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Sample records for active force generation

  1. The Distribution of Active Force Generators Controls Mitotic Spindle Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Hyman, Anthony A.

    2003-07-01

    During unequal cell divisions a mitotic spindle is eccentrically positioned before cell cleavage. To determine the basis of the net force imbalance that causes spindle displacement in one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we fragmented centrosomes with an ultraviolet laser. Analysis of the mean and variance of fragment speeds suggests that the force imbalance is due to a larger number of force generators pulling on astral microtubules of the posterior aster relative to the anterior aster. Moreover, activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) α subunits is required to generate these astral forces.

  2. Protrusion force microscopy reveals oscillatory force generation and mechanosensing activity of human macrophage podosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labernadie, Anna; Bouissou, Anaïs; Delobelle, Patrick; Balor, Stéphanie; Voituriez, Raphael; Proag, Amsha; Fourquaux, Isabelle; Thibault, Christophe; Vieu, Christophe; Poincloux, Renaud; Charrière, Guillaume M.; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    Podosomes are adhesion structures formed in monocyte-derived cells. They are F-actin-rich columns perpendicular to the substrate surrounded by a ring of integrins. Here, to measure podosome protrusive forces, we designed an innovative experimental setup named protrusion force microscopy (PFM), which consists in measuring by atomic force microscopy the deformation induced by living cells onto a compliant Formvar sheet. By quantifying the heights of protrusions made by podosomes onto Formvar sheets, we estimate that a single podosome generates a protrusion force that increases with the stiffness of the substratum, which is a hallmark of mechanosensing activity. We show that the protrusive force generated at podosomes oscillates with a constant period and requires combined actomyosin contraction and actin polymerization. Finally, we elaborate a model to explain the mechanical and oscillatory activities of podosomes. Thus, PFM shows that podosomes are mechanosensing cell structures exerting a protrusive force.

  3. Protrusion force microscopy reveals oscillatory force generation and mechanosensing activity of human macrophage podosomes.

    PubMed

    Labernadie, Anna; Bouissou, Anaïs; Delobelle, Patrick; Balor, Stéphanie; Voituriez, Raphael; Proag, Amsha; Fourquaux, Isabelle; Thibault, Christophe; Vieu, Christophe; Poincloux, Renaud; Charrière, Guillaume M; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Podosomes are adhesion structures formed in monocyte-derived cells. They are F-actin-rich columns perpendicular to the substrate surrounded by a ring of integrins. Here, to measure podosome protrusive forces, we designed an innovative experimental setup named protrusion force microscopy (PFM), which consists in measuring by atomic force microscopy the deformation induced by living cells onto a compliant Formvar sheet. By quantifying the heights of protrusions made by podosomes onto Formvar sheets, we estimate that a single podosome generates a protrusion force that increases with the stiffness of the substratum, which is a hallmark of mechanosensing activity. We show that the protrusive force generated at podosomes oscillates with a constant period and requires combined actomyosin contraction and actin polymerization. Finally, we elaborate a model to explain the mechanical and oscillatory activities of podosomes. Thus, PFM shows that podosomes are mechanosensing cell structures exerting a protrusive force. PMID:25385672

  4. Three-dimensional analysis of optical forces generated by an active tractor beam using radial polarization.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Luis; Acebal, Pablo; Blaya, Salvador

    2014-02-10

    We theoretically study the three-dimensional behavior of nanoparticles in an active optical conveyor. To do this, we solved the Langevin equation when the forces are generated by a focusing system at the near field. Analytical expressions for the optical forces generated by the optical conveyor were obtained by solving the Richards and Wolf vectorial diffraction integrals in an approximated form when a mask of two annular pupils is illuminated by a radially polarized Hermite-Gauss beam. Trajectories, in both the transverse plane and the longitudinal direction, are analyzed showing that the behavior of the optical conveyor can be optimized by conveniently choosing the configuration of the mask of the two annular pupils (inner and outer radius of the two rings) in order to trap and transport all particles at the focal plane. PMID:24663619

  5. Localized sequential use of resilient lining to generate orthodontic force in thermoformed active removable appliances.

    PubMed

    Ng, E W H

    2005-12-01

    A new modality of orthodontic treatment based on the thermoformed appliance was developed and trialled clinically. A light-cured resilient lining material commonly used for denture relining was placed locally and sequentially in thermoformed appliances to generate orthodontic forces. The new method appeared to be effective. All the presented cases showed substantial improvement in dental alignment. A number of orthodontic movements were demonstrated. Localized use of resilient lining in thermoformed orthodontic appliances appeared to be a promising alternative to other thermoformed active removable appliance (TARA) treatments. Further studies are required to optimize the procedures and explore its full potential.

  6. Acoustic manipulation of active spherical carriers: Generation of negative radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid; Mojahed, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    This paper examines theoretically a novel mechanism of generating negative (pulling) radiation force for acoustic manipulation of spherical carriers equipped with piezoelectric actuators in its inner surface. In this mechanism, the spherical particle is handled by common plane progressive monochromatic acoustic waves instead of zero-/higher- order Bessel beams or standing waves field. The handling strategy is based on applying a spatially uniform harmonic electrical voltage at the piezoelectric actuator with the same frequency of handling acoustic waves, in order to change the radiation force effect from repulsive (away from source) to attractive (toward source). This study may be considered as a start point for development of contact-free precise handling and entrapment technology of active carriers which are essential in many engineering and medicine applications.

  7. Preparing the periphery for a subsequent behavior: motor neuronal activity during biting generates little force but prepares a retractor muscle to generate larger forces during swallowing in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; McManus, Jeffrey M; Cullins, Miranda J; Chiel, Hillel J

    2015-03-25

    Some behaviors occur in obligatory sequence, such as reaching before grasping an object. Can the earlier behavior serve to prepare the musculature for the later behavior? If it does, what is the underlying neural mechanism of the preparation? To address this question, we examined two feeding behaviors in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, one of which must precede the second: biting and swallowing. Biting is an attempt to grasp food. When that attempt is successful, the animal immediately switches to swallowing to ingest food. The main muscle responsible for pulling food into the buccal cavity during swallowing is the I3 muscle, whose motor neurons B6, B9, and B3 have been previously identified. By performing recordings from these neurons in vivo in intact, behaving animals or in vitro in a suspended buccal mass preparation, we demonstrated that the frequencies and durations of these motor neurons increased from biting to swallowing. Using the physiological patterns of activation to drive these neurons intracellularly, we further demonstrated that activating them using biting-like frequencies and durations, either alone or in combination, generated little or no force in the I3 muscle. When biting-like patterns preceded swallowing-like patterns, however, the forces during the subsequent swallowing-like patterns were significantly enhanced. Sequences of swallowing-like patterns, either with these neurons alone or in combination, further enhanced forces in the I3 muscle. These results suggest a novel mechanism for enhancing force production in a muscle, and may be relevant to understanding motor control in vertebrates.

  8. Monopolar active accessories can be connected to Covidien ForceTriad electrosurgical generators incorrectly, disabling coagulation mode.

    PubMed

    2011-03-01

    The monopolar output receptacle on the Covidien ForceTriad electrosurgical generator is designed in such a way that users can unknowingly connect active accessories in the wrong orientation, disabling the system's coagulation function. The manufacturer is developing labeling for ForceTriad production units that depicts the proper orientation in which to connect the accessory during setup. Covidien is currently considering how it will address units already in the field.

  9. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening. PMID:26626178

  10. Force propagation and force generation in cells.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Oliver; Duschl, Claus

    2010-09-01

    Determining how forces are produced by and propagated through the cytoskeleton (CSK) of the cell is of great interest as dynamic processes of the CSK are intimately correlated with many molecular signaling pathways. We are presenting a novel approach for integrating measurements on cell elasticity, transcellular force propagation, and cellular force generation to obtain a comprehensive description of dynamic and mechanical properties of the CSK under force loading. This approach uses a combination of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We apply well-defined loading schemes onto the apical cell membrane of fibroblasts using the SFM and simultaneously use TIRF microscopy to image the topography of the basal cell membrane. The locally distinct changes of shape and depth of the cytoskeletal imprints onto the basal membrane are interpreted as results of force propagation through the cytoplasm. This observation provides evidence for the tensegrity model and demonstrates the usefulness of our approach that does not depend on potentially disturbing marker compounds. We confirm that the actin network greatly determines cell stiffness and represents the substrate that mediates force transduction through the cytoplasm of the cell. The latter is an essential feature of tensegrity. Most importantly, our new finding that, both intact actin and microtubule networks are required for enabling the cell to produce work, can only be understood within the framework of the tensegrity model. We also provide, for the first time, a direct measurement of the cell's mechanical power output under compression at two femtowatts. PMID:20607861

  11. PPARdelta agonism inhibits skeletal muscle PDC activity, mitochondrial ATP production and force generation during prolonged contraction.

    PubMed

    Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Baker, David J; Constantin, Despina; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2009-01-15

    We have recently shown that PPARdelta agonism, used clinically to treat insulin resistance, increases fat oxidation and up-regulates mitochondrial PDK4 mRNA and protein expression in resting skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that PDK4 up-regulation, which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC)-dependent carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation, would negatively affect muscle function during sustained contraction where the demand on CHO is markedly increased. Three groups of eight male Wistar rats each received either vehicle or a PPARdelta agonist (GW610742X) at two doses (5 and 100 mg (kg body mass (bm))(-1) orally for 6 days. On the seventh day, the gastrocnemius-soleus-plantaris muscle group was isolated and snap frozen, or underwent 30 min of electrically evoked submaximal intensity isometric contraction using a perfused hindlimb model. During contraction, the rate of muscle PDC activation was significantly lower at 100 mg (kg bm)(-1) compared with control (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the rates of muscle PCr hydrolysis and lactate accumulation were significantly increased at 100 mg (kg bm)(-1) compared with control, reflecting lower mitochondrial ATP generation. Muscle tension development during contraction was significantly lower at 100 mg (kg bm)(-1) compared with control (25%; P < 0.05). The present data demonstrate that PPARdelta agonism inhibits muscle CHO oxidation at the level of PDC during prolonged contraction, and is paralleled by the activation of anaerobic metabolism, which collectively impair contractile function.

  12. Dynein arms are oscillating force generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingyoji, Chikako; Higuchi, Hideo; Yoshimura, Misako; Katayama, Eisaku; Yanagida, Toshio

    1998-06-01

    Eukaryotic flagella beat rhythmically. Dynein is a protein that powers flagellar motion, and oscillation may be inherent to this protein. Here we determine whether oscillation is a property of dynein arms themselves or whether oscillation requires an intact axoneme, which is the central core of the flagellum and consists ofa regular array of microtubules. Using optical trapping nanometry,, we measured the force generated by a few dynein arms on an isolated doublet microtubule. When the dynein arms on the doublet microtubule contact a singlet microtubule and are activated by photolysis of caged ATP, they generate a peak force of ~6pN and move the singlet microtubule over the doublet microtubule in a processive manner. The force and displacement oscillate with a peak-to-peak force and amplitude of ~2pN and ~30nm, respectively. The geometry of the interaction indicates that very few (possibly one) dynein arms are needed to generate the oscillation. The maximum frequency of the oscillation at 0.75mM ATP is ~70Hz this frequency decreases as the ATP concentration decreases. A similar oscillatory force is also generated by inner dynein arms alone on doublet microtubules that are depleted of outer dynein arms. The oscillation of the dynein arm may be a basic mechanism underlying flagellar beating.

  13. NON-NEUTRALIZED ELECTRIC CURRENT PATTERNS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS: ORIGIN OF THE SHEAR-GENERATING LORENTZ FORCE

    SciTech Connect

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Mikic, Zoran

    2012-12-10

    Using solar vector magnetograms of the highest available spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, we perform a detailed study of electric current patterns in two solar active regions (ARs): a flaring/eruptive and a flare-quiet one. We aim to determine whether ARs inject non-neutralized (net) electric currents in the solar atmosphere, responding to a debate initiated nearly two decades ago that remains inconclusive. We find that well-formed, intense magnetic polarity inversion lines (PILs) within ARs are the only photospheric magnetic structures that support significant net current. More intense PILs seem to imply stronger non-neutralized current patterns per polarity. This finding revises previous works that claim frequent injections of intense non-neutralized currents by most ARs appearing in the solar disk but also works that altogether rule out injection of non-neutralized currents. In agreement with previous studies, we also find that magnetically isolated ARs remain globally current-balanced. In addition, we confirm and quantify the preference of a given magnetic polarity to follow a given sense of electric currents, indicating a dominant sense of twist in ARs. This coherence effect is more pronounced in more compact ARs with stronger PILs and must be of sub-photospheric origin. Our results yield a natural explanation of the Lorentz force, invariably generating velocity and magnetic shear along strong PILs, thus setting a physical context for the observed pre-eruption evolution in solar ARs.

  14. Parallel inhibition of active force and relaxed fiber stiffness by caldesmon fragments at physiological ionic strength and temperature conditions: additional evidence that weak cross-bridge binding to actin is an essential intermediate for force generation.

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, T; Chalovich, J M; Yu, L C; Brenner, B

    1995-01-01

    Previously we showed that stiffness of relaxed fibers and active force generated in single skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle are inhibited in parallel by actin-binding fragments of caldesmon, an actin-associated protein of smooth muscle, under conditions in which a large fraction of cross-bridges is weakly attached to actin (ionic strength of 50 mM and temperature of 5 degrees C). These results suggested that weak cross-bridge attachment to actin is essential for force generation. The present study provides evidence that this is also true for physiological ionic strength (170 mM) at temperatures up to 30 degrees C, suggesting that weak cross-bridge binding to actin is generally required for force generation. In addition, we show that the inhibition of active force is not a result of changes in cross-bridge cycling kinetics but apparently results from selective inhibition of weak cross-bridge binding to actin. Together with our previous biochemical, mechanical, and structural studies, these findings support the proposal that weak cross-bridge attachment to actin is an essential intermediate on the path to force generation and are consistent with the concept that isometric force mainly results from an increase in strain of the attached cross-bridge as a result of a structural change associated with the transition from a weakly bound to a strongly bound actomyosin complex. This mechanism is different from the processes responsible for quick tension recovery that were proposed by Huxley and Simmons (Proposed mechanism of force generation in striated muscle. Nature. 233:533-538.) to represent the elementary mechanism of force generation. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7647245

  15. Force generation in a regrowing eukaryotic flagellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, Marco; Bruneau, Bastien; Johnson, Thomas; Goldstein, Raymond

    2012-02-01

    Flagella are whip-like organelles with a complex internal structure, the axoneme, highly conserved across eukaryotic species. The highly regulated activity of motor proteins arranged along the axoneme moves the flagellum in the surrounding fluid, generating forces that can be used for swimming or fluid propulsion. Although our understanding of the general mechanism behind flagellar motion is well established, the details of its implementation in a real axoneme is still poorly understood. Here we explore the inner working of the eukaryotic flagellum using a uniflagellated mutant of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to investigate in detail the force and power generated by a moving flagellum during axonemal regrowth after deflagellation. These experiments will contribute to our understanding of the inner working of the eukaryotic flagellum.

