Dynamic drivers of a shallow-water hydrothermal vent ecogeochemical system (Milos, Eastern Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, Mustafa; Sievert, Stefan; Giovanelli, Donato; Foustoukos, Dionysis; DeForce, Emelia; Thomas, François; Vetriani, Constantino; Le Bris, Nadine

    2014-05-01

    Shallow-water hydrothermal vents share many characteristics with their deep-sea analogs. However, despite ease of access, much less is known about the dynamics of these systems. Here, we report on the spatial and temporal chemical variability of a shallow-water vent system at Paleochori Bay, Milos Island, Greece, and on the bacterial and archaeal diversity of associated sandy sediments. Our multi-analyte voltammetric profiles of dissolved O2 and hydrothermal tracers (e.g. Fe2+, FeSaq, Mn2+) on sediment cores taken along a transect in hydrothermally affected sediments indicate three different areas: the central vent area (highest temperature) with a deeper penetration of oxygen into the sediment, and a lack of dissolved Fe2+ and Mn2+; a middle area (0.5 m away) rich in dissolved Fe2+ and Mn2+ (exceeding 2 mM) and high free sulfide with potential for microbial sulfide oxidation as suggested by the presence of white mats at the sediment surface; and, finally, an outer rim area (1-1.5 m away) with lower concentrations of Fe2+ and Mn2+ and higher signals of FeSaq, indicating an aged hydrothermal fluid contribution. In addition, high-frequency temperature series and continuous in situ H2S measurements with voltammetric sensors over a 6-day time period at a distance 0.5 m away from the vent center showed substantial temporal variability in temperature (32 to 46 ºC ) and total sulfide (488 to 1329 µM) in the upper sediment layer. Analysis of these data suggests that tides, winds, and abrupt geodynamic events generate intermittent mixing conditions lasting for several hours to days. Despite substantial variability, the concentration of sulfide available for chemoautotrophic microbes remained high. These findings are consistent with the predominance of Epsilonproteobacteria in the hydrothermally influenced sediments Diversity and metagenomic analyses on sediments and biofilm collected along a transect from the center to the outer rim of the vent provide further insights on

  10. Noble Gas geochemistry of the newly discovered hydrothermal fields in the Gulf of California: preliminary He-isotope ratios from the Alarcon Rise and Pescadero basin vent sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spelz, R. M.; Lupton, J. E.; Evans, L. J.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Neumann, F.; Paduan, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Numerous submarine deep-sea hydrothermal vents related to volcanic activity of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) are situated along the Pacific margins of Mexico. Until recently, active hydrothermal venting was unknown between the Guaymas Basin and 21°N on the EPR. MBARI's recent oceanographic surveys have added 7 new active vent sites. In this study, we aimed to sample the high-temperature hydrothermal fluids emanating from two distinct vent sites, named Meyibo and Auka, located in the Alarcon Rise and Pescadero Basin, respectively. Mantle-derived He have long been identified in hydrothermal fluid releases. The presence of He in aqueous fluids with 3He/4He ratios greater than in-situ production values (~0.05 RA, where RA = air He or 1.4 x 10-6) indicates the presence of mantle-derived melts. Preliminary analyses of He-isotope ratios derived from the newly discovered Meyibo and Auka hydrothermal fields show high 3He/4He ratios (~8RA), typical of MORB's. Auka vent field, characterized by chimneys composed of light carbonate minerals and oil-like hydrocarbons, and temperatures between 250-290oC, show average values of ~7.87RA. In contrast, the black-smokers at the Meyibo field, composed of dark sulfide minerals and temperatures over 350oC, yielded a higher He ratio of ~8.24RA. Recently, it has become clear that regional maximum mantle He values correlate with the velocity structure in the mantle, therefore, He has the potential to map regions of the underlying mantle that are undergoing partial melting. Seismic records could then be compared with the geochemical He ratio signal and supply information regarding tectonics and other processes involved in the generation of these gases. The data presented here will be completing a totally new inventory of He results from hydrothermal vents in the EPR and fault-termination basins distributed along the P-NA plate boundary in the Gulf of California. The results will be further coupled with the analysis of other geochemical

  11. Development of assemblages associated with alvinellid colonies on the walls of high-temperature vents at the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradillon, F.; Zbinden, M.; Le Bris, N.; Hourdez, S.; Barnay, A.-S.; Gaill, F.

    2009-09-01

    Several species of the polychaete family Alvinellidae may be considered as 'ecosystem engineer' because, by building their tubes, they modify the architecture of the hydrothermal fluid-seawater interface on the walls of vent chimneys. This affects the thermal and chemical gradients, and creates a mosaic of micro-niches, which could enable colonization by a variety of less-tolerant species. On high temperature vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Alvinellid-dominated communities colonizing first mineral surfaces are followed by a succession of communities with different species composition. On the East Pacific Rise (EPR), tubes of Alvinella spp, may seal the mineral surface on which they grow and decrease fluid seepage, or tubes may become encrusted in mineral precipitations. An alvinellid colony may therefore persist for only a restricted time period at a given place. Here we investigated the development of alvinellid colonies on the EPR vent sites in order to detect whether a succession of new species less tolerant would follow colonization by Alvinella spp. or if different assemblages are forming depending on local conditions. Using a specially designed device called TRAC (titanium ring for alvinellid colonization), we described the evolution of newly formed colonies. Fifteen experiments were conducted on several chimneys of the 9°N and 13°N vent fields of the EPR, over durations ranging from 5 days up to 5 months. Through video analysis, different types of colonies were identified, characterized by increasing thickness of the Alvinella coverage, decreasing fluid flow bathing the colony, and decreasing surface temperatures. We showed that the assemblage formed by minerals, tubes, and organisms is produced at a very high rate. While animals may colonize the new surface in less than a week, and tubes are also quickly produced ( Alvinella species may grow their tube up to 1 cm day -1 during the early stages of colonization), mineral precipitation progressively

  12. Hydrocarbon flux from natural deepwater Gulf of Mexico vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemings, P. B.; Smith, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Natural vents that expel water and hydrocarbons are present on continental margins around the world. The expelled fluids support biological vent communities, escape to the ocean and atmosphere, and may contribute significantly to oceanic and atmospheric carbon budgets. We describe two vents in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) at lease blocks MC852/853 and GB425 that have significant flow, high salinities, and elevated temperatures. We use a steady state multi-phase flow model and show that there is a unique water and hydrocarbon flux that simulates the observed salinity and temperature. We estimate the hydrocarbon flux at each vent to be 2.0-9.9x104 t yr-1 and 1.7-7.1x104 t yr-1, respectively. We extrapolate these results and estimate the hydrocarbon flux from the entire Gulf of Mexico to be 9.7-55x106 t yr-1. This flux is at least 50x greater than previous estimates11 and is 6-40% of the hydrocarbon flux from the Macondo oil spill. Large natural seepage may inoculate marine basins such as the Gulf of Mexico from oil spills like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout by sustaining populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria.

  13. CFD analysis of gas explosions vented through relief pipes.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, G; Di Benedetto, A; Salzano, E; Russo, G

    2006-09-21

    Vent devices for gas and dust explosions are often ducted to safe locations by means of relief pipes. However, the presence of the duct increases the severity of explosion if compared to simply vented vessels (i.e. compared to cases where no duct is present). Besides, the identification of the key phenomena controlling the violence of explosion has not yet been gained. Multidimensional models coupling, mass, momentum and energy conservation equations can be valuable tools for the analysis of such complex explosion phenomena. In this work, gas explosions vented through ducts have been modelled by a two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model based on the unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) approach in which the laminar, flamelet and distributed combustion models have been implemented. Numerical test have been carried out by varying ignition position, duct diameter and length. Results have evidenced that the severity of ducted explosions is mainly driven by the vigorous secondary explosion occurring in the duct (burn-up) rather than by the duct flow resistance or acoustic enhancement. Moreover, it has been found out that the burn-up affects explosion severity due to the reduction of venting rate rather than to the burning rate enhancement through turbulization.

  14. Variation in the diets of hydrothermal vent gastropods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govenar, Breea; Fisher, Charles R.; Shank, Timothy M.

    2015-11-01

    A prevailing paradigm of hydrothermal vent ecology is that primary consumers feed on chemoautotrophic bacteria. However, for the purposes of reconstructing vent food webs and for tracking energy flow from the generation of rock and fluid chemistry through primary/ secondary productivity and consumption to the overlying water column, it remains unclear which consumers feed on which bacteria. In paired analyses of carbon and nitrogen tissue stable isotope values with unique 16S rRNA sequences from the stomach contents, we determined that two species of gastropod grazers appear to feed on epsilon-proteobacteria, while two other species have more diverse diets, including one species that consumes alpha-proteobacteria, planctomycetes, and non-green sulfur bacteria. Different carbon fixation pathways used by epsilon- and alpha-proteobacteria may account for the variation in the carbon stable isotope values among the consumers. Furthermore, our results indicate that trophic specialization and niche partitioning may contribute to the distribution and abundance of vent-endemic gastropods and support the hypothesis that consumers in the warmer habitats commonly feed on epsilon-proteobacteria that use the rTCA cycle, while in the cooler habitats they feed on additional bacteria that use the CBB cycle. These results suggest that the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of free-living bacteria may play an important and previously overlooked role in facilitating species coexistence among primary consumers at hydrothermal vents and other chemosynthesis-based ecosystems.

  15. Development and testing of heat transport fluids for use in active solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Work on heat transport fluids for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is described. Program objectives and how they were accomplished including problems encountered during testing are discussed.

  16. Carbon fluxes from hydrothermal vents off Milos, Aegean Volcanic Arc, and the influence of venting on the surrounding ecosystem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dando, Paul; Aliani, Stefano; Bianchi, Nike; Kennedy, Hilary; Linke, Peter; Morri, Carla

    2014-05-01

    The island of Milos, in the Aegean Sea, has extensive hydrothermal fields to the east and southeast of the island with additional venting areas near the entrance to and within the central caldera. A calculation of the total area of the vent fields, based on ship and aerial surveys, suggested that the hydrothermal fields occupy 70 km2, twice the area previously estimated. The vents ranged in water depth from the intertidal to 300 m. As a result of the low depths there was abundant free gas release: in places water boiled on the seabed. The stream of gas bubbles rising through the sandy seabed drove a shallow re-circulation of bottom seawater. The majority of the water released with the gas, with a mean pH of 5.5, was re-circulated bottom water that had become acidified in contact with CO2 gas and was often diluted by admixture with the vapour phase from the deeper fluids. The major component of the free gas, 80%, was CO2, with an estimated total flux of 1.5-7.5 x 1012 g a-1. The methane flux, by comparison, was of the order of 1010 g a.-1 Using methane as a tracer it was shown that the major gas export from the vents was below the thermocline towards the southwest, in agreement with the prevailing currents. Areas of hydrothermal brine seepage occurred between the gas vents and occasional brine pools were observed in seabed depressions. Under relatively calm conditions, many of the brine seeps were covered by thick minero-bacterial mats consisting of silica and sulphur and surrounded by mats of diatoms and cyanobacteria. The minerals were not deposited in the absence of bacteria. Storms disrupted the mats, leading to an export of material to the surrounding area. Stable isotope data from sediments and sediment trap material suggested that exported POM was processed by zooplankton. The combined effects of the geothermal heating of the seabed, the large gas flux, variation in the venting and the effect of the brine seeps had a dramatic effect on the surrounding

  17. A Retrievable Mineral Microcosm for Examining Microbial Colonization and Mineral Precipitation at Seafloor Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, E. E.; Holloway, J. R.; Cary, S.; Voglesonger, K. M.; Ashbridge, D. A.; O'Day, P. A.

    2002-12-01

    Although seafloor hydrothermal vent environments are known to support thriving ecosystems, the microscale physical and chemical environment suitable for microbial colonization and the identity of pioneering organisms is unknown. Because of the fragility of young chimneys and their ephemeral nature, novel methods for sample retrieval and analysis are required. The mineral microcosm consists of four titanium mesh chambers containing crushed minerals mounted on a titanium base that allows for fluid flow through the chambers. The chambers can be filled with different minerals or mineral mixtures (or no minerals) to supply different substrates for microbial colonization and different local microenvironments as minerals react with the surrounding fluids. The device sets on top of an active hydrothermal vent for a period of days to weeks to allow colonization and mineral reaction. The mineral microcosm was deployed during the Atlantis/Alvin Extreme 2001 Cruise (Oct.- Nov.,2001) to 9° 50'N on the East Pacific Rise a total of three times, for ~ 24, ~ 96, and ~ 48 hours each. It was deployed in two different environments, twice in lower temperature (<300°C), diffuse-flow environments and once (for ~96 hours) in a higher temperature black smoker environment (>350°C).Seed minerals included sulfides, sulfates, magnetite, apatite, and quartz, both individually and in mixtures. In the first 24-hour deployment, dissolution of anhydrite but not sulfide minerals within the chambers indicated high temperatures in chamber interiors and rapid reaction rates. Temperatures measured on chamber exteriors before retrieval ranged from 4° -98°C. The 96-hour deployment on a hot vent (fluid ~370°C before deployment) resulted in extensive mineral precipitation and chimney growth inside the mineral chambers, on the outer surfaces of the chambers, and on the platform as a whole, creating micro-chimneys several centimeters tall. The young chimneys were mainly composed of pyrite with lesser

  18. Deep-sea hydrothermal vents: potential hot spots for natural products discovery?

    PubMed

    Thornburg, Christopher C; Zabriskie, T Mark; McPhail, Kerry L

    2010-03-26

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are among the most extreme and dynamic environments on Earth. However, islands of highly dense and biologically diverse communities exist in the immediate vicinity of hydrothermal vent flows, in stark contrast to the surrounding bare seafloor. These communities comprise organisms with distinct metabolisms based on chemosynthesis and growth rates comparable to those from shallow water tropical environments, which have been rich sources of biologically active natural products. The geological setting and geochemical nature of deep-sea vents that impact the biogeography of vent organisms, chemosynthesis, and the known biological and metabolic diversity of Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea, including the handful of natural products isolated to date from deep-sea vent organisms, are considered here in an assessment of deep-sea hydrothermal vents as potential hot spots for natural products investigations. Of critical importance too are the logistics of collecting deep vent organisms, opportunities for re-collection considering the stability and longevity of vent sites, and the ability to culture natural product-producing deep vent organisms in the laboratory. New cost-effective technologies in deep-sea research and more advanced molecular techniques aimed at screening a more inclusive genetic assembly are poised to accelerate natural product discoveries from these microbial diversity hot spots.

  19. Living with the Heat. Submarine Ring of Fire--Grades 5-6. Hydrothermal Vent Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This activity is designed to teach about hydrothermal vent ecology. Students are expected to describe how hydrothermal vents are formed and characterize the physical conditions at these sites, explain chemosynthesis and contrast this process with photosynthesis, identify autotrophic bacteria as the basis for food webs in hydrothermal vent…

  20. Microdistribution of Faunal Assemblages at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents in the Southern Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Leigh; Copley, Jonathan T.; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Linse, Katrin; Reid, William D. K.; Rogers, Alex D.; Sweeting, Christopher J.; Tyler, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Chemosynthetic primary production by microbes supports abundant faunal assemblages at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, with zonation of invertebrate species typically occurring along physico-chemical gradients. Recently discovered vent fields on the East Scotia Ridge (ESR) in the Southern Ocean represent a new province of vent biogeography, but the spatial dynamics of their distinct fauna have yet to be elucidated. This study determines patterns of faunal zonation, species associations, and relationships between faunal microdistribution and hydrothermal activity in a vent field at a depth of 2,400 m on the ESR. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives obtained high-definition imagery of three chimney structures with varying levels of hydrothermal activity, and a mosaic image of >250 m2 of seafloor co-registered with temperature measurements. Analysis of faunal microdistribution within the mosaiced seafloor reveals a consistent pattern of faunal zonation with increasing distance from vent sources and peak temperatures. Assemblages closest to vent sources are visibly dominated by a new species of anomuran crab, Kiwa n. sp. (abundance >700 individuals m−2), followed by a peltospiroid gastropod (>1,500 individuals m−2), eolepadid barnacle (>1,500 individuals m−2), and carnivorous actinostolid anemone (>30 individuals m−2). Peripheral fauna are not dominated by a single taxon, but include predatory and scavenger taxa such as stichasterid seastars, pycnogonids and octopus. Variation in faunal microdistribution on chimneys with differing levels of activity suggests a possible successional sequence for vent fauna in this new biogeographic province. An increase in δ34S values of primary consumers with distance from vent sources, and variation in their δ13C values also indicate possible zonation of nutritional modes of the vent fauna. By using ROV videography to obtain a high-resolution representation of a vent environment over a greater extent than previous studies

  1. Microdistribution of faunal assemblages at deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Leigh; Copley, Jonathan T; Huvenne, Veerle A I; Linse, Katrin; Reid, William D K; Rogers, Alex D; Sweeting, Christopher J; Tyler, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Chemosynthetic primary production by microbes supports abundant faunal assemblages at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, with zonation of invertebrate species typically occurring along physico-chemical gradients. Recently discovered vent fields on the East Scotia Ridge (ESR) in the Southern Ocean represent a new province of vent biogeography, but the spatial dynamics of their distinct fauna have yet to be elucidated. This study determines patterns of faunal zonation, species associations, and relationships between faunal microdistribution and hydrothermal activity in a vent field at a depth of 2,400 m on the ESR. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives obtained high-definition imagery of three chimney structures with varying levels of hydrothermal activity, and a mosaic image of >250 m(2) of seafloor co-registered with temperature measurements. Analysis of faunal microdistribution within the mosaiced seafloor reveals a consistent pattern of faunal zonation with increasing distance from vent sources and peak temperatures. Assemblages closest to vent sources are visibly dominated by a new species of anomuran crab, Kiwa n. sp. (abundance >700 individuals m(-2)), followed by a peltospiroid gastropod (>1,500 individuals m(-2)), eolepadid barnacle (>1,500 individuals m(-2)), and carnivorous actinostolid anemone (>30 individuals m(-2)). Peripheral fauna are not dominated by a single taxon, but include predatory and scavenger taxa such as stichasterid seastars, pycnogonids and octopus. Variation in faunal microdistribution on chimneys with differing levels of activity suggests a possible successional sequence for vent fauna in this new biogeographic province. An increase in δ(34)S values of primary consumers with distance from vent sources, and variation in their δ(13)C values also indicate possible zonation of nutritional modes of the vent fauna. By using ROV videography to obtain a high-resolution representation of a vent environment over a greater extent than previous studies

  2. Recovery of Alkylation Activity in Deactivated USY Catalyst Using Supercritical Fluids: A Comparison of Light Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; David N. Thompson; Kyle C. Burch

    2004-05-01

    Off-line, in-situ alkylation activity recovery from a completely deactivated solid acid catalyst was examined in a continuous-flow reaction system employing supercritical fluids (SCF). A USY zeolite catalyst was initially deactivated during the liquid phase alkylation of butene with isobutane in a single-pass reactor and then varying amounts of alkylation activity were recovered by passing supercritical fluids over the catalyst bed. A comparison of reactivation fluids on catalyst activity recovery is reported. Fluids examined included helium, propane, n-butane, isobutane, n-pentane, and isopentane. Phases studied included gas, liquid, and supercritical. As much as 82% of the fresh catalyst activity was recovered when employing supercritical isobutane. The ability of the fluid to facilitate a hydride reaction with the adsorbed deactivating high-molecular weight carbocations was indicated as an important property necessary to attain high levels of catalyst activity recovery. Activity recovery utilizing supercritical fluids that enhance reactivation by both reacting with and desorbing fouling compounds appears to be a promising technique to advance solid catalyst alkylation.

  3. Detection of fluid density anomalies using remote imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Clara J.

    Systematic and remote imaging techniques capable of detecting fluid density anomalies will allow for effective scientific sampling, improved geologic and biologic spatial understanding and analysis of temporal changes. This work presents algorithms for detection of anomalous fluids using an ROV-mounted high resolution imaging suite, specifically the structured light laser sensor and 1350kHz multibeam sonar system. As the ROV-mounted structured light laser sensor passes over areas of active flow the turbulent nature of the density anomaly causes the project laser line, imaged at the seafloor, to blur and distort. Detection of this phenomena was initially presented in 2013 with significant limitations including false positive results for active venting. Advancements to the detection algorithm presented in this work include intensity normalization algorithms and the implementation of a support vector machine classification algorithm. Results showing clear differentiation between areas of plain seafloor, bacteria or biology, and active venting are presented for multiple hydrothermal vent fields. Survey altitudes and the direction of travel impact laser data gathered over active vent sites. To determine the implications of these survey parameters, data collected over a single hydrothermal vent at three altitudes with four headings per altitude are analyzed. Changing survey geometry will impact the resolution and intensity of the laser line images, therefore, normalization and processing considerations are presented to maintain signal quality. The spatial distribution of the detected density anomaly will also be discussed as it is impacted by survey range and vehicle heading. While surveying hypersaline brine pools the observed acoustic responses from the 1350kHz high frequency multibeam sonar system indicate sensitivity to changes in acoustic impedance and therefore the density of a fluid. Internal density stratification was detected acoustically, appearing as multiple

  4. An off-axis hydrothermal vent field near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 30 degrees N.

    PubMed

    Kelley, D S; Karson, J A; Blackman, D K; Früh-Green, G L; Butterfield, D A; Lilley, M D; Olson, E J; Schrenk, M O; Roe, K K; Lebon, G T; Rivizzigno, P

    2001-07-12

    Evidence is growing that hydrothermal venting occurs not only along mid-ocean ridges but also on old regions of the oceanic crust away from spreading centres. Here we report the discovery of an extensive hydrothermal field at 30 degrees N near the eastern intersection of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the Atlantis fracture zone. The vent field--named 'Lost City'--is distinctly different from all other known sea-floor hydrothermal fields in that it is located on 1.5-Myr-old crust, nearly 15 km from the spreading axis, and may be driven by the heat of exothermic serpentinization reactions between sea water and mantle rocks. It is located on a dome-like massif and is dominated by steep-sided carbonate chimneys, rather than the sulphide structures typical of 'black smoker' hydrothermal fields. We found that vent fluids are relatively cool (40-75 degrees C) and alkaline (pH 9.0-9.8), supporting dense microbial communities that include anaerobic thermophiles. Because the geological characteristics of the Atlantis massif are similar to numerous areas of old crust along the Mid-Atlantic, Indian and Arctic ridges, these results indicate that a much larger portion of the oceanic crust may support hydrothermal activity and microbial life than previously thought.

  5. Geological and geochemical controls on the distribution of Alviniconcha vent snail symbioses: Have we finally linked mantle to microbe? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girguis, P. R.; Beinart, R.; Sanders, J.; Seewald, J.

    2010-12-01

    Gastropods of the genus Alviniconcha are found at hydrothermal vent fields in the Western Pacific, and have been reported to associate with either γ- or ɛ-Proteobacterial endosymbionts. These symbionts harness energy from the oxidation of chemicals in vent fluid to fix inorganic carbon and are the primary source of nutrition for the holobiont. An extensive sampling effort during a recent expedition to the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) has revealed that Alviniconcha host both previously observed symbiont types, as well as an additional γ- proteobacterial symbiont. Specifically, we collected 266 Alviniconcha individuals from four vent fields along the spreading center (30-140km apart) which span the north-south transition from fast spreading, basalt-hosted to slower spreading, andesite-hosted fields. Vent fluids from each field were also analyzed for the abundances of aqueous volatile and non-volatile species. The symbionts of all collected Alviniconcha were genotyped using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis as well as quantitative PCR. Individuals were found to primarily host one of the three symbiont genotypes (two γ- and one ɛ-Proteobacteria). Notably, we found that the two northern-most sites (basalt-hosted vents) were greatly dominated by individuals with the ɛ-Proteobacterial symbiont, while the two southern sites (andesite-hosted vents) were dominated by individuals hosting one of the two γ-Proteobacterial symbionts. This pattern corresponds to differences in the aqueous chemistry of the vent fluids along the spreading center. In particular, we have measured higher concentrations of hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide in the vent fluids at the northern sites than in the fluids of the southern sites. We posit that vent chemistry -which is influenced by subsurface water-rock interactions- may be influencing the dominance of each symbiont type along the ELSC. The putative implications for the role that geology and geochemistry plays in

  6. CONE - An STS-based cryogenic fluid management experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R. S.; Vento, D. M.; Hanna, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the CONE program is presented which includes a definition of the technology addressed by CONE and a baseline experiment set, a description of the experimental and support subsystems, interface requirements between the STS and the experiment carrier (Hitchhiker M), and the reusability and expansion capacity for additional experiment flights. CONE evaluates three primary technologies: the active thermodynamic vent system, the passive thermodynamic vent system, and liquid acquisition device performance. The cryogenic fluid management technology database that the system offers will allow for efficient subcritical cryogenic system designs for operation in a low-gravity environment. This system maximizes the balance between existing component technology and the need for the development of a cryogenic-fluid-management (CFM) test bed to investigate and demonstrate methods of storage and handling arenas.