  16. Keratocytes generate traction forces in two phases.

    PubMed

    Burton, K; Park, J H; Taylor, D L

    1999-11-01

    Forces generated by goldfish keratocytes and Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts have been measured with nanonewton precision and submicrometer spatial resolution. Differential interference contrast microscopy was used to visualize deformations produced by traction forces in elastic substrata, and interference reflection microscopy revealed sites of cell-substratum adhesions. Force ranged from a few nanonewtons at submicrometer spots under the lamellipodium to several hundred nanonewtons under the cell body. As cells moved forward, centripetal forces were applied by lamellipodia at sites that remained stationary on the substratum. Force increased and abruptly became lateral at the boundary of the lamellipodium and the cell body. When the cell retracted at its posterior margin, cell-substratum contact area decreased more rapidly than force, so that stress (force divided by area) increased as the cell pulled away. An increase in lateral force was associated with widening of the cell body. These mechanical data suggest an integrated, two-phase mechanism of cell motility: (1) low forces in the lamellipodium are applied in the direction of cortical flow and cause the cell body to be pulled forward; and (2) a component of force at the flanks pulls the rear margins forward toward the advancing cell body, whereas a large lateral component contributes to detachment of adhesions without greatly perturbing forward movement. PMID:10564269

  17. Shear forces during blast, not abrupt changes in pressure alone, generate calcium activity in human brain cells.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Rea; Blank, Paul S; Steinkamp, Alex; Rappaport, Shay M; Ravin, Nitay; Bezrukov, Ludmila; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) describes a spectrum of injuries caused by an explosive force that results in changes in brain function. The mechanism responsible for primary bTBI following a blast shockwave remains unknown. We have developed a pneumatic device that delivers shockwaves, similar to those known to induce bTBI, within a chamber optimal for fluorescence microscopy. Abrupt changes in pressure can be created with and without the presence of shear forces at the surface of cells. In primary cultures of human central nervous system cells, the cellular calcium response to shockwaves alone was negligible. Even when the applied pressure reached 15 atm, there was no damage or excitation, unless concomitant shear forces, peaking between 0.3 to 0.7 Pa, were present at the cell surface. The probability of cellular injury in response to a shockwave was low and cell survival was unaffected 20 hours after shockwave exposure.

  18. Air Force seal activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhew, Ellen R.

    1994-07-01

    Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Brush seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to reduce leakage at the required conditions. Likewise, challenges in engine mainshaft air/oil seals are also being addressed. Counter-rotating intershaft applications within the IHPTET initiative involve very high rubbing velocities. This viewgraph presentation briefly describes past and current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engine testing.

  19. Comparison of Recovery Strategies on Maximal Force-Generating Capacity and Electromyographic Activity Level of the Knee Extensor Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Zarrouk, Nidhal; Rebai, Haithem; Yahia, Abdelmoneem; Souissi, Nizar; Hug, François; Dogui, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Context: With regard to intermittent training exercise, the effects of the mode of recovery on subsequent performance are equivocal. Objective: To compare the effects of 3 types of recovery intervention on peak torque (PT) and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the knee extensor muscles after fatiguing isokinetic intermittent concentric exercise. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eight elite judo players (age = 18.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 180 ± 3 cm, mass = 77.0 ± 4.2 kg). Interventions : Participants completed 3 randomized sessions within 7 days. Each session consisted of 5 sets of 10 concentric knee extensions at 80% PT at 120°/s, with 3 minutes of recovery between sets. Recovery interventions were passive, active, and electromyostimulation. The PT and maximal EMG activity were recorded simultaneously while participants performed isokinetic dynamometer trials before and 3 minutes after the resistance exercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): The PT and maximal EMG activity from the knee extensors were quantified at isokinetic velocities of 60°/s, 120°/s, and 180°/s, with 5 repetitions at each velocity. Results: The reduction in PT observed after electromyo-stimulation was less than that seen after passive (P < .001) or active recovery (P < .001). The reduction in PT was less after passive recovery than after active recovery (P < .001). The maximal EMG activity level observed after electromyostimulation was higher than that seen after active recovery (P < .05). Conclusions: Electromyostimulation was an effective recovery tool in decreasing neuromuscular fatigue after high-intensity, intermittent isokinetic concentric exercise for the knee extensor muscles. Also, active recovery induced the greatest amount of neuromuscular fatigue. PMID:21944070

  20. Minimizing forced outage risk in generator bidding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Dibyendu

    Competition in power markets has exposed the participating companies to physical and financial uncertainties. Generator companies bid to supply power in a day-ahead market. Once their bids are accepted by the ISO they are bound to supply power. A random outage after acceptance of bids forces a generator to buy power from the expensive real-time hourly spot market and sell to the ISO at the set day-ahead market clearing price, incurring losses. A risk management technique is developed to assess this financial risk associated with forced outages of generators and then minimize it. This work presents a risk assessment module which measures the financial risk of generators bidding in an open market for different bidding scenarios. The day-ahead power market auction is modeled using a Unit Commitment algorithm and a combination of Normal and Cauchy distributions generate the real time hourly spot market. Risk profiles are derived and VaRs are calculated at 98 percent confidence level as a measure of financial risk. Risk Profiles and VaRs help the generators to analyze the forced outage risk and different factors affecting it. The VaRs and the estimated total earning for different bidding scenarios are used to develop a risk minimization module. This module will develop a bidding strategy of the generator company such that its estimated total earning is maximized keeping the VaR below a tolerable limit. This general framework of a risk management technique for the generating companies bidding in competitive day-ahead market can also help them in decisions related to building new generators.

  1. Force generation by the growth of amyloid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Herling, Therese W; Garcia, Gonzalo A; Michaels, Thomas C T; Grentz, Wolfgang; Dean, James; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Gang, Hongze; Müller, Thomas; Kav, Batuhan; Terentjev, Eugene M; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2015-08-01

    The generation of mechanical forces are central to a wide range of vital biological processes, including the function of the cytoskeleton. Although the forces emerging from the polymerization of native proteins have been studied in detail, the potential for force generation by aberrant protein polymerization has not yet been explored. Here, we show that the growth of amyloid fibrils, archetypical aberrant protein polymers, is capable of unleashing mechanical forces on the piconewton scale for individual filaments. We apply microfluidic techniques to measure the forces released by amyloid growth for two systems: insulin and lysozyme. The level of force measured for amyloid growth in both systems is comparable to that observed for actin and tubulin, systems that have evolved to generate force during their native functions and, unlike amyloid growth, rely on the input of external energy in the form of nucleotide hydrolysis for maximum force generation. Furthermore, we find that the power density released from growing amyloid fibrils is comparable to that of high-performance synthetic polymer actuators. These findings highlight the potential of amyloid structures as active materials and shed light on the criteria for regulation and reversibility that guide molecular evolution of functional polymers.

  2. Force generation by the growth of amyloid aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Herling, Therese W.; Garcia, Gonzalo A.; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Grentz, Wolfgang; Dean, James; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Gang, Hongze; Müller, Thomas; Kav, Batuhan; Terentjev, Eugene M.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of mechanical forces are central to a wide range of vital biological processes, including the function of the cytoskeleton. Although the forces emerging from the polymerization of native proteins have been studied in detail, the potential for force generation by aberrant protein polymerization has not yet been explored. Here, we show that the growth of amyloid fibrils, archetypical aberrant protein polymers, is capable of unleashing mechanical forces on the piconewton scale for individual filaments. We apply microfluidic techniques to measure the forces released by amyloid growth for two systems: insulin and lysozyme. The level of force measured for amyloid growth in both systems is comparable to that observed for actin and tubulin, systems that have evolved to generate force during their native functions and, unlike amyloid growth, rely on the input of external energy in the form of nucleotide hydrolysis for maximum force generation. Furthermore, we find that the power density released from growing amyloid fibrils is comparable to that of high-performance synthetic polymer actuators. These findings highlight the potential of amyloid structures as active materials and shed light on the criteria for regulation and reversibility that guide molecular evolution of functional polymers. PMID:26195762

  3. Do centrioles generate a polar ejection force?

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    A microtubule-dependent polar ejection force that pushes chromosomes away from spindle poles during prometaphase is observed in animal cells but not in the cells of higher plants. Elongating microtubules and kinesin-like motor molecules have been proposed as possible causes, but neither accounts for all the data. In the hypothesis proposed here a polar ejection force is generated by centrioles, which are found in animals but not in higher plants. Centrioles consist of nine microtubule triplets arranged like the blades of a tiny turbine. Instead of viewing centrioles through the spectacles of molecular reductionism and neo-Darwinism, this hypothesis assumes that they are holistically designed to be turbines. Orthogonally oriented centriolar turbines could generate oscillations in spindle microtubules that resemble the motion produced by a laboratory vortexer. The result would be a microtubule-mediated ejection force tending to move chromosomes away from the spindle axis and the poles. A rise in intracellular calcium at the onset of anaphase could regulate the polar ejection force by shutting down the centriolar turbines, but defective regulation could result in an excessive force that contributes to the chromosomal instability characteristic of most cancer cells.

  4. Do centrioles generate a polar ejection force?

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    A microtubule-dependent polar ejection force that pushes chromosomes away from spindle poles during prometaphase is observed in animal cells but not in the cells of higher plants. Elongating microtubules and kinesin-like motor molecules have been proposed as possible causes, but neither accounts for all the data. In the hypothesis proposed here a polar ejection force is generated by centrioles, which are found in animals but not in higher plants. Centrioles consist of nine microtubule triplets arranged like the blades of a tiny turbine. Instead of viewing centrioles through the spectacles of molecular reductionism and neo-Darwinism, this hypothesis assumes that they are holistically designed to be turbines. Orthogonally oriented centriolar turbines could generate oscillations in spindle microtubules that resemble the motion produced by a laboratory vortexer. The result would be a microtubule-mediated ejection force tending to move chromosomes away from the spindle axis and the poles. A rise in intracellular calcium at the onset of anaphase could regulate the polar ejection force by shutting down the centriolar turbines, but defective regulation could result in an excessive force that contributes to the chromosomal instability characteristic of most cancer cells. PMID:15889341

  5. Force generation by endocytic actin patches in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Anders E; Bayly, Philip V

    2014-04-15

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The deformation of the gel is treated using a finite-element approach. We explore the effects and interplay of three different types of force driving invagination: 1), forces perpendicular to the membrane, generated by differences between actin polymerization rates at the edge of the patch and those at the center; 2), the inherent curvature of the coat-protein layer; and 3), forces parallel to the membrane that buckle the coat protein layer, generated by an actomyosin contractile ring. We find that with optimistic estimates for the stall stress of actin gel growth and the shear modulus of the actin gel, actin polymerization can generate almost enough force to overcome the turgor pressure. In combination with the other mechanisms, actin polymerization can the force over the critical value.

  6. Force Generation by Endocytic Actin Patches in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Anders E.; Bayly, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane deformation during endocytosis in yeast is driven by local, templated assembly of a sequence of proteins including polymerized actin and curvature-generating coat proteins such as clathrin. Actin polymerization is required for successful endocytosis, but it is not known by what mechanisms actin polymerization generates the required pulling forces. To address this issue, we develop a simulation method in which the actin network at the protein patch is modeled as an active gel. The deformation of the gel is treated using a finite-element approach. We explore the effects and interplay of three different types of force driving invagination: 1), forces perpendicular to the membrane, generated by differences between actin polymerization rates at the edge of the patch and those at the center; 2), the inherent curvature of the coat-protein layer; and 3), forces parallel to the membrane that buckle the coat protein layer, generated by an actomyosin contractile ring. We find that with optimistic estimates for the stall stress of actin gel growth and the shear modulus of the actin gel, actin polymerization can generate almost enough force to overcome the turgor pressure. In combination with the other mechanisms, actin polymerization can the force over the critical value. PMID:24739159

  7. Modular Aspects of Kinesin Force Generation Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, William R.; Steiner, Miriam; Wohlever, Matthew L.; Kamm, Roger D.; Hwang, Wonmuk; Lang, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    The motor head of kinesin carries out microtubule binding, ATP hydrolysis, and force generation. Despite a high level of sequence and structural conservation, subtle variations in subdomains of the motor head determine family-specific properties. In particular, both Kinesin-1 (Kin-1) and Kinesin-5 (Kin-5) walk processively to the microtubule plus-end, yet show distinct motility characteristics suitable for their functions. We studied chimeric Kin-1/Kin-5 constructs with a combination of single molecule motility assays and molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate that Kin-5 possesses a force-generating element similar to Kin-1, i.e., the cover-neck bundle. Furthermore, the Kin-5 neck linker makes additional contacts with the core of the motor head via loop L13, which putatively compensates for the shorter cover-neck bundle of Kin-5. Our results indicate that Kin-1 is mechanically optimized for individual cargo transport, whereas Kin-5 does not necessarily maximize its mechanical performance. Its biochemical rates and enhanced force sensitivity may instead be beneficial for operation in a group of motors. Such variations in subdomains would be a strategy for achieving diversity in motility with the conserved motor head. PMID:23663840

  8. Control Strategies for Accurate Force Generation and Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics and motor strategies for force generation and force relaxation were examined using graded tasks during isometric force control. Ten female college students (M age = 20.2 yr., SD = 1.1) were instructed to accurately control the force of isometric elbow flexion using their right arm to match a target force level as quickly as possible. They performed: (1) a generation task, wherein they increased their force from 0% maximum voluntary force to 20% maximum voluntary force (0%-20%), 40% maximum voluntary force (0%-40%), or 60% maximum voluntary force (0%-60%) and (2) and a relaxation task, in which they decreased their force from 60% maximum voluntary force to 40% maximum voluntary force (60%-40%), 20% maximum voluntary force (60%-20%), or to 0% maximum voluntary force (60%-0%). Produced force parameters of point of accuracy (force level, error), quickness (reaction time, adjustment time, rate of force development), and strategy (force wave, rate of force development) were analyzed. Errors of force relaxation were all greater, and reaction times shorter, than those of force generation. Adjustment time depended on the magnitude of force and peak rates of force development and force relaxation differed. Controlled relaxation of force is more difficult with low magnitude of force control.

  9. Control Strategies for Accurate Force Generation and Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics and motor strategies for force generation and force relaxation were examined using graded tasks during isometric force control. Ten female college students (M age = 20.2 yr., SD = 1.1) were instructed to accurately control the force of isometric elbow flexion using their right arm to match a target force level as quickly as possible. They performed: (1) a generation task, wherein they increased their force from 0% maximum voluntary force to 20% maximum voluntary force (0%-20%), 40% maximum voluntary force (0%-40%), or 60% maximum voluntary force (0%-60%) and (2) and a relaxation task, in which they decreased their force from 60% maximum voluntary force to 40% maximum voluntary force (60%-40%), 20% maximum voluntary force (60%-20%), or to 0% maximum voluntary force (60%-0%). Produced force parameters of point of accuracy (force level, error), quickness (reaction time, adjustment time, rate of force development), and strategy (force wave, rate of force development) were analyzed. Errors of force relaxation were all greater, and reaction times shorter, than those of force generation. Adjustment time depended on the magnitude of force and peak rates of force development and force relaxation differed. Controlled relaxation of force is more difficult with low magnitude of force control. PMID:27555365

  10. Active Learning Crosses Generations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Diane K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the benefits of intergenerational programs, highlighting a child care program that offers age-appropriate and mutually beneficial activities for children and elders within a nearby retirement community. The program has adopted High/Scope's active learning approach to planning and implementing activities that involve both generations. The…

  11. Wave activated generator

    SciTech Connect

    Neuenschwander, V. L.

    1985-09-03

    A wave activated generator utilizes the principle of providing relative movement between a permanent magnet and a coil to induce an electrical current in the coil. The coil is situated in a static tube anchored to the sea bed by means of a ballast tank at the base of the tube and guy wires extending from the tube. A plunger with permanent magnets is mounted in the tube for vertical reciprocation of the plunger, the plunger projecting outwardly from the upper end of the tube and terminating in a hull-shaped float which rides the water surface and provides vertical reciprocation of the plunger responsive to wave motion in order to move the magnets relative to the coil and generate current in the coil.

  12. Traction force dynamics predict gap formation in activated endothelium.

    PubMed

    Valent, Erik T; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Hordijk, Peter L

    2016-09-10

    In many pathological conditions the endothelium becomes activated and dysfunctional, resulting in hyperpermeability and plasma leakage. No specific therapies are available yet to control endothelial barrier function, which is regulated by inter-endothelial junctions and the generation of acto-myosin-based contractile forces in the context of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the spatiotemporal distribution and stimulus-induced reorganization of these integral forces remain largely unknown. Traction force microscopy of human endothelial monolayers was used to visualize contractile forces in resting cells and during thrombin-induced hyperpermeability. Simultaneously, information about endothelial monolayer integrity, adherens junctions and cytoskeletal proteins (F-actin) were captured. This revealed a heterogeneous distribution of traction forces, with nuclear areas showing lower and cell-cell junctions higher traction forces than the whole-monolayer average. Moreover, junctional forces were asymmetrically distributed among neighboring cells. Force vector orientation analysis showed a good correlation with the alignment of F-actin and revealed contractile forces in newly formed filopodia and lamellipodia-like protrusions within the monolayer. Finally, unstable areas, showing high force fluctuations within the monolayer were prone to form inter-endothelial gaps upon stimulation with thrombin. To conclude, contractile traction forces are heterogeneously distributed within endothelial monolayers and force instability, rather than force magnitude, predicts the stimulus-induced formation of intercellular gaps. PMID:27498166

  13. The generation of side force by distributed suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard; Hong, John

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an approximate analysis of the generation of side force on a cylinder placed horizontal to the flow direction by the application of distributed suction on the rearward side of the cylinder. Relationships are derived between the side force coefficients and the required suction coefficients necessary to maintain attached flow on one side of the cylinder, thereby inducing circulation around the cylinder and a corresponding side force.

  14. The generation of side force by distributed suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Leonard; Hong, John

    1993-05-01

    This report provides an approximate analysis of the generation of side force on a cylinder placed horizontal to the flow direction by the application of distributed suction on the rearward side of the cylinder. Relationships are derived between the side force coefficients and the required suction coefficients necessary to maintain attached flow on one side of the cylinder, thereby inducing circulation around the cylinder and a corresponding side force.

  15. Highbay Generator Room, looking northwest Beale Air Force Base, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Highbay Generator Room, looking northwest - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Power Plant, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  16. Scaling of motor cortical excitability during unimanual force generation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Monica A; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2009-10-01

    During performance of a unimanual force generation task primary motor cortices (M1s) experience clear functional changes. Here, we evaluated the way in which M1s interact during parametric increases in right wrist flexion force in healthy volunteers. We measured the amplitude and the slope of motor evoked potentials (MEP) recruitment curves to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the left and right flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscles at rest and during 10%, 30% and 70% of maximal wrist flexion force. At rest, no differences were observed in the amplitude and slope of MEP recruitment curves in the left and right FCR muscles. With increasing right wrist flexion force, MEP amplitudes increased in both FCR muscles, with larger amplitudes in the right FCR. We found a significant correlation between the left and right MEP amplitudes across conditions. The slope of right and left FCR MEP recruitment curve was significantly steeper at 70% of force compared to rest and 10% of force. A significant correlation between the slope of left and right FCR MEP amplitudes was found at 70% of force only. Our results indicate a differential scaling of excitability in the corticospinal system controlling right and left FCR muscles at increasing levels of unimanual force generation. Specifically, these data highlights that at strong levels of unimanual force the increases in motor cortical excitability with increasing TMS stimulus intensities follow a similar pattern in both M1s, while at low levels of force they do not.

  17. Force Generation, Polymerization Dynamics and Nucleation of Actin Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruizhe

    We study force generation and actin filament dynamics using stochastic and deterministic methods. First, we treat force generation of bundled actin filaments by polymerization via molecular-level stochastic simulations. In the widely-used Brownian Ratchet model, actin filaments grow freely whenever the tip-obstacle gap created by thermal fluctuation exceeds the monomer size. We name this model the Perfect Brownian Ratchet (PBR) model. In the PBR model, actin monomer diffusion is treated implicitly. We perform a series of simulations based on the PBR, in which obstacle motion is treated explicitly; in most previous studies, obstacle motion has been treated implicitly. We find that the cooperativity of filaments is generally weak in the PBR model, meaning that more filaments would grow more slowly given the same force per filament. Closed-form formulas are also developed, which match the simulation results. These portable and accurate formulas provide guidance for experiments and upper and lower bounds for theoretical analyses. We also studied a variation of the PBR, called the Diffusing Brownian Ratchet (DBR) model, in which both actin monomer and obstacle diffusion are treated explicitly. We find that the growth rate of multiple filaments is even lower, compared with that in PBR. This finding challenges the widely-accepted PBR assumption and suggests that pushing the study of actin dynamics down to the sub-nanometer level yields new insights. We subsequently used a rate equation approach to model the effect of local depletion of actin monomers on the nucleation of actin filaments on biomimetic beads, and how the effect is regulated by capping protein (CP). We find that near the bead surface, a higher CP concentration increases local actin concentration, which leads to an enhanced activities of actin filaments' nucleation. Our model analysis matches the experimental results and lends support to an important but undervalued hypothesis proposed by Carlier and

  18. Endothermic force generation in skinned cardiac muscle from rat.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, K W

    1999-08-01

    Isometric tension responses to rapid temperature jumps (T-jumps) of 2-6 degrees C were examined in skinned muscle fibre bundles isolated from papillary muscles of the rat heart. T-jumps were induced by an infra-red laser pulse (wave length 1.32 microm, pulse duration 0.2 ms) obtained from a Nd-YAG laser, which heated the fibres and bathing buffer solution in a 50 microl trough; the increased temperature by laser pulse was clamped at the high temperature by a Peltier system (see Ranatunga, 1996). In maximally Ca2+ -activated (pCa ca. 4.5) fibres, the relationship between tension and temperature was non-linear, the increase of active tension with temperature being more pronounced at lower temperatures (below ca. 20 degrees C). A T-jump at any temperature (range 3-35 degrees C) induced an initial step decrease of tension of variable amplitude (Phase 1), probably due to thermal expansion, and it was followed by a tension transient which resulted in a net rise of tension above the pre-T-jump level. The rate of net rise of tension (Phase 2b or endothermic force generation) was 7-10/s at ca. 12 degrees C and its Q10 was 6.3 (below 25 degrees C). In cases where the step decrease of tension in Phase 1 was prominent, an initial quick tension recovery phase (Phase 2a, 70-100/s at 12 degrees C) that did not contribute to a rise of tension above the pre-T-jump level, was also seen. This phase (Phase 2a) appeared to be similar to the quick tension recovery induced by a small length release and its rate increased with temperature with a Q10 of 1.8. In some cases where Phase 2a was present, a slower tension rise (Phase 3) was seen; its rate (ca. 5/s) was temperature-insensitive. The results show that the rate of endothermic force generation in cardiac fibres is clearly different from that of either fast-twitch or slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscle fibres; implication of such fibre type-specific differences is discussed in relation to the difficulty in identifying the

  19. Keratocytes Generate Traction Forces in Two PhasesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Kevin; Park, Jung H.; Taylor, D. Lansing

    1999-01-01

    Forces generated by goldfish keratocytes and Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts have been measured with nanonewton precision and submicrometer spatial resolution. Differential interference contrast microscopy was used to visualize deformations produced by traction forces in elastic substrata, and interference reflection microscopy revealed sites of cell-substratum adhesions. Force ranged from a few nanonewtons at submicrometer spots under the lamellipodium to several hundred nanonewtons under the cell body. As cells moved forward, centripetal forces were applied by lamellipodia at sites that remained stationary on the substratum. Force increased and abruptly became lateral at the boundary of the lamellipodium and the cell body. When the cell retracted at its posterior margin, cell-substratum contact area decreased more rapidly than force, so that stress (force divided by area) increased as the cell pulled away. An increase in lateral force was associated with widening of the cell body. These mechanical data suggest an integrated, two-phase mechanism of cell motility: (1) low forces in the lamellipodium are applied in the direction of cortical flow and cause the cell body to be pulled forward; and (2) a component of force at the flanks pulls the rear margins forward toward the advancing cell body, whereas a large lateral component contributes to detachment of adhesions without greatly perturbing forward movement. PMID:10564269

  20. Generation of spin motive force in a soliton lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, A. S. Sinitsyn, V. E.; Bostrem, I. G.; Kishine, J.

    2013-05-15

    The generation of a spin motive force in a chiral helimagnet due to the action of two crossed magnetic fields is considered. The cases of pulsed and periodic magnetic fields directed along the helical axis under a perpendicular dc field are analyzed. It is shown that, in the case of a pulsed field, the spin motive force is related to dissipation, whereas in a periodic field, there is a reactive component that is not related to damping processes.

  1. Direct measurement of the forces generated by an undulatory microswimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Rafael; Backholm, Matilda; Ryu, William; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2014-11-01

    C. elegans is a millimeter-sized nematode which has served as a model organism in biology for several decades, primarily due to its simple anatomy. Employing an undulatory form of locomotion, this worm is capable of propelling itself through various media. Using a micropipette deflection technique, in conjunction with high speed imaging, we directly measure the time-varying forces generated by C. elegans. We observe excellent agreement between our measured forces and the predictions of resistive force theory, through which we determine the drag coefficients of the worm. We also perform the direct force measurements at controlled distances from a single solid boundary as well as between two solid boundaries. We extract the drag coefficients of the worm to quantify the influence of the boundary on the swimming and the hydrodynamic forces involved.

  2. Aeroacoustics. [analysis of properties of sound generated by aerodynamic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M., E.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to determine the properties of sound generated by aerodynamic forces or motions originating in a flow, such as the unsteady aerodynamic forces on propellers or by turbulent flows around an aircraft. The acoustics of moving media are reviewed and mathematical models are developed. Lighthill's acoustic analogy and the application to turbulent flows are analyzed. The effects of solid boundaries are calculated. Theories based on the solution of linearized vorticity and acoustic field equations are explained. The effects of nonuniform mean flow on the generation of sound are reported.

  3. Force Generation and Dynamics of Individual Cilia under External Loading

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David B.; Swaminathan, Vinay; Estes, Ashley; Cribb, Jeremy; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Davis, C. William; Superfine, R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Motile cilia are unique multimotor systems that display coordination and periodicity while imparting forces to biological fluids. They play important roles in normal physiology, and ciliopathies are implicated in a growing number of human diseases. In this work we measure the response of individual human airway cilia to calibrated forces transmitted via spot-labeled magnetic microbeads. Cilia respond to applied forces by 1), a reduction in beat amplitude (up to an 85% reduction by 160–170 pN of force); 2), a decreased tip velocity proportionate to applied force; and 3), no significant change in beat frequency. Tip velocity reduction occurred in each beat direction, independently of the direction of applied force, indicating that the cilium is “driven” in both directions at all times. By applying a quasistatic force model, we deduce that axoneme stiffness is dominated by the rigidity of the microtubules, and that cilia can exert 62 ± 18 pN of force at the tip via the generation of 5.6 ± 1.6 pN/dynein head. PMID:20085719

  4. Surface texture generation during cylindrical milling in the aspect of cutting force variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, S.; Twardowski, P.; Pelic, M.

    2014-03-01

    The work presented here concentrates on surface texture analysis, after cylindrical milling of hardened steel. Cutting force variations occurring in the machining process have direct influence on the cutter displacements and thus on the generated surface texture. Therefore, in these experiments, the influence of active number of teeth (zc) on the cutting force variations was investigated. Cutting forces and cutter displacements were measured during machining process (online) using, namely piezoelectric force dynamometer and 3D laser vibrometer. Surface roughness parameters were measured using stylus surface profiler. The surface roughness model including cutting parameters (fz, D) and cutting force variations was also developed. The research revealed that in cylindrical milling process, cutting force variations have immediate influence on surface texture generation.

  5. Evaluation of force generation mechanisms in natural, passive hydraulic actuators.

    PubMed

    Le Duigou, A; Castro, M

    2016-01-01

    Pine cones are well known natural actuators that can move their scales upon humidity gradient. The mechanism manifests itself through a displacement easily observable by the naked eye, but coupled with stress generation. In ancient Egypt, wooden wedges were used to break soft blocks of stone by the generated swelling stress. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the ability of pine cone scales to generate forces while being wetted. In our experiments, a blocking force of around 3N is measured depending on the position on the pine cone where the scales are extracted. A fairly good agreement is obtained when theoretical results based on bimetallic strip systems are compared with experimental data, even if overestimation is observed arising from the input data considered for dry tissues. Inspired by a simplified pine cone microstructure, a biocomposite analogue is manufactured and tested. Although an adequate blocking force can be generated, it has a lower value compared to natural pine cones which benefit from optimized swelling tissue content and interfacial bond strength between them. This study provides new insights to understand the generation of force by pine cones as well as to develop novel biocomposite functionalities. PMID:26726792

  6. Evaluation of force generation mechanisms in natural, passive hydraulic actuators

    PubMed Central

    Le Duigou, A.; Castro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Pine cones are well known natural actuators that can move their scales upon humidity gradient. The mechanism manifests itself through a displacement easily observable by the naked eye, but coupled with stress generation. In ancient Egypt, wooden wedges were used to break soft blocks of stone by the generated swelling stress. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the ability of pine cone scales to generate forces while being wetted. In our experiments, a blocking force of around 3N is measured depending on the position on the pine cone where the scales are extracted. A fairly good agreement is obtained when theoretical results based on bimetallic strip systems are compared with experimental data, even if overestimation is observed arising from the input data considered for dry tissues. Inspired by a simplified pine cone microstructure, a biocomposite analogue is manufactured and tested. Although an adequate blocking force can be generated, it has a lower value compared to natural pine cones which benefit from optimized swelling tissue content and interfacial bond strength between them. This study provides new insights to understand the generation of force by pine cones as well as to develop novel biocomposite functionalities. PMID:26726792

  7. Evaluation of force generation mechanisms in natural, passive hydraulic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duigou, A.; Castro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Pine cones are well known natural actuators that can move their scales upon humidity gradient. The mechanism manifests itself through a displacement easily observable by the naked eye, but coupled with stress generation. In ancient Egypt, wooden wedges were used to break soft blocks of stone by the generated swelling stress. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the ability of pine cone scales to generate forces while being wetted. In our experiments, a blocking force of around 3N is measured depending on the position on the pine cone where the scales are extracted. A fairly good agreement is obtained when theoretical results based on bimetallic strip systems are compared with experimental data, even if overestimation is observed arising from the input data considered for dry tissues. Inspired by a simplified pine cone microstructure, a biocomposite analogue is manufactured and tested. Although an adequate blocking force can be generated, it has a lower value compared to natural pine cones which benefit from optimized swelling tissue content and interfacial bond strength between them. This study provides new insights to understand the generation of force by pine cones as well as to develop novel biocomposite functionalities.