  7. Transient seafloor venting from methane hydrate dissociation on continental slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnell, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    We present model results of hydrate dynamics that show the development of a gas chimney at three-phase equilibrium where gas flows through the marine hydrate stability zone and vents into the ocean during transient adjustment to imposed warming. Previous studies show venting occurs at the seaward retreating up-dip boundary of the hydrate stability zone during warming, whereas our results are the first to provide a mechanism for temporary gas venting vertically through the hydrate stability zone during warming. Transient behavior records the combined effect of hydrate dissociation from seafloor warming and secondary hydrate formation from gas produced by hydrate dissociation. We perform simulations of seafloor warming with a 1-d, unsteady, multiphase, fluid-flow model of methane hydrate dynamics. We assume an initial hydrate layer 6o meters thick with 10% pore volume saturation with seawater occupying the remaining domain above and below. We apply an instantaneous temperature increase at the seafloor. The temperature increase propagates downward through the deposit and initiates hydrate dissociation at the base of the deposit. Gas sourced from dissociation migrates upward and re-solidifies as hydrate to a maximum saturation set by a three-phase equilibrium salinity constraint. Additional gas migrates further upward to repeat the process. A chimney defined by dissociation at the bottom, secondary hydrate formation at the top, and maintained at three-phase equilibrium on the interior propagates to the seafloor in 10 kyr. Gas and salt then exit the system by venting into the ocean until dissociation stops producing new gas. Elevated salinities then diffuse to background seawater values. A shorter, shoaled hydrate deposit remains after ~100 kyr. This result shows that temporary venting can potentially occur anywhere along the hydrate stability zone during seafloor warming while retaining a hydrate deposit at steady state.

  8. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, Robin H.; Holt, James B.; Hastings, Leon J.

    2001-01-01

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space, and would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray-bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray-bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger, and a spray-bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy extraction is required, a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point, the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating boil-off losses.

  9. Subsurface magma pathways inferred from statistical analysis of volcanic vent distribution and numerical model of magma ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germa, Aurelie; Connor, Laura; Connor, Chuck; Malservisi, Rocco

    2015-04-01

    with variable conductivity dependent on flow rate and lithospheric stress to model the flow of a viscous fluid within a homogeneous porous medium. Here, we apply the initial developments of this framework to the Lassen Segment (northern California), a distributed volcanic system. An investigation of the spatial density of eruptive vents has been processed separately for basaltic, andesitic and silicic vents. Results suggest that mafic and andesitic melt regions are related, widespread in space and time, with frequent eruptions distributed across the entire field. In contrast, silicic volcanism is spatially focused, and geochronological record suggest episodic activity. Additionally, we explore the influence of various physical parameters, such as crust porosity and the development of shallow reservoirs, into magma transport and flux by modeling it as the non-linear flow of a viscous fluid within a homogeneous porous medium. By comparing output data from numerical simulations to the flux revealed at the surface by our spatial density analysis, we gain insights into the subsurface processes controlling the location of mafic distributed volcanism.

  10. Geology, sulfide geochemistry and supercritical venting at the Beebe Hydrothermal Vent Field, Cayman Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Alexander P.; Roberts, Stephen; Murton, Bramley J.; Hodgkinson, Matthew R. S.

    2015-09-01

    The Beebe Vent Field (BVF) is the world's deepest known hydrothermal system, at 4960 m below sea level. Located on the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre, Caribbean, the BVF hosts high temperature (˜401°C) "black smoker" vents that build Cu, Zn and Au-rich sulfide mounds and chimneys. The BVF is highly gold-rich, with Au values up to 93 ppm and an average Au:Ag ratio of 0.15. Gold precipitation is directly associated with diffuse flow through "beehive" chimneys. Significant mass-wasting of sulfide material at the BVF, accompanied by changes in metal content, results in metaliferous talus and sediment deposits. Situated on very thin (2-3 km thick) oceanic crust, at an ultraslow spreading centre, the hydrothermal system circulates fluids to a depth of ˜1.8 km in a basement that is likely to include a mixture of both mafic and ultramafic lithologies. We suggest hydrothermal interaction with chalcophile-bearing sulfides in the mantle rocks, together with precipitation of Au in beehive chimney structures, has resulted in the formation of a Au-rich volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposit. With its spatial distribution of deposit materials and metal contents, the BVF represents a modern day analogue for basalt hosted, Au-rich VMS systems.

  11. A vented inverted fuel assembly design for an SFR

    SciTech Connect

    Vitillo, F.; Todreas, N. E.; Driscoll, M. J.

    2012-07-01

    The inverted geometry (fuel outside coolant tubes) has been previously investigated at MIT for application in gas-cooled fast reactors and pressurized water-cooled thermal reactors. Venting has also been studied for conventional fuel pins and was employed for those in the Dounreay Fast Reactor. In the present work the inverted fuel approach was adopted because it allows high fuel volume fraction, reduction of the coolant void reactivity, neutron leakage and enrichment, as well as lower pressure drop for the same channel length because grids and wire wraps are no longer necessary. Furthermore most results also apply to venting of conventional fuel pins. Physical and chemical behavior of volatile fission products in sodium was investigated to determine the maximum activity inventory which would eventually be released into the primary sodium. Results of this analysis show that the most troublesome radionuclides in terms of propensity to escape from the venting system are noble gases ({sup 85}Kr and {sup 133}Xe), and cesium ({sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs). A final vented inverted fuel assembly design is proposed which meets all the design goals which have been set. Additionally purification systems were devised to reduce radionuclide activity of the coolant and the cover gas to tolerable levels. It is concluded that vented inverted (or vented conventional pin) fuel is a feasible concept and has sufficiently promising advantages - increasing fuel volume fraction to 50% and core outlet temperature by 20 deg. C, hence incrementing plant thermal efficiency by about 1% - to warrant serious consideration for future SFR designs. (authors)

  12. Emergency relief venting of the infrared telescope liquid helium dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E. W.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is made of the emergency relief venting of the liquid helium dewar of the Spacelab 2 infrared telescope experiment in the event of a massive failure of the dewar guard vacuum. Such a failure, resulting from a major accident, could cause rapid heating and pressurization of the liquid helium in the dewar and lead to relief venting through the emergency relief system. The heat input from an accident is estimated for various fluid conditions in the dewar and the relief process as it takes place through one or both of the emergency relief paths is considered. It is shown that under all reasonable circumstances the dewar will safely relieve itself, and the pressure will not exceed 85 percent of the proof pressure or 63 percent of the burst pressure.

  13. Laboratory quantification of permeability-porosity relationships for seafloor vent deposits: anisotropy in flange, slab, and crust samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribbin, J. L.; Zhu, W.; Tivey, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal vents accommodate the convective transfer of material from Earth’s interior to the oceans. A variety of seafloor deposits form at vent fields, including flanges, slabs, and crust. Flanges recovered from Guaymas Basin and the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) are horizontal ledges that protrude from the sides of larger structures. Fluid pools under and can percolate upwards through the flanges. Slabs taken from the Lucky Strike Vent Field are layered silicified deposits rich in sulfides, barite, and volcanic fragments; fluids can percolate upward through the cracked slab layers. Crust samples recovered from the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) active mound are composed of re-cemented older vent debris, and, again, fluids can percolate upward through the crust layers. Permeability and porosity measurements were made on a suite of flange, slab, and crust samples to determine evolution of permeability-porosity relationships (EPPRs). EPPRs are power-law relationships relating permeability and porosity through an exponent, α, that varies with changes in pore geometry - the higher the α value, the greater the change in permeability with respect to changes in porosity. Two trends were identified for the measured permeability and porosity data. First, measurements made on cores taken parallel to flange/slab/crust layers had consistently higher permeabilities (≈ 10-12 m2) and porosities (30-40%), and followed a trend of α ≈ 2. This trend differs significantly from the trend determined for measurements made on cores taken perpendicular to layering (representing most of the sample measurements): permeabilities ranged from 10-16-10-12 m2 and porosities from 20-45%, with a trend of α ≈ 4. The two distinct trends are consistent with the primary fluid flow direction having been parallel to layering (the α ≈ 2 trend), with flow perpendicular to layering (the α ≈ 4 trend) having been restricted to serial pathways that intersected the various layers

  14. Archaeal diversity and community development in deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Takai, Ken; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2011-06-01

    Over the past 35 years, researchers have explored deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments around the globe and studied a number of archaea, their unique metabolic and physiological properties, and their vast phylogenetic diversity. Although the pace of discovery of new archaeal taxa, phylotypes and phenotypes in deep-sea hydrothermal vents has slowed recently, bioinformatics and interdisciplinary geochemistry-microbiology approaches are providing new information on the diversity and community composition of archaea living in deep-sea vents. Recent investigations have revealed that archaea could have originated and dispersed from ancestral communities endemic to hydrothermal vents into other biomes on Earth, and the community structure and productivity of chemolithotrophic archaea are controlled primarily by variations in the geochemical composition of hydrothermal fluids.

  15. Crustal magnetization and the subseafloor structure of the ASHES vent field, Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for the investigation of hydrothermal sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratori Tontini, Fabio; Crone, Timothy J.; Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Kinsey, James C.; Mittelstaedt, Eric; Tivey, Maurice

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution geophysical data have been collected using the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Sentry over the ASHES (Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emission Study) high-temperature (~348°C) vent field at Axial Seamount, on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Multiple surveys were performed on a 3-D grid at different altitudes above the seafloor, providing an unprecedented view of magnetic data resolution as a function of altitude above the seafloor. Magnetic data derived near the seafloor show that the ASHES field is characterized by a zone of low magnetization, which can be explained by hydrothermal alteration of the host volcanic rocks. Surface manifestations of hydrothermal activity at the ASHES vent field are likely controlled by a combination of local faults and fractures and different lava morphologies near the seafloor. Three-dimensional inversion of the magnetic data provides evidence of a vertical, pipe-like upflow zone of the hydrothermal fluids with a vertical extent of ~100 m.

  16. Organic matter in hydrothermal metal ores and hydrothermal fluids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Spiker, E. C.; Kotra, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Massive polymetallic sulfides are currently being deposited around active submarine hydrothermal vents associated with spreading centers. Chemoautolithotrophic bacteria are responsible for the high production of organic matter also associated with modern submarine hydrothermal activity. Thus, there is a significant potential for organic matter/metal interactions in these systems. We have studied modern and ancient hydrothermal metal ores and modern hydrothermal fluids in order to establish the amounts and origin of the organic matter associated with the metal ores. Twenty-six samples from modern and ancient hydrothermal systems were surveyed for their total organic C contents. Organic C values ranged from 0.01% to nearly 4.0% in these samples. Metal ores from modern and ancient sediment-covered hydrothermal systems had higher organic C values than those from modern and ancient hydrothermal systems lacking appreciable sedimentary cover. One massive pyrite sample from the Galapagos spreading center (3% organic C) had stable isotope values of -27.4% (??13C) and 2.1% (??15N), similar to those in benthic siphonophors from active vents and distinct from seep sea sedimentary organic matter. This result coupled with other analyses (e.g. 13C NMR, pyrolysis/GC, SEM) of this and other samples suggests that much of the organic matter may originate from chemoautolithotrophic bacteria at the vents. However, the organic matter in hydrothermal metal ores from sediment covered vents probably arises from complex sedimentary organic matter by hydrothermal pyrolysis. The dissolved organic C concentrations of hydrothermal fluids from one site (Juan de Fuca Ridge) were found to be the same as that of background seawater. This result may indicate that dissolved organic C is effectively scavenged from hydrothermal fluids by biological activity or by co-precipitation with metal ores. ?? 1990.

  17. Influence of Geologic Setting on the Morphology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry of Vent Deposits Along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, M. K.; Evans, G. N.; Ferrini, V. L.

    2014-12-01

    Establishment of links between lithology, vent fluid chemistry, and vent deposit characteristics along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) was made possible using deep submergence vehicles and technology. ROV Jason was used to collect ultrahigh-resolution (submeter) bathymetric data sufficient to quantify characteristics of volcanic, tectonic and hydrothermal features; differences within vent fields from north to south include a change from low-relief volcanic domes cut by faults and fissures to higher aspect ratio volcanic domes dominated by aa-type lava morphologies (Ferrini et al., G-cubed, 2008). Highest temperature fluids are associated with crosscutting faults at all but Mariner vent field where faults are not observed. The detailed maps were used to target areas within vent fields for observations and sampling. Vent deposit morphologies are similar at the northernmost vent fields (Kilo Moana, TowCam, Tahi Moana), with black smokers and diffusers present on branched edifices. Vent deposits at the more southerly ABE, Tui Malila and Mariner vent fields vary in morphology, despite similar substrate lithology. Examples include abundant flanges at ABE and Tui Malila and ~20m-tall spires and squat barite-rich edifices at Mariner. Geochemical analyses and petrographic observations document the influence of lithology, fluid temperature, pH, and extents of seawater mixing on deposit formation. Concentrations of As, which increase from north to south, reflect lithologic control. Sb, Pb, and Ba concentrations also reflect lithologic control, but are affected as well by low pH and/or extents of seawater mixing. The significant differences in Mariner deposits reflect formation from very high temperature, low pH (<3 vs >4) fluids that keep Zn in solution, combined with local subsurface mixing. Overall, results document the influence of the Tonga Subduction Zone on vent deposits through its affects on lithology and vent fluid composition.

  18. Mineralogical gradients associated with alvinellids at deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbinden, Magali; Le Bris, Nadine; Compère, Philippe; Martinez, Isabelle; Guyot, François; Gaill, Françoise

    2003-02-01

    Alvinella pompejana and Alvinella caudata live in organic tubes on active sulphide chimney walls at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. These polychaete annelids are exposed to extreme thermal and chemical gradients and to intense mineral precipitation. This work points out that mineral particles associated with Pompeii worm ( A. pompejana and A. caudata) tubes constitute useful markers for evaluating the chemical characteristics of their micro-environment. The minerals associated with these worm tubes were analysed on samples recovered from an experimental alvinellid colony, at different locations in the vent fluid-seawater interface. Inhabited tubes from the most upper and lower parts of the colony were analysed by light and electron microscopies, X-ray microanalysis and X-ray diffraction. A change was observed from a Fe-Zn-S mineral assemblage to a Zn-S assemblage at the millimeter scale from the outer to the inner face of a tube. A similar gradient in proportions of minerals was observed at a decimeter scale from the lower to the upper part of the colony. The marcasite/pyrite ratio of iron disulphides also displays a steep decrease along the few millimeters adjacent to the external tube surface. The occurrence of these gradients indicates that the micro-environment within the tube differs from that outside the tube, and suggests that the tube wall acts as an efficient barrier to the external environment.

  19. Vent System Analysis for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage Transfer Ground Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A

    2013-01-01

    To test and validate key capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements such as large cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots, NASA is leading the efforts to develop and design the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) payload. The primary objectives of CPST payload are to demonstrate: 1) in-space storage of cryogenic propellants for long duration applications; and 2) in-space transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Ground Test Article (GTA) is a technology development version of the CPST payload. The GTA consists of flight-sized and flight-like storage and transfer tanks, liquid acquisition devices, transfer, and pressurization systems with all of the CPST functionality. The GTA is designed to perform integrated passive and active thermal storage and transfer performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a vacuum environment. The GTA storage tank is designed to store liquid hydrogen and the transfer tank is designed to be 5% of the storage tank volume. The LH2 transfer subsystem is designed to transfer propellant from one tank to the other utilizing pressure or a pump. The LH2 vent subsystem is designed to prevent over-pressurization of the storage and transfer tanks. An in-house general-purpose computer program was utilized to model and simulate the vent subsystem operation. The modeling, analysis, and the results will be presented in the final paper.

  20. Neuraminidase Activity and Resistance of 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus to Antiviral Activity in Bronchoalveolar Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ruangrung, Kanyarat; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Maneechotesuwan, Kittipong; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Chakritbudsabong, Warunya; Assawabhumi, Jirawatna; Bhattarakosol, Parvapan; Uiprasertkul, Mongkol; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human bronchoalveolar fluid is known to have anti-influenza activity. It is believed to be a frontline innate defense against the virus. Several antiviral factors, including surfactant protein D, are believed to contribute to the activity. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus was previously shown to be less sensitive to surfactant protein D. Nevertheless, whether different influenza virus strains have different sensitivities to the overall anti-influenza activity of human bronchoalveolar fluid was not known. We compared the sensitivities of 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal H1N1, and seasonal H3N2 influenza virus strains to inhibition by human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. The pandemic and seasonal H1N1 strains showed lower sensitivity to human BAL fluid than the H3N2 strains. The BAL fluid anti-influenza activity could be enhanced by oseltamivir, indicating that the viral neuraminidase (NA) activity could provide resistance to the antiviral defense. In accordance with this finding, the BAL fluid anti-influenza activity was found to be sensitive to sialidase. The oseltamivir resistance mutation H275Y rendered the pandemic H1N1 virus but not the seasonal H1N1 virus more sensitive to BAL fluid. Since only the seasonal H1N1 but not the pandemic H1N1 had compensatory mutations that allowed oseltamivir-resistant strains to maintain NA enzymatic activity and transmission fitness, the resistance to BAL fluid of the drug-resistant seasonal H1N1 virus might play a role in viral fitness. IMPORTANCE Human airway secretion contains anti-influenza activity. Different influenza strains may vary in their susceptibilities to this antiviral activity. Here we show that the 2009 pandemic and seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses were less sensitive to human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid than H3N2 seasonal influenza virus. The resistance to the pulmonary innate antiviral activity of the pandemic virus was determined by its neuraminidase (NA) gene, and it was shown that the

  1. Filtered-vented containment systems. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, A S; Walling, H C; Cybulskis, P; DiSalvo, R

    1980-01-01

    The potential benefits of filtered-vented containment systems as a means for mitigating the effects of severe accidents are analyzed. Studies so far have focused upon two operating reactor plants in the United States, a large-containment pressurized water reactor and a Mark I containment boiling water reactor. Design options that could be retrofitted to these plants are described including single-component once-through venting systems, multiple-component systems with vent and recirculation capabilities, and totally contained venting systems. A variety of venting strategies are also described which include simple low-volume containment pressure relief strategies and more complicated, high-volume venting strategies that require anticipatory actions. The latter type of strategy is intended for accidents that produce containment-threatening pressure spikes.

  2. Deep-Sea Hydrothermal-Vent Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Venkateswaran, Kasthur; Matthews, Jaret B.

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus is being developed for sampling water for signs of microbial life in an ocean hydrothermal vent at a depth of as much as 6.5 km. Heretofore, evidence of microbial life in deep-sea hydrothermal vents has been elusive and difficult to validate. Because of the extreme conditions in these environments (high pressures and temperatures often in excess of 300 C), deep-sea hydrothermal- vent samplers must be robust. Because of the presumed low density of biomass of these environments, samplers must be capable of collecting water samples of significant volume. It is also essential to prevent contamination of samples by microbes entrained from surrounding waters. Prior to the development of the present apparatus, no sampling device was capable of satisfying these requirements. The apparatus (see figure) includes an intake equipped with a temperature probe, plus several other temperature probes located away from the intake. The readings from the temperature probes are utilized in conjunction with readings from flowmeters to determine the position of the intake relative to the hydrothermal plume and, thereby, to position the intake to sample directly from the plume. Because it is necessary to collect large samples of water in order to obtain sufficient microbial biomass but it is not practical to retain all the water from the samples, four filter arrays are used to concentrate the microbial biomass (which is assumed to consist of particles larger than 0.2 m) into smaller volumes. The apparatus can collect multiple samples per dive and is designed to process a total volume of 10 L of vent fluid, of which most passes through the filters, leaving a total possibly-microbe-containing sample volume of 200 mL remaining in filters. A rigid titanium nose at the intake is used for cooling the sample water before it enters a flexible inlet hose connected to a pump. As the water passes through the titanium nose, it must be cooled to a temperature that is above a mineral

  3. Experimental and theoretical constraints on the origin of mid-ocean ridge geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrothermal experiments were performed using basalt, diabase, and two synthetic plagioclase bearing assemblages and Na-Ca-K-Cl fluids of seawater chlorinity at conditions from 350 to 425/sup 0/C and 250 to 400 bars. Dissolved Ca, Na, SiO/sub 2/, and pH appear to be controlled by equilibrium with plagioclase and epidote. Fluids reacting with diabase at low fluid/rock ratios (0.5-1) remain undersaturated with respect to quartz due to formation of olivine hydration products, whereas fluids reacting with basalt become supersaturated with respect to quartz due to breakdown of fractionated glass and formation of amphibole. High SiO/sub 2/ activities during basalt alteration, leads to high Ca and base metal concentrations and low pH compared to diabase alteration at the same conditions. Dissolved Li, K, Rb, and Ba concentrations reach higher levels during basalt alteration than during diabase alteration. Since these elements avoid incorporation into crystalline phases during solidification of magmas they are concentrated in the glass which is easily altered by fluids and explains their increased mobility during basalt alteration. Na-Ca-pH-SiO/sub 2/ relationships in vent fluids can be used to constrain reaction zone conditions assuming the fluids are equilibrated with plagioclase and epidote. The temperatures predicted by such models are higher than measured vent fluid temperatures. Dissolved Sr/Ca ratios for ridge crest fluids are similar to those produced during diabase alteration and higher than those produced during basalt alteration. This observation supports deep-seated reaction of the hydrothermal fluids with diabase dikes and/or gabbro for vent fluid origin. Only 4% of the Sr initially present in basalt is mobilized during hydrothermal alteration even after 800 hours of reaction.

  4. Metabolic Potential and Activity in Fluids of the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory, California, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, T.; Som, S.; Schrenk, M.; McCollom, T.; Cardace, D.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic potential and activity associated with hydrogen and carbon monoxide were characterized in fluids sampled from the the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO). CROMO consists of two clusters of science-dedicated wells drilled to varying depths up to 35m in the actively serpentinizing, Jurassic-age Coast Range Ophiolite of Northern California, along with a suite of pre-existing monitoring wells at the same site. Consistent with the fluid chemistry observed in other serpentinizing systems, CROMO fluids are highly alkaline, with pH up to 12.5, high in methane, with concentrations up 1600 micromolar, and low in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), with concentrations of 10's to 100's of micromolar. CROMO is conspicuous for fluid H2 concentrations that are consistently sub-micromolar, orders of magnitude lower than is typical of other systems. However, higher H2 concentrations (10's -100's of micromolar) at an earlier stage of fluid chemical evolution are predicted by, or consistent with: thermodynamic models for fluid chemistry based on parent rock composition equivalent to local peridotite and with water:rock ratio constrained by observed pH; the presence of magnetite at several wt% in CROMO drill cores; and concentrations of formate and carbon monoxide that would require elevated H2 if formed in equilibrium with H2 and DIC. Calculated Gibbs energy changes for reaction of H2 and CO in each of several metabolisms, across the range of fluid composition encompassed by the CROMO wells, range from bioenergetically feasible (capable of driving ATP synthesis) to thermodynamically unfavorable. Active consumption relative to killed controls was observed for both CO and H2 during incubation of fluids from the pre-existing monitoring wells; in incubations of freshly cored solids, consumption was only observed in one sample set (corresponding to the lowest pH) out of three. The specific metabolisms by which H2 and CO are consumed remain to be determined.