  8. Diffusible crosslinkers generate directed forces in microtubule networks.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Zdenek; Braun, Marcus; Lüdecke, Annemarie; Schlierf, Michael; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Janson, Marcel E; Diez, Stefan

    2015-03-12

    Cytoskeletal remodeling is essential to eukaryotic cell division and morphogenesis. The mechanical forces driving the restructuring are attributed to the action of molecular motors and the dynamics of cytoskeletal filaments, which both consume chemical energy. By contrast, non-enzymatic filament crosslinkers are regarded as mere friction-generating entities. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that diffusible microtubule crosslinkers of the Ase1/PRC1/Map65 family generate directed microtubule sliding when confined between partially overlapping microtubules. The Ase1-generated forces, directly measured by optical tweezers to be in the piconewton-range, were sufficient to antagonize motor-protein driven microtubule sliding. Force generation is quantitatively explained by the entropic expansion of confined Ase1 molecules diffusing within the microtubule overlaps. The thermal motion of crosslinkers is thus harnessed to generate mechanical work analogous to compressed gas propelling a piston in a cylinder. As confinement of diffusible proteins is ubiquitous in cells, the associated entropic forces are likely of importance for cellular mechanics beyond cytoskeletal networks. PMID:25748652

  9. Robustness of muscle synergies underlying three-dimensional force generation at the hand in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Rymer, William Z.; Beer, Randall F.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies using advanced matrix factorization techniques have shown that the coordination of human voluntary limb movements may be accomplished using combinations of a small number of intermuscular coordination patterns, or muscle synergies. However, the potential use of muscle synergies for isometric force generation has been evaluated mostly using correlational methods. The results of such studies suggest that fixed relationships between the activations of pairs of muscles are relatively rare. There is also emerging evidence that the nervous system uses independent strategies to control movement and force generation, which suggests that one cannot conclude a priori that isometric force generation is accomplished by combining muscle synergies, as shown in movement control. In this study, we used non-negative matrix factorization to evaluate the ability of a few muscle synergies to reconstruct the activation patterns of human arm muscles underlying the generation of three-dimensional (3-D) isometric forces at the hand. Surface electromyographic (EMG) data were recorded from eight key elbow and shoulder muscles during 3-D force target-matching protocols performed across a range of load levels and hand positions. Four synergies were sufficient to explain, on average, 95% of the variance in EMG datasets. Furthermore, we found that muscle synergy composition was conserved across biomechanical task conditions, experimental protocols, and subjects. Our findings are consistent with the view that the nervous system can generate isometric forces by assembling a combination of a small number of muscle synergies, differentially weighted according to task constraints. PMID:22279190

  10. New-generation amber united-atom force field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijiang; Tan, Chun-Hu; Hsieh, Meng-Juei; Wang, Junmei; Duan, Yong; Cieplak, Piotr; Caldwell, James; Kollman, Peter A; Luo, Ray

    2006-07-01

    We have developed a new-generation Amber united-atom force field for simulations involving highly demanding conformational sampling such as protein folding and protein-protein binding. In the new united-atom force field, all hydrogens on aliphatic carbons in all amino acids are united with carbons except those on Calpha. Our choice of explicit representation of all protein backbone atoms aims at minimizing perturbation to protein backbone conformational distributions and to simplify development of backbone torsion terms. Tests with dipeptides and solvated proteins show that our goal is achieved quite successfully. The new united-atom force field uses the same new RESP charging scheme based on B3LYP/cc-pVTZ//HF/6-31g** quantum mechanical calculations in the PCM continuum solvent as that in the Duan et al. force field. van der Waals parameters are empirically refitted starting from published values with respect to experimental solvation free energies of amino acid side-chain analogues. The suitability of mixing new point charges and van der Waals parameters with existing Amber covalent terms is tested on alanine dipeptide and is found to be reasonable. Parameters for all new torsion terms are refitted based on the new point charges and the van der Waals parameters. Molecular dynamics simulations of three small globular proteins in the explicit TIP3P solvent are performed to test the overall stability and accuracy of the new united-atom force field. Good agreements between the united-atom force field and the Duan et al. all-atom force field for both backbone and side-chain conformations are observed. In addition, the per-step efficiency of the new united-atom force field is demonstrated for simulations in the implicit generalized Born solvent. A speedup around two is observed over the Duan et al. all-atom force field for the three tested small proteins. Finally, the efficiency gain of the new united-atom force field in conformational sampling is further demonstrated

  11. Similar scaling of contralateral and ipsilateral cortical responses during graded unimanual force generation.

    PubMed

    Derosière, G; Alexandre, F; Bourdillon, N; Mandrick, K; Ward, T E; Perrey, S

    2014-01-15

    Hemibody movements are strongly considered as being under the control of the contralateral hemisphere of the cerebral cortex. However, some neuroimaging studies have found a bilateral activation of either the primary sensori-motor (SM1) areas or the rostral prefrontal cortex (PFC), during unimanual tasks. More than just bilateral, the activation of these areas was found to be symmetrical in some studies. However, the symmetrical response remains strongly controversial notably for handgrip force generations. We therefore aimed to examine the bilateral SM1 and rostral PFC area activations in response to graded submaximal force generation during a unilateral handgrip task. Fifteen healthy subjects performed 6 levels of force (ranging from 5 to 50% of MVC) during a handgrip task. We concomitantly measured the activation of bilateral SM1 and rostral PFC areas through near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the bilateral flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscles. Symmetrical activation was found over the SM1 areas for all the investigated levels of force. At the highest level of force (i.e., 50% of MVC), the EMG of the passive FDS increased significantly and the ipsilateral rostral PFC activation was found more intense than the corresponding contralateral rostral PFC activation. We suggest that the visuo-guided control of force levels during a handgrip task requires the cross-talk from ipsi- to contralateral SM1 to cope for the relative complexity of the task, similar to that which occurs during complex sequential finger movement. We also propose alternative explanations for the observed symmetrical SM1 activation including (i) the ipsilateral corticospinal tract and (ii) interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) mechanism. The increase in EMG activity over the passive FDS could be associated with a release of IHI at 50% of MVC. Finally, our results suggest that the greater ipsilateral (right) rostral PFC activation may reflect the

  12. Force Generation by Membrane-Associated Myosin-I

    PubMed Central

    Pyrpassopoulos, Serapion; Arpağ, Göker; Feeser, Elizabeth A.; Shuman, Henry; Tüzel, Erkan; Ostap, E. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate myosin-IC (Myo1c) is a type-1 myosin that links cell membranes to the cytoskeleton via its actin-binding motor domain and its phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2)-binding tail domain. While it is known that Myo1c bound to PtdIns(4,5)P2 in fluid-lipid bilayers can propel actin filaments in an unloaded motility assay, its ability to develop forces against external load on actin while bound to fluid bilayers has not been explored. Using optical tweezers, we measured the diffusion coefficient of single membrane-bound Myo1c molecules by force-relaxation experiments, and the ability of ensembles of membrane-bound Myo1c molecules to develop and sustain forces. To interpret our results, we developed a computational model that recapitulates the basic features of our experimental ensemble data and suggests that Myo1c ensembles can generate forces parallel to lipid bilayers, with larger forces achieved when the myosin works away from the plane of the membrane or when anchored to slowly diffusing regions. PMID:27156719

  13. Active droplet generation in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chong, Zhuang Zhi; Tan, Say Hwa; Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Tor, Shu Beng; Loh, Ngiap Hiang; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    The reliable generation of micron-sized droplets is an important process for various applications in droplet-based microfluidics. The generated droplets work as a self-contained reaction platform in droplet-based lab-on-a-chip systems. With the maturity of this platform technology, sophisticated and delicate control of the droplet generation process is needed to address increasingly complex applications. This review presents the state of the art of active droplet generation concepts, which are categorized according to the nature of the induced energy. At the liquid/liquid interface, an energy imbalance leads to instability and droplet breakup.

  14. Active droplet generation in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chong, Zhuang Zhi; Tan, Say Hwa; Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Tor, Shu Beng; Loh, Ngiap Hiang; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    The reliable generation of micron-sized droplets is an important process for various applications in droplet-based microfluidics. The generated droplets work as a self-contained reaction platform in droplet-based lab-on-a-chip systems. With the maturity of this platform technology, sophisticated and delicate control of the droplet generation process is needed to address increasingly complex applications. This review presents the state of the art of active droplet generation concepts, which are categorized according to the nature of the induced energy. At the liquid/liquid interface, an energy imbalance leads to instability and droplet breakup. PMID:26555381

  15. Passive Joint Forces Are Tuned to Limb Use in Insects and Drive Movements without Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ache, Jan M.; Matheson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Limb movements are generally driven by active muscular contractions working with and against passive forces arising in muscles and other structures. In relatively heavy limbs, the effects of gravity and inertia predominate, whereas in lighter limbs, passive forces intrinsic to the limb are of greater consequence. The roles of passive forces generated by muscles and tendons are well understood, but there has been little recognition that forces originating within joints themselves may also be important, and less still that these joint forces may be adapted through evolution to complement active muscle forces acting at the same joint. Results We examined the roles of passive joint forces in insect legs with different arrangements of antagonist muscles. We first show that passive forces modify actively generated movements of a joint across its working range, and that they can be sufficiently strong to generate completely passive movements that are faster than active movements observed in natural behaviors. We further demonstrate that some of these forces originate within the joint itself. In legs of different species adapted to different uses (walking, jumping), these passive joint forces complement the balance of strength of the antagonist muscles acting on the joint. We show that passive joint forces are stronger where they assist the weaker of two antagonist muscles. Conclusions In limbs where the dictates of a key behavior produce asymmetry in muscle forces, passive joint forces can be coadapted to provide the balance needed for the effective generation of other behaviors. PMID:23871240

  16. Comparative evaluation of inertial forces generated by ultrasonic lithotriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Bodo E.

    2010-02-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy has become the standard of care for large renal calculi requiring surgical removal. Ultrasonic intracorporeal lithotriptors are used to fragment and evacuate the calculi. Numerous commercially available systems exist. While previous study has demonstrated differing performance characteristics of the various systems, a standardized testing modality does not exist.1-6 In addition, ultrasonic lithotriptor efficiency is thought to deteriorate over time, but an objective measurement technique has not been reported. Rather, subjective performance of the ultrasound during surgical procedures is used to gauge the effectiveness of the instrument. In this study we test the performance of two commercially available ultrasonic lithotriptors, the Lithoclast Select (Boston Scientific, Natick, MA) and Cyberwand (Gyrus ACMI, Southborough, MA). The Lithoclast Select combines pneumatic and ultrasonic lithotripsy in one handpiece but only the ultrasonic component was evaluated in this study. The Cyberwand combines two concentric ultrasound probes into a single handpiece. Several recent studies have shown the clinical effectiveness of the Lithoclast Ultra for PCNL.1-5 The Cyberwand has been shown during in vitro testing to be an efficient lithotrite.6 G-force is the measurement of as objects acceleration relative to free-fall and is measured by the unit g. One g is equal to the standard of gravity which is 9.806 m/s2. In this study we measured the g-forces generated by the ultrasonic lithotriptors to determine if there was a difference in the forces generated by the devices.

  17. Pulling together: Tissue-generated forces that drive lumen morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Navis, Adam; Nelson, Celeste M

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical interactions are essential for bending and shaping tissues during morphogenesis. A common feature of nearly all internal organs is the formation of a tubular network consisting of an epithelium that surrounds a central lumen. Lumen formation during organogenesis requires precisely coordinated mechanical and biochemical interactions. Whereas many genetic regulators of lumen formation have been identified, relatively little is known about the mechanical cues that drive lumen morphogenesis. Lumens can be shaped by a variety of physical behaviors including wrapping a sheet of cells around a hollow core, rearranging cells to expose a lumenal cavity, or elongating a tube via cell migration, though many of the details underlying these movements remain poorly understood. It is essential to define how forces generated by individual cells cooperate to produce the tissue-level forces that drive organogenesis. Transduction of mechanical forces relies on several conserved processes including the contraction of cytoskeletal networks or expansion of lumens through increased fluid pressure. The morphogenetic events that drive lumen formation serve as a model for similar mechanical processes occurring throughout development. To understand how lumenal networks arise, it will be essential to investigate how biochemical and mechanical processes integrate to generate complex structures from comparatively simple interactions.

  18. Shortening actin filaments cause force generation in actomyosin network to change from contractile to extensile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Gardel, Margaret

    Motor proteins in conjunction with filamentous proteins convert biochemical energy into mechanical energy which serves a number of cellular processes including cell motility, force generation and intracellular cargo transport. In-vitro experiments suggest that the forces generated by kinesin motors on microtubule bundles are extensile in nature whereas myosin motors on actin filaments are contractile. It is not clear how qualitatively similar systems can show completely different behaviors in terms of the nature of force generation. In order to answer this question, we carry out in vitro experiments where we form quasi 2D filamentous actomyosin networks and vary the length of actin filaments by adding capping protein. We show that when filaments are much shorter than their typical persistence length (approximately 10 microns), the forces generated are extensile and we see active nematic defect propagation, as seen in the microtubule-kinesin system. Based on this observation, we claim that the rigidity of rods plays an important role in dictating the nature of force generation in such systems. In order to understand this transition, we selectively label individual filaments and find that longer filaments show considerable bending and buckling, making them difficult to slide and extend along their length.

  19. A Novel 3D Fibril Force Assay Implicates Src in Tumor Cell Force Generation in Collagen Networks

    PubMed Central

    Polackwich, Robert J.; Koch, Daniel; Arevalo, Richard; Miermont, Anne M.; Jee, Kathleen J.; Lazar, John; Urbach, Jeffrey; Mueller, Susette C.; McAllister, Ryan G.

    2013-01-01

    New insight into the biomechanics of cancer cell motility in 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) environments would significantly enhance our understanding of aggressive cancers and help identify new targets for intervention. While several methods for measuring the forces involved in cell-matrix interactions have been developed, previous to this study none have been able to measure forces in a fibrillar environment. We have developed a novel assay for simultaneously measuring cell mechanotransduction and motility in 3D fibrillar environments. The assay consists of a controlled-density fibrillar collagen gel atop a controlled-stiffness polyacrylamide (PAA) surface. Forces generated by living cells and their migration in the 3D collagen gel were measured with the 3D motion of tracer beads within the PAA layer. Here, this 3D fibril force assay is used to study the role of the invasion-associated protein kinase Src in mechanotransduction and motility. Src expression and activation are linked with proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, and have been shown to be required in 2D for invadopodia membranes to direct and mediate invasion. Breast cancer cell line MDA-MD-231 was stably transfected with GFP-tagged constitutively active Src or wild-type Src. In 3D fibrillar collagen matrices we found that, relative to wild-type Src, constitutively active Src: 1) increased the strength of cell-induced forces on the ECM, 2) did not significantly change migration speed, and 3) increased both the duration and the length, but not the number, of long membrane protrusions. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that Src controls invasion by controlling the ability of the cell to form long lasting cellular protrusions to enable penetration through tissue barriers, in addition to its role in promoting invadopodia matrix-degrading activity. PMID:23536784

  20. Dynamics of Oscillatory Vortex Multipoles Generated by Electromagnetic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Aldo; Cuevas, Sergio; Ramos, Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    Vortices formed by the concurrent effect on a localized magnetic field distribution and two alternate electric currents perpendicular to each other in a shallow (4mm) layer of an electrolyte are analyzed. Alternate currents with frequencies and amplitude in the range of 1-500 mHz and 80 mA, respectively, are explored. For a single dipolar magnetic field and a single electric current, the dominant structure of the flow is a pair of alternating lobes located co-linear with the generated Lorenz force. The flow presents a resonant behavior when the forcing frequency is around 10 mHz. When multipoles are used to generate the magnetic field, more complicated lobe distributions are obtained. The flow patterns were successfully described using a quasi-two-dimensional numerical model. A tridimensional numerical models corroborates the theoretical results. Flow visualization and numerical Lagrangian particle tracking indicate that multipolar flows present symmetries according to the magnetic field distributions. Although in some regions the flow patterns efficiently mix the fluid, the mixing is inhomogeneous due to symmetry conditions of the flows. Mixing is enhanced when symmetries are destroyed by the use of a random array of magnets or by injecting two electric currents.