  5. Nanocalorimetric Characterization of Microbial Activity in Deep Subsurface Oceanic Crustal Fluids.

    PubMed

    Robador, Alberto; LaRowe, Douglas E; Jungbluth, Sean P; Lin, Huei-Ting; Rappé, Michael S; Nealson, Kenneth H; Amend, Jan P

    2016-01-01

    Although fluids within the upper oceanic basaltic crust harbor a substantial fraction of the total prokaryotic cells on Earth, the energy needs of this microbial population are unknown. In this study, a nanocalorimeter (sensitivity down to 1.2 nW ml(-1)) was used to measure the enthalpy of microbially catalyzed reactions as a function of temperature in samples from two distinct crustal fluid aquifers. Microorganisms in unamended, warm (63°C) and geochemically altered anoxic fluids taken from 292 meters sub-basement (msb) near the Juan de Fuca Ridge produced 267.3 mJ of heat over the course of 97 h during a step-wise isothermal scan from 35.5 to 85.0°C. Most of this heat signal likely stems from the germination of thermophilic endospores (6.66 × 10(4) cells ml(-1) FLUID) and their subsequent metabolic activity at temperatures greater than 50°C. The average cellular energy consumption (5.68 pW cell(-1)) reveals the high metabolic potential of a dormant community transported by fluids circulating through the ocean crust. By contrast, samples taken from 293 msb from cooler (3.8°C), relatively unaltered oxic fluids, produced 12.8 mJ of heat over the course of 14 h as temperature ramped from 34.8 to 43.0°C. Corresponding cell-specific energy turnover rates (0.18 pW cell(-1)) were converted to oxygen uptake rates of 24.5 nmol O2 ml(-1) FLUID d(-1), validating previous model predictions of microbial activity in this environment. Given that the investigated fluids are characteristic of expansive areas of the upper oceanic crust, the measured metabolic heat rates can be used to constrain boundaries of habitability and microbial activity in the oceanic crust.

  6. Evaluation of aperture cover tank vent nozzles for the IRAS spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of coefficients for the three axes of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) were established to determine the maximum allowable thrust difference between the two vent nozzles of the aperture cover tank low thrust vent system and their maximum misalignment. Test data generated by flow and torque measurements permitted the selection of two nozzles whose thrust differential was within the limit of the attitude control capability. Based on thrust stand data, a thrust vector misalignment was indicated that was slightly higher than permissible for the worst case, i.e., considerable degradation of the torque capacity of the attitude control system combined with venting of helium at its upper limit. The probability of destabilizing the IRAS spacecraft by activating the venting system appeared to be very low. The selection and mounting of the nozzles have satisfied all the requirements for the safe venting of helium.

  7. Elastically cooperative activated barrier hopping theory of relaxation in viscous fluids. I. General formulation and application to hard sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2014-05-21

    We generalize the force-level nonlinear Langevin equation theory of single particle hopping to include collective effects associated with long range elastic distortion of the liquid. The activated alpha relaxation event is of a mixed spatial character, involving two distinct, but inter-related, local and collective barriers. There are no divergences at volume fractions below jamming or temperatures above zero Kelvin. The ideas are first developed and implemented analytically and numerically in the context of hard sphere fluids. In an intermediate volume fraction crossover regime, the local cage process is dominant in a manner consistent with an apparent Arrhenius behavior. The super-Arrhenius collective barrier is more strongly dependent on volume fraction, dominates the highly viscous regime, and is well described by a nonsingular law below jamming. The increase of the collective barrier is determined by the amplitude of thermal density fluctuations, dynamic shear modulus or transient localization length, and a growing microscopic jump length. Alpha relaxation time calculations are in good agreement with recent experiments and simulations on dense fluids and suspensions of hard spheres. Comparisons of the theory with elastic models and entropy crisis ideas are explored. The present work provides a foundation for constructing a quasi-universal, fit-parameter-free theory for relaxation in thermal molecular liquids over 14 orders of magnitude in time.

  8. Discovery of abundant hydrothermal venting on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, H N; Michael, P J; Baker, E T; Connelly, D P; Snow, J E; Langmuir, C H; Dick, H J B; Mühe, R; German, C R; Graham, D W

    2003-01-16

    Submarine hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges is an important contributor to ridge thermal structure, and the global distribution of such vents has implications for heat and mass fluxes from the Earth's crust and mantle and for the biogeography of vent-endemic organisms. Previous studies have predicted that the incidence of hydrothermal venting would be extremely low on ultraslow-spreading ridges (ridges with full spreading rates <2 cm x yr(-1)-which make up 25 per cent of the global ridge length), and that such vent systems would be hosted in ultramafic in addition to volcanic rocks. Here we present evidence for active hydrothermal venting on the Gakkel ridge, which is the slowest spreading (0.6-1.3 cm x yr(-1)) and least explored mid-ocean ridge. On the basis of water column profiles of light scattering, temperature and manganese concentration along 1,100 km of the rift valley, we identify hydrothermal plumes dispersing from at least nine to twelve discrete vent sites. Our discovery of such abundant venting, and its apparent localization near volcanic centres, requires a reassessment of the geologic conditions that control hydrothermal circulation on ultraslow-spreading ridges.

  9. Implications of perennial saline springs for abnormally high fluid pressures and active thrusting in western California

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, J.R.; Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.; Moores, E.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Perennial saline springs in the Rumsey Hills area, southwestern Sacramento Valley, California, locally discharge at high elevations and near ridgetops. The springs are cold, are commonly associated with natural gas seeps, and typically emerge along west-vergent thrust faults. Stable isotope analyses indicate that the spring waters are similar to oil-field formation fluids and they have had a significant residence time in the subsurface at moderate temperatures. The nonmeteoric character of the springs demonstrates that they are not being fed by perched water tables. The authors propose that these subsurface formation waters are being forced to the surface by anomalously high porefluid pressures. The Rumsey Hills area is one of Quaternary uplift, thrusting, and crustal shortening, and prospect wells drilled there have encountered anomalously high fluid pressures at shallow depths. They attribute these high fluid pressures to active tectonic compression and shortening of Cretaceous marine sedimentary rocks. The widespread occurrence of anomalously high pore-fluid pressures and perennial saline springs in the Coast Ranges and western Great Valley suggests that much of western California may be characterized as a seismically active, overpressured thrust belt. The emergence of formation waters along thrust faults further suggests that patterns of subsurface fluid flow in western California may be similar to those in overpressured accretionary prisms, and that excess fluid pressures may also play a role in the distribution of seismicity.

  10. Overview of Fluid Dynamics Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa W.; Wang, Ten-See

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception 40 years ago, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has had the need to maintain and advance state-of-the-art flow analysis and cold-flow testing capability to support its roles and missions. This overview discusses the recent organizational changes that have occurred at MSFC with emphasis on the resulting three groups that form the core of fluid dynamics expertise at MSFC: the Fluid Physics and Dynamics Group, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, and the Experimental Fluid Dynamics Group. Recently completed activities discussed include the analysis and flow testing in support of the Fastrac engine design, the X-33 vehicle design, and the X34 propulsion system design. Ongoing activities include support of the RLV vehicle design, Liquid Fly Back Booster aerodynamic configuration definition, and RLV focused technologies development. Other ongoing activities discussed are efforts sponsored by the Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) to develop an advanced incompressible flow code and to develop optimization techniques. Recently initiated programs and their anticipated required fluid dynamics support are discussed. Based on recent experiences and on the anticipated program needs, required analytical and experimental technique improvements are presented. Due to anticipated budgetary constraints, there is a strong need to leverage activities and to pursue teaming arrangements in order to advance the state-of-the-art and to adequately support concept development. Throughout this overview there is discussion of the lessons learned and of the capabilities demonstrated and established in support of the hardware development programs.

  11. Lysozyme activity in earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomic fluid and coelomocytes: Enzyme assay for immunotoxicity of xenobiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Goven, A.J.; Chen, S.C.; Fitzpatrick, L.C. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Venables, B.J. . Dept. of Biological Sciences TRAC Laboratories Inc., Denton, TX )

    1994-04-01

    Lysozyme activity in earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomic fluid and coelomocytes appears sufficiently sensitive for use as a nonmammalian biomarker to detect toxic effects of sublethal body burdens of Cu[sup 2+]. Lysozyme, a phylogenetically conserved enzyme, is capable of bactericidal activity via action on peptidoglycan of gram-positive bacterial cell walls and functions as a component of an organism's innate antimicrobial defense mechanism. Coelomic fluid and coelomocyte lysozyme activities, which exhibit temperature-response patterns similar to those of human saliva, plasma, serum and leukocyte extracts, were sensitive to Cu[sup 2+] exposure. Lysozyme activity of coelomic fluid and coelomocyte extracts from earthworms exposed for 5 d to CuSO[sub 4], using filter paper contact exposure, decreased with increasing sublethal Cu[sup 2+] concentrations of 0.05 and 0.1 [mu]g/cm[sup 2]. Compared to controls, coelomic fluid lysozyme activity was suppressed significantly at both exposure concentrations, whereas coelomocyte extract lysozyme activity was suppressed significantly at the 0.1-[mu]g/cm[sup 2] exposure concentration. Low inherent natural variability and sensitivity to sublethal Cu[sup 2+] body burdens indicate that lysozyme activity has potential as a biomarker for assaying immunotoxicity of metals.

  12. Novel and diverse integron integrase genes and integron-like gene cassettes are prevalent in deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Elsaied, Hosam; Stokes, H W; Nakamura, Takamichi; Kitamura, Keiko; Fuse, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Akihiko

    2007-09-01

    The lack of information about mobile DNA in deep-sea hydrothermal vents limits our understanding of the phylogenetic diversity of the mobile genome of bacteria in these environments. We used culture-independent techniques to explore the diversity of the integron/mobile gene cassette system in a variety of hydrothermal vent communities. Three samples, which included two different hydrothermal vent fluids and a mussel species that contained essentially monophyletic sulfur-oxidizing bacterial endosymbionts, were collected from Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin, Japan, and Pika site, Mariana arc. First, using degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers, we amplified integron integrase genes from metagenomic DNA from each sample. From vent fluids, we discovered 74 new integrase genes that were classified into 11 previously undescribed integron classes. One integrase gene was recorded in the mussel symbiont and was phylogenetically distant from those recovered from vent fluids. Second, using PCR primers targeting the gene cassette recombination site (59-be), we amplified and subsequently identified 60 diverse gene cassettes. In multicassette amplicons, a total of 13 59-be sites were identified. Most of these sites displayed features that were atypical of the features previously well conserved in this family. The Suiyo vent fluid was characterized by gene cassette open reading frames (ORFs) that had significant homologies with transferases, DNA-binding proteins and metal transporter proteins, while the majority of Pika vent fluid gene cassettes contained novel ORFs with no identifiable homologues in databases. The symbiont gene cassette ORFs were found to be matched with DNA repair proteins, methionine aminopeptidase, aminopeptidase N, O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase and glutamate synthase, which are proteins expected to play a role in animal/symbiont metabolism. The success of this study indicates that the integron/gene cassette system is common in deep-sea hydrothermal

  13. Collective dynamics of chemically active particles trapped at a fluid interface.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Alvaro; Malgaretti, P; Popescu, M N; Dietrich, S

    2016-10-12

    Chemically active colloids generate changes in the chemical composition of their surrounding solution and thereby induce flows in the ambient fluid which affect their dynamical evolution. Here we study the many-body dynamics of a monolayer of spherically symmetric active particles trapped at a fluid-fluid interface. To this end we consider a model for the large-scale spatial distribution of particles which incorporates the direct pair interaction (including also the capillary interaction which is caused specifically by the interfacial trapping) as well as the effect of hydrodynamic interactions (including the Marangoni flow induced by the response of the interface to the chemical activity). The values of the relevant physical parameters for typical experimental realizations of such systems are estimated and various scenarios, which are predicted by our approach for the dynamics of the monolayer, are discussed. In particular, we show that the chemically-induced Marangoni flow can prevent the clustering instability driven by the capillary attraction.

  14. Active modal control simulation of vibro-acoustic response of a fluid-loaded plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Active modal control simulation of vibro-acoustic response of a fluid-loaded plate is presented. The active modal control of the vibro-acoustic response is implemented using piezoelectric actuators/sensors. The active modal damping is added to the coupled system via negative velocity feedback. The feedback gain between the piezoelectric actuators/sensors for the modal control is obtained using the in-vacuo modal matrix and the incompressible fluid-loaded modal matrix. The modal control performance of structural vibration and acoustic radiation of a baffled plate is numerically studied. It is shown that the proposed method increases the modal damping ratio and achieves reduction in the mean square velocity and the sound power for given modes of the fluid-loaded plate.

  15. Explosive Volcanic Eruptions from Linear Vents on Earth, Venus and Mars: Comparisons with Circular Vent Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Wimert, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    Conditions required to support buoyant convective plumes are investigated for explosive volcanic eruptions from circular and linear vents on Earth, Venus, and Mars. Vent geometry (linear versus circular) plays a significant role in the ability of an explosive eruption to sustain a buoyant plume. On Earth, linear and circular vent eruptions are both capable of driving buoyant plumes to equivalent maximum rise heights, however, linear vent plumes are more sensitive to vent size. For analogous mass eruption rates, linear vent plumes surpass circular vent plumes in entrainment efficiency approximately when L(sub o) > 3r(sub o) owing to the larger entrainment area relative to the control volume. Relative to circular vents, linear vents on Venus favor column collapse and the formation of pyroclastic flows because the range of conditions required to establish and sustain buoyancy is narrow. When buoyancy can be sustained, however, maximum plume heights exceed those from circular vents. For current atmospheric conditions on Mars, linear vent eruptions are capable of injecting volcanic material slightly higher than analogous circular vent eruptions. However, both geometries are more likely to produce pyroclastic fountains, as opposed to convective plumes, owing to the low density atmosphere. Due to the atmospheric density profile and water content on Earth, explosive eruptions enjoy favorable conditions for producing sustained buoyant columns, while pyroclastic flows would be relatively more prevalent on Venus and Mars. These results have implications for the injection and dispersal of particulates into the planetary atmosphere and the ability to interpret the geologic record of planetary volcanism.

  16. Hydrothermal Activity and Volcanism on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. M.; Scientific Party, M.

    2005-12-01

    In April 2005 four recently discovered different hydrothermal fields on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) south of the Equator were studied and sampled using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) during cruise METEOR 64/1. Three of these hydrothermally active fields (called Turtle Pits, Red Lion, and Wideawake) occur at about 3000 m water depth in the centre of a MAR segment at 4° 48'S which appears to be volcanically very active. The youngest lava flow partly covers the low-temperature, diffuse flow Wideawake mussel field and is thus probably only a few years old. The high-temperature Turtle Pits hydrothermal field with four active vent structures lies some 300 m west of the diffuse vent field and is characterized by boiling fluids with temperatures close to 400° C. The mineral assemblage recovered from inactive hydrothermal mounds includes massive magnetite+hematite+sulfate and differs from that of the presently active vents and indicates more oxidizing conditions during the earlier activity. The vent fluids at Turtle Pits contain relatively high contents of hydrogen which may have formed during iron oxidation processes when basaltic magmas crystallized. The high fluid temperatures, the change to more reducing conditions, and the relatively high hydrogen contents in the fluids are most likely due to the ascent of magmas from the mantle that fed the very recent eruption. The high-temperature Red Lion hydrothermal field lies some 2 km north of the Turtle Pits field and consists of at least four active black smokers surrounded by several inactive sulfide mounds. The composition of the Red Lion fluids differs significantly from the Turtle Pits fluids, possibly owing largely to a difference in the temperature of the two systems. The fourth hydrothermally active field on the southern MAR, the Liliput field, was discovered near 9° 33'S in a water depth of 1500 m and consists of several low-temperature vents. A shallow hydrothermal plume in the water column

  17. Assessment of rheumatoid activity based on clinical features and blood and synovial fluid analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Farr, M; Kendall, M J; Young, D W; Meynell, M J; Hawkins, C F

    1976-01-01

    Joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis has been assessed, and the most useful guides to disease activity were determined by analysis of synovial fluid and blood together with the history of joint disability. The patient's own evaluation of the amount of pain suffered was the most useful clinical assessment. Differential cell count and glucose estimations were the most helpful guides in the synovial fluid, while C-reactive protein in the serum most accurately reflected disease activity. The effects of systemic steroids on these indices were studied, and the differences between seronegative and seropositive patients noted. PMID:942273

  18. Dissolved Carbon Species in Diffuse and Focused Flow Hydrothermal Vents at the Main Endeavour Field, Northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foustoukos, D. I.; Seyfried, W. E.; Ding, K.; Pester, N. J.

    2006-12-01

    The magmatic and tectonic event of 1999 had a significant impact on the chemical composition of vent fluids issuing from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF), Juan de Fuca Ridge. Here, we report dissolved concentrations of H2, CO2, CO and C1-C3 alkanes measured in low and high-temperature hydrothermal fluids collected in August 2005 during an RV Atlantis/DSV Alvin expedition at MEF. In comparison with time series data, temperatures of the 2005 vent fluids were slightly lower than those recorded in the aftermaths of the tectonic event of 1999. The possible cooling of the hydrothermal subseafloor reaction zone is consistent with the observed increase in dissolved Cl to pre-1999 values. Converging compositional trends to pre-1999 conditions are also suggested for dissolved CO2 concentrations (~20 mmol/kg) in Puffer, Sully, Bastille and S&M vent fluids. In these focused flow and high-temperature vent fluids, dissolved CO2 is in thermodynamic equilibrium with CO(aq). The systematics of organic species in diffuse flow fluids, however, appears to be closely related to processes occurring within the near-seafloor environment. For example, excess CO(aq) observed in the diffuse flow fluids at Easter Island is attributed to sluggish CO- CO2(aq) equilibria at low temperatures, suggesting hydrothermal circulation of short-residence times. Short-lived hydrothermal circulation is further supported by the nearly identical C1/(C2+C3) ratios between focused and diffuse flow fluids. Furthermore, alkane distribution in the MEF diffuse flow fluids suggests direct mixing between seawater and hydrothermal fluid with minimal biological inputs, in contrast with the greater effect of microbial methanogenesis proposed in other ridge-crest hydrothermal environments. Thus, the coupling of CO2(aq)-CO(aq) redox equilibrium with dissolved carbon species in low- temperature vent fluids could provide a better understanding of the effect of subsurface microbial communities upon the composition of mid

  19. Preliminary Results on Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Loki's Castle Arctic Vents and Host Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Fernando; Carvalho, Carlos; Inês Cruz, M.; Dias, Ágata; Fonseca, Rita; Relvas, Jorge; Pedersen, Rolf

    2010-05-01

    The Loki's Castle hydrothermal vent field was discovered in the summer of 2008, during a cruise led by the Centre of Geobiology of the University of Bergen, integrated in the H2Deep Project (Eurocores, ESF). Loki's Castle is the northernmost hydrothermal vent field discovered to date. It is located at the junction between the Mohns Ridge and the South Knipovich Ridge, in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, at almost 74°N. This junction shows unique features and apparently there is no transform fault to accommodate the deformation generated by the bending of the rift valley from WSW-ENE to almost N-S. The Knipovich Rigde, being a complex structure, is an ultra-slow spreading ridge, with an effective spreading rate of only ~ 6 mm/y. It is partly masked by a substantial cover of glacial and post-glacial sediments, estimated to be between 12 and 20 ky old, derived from the nearby Bear Island fan, to the East of the ridge. The Loki's Castle vent site is composed of several active, over 10 m tall chimneys, producing up to 320°C fluid, at the top of a very large sulphide mound, which is estimated to be around 200 m in diameter. About a dozen gravity cores were obtained in the overall area. From these we collected nearly 200 subsamples. Eh and pH were measured in all subsamples. The Portuguese component of the H2Deep project is aimed at characterizing, chemically and mineralogically, the sulphide chimneys and the collected sediments around the vents (up to 5 meters long gravity cores). These studies are aimed at understanding the ore-forming system, and its implications for submarine mineral exploration, as well as the relation of the microbial population with the hydrothermal component of sediments. Here we present an overview of preliminary data on the mineralogical assemblage found in the analyzed sediments and chimneys. The identification of the different mineral phases was obtained through petrographic observations of polished thin sections under the microscope (with both

  20. TRY-5 Is a Sperm-Activating Protease in Caenorhabditis elegans Seminal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joseph R.; Stanfield, Gillian M.

    2011-01-01

    Seminal fluid proteins have been shown to play important roles in male reproductive success, but the mechanisms for this regulation remain largely unknown. In Caenorhabditis elegans, sperm differentiate from immature spermatids into mature, motile spermatozoa during a process termed sperm activation. For C. elegans males, sperm activation occurs during insemination of the hermaphrodite and is thought to be mediated by seminal fluid, but the molecular nature of this activity has not been previously identified. Here we show that TRY-5 is a seminal fluid protease that is required in C. elegans for male-mediated sperm activation. We observed that TRY-5::GFP is expressed in the male somatic gonad and is transferred along with sperm to hermaphrodites during mating. In the absence of TRY-5, male seminal fluid loses its potency to transactivate hermaphrodite sperm. However, TRY-5 is not required for either hermaphrodite or male fertility, suggesting that hermaphrodite sperm are normally activated by a distinct hermaphrodite-specific activator to which male sperm are also competent to respond. Within males, TRY-5::GFP localization within the seminal vesicle is antagonized by the protease inhibitor SWM-1. Together, these data suggest that TRY-5 functions as an extracellular activator of C. elegans sperm. The presence of TRY-5 within the seminal fluid couples the timing of sperm activation to that of transfer of sperm into the hermaphrodite uterus, where motility must be rapidly acquired. Our results provide insight into how C. elegans has adopted sex-specific regulation of sperm motility to accommodate its male-hermaphrodite mode of reproduction. PMID:22125495

  1. TRY-5 is a sperm-activating protease in Caenorhabditis elegans seminal fluid.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joseph R; Stanfield, Gillian M

    2011-11-01

    Seminal fluid proteins have been shown to play important roles in male reproductive success, but the mechanisms for this regulation remain largely unknown. In Caenorhabditis elegans, sperm differentiate from immature spermatids into mature, motile spermatozoa during a process termed sperm activation. For C. elegans males, sperm activation occurs during insemination of the hermaphrodite and is thought to be mediated by seminal fluid, but the molecular nature of this activity has not been previously identified. Here we show that TRY-5 is a seminal fluid protease that is required in C. elegans for male-mediated sperm activation. We observed that TRY-5::GFP is expressed in the male somatic gonad and is transferred along with sperm to hermaphrodites during mating. In the absence of TRY-5, male seminal fluid loses its potency to transactivate hermaphrodite sperm. However, TRY-5 is not required for either hermaphrodite or male fertility, suggesting that hermaphrodite sperm are normally activated by a distinct hermaphrodite-specific activator to which male sperm are also competent to respond. Within males, TRY-5::GFP localization within the seminal vesicle is antagonized by the protease inhibitor SWM-1. Together, these data suggest that TRY-5 functions as an extracellular activator of C. elegans sperm. The presence of TRY-5 within the seminal fluid couples the timing of sperm activation to that of transfer of sperm into the hermaphrodite uterus, where motility must be rapidly acquired. Our results provide insight into how C. elegans has adopted sex-specific regulation of sperm motility to accommodate its male-hermaphrodite mode of reproduction.

  2. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...: (1) An integral vent system listed or certified as part of the appliance. (2) A venting system... roof line or outside the wall line may be installed at the site. Sectional venting systems shall...

  3. 400°C hot Boiling Fluids From a Hydrothermal Field at 5°S on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Results of Meteor Cruise M64/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koschinsky, A.; Garbe-Schoenberg, D.; Seifert, R.; Strauss, H.; Weber, S.; Marbler, H.

    2005-12-01

    Until recently, hydrothermal activity was unknown from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) south of the Equator where the MAR is offset by several 100 km at the St. Paul's and Romanche fracture zones. During the British cruise CD 169 in Feb./March 2005, an active hydrothermal vent field was discovered on the southern MAR at 5°S. During the German follow-up cruise M64/1 in April 2005, the first samples from this vent field were recovered with the ROV QUEST (Univ. Bremen). The high-temperature vent field is situated in a water depth of 2990 m within a large basaltic sheet flow. A diffuse, low-temperature field occurs in few hundred meters to the east. Here we show for the first time that boiling fluids of 400°C are emanating at a depth of about 3000 m at a slow-spreading MAR segment. Although this segment is composed of thick basaltic crust, these fluids are dominated by hydrogen relative to methane, similar to ultramafic-hosted systems. The samples have significantly reduced chloride concentrations with a calculated endmember value of 254 mmol/l Cl compared to a background seawater value of 560 mmol/l Cl. This indicates that the fluids are phase-separated and that the samples collected represent the vapor-type phase of the boiling fluids. Fluids from the neighbouring diffuse vent field lie on the same mixing line of seawater and hydrothermal endmember chlorinity, indicating the same fluid source. The fluids of an additional vent field found only 3 km distant in a similar setting do not show any signs of phase separation but higher metal concentrations and a much lower Fe/Mn ratio compared to the hot vapor-type fluids. Apparently, the temperature conditions in a hydrothermal vent system in combination with phase separation processes may be more important for the fluid composition than the leached rock type. We hypothesize that a very recent intrusion and/or eruption event at the vent field where the hot phase-separated fluids were sampled causes the high heat, gas and Fe

  4. Comparison of Active Drug Concentrations in the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid and Interstitial Fluid of Calves Injected with Enrofloxacin, Florfenicol, Ceftiofur, or Tulathromycin.