  1. Shaping tissues by balancing active forces and geometric constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foolen, Jasper; Yamashita, Tadahiro; Kollmannsberger, Philip

    2016-02-01

    The self-organization of cells into complex tissues during growth and regeneration is a combination of physical-mechanical events and biochemical signal processing. Cells actively generate forces at all stages in this process, and according to the laws of mechanics, these forces result in stress fields defined by the geometric boundary conditions of the cell and tissue. The unique ability of cells to translate such force patterns into biochemical information and vice versa sets biological tissues apart from any other material. In this topical review, we summarize the current knowledge and open questions of how forces and geometry act together on scales from the single cell to tissues and organisms, and how their interaction determines biological shape and structure. Starting with a planar surface as the simplest type of geometric constraint, we review literature on how forces during cell spreading and adhesion together with geometric constraints impact cell shape, stress patterns, and the resulting biological response. We then move on to include cell-cell interactions and the role of forces in monolayers and in collective cell migration, and introduce curvature at the transition from flat cell sheets to three-dimensional (3D) tissues. Fibrous 3D environments, as cells experience them in the body, introduce new mechanical boundary conditions and change cell behaviour compared to flat surfaces. Starting from early work on force transmission and collagen remodelling, we discuss recent discoveries on the interaction with geometric constraints and the resulting structure formation and network organization in 3D. Recent literature on two physiological scenarios—embryonic development and bone—is reviewed to demonstrate the role of the force-geometry balance in living organisms. Furthermore, the role of mechanics in pathological scenarios such as cancer is discussed. We conclude by highlighting common physical principles guiding cell mechanics, tissue patterning and

  2. Dynein arms are strain-dependent direction-switching force generators.

    PubMed

    Shingyoji, Chikako; Nakano, Izumi; Inoue, Yuichi; Higuchi, Hideo

    2015-08-01

    Dynein is a minus-end-directed motor that can generate (forward) force to move along the microtubule toward its minus end. In addition, axonemal dyneins were reported to oscillate in the generation of forward force, and cytoplasmic dynein is observed to generate bidirectional forces in response to defined chemical states. Both dyneins can also respond to mechanically applied force. To test whether axonemal dynein can switch direction of force generation, we measured force using an optical trap and UV-photolysis of caged ATP. We observed that isolated dynein could repeatedly generate force in both directions along the microtubule. Bidirectional force was also observed for dynein arms that are still attached on the doublet microtubules. Axonemal dynein generated force to move backward (∼ 4 pN) as well as forward (5-6 pN) along microtubules. Furthermore, backward force could be stimulated by plus-end directed external force applied to axonemal dynein before ATP application. The results show that axonemal dynein is unique exhibiting multiple modes of force generation including backward and forward force, oscillatory force and slow, repetitive bidirectional force. The results also demonstrate that mechanical strain is important for switching the directionality of force generation in axonemal dyneins.

  3. Regulation of the basement membrane by epithelia generated forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Kandice

    2012-12-01

    Tumor metastasis involves a progressive loss of tissue architecture and dissolution of structural boundaries between the epithelium and connective tissue. The basement membrane (BM), a specialized network of extracellular matrix proteins forms a barrier that physically restricts pre-invasive lesions such that they remain as local insults. The BM is not a static structure, but one that is constantly regenerated and remodeled in the adult organism. Matrix organization also regulates cell function. Thus alterations in the balance of synthesis, remodeling and proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix proteins may contribute to a loss of structural integrity. However, the de novo assembly and maintenance of the complex structural properties of in vivo basement membranes remain elusive. Here, this paper highlights the current understanding on the structural properties and the establishment of the BM, and discusses the potential role of self-generated forces in adult tissue remodeling and the maintenance of the BM as a malignancy suppressor.

  4. Cooperative Force Generation of KIF1A Brownian Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriola, David; Casademunt, Jaume

    2013-07-01

    KIF1A is a kinesin motor protein that can work processively in a monomeric (single-headed) form by using a noise-driven ratchet mechanism. Here, we show that the combination of a passive diffusive state and finite-time kinetics of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis provides a powerful mechanism of cooperative force generation, implying for instance that ˜10 monomeric KIF1As can team up to become ˜100 times stronger than a single one. Consequently, we propose that KIF1A could outperform conventional (double-headed) kinesin collectively and thus explain its specificity in axonal trafficking. We elucidate the cooperativity mechanism with a lattice model that includes multiparticle transitions.

  5. Molecular organization and force-generating mechanism of dynein.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

    2011-09-01

    Dynein, which is a minus-end-directed microtubule motor, is crucial to a range of cellular processes. The mass of its motor domain is about 10 times that of kinesin, the other microtubule motor. Its large size and the difficulty of expressing and purifying mutants have hampered progress in dynein research. Recently, however, electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography and single-molecule nanometry have shed light on several key unsolved questions concerning how the dynein molecule is organized, what conformational changes in the molecule accompany ATP hydrolysis, and whether two or three motor domains are coordinated in the movements of dynein. This minireview describes our current knowledge of the molecular organization and the force-generating mechanism of dynein, with emphasis on findings from electron microscopy and single-molecule nanometry.

  6. How muscle fiber lengths and velocities affect muscle force generation as humans walk and run at different speeds.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edith M; Hamner, Samuel R; Seth, Ajay; Millard, Matthew; Delp, Scott L

    2013-06-01

    The lengths and velocities of muscle fibers have a dramatic effect on muscle force generation. It is unknown, however, whether the lengths and velocities of lower limb muscle fibers substantially affect the ability of muscles to generate force during walking and running. We examined this issue by developing simulations of muscle-tendon dynamics to calculate the lengths and velocities of muscle fibers from electromyographic recordings of 11 lower limb muscles and kinematic measurements of the hip, knee and ankle made as five subjects walked at speeds of 1.0-1.75 m s(-1) and ran at speeds of 2.0-5.0 m s(-1). We analyzed the simulated fiber lengths, fiber velocities and forces to evaluate the influence of force-length and force-velocity properties on force generation at different walking and running speeds. The simulations revealed that force generation ability (i.e. the force generated per unit of activation) of eight of the 11 muscles was significantly affected by walking or running speed. Soleus force generation ability decreased with increasing walking speed, but the transition from walking to running increased the force generation ability by reducing fiber velocities. Our results demonstrate the influence of soleus muscle architecture on the walk-to-run transition and the effects of muscle-tendon compliance on the plantarflexors' ability to generate ankle moment and power. The study presents data that permit lower limb muscles to be studied in unprecedented detail by relating muscle fiber dynamics and force generation to the mechanical demands of walking and running.

  7. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor

    PubMed Central

    Migliori, Amy D.; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I.; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B.; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here, we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force, and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle. PMID:24937091

  8. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free-energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free-energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle. PMID:24937091

  9. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, Amy D.; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I.; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B.; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E.

    2014-06-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free-energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free-energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle.

  10. How muscle fiber lengths and velocities affect muscle force generation as humans walk and run at different speeds

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Edith M.; Hamner, Samuel R.; Seth, Ajay; Millard, Matthew; Delp, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The lengths and velocities of muscle fibers have a dramatic effect on muscle force generation. It is unknown, however, whether the lengths and velocities of lower limb muscle fibers substantially affect the ability of muscles to generate force during walking and running. We examined this issue by developing simulations of muscle–tendon dynamics to calculate the lengths and velocities of muscle fibers from electromyographic recordings of 11 lower limb muscles and kinematic measurements of the hip, knee and ankle made as five subjects walked at speeds of 1.0–1.75 m s−1 and ran at speeds of 2.0–5.0 m s−1. We analyzed the simulated fiber lengths, fiber velocities and forces to evaluate the influence of force–length and force–velocity properties on force generation at different walking and running speeds. The simulations revealed that force generation ability (i.e. the force generated per unit of activation) of eight of the 11 muscles was significantly affected by walking or running speed. Soleus force generation ability decreased with increasing walking speed, but the transition from walking to running increased the force generation ability by reducing fiber velocities. Our results demonstrate the influence of soleus muscle architecture on the walk-to-run transition and the effects of muscle–tendon compliance on the plantarflexors' ability to generate ankle moment and power. The study presents data that permit lower limb muscles to be studied in unprecedented detail by relating muscle fiber dynamics and force generation to the mechanical demands of walking and running. PMID:23470656

  11. Dynamic actin interaction of cross-bridges during force generation: implications for cross-bridge action in muscle.

    PubMed

    Brenner, B

    1993-01-01

    The force response of Ca(2+)-activated, permeabilized segments of rabbit psoas muscle fibers to stretches and releases was studied. These length changes were imposed (i) during isometric steady state contraction, (ii) as a restretch at the end of a ramp-shaped prerelease, and (iii) during isotonic steady state shortening. The speed of the stretches/releases was varied between about 10 and 10(5) (nm/half-sarcomere)/s. At physiological ionic strength and at low temperature (5 degrees C), the force response to stretches apparently is neither affected by cross-bridges that occupy weak-binding states nor by redistribution among various attached force-generating states. Plots of force vs. imposed length change ("T-plots") and plots of apparent fiber stiffness vs. speed of the imposed length change ("stiffness-speed relations") recorded under all these conditions suggest that cross-bridges, even during force-generation, dissociate and reassociate from and to actin on a time scale that is fast compared to active cross-bridge cycling (> 50- 1000s-1 vs. 1-10s-1). This rapid dissociation/reassociation of force-generating cross-bridges may provide a mechanism to account for the unexpectedly low ATPase activity during high-speed shortening and for filament sliding exceeding 10-20nm while a cross-bridge passes through the force-generating states.

  12. Activation-induced force enhancement in human adductor pollicis.

    PubMed

    Oskouei, Ali E; Herzog, Walter

    2009-10-01

    It has been known for a long time that the steady-state isometric force after muscle stretch is bigger than the corresponding force obtained in a purely isometric contraction for electrically stimulated and maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Recent studies using sub-maximal voluntary contractions showed that force enhancement only occurred in a sub-group of subjects suggesting that force enhancement for sub-maximal voluntary contractions has properties different from those of electrically-induced and maximal voluntary contractions. Specifically, force enhancement for sub-maximal voluntary contractions may contain an activation-dependent component that is independent of muscle stretching. To address this hypothesis, we tested for force enhancement using (i) sub-maximal electrically-induced contractions and stretch and (ii) using various activation levels preceding an isometric reference contraction at 30% of MVC (no stretch). All tests were performed on human adductor pollicis muscles. Force enhancement following stretching was found for all subjects (n=10) and all activation levels (10%, 30%, and 60% of MVC) for electrically-induced contractions. In contrast, force enhancement at 30% of MVC, preceded by 6s of 10%, 60%, and 100% of MVC was only found in a sub-set of the subjects and only for the 60% and 100% conditions. This result suggests that there is an activation-dependent force enhancement for some subjects for sub-maximal voluntary contractions. This activation-dependent force enhancement was always smaller than the stretch-induced force enhancement obtained at the corresponding activation levels. Active muscle stretching increased the force enhancement in all subjects, independent whether they showed activation dependence or not. It appears that post-activation potentiation, and the associated phosphorylation of the myosin light chains, might account for the stretch-independent force enhancement observed here.

  13. Molecular mechanism of motion and force generation by cytoplasmic dynein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennerich, Arne

    2013-03-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is an intricate microtubule (MT) motor with four AAA (ATPase associated with various cellular activities) ATPases per head domain. Dynein homodimers take hundreds of consecutive steps, during which the leading and trailing heads experience intramolecular tension in opposite directions. We hypothesize that this asymmetry may differentially regulate the MT-binding and ATPase functions in each head, thereby facilitating processive movement. Here, we elucidate the function of tension in regulating dynein-MT interactions, and dissect the roles of its multiple AAA subunits in effecting and modulating this behavior. Using optical tweezers to measure unbinding forces of single S. cerevisiae dynein heads in the absence of nucleotide, we show that intrinsic dynein-MT binding is significantly weaker under forward (MT-minus-end directed) tension than under rearward tension. Thus, forward tension likely promotes rear head detachment in the dimeric motor. The nucleotide states of specific AAA sites modify this intrinsic behavior. Mutational analysis shows that ATP binding to AAA1 substantially weakens MT binding. Moreover, ADP binding to AAA3 `locks' dynein in a previously undescribed, weak MT-binding state with a relatively symmetric response to tension. Interestingly, tension also affects nucleotide affinity: ADP affinity is lower under rearward than under forward load, suggesting that the front head preferentially releases ADP (likely from AAA3), perhaps driving a transition from an ADP state with relatively weak MT attachment to a strongly MT-attached, nucleotide-free state. Our analysis suggests that intramolecular tension is key to dynein motility, and highlights the importance of including multiple AAA ATPases in models for dynein mechanochemistry. NIH R01GM098469

  14. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris‒flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris‒flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris‒flow events had a large‒magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time‒averaged mean force), high‒frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time‒averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ~ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time‒averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (~ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse‒grained granular surges and water‒rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite

  15. Subthalamic Nucleus Local Field Potential Activity Helps Encode Motor Effort Rather Than Force in Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Pogosyan, Alek; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Cheeran, Binith; FitzGerald, James J.; Green, Alexander L.; Aziz, Tipu; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Brown, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Local field potential (LFP) recordings from patients with deep brain stimulation electrodes in the basal ganglia have suggested that frequency-specific activities correlate with force or effort, but previous studies have not been able to disambiguate the two. Here, we dissociated effort from actual force generated by contrasting the force generation of different fingers while recording LFP activity from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease who had undergone functional surgery. Patients were studied while on their normal dopaminergic medication. We investigated the relationship between frequency-specific oscillatory activity in the STN and voluntary flexion of either the index or little finger at different effort levels. At each tested effort level (10%, 25%, and 40% of the maximal voluntary contraction force of each individual finger), the index finger generated larger force than the little finger. Movement-related suppression of beta-band power in the STN LFP was significantly modulated by effort, but not by which finger was used, suggesting that the beta suppression in the STN LFP during sustained contraction serves as a proxy for effort. The absolute force scaled with beta power suppression, but with the scaling determined by the maximal voluntary contraction force of the motor effector. Our results argue against the hypothesis that the basal ganglia are directly involved in the parameterization of force during movement and support a role of the STN in the control of motor effort to be attributed to a response. PMID:25878267

  16. Crafting a Balanced System of Assessment in Wisconsin. Recommendations of the Next Generation Assessment Task Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Assessment Task Force was convened to formulate Wisconsin's path forward. Task force members listened to leaders from business and technology sectors as well as leaders from PK-12 and higher education. This summary shares the process, definitions, assumptions, and recommendations of the task force. This paper aims to use these…

  17. Method of generating and measuring static small force using down-slope component of gravity.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yusaku

    2007-06-01

    A method of generating and measuring static small forces at the micro-Newton level is proposed. In the method, the down-slope component of gravity acting on a mass on an inclined plane is used as a static force. To realize a linear motion of the mass with a small friction, an aerostatic linear bearing is used. The forces acting on the mass, such as the down-slope component of gravity and the dynamic frictional force, are determined by the levitation mass method. In an experiment, a static small force of approximately 183 microN is generated and measured with a standard uncertainty of approximately 2 microN.

  18. Adaptive force generation for precision-grip lifting by a spectral timing model of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Antonio; Bullock, Daniel; Rhodes, Bradley J

    2003-01-01

    We modeled adaptive generation of precision grip forces during object lifting. The model presented adjusts reactive and anticipatory grip forces to a level just above that needed to stabilize lifted objects in the hand. The model obeys principles of cerebellar structure and function by using slip sensations as error signals to adapt phasic motor commands to tonic force generators associated with output synergies controlling grip aperture. The learned phasic commands are weight- and texture-dependent. Simulations of the new circuit model reproduce key aspects of experimental observations of force application. Over learning trials, the onset of grip force buildup comes to lead the load force buildup, and the rate-of-rise of grip force, but not load force, scales inversely with the friction of the object.