    PubMed

    Foster, Derek M; Martin, Luke G; Papich, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is the most common reason for parenteral antimicrobial administration to beef cattle in the United States. Yet there is little information describing the antimicrobial concentrations at the site of action. The objective of this study was to compare the active drug concentrations in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and interstitial fluid of four antimicrobials commonly used in cattle. After injection, plasma, interstitial fluid, and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentrations and protein binding were measured to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of each drug. A cross-over design with six calves per drug was used. Following sample collection and drug analysis, pharmacokinetic calculations were performed. For enrofloxacin and metabolite ciprofloxacin, the interstitial fluid concentration was 52% and 78% of the plasma concentration, while pulmonary fluid concentrations was 24% and 40% of the plasma concentration, respectively. The pulmonary concentrations (enrofloxacin + ciprofloxacin combined) exceeded the MIC90 of 0.06 μg/mL at 48 hours after administration. For florfenicol, the interstitial fluid concentration was almost 98% of the plasma concentration, and the pulmonary concentrations were over 200% of the plasma concentrations, exceeding the breakpoint (≤ 2 μg/mL), and the MIC90 for Mannheimia haemolytica (1.0 μg/mL) for the duration of the study. For ceftiofur, penetration to the interstitial fluid was only 5% of the plasma concentration. Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentration represented 40% of the plasma concentration. Airway concentrations exceeded the MIC breakpoint for susceptible respiratory pathogens (≤ 2 μg/mL) for a short time at 48 hours after administration. The plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of tulathromcyin were lower than the concentrations in pulmonary fluid throughout the study. The bronchial concentrations were higher than the plasma or interstitial concentrations, with over 900

  5. Comparison of Active Drug Concentrations in the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid and Interstitial Fluid of Calves Injected with Enrofloxacin, Florfenicol, Ceftiofur, or Tulathromycin

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Derek M.; Martin, Luke G.; Papich, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is the most common reason for parenteral antimicrobial administration to beef cattle in the United States. Yet there is little information describing the antimicrobial concentrations at the site of action. The objective of this study was to compare the active drug concentrations in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and interstitial fluid of four antimicrobials commonly used in cattle. After injection, plasma, interstitial fluid, and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentrations and protein binding were measured to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of each drug. A cross-over design with six calves per drug was used. Following sample collection and drug analysis, pharmacokinetic calculations were performed. For enrofloxacin and metabolite ciprofloxacin, the interstitial fluid concentration was 52% and 78% of the plasma concentration, while pulmonary fluid concentrations was 24% and 40% of the plasma concentration, respectively. The pulmonary concentrations (enrofloxacin + ciprofloxacin combined) exceeded the MIC90 of 0.06 μg/mL at 48 hours after administration. For florfenicol, the interstitial fluid concentration was almost 98% of the plasma concentration, and the pulmonary concentrations were over 200% of the plasma concentrations, exceeding the breakpoint (≤ 2 μg/mL), and the MIC90 for Mannheimia haemolytica (1.0 μg/mL) for the duration of the study. For ceftiofur, penetration to the interstitial fluid was only 5% of the plasma concentration. Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentration represented 40% of the plasma concentration. Airway concentrations exceeded the MIC breakpoint for susceptible respiratory pathogens (≤ 2 μg/mL) for a short time at 48 hours after administration. The plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of tulathromcyin were lower than the concentrations in pulmonary fluid throughout the study. The bronchial concentrations were higher than the plasma or interstitial concentrations, with over 900

  6. Endemicity of the cosmopolitan mesophilic chemolithoautotroph Sulfurimonas at deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Mino, Sayaka; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Makita, Hiroko; Toki, Tomohiro; Miyazaki, Junichi; Sievert, Stefan M; Polz, Martin F; Inagaki, Fumio; Godfroy, Anne; Kato, Shingo; Watanabe, Hiromi; Nunoura, Takuro; Nakamura, Koichi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Watsuji, Tomo-O; Kojima, Shigeaki; Takai, Ken; Sawabe, Tomoo

    2017-04-01

    Rich animal and microbial communities have been found at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Although the biogeography of vent macrofauna is well understood, the corresponding knowledge about vent microbial biogeography is lacking. Here, we apply the multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) to assess the genetic variation of 109 Sulfurimonas strains with ⩾98% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, which were isolated from four different geographical regions (Okinawa Trough (OT), Mariana Volcanic Arc and Trough (MVAT), Central Indian Ridge (CIR) and Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR)). Sequence typing based on 11 protein-coding genes revealed high genetic variation, including some allele types that are widespread within regions, resulting in 102 nucleotide sequence types (STs). This genetic variation was predominantly due to mutation rather than recombination. Phylogenetic analysis of the 11 concatenated genes showed a clear geographical isolation corresponding to the hydrothermal regions they originated from, suggesting limited dispersal. Genetic differentiation among Sulfurimonas populations was primarily influenced by geographical distance rather than gas composition of vent fluid or habitat, although in situ environmental conditions of each microhabitat could not be examined. Nevertheless, Sulfurimonas may possess a higher dispersal capability compared with deep-sea hydrothermal vent thermophiles. This is the first report on MLSA of deep-sea hydrothermal vent Epsilonproteobacteria, which is indicative of allopatric speciation.

  7. Comparative study of vent and seep macrofaunal communities in the Guaymas Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portail, M.; Olu, K.; Escobar-Briones, E.; Caprais, J. C.; Menot, L.; Waeles, M.; Cruaud, P.; Sarradin, P. M.; Godfroy, A.; Sarrazin, J.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the ecological processes and connectivity of chemosynthetic deep-sea ecosystems requires comparative studies. In the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico), the presence of seeps and vents in the absence of biogeographic barrier, comparable sedimentary settings and depths offers a unique opportunity to assess the role of ecosystem specific environmental conditions on macrofaunal communities. Six seep and four vent assemblages were studied, three of which were characterised by common major foundation taxa: vesicomyid bivalves, siboglinid tubeworms and microbial mats. Macrofaunal community structure at the family level showed that density, diversity and composition patterns were primarily shaped by seep and vent common abiotic factors including methane and hydrogen sulphide concentrations. The type of substratum and the heterogeneity provided by foundation species were identified as additional structuring factors and their roles were found to vary according to fluid regimes. Surprisingly, the presence of vent environmental specificities, with higher temperature, higher metal concentrations and lower pH was not significant in explaining community patterns. Moreover, Guaymas seep and vent shared an important number of common species suggesting frequent connections between the two ecosystems. Finally, this study provides further support for the hypothesis of continuity among deep-sea seep and vent ecosystems.

  8. 46 CFR 151.15-5 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Pressure-vacuum venting. A normally closed venting system fitted with a device to automatically limit the pressure or vacuum in the tank to design limits. Pressure-vacuum relief valves shall comply with the... devices in accordance with the requirements of § 54.15-13 of this chapter. (2) When a...

  9. Larvicidal and Growth-Inhibitory Activity of Entomopathogenic Bacteria Culture Fluids Against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    da Silva, João Luiz Rosa; Undurraga Schwalm, Fernanda; Eugênio Silva, Carlos; da Costa, Marisa; Heermann, Ralf; Santos da Silva, Onilda

    2017-01-06

    Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika are important vector-borne diseases, and Aedes aegypti L. is their main transmitter. As the disease management is mainly based on mosquito control strategies, the search for alternative and cost-effective approaches is ongoing. The Gram-negative bacteria Xenorhabdus nematophila and Photorhabdus luminescens are symbiotically associated with entomopathogenic nematodes and are highly pathogenic for insect larvae. After we have recently confirmed the toxicity of these bacteria in Ae. aegypti larvae, we here evaluated the toxic activity of culture fluids on the development of this mosquito species. Larval susceptibility was assessed by exposing larvae to different concentrations of P. luminescens or X. nematophila culture fluids to confirm whether secondary metabolites might cause the mosquitos' death. Xenorhabdus nematophila culture fluid was more effective and stable during the mosquito pathogenicity bioassays compared to that of P. luminescens Larval mortality started a few hours after exposure of the insects to the fluids. Furthermore, the residual effect of larvicidal activity of X. nematophila fluid persisted at full efficiency for 4 d. Particularly, larval mortality was still higher than 50% for up to 8 d. Exposure of larvae to a sublethal dose of X. nematophila fluid delayed pupation as well as emergence of adult mosquitoes and caused cumulative larval mortality higher than 90% by day 14. Here, we describe for the first time the use of stable culture fluids and therefore secondary metabolites of P. luminescens and X. nematophila as a promising basis for the use as biopesticide for control of Ae. aegypti in the future.

  10. Traps of carnivorous pitcher plants as a habitat: composition of the fluid, biodiversity and mutualistic activities

    PubMed Central

    Adlassnig, Wolfram; Peroutka, Marianne; Lendl, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background Carnivorous pitcher plants (CPPs) use cone-shaped leaves to trap animals for nutrient supply but are not able to kill all intruders of their traps. Numerous species, ranging from bacteria to vertrebrates, survive and propagate in the otherwise deadly traps. This paper reviews the literature on phytotelmata of CPPs. Pitcher Fluid as a Habitat The volumes of pitchers range from 0·2 mL to 1·5 L. In Nepenthes and Cephalotus, the fluid is secreted by the trap; the other genera collect rain water. The fluid is usually acidic, rich in O2 and contains digestive enzymes. In some taxa, toxins or detergents are found, or the fluid is extremely viscous. In Heliamphora or Sarracenia, the fluid differs little from pure water. Inquiline Diversity Pitcher inquilines comprise bacteria, protozoa, algae, fungi, rotifers, crustaceans, arachnids, insects and amphibia. The dominant groups are protists and Dipteran larvae. The various species of CPPs host different sets of inquilines. Sarracenia purpurea hosts up to 165 species of inquilines, followed by Nepenthes ampullaria with 59 species, compared with only three species from Brocchinia reducta. Reasons for these differences include size, the life span of the pitcher as well as its fluid. Mutualistic Activities Inquilines closely interact with their host. Some live as parasites, but the vast majority are mutualists. Beneficial activities include secretion of enzymes, feeding on the plant's prey and successive excretion of inorganic nutrients, mechanical break up of the prey, removal of excessive prey and assimilation of atmospheric N2. Conclusions There is strong evidence that CPPs influence their phytotelm. Two strategies can be distinguished: (1) Nepenthes and Cephalotus produce acidic, toxic or digestive fluids and host a limited diversity of inquilines. (2) Genera without efficient enzymes such as Sarracenia or Heliamphora host diverse organisms and depend to a large extent on their symbionts for prey utilization

  11. Euryhaline Halophilic Microorganisms From the Suiyo Seamount Hydrothermal Vents.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T.; Kimura, H.; Maruyama, A.; Naganuma, T.

    2002-12-01

    The euryhaline halophilic microorganisms grow in a wide salinity range from <3% NaCl (seawater equivalent) to >15% NaCl or to even saturation (about 30% NaCl). A number of euryhaline halophiles have been found in a wide range of habitats from oceanic and terrestrial regimes, from deep-sea vents and seeps, and from Antarctic sea ice and terrains. We have isolated the euryhaline strains independently from a Mid-Atlantic Ridge vent fluids and Antarctic terrains are closely related species of the genus Halomonas. Some euryhaline halophiles maintain intracellular osmotic balance by controlling the concentration of compatible solute such as ectoine. This compatible solute not only stabilizes the proteins from denaturation caused by high salt concentration but also serves as a protectant against stresses such as heating, freezing and drying. The sub-seafloor structure of a hydrothermal vent is highly complicated with mosaic heterogeneity of physicochemical parameters such as temperature and salinity. This premise led us to the hypothesis that some euryhaline halophiles including Halomonas species well adapt to a wide salinity-ranged habitat in the sub-vent. To test this hypothesis, isolation and characterization of euryhaline halophiles from the Suiyo Seamount hydrothermal vents were conducted the drill-cored rock samples from the sites APSK-02, 03, and 07 and the filter-trapped fluid particle samples from the sites APSK-01 and 05 were used. For initial cultivation, a heterotrophic bacterial medium of 15% NaCl was used. The samples was added to the medium and incubated under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions at room temperature. A total of 5 euryhaline halophilic strains were obtained and phylogenetically characterized: two strains (both related to Marinobacter) from APSK-02 core section 2; one strain (related to H. meridiana) from APSK-07 core section 3; and two strains (related to H. meridiana and H. variabilis) from APSK-01 trapped particles. In addition, some

  12. Antifungal activity of fluid extract and essential oil from anise fruits (Pimpinella anisum L., Apiaceae).

    PubMed

    Kosalec, Ivan; Pepeljnjak, Stjepan; Kustrak, Danica

    2005-12-01

    Antifungal activities of fluid extract and essential oil obtained from anise fruits Pimpinella anisum L. (Apiaceae) were tested in vitro on clinical isolates of seven species of yeasts and four species of dermatophytes. Diffusion method with cylinders and the broth dilution method were used for antifungal activity testing. Anise fluid extract showed antimycotic activity against Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. pseudotropicalis and C. krusei with MIC values between 17 and 20% (v/v). No activity was noticed against C. glabrata, and anis fruits extracts showed growth promotion activity on Geotrichum spp. Anise fruits extract inhibited the growth of dermatophyte species (Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, Microsporum canis and M. gypseum) with MIC values between 1.5 and 9.0% (V/V). Anise essential oil showed strong antifungal activity against yeasts with MIC lower than 1.56% (V/V) and dermatophytes with MIC lower than 0.78% (V/V). Significant differences in antifungal activities were found between anise fluid extract and anise essential oil (p<0.01). Anise essential oil exhibited stronger antifungal activities against yeasts and dermatophytes with MIC values between 0.10 and 1.56% (V/V), respectively.

  13. Factors Influencing the Measurement of Lysosomal Enzymes Activity in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Parnetti, Lucilla; Eusebi, Paolo; Paciotti, Silvia; De Carlo, Claudia; Codini, Michela; Tambasco, Nicola; Rossi, Aroldo; Agnaf, Omar M. El.; Calabresi, Paolo; Beccari, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the activities of lysosomal enzymes in cerebrospinal fluid have recently been proposed as putative biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. To define the operating procedures useful for ensuring the reliability of these measurements, we analyzed several pre-analytical factors that may influence the activity of β-glucocerebrosidase, α-mannosidase, β-mannosidase, β-galactosidase, α-fucosidase, β-hexosaminidase, cathepsin D and cathepsin E in cerebrospinal fluid. Lysosomal enzyme activities were measured by well-established fluorimetric assays in a consecutive series of patients (n = 28) with different neurological conditions, including Parkinson's disease. The precision, pre-storage and storage conditions, and freeze/thaw cycles were evaluated. All of the assays showed within- and between-run variabilities below 10%. At −20°C, only cathepsin D was stable up to 40 weeks. At −80°C, the cathepsin D, cathepsin E, and β-mannosidase activities did not change significantly up to 40 weeks, while β-glucocerebrosidase activity was stable up to 32 weeks. The β-galactosidase and α-fucosidase activities significantly increased (+54.9±38.08% after 4 weeks and +88.94±36.19% after 16 weeks, respectively). Up to four freeze/thaw cycles did not significantly affect the activities of cathepsins D and E. The β-glucocerebrosidase activity showed a slight decrease (−14.6%) after two freeze/thaw cycles. The measurement of lysosomal enzyme activities in cerebrospinal fluid is reliable and reproducible if pre-analytical factors are accurately taken into consideration. Therefore, the analytical recommendations that ensue from this study may contribute to the establishment of actual values for the activities of cerebrospinal fluid lysosomal enzymes as putative biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24983953

  14. Increased cellular activity in rat insular cortex after water and salt ingestion induced by fluid depletion.

    PubMed

    Pastuskovas, Cinthia V; Cassell, Martin D; Johnson, Alan Kim; Thunhorst, Robert L

    2003-04-01

    Insular cortex (IC) receives inputs from multiple sensory systems, including taste, and from receptors that monitor body electrolyte and fluid balance and blood pressure. This work analyzed metabolic activity of IC cells after water and sodium ingestion induced by sodium depletion. Rats were injected with the diuretic furosemide (10 mg/kg body wt), followed 5 min later by injections of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (5 mg/kg body wt). After 90 min, some rats received water and 0.3 M NaCl to drink for 2 h while others did not. A third group had access to water and saline but was not depleted of fluids. All rats were killed for processing of brain tissue for Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-ir). Nondepleted animals had weak-to-moderate levels of Fos-ir within subregions of IC. Fluid-depleted rats without fluid access had significantly increased Fos-ir in all areas of IC. Levels of Fos-ir were highest in fluid-depleted rats that drank water and sodium. Fos-ir levels were highest in anterior regions of IC and lowest in posterior regions of IC. These results implicate visceral, taste, and/or postingestional factors in the increased metabolic activity of cells in IC.

  15. Spontaneous mirror-symmetry breaking induces inverse energy cascade in 3D active fluids

    PubMed Central

    Słomka, Jonasz; Dunkel, Jörn

    2017-01-01

    Classical turbulence theory assumes that energy transport in a 3D turbulent flow proceeds through a Richardson cascade whereby larger vortices successively decay into smaller ones. By contrast, an additional inverse cascade characterized by vortex growth exists in 2D fluids and gases, with profound implications for meteorological flows and fluid mixing. The possibility of a helicity-driven inverse cascade in 3D fluids had been rejected in the 1970s based on equilibrium-thermodynamic arguments. Recently, however, it was proposed that certain symmetry-breaking processes could potentially trigger a 3D inverse cascade, but no physical system exhibiting this phenomenon has been identified to date. Here, we present analytical and numerical evidence for the existence of an inverse energy cascade in an experimentally validated 3D active fluid model, describing microbial suspension flows that spontaneously break mirror symmetry. We show analytically that self-organized scale selection, a generic feature of many biological and engineered nonequilibrium fluids, can generate parity-violating Beltrami flows. Our simulations further demonstrate how active scale selection controls mirror-symmetry breaking and the emergence of a 3D inverse cascade. PMID:28193853

  16. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, A. F.

    This report details progress made on the jet impingement - liquid crystal - digital imaging experiment. With the design phase complete, the experiment is currently in the construction phase. In order to reach this phase two design related issues were resolved. The first issue was to determine NASP leading edge active cooling design parameters. Meetings were arranged with personnel at SAIC International, Torrance, CA in order to obtain recent publications that characterized expected leading edge heat fluxes as well as other details of NASP operating conditions. The information in these publications was used to estimate minimum and maximum jet Reynolds numbers needed to accomplish the required leading edge cooling, and to determine the parameters of the experiment. The details of this analysis are shown in Appendix A. One of the concerns for the NASP design is that of thermal stress due to large surface temperature gradients. Using a series of circular jets to cool the leading edge will cause a non-uniform temperature distribution and potentially large thermal stresses. Therefore it was decided to explore the feasibility of using a slot jet to cool the leading edge. The literature contains many investigations into circular jet heat transfer but few investigations of slot jet heat transfer. The first experiments will be done on circular jets impinging on a fiat plate and results compared to previously published data to establish the accuracy of the method. Subsequent experiments will be slot jets impinging on full scale models of the NASP leading edge. Table 1 shows the range of parameters to be explored. Next a preliminary design of the experiment was done. Previous papers which used a similar experimental technique were studied and elements of those experiments adapted to the jet impingement study. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine which design was the least expensive, easy to construct, and easy to use. Once the final design was settled, vendors were

  17. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    This report details progress made on the jet impingement - liquid crystal - digital imaging experiment. With the design phase complete, the experiment is currently in the construction phase. In order to reach this phase two design related issues were resolved. The first issue was to determine NASP leading edge active cooling design parameters. Meetings were arranged with personnel at SAIC International, Torrance, CA in order to obtain recent publications that characterized expected leading edge heat fluxes as well as other details of NASP operating conditions. The information in these publications was used to estimate minimum and maximum jet Reynolds numbers needed to accomplish the required leading edge cooling, and to determine the parameters of the experiment. The details of this analysis are shown in Appendix A. One of the concerns for the NASP design is that of thermal stress due to large surface temperature gradients. Using a series of circular jets to cool the leading edge will cause a non-uniform temperature distribution and potentially large thermal stresses. Therefore it was decided to explore the feasibility of using a slot jet to cool the leading edge. The literature contains many investigations into circular jet heat transfer but few investigations of slot jet heat transfer. The first experiments will be done on circular jets impinging on a fiat plate and results compared to previously published data to establish the accuracy of the method. Subsequent experiments will be slot jets impinging on full scale models of the NASP leading edge. Table 1 shows the range of parameters to be explored. Next a preliminary design of the experiment was done. Previous papers which used a similar experimental technique were studied and elements of those experiments adapted to the jet impingement study. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine which design was the least expensive, easy to construct, and easy to use. Once the final design was settled, vendors were

  18. Testing of an Ammonia EVA Vent Tool for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Stanewich, Brett J.; Wilhelm, Sheri Munekata

    2000-01-01

    When components of the International Space Station ammonia External Active Thermal Control System are replaced on-orbit, they must be vented immediately after removal from the system. Venting ensures that the component is not hard packed with liquid and thus does not pose a hazard. An extravehicular activity (EVA) vent tool has been developed to perform this function. However, there were concerns that the tool could whip, posing a hazard to the EVA astronaut, or would freeze. The ammonia vent tool was recently tested in a thermal/vacuum chamber to demonstrate that it would operate safely and would not freeze during venting. During the test, ammonia mimicking the venting conditions for six different heat exchanger initial conditions was passed through representative test articles. In the present work, the model that was used to develop the ammonia state and flow for the test points is discussed and the test setup and operation is described. The qualitative whipping and freezing results of the test are discussed and vent plume pressure measurements are described and interpreted.

  19. Characterization of cellulolytic activity from digestive fluids of Dissosteira carolina (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous screening of head-derived and gut fluid extracts of Carolina grasshoppers, Dissosteira carolina (L.), revealed relatively high activity against cellulase substrates when compared to other insect groups. In this work we report on the characterization and identification of enzymes involved i...

  20. Indices of free radical activity in the cerebrospinal fluid in motor neuron disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J D; Jackson, M J; Pentland, B

    1987-01-01

    Indices of free-radical activity and lipid peroxidation were studied in cerebrospinal fluid samples obtained from 11 patients with motor neuron disease and 11 reference subjects. No differences were found between the two groups. The significance of this finding is discussed in relation to current views of the possible pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:3625217

  1. Modeling the Growth of Hyperthermophiles in Deep-sea Hydrothermal Diffuse Fluids and Sulfide Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ver Eecke, H. C.; Oslowski, D. M.; Butterfield, D. A.; Olson, E. J.; Lilley, M. D.; Holden, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    In 2008 and 2009, 534 hydrothermal fluid samples and 5 actively-venting black smoker chimneys were collected using Alvin for correlative microbiological and chemical analyses as part of the Endeavour Segment and Axial Volcano Geochemistry and Ecology Research (EAGER) program. Hyperthermophilic, autotrophic Fe(III) oxide reducers, methanogens, and sulfur-reducing heterotrophs were enriched for at 85 and 95°C using most-probable-number estimates from 28 diffuse fluid and 8 chimney samples. Heterotrophs were the most abundant of the three groups in both diffuse fluids and black-smoker chimneys. Iron reducers were more abundant than methanogens, and more abundant in sulfide-hosted vents than in basalt-hosted vents. Fluid chemistry suggests that there is net biogenic methanogenesis at the Marker 113/62 diffuse vent at Axial Volcano but nowhere else sampled. The growth of hyperthermophilic methanogens and heterotrophs was modeled in the lab using pure cultures. Methanocaldococcus jannaschii grew at 82°C in a 2-liter reactor with continuous gas flow at H2 concentrations between 20 and 225 µM with a H2 km of 100 µM. Correlating H2 end-member mixing curves from vent fluids and seawater with our laboratory modeling study suggests that H2 concentrations are limiting for Methanocaldococcus growth at most Mothra, Main Field, and High Rise vent sites at Endeavour but sufficient to support growth at some Axial Volcano vents. Therefore, hyperthermophilic methanogens may depend on H2 syntrophy at low H2 sites. Twenty-one pure hyperthermophilic heterotroph strains each grew on α-1,4 and β-1,4 linked sugars and polypeptides with concomitant H2 production. The H2 production rate (cell-1 doubling-1) for Pyrococcus furiosus at 95°C without sulfur was 29 fmol, 36 fmol, and 53 fmol for growth on α-1,4 sugars, β-1,4 sugars, and peptides, respectively. The CH4 production rate for M. jannaschii was 390 fmol cell-1 doubling-1; therefore, we estimate that it would take approximately

  2. Preliminary Modeling of Two-Phase Flow at the Main Endeavour Vent Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Lowell, R. P.

    2011-12-01

    The high temperature hydrothermal vents of Main Endeavour Field (MEF), Juan de Fuca ridge exhibited quasi-steady North-South trending spatial gradients of both temperature and salinity for more than a decade before a magmatic event changed the vent characteristics. In order to explain these observations, we construct two-dimensional numerical models of two-phase hydrothermal flow of the MEF. We consider both along-axis and across-axis simulations, taking into account the vent field geometry and incorporating various parameters, such as different basal temperature distributions and permeability structures that might affect the vent fluid temperature and chemistry. Preliminary results from across-axis models, in which the basal temperature decreases linearly away from the ridge axis and results in a single high-temperature plume, indicate that basal temperature alone does not affect steady-state vent temperature and salinity of the vents. Simulations that include the presence of a high-permeability extrusive layer 2A atop the spreading ridge results in a zone of narrower and lower temperature venting. The effect of a low permeability zone of anhydrite would tend to mitigate the decrease in temperature, however. Along-axis simulations performed to date, with an extended uniform high temperature basal boundary, produce multiple plumes; but the plumes do not exhibit a strong along-axis gradient in vent salinity or temperature as observed at the MEF. These preliminary results suggest that the observed N-S gradient in temperature and salinity at MEF reflects interplay between heat source and either near the surface or deep-seated heterogeneous permeability structures. Three-dimensional simulations might ultimately be required to understand hydrothermal circulation at the MEF.

  3. Evaluation of activated sludge for biodegradation of propylene glycol as an aircraft deicing fluid.

    PubMed

    Delorit, Justin D; Racz, LeeAnn

    2014-04-01

    Aircraft deicing fluid used at airport facilities is often collected for treatment or disposal in order to prevent serious ecological threats to nearby surface waters. This study investigated lab scale degradation of propylene glycol, the active ingredient in a common aircraft deicing fluid, by way of a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor containing municipal waste water treatment facility activated sludge performing simultaneous organic carbon oxidation and nitrification. The ability of activated sludge to remove propylene glycol was evaluated by studying the biodegradation and sorption characteristics of propylene glycol in an activated sludge medium. The results indicate sorption may play a role in the fate of propylene glycol in AS, and the heterotrophic bacteria readily degrade this compound. Therefore, a field deployable bioreactor may be appropriate for use in flight line applications.

  4. Anhydrite Solubility and Ca Isotope Fractionation in the Vapor-Liquid Field of the NaCl-H2O System: Implications for Hydrothermal Vent Fluids at Mid-ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, P.; Syverson, D. D.; Higgins, J. A.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal experiments were performed at 410, 420 and 450°C between 180-450 bar to investigate anhydrite (CaSO4) solubility and Ca isotope fractionation in the liquid-vapor stability field of the NaCl-H2O system. Experiments were conducted in flexible gold reaction cells and a fixed volume Ti reactor to reach all pressures between the critical curve and three-phase boundary. During isothermal decompression at 410°C, anhydrite solubility in the liquid phase increases (1 to 9 mmol/kg Ca), whereas the solubility decreases in the vapor phase (130 to < 10 umol/kg Ca). At 410°C and 290-270 bar, the partition coefficient, log Km = log (mv / ml), for Ca decreases from -1.35 to -2.46, and that of SO4 decreases from -1.76 to -2.82. At 420°C the Ca:SO4 ratio of the starting solution was 2:1, and the pH25°C decreases in the liquid and increases in the vapor upon decompression. Ca hydrolysis in the liquid and complex interactions between undetermined aqueous species in the vapor could explain this pattern. At 410 and 450°C, the experiments started with a Ca:SO4 ratio of 1:1. Along the 410°C isotherm, pH25°C initially increases in both the liquid and vapor, potentially caused by precipitation of an H+ bearing salt, such as NaHSO4. 30-40 bar below the critical curve there is a sudden decrease in pH25°C as the putative salt phase may become unstable and dissolve. At 450°C, pH25°C decreases in the vapor and increases in the liquid, as HCl and H2SO4 partition into the vapor. Ca isotope data at 420°C between 375-300 bar indicate that the vapor is isotopically light relative to the liquid. At lower pressures both phases approach the isotopic composition of the coexisting anhydrite, suggesting that dissolved Ca speciation becomes more structurally similar to anhydrite. This study furthers our understanding of elemental partitioning and isotopic fractionation in mineral-fluid systems with implications for mass transfer reactions at/near the magma-hydrothermal boundary at

  5. Subtidal gastropods consume sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: evidence from coastal hydrothermal vents

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.L.

    1984-02-17

    The black abalone (Haliotis cracherodii), a commercially important shallow-water gastropod common off White Point, Southern California, is found frequently at subtidal hydrothermal vents within mats of filamentous sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Foraging vent abalones actively consume the bacteria and confine their nightly feeding forays to bacterial mats surrounding the vents. The growth of abalones consuming the sulfur bacteria exceeds that of control individuals consuming microalgae and is comparable to reported growth rates of abalones consuming macroalgae. Thus, off White Point, the black abalone may derive a portion of its nutrition from the subsidy of geothermal energy.

  6. Effects of adding fluids to solid foods on muscle activity and number of chewing cycles.

    PubMed

    van der Bilt, Andries; Engelen, Lina; Abbink, Jan; Pereira, Luciano J

    2007-06-01

    The production of a sufficient amount of saliva is indispensable for good chewing. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that adding fluid to a food will facilitate the chewing process, especially for dry foods. The effect might be larger for subjects with relatively low salivary flow rates. Furthermore, adding fluids that contain mucins or alpha-amylase may have a larger facilitating effect on mastication than the addition of water alone. Twenty subjects chewed on melba toast, breakfast cake, carrot, peanut, and Gouda cheese. In addition, they chewed on these foods after different volumes of water, artificial saliva containing mucins, or a solution of alpha-amylase had been added. Muscle activity and number of chewing strokes until swallowing were measured. The salivary flow rates of the subjects were also determined. Adding fluid to the food significantly reduced the number of chewing cycles and total muscular work (i.e. the integrated surface electromyograpy of masseter and temporalis muscles measured bilaterally, summed for all chewing cycles) until swallowing for all foods, except carrot. The largest effects were observed for melba and cake, which are dry products requiring sufficient saliva to form a coherent bolus safe for swallowing. More facilitation of the chewing process was observed after adding fluid to breakfast cake for subjects with relatively low salivary flow rates. The type of fluid had no significant effect on the chewing process.

  7. Emergent Structures in an Active Polar Fluid: Dynamics of Shape, Scattering, and Merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Kabir; Rao, Madan

    2017-02-01

    Spatially localized defect structures emerge spontaneously in a hydrodynamic description of an active polar fluid comprising polar "actin" filaments and "myosin" motor proteins that (un)bind to filaments and exert active contractile stresses. These emergent defect structures are characterized by distinct textures and can be either static or mobile—we derive effective equations of motion for these "extended particles" and analyze their shape, kinetics, interactions, and scattering. Depending on the impact parameter and propulsion speed, these active defects undergo elastic scattering or merger. Our results are relevant for the dynamics of actomyosin-dense structures at the cell cortex, reconstituted actomyosin complexes, and 2D active colloidal gels.

  8. Quantifying volcanic hazard at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) with uncertainty assessment: 1. Vent opening maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, Andrea; Isaia, Roberto; Neri, Augusto; Vitale, Stefano; Aspinall, Willy P.; Bisson, Marina; Flandoli, Franco; Baxter, Peter J.; Bertagnini, Antonella; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Iannuzzi, Enrico; Pistolesi, Marco; Rosi, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    Campi Flegrei is an active volcanic area situated in the Campanian Plain (Italy) and dominated by a resurgent caldera. The great majority of past eruptions have been explosive, variable in magnitude, intensity, and in their vent locations. In this hazard assessment study we present a probabilistic analysis using a variety of volcanological data sets to map the background spatial probability of vent opening conditional on the occurrence of an event in the foreseeable future. The analysis focuses on the reconstruction of the location of past eruptive vents in the last 15 ka, including the distribution of faults and surface fractures as being representative of areas of crustal weakness. One of our key objectives was to incorporate some of the main sources of epistemic uncertainty about the volcanic system through a structured expert elicitation, thereby quantifying uncertainties for certain important model parameters and allowing outcomes from different expert weighting models to be evaluated. Results indicate that past vent locations are the most informative factors governing the probabilities of vent opening, followed by the locations of faults and then fractures. Our vent opening probability maps highlight the presence of a sizeable region in the central eastern part of the caldera where the likelihood of new vent opening per kilometer squared is about 6 times higher than the baseline value for the whole caldera. While these probability values have substantial uncertainties associated with them, our findings provide a rational basis for hazard mapping of the next eruption at Campi Flegrei caldera.

  9. Genetic diversity and connectivity of deep-sea hydrothermal vent metapopulations.

    PubMed

    Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2010-10-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents provide ephemeral habitats for animal communities that depend on chemosynthetic primary production. Sporadic volcanic and tectonic events destroy local vent fields and create new ones. Ongoing dispersal and cycles of extirpation and colonization affect the levels and distribution of genetic diversity in vent metapopulations. Several species exhibit evidence for stepping-stone dispersal along relatively linear, oceanic, ridge axes. Other species exhibit very high rates of gene flow, although natural barriers associated with variation in depth, deep-ocean currents, and lateral offsets of ridge axes often subdivide populations. Various degrees of impedance to dispersal across such boundaries are products of species-specific life histories and behaviours. Though unrelated to the size of a species range, levels of genetic diversity appear to correspond with the number of active vent localities that a species occupies within its range. Pioneer species that rapidly colonize nascent vents tend to be less subdivided and more diverse genetically than species that are slow to establish colonies at vents. Understanding the diversity and connectivity of vent metapopulations provides essential information for designing deep-sea preserves in regions that are under consideration for submarine mining of precious metals.

  10. A non-intrusive fluid-wave actuator and sensor pair for the active control of fluid-borne vibrations in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, M. J.; Elliott, S. J.; Pinnington, R. J.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes the design of a non-intrusive fluid-wave actuator and sensor pair for use in an active control system to control fluid-borne vibrations in pipework systems. Piping systems can be excited by sources such as pumps and compressors and vibrational energy can propagate both in the pipe wall and the fluid. The transducers developed in this paper are designed only for the control of the fluid-borne vibrational energy. A theoretical framework is developed that integrates the transducers into the pipe and couples them to the motion of the fluid inside the pipe. A hydraulic actuator driven with a magnetostrictive element and fitted to a water-filled perspex pipe has been designed and tested. The sensor was made from piezoelectric elements fitted around the outer circumference of the pipe. Experimental results show that the actuator is capable of suppressing a propagating fluid-wave, but in doing so it increases the vibration of the pipe-wall in the vicinity of the actuator. When the sensor is employed as an error sensor together with the actuator in the frequency range 10 - 1000 Hz, a reduction in the fluid-wave amplitude of around 20 dB is possible.

  11. Spatial and Temporal Changes in Fluid Chemistry and Microbial Community Diversity in Subseafloor Habitats at Axial Seamount Following the 1998 Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opatkiewicz, A. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Baross, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    The subseafloor associated with hydrothermal vents has the potential to contribute significantly to primary production and biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. However, too little is known about the phylogenetic and physiological diversity of the microbial communities or their in situ activity to assess this potential. There are previous reports that subseafloor environments at active vent sites harbor a high diversity of microorganisms that include different thermal and metabolic groups of Bacteria and Archaea. However, little is known about how these communities change over time (minutes to years), at different vent sites, or in response to perturbations. In an effort to address these issues, the subseafloor microbial community diversity was examined from five diffuse-flow hydrothermal vent sites (distributed geographically over the seamount between three distinguishable vent fields) over the course of six years following the 1998 eruption at Axial Seamount (45° 58'N; 130° 00' W). PCR-based Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses were used to follow changes in the microbial community structure. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was used to identify the specific groups of Bacteria and Archaea from the TRFLP analyses. Deep-sea background seawater microorganisms were detected in hydrothermal fluid samples (Bacteria: Alpha and Gamma Proteobacteria, Archaea: Marine Group I Crenarchaeota and Marine Group II Euryarchaeota). The unique subseafloor phylotypes detected included Epsilon, Delta and Beta Proteobacteria, Methanococcales and thermophilic Euryarchaeota. Temperature and key chemical species, which indicate the degree of mixing of hydrothermal fluid with seawater in the subsurface, have been shown previously to be important in affecting the diversity of the microbial communities (Huber et al., 2003). This work substantiates these earlier findings and furthermore presents evidence that additional chemical species, distinguishing the

  12. Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria Found at Slow-Spreading Ridge: a Case Study of Capelinhos Hydrothermal Vent (Lucky Strike, MAR 37°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, P. A.; Rommevaux, C.; Lesongeur, F.; Emerson, D.; Leleu, T.; Chavagnac, V.

    2015-12-01

    Iron-oxidizing bacteria becomes increasingly described in different geological settings from volcanically active seamounts, coastal waters, to diffuse hydrothermal vents near seafloor spreading centers [Emerson et al., 2010]. They have been mostly identified and described in Pacific Ocean, and have been only recently found in hydrothermal systems associated to slow spreading center of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) [Scott et al., 2015]. During the MoMARSAT'13 cruise at Lucky Strike hydrothermal field (MAR), a new hydrothermal site was discovered at about 1.5 km eastward from the lava lake and from the main hydrothermal vents. This active venting site, named Capelinhos, is therefore the most distant from the volcano, features many chimneys, both focused and diffuses. The hydrothermal end-member fluids from Capelinhos are different from those of the other sites of Lucky Strike, showing the highest content of iron (Fe/Mn≈3.96) and the lowest chlorinity (270 mmol/l) [Leleu et al., 2015]. Most of the chimneys exhibit rust-color surfaces and bacterial mats near diffuse flows. During the MoMARSAT'15 cruise, an active chimney, a small inactive one, and rust-color bacterial mat near diffuse flow were sampled at Capelinhos. Observations by SEM of the hydrothermal samples revealed the presence of iron oxides in an assemblage of tubular "sheaths", assembled "stalks", helical "stalks" and amorphous aggregates. These features are similar to those described from the Loihi iron-mats deposits and argue for the occurrence of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Cultures under micro-aerobic and neutral pH conditions allowed us to isolate strains from the small inactive chimney. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of the isolates and environmental samples will soon be performed, which should confirm the presence of iron-oxidizing bacteria and reveal the organization of bacterial communities in this original and newly discovered hydrothermal site of the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Emerson

  13. Immunosuppressive activity of human amniotic fluid of normal and abnormal pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Shohat, B; Faktor, J M

    1988-01-01

    Twenty specimens of amniotic fluid (AF) obtained between week 16 and 18 of gestation from normal pregnant women and six specimens from pregnant women in which trisomia of chromosome 21 was found were tested for immunosuppressive activity. Incubation of normal human donor lymphocytes with 0.2-1 mL of AF from normal pregnant women for one hour at 37 degrees C was sufficient for induction of significant inhibition of the ability of these cells to induce a local xenogeneic graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) as well as inhibition of E and E-active rosette formation, the GVHR being the most sensitive test. On the other hand, amniotic fluid obtained from the six pregnant women in which trisomia of chromosome 21 was found showed no inhibitory activity in either the E or E-active rosette formation, nor in the local xenogeneic graft-versus-host reaction. AF from all the women tested was found to have no effect on phenotype expression of the lymphocytes, as tested by the monoclonal antibodies OKT4+ and OKT8+, nor on B-lymphocytes, as tested by surface immunoglobulins. No correlation was found between the alpha-fetoprotein levels in the sera of those women and the immunosuppressive activity. These findings indicate that genetic defects of the conceptus are not limited to the embryo but may affect the composition of immunosuppressive components present in normal amniotic fluid.

  14. Active 3-D microscaffold system with fluid perfusion for culturing in vitro neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Laura; Almasri, Mahmoud; Lee, Kil; Fogleman, Nick; Brewer, Gregory J; Nam, Yoonkey; Wheeler, Bruce C; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Frazier, A Bruno

    2007-04-01

    This work demonstrated the design, fabrication, packaging, and characterization of an active microscaffold system with fluid perfusion/nutrient delivery functionalities for culturing in vitro neuronal networks from dissociated hippocampal rat pup neurons. The active microscaffold consisted of an 8 x 8 array of hollow, microfabricated, SU-8 towers (1.0 mm or 1.5 mm in height), with integrated, horizontal, SU-8 cross-members that connect adjacent towers, thus forming a 3-D grid that is conducive to branching, growth, and increased network formation of dissociated hippocampal neurons. Each microtower in the microscaffold system contained a hollow channel and multiple fluid ports for media delivery and perfusion of nutrients to the in vitro neuronal network growing within the microscaffold system. Additionally, there were two exposed Au electrodes on the outer wall of each microtower at varying heights (with insulated leads running within the microtower walls), which will later allow for integration of electrical stimulation/recording functionalities into the active microscaffold system. However, characterization of the stimulation/recording electrodes was not included in the scope of this paper. Design, fabrication, fluid packaging, and characterization of the active microscaffold system were performed. Furthermore, use of the active microscaffold system was demonstrated by culturing primary hippocampal embryonic rat pup neurons, and characterizing cell viability within the microscaffold system.

  15. Design and integrated operation of an innovative thermodynamic vent system concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazah, Michel M.; Lak, Tibor; Nguyen, Han; Wood, Charles C.

    1993-01-01

    A unique zero-g thermodynamic vent system (TVS) is being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Rockwell International to meet cryogenic propellant management requirements for future space missions. The design is highly innovative in that it integrates the functions of a spray-bar tank mixer and a TVS. This concept not only satisfies the requirement for efficient tank mixing and zero-g venting but also accommodates thermal conditioning requirements for other components (e.g., engine feed lines, turbopumps, and liquid acquisition devices). In addition, operations can be extended to accomplish tank chill-down, no-vent fill, and emergency venting during zero-g propellant transfer. This paper describes the system performance characterization and future test activities that are part of MSFC's Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) program. The testing will demonstrate the feasibility and merit of the design, and serve as a proof-of-concept development activity.

  16. Synovial fluid matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activities in dogs suffering from joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kohei; Maeda, Shingo; Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Matsuki, Naoaki

    2016-07-01

    The activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in synovial fluids (SF) sampled from dogs with joint disorders was investigated by gelatin zymography and densitometry. Pro-MMP-2 showed similar activity levels in dogs with idiopathic polyarthritis (IPA; n=17) or canine rheumatoid arthritis (cRA; n=4), and healthy controls (n=10). However, dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR; n=5) presented significantly higher pro-MMP-2 activity than IPA and healthy dogs. Meanwhile, dogs with IPA exhibited significantly higher activity of pro- and active MMP-9 than other groups. Activity levels in pro- and active MMP-9 in cRA and CCLR dogs were not significantly different from those in healthy controls. Different patterns of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity may reflect the differences in the underlying pathological processes.

  17. Rapid growth of mineral deposits at artificial seafloor hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Shimada, Kazuhiko; Nagase, Toshiro; Takaya, Yutaro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Watsuji, Tomoo; Shibuya, Takazo; Yamada, Ryoichi; Saruhashi, Tomokazu; Kyo, Masanori; Takai, Ken

    2016-02-25

    Seafloor massive sulphide deposits are potential resources for base and precious metals (Cu-Pb-Zn ± Ag ± Au), but difficulties in estimating precise reserves and assessing environmental impacts hinder exploration and commercial mining. Here, we report petrological and geochemical properties of sulphide chimneys less than 2 years old that formed where scientific boreholes vented hydrothermal fluids in the Iheya-North field, Okinawa Trough, in East China Sea. One of these infant chimneys, dominated by Cu-Pb-Zn-rich sulphide minerals, grew a height of 15 m within 25 months. Portions of infant chimneys are dominated by sulphate minerals. Some infant chimneys are sulphide-rich similar to high-grade Cu-Pb-Zn bodies on land, albeit with relatively low As and Sb concentrations. The high growth rate reaching the 15 m height within 25 months is attributed to the large hydrothermal vent more than 50 cm in diameter created by the borehole, which induced slow mixing with the ambient seawater and enhanced efficiency of sulphide deposition. These observations suggest the possibility of cultivating seafloor sulphide deposits and even controlling their growth and grades through manipulations of how to mix and quench hydrothermal fluids with the ambient seawater.

  18. Rapid growth of mineral deposits at artificial seafloor hydrothermal vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Shimada, Kazuhiko; Nagase, Toshiro; Takaya, Yutaro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Watsuji, Tomoo; Shibuya, Takazo; Yamada, Ryoichi; Saruhashi, Tomokazu; Kyo, Masanori; Takai, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Seafloor massive sulphide deposits are potential resources for base and precious metals (Cu-Pb-Zn ± Ag ± Au), but difficulties in estimating precise reserves and assessing environmental impacts hinder exploration and commercial mining. Here, we report petrological and geochemical properties of sulphide chimneys less than 2 years old that formed where scientific boreholes vented hydrothermal fluids in the Iheya-North field, Okinawa Trough, in East China Sea. One of these infant chimneys, dominated by Cu-Pb-Zn-rich sulphide minerals, grew a height of 15 m within 25 months. Portions of infant chimneys are dominated by sulphate minerals. Some infant chimneys are sulphide-rich similar to high-grade Cu-Pb-Zn bodies on land, albeit with relatively low As and Sb concentrations. The high growth rate reaching the 15 m height within 25 months is attributed to the large hydrothermal vent more than 50 cm in diameter created by the borehole, which induced slow mixing with the ambient seawater and enhanced efficiency of sulphide deposition. These observations suggest the possibility of cultivating seafloor sulphide deposits and even controlling their growth and grades through manipulations of how to mix and quench hydrothermal fluids with the ambient seawater.

  19. Rapid growth of mineral deposits at artificial seafloor hydrothermal vents

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Shimada, Kazuhiko; Nagase, Toshiro; Takaya, Yutaro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Watsuji, Tomoo; Shibuya, Takazo; Yamada, Ryoichi; Saruhashi, Tomokazu; Kyo, Masanori; Takai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Seafloor massive sulphide deposits are potential resources for base and precious metals (Cu-Pb-Zn ± Ag ± Au), but difficulties in estimating precise reserves and assessing environmental impacts hinder exploration and commercial mining. Here, we report petrological and geochemical properties of sulphide chimneys less than 2 years old that formed where scientific boreholes vented hydrothermal fluids in the Iheya-North field, Okinawa Trough, in East China Sea. One of these infant chimneys, dominated by Cu-Pb-Zn-rich sulphide minerals, grew a height of 15 m within 25 months. Portions of infant chimneys are dominated by sulphate minerals. Some infant chimneys are sulphide-rich similar to high-grade Cu-Pb-Zn bodies on land, albeit with relatively low As and Sb concentrations. The high growth rate reaching the 15 m height within 25 months is attributed to the large hydrothermal vent more than 50 cm in diameter created by the borehole, which induced slow mixing with the ambient seawater and enhanced efficiency of sulphide deposition. These observations suggest the possibility of cultivating seafloor sulphide deposits and even controlling their growth and grades through manipulations of how to mix and quench hydrothermal fluids with the ambient seawater. PMID:26911272

  20. Venting of Pressure through Perforated Plates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    2623, May 1976. (AD #BO11616L) 4. W.A. Keenan and J.A. Tamareto, "Blaat Envirowaent from Fully and Partially Vented Exploaions in Cubicles". Civil...the scatter of experimental results obtained from vented structures and high explosives. In Reference 4, Keenan and Tamareto developed an equation to...May 1976. (AD #BO11616L) 4. W.A. Keenan and J.A. Tamareto, "Blast Environment from l’ullyand Partially Vented Explosions in Cubicles". Civil

  1. Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Campana, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

  2. Hydrothermal mineralogy and fluid inclusions chemistry to understand the roots of active geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambefort, I. S.; Dilles, J. H.; Heinrich, C.