  19. Nature of the coupling between neural drive and force-generating capacity in the human quadriceps muscle.

    PubMed

    Hug, François; Goupille, Clément; Baum, Daniel; Raiteri, Brent J; Hodges, Paul W; Tucker, Kylie

    2015-11-22

    The force produced by a muscle depends on both the neural drive it receives and several biomechanical factors. When multiple muscles act on a single joint, the nature of the relationship between the neural drive and force-generating capacity of the synergistic muscles is largely unknown. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the ratio of neural drive and the ratio of muscle force-generating capacity between two synergist muscles (vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM)) in humans. Twenty-one participants performed isometric knee extensions at 20 and 50% of maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Myoelectric activity (surface electromyography (EMG)) provided an index of neural drive. Physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) was estimated from measurements of muscle volume (magnetic resonance imaging) and muscle fascicle length (three-dimensional ultrasound imaging) to represent the muscles' force-generating capacities. Neither PCSA nor neural drive was balanced between VL and VM. There was a large (r = 0.68) and moderate (r = 0.43) correlation between the ratio of VL/VM EMG amplitude and the ratio of VL/VM PCSA at 20 and 50% of MVC, respectively. This study provides evidence that neural drive is biased by muscle force-generating capacity, the greater the force-generating capacity of VL compared with VM, the stronger bias of drive to the VL.

  20. Characterization of the pre-force-generation state in the actomyosin cross-bridge cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxuan; Rose, Michael B.; Ananthanarayanan, Shobana K.; Jacobs, Donald J.; Yengo, Christopher M.

    2008-01-01

    Myosin is an actin-based motor protein that generates force by cycling between actin-attached (strong binding: ADP or rigor) and actin-detached (weak binding: ATP or ADP·Pi) states during its ATPase cycle. However, it remains unclear what specific conformational changes in the actin binding site take place on binding to actin, and how these structural changes lead to product release and the production of force and motion. We studied the dynamics of the actin binding region of myosin V by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to monitor conformational changes in the upper-50-kDa domain of the actin binding cleft in the weak and strong actin binding states. Steady-state and lifetime data monitoring the FRET signal suggest that the cleft is in a more open conformation in the weak actin binding states. Transient kinetic experiments suggest that a rapid conformational change occurs, which is consistent with cleft closure before actin-activated phosphate release. Our results have identified a pre-force-generation actomyosin ADP·Pi state, and suggest force generation may occur from a state not yet seen by crystallography in which the actin binding cleft and the nucleotide binding pocket are closed. Computational modeling uncovers dramatic changes in the rigidity of the upper-50-kDa domain in different nucleotide states, which suggests that the intrinsic flexibility of this domain allows myosin motors to accomplish simultaneous tight nucleotide binding (closed nucleotide binding pocket) and high-affinity actin binding (closed actin binding cleft). PMID:18552179

  1. Active mechanics in living oocytes reveal molecular-scale force kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Wylie; Fodor, Etienne; Almonacid, Maria; Bussonnier, Matthias; Verlhac, Marie-Helene; Gov, Nir; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frederic; Betz, Timo

    Unlike traditional materials, living cells actively generate forces at the molecular scale that change their structure and mechanical properties. This nonequilibrium activity is essential for cellular function, and drives processes such as cell division. Single molecule studies have uncovered the detailed force kinetics of isolated motor proteins in-vitro, however their behavior in-vivo has been elusive due to the complex environment inside the cell. Here, we quantify active forces and intracellular mechanics in living oocytes using in-vivo optical trapping and laser interferometry of endogenous vesicles. We integrate an experimental and theoretical framework to connect mesoscopic measurements of nonequilibrium properties to the underlying molecular- scale force kinetics. Our results show that force generation by myosin-V drives the cytoplasmic-skeleton out-of-equilibrium (at frequencies below 300 Hz) and actively softens the environment. In vivo myosin-V activity generates a force of F ~ 0 . 4 pN, with a power-stroke of length Δx ~ 20 nm and duration τ ~ 300 μs, that drives vesicle motion at vv ~ 320 nm/s. This framework is widely applicable to characterize living cells and other soft active materials.

  2. Running induces nausea in rats: Kaolin intake generated by voluntary and forced wheel running.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2016-10-01

    Three experiments were conducted showing rats' pica behavior (kaolin clay intake) due to running in activity wheels. The amount of kaolin consumed was a positive function of the available time of voluntary running (20, 40, or 60 min), although this relationship was blunted by a descending (i.e., 60 → 40 → 20 min) test series of execution (Experiment 1). Pica was also generated by forced running in a motorized wheel for 60 min as a positive function of the speed of wheel rotations at 98, 185, or 365 m/h, independent of the order of execution (Experiment 2). Voluntary running generated more pica than did forced running at 80 m/h, although the distance travelled in the former condition was 27% lesser than that in the latter condition (Experiment 3). Because kaolin intake is regarded as a reliable measure of nausea in rats, these results show that wheel running, either voluntary or forced, induces nausea in rats.

  3. Jar-opening challenges. Part 2: estimating the force-generating capacity of thumb muscles in healthy young adults during jar-opening tasks.

    PubMed

    Kuo, L C; Chang, J H; Lin, C F; Hsu, H Y; Ho, K Y; Su, F C

    2009-07-01

    This study discusses the force-generating capacity of thumb muscles during jar-opening tasks using two grip patterns: the power grip and the precision grip. This study develops a three-dimensional biomechanical model of the thumb to predict muscle forces in jar-opening activities based on external forces measured by a custom-designed jar device. Ten healthy subjects participated in the study. Each participant turned a jar lid of 66 mm diameter counterclockwise with maximal effort and preferred speed using both grip patterns. The average normal and tangential forces applied by the thumb to the jar lid show that the normal force is the primary contributive force for opening a jar. This normal force is approximately three times the tangential force. Muscular force-generating capacity measurements show that the major active muscles during a jar-opening activity for both grips include the flexor pollicis longus, flexor pollicis brevis, abductor pollicis brevis, adductor pollicis, and opponens pollicis. The total muscle force ratios for the precision grip and power grip with respect to externally applied forces are 5.6 and 4.7 respectively. These ratios indicate that the power grip pattern produces less muscle force per unit of external applied load. The technique proposed in this study provides a proper apparatus and model for measuring three-dimensional loads and estimating the force-generating capacity of each muscle and tendon of the thumb during jar-opening tasks. PMID:19623911

  4. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects.

  5. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects. PMID:27146004

  6. Generating Coherent Patterns of Activity from Chaotic Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sussillo, David; Abbott, L. F.

    2009-01-01

    Neural circuits display complex activity patterns both spontaneously and when responding to a stimulus or generating a motor output. How are these two forms of activity related? We develop a procedure called FORCE learning for modifying synaptic strengths either external to or within a model neural network to change chaotic spontaneous activity into a wide variety of desired activity patterns. FORCE learning works even though the networks we train are spontaneously chaotic and we leave feedback loops intact and unclamped during learning. Using this approach, we construct networks that produce a wide variety of complex output patterns, input-output transformations that require memory, multiple outputs that can be switched by control inputs, and motor patterns matching human motion capture data. Our results reproduce data on pre-movement activity in motor and premotor cortex, and suggest that synaptic plasticity may be a more rapid and powerful modulator of network activity than generally appreciated. PMID:19709635

  7. Applying the cost of generating force hypothesis to uphill running

    PubMed Central

    Taboga, Paolo; Kram, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Historically, several different approaches have been applied to explain the metabolic cost of uphill human running. Most of these approaches result in unrealistically high values for the efficiency of performing vertical work during running uphill, or are only valid for running up steep inclines. The purpose of this study was to reexamine the metabolic cost of uphill running, based upon our understanding of level running energetics and ground reaction forces during uphill running. In contrast to the vertical efficiency approach, we propose that during incline running at a certain velocity, the forces (and hence metabolic energy) required for braking and propelling the body mass parallel to the running surface are less than during level running. Based on this idea, we propose that the metabolic rate during uphill running can be predicted by a model, which posits that (1) the metabolic cost of perpendicular bouncing remains the same as during level running, (2) the metabolic cost of running parallel to the running surface decreases with incline, (3) the delta efficiency of producing mechanical power to lift the COM vertically is constant, independent of incline and running velocity, and (4) the costs of leg and arm swing do not change with incline. To test this approach, we collected ground reaction force (GRF) data for eight runners who ran thirty 30-second trials (velocity: 2.0–3.0 m/s; incline: 0–9°). We also measured the metabolic rates of eight different runners for 17, 7-minute trials (velocity: 2.0–3.0 m/s; incline: 0–8°). During uphill running, parallel braking GRF approached zero for the 9° incline trials. Thus, we modeled the metabolic cost of parallel running as exponentially decreasing with incline. With that assumption, best-fit parameters for the metabolic rate data indicate that the efficiency of producing mechanical power to lift the center of mass vertically was independent of incline and running velocity, with a value of ∼29%. The

  8. Direct charge radioisotope activation and power generation

    DOEpatents

    Lal, Amit; Li, Hui; Blanchard, James P.; Henderson, Douglass L.

    2002-01-01

    An activator has a base on which is mounted an elastically deformable micromechanical element that has a section that is free to be displaced toward the base. An absorber of radioactively emitted particles is formed on the base or the displaceable section of the deformable element and a source is formed on the other of the displaceable section or the base facing the absorber across a small gap. The radioactive source emits charged particles such as electrons, resulting in a buildup of charge on the absorber, drawing the absorber and source together and storing mechanical energy as the deformable element is bent. When the force between the absorber and the source is sufficient to bring the absorber into effective electrical contact with the source, discharge of the charge between the source and absorber allows the deformable element to spring back, releasing the mechanical energy stored in the element. An electrical generator such as a piezoelectric transducer may be secured to the deformable element to convert the released mechanical energy to electrical energy that can be used to provide power to electronic circuits.

  9. Force-free magnetic fields - Generating functions and footpoint displacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard; Verma, Ritu

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents analytic and numerical calculations that explore equilibrium sequences of bipolar force-free magnetic fields in relation to displacments of their magnetic footpoints. It is shown that the appearance of magnetic islands - sometimes interpreted as marking the loss of equilibrium in models of the solar atmosphere - is likely associated only with physically unrealistic footpoint displacements such as infinite separation or 'tearing' of the model photosphere. The work suggests that the loss of equilibrium in bipolar configurations, sometimes proposed as a mechanism for eruptive solar events, probably requires either fully three-dimensional field configurations or nonzero plasma pressure. The results apply only to fields that are strictly bipolar, and do not rule out equilibrium loss in more complex structures such as quadrupolar fields.

  10. Local Lorentz force flowmeter at a continuous caster model using a new generation multicomponent force and torque sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Daniel; Schleichert, Jan; Karcher, Christian; Fröhlich, Thomas; Wondrak, Thomas; Timmel, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry is a non-invasive velocity measurement technique for electrical conductive liquids like molten steel. In this technique, the metal flow interacts with a static magnetic field generating eddy currents which, in turn, produce flow-braking Lorentz forces within the fluid. These forces are proportional to the electrical conductivity and to the velocity of the melt. Due to Newton’s third law, a counter force of the same magnitude acts on the source of the applied static magnetic field which is in our case a permanent magnet. In this paper we will present a new multicomponent sensor for the local Lorentz force flowmeter (L2F2) which is able to measure simultaneously all three components of the force as well as all three components of the torque. Therefore, this new sensor is capable of accessing all three velocity components at the same time in the region near the wall. In order to demonstrate the potential of this new sensor, it is used to identify the 3-dimensional velocity field near the wide face of the mold of a continuous caster model available at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. As model melt, the eutectic alloy GaInSn is used.

  11. Design of the magnetorheological mount with high damping force for medium speed diesel generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, O.-H.; Kim, W.-H.; Joo, W. H.; Park, J.-H.

    2013-04-01

    This paper investigates the controllable magnetorheological (MR) mount for the marine diesel-generator (D/G) sets. Sometimes, significant vibrations over the allowable limit are observed on the D/G sets due to their huge excitation forces. Because the severe vibration can lead to structural damages to the D/G sets, it should be reduced to below the limit. Although passive mounts with rubber isolators are usually used, the vibration reduction performance is not always sufficient. In addition, expecting that the vibration levels required by customers will get more severe, semi-active vibration isolation system needs to be developed. To the aim, the valve (flow) mode type of MR mount has been designed. Especially, the annular-radial configuration was adopted to enhance the damping force within the restricted space. The geometry of the mount has been optimized to obtain the required damping force and the magnetic field analysis has been carried out using ANSYS APDL. To verify the performance of the developed MR mount, excitation test was conducted and the dynamic characteristics were identified. Since damping property of the MR fluid is changed by the applied magnetic field strength and excitation frequency, responses to changing applied currents and frequencies were obtained. From the results, damping performance of the MR mount was evaluated.

  12. Next-Generation Force Fields from Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaniel, Jesse G.; Schmidt, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) provides a unique set of advantages for parameterizing next-generation force fields from first principles. SAPT provides a direct, basis-set superposition error free estimate of molecular interaction energies, a physically intuitive energy decomposition, and a seamless transition to an asymptotic picture of intermolecular interactions. These properties have been exploited throughout the literature to develop next-generation force fields for a variety of applications, including classical molecular dynamics simulations, crystal structure prediction, and quantum dynamics/spectroscopy. This review provides a brief overview of the formalism and theory of SAPT, along with a practical discussion of the various methodologies utilized to parameterize force fields from SAPT calculations. It also highlights a number of applications of SAPT-based force fields for chemical systems of particular interest. Finally, the review ends with a brief outlook on the future opportunities and challenges that remain for next-generation force fields based on SAPT.

  13. Next-Generation Force Fields from Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Jesse G; Schmidt, J R

    2016-05-27

    Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) provides a unique set of advantages for parameterizing next-generation force fields from first principles. SAPT provides a direct, basis-set superposition error free estimate of molecular interaction energies, a physically intuitive energy decomposition, and a seamless transition to an asymptotic picture of intermolecular interactions. These properties have been exploited throughout the literature to develop next-generation force fields for a variety of applications, including classical molecular dynamics simulations, crystal structure prediction, and quantum dynamics/spectroscopy. This review provides a brief overview of the formalism and theory of SAPT, along with a practical discussion of the various methodologies utilized to parameterize force fields from SAPT calculations. It also highlights a number of applications of SAPT-based force fields for chemical systems of particular interest. Finally, the review ends with a brief outlook on the future opportunities and challenges that remain for next-generation force fields based on SAPT.

  14. Tensioning the helix: a mechanism for force generation in twining plants

    PubMed Central

    Isnard, Sandrine; Cobb, Alexander R.; Holbrook, N.Michele; Zwieniecki, Maciej; Dumais, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Twining plants use their helical stems to clasp supports and to generate a squeezing force, providing stability against gravity. To elucidate the mechanism that allows force generation, we measured the squeezing forces exerted by the twiner Dioscorea bulbifera while following its growth using time-lapse photography. We show that the development of the squeezing force is accompanied by stiffening of the stem and the expansion of stipules at the leaf base. We use a simple thin rod model to show that despite their small size and sparse distribution, stipules impose a stem deformation sufficient to account for the measured squeezing force. We further demonstrate that tensioning of the stem helix, although counter-intuitive, is the most effective mechanism for generating large squeezing forces in twining plants. Our observations and model point to a general mechanism for the generation of the twining force: a modest radial stem expansion during primary growth, or the growth of lateral structures such as leaf bases, causes a delayed stem tensioning that creates the squeezing forces necessary for twining plants to ascend their supports. Our study thus provides the long-sought answer to the question of how twining plants ascend smooth supports without the use of adhesive or hook-like structures. PMID:19386656

  15. Compliant tactile sensor for generating a signal related to an applied force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Jara, Eduardo (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Tactile sensor. The sensor includes a compliant convex surface disposed above a sensor array, the sensor array adapted to respond to deformation of the convex surface to generate a signal related to an applied force vector.