    2013-12-01

    An integrated study to link magmatic textures, magmatic mineral compositions, hydrothermal alteration zoning, hydrothermal mineral chemistry, and fluid inclusion compositions has been undertaken to link an intrusive complex and its degassing alteration halo with their surface equivalent in an active geothermal system. Ngatamariki geothermal system, New Zealand, presents a unique feature in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ). Drilling intercepted an intrusive complex with a high temperature alteration halo similarly to what is observed in magmatic-derived ore deposits. Thus it presents the perfect opportunity to study the magmatic-hydrothermal transition of the TVZ by characterizing the nature of the deep magmatic fluids link to the heat source of the world known geothermal fields. The record of magmatic-hydrothermal fluid-rock interactions preserved at Ngatamariki may be analogous of processes presently occurring at depth beneath TVZ geothermal systems. The intrusive complex consists of over 5 km3 of tonalite, diorite, basalt and aplitic dykes. Evidence of undercooling subsolidus magmatic textures such as myrmekite and skeletal overgrowth are commonly observed and often linked to volatile loss. The fluids released during the crystallization of the intrusive complex are interpreted to be at the origin of the surrounding high temperature alteration halo. Advanced argillic to potassic alteration and high temperature acidic assemblage is associated with high-temperature quartz veining at depth and vuggy silica at the paleo-surface. Major element compositions of the white micas associated with the high temperature halo show a transition from, muscovite to phengite, muscovitic illite away from the intrusion, with a transition to pyrophyllite and/ or topaz, and andalusite characteristic of more acidic conditions. Abundant high-density (up to 59 wt% NaCl eq and homogenization temperatures of 550 degree Celsius and above) coexist with low-density vapor fluid inclusions. This

  3. On the global distribution of hydrothermal vent fields: One decade later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, S. E.; Baker, E. T.; German, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Since the last global compilation one decade ago, the known number of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields has almost doubled. At the end of 2009, a total of 518 active vent fields was catalogued, with about half (245) visually confirmed and others (273) inferred active at the seafloor. About half (52%) of these vent fields are at mid-ocean ridges (MORs), 25% at volcanic arcs, 21% at back-arc spreading centers (BASCs), and 2% at intra-plate volcanoes and other settings. One third are in high seas, and the nations with the most known active vent fields within EEZs are Tonga, USA, Japan, and New Zealand. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. Here, we have comprehensively documented the percentage of strike length at MORs and BASCs that has been systematically explored for hydrothermal activity. As of the end of 2009, almost 30% of the ~60,000 km of MORs had been surveyed at least with spaced vertical profiles to detect hydrothermal plumes. A majority of the vents discovered at MORs in the past decade occurred at segments with < 60 mm/yr full spreading rate. Discoveries at ultra-slow MORs in the past decade included the deepest known vent (Beebe at Mid-Cayman Rise) and high-temperature black smoker vents (e.g., Dragon at SWIR and Loki's Castle at Mohns Ridge), and the highest temperature vent was measured at the slow-spreading S MAR (Turtle Pits). Using a previously published equation for the linear relationship between the number of active vent fields per 100 km strike length (F_s) vs. weighted-average full spreading rate (u_s), we predicted 676 vent fields remaining to be discovered at MORs. Even accounting for the lower F_s at slower spreading rates, almost half of the vents that are predicted remaining to be discovered at MORs are at ultra-slow to slow spreading rates (< 40 mm/yr) and about 1/3 at intermediate rates (40-80 mm

  4. Geochemistry of hydrothermal fluids from the PACMANUS, Northeast Pual and Vienna Woods hydrothermal fields, Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, Eoghan P.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Saccocia, Peter; Bach, Wolfgang; Craddock, Paul R.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Sylva, Sean P.; Walsh, Emily; Pichler, Thomas; Rosner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Processes controlling the composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in silicic back-arc or near-arc crustal settings remain poorly constrained despite growing evidence for extensive magmatic-hydrothermal activity in such environments. We conducted a survey of vent fluid compositions from two contrasting sites in the Manus back-arc basin, Papua New Guinea, to examine the influence of variations in host rock composition and magmatic inputs (both a function of arc proximity) on hydrothermal fluid chemistry. Fluid samples were collected from felsic-hosted hydrothermal vent fields located on Pual Ridge (PACMANUS and Northeast (NE) Pual) near the active New Britain Arc and a basalt-hosted vent field (Vienna Woods) located farther from the arc on the Manus Spreading Center. Vienna Woods fluids were characterized by relatively uniform endmember temperatures (273-285 degrees C) and major element compositions, low dissolved CO2 concentrations (4.4 mmol/kg) and high measured pH (4.2-4.9 at 25 degrees C). Temperatures and compositions were highly variable at PACMANUS/NE Pual and a large, newly discovered vent area (Fenway) was observed to be vigorously venting boiling (358 degrees C) fluid. All PACMANUS fluids are characterized by negative delta DH2O values, in contrast to positive values at Vienna Woods, suggesting substantial magmatic water input to circulating fluids at Pual Ridge. Low measured pH (25 degrees C) values (~2.6-2.7), high endmember CO2 (up to 274 mmol/kg) and negative delta 34SH2S values (down to -2.7 permille) in some vent fluids are also consistent with degassing of acid-volatile species from evolved magma. Dissolved CO2 at PACMANUS is more enriched in 13C (-4.1 permille to -2.3 permille) than Vienna Woods (-5.2 permille to -5.7 permille), suggesting a contribution of slab-derived carbon. The mobile elements (e.g. Li, K, Rb, Cs and B) are also greatly enriched in PACMANUS fluids reflecting increased abundances in the crust there relative to the Manus

  5. Nepenthesin protease activity indicates digestive fluid dynamics in carnivorous nepenthes plants.

    PubMed

    Buch, Franziska; Kaman, Wendy E; Bikker, Floris J; Yilamujiang, Ayufu; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep). Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer)-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster) prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory.

  6. Nepenthesin Protease Activity Indicates Digestive Fluid Dynamics in Carnivorous Nepenthes Plants

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Franziska; Kaman, Wendy E.; Bikker, Floris J.; Yilamujiang, Ayufu; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep). Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer)-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster) prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory. PMID:25750992

  7. Inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment drives primary human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Füchtmeier, Bernd; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank; Hoff, Paula

    2012-06-01

    The role of human chondrocytes in the pathogenesis of cartilage degradation in rheumatic joint diseases has presently gained increasing interest. An active chondrocyte participation in local inflammation may play a role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory joint diseases and in a disruption of cartilage repair mechanisms resulting in cartilage degradation. In the present study, we hypothesized that inflammatory synovial fluid triggers human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory processes in rheumatic joint diseases. Primary human chondrocytes were incubated in synovial fluids gained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis arthritis and reactive arthritis. The detection of vital cell numbers was determined by using Casy Cell Counter System. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin-V and 7AAD staining. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined by a multiplex suspension array. Detection of vital cells showed a highly significant decrease in chondrocyte numbers. Flow cytometry demonstrated a significant increase in apoptotic chondrocytes after the incubation. An active secretion of cytokines such as MCP-1 and MIF by chondrocytes was observed. The inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment mediates apoptosis and cell death of chondrocytes. Moreover, in terms of cytokine secretion, it also induces an active participation of chondrocytes in ongoing inflammation.

  8. 30 CFR 77.304 - Explosion release vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosion release vents. 77.304 Section 77.304... Dryers § 77.304 Explosion release vents. Drying chambers, dry-dust collectors, ductwork connecting dryers... explosion release vents which open directly to the outside atmosphere, and all such vents shall be:...

  9. 46 CFR 153.355 - PV venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false PV venting systems. 153.355 Section 153.355 Shipping... Systems § 153.355 PV venting systems. When Table 1 requires a PV venting system, the cargo tank must have a PV valve in its vent line. The PV valve must be located between the tank and any connection...

  10. 46 CFR 153.355 - PV venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PV venting systems. 153.355 Section 153.355 Shipping... Systems § 153.355 PV venting systems. When Table 1 requires a PV venting system, the cargo tank must have a PV valve in its vent line. The PV valve must be located between the tank and any connection...

  11. 46 CFR 153.358 - Venting system flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Venting Systems § 153.358 Venting system flow capacity. (a) The cross-sectional flow area of any vent system segment, including any PV or SR valve, must at no point be less than that of a pipe whose inside... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Venting system flow capacity. 153.358 Section...

  12. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Venting, ventilation and combustion... Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required by... appliance listing and the appliance manufacturer's instructions. (b) Venting and combustion air...

  13. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venting, ventilation and combustion... Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required by... appliance listing and the appliance manufacturer's instructions. (b) Venting and combustion air...

  14. Serum and blister fluid pharmacokinetics and bactericidal activities of ampicillin-sulbactam, cefotetan, cefoxitin, ceftizoxime, and ticarcillin-clavulanate.

    PubMed

    Jaresko, G S; Barriere, S L; Johnson, B L

    1992-10-01

    Ampicillin-sulbactam, ticarcillin-clavulanate, cefoxitin, cefotetan, and ceftizoxime are promoted for the treatment of mixed aerobic-anaerobic bacterial infections. Their activities have been compared in vitro but not in vivo. In order to assess the in vivo activities of these agents in serum and interstitial fluid, we administered single, intravenous doses of these antimicrobial agents to healthy subjects. Concentrations of the antimicrobial agents in serum and suction-induced blister fluid and bactericidal activity were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography and the standard methodology of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, respectively. The organisms used for bactericidal activity tests were one isolate each of Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Bacteroides fragilis. Pharmacokinetic parameters in serum and blister fluid were similar to those derived in other investigations. Of note were the high and prolonged concentrations of ticarcillin and cefotetan in blister fluid, despite high-level serum protein binding. The bactericidal activities in serum and blister fluid reflected the relative in vitro activities and kinetic dispositions of the various antimicrobial agents except for the bactericidal activity of cefotetan, which was substantially lower in blister fluid than serum, despite a blister fluid:serum area under the concentration-time curve ratio of 1.5. Similarly, the activity of ticarcillin-clavulanate in blister fluid was also substantially less than would have been predicted by the blister fluid:serum ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve of 1.1, possibly because of the low concentrations of clavulanate in blister fluid. The rankings of the in vivo bactericidal activities of the five drugs were as follows: for S. aureus, ampicillin-sulbactam > ticarcillin-clavulanate > ceftizoxime > cefoxitin > cefotetan; for K. pneumoniae, ceftizoxime > cefotetan > ampicillin-sulbactam = ticarcillin

  15. Effect of a fluid layer on the sound radiation of a plate and its active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Pan, Jie; Yang, Tiejun

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a baffled plate facing a layer of fluid is used to investigate the effects of the radiating environment on the plate's sound radiation and its active control. By varying the thickness of the fluid layer, different radiation environments are presented to the plate, resulting in a variation in the efficiencies and shapes of the radiation modes of the plate. As the design of feed-forward control of the radiated sound power and of feedback control of the vibration velocity or volume velocity is limited by the properties of the secondary control path (an open-loop frequency response function), the performance of the control system may be deteriorated if a controller optimally designed for one radiation environment is used for a different environment. The effects of radiation environment on the properties of the secondary control path and performance of active control are investigated.

  16. Biocatalytic synthesis of acrylates in supercritical fluids: tuning enzyme activity by changing pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, S V; Iwaskewycz, B; Beckman, E J; Russell, A J

    1993-01-01

    Supercritical fluids are a unique class of nonaqueous media in which biocatalytic reactions can occur. The physical properties of supercritical fluids, which include gas-like diffusivities and liquid-like densities, can be predictably controlled with changing pressure. This paper describes how adjustment of pressure, with the subsequent predictable changes of the dielectric constant and Hildebrand solubility parameter for fluoroform, ethane, sulfur hexafluoride, and propane, can be used to manipulate the activity of lipase in the transesterification of methylmethacrylate with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. Of particular interest is that the dielectric constant of supercritical fluoroform can be tuned from approximately 1 to 8, merely by increasing pressure from 850 to 4000 psi (from 5.9 to 28 MPa). The possibility now exists to predictably alter both the selectivity and the activity of a biocatalyst merely by changing pressure. Images Fig. 6 PMID:8464910

  17. External Tank GH2 Vent Arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, G. E.; Glassburn, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Because the venting of free hydrogen gas to the atmosphere presents an extremely hazardous situation, it was necessary to devise a means for safe, controlled venting of the shuttle external tank gaseous hydrogen during and after liquid hydrogen tank loading. Several design concepts that were considered initially were discarded as unfeasible because of vehicle weight restrictions, high cost, and because the proposed structure was itself deemed a hazard due to the vehicle's nonvertical launch trajectory. These design concepts are discussed. A design employing a support structure/access arm attached to the fixed service structure was finally selected. The various design problems resolved included vent arm disconnect/drop interference, minimizing refurbishment due to launch damage, disconnect reliability, vehicle movement tracking, minimizing vent line pressure drop, and the presence of other vehicle services at the same centralized supply area. Six launches have proven the system to be reliable, efficient, and of nearly zero refurbishment cost.

  18. Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents in the Gulf of California: Natural Laboratories for Multidisciplinary Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, M.; Hilton, D. R.; Price, R. E.; Kulongoski, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Modern and fossil examples of shallow water submarine hydrothermal vents occur throughout the Gulf of California. These sites offer important information about the processes involved in the extensional tectonics that created the Gulf of California and continue to shape the region to this day. Due to their accessibility, shallow water marine hydrothermal vents are far easier to access and study than their deeper analogs, and these settings can provide natural laboratories to study biogeochemical processes. Certain biogeochemical and biomineralizing processes occurring at shallow vents are very similar to those observed around deep-sea hydrothermal vents. In some cases, authigenic carbonates form around shallow vents. However, the hydrothermal precipitates are generally composed of Fe-oxyhydroxides, Mn-oxides, opal, calcite, pyrite and cinnabar, and their textural and morphological characteristics suggest microbial mediation for mineral deposition. Modern shallow-water hydrothermal vents also support complex biotic communities, characterized by the coexistence of chemosynthetic and photosynthetic organisms. These shallow vents are highly productive and provide valuable resources to local fishermen. Extant shallow water hydrothermal activity has been studied in Bahía Concepción, San Felipe, Punta Estrella, El Coloradito, Puertecitos, and around the Islas Encantadas. Discrete streams of gas bubbles are often discharged along with hot liquids at shallow water vents. The vent liquids generally exhibit lower salinities than seawater, and their isotopic compositions indicate that they contain meteoric water mixed with seawater. The composition of the shallow vent gas is primarily made up of CO2, but may also be enriched in N2, H2S, CH4, and other higher hydrocarbons. The geochemistry of these gases can be informative in determining the sources and processes involved in their generation. In particular, 3He/4He ratios may provide valuable information about the origin of

  19. The effect of sitting and calf activity on leg fluid and snoring.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhajan; Yadollahi, Azadeh; Lyons, Owen; Alshaer, Hisham; Bradley, T Douglas

    2017-02-16

    Prolonged sitting may promote leg fluid retention that redistributes to the neck during sleep and contributes to snoring. This could be attenuated by calf activity while sitting. In 16 healthy non-obese subjects we measured leg fluid volume (LFV) below the knees using bioelectrical impedance while sitting for 4h, snoring using a portable BresoDx™ device, and Mallampati grade. Using a double cross-over study design, subjects were randomized to one of two arms and crossed-over one week later: control arm - no calf exercise while sitting; intervention arm - calf contraction against a pedal resistance while sitting. The effects of sitting±calf activity on LFV and snoring were compared. We found that LFV increased by 216±101.0ml (p<0.0001) after sitting. Calf activity while sitting attenuated LFV by 53.8ml (p<0.0001) and, in all five subjects with severe upper airway narrowing (Mallampati grade IV), reduced snoring duration (from 357±132.9 to 116.2±72.1s/h, p=0.02) suggesting reduced overnight rostral fluid shift to the neck.

  20. Technical note: In vitro total gas and methane production measurements from closed or vented rumen batch culture systems.

    PubMed

    Cattani, M; Tagliapietra, F; Maccarana, L; Hansen, H H; Bailoni, L; Schiavon, S

    2014-03-01

    This study compared measured gas production (GP) and computed CH4 production values provided by closed or vented bottles connected to gas collection bags. Two forages and 3 concentrates were incubated. Two incubations were conducted, where the 5 feeds were tested in 3 replicates in closed or vented bottles, plus 4 blanks, for a total of 64 bottles. Half of the bottles were not vented, and the others were vented at a fixed pressure (6.8 kPa) and gas was collected into one gas collection bag connected to each bottle. Each bottle (317 mL) was filled with 0.4000 ± 0.0010 g of feed sample and 60 mL of buffered rumen fluid (headspace volume = 257 mL) and incubated at 39.0°C for 24 h. At 24 h, gas samples were collected from the headspace of closed bottles or from headspace and bags of vented bottles and analyzed for CH4 concentration. Volumes of GP at 24 h were corrected for the gas dissolved in the fermentation fluid, according to Henry's law of gas solubility. Methane concentration (mL/100mL of GP) was measured and CH4 production (mL/g of incubated DM) was computed using corrected or uncorrected GP values. Data were analyzed for the effect of venting technique (T), feed (F), interaction between venting technique and feed (T × F), and incubation run as a random factor. Closed bottles provided lower uncorrected GP (-18%) compared with vented bottles, especially for concentrates. Correction for dissolved gas reduced but did not remove differences between techniques, and closed bottles (+25 mL of gas/g of incubated DM) had a greater magnitude of variation than did vented bottles (+1 mL of gas/g of incubated DM). Feeds differed in uncorrected and corrected GP, but the ranking was the same for the 2 techniques. The T × F interaction influenced uncorrected GP values, but this effect disappeared after correction. Closed bottles provided uncorrected CH4 concentrations 23% greater than that of vented bottles. Correction reduced but did not remove this difference. Methane

  1. NATURAL CO2 FLOW FROM THE LOIHI VENT: IMPACT ON MICROBIAL PRODUCTION AND FATE OF THE CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Richard B. Coffin; Thomas J. Boyd; David L. Knies; Kenneth S. Grabowski; John W. Pohlman; Clark S. Mitchell

    2004-02-27

    The program for International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration was initiated December 1997. Preliminary steps involved surveying a suite of biogeochemical parameters off the coast of Kona on the Big Island of Hawaii. The preliminary survey was conducted twice, in 1999 and 2000, to obtain a thorough data set including measurements of pH, current profiles, CO{sub 2} concentrations, microbial activities, and water and sediment chemistries. These data were collected in order to interpret a planned CO{sub 2} injection experiment. After these preliminary surveys were completed, local environment regulation forced moving the project to the coast north east of Bergen, Norway. The preliminary survey along the Norwegian Coast was conducted during 2002. However, Norwegian government revoked a permit, approved by the Norwegian State Pollution Control Authority, for policy reasons regarding the CO{sub 2} injection experiment. As a result the research team decided to monitor the natural CO{sub 2} flow off the southern coast of the Big Island. From December 3rd-13th 2002 scientists from four countries representing the Technical Committee of the International Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Experiment examined the hydrothermal venting at Loihi Seamount (Hawaiian Islands, USA). Work focused on tracing the venting gases, the impacts of the vent fluids on marine organisms, and CO{sub 2} influence on biogeochemical cycles. The cruise on the R/V Ka'imikai-O-Kanaloa (KOK) included 8 dives by the PISCES V submarine, 6 at Loihi and 2 at a nearby site in the lee of the Big Island. Data for this final report is from the last 2 dives on Loihi.

  2. Inorganic carbon acquisition by the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Riftia pachyptila depends upon high external PCO2 and upon proton-equivalent ion transport by the worm

    PubMed

    Goffredi; Childress; Desaulniers; Lee; Lallier; Hammond

    1997-01-01

    Riftia pachyptila is the most conspicuous organism living at deep sea hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise. To support its large size and high growth rates, this invertebrate relies exclusively upon internal chemosynthetic bacterial symbionts. The animal must supply inorganic carbon at high rates to the bacteria, which are far removed from the external medium. We found substantial differences in body fluid total inorganic carbon (CO2) both within and between vent sites when comparing freshly captured worms from a variety of places. However, the primary influence on body fluid CO2 was the chemical characteristics of the site from which the worms were collected. Studies on tubeworms, both freshly captured and maintained in captivity, demonstrate that the acquisition of inorganic carbon is apparently limited by the availability of CO2, as opposed to bicarbonate, and thus appears to be accomplished via diffusion of CO2 into the plume, rather than by mediated transport of bicarbonate. The greatly elevated PCO2 measured at the vent sites (up to 12.6 kPa around the tubeworms), which is a result of low environmental pH (as low as 5.6 around the tubeworms), and elevated CO2 (as high as 7.1 mmol l-1 around the tubes) speeds this diffusion. Moreover, despite large and variable amounts of internal CO2, these worms maintain their extracellular fluid pH stable, and alkaline, in comparison with the environment. The maintenance of this alkaline pH acts to concentrate inorganic carbon into extracellular fluids. Exposure to N-ethylmaleimide, a non-specific H+-ATPase inhibitor, appeared to stop this process, resulting in a decline in extracellular pH and CO2. We hypothesize that the worms maintain their extracellular pH by active proton-equivalent ion transport via high concentrations of H+-ATPases. Thus, Riftia pachyptila is able to support its symbionts' large demand for inorganic carbon owing to the elevated PCO2 in the vent environment and because of its ability to

  3. Thermal Constraints on Upper Basement Permeability Near a Venting Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutnak, M.; Fisher, A. T.; Zuehlsdorff, L.; Spiess, V.

    2003-12-01

    We used transient numerical simulations of coupled heat and fluid transport to quantify relations between fluid fluxes, basement permeability, and the vigor of local convection on seafloor heat flow patterns adjacent to a basement outcrop through which warm hydrothermal fluids are discharged. These finite-element models are designed to replicate conditions near the Baby Bare outcrop on 3.5-Ma seafloor on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, where 5-20 L/s of warm fluid seeps from the seafloor. Several transects of heat flow observations co-located along seismic reflection profiles around this feature provide observational constraints for the models. Heat flow is not greatly influenced by venting at the outcrop at distances of several kilometers from the point of sediment onlap, but values rise abruptly immediately adjacent to the outcrop. The model domain consisted of a 21 km x 5 km radial grid, with 8 sedimentary and 6 basalt units, and a characteristic node spacing of 20-500 meters. Conductive simulations include a small rise in heat flow near the outcrop as a result of conductive refraction, but the magnitude of the rise is much smaller than observed. Additional simulations were run using elevated basement thermal conductivity as a proxy for local convection, to evaluate the vigor of local convection required to generate large increases in heat flow near the outcrop. Nusselt numbers (the ratio of heat transported within the edifice by conduction and advection to that which would be transported by conduction alone) of 100 < Nu < 1000 are required in order to homogenize temperatures along the sediment-basement interface and closely match the observed heat flow profile. Interestingly, it is not necessary to vent any fluid at the outcrop to generate this pattern; local convection is sufficient. Fully-coupled simulations were run with fluid forced from the seamount at 5-20 L/s. We find that local convection occurs within the seamount in cases with

  4. Des Vents et des Jets Astrophysiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauty, C.

    Plasma outflows from a central gravitating object are a widespread phenomenon in astrophysics. They include the solar and stellar winds, jets from Young Stellar Objects, jets from compact stellar objects and extra-galactic jets associated with Active Galactic Nuclei and quasars. Beyond this huge zoology, a common theoretical ground exists. The aim of this review is to present qualitatively the various theories of winds (Part 1) and how different astrophysical domains interplay. A more or less complete catalog of the ideas proposed for explaining the acceleration and the morphologies of winds and jets is intended. All this part avoids getting into any mathematical formalism. Some macroscopic properties of such outflows may be described by solving the time-independent and axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic equations. This formalism, underlying most of the theories, is presented in Part 2. It helps to introduce quantitatively the free integrals that such systems possess. Those integrals play an important role in the basic physics of acceleration and collimation, in particular the mass loss rate, the angular momentum loss rate and the energy of the magnetic rotator. Most of the difficulty in modelling flows lies in the necessity to cross critical points, characteristic of non linear equations. The physical nature and the location of such critical points is debated because they are the clue towards the resolution. We thus introduce the notions of topology and critical points (Parts 3 and 4) from the simplest hydrodynamic and spherically symmetric case to the most sophisticated, MHD and axisymmetric cases. Particular attention is given to self-similar models which allows to give some general and simple ideas on the problem due to their semi-analytical treatment. With the use of these notions, a more quantitative comparison of the various models is given (Parts 3 and 4), especially on the shape of the flows. It is thus shown that magnetic collimation of winds into jets is a

  5. Geomicrobiology of sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake: geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Inskeep, William P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Macur, Richard E.; Clingenpeel, Scott; Tenney, Aaron; Lovalvo, David; Beam, Jacob P.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Shanks, W. C.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Kan, Jinjun; Gorby, Yuri; Yooseph, Shibu; Nealson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) is a large high-altitude (2200 m), fresh-water lake, which straddles an extensive caldera and is the center of significant geothermal activity. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary study was to evaluate the microbial populations inhabiting thermal vent communities in Yellowstone Lake using 16S rRNA gene and random metagenome sequencing, and to determine how geochemical attributes of vent waters influence the distribution of specific microorganisms and their metabolic potential. Thermal vent waters and associated microbial biomass were sampled during two field seasons (2007–2008) using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Sublacustrine thermal vent waters (circa 50–90°C) contained elevated concentrations of numerous constituents associated with geothermal activity including dissolved hydrogen, sulfide, methane and carbon dioxide. Microorganisms associated with sulfur-rich filamentous “streamer” communities of Inflated Plain and West Thumb (pH range 5–6) were dominated by bacteria from the Aquificales, but also contained thermophilic archaea from the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Novel groups of methanogens and members of the Korarchaeota were observed in vents from West Thumb and Elliot's Crater (pH 5–6). Conversely, metagenome sequence from Mary Bay vent sediments did not yield large assemblies, and contained diverse thermophilic and nonthermophilic bacterial relatives. Analysis of functional genes associated with the major vent populations indicated a direct linkage to high concentrations of carbon dioxide, reduced sulfur (sulfide and/or elemental S), hydrogen and methane in the deep thermal ecosystems. Our observations show that sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake support novel thermophilic communities, which contain microorganisms with functional attributes not found to date in terrestrial geothermal systems of YNP. PMID:26579074

  6. Geomicrobiology of sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake: geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function.

    PubMed

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Macur, Richard E; Clingenpeel, Scott; Tenney, Aaron; Lovalvo, David; Beam, Jacob P; Kozubal, Mark A; Shanks, W C; Morgan, Lisa A; Kan, Jinjun; Gorby, Yuri; Yooseph, Shibu; Nealson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) is a large high-altitude (2200 m), fresh-water lake, which straddles an extensive caldera and is the center of significant geothermal activity. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary study was to evaluate the microbial populations inhabiting thermal vent communities in Yellowstone Lake using 16S rRNA gene and random metagenome sequencing, and to determine how geochemical attributes of vent waters influence the distribution of specific microorganisms and their metabolic potential. Thermal vent waters and associated microbial biomass were sampled during two field seasons (2007-2008) using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Sublacustrine thermal vent waters (circa 50-90°C) contained elevated concentrations of numerous constituents associated with geothermal activity including dissolved hydrogen, sulfide, methane and carbon dioxide. Microorganisms associated with sulfur-rich filamentous "streamer" communities of Inflated Plain and West Thumb (pH range 5-6) were dominated by bacteria from the Aquificales, but also contained thermophilic archaea from the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Novel groups of methanogens and members of the Korarchaeota were observed in vents from West Thumb and Elliot's Crater (pH 5-6). Conversely, metagenome sequence from Mary Bay vent sediments did not yield large assemblies, and contained diverse thermophilic and nonthermophilic bacterial relatives. Analysis of functional genes associated with the major vent populations indicated a direct linkage to high concentrations of carbon dioxide, reduced sulfur (sulfide and/or elemental S), hydrogen and methane in the deep thermal ecosystems. Our observations show that sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake support novel thermophilic communities, which contain microorganisms with functional attributes not found to date in terrestrial geothermal systems of YNP.

  7. Kinetic arrest, dynamical transitions, and activated relaxation in dense fluids of attractive nonspherical colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2011-06-01

    The coupled translation-rotation activated dynamics in dense suspensions of attractive homogeneous and Janus uniaxial dicolloids are studied using microscopic statistical mechanical theory. Multiple kinetic arrest transitions and reentrant phenomena are predicted that are associated with fluid, gel, repulsive glass, attractive glass, plastic glass, and novel glass-gel states. The activated relaxation rate is a nonuniversal nonmonotonic function of attraction strength at high volume fractions due to the consequences of a change of the transient localization mechanism from caging to physical bonding.

  8. Loki's Castle: Discovery and geology of a black smoker vent field at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, R.; Thorseth, I. H.; Lilley, M. D.; Barriga, F. J.; Früh-Green, G.; Nakamura, K.

    2010-12-01

    Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting at the ultraslow spreading and magma starved parts of the Arctic Mid Ocean Ridge (AMOR) have been unsuccessful. A black smoker vent field was eventually discovered at the Mohns-Knipovich bend at 73.5°N in 2008, and the field was revisited in 2009 and 2010. The Loki’s Castle vent field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge that is bordered by a tectonic terrain dominated by core complexes to the NW, and a ridge flank that is buried by sediments from the Bear Island Fan to the SE. Fluid compositions are anomalous to other basalt-hosted fields and indicate interactions with sediments at depths. The vent field is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting occurs at ultraslow spreading ridges despite the strongly reduced magmatic heat budget. ROV surveys have shown that venting occurs in two areas separated by around 100 m. Micro-bathymetry acquired by a Hugin AUV documents that two 20-30 tall mounds that coalesce at the base have developed around the vent sites. The micro-bathymetry also shows that the venting is located above two normal faults that define the NW margin of a rift that runs along the crest of the volcano. The black smoker fluids reach 317 °C, with an end-member SiO2 content of 16 mmol/kg. End-member chlorinity is around 85% of seawater suggesting that the fluids have phase-separated at depth. The fluid compositions indicate that the rock-water reactions occur around 2 km below the seafloor. The crustal thickness is estimated to be 4 +/- 0.5 km in the area. Whereas the depth of the reaction zone is comparable with faster spreading ridges, the fraction of crust cooled convectively by hydrothermal circulation is two times that of vent fields at ridges with normal crustal thickness.

  9. Effects of spatial variation of skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers on optical mapping of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuping; Shibahara, Nanae; Kuramashi, Daishi; Okawa, Shinpei; Kakuta, Naoto; Okada, Eiji; Maki, Atsushi; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the effects of anatomical variation in human heads on the optical mapping of brain activity, we perform simulations of optical mapping by solving the photon diffusion equation for layered-models simulating human heads using the finite element method (FEM). Particularly, the effects of the spatial variations in the thicknesses of the skull and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layers on mapping images are investigated. Mapping images of single active regions in the gray matter layer are affected by the spatial variations in the skull and CSF layer thicknesses, although the effects are smaller than those of the positions of the active region relative to the data points. The increase in the skull thickness decreases the sensitivity of the images to active regions, while the increase in the CSF layer thickness increases the sensitivity in general. The images of multiple active regions are also influenced by their positions relative to the data points and by their depths from the skin surface.

  10. Phylogenetic Diversity of Nitrogenase (nifH) Genes in Deep-Sea and Hydrothermal Vent Environments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Mausmi P.; Butterfield, David A.; Baross, John A.

    2003-01-01

    The subseafloor microbial habitat associated with typical unsedimented mid-ocean-ridge hydrothermal vent ecosystems may be limited by the availability of fixed nitrogen, inferred by the low ammonium and nitrate concentrations measured in diffuse hydrothermal fluid. Dissolved N2 gas, the largest reservoir of nitrogen in the ocean, is abundant in deep-sea and hydrothermal vent fluid. In order to test the hypothesis that biological nitrogen fixation plays an important role in nitrogen cycling in the subseafloor associated with unsedimented hydrothermal vents, degenerate PCR primers were designed to amplify the nitrogenase iron protein gene nifH from hydrothermal vent fluid. A total of 120 nifH sequences were obtained from four samples: a nitrogen-poor diffuse vent named marker 33 on Axial Volcano, sampled twice over a period of 1 year as its temperature decreased; a nitrogen-rich diffuse vent near Puffer on Endeavour Segment; and deep seawater with no detectable hydrothermal plume signal. Subseafloor nifH genes from marker 33 and Puffer are related to anaerobic clostridia and sulfate reducers. Other nifH genes unique to the vent samples include proteobacteria and divergent Archaea. All of the nifH genes from the deep-seawater sample are most closely related to the thermophilic, anaerobic archaeon Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus (77 to 83% amino acid similarity). These results provide the first genetic evidence of potential nitrogen fixers in hydrothermal vent environments and indicate that at least two sources contribute to the diverse assemblage of nifH genes detected in hydrothermal vent fluid: nifH genes from an anaerobic, hot subseafloor and nifH genes from cold, oxygenated deep seawater. PMID:12571018

  11. Submarine fissure eruptions and hydrothermal vents on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge: preliminary observations from the submersible Alvin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The submersible Alvin was used to investigate 3 active hydrothermal discharge sites along the S Juan de Fuca Ridge in September 1984. The hydrothermal zones occur within a 10-30m-deep, 30-50m-wide cleft marking the center of the axial valley. This cleft is the eruptive locus for the axial valley. The hydrothermal vents coincide with the main eruptive vents along the cleft. Each hydrothermal zone has multiple discharge sites extending as much as 500m along the cleft. Sulfide deposits occur as clusters (15-100m2 area) of small chimneys (= or <2m high) and as individual and clustered fields of large, branched chimneys (= or <10m high). Recovered sulfide samples are predominantly the tops of chimneys and spires and typically contain more than 80% sphalerite and wurtzite with minor pyrrhotite, pyrite, marcasite, isocubanite, chalcopyrite, anhydrite, anhydrite, and amorphous silica. The associated hydrothermal fluids have the highest chlorinity of any reported to date.-Authors

  12. Thermodynamic Vent System for an On-Orbit Cryogenic Reaction Control Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; Romig, Kris A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Flores, Sam

    2012-01-01

    A report discusses a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) that integrates a Joule-Thompson (JT) device (expansion valve) and thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with a cryogenic distribution system to allow fine control of the propellant quality (subcooled liquid) during operation of the device. It enables zero-venting when coupled with an RCS engine. The proper attachment locations and sizing of the orifice are required with the propellant distribution line to facilitate line conditioning. During operations, system instrumentation was strategically installed along the distribution/TVS line assembly, and temperature control bands were identified. A sub-scale run tank, full-scale distribution line, open-loop TVS, and a combination of procured and custom-fabricated cryogenic components were used in the cryogenic RCS build-up. Simulated on-orbit activation and thruster firing profiles were performed to quantify system heat gain and evaluate the TVS s capability to maintain the required propellant conditions at the inlet to the engine valves. Test data determined that a small control valve, such as a piezoelectric, is optimal to provide continuously the required thermal control. The data obtained from testing has also assisted with the development of fluid and thermal models of an RCS to refine integrated cryogenic propulsion system designs. This system allows a liquid oxygenbased main propulsion and reaction control system for a spacecraft, which improves performance, safety, and cost over conventional hypergolic systems due to higher performance, use of nontoxic propellants, potential for integration with life support and power subsystems, and compatibility with in-situ produced propellants.

  13. 14 CFR 29.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. 29.975 Section 29.975 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System §...

  14. 14 CFR 29.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. 29.975 Section 29.975 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System §...

  15. 14 CFR 25.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. 25.975 Section 25.975 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System §...

  16. 14 CFR 25.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. 25.975 Section 25.975 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System §...

  17. 14 CFR 29.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. 29.975 Section 29.975 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System §...

  18. 14 CFR 29.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. 29.975 Section 29.975 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System §...

  19. 14 CFR 25.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. 25.975 Section 25.975 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System §...

  20. 14 CFR 25.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. 25.975 Section 25.975 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System §...

  1. 14 CFR 23.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... will constitute a fire hazard or from which fumes may enter personnel compartments; and (7) Vents must... a separate vent line to lead vapors back to the top of one of the fuel tanks. If there is more than... line must lead back to the fuel tank to be used first, unless the relative capacities of the tanks...

  2. 14 CFR 25.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... may end at any point— (i) Where the discharge of fuel from the vent outlet would constitute a fire... carburetor with vapor elimination connections must have a vent line to lead vapors back to one of the fuel... return line must lead back to the fuel tank used for takeoff and landing....

  3. 14 CFR 29.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... end at any point— (i) Where the discharge of fuel from the vent outlet would constitute a fire hazard... with vapor elimination connections must have a vent line to lead vapors back to one of the fuel tanks... line must lead back to the fuel tank used for takeoff and landing....

  4. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  5. Constrained circulation at Endeavour ridge facilitates colonization by vent larvae.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Richard E; Mihály, Steven F; Rabinovich, Alexander B; McDuff, Russell E; Veirs, Scott R; Stahr, Frederick R

    2003-07-31

    Understanding how larvae from extant hydrothermal vent fields colonize neighbouring regions of the mid-ocean ridge system remains a major challenge in oceanic research. Among the factors considered important in the recruitment of deep-sea larvae are metabolic lifespan, the connectivity of the seafloor topography, and the characteristics of the currents. Here we use current velocity measurements from Endeavour ridge to examine the role of topographically constrained circulation on larval transport along-ridge. We show that the dominant tidal and wind-generated currents in the region are strongly attenuated within the rift valley that splits the ridge crest, and that hydrothermal plumes rising from vent fields in the valley drive a steady near-bottom inflow within the valley. Extrapolation of these findings suggests that the suppression of oscillatory currents within rift valleys of mid-ocean ridges shields larvae from cross-axis dispersal into the inhospitable deep ocean. This effect, augmented by plume-driven circulation within rift valleys having active hydrothermal venting, helps retain larvae near their source. Larvae are then exported preferentially down-ridge during regional flow events that intermittently over-ride the currents within the valley.

  6. Porphyry-copper ore shells form at stable pressure-temperature fronts within dynamic fluid plumes.

    PubMed

    Weis, P; Driesner, T; Heinrich, C A

    2012-12-21

    Porphyry-type ore deposits are major resources of copper and gold, precipitated from fluids expelled by crustal magma chambers. The metals are typically concentrated in confined ore shells within vertically extensive vein networks, formed through hydraulic fracturing of rock by ascending fluids. Numerical modeling shows that dynamic permeability responses to magmatic fluid expulsion can stabilize a front of metal precipitation at the boundary between lithostatically pressured up-flow of hot magmatic fluids and hydrostatically pressured convection of cooler meteoric fluids. The balance between focused heat advection and lateral cooling controls the most important economic characteristics, including size, shape, and ore grade. This self-sustaining process may extend to epithermal gold deposits, venting at active volcanoes, and regions with the potential for geothermal energy production.

  7. Complement (C5)-derived chemotactic activity accounts for accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in cerebrospinal fluid of rabbits with pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, J D; Hartiala, K T; Goldstein, I M; Sande, M A

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed to identify the chemoattractant for polymorphonuclear leukocytes that appears in the cerebrospinal fluid of rabbits with experimental pneumococcal meningitis. Meningitis was induced in anesthetized New Zealand white rabbits by injecting 10(4) cells of stationary-phase Streptococcus pneumoniae type III intracisternally. Before bacteria were injected, cerebrospinal fluid contained neither polymorphonuclear leukocytes nor chemotactic activity. Significant chemotactic activity for rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes was detected 12 h after inoculation with bacteria and was maximal after 18 to 20 h. Chemotactic activity appeared in cerebrospinal fluid while concentrations of pneumococci and total protein were increasing but before there was any accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The chemotactic activity in cerebrospinal fluid was heat stable (56 degrees C for 30 min), eluted from Sephadex G-75 with a profile identical to that of the chemotactic activity in zymosan-activated rabbit serum, and was inhibited by treatment with antibodies to native human C5. In addition, preincubation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes with partially purified rabbit C5a selectively inhibited their subsequent chemotactic responses to cerebrospinal fluid. These data indicate that complement (C5)-derived chemotactic activity appears in cerebrospinal fluid during the course of experimental pneumococcal meningitis in rabbits and suggest that this activity accounts for the accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes observed in this infection. PMID:6480117

  8. Spontaneous activity of cochlear hair cells triggered by fluid secretion mechanism in adjacent support cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han Chin; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Cheung, Rocky; Zhang-Hooks, YingXin; Agarwal, Amit; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Rock, Jason; Bergles, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Spontaneous electrical activity of neurons in developing sensory systems promotes their maturation and proper connectivity. In the auditory system, spontaneous activity of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) is initiated by the release of ATP from glia-like inner supporting cells (ISCs), facilitating maturation of central pathways before hearing onset. Here, we find that ATP stimulates purinergic autoreceptors in ISCs, triggering Cl− efflux and osmotic cell shrinkage by opening TMEM16A Ca2+-activated Cl− channels. Release of Cl− from ISCs also forces K+ efflux, causing transient depolarization of IHCs near ATP release sites. Genetic deletion of TMEM16A markedly reduces the spontaneous activity of IHCs and spiral ganglion neurons in the developing cochlea, and prevents ATP-dependent shrinkage of supporting cells. These results indicate that support cells in the developing cochlea have adapted a pathway used for fluid secretion in other organs to induce periodic excitation of hair cells. PMID:26627734

  9. The uptake and excretion of partially oxidized sulfur expands the repertoire of energy resources metabolized by hydrothermal vent symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Beinart, R. A.; Gartman, A.; Sanders, J. G.; Luther, G. W.; Girguis, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic associations between animals and chemoautotrophic bacteria crowd around hydrothermal vents. In these associations, symbiotic bacteria use chemical reductants from venting fluid for the energy to support autotrophy, providing primary nutrition for the host. At vents along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center, the partially oxidized sulfur compounds (POSCs) thiosulfate and polysulfide have been detected in and around animal communities but away from venting fluid. The use of POSCs for autotrophy, as an alternative to the chemical substrates in venting fluid, could mitigate competition in these communities. To determine whether ESLC symbioses could use thiosulfate to support carbon fixation or produce POSCs during sulfide oxidation, we used high-pressure, flow-through incubations to assess the productivity of three symbiotic mollusc genera—the snails Alviniconcha spp. and Ifremeria nautilei, and the mussel Bathymodiolus brevior—when oxidizing sulfide and thiosulfate. Via the incorporation of isotopically labelled inorganic carbon, we found that the symbionts of all three genera supported autotrophy while oxidizing both sulfide and thiosulfate, though at different rates. Additionally, by concurrently measuring their effect on sulfur compounds in the aquaria with voltammetric microelectrodes, we showed that these symbioses excreted POSCs under highly sulfidic conditions, illustrating that these symbioses could represent a source for POSCs in their habitat. Furthermore, we revealed spatial disparity in the rates of carbon fixation among the animals in our incubations, which might have implications for the variability of productivity in situ. Together, these results re-shape our thinking about sulfur cycling and productivity by vent symbioses, demonstrating that thiosulfate may be an ecologically important energy source for vent symbioses and that they also likely impact the local geochemical regime through the excretion of POSCs. PMID:25876848

  10. Spatial Differences in East Scotia Ridge Hydrothermal Vent Food Webs: Influences of Chemistry, Microbiology and Predation on Trophodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Reid, William D. K.; Sweeting, Christopher J.; Wigham, Ben D.; Zwirglmaier, Katrin; Hawkes, Jeffrey A.; McGill, Rona A. R.; Linse, Katrin; Polunin, Nicholas V. C.

    2013-01-01

    The hydrothermal vents on the East Scotia Ridge are the first to be explored in the Antarctic and are dominated by large peltospiroid gastropods, stalked barnacles (Vulcanolepas sp.) and anomuran crabs (Kiwa sp.) but their food webs are unknown. Vent fluid and macroconsumer samples were collected at three vent sites (E2, E9N and E9S) at distances of tens of metres to hundreds of kilometres apart with contrasting vent fluid chemistries to describe trophic interactions and identify potential carbon fixation pathways using stable isotopes. δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon from vent fluids ranged from −4.6‰ to 0.8‰ at E2 and from −4.4‰ to 1.5‰ at E9. The lowest macroconsumer δ13C was observed in peltospiroid gastropods (−30.0‰ to −31.1‰) and indicated carbon fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle by endosymbiotic gamma-Proteobacteria. Highest δ13C occurred in Kiwa sp. (−19.0‰ to −10.5‰), similar to that of the epibionts sampled from their ventral setae. Kiwa sp. δ13C differed among sites, which were attributed to spatial differences in the epibiont community and the relative contribution of carbon fixed via the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) and CBB cycles assimilated by Kiwa sp. Site differences in carbon fixation pathways were traced into higher trophic levels e.g. a stichasterid asteroid that predates on Kiwa sp. Sponges and anemones at the periphery of E2 assimilated a proportion of epipelagic photosynthetic primary production but this was not observed at E9N. Differences in the δ13C and δ34S values of vent macroconsumers between E2 and E9 sites suggest the relative contributions of photosynthetic and chemoautotrophic carbon fixation (rTCA v CBB) entering the hydrothermal vent food webs vary between the sites. PMID:23762393

  11. Lava-flow hazard with optimized non-uniform grid of vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucà, Federica; Rongo, Rocco; Lupiano, Valeria; Iovine, Giulio

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the sensitivity to vents (in terms of number and distribution) of sectors affected by lava flows and of hazard values at Mount Etna. The proposed methodology relies on the application of the Cellular Automata model SCIARA, and on the adoption of an optimization algorithm for progressively integrating an initial uniform distribution of 1006 vents (1-km spaced) with 500 additional sources. Vents have iteratively been added, at steps of 50, through spatial simulated annealing, using slope roughness as weigh function. For each vent, 41 types of simulations have been executed to take into proper account the potential behaviour of the volcano, based on historical records. The performed simulations have been further processed to derive lava-flow hazard, by assigning each simulation: i) a spatial likelihood of vent opening; ii) a magnitude probability, depending on the type of eruption; and iii) a temporal probability of source activation, based on historical occurrences in the past 400 years. First results are discussed, and the influence of the number and distribution of additional vents is preliminarily investigated.

  12. Are midwater shrimp trapped in the craters of submarine volcanoes by hydrothermal venting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishner, Karen F.; Graff, Jason R.; Martin, Joel W.; Carey, S.; Sigurdsson, H.; Seibel, B. A.

    2005-08-01

    The biology of Kick'em Jenny (KEJ) submarine volcano, part of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc and located off the coast of Grenada in the Caribbean Sea, was studied during a cruise in 2003. Hydrothermal venting and an associated biological assemblage were discovered in the volcanic crater (˜250 m depth). Warm water with bubbling gas emanated through rock fissures and sediments. Shrimp (some of them swimming) were clustered at vents, while other individuals lay immobile on sediments. The shrimp fauna consisted of 3 mesopelagic species that had no prior record of benthic or vent association. We suggest that these midwater shrimp, from deeper water populations offshore, were trapped within the crater during their downward diel vertical migration. It is unknown whether they then succumbed to the hostile vent environment (immobile individuals) or whether they are potentially opportunistic vent residents (active individuals). Given the abundance of submarine arc volcanoes worldwide, this phenomenon suggests that volcanic arcs could be important interaction sites between oceanic midwater and vent communities.

  13. Antimicrobial activity and composition profile of grape (Vitis vinifera) pomace extracts obtained by supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Daniela A; Salvador, Ana Augusta; Smânia, Artur; Smânia, Elza F A; Maraschin, Marcelo; Ferreira, Sandra R S

    2013-04-10

    The possibility of increasing the aggregated value of the huge amount of residues generated by wineries around the world foment studies using the grape pomace - the residue from the wine production, composed by seed, skin and stems - to obtain functional ingredients. Nowadays, consumers in general prefer natural and safe products mainly for food and cosmetic fields, where the supercritical fluid extraction is of great importance due to the purity of the extracts provided. Therefore, the objective of this work is to evaluate the global extraction yield, the antimicrobial activity and the composition profile of Merlot and Syrah grape pomace extracts obtained by supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) and CO2 added with co-solvent at pressures up to 300 bar and temperatures of 50 and 60 °C. The results were compared with the ones obtained by Soxhlet and by ultrasound-assisted leaching extraction methods. The main components from the extracts, identified by HPLC, were gallic acid, p-OH-benzoic acid, vanillic acid and epicatechin. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the extracts were evaluated using four strains of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and three fungi strains (Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei). Despite lower extraction yield results, the supercritical fluid extracts presented the highest antimicrobial effectiveness compared to the other grape pomace extracts due to the presence of antimicrobial active compounds. Syrah extracts were less efficient against the microorganisms tested and Merlot extracts were more active against Gram-positive bacteria.