  16. Elbow and wrist joint contact forces during occupational pick and place activities.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, E K; Nicol, A C

    2000-05-01

    A three-dimensional, mathematical model of the elbow and wrist joints, including 15 muscle units, 3 ligaments and 4 joint forces, has been developed. A new strain gauge transducer has been developed to measure functional grip forces. The device measures radial forces divided into six components and forces of up to 250N per segment can be measured with an accuracy of +/-1%. Ten normal volunteers were asked to complete four tasks representing occupational activities, during which time their grip force was monitored. Together with kinematic information from the six-camera Vicon data, the moment effect of these loads at the joints was calculated. These external moments are assumed to be balanced by the internal moments, generated by the muscles, passive soft tissue and bone contact. The effectiveness of the body's internal structures in generating joint moments was assessed by studying the geometry of a simplified model of the structures, where information about the lines of action and moment arms of muscles, tendons and ligaments is contained. The assumption of equilibrium between these external and internal joint moments allows formulation of a set of equations from which muscle and joint forces can be calculated. A two stage, linear optimisation routine minimising the overall muscle stress and the sum of the joint forces has been used to overcome the force-sharing problem. Humero-ulnar forces of up to 1600N, humero-radial forces of up to 800N and wrist joint forces of up to 2800N were found for moderate level activity. The model was validated by comparison with other studies.

  17. ADITEC: joining forces for next-generation vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rappuoli, Rino; Medaglini, Donata

    2012-04-01

    Scientists sit poised at a singular moment in the history of vaccine research. Genomics and systems biology have fueled advances in our understanding of human immunology. Together with adjuvant development and structure-based design of immunogens, these next-generation technologies are transforming the field of vaccinology and shaping the future of medicine. However, the sophisticated science behind the development of modern vaccines and the resulting knotty ethical issues have become so complex that scientists and policy-makers need a new model for vaccine research. The European Commission-sponsored Advanced Immunization Technologies project--ADITEC--brings together some of the leading laboratories in the field to tackle the problems that no lab can tackle in isolation.

  18. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. PMID:25311860

  19. Aircraft: United States Air Force Child Care Program Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boggs, Juanita; Brant, Linda

    General information about United States' aircraft is provided in this program activity guide for teachers and caregivers in Air Force preschools and day care centers. The guide includes basic information for teachers and caregivers, basic understandings, suggested teaching methods and group activities, vocabulary, ideas for interest centers, and…

  20. Deadlift muscle force and activation under stable and unstable conditions.

    PubMed

    Chulvi-Medrano, Iván; García-Massó, Xavier; Colado, Juan C; Pablos, Carlos; de Moraes, Joao Alves; Fuster, Maria A

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the production of force and paraspinal muscle activity between deadlifts carried out in a standard way and with different instability devices (Bosu and T-Bow). Deadlifts involve the performance of muscle activities with dynamic and isometric characteristics. Thirty-one subjects participated voluntarily in the study. Initially, they performed an isometric test for 5 seconds in each condition. After that, they performed a set of 5 repetitions with 70% of the maximum isometric force obtained in each one of the previously evaluated conditions. During the isometric tests, records of electromyographic activity and force production were obtained, whereas during the dynamic tests, only the electromyographic activity was registered. The subjects produced more force and muscle activity on the stable surface than under the other conditions during the isometric test (p < 0.05), and the same differences in muscle activity were observed during the dynamic test (p < 0.05). These data show that the performance of deadlifts under stable conditions favors a higher production of maximum strength and muscle activity. Therefore, we conclude that the use of instability devices in deadlift training does not increase performance, nor does it provide greater activation of the paraspinal muscles, leading us to question their value in the performance of other types of exercises. PMID:20885194

  1. The Role of Rac1 in the Growth Cone Dynamics and Force Generation of DRG Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sayyad, Wasim A.; Fabris, Paolo; Torre, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    We used optical tweezers, video imaging, immunocytochemistry and a variety of inhibitors to analyze the role of Rac1 in the motility and force generation of lamellipodia and filopodia from developing growth cones of isolated Dorsal Root Ganglia neurons. When the activity of Rac1 was inhibited by the drug EHop-016, the period of lamellipodia protrusion/retraction cycles increased and the lamellipodia retrograde flow rate decreased; moreover, the axial force exerted by lamellipodia was reduced dramatically. Inhibition of Arp2/3 by a moderate amount of the drug CK-548 caused a transient retraction of lamellipodia followed by a complete recovery of their usual motility. This recovery was abolished by the concomitant inhibition of Rac1. The filopodia length increased upon inhibition of both Rac1 and Arp2/3, but the speed of filopodia protrusion increased when Rac1 was inhibited and decreased instead when Arp2/3 was inhibited. These results suggest that Rac1 acts as a switch that activates upon inhibition of Arp2/3. Rac1 also controls the filopodia dynamics necessary to explore the environment. PMID:26766136

  2. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  3. Forces generated during stretch in the heart of the lobster Homarus americanus are anisotropic and are altered by neuromodulators.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, E S; Johnson, A S; Ellers, O; Dickinson, P S

    2016-04-15

    Mechanical and neurophysiological anisotropies mediate three-dimensional responses of the heart of ITALIC! Homarus americanus Although hearts ITALIC! in vivoare loaded multi-axially by pressure, studies of invertebrate cardiac function typically use uniaxial tests. To generate whole-heart length-tension curves, stretch pyramids at constant lengthening and shortening rates were imposed uniaxially and biaxially along longitudinal and transverse axes of the beating whole heart. To determine whether neuropeptides that are known to modulate cardiac activity in ITALIC! H. americanusaffect the active or passive components of these length-tension curves, we also performed these tests in the presence of SGRNFLRFamide (SGRN) and GYSNRNYLRFamide (GYS). In uniaxial and biaxial tests, both passive and active forces increased with stretch along both measurement axes. The increase in passive forces was anisotropic, with greater increases along the longitudinal axis. Passive forces showed hysteresis and active forces were higher during lengthening than shortening phases of the stretch pyramid. Active forces at a given length were increased by both neuropeptides. To exert these effects, neuropeptides might have acted indirectly on the muscle via their effects on the cardiac ganglion, directly on the neuromuscular junction, or directly on the muscles. Because increases in response to stretch were also seen in stimulated motor nerve-muscle preparations, at least some of the effects of the peptides are likely peripheral. Taken together, these findings suggest that flexibility in rhythmic cardiac contractions results from the amplified effects of neuropeptides interacting with the length-tension characteristics of the heart.

  4. Forces generated during stretch in the heart of the lobster Homarus americanus are anisotropic and are altered by neuromodulators.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, E S; Johnson, A S; Ellers, O; Dickinson, P S

    2016-04-15

    Mechanical and neurophysiological anisotropies mediate three-dimensional responses of the heart of ITALIC! Homarus americanus Although hearts ITALIC! in vivoare loaded multi-axially by pressure, studies of invertebrate cardiac function typically use uniaxial tests. To generate whole-heart length-tension curves, stretch pyramids at constant lengthening and shortening rates were imposed uniaxially and biaxially along longitudinal and transverse axes of the beating whole heart. To determine whether neuropeptides that are known to modulate cardiac activity in ITALIC! H. americanusaffect the active or passive components of these length-tension curves, we also performed these tests in the presence of SGRNFLRFamide (SGRN) and GYSNRNYLRFamide (GYS). In uniaxial and biaxial tests, both passive and active forces increased with stretch along both measurement axes. The increase in passive forces was anisotropic, with greater increases along the longitudinal axis. Passive forces showed hysteresis and active forces were higher during lengthening than shortening phases of the stretch pyramid. Active forces at a given length were increased by both neuropeptides. To exert these effects, neuropeptides might have acted indirectly on the muscle via their effects on the cardiac ganglion, directly on the neuromuscular junction, or directly on the muscles. Because increases in response to stretch were also seen in stimulated motor nerve-muscle preparations, at least some of the effects of the peptides are likely peripheral. Taken together, these findings suggest that flexibility in rhythmic cardiac contractions results from the amplified effects of neuropeptides interacting with the length-tension characteristics of the heart. PMID:26896540

  5. Mapping Muscles Activation to Force Perception during Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Simone; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It has been largely proved that while judging a force humans mainly rely on the motor commands produced to interact with that force (i.e., sense of effort). Despite of a large bulk of previous investigations interested in understanding the contributions of the descending and ascending signals in force perception, very few attempts have been made to link a measure of neural output (i.e., EMG) to the psychophysical performance. Indeed, the amount of correlation between EMG activity and perceptual decisions can be interpreted as an estimate of the contribution of central signals involved in the sensation of force. In this study we investigated this correlation by measuring the muscular activity of eight arm muscles while participants performed a quasi-isometric force detection task. Here we showed a method to quantitatively describe muscular activity (“muscle-metric function”) that was directly comparable to the description of the participants' psychophysical decisions about the stimulus force. We observed that under our experimental conditions, muscle-metric absolute thresholds and the shape of the muscle-metric curves were closely related to those provided by the psychophysics. In fact a global measure of the muscles considered was able to predict approximately 60% of the perceptual decisions total variance. Moreover the inter-subjects differences in psychophysical sensitivity showed high correlation with both participants' muscles sensitivity and participants' joint torques. Overall, our findings gave insights into both the role played by the corticospinal motor commands while performing a force detection task and the influence of the gravitational muscular torque on the estimation of vertical forces. PMID:27032087

  6. A component analysis of the generation and release of isometric force in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, N; Sagar, H J; Cooper, J A

    1992-01-01

    Paradigms of isometric force control allow study of the generation and release of movement in the absence of complications due to disordered visuomotor coordination. The onset and release of isometric force in Parkinson's disease (PD) was studied, using computerised determinants of latency of response and rate of force generation and release. Components of isometric force control were related to measures of cognitive, affective and clinical motor disability. The effects of treatment were determined by longitudinal study of de novo patients. Patients with PD showed impairment in latency and rate of force change for movement release as well as onset. Rate of force change correlated with depression, clinical motor disability and memory quotient but latency showed no correlation with any of these measures. Treatment improved rate of force release, in concert with clinical motor disability, but not latency. These results suggest dissociations between latency and rate of force change that may be linked to different neurochemical deficits. Further, they demonstrate akinetic deficits in force release that argue against the "neural energy hypothesis" of akinesia. PMID:1640233

  7. An Improved Optical Tweezers Assay for Measuring the Force Generation of Single Kinesin Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Rao, Lu; Gennerich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Numerous microtubule-associated molecular motors, including several kinesins and cytoplasmic dynein, produce opposing forces that regulate spindle and chromosome positioning during mitosis. The motility and force generation of these motors are therefore critical to normal cell division, and dysfunction of these processes may contribute to human disease. Optical tweezers provide a powerful method for studying the nanometer motility and piconewton force generation of single motor proteins in vitro. Using kinesin-1 as a prototype, we present a set of step-by-step, optimized protocols for expressing a kinesin construct (K560-GFP) in Escherichia coli, purifying it, and studying its force generation in an optical tweezers microscope. We also provide detailed instructions on proper alignment and calibration of an optical trapping microscope. These methods provide a foundation for a variety of similar experiments. PMID:24633799

  8. OCT-based quantification of flow velocity, shear force, and power generated by a biological ciliated surface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Loewenberg, Michael; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    In cilia-driven fluid flow physiology, quantification of flow velocity, shearing force, and power dissipation is important in defining abnormal ciliary function. The capacity to generate flow can be robustly described in terms of shearing force. Dissipated power can be related to net ATP consumption by ciliary molecular motors. To date, however, only flow velocity can be routinely quantified in a non-invasive, non-contact manner. Additionally, traditional power-based metrics rely on metabolic consumption that reflects energy consumption not just from cilia but also from all active cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the estimation of all three of these quantities (flow velocity, shear force, and power dissipation) using only optical coherence tomography (OCT). Specifically, we develop a framework that can extract force and power information from vectorial flow velocity fields obtained using OCT-based methods. We do so by (a) estimating the viscous stress tensor from flow velocity fields to estimate shearing force and (b) using the viscous stress tensor to estimate the power dissipation function to infer total mechanical power. These estimates have the advantage of (a) requiring only a single modality, (b) being non-invasive in nature, and (c) being reflective of only the net power work generated by a ciliated surface. We demonstrate our all-optical approach to the estimation of these parameters in the Xenopus animal model system under normal and increased viscous loading. Our preliminary data support the hypothesis that the Xenopus ciliated surface can increase force output under loading conditions.

  9. Measurement of hydrodynamic force generation by swimming dolphins using bubble DPIV.

    PubMed

    Fish, Frank E; Legac, Paul; Williams, Terrie M; Wei, Timothy

    2014-01-15

    Attempts to measure the propulsive forces produced by swimming dolphins have been limited. Previous uses of computational hydrodynamic models and gliding experiments have provided estimates of thrust production by dolphins, but these were indirect tests that relied on various assumptions. The thrust produced by two actively swimming bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) was directly measured using digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). For dolphins swimming in a large outdoor pool, the DPIV method used illuminated microbubbles that were generated in a narrow sheet from a finely porous hose and a compressed air source. The movement of the bubbles was tracked with a high-speed video camera. Dolphins swam at speeds of 0.7 to 3.4 m s(-1) within the bubble sheet oriented along the midsagittal plane of the animal. The wake of the dolphin was visualized as the microbubbles were displaced because of the action of the propulsive flukes and jet flow. The oscillations of the dolphin flukes were shown to generate strong vortices in the wake. Thrust production was measured from the vortex strength through the Kutta-Joukowski theorem of aerodynamics. The dolphins generated up to 700 N during small amplitude swimming and up to 1468 N during large amplitude starts. The results of this study demonstrated that bubble DPIV can be used effectively to measure the thrust produced by large-bodied dolphins.

  10. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  11. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  12. EMAT generation of bulk forces in a ferromagnetic plate and their equivalent surface stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouge, C.; Lhémery, A.; Aristégui, C.

    2014-04-01

    Electro-magnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) are successfully used in many NDE applications, despite their low efficiency: they do not require a coupling medium and can easily generate elastic waves that standard piezoelectric transducers cannot, such as shear horizontal guided waves. There are all sorts of EMAT designs, so much so that dedicated simulation tools are necessary to optimally conceive an EMAT for a given application. EMAT performances also strongly depend on material properties of the piece under test. Here, ferromagnetic materials are considered. In such a material, an EMAT is the source of three forces resulting from three distinct and generally nonlinear phenomena: in addition to the Lorentz's force generated in all conductive media, the magnetization and magnetostriction forces take place. All these forces are modelled as vector fields in the volume of the specimen. However, wave generation is more efficiently predicted by considering sources of surface stress than sources of body force. Thus, a general model is derived for transforming body forces into surface stresses; this approach is used to express the 2D modal amplitudes of Lamb waves generated by an EMAT in a ferromagnetic plate as quasi-closed form solutions.

  13. A comparative assessment of forces and moments generated by lingual and conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Sifakakis, Iosif; Pandis, Nikolaos; Makou, Margarita; Katsaros, Christos; Eliades, Theodore; Bourauel, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bracket type on the labiopalatal forces and moments generated in the sagittal plane. Incognito™ lingual brackets (3M Unitek), STb™ lingual brackets (Light Lingual System; ORMCO), and conventional 0.018 inch slot brackets (Gemini; 3M Unitek) were bonded on three identical maxillary acrylic resin models, with a palatally displaced right lateral incisor. The transfer trays for the indirect bonding of the lingual brackets were constructed in certified laboratories. Each model was mounted on the orthodontic measurement and simulation system and ten 0.013 inch CuNiTi wires were used for each bracket type. The wire was ligated with elastomerics and each measurement was repeated once after re-ligation. The labiopalatal forces and the moments in the sagittal plane were recorded on the right lateral incisor. One-way analysis of variance and post hoc Scheffe pairwise comparisons were used to assess the effect on bracket type on the generated forces and moments. The magnitude of forces ranged from 1.62, 1.27, and 1.81 N for the STb, conventional, and Incognito brackets, respectively; the corresponding moments were 2.01, 1.45, and 2.19 N mm, respectively. Bracket type was a significant predictor of the generated forces (P < 0.001) and moments (P < 0.001). The produced forces were different among all three bracket types, whereas the generated moments differed between conventional and lingual brackets but not between lingual brackets.

  14. Student Activities Can Generate Positive PR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armistead, Lew

    1985-01-01

    To counter negative news about education it is important to make sure that positive school activities receive their fair share of exposure in the news media. Presents tips on how to generate positive public relations. Includes a list of newsworthy activities ideas. (MD)

  15. Molecular interaction forces generated during protein adsorption to well-defined polymer brush surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Sho; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-03-17

    The molecular interaction forces generated during the adsorption of proteins to surfaces were examined by the force-versus-distance (f-d) curve measurements of atomic force microscopy using probes modified with appropriate molecules. Various substrates with polymer brush layers bearing zwitterionic, cationic, anionic, and hydrophobic groups were systematically prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. Surface interaction forces on these substrates were analyzed by the f-d curve measurements using probes with the same polymer brush layer as the substrate. Repulsive forces, which decreased depending on the ionic strength, were generated between cationic or anionic polyelectrolyte brush layers; these were considered to be electrostatic interaction forces. A strong adhesive force was detected between hydrophobic polymer brush layers during retraction; this corresponded to the hydrophobic interaction between two hydrophobic polymer layers. In contrast, no significant interaction forces were detected between zwitterionic polymer brush layers. Direct interaction forces between proteins and polymer brush layers were then quantitatively evaluated by the f-d curve measurements using protein-immobilized probes consisting of negatively charged albumin and positively charged lysozyme under physiological conditions. In addition, the amount of protein adsorbed on the polymer brush layer was quantified by surface plasmon resonance measurements. Relatively large amounts of protein adsorbed to the polyelectrolyte brush layers with opposite charges. It was considered that the detachment of the protein after contact with the polymer brush layer hardly occurred due to salt formation at the interface. Both proteins adsorbed significantly on the hydrophobic polymer brush layer, which was due to hydrophobic interactions at the interface. In contrast, the zwitterionic polymer brush layer exhibited no significant interaction force with proteins and suppressed

  16. Mechanisms of force generation by end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Ajit P.; Bloom, Kerry S.; Salmon, E. D.

    2010-01-01

    Generation of motile force is one of the main functions of the eukaryotic kinetochore during cell division. In recent years, the KMN network of proteins (Ndc80 complex, Mis12 complex and KNL-1 complex) has emerged as a highly conserved core microtubule-binding complex at the kinetochore. It plays a major role in coupling force generation to microtubule plus-end polymerization and depolymerization. In this review, we discuss current theoretical mechanisms of force generation, and then focus on emerging information about mechanistic contributions from the Ndc80 complex in eukaryotes, and the microtubule-binding Dam1/DASH complex from fungi. New information has also become available from super-resolution light microscopy on the protein architecture of the kinetochore-microtubule attachment site in both budding yeast and humans, which provides further insight into the mechanism of force generation. We briefly discuss potential contributions of motors, other microtubule-associated proteins, and microtubule depolymerases. Using the above evidence, we present speculative models of force generation at the kinetochore. PMID:20061128

  17. Hybrid electro-optical stimulation of the rat sciatic nerve induces force generation in the plantarflexor muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Austin R.; Peterson, Erik; Mackanos, Mark A.; Atkinson, James; Tyler, Dustin; Jansen, E. Duco

    2012-12-01

    Objective. Optical methods of neural activation are becoming important tools for the study and treatment of neurological disorders. Infrared nerve stimulation (INS) is an optical technique exhibiting spatially precise activation in the native neural system. While this technique shows great promise, the risk of thermal damage may limit some applications. Combining INS with traditional electrical stimulation, a method known as hybrid electro-optical stimulation, reduces the laser power requirements and mitigates the risk of thermal damage while maintaining spatial selectivity. Here we investigate the capability of inducing force generation in the rat hind limb through hybrid stimulation of the sciatic nerve. Approach. Hybrid stimulation was achieved by combining an optically transparent nerve cuff for electrical stimulation and a diode laser coupled to an optical fiber for infrared stimulation. Force generation in the rat plantarflexor muscles was measured in response to hybrid stimulation with 1 s bursts of pulses at 15 and 20 Hz and with a burst frequency of 0.5 Hz. Main results. Forces were found to increase with successive stimulus trains, ultimately reaching a plateau by the 20th train. Hybrid evoked forces decayed at a rate similar to the rate of thermal diffusion in tissue. Preconditioning the nerve with an optical stimulus resulted in an increase in the force response to both electrical and hybrid stimulation. Histological evaluation showed no signs of thermally induced morphological changes following hybrid stimulation. Our results indicate that an increase in baseline temperature is a likely contributor to hybrid force generation. Significance. Extraneural INS of peripheral nerves at physiologically relevant repetition rates is possible using hybrid electro-optical stimulation.

  18. Timing-specific transfer of adapted muscle activity after walking in an elastic force field.

    PubMed

    Blanchette, Andreanne; Bouyer, Laurent J

    2009-07-01

    Human locomotion results from interactions between feedforward (central commands from voluntary and automatic drive) and feedback (peripheral commands from sensory inputs) mechanisms. Recent studies have shown that locomotion can be adapted when an external force is applied to the lower limb. To better understand the neural control of this adaptation, the present study investigated gait modifications resulting from exposure to a position-dependent force field. Ten subjects walked on a treadmill before, during, and after exposure to a force field generated by elastic tubing that pulled the foot forward and up during swing. Lower limb kinematics and electromyographic (EMG) activity were recorded during each walking period. During force field exposure, peak foot velocity was initially increased by 38%. As subjects adapted, peak foot velocity gradually returned to baseline in activity started earlier (16% before toe off) and remained elevated throughout swing. After force field exposure, foot velocity was initially reduced by 22% and returned to baseline in 9-51 strides. Aftereffects in hamstring EMGs consisted of increased activity around toe off. Contrary to the adapted state, this increase was not maintained during the rest of swing. Together, these results suggest that while the neural control of human locomotion can adapt to force field exposure, the mechanisms underlying this adaptation may vary according to the timing in the gait cycle. Adapted hamstring EMG activity may rely more on feedforward mechanisms around toe off and more on feedback mechanisms during the rest of swing. PMID:19420121

  19. Comparative assessment of forces generated during simulated alignment with self-ligating and conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Eliades, Theodore; Bourauel, Christoph

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to comparatively assess the magnitude and direction of forces and moments generated from different bracket systems, during the initial levelling and alignment stage of orthodontic treatment. Three types of brackets were used: Orthos2 (Ormco), Damon2 (Ormco), and In-Ovation R (GAC). The brackets were bonded on resin replicas models of a patient's crowded mandibular arch, and a 0.014 inch Damon archform CuNiTi (Ormco) wire was inserted. The model was mounted on the Orthodontic Measurement and Simulation System (OMSS) and six static measurements were taken at the initial crowded state per bracket for the lateral incisor, canine, and first premolar. A total of 10 repetitions were performed for each measurement, with new brackets and archwires used for each trial. The forces and moments generated were registered directly on the OMSS software and were statistically analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance separately for each dental arch location and force component. Group differences were further analyzed with Tukey's post hoc comparisons test at the 0.05 significance level. The lingually inclined, crowded lateral incisor presented an extrusive and buccal movement and showed the lowest force in the vertical direction, whereas the self-ligating group of brackets generated the highest force in the buccolingual direction. The moments applied by the three bracket systems followed the general trend shown for forces; in the vertical axis, the self-ligating brackets exerted lower forces than their conventional counterpart. This was modified in the buccolingual direction where, in most instances, the self-ligating appliances applied higher moments compared with the conventional bracket. In most cases, the magnitude of forces and moments ranged between 30-70 cN and 2-6 N mm, respectively. However, maximum forces and moments developed at the lateral incisor were almost four times higher than the average. PMID:19349418

  20. Correlation of fingertip shear force direction with somatosensory cortical activity in monkey.

    PubMed

    Fortier-Poisson, Pascal; Langlais, Jean-Sébastien; Smith, Allan M

    2016-01-01

    To examine the activity of somatosensory cortex (S1) neurons to self-generated shear forces on the index and thumb, two monkeys were trained to grasp a stationary metal tab with a key grip and exert forces without the fingers slipping in one of four orthogonal directions for 1 s. A majority (∼85%) of slowly adapting and rapidly adapting (RA) S1 neurons had activity modulated with shear force direction. The cells were recorded mainly in areas 1 and 2 of the S1, although some area 3b neurons also responded to shear direction or magnitude. The preferred shear vectors were distributed in every direction, with tuning arcs varying from 50° to 170°. Some RA neurons sensitive to dynamic shear force direction also responded to static shear force but within a narrower range, suggesting that the direction of the shear force may influence the adaptation rate. Other neurons were modulated with shear forces in diametrically opposite directions. The directional sensitivity of S1 cortical neurons is consistent with recordings from cutaneous afferents showing that shear direction, even without slip, is a powerful stimulus to S1 neurons. PMID:26467520

  1. The myofilament elasticity and its effect on kinetics of force generation by the myosin motor.

    PubMed

    Piazzesi, Gabriella; Dolfi, Mario; Brunello, Elisabetta; Fusi, Luca; Reconditi, Massimo; Bianco, Pasquale; Linari, Marco; Lombardi, Vincenzo

    2014-06-15

    The half-sarcomere is the functional unit of striated muscle, in which, according to a "linear" mechanical model, myosin motors are parallel force generators with an average strain s acting between the opposing myosin and actin filaments that behave as a series elastic element with compliance Cf. Thus the definition of the mechanism of force generation by myosin motors in muscle requires integration of the crystallographic model of the working stroke with the mechanical constraints provided by the organization of motors in the half-sarcomere. The relation between half-sarcomere compliance and force (Chs-T) during the development of isometric contraction deviates, at low forces, from that predicted by the linear model, indicating the presence of an elastic element in parallel with the myosin motors, which may influence the estimate of s. A working stroke model, kinetically constrained by the early phase of the isotonic velocity transient following a force step, predicts that the rate of quick force recovery following a length step is reduced to the observed value by a Cf of 12.6nm/MPa. With this value of Cf, the fit of Chs-T relation during the isometric force rise gives s=1.8-1.9nm, similar to the values estimated using the linear model. PMID:24631572

  2. The actin crosslinking protein palladin modulates force generation and mechanosensitivity of tumor associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Azatov, Mikheil; Goicoechea, Silvia M.; Otey, Carol A.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    Cells organize actin filaments into higher-order structures by regulating the composition, distribution and concentration of actin crosslinkers. Palladin is an actin crosslinker found in the lamellar actin network and stress fibers, which are critical for mechanosensing of the environment. Palladin also serves as a molecular scaffold for α-actinin, another key actin crosslinker. By virtue of its close interactions with actomyosin structures in the cell, palladin may play an important role in cell mechanics. However, the role of palladin in cellular force generation and mechanosensing has not been studied. Here, we investigate the role of palladin in regulating the plasticity of the actin cytoskeleton and cellular force generation in response to alterations in substrate stiffness. Traction force microscopy revealed that tumor-associated fibroblasts generate larger forces on substrates of increased stiffness. Contrary to expectations, knocking down palladin increased the forces generated by cells and inhibited their ability to sense substrate stiffness for very stiff gels. This was accompanied by significant differences in actin organization, adhesion dynamics and altered myosin organization in palladin knock-down cells. Our results suggest that actin crosslinkers such as palladin and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant behavior as in cancer metastasis. PMID:27353427

  3. Force generation by skeletal muscle is controlled by mechanosensing in myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Linari, Marco; Brunello, Elisabetta; Reconditi, Massimo; Fusi, Luca; Caremani, Marco; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Irving, Malcolm

    2015-12-10

    Contraction of both skeletal muscle and the heart is thought to be controlled by a calcium-dependent structural change in the actin-containing thin filaments, which permits the binding of myosin motors from the neighbouring thick filaments to drive filament sliding. Here we show by synchrotron small-angle X-ray diffraction of frog (Rana temporaria) single skeletal muscle cells that, although the well-known thin-filament mechanism is sufficient for regulation of muscle shortening against low load, force generation against high load requires a second permissive step linked to a change in the structure of the thick filament. The resting (switched 'OFF') structure of the thick filament is characterized by helical tracks of myosin motors on the filament surface and a short backbone periodicity. This OFF structure is almost completely preserved during low-load shortening, which is driven by a small fraction of constitutively active (switched 'ON') myosin motors outside thick-filament control. At higher load, these motors generate sufficient thick-filament stress to trigger the transition to its long-periodicity ON structure, unlocking the major population of motors required for high-load contraction. This concept of the thick filament as a regulatory mechanosensor provides a novel explanation for the dynamic and energetic properties of skeletal muscle. A similar mechanism probably operates in the heart. PMID:26560032

  4. Active supports and force optimization for the MMT primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Hubert M.; Callahan, Shawn P.; Cuerden, Brian; Davison, Warren B.; Derigne, S. T.; Dettmann, Lee R.; Parodi, G.; Trebisky, T. J.; West, Steve C.; Williams, Joseph T.

    1998-08-01

    We describe the active support system and optimization of support forces for the 6.5 m primary mirror for the Multiple Mirror Telescope Conversion. The mirror was figured to an accuracy of 26 nm rms surface error, excluding certain flexible bending modes that will be controlled by support forces in the telescope. On installation of the mirror into its telescope support cell, an initial optimization of support forces is needed because of minor differences between the support used during fabrication and that in the telescope cell. The optimization is based on figure measurements made interferometrically in the vibration- isolated test tower of the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab. Actuator influence functions were determined by finite- element analysis and verified by measurement. The optimization is performed by singular value decomposition of the influence functions into normal modes. Preliminary results give a wavefront accuracy better than that of the atmosphere in 0.11 arcsecond seeing.

  5. Microglia mechanics: immune activation alters traction forces and durotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Lars; Koser, David E.; Shahapure, Rajesh; Gautier, Hélène O. B.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Gather, Malte C.; Ulbricht, Elke; Franze, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells are key players in the primary immune response of the central nervous system. They are highly active and motile cells that chemically and mechanically interact with their environment. While the impact of chemical signaling on microglia function has been studied in much detail, the current understanding of mechanical signaling is very limited. When cultured on compliant substrates, primary microglial cells adapted their spread area, morphology, and actin cytoskeleton to the stiffness of their environment. Traction force microscopy revealed that forces exerted by microglia increase with substrate stiffness until reaching a plateau at a shear modulus of ~5 kPa. When cultured on substrates incorporating stiffness gradients, microglia preferentially migrated toward stiffer regions, a process termed durotaxis. Lipopolysaccharide-induced immune-activation of microglia led to changes in traction forces, increased migration velocities and an amplification of durotaxis. We finally developed a mathematical model connecting traction forces with the durotactic behavior of migrating microglial cells. Our results demonstrate that microglia are susceptible to mechanical signals, which could be important during central nervous system development and pathologies. Stiffness gradients in tissue surrounding neural implants such as electrodes, for example, could mechanically attract microglial cells, thus facilitating foreign body reactions detrimental to electrode functioning. PMID:26441534

  6. Microglia mechanics: immune activation alters traction forces and durotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Lars; Koser, David E; Shahapure, Rajesh; Gautier, Hélène O B; Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Gather, Malte C; Ulbricht