  14. Long-Lived Serpentinization and Carbonate Precipitation at the Lost City Hydrothermal Vent Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frueh-Green, G. L.; Kelley, D. S.; Karson, J. A.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Proskurowski, G.; Ludwig, K. A.

    2003-12-01

    The discovery of spectacular, actively venting carbonate chimneys at the Lost City hydrothermal vent field (LCHF) on the Atlantis Massif (MAR 30oN) has stimulated great interest in the role of serpentinization in driving hydrothermal circulation in peridotite-hosted systems and in the biological communities that may be supported in these environments. The top of this fault-bounded, dome-like massif consists of variably deformed, talc-bearing serpentinites and gabbroic rocks ( ˜1.5 Ma), unconformably overlain by polymictic sedimentary breccias and bedded pelagic limestones or chalks that form a flat-lying carbonate cap. The limestones and matrix of the breccias consist of highly indurated foraminiferal sand with a well-preserved sub-tropical fauna, which were at least locally deposited before the last glacial maximum. Calcite and/or aragonite veins are abundant; fractures in the basement are filled by carbonate sediments and lithic fragments. Veining generally pre-dates sedimentary fracture-infilling. The youngest hydrothermal phases include the LCHF chimneys and carbonate precipitates on outcrop surfaces, in cavities, and as growths protruding from fissures that are locally venting fluids. Sr-, C- and O-isotope analyses and radiocarbon age-dating indicate that this system is the integrated effect of tectonic activity, serpentinization, and hydrothermal flow that has lasted at least 30,000 years. C- and O-isotope compositions indicate a range of precipitation temperatures from ambient conditions up to ˜ 250oC at depth and reflect mixing of seawater and serpentinization-derived hydrothermal fluids. Analyses of separated fractions of sedimentary and hydrothermal components define a sedimentary end-member composition of δ 13C = 1.3 +/- 0.3 and δ 18O = 1.5 +/- 0.5‰ (VPDB) and a hydrothermal end-member composition of δ 13C = 3.3 and δ 18O = 5‰ . Based on the present-day degree of serpentinization, the geophysical structure and age of the lithosphere at the

  15. Reactivity landscape of pyruvate under simulated hydrothermal vent conditions

    PubMed Central

    Novikov, Yehor; Copley, Shelley D.

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate is an important “hub” metabolite that is a precursor for amino acids, sugars, cofactors, and lipids in extant metabolic networks. Pyruvate has been produced under simulated hydrothermal vent conditions from alkyl thiols and carbon monoxide in the presence of transition metal sulfides at 250 °C [Cody GD et al. (2000) Science 289(5483):1337–1340], so it is plausible that pyruvate was formed in hydrothermal systems on the early earth. We report here that pyruvate reacts readily in the presence of transition metal sulfide minerals under simulated hydrothermal vent fluids at more moderate temperatures (25–110 °C) that are more conducive to survival of biogenic molecules. We found that pyruvate partitions among five reaction pathways at rates that depend upon the nature of the mineral present; the concentrations of H2S, H2, and NH4Cl; and the temperature. In most cases, high yields of one or two primary products are found due to preferential acceleration of certain pathways. Reactions observed include reduction of ketones to alcohols and aldol condensation, both reactions that are common in extant metabolic networks. We also observed reductive amination to form alanine and reduction to form propionic acid. Amino acids and fatty acids formed by analogous processes may have been important components of a protometabolic network that allowed the emergence of life. PMID:23872841

  16. Nondestructive imaging of fragile sea-floor vent deposit samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingston Tivey, Margaret; Singh, Sandipa

    1997-10-01

    X-ray computed tomography was used to detail the internal structure of sea-floor hydrothermal vent samples. A third-generation industrial computed tomography (CT) scanner with a microfocus tube was used to scan a black smoker chimney and cores taken from a white smoker chimney and a block of Fe-rich sulfide. Images of the black smoker chimney clearly show sulfide- versus anhydrite-dominated areas. Display of pore space in three dimensions shows the complex geometry of the main flow conduit, and also much smaller (2 3 mm diameter) conduits within the chimney wall that parallel the main flow conduit. Images of the white smoker sample document the continuity of an anastomosing ˜1-mm-diameter flow conduit, and the pronounced anisotropy of porosity. Tube structures presumed to be casts of worm tubes are clearly evident in images of the Fe-rich sulfide sample. X-ray CT is an excellent technique for rapidly identifying the internal structure of porosity and mineralogy of fragile hydrothermal precipitates on scales of tens of microns to hundreds of millimeters, and data can be used to deduce styles of fluid flow and other processes involved in vent deposit formation.

  17. Effects of Vent Asymmetry on Explosive Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, S.; Ogden, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Current computer models of volcanic eruptions are typically based on symmetric vent and conduit geometries. However, in natural settings, these features are rarely perfectly symmetric. For example, the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St Helens (MSH) took place through a highly asymmetrical crater due to the preceding landslide and subsequent vent erosion. In supersonic, high pressure eruptions, such as what may have occurred at MSH, vent and crater asymmetry can strongly affect the directionality of the gas-thrust region. These effects on eruption direction may have implications for the formation of lateral blasts and pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). Here, we present preliminary results from numerical simulations using CartaBlanca, a Java based simulation tool for non-linear physics as developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using 2D time-dependent simulations of explosive volcanic eruptions, we study the effects of vent asymmetry on a variety of eruptive conditions. Preliminary results suggest that asymmetric vent shape may provide an additional mechanism for the formation of lateral blasts and PDCs.

  18. Effects of Intense Physical Activity with Free Water Replacement on Bioimpedance Parameters and Body Fluid Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, E. B.; Ulbricht, L.; Krueger, E.; Romaneli, E. F. R.; Souza, M. N.

    2012-12-01

    Authors have emphasized the need for previous care in order to perform reliable bioimpedance acquisition. Despite of this need some authors have reported that intense physical training has little effect on Bioimpedance Analysis (BIA), while other ones have observed significant effects on bioimpedance parameters in the same condition, leading to body composition estimates considered incompatible with human physiology. The aim of this work was to quantify the changes in bioimpedance parameters, as well as in body fluids estimates by BIA, after four hours of intense physical activity with free water replacement in young males. Xitron Hydra 4200 equipment was used to acquire bioimpedance data before and immediately after the physical training. After data acquisition body fluids were estimates from bioimpedance parameters. Height and weight of all subjects were also acquired to the nearest 0.1 cm and 0.1 kg, respectively. Results point that among the bioimpedance parameter, extracellular resistance presented the most coherent behavior, leading to reliable estimates of the extracellular fluid and part of the total body water. Results also show decreases in height and weight of the participants, which were associated to the decrease in body hydration and in intervertebral discs.

  19. Fluid shear stress stimulates MATE2-K expression via Nrf2 pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yasunori; Kaishima, Misato; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Tohyama, Kimio; Chisaki, Ikumi; Nakayama, Yusuke; Ogasawara-Shimizu, Mari; Kawamata, Yuji

    2017-03-04

    Accurate prediction of drug-induced renal toxicity is necessary for development of safer drugs for patients. Cellular assay systems that recapitulate physiologically relevant microenvironments have been proposed for correct estimation of drug responses in the human body. However, establishment of such assay systems for accurate prediction of renal toxicity is challenging because of the lack of readily available in vitro assay systems. In this study, we investigated the cellular response to fluid shear stress, which is a characteristic of the environment in the kidney proximal tubules, using microfluidic devices. The global gene expression profiles of human primary proximal tubule cells under the fluidic conditions revealed upregulation of MATE2-K and activation of Nrf2 signaling in response to fluid shear stress. Network and cell biological analysis additionally showed that expression of MATE2-K is regulated by Nrf2 signaling. These results strongly suggest that fluid shear stress is involved in the expression and maintenance of function of tissue-specific drug transporters in the proximal tubule, where the cells are exposed to continuous shear stress by primary urine. Furthermore, the microfluidic culture of human proximal tubules was demonstrated to be a useful system to analyze the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression in physiologically relevant cell conditions.

  20. Temporal and spatial variation in temperature experienced by macrofauna at Main Endeavour hydrothermal vent field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Raymond W.; Robert, Katleen; Matabos, Marjolaine; Bates, Amanda E.; Juniper, S. Kim

    2015-12-01

    A significant focus of hydrothermal vent ecological studies has been to understand how species cope with various stressors through physiological tolerance and biochemical resistance. Yet, the environmental conditions experienced by vent species have not been well characterized. This objective requires continuous observations over time intervals that can capture environmental variability at scales that are relevant to animals. We used autonomous temperature logger arrays (four roughly parallel linear arrays of 12 loggers spaced every 10-12 cm) to study spatial and temporal variations in the thermal regime experienced by hydrothermal vent macrofauna at a diffuse flow vent. Hourly temperatures were recorded over eight months from 2010 to 2011 at Grotto vent in the Main Endeavour vent field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, a focus area of the Ocean Networks Canada cabled observatory. The conspicuous animal assemblages in video footage contained Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms, gastropods (primarily Lepetodrilus fucensis), and polychaetes (polynoid scaleworms and the palm worm Paralvinella palmiformis). Two dimensional spatial gradients in temperature were generally stable over the deployment period. The average temperature recorded by all arrays, and in some individual loggers, revealed distinctive fluctuations in temperature that often corresponded with the tidal cycle. We postulate that this may be related to changes in bottom currents or fluctuations in vent discharge. A marked transient temperature increase lasting over a period of days was observed in April 2011. While the distributions and behavior of Juan de Fuca Ridge vent invertebrates may be partially constrained by environmental temperature and temperature tolerance, except for the one transient high-temperature event, observed fluid temperatures were generally similar to the thermal preferences for some species, and typically well below lethal temperatures for all species. Average temperatures of the four arrays

  1. A 2D suspension of active agents: the role of fluid mediated interactions.

    PubMed

    Behmadi, Hojjat; Fazli, Zahra; Najafi, Ali

    2017-03-22

    Taking into account both the Vicsek short-range ordering and the far-field hydrodynamic interactions mediated by the ambient fluid, we investigate the role of long-range interactions in the ordering phenomena in a quasi 2-dimensional active suspension. By studying the number fluctuations, the velocity correlation functions and cluster size distribution function, we show that depending on the number density of swimmers and the strength of noise, the hydrodynamic interactions can have significant effects in a suspension. For a fixed value of noise, at larger density of particles, long-range interactions enhance the particle pairing and cluster formation in the system.

  2. A 2D suspension of active agents: the role of fluid mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmadi, Hojjat; Fazli, Zahra; Najafi, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Taking into account both the Vicsek short-range ordering and the far-field hydrodynamic interactions mediated by the ambient fluid, we investigate the role of long-range interactions in the ordering phenomena in a quasi 2-dimensional active suspension. By studying the number fluctuations, the velocity correlation functions and cluster size distribution function, we show that depending on the number density of swimmers and the strength of noise, the hydrodynamic interactions can have significant effects in a suspension. For a fixed value of noise, at larger density of particles, long-range interactions enhance the particle pairing and cluster formation in the system.

  3. Heat and Mass Transfer in Unsteady Rotating Fluid Flow with Binary Chemical Reaction and Activation Energy

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Faiz G.; Motsa, Sandile; Khumalo, Melusi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM) is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM) are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations. PMID:25250830

  4. Evidence of cellular immune activation in children with opsoclonus-myoclonus: cerebrospinal fluid neopterin.

    PubMed

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Hyland, Keith; Tate, Elizabeth D; Arnold, Lauren A; Allison, Tyler J; Soori, Gamini S

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate cellular immune activation in opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome, we measured the inflammatory marker neopterin in the cerebrospinal fluid of 16 children with opsoclonus-myoclonus and neuroblastoma, 24 children with opsoclonus-myoclonus but no tumor, and 19 age-matched controls. The mean concentration in opsoclonus-myoclonus was 2.3-fold higher than in controls (P = .008). Neopterin was greatly elevated in four of the most neurologically severe cases, up to 8.3-fold above the highest control level. Thirteen of the 40 children with opsoclonus-myoclonus but no controls had a neopterin concentration >2 SD above the control mean (P = .005). In this high neopterin subgroup, neurologic severity was significantly greater and the duration of neurologic symptoms was less. In 16 children re-examined on immunotherapy, including adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) combination therapy, treatment was associated with a significant reduction in both neopterin and neurologic severity. Neopterin did not differ significantly between the tumor and non-tumor opsoclonus-myoclonus etiologies. No abnormalities of tetrahydrobiopterin were found. Although cerebrospinal fluid neopterin lacked the sensitivity to be a biomarker of disease activity in opsoclonus-myoclonus, elevated concentrations do support a role for T-cell activation and cell-mediated immunity in its pathophysiology.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation Study of Active Power Control in Wind Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Paul; Aho, Jake; Gebraad, Pieter; Pao, Lucy; Zhang, Yingchen

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an analysis performed on a wind plant's ability to provide active power control services using a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics-based wind plant simulator. This approach allows examination of the impact on wind turbine wake interactions within a wind plant on performance of the wind plant controller. The paper investigates several control methods for improving performance in waked conditions. One method uses wind plant wake controls, an active field of research in which wind turbine control systems are coordinated to account for their wakes, to improve the overall performance. Results demonstrate the challenge of providing active power control in waked conditions but also the potential methods for improving this performance.

  6. [Aminopeptidases activity in the amniotic fluid in women in labor with EPH-gestosis].

    PubMed

    Karmowski, A; Sobiech, K A; Malinowski, J; Nowacka, I; Pałczyński, B; Kertyńska, I

    2000-01-01

    The thesis of this work was to compare the aminopeptidases activity in the amniotic fluid obtained during the physiological labor and during the labor of pregnant with EPH-gestosis, in presence of the beta-naphtlamidic L-amino-acids (alanine, leucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, histidine, cysteine) chromogenic substrates. It was assumed the 3-7 times increase in the aminopeptidases activity counted to the proteins from the labored with EPH-gestosis comparing to the labored in physiological labor. Among the used substrates the highest activity in both groups of labored women was measured in presence of substrates with exact amino-acids in this order: L-Ala > L-Leu > L-Phe > L-Tyr > L-His > L-Cys.

  7. Medium Fidelity Simulation of Oxygen Tank Venting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, Adam; Kurien, James; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The item to he cleared is a medium-fidelity software simulation model of a vented cryogenic tank. Such tanks are commonly used to transport cryogenic liquids such as liquid oxygen via truck, and have appeared on liquid-fueled rockets for decades. This simulation model works with the HCC simulation system that was developed by Xerox PARC and NASA Ames Research Center. HCC has been previously cleared for distribution. When used with the HCC software, the model generates simulated readings for the tank pressure and temperature as the simulated cryogenic liquid boils off and is vented. Failures (such as a broken vent valve) can be injected into the simulation to produce readings corresponding to the failure. Release of this simulation will allow researchers to test their software diagnosis systems by attempting to diagnose the simulated failure from the simulated readings. This model does not contain any encryption software nor can it perform any control tasks that might be export controlled.

  8. Inside Out: Active learning in fluid dynamics in and out of the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Nigel; Benson, Lisa; Sill, Ben

    2014-11-01

    Active learning can be broadly defined as any activity that engages students beyond just listening. But is it worth the effort, when we can just lecture and tell students all they need to know? Learning theories posit that students remember far more of what they say and do than of what they hear and see. The benefits of active learning include increased attendance (because class is now something different and attending is more worthwhile) and deeper understanding of concepts (because students get to practice answering and generating questions). A recent meta-analysis of research on active learning has summarized evidence of real outcomes of active learning. Research is showing that students' performance on exams are higher and that they fail at lower rates in classes that involve active learning compared to traditional lecturing. Other studies have shown evidence of improved performance in follow-on classes, showing that the improved learning lasts. There are some topics and concepts that are best taught (or at least introduced) through lecturing, but even lecturing can be broken up by short activities that engage students so they learn more effectively. In this presentation, we will review the findings of the meta study and provide examples of active learning both inside and outside the classroom that demonstrate simple ways of introducing this approach in fluid dynamics classes.

  9. Cytoskeletal protein Flightless (Flii) is elevated in chronic and acute human wounds and wound fluid: neutralizing its activity in chronic but not acute wound fluid improves cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ruzehaji, Nadira; Grose, Randall; Krumbiegel, Doreen; Zola, Heddy; Dasari, Pallave; Wallace, Hilary; Stacey, Michael; Fitridge, Robert; Cowin, Allison J

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds form a medical need which will expand as the population ages and the obesity epidemic grows. Whilst the complex mechanisms underlying wound repair are not fully understood, remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role. Elevated expression of the actin cytoskeletal protein Flightless I (Flii) is known to impair wound outcomes. To determine if Flii is involved in the impaired healing observed in chronic wounds, its expression in non-healing human wounds from patients with venous leg ulcers was determined and compared to its expression in acute wounds and unwounded skin. Increased expression of Flii was observed in both chronic and acute wounds with wound fluid and plasma also containing secreted Flii protein. Inflammation is a key aspect of wound repair and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis revealed Flii was located in neutrophils within the blood and that it co-localised with CD16+ neutrophils in chronic wounds. The function of secreted Flii was investigated as both chronic wound fluid and Flii have previously been shown to inhibit fibroblast proliferation. To determine if the inhibitory effect of wound fluid was due in part to the presence of Flii, wound fluids were depleted of Flii using Flii-specific neutralizing antibodies (FnAb). Flii depleted chronic wound fluid no longer inhibited fibroblast proliferation, suggesting that Flii may contribute to the inhibitory effect of chronic wound fluid on fibroblast function. Application of FnAbs to chronic wounds may therefore be a novel approach used to improve the local environment of non-healing wounds and potentially improve healing outcomes.

  10. Quantitation of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-specific protease activity in mouse, baboon and human fluids and organs.

    PubMed

    Keane, Fiona M; Yao, Tsun-Wen; Seelk, Stefanie; Gall, Margaret G; Chowdhury, Sumaiya; Poplawski, Sarah E; Lai, Jack H; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Farrell, Penny; Vieira de Ribeiro, Ana Julia; Osborne, Brenna; Yu, Denise M T; Seth, Devanshi; Rahman, Khairunnessa; Haber, Paul; Topaloglu, A Kemal; Wang, Chuanmin; Thomson, Sally; Hennessy, Annemarie; Prins, John; Twigg, Stephen M; McLennan, Susan V; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Bachovchin, William W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The protease fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a specific marker of activated mesenchymal cells in tumour stroma and fibrotic liver. A specific, reliable FAP enzyme assay has been lacking. FAP's unique and restricted cleavage of the post proline bond was exploited to generate a new specific substrate to quantify FAP enzyme activity. This sensitive assay detected no FAP activity in any tissue or fluid of FAP gene knockout mice, thus confirming assay specificity. Circulating FAP activity was ∼20- and 1.3-fold less in baboon than in mouse and human plasma, respectively. Serum and plasma contained comparable FAP activity. In mice, the highest levels of FAP activity were in uterus, pancreas, submaxillary gland and skin, whereas the lowest levels were in brain, prostate, leukocytes and testis. Baboon organs high in FAP activity included skin, epididymis, bladder, colon, adipose tissue, nerve and tongue. FAP activity was greatly elevated in tumours and associated lymph nodes and in fungal-infected skin of unhealthy baboons. FAP activity was 14- to 18-fold greater in cirrhotic than in non-diseased human liver, and circulating FAP activity was almost doubled in alcoholic cirrhosis. Parallel DPP4 measurements concorded with the literature, except for the novel finding of high DPP4 activity in bile. The new FAP enzyme assay is the first to be thoroughly characterised and shows that FAP activity is measurable in most organs and at high levels in some. This new assay is a robust tool for specific quantitation of FAP enzyme activity in both preclinical and clinical samples, particularly liver fibrosis.

  11. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravex, Alain; Flachbart, Robin; Holt, Barney

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube, heat exchanger, and a spray bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy extraction is required, a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point, the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating boil-off losses. TVS performance testing demonstrated that the spray bar was effective in providing tank pressure control within a 6

  12. Temporal and spatial archaeal colonization of hydrothermal vent deposits.

    PubMed

    Pagé, Antoine; Tivey, Margaret K; Stakes, Debra S; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2008-04-01

    Thermocouple arrays were deployed on two deep-sea hydrothermal vents at Guaymas Basin (27 degrees 0.5'N, 111 degrees 24.5'W) in order to measure in situ temperatures at which microorganisms colonize the associated mineral deposits. Intact sections of three structures that formed around the arrays were collected after 4 and 72 day deployments (named BM4, BM72 and TS72). Archaeal diversity associated with discreet subsamples collected across each deposit was determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA genes. Spatial differences in archaeal diversity were observed in all deposits and appeared related to in situ temperature. In BM4, no 16S rRNA genes were detected beyond about 1.5 cm within the sample (> 200 degrees C). Phylotypes detected on the outside of this deposit belong to taxonomic groups containing mesophiles and (hyper)thermophiles, whereas only putative hyperthermophiles were detected 1.5 cm inside the structure (approximately 110 degrees C). In contrast, the more moderate thermal gradient recorded across TS72 was associated with a deeper colonization (2-3 cm inside the deposit) of putative hyperthermophilic phylotypes. Although our study does not provide a precise assessment of the highest temperature for the existence of microbial habitats inside the deposits, archaeal 16S rRNA genes were detected directly next to thermocouples that measured 110 degrees C (Methanocaldococcus spp. in BM4) and 116 degrees C (Desulfurococcaceae in TS72). The successive array deployments conducted at the Broken Mushroom (BM) site also revealed compositional differences in archaeal communities associated with immature (BM4) and mature chimneys (BM72) formed by the same fluids. These differences suggest a temporal transition in the primary carbon sources used by the archaeal communities, with potential CO(2)/H(2) methanogens prevalent in BM4 being replaced by possible methylotroph or acetoclastic methanogens and heterotrophs in BM72. This study is the first

  13. From Concept-to-Flight: An Active Active Fluid Loop Based Thermal Control System for Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, Gajanana C.; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bame, David; Karlmann, Paul; Mastropietro, A. J.; Liu, Yuanming; Miller, Jennifer; Pauken, Michael; Lyra, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, which was launched on November 26, 2011, incorporates a novel active thermal control system to keep the sensitive electronics and science instruments at safe operating and survival temperatures. While the diurnal temperature variations on the Mars surface range from -120 C to +30 C, the sensitive equipment are kept within -40 C to +50 C. The active thermal control system is based on a single-phase mechanically pumped fluid loop (MPFL) system which removes or recovers excess waste heat and manages it to maintain the sensitive equipment inside the rover at safe temperatures. This paper will describe the entire process of developing this active thermal control system for the MSL rover from concept to flight implementation. The development of the rover thermal control system during its architecture, design, fabrication, integration, testing, and launch is described.

  14. Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.; Jackaway, Adam D.

    2000-05-16

    A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

  15. Hydrothermal vents and the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Martin, William; Baross, John; Kelley, Deborah; Russell, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are geochemically reactive habitats that harbour rich microbial communities. There are striking parallels between the chemistry of the H(2)-CO(2) redox couple that is present in hydrothermal systems and the core energy metabolic reactions of some modern prokaryotic autotrophs. The biochemistry of these autotrophs might, in turn, harbour clues about the kinds of reactions that initiated the chemistry of life. Hydrothermal vents thus unite microbiology and geology to breathe new life into research into one of biology's most important questions - what is the origin of life?

  16. Detailed dynamics and seasonal persistence of methane venting from lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, B. P.; Wood, H. G.; Ruppel, C. D.; Hemond, H.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    Lake-bottom sediments emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, into the overlying water column and atmosphere. A large fraction of the methane is released as bubbles, but constraining the magnitude of this methane flux is challenging because ebullition is patchy in space and episodic in time. Extrapolating observations from individual methane seeps to a larger scale in time or space can result in severe over- or under-estimation of the methane flux, yet to date observations have not combined large, complete spatial coverage with multiple-season deployment periods. We present methane ebullition data from a fixed-location multibeam sonar, which observes a large area (420 m2) over a deployment period of over 6 months and with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to detect individual bubbles. The large amount of data generated by the system presents a challenge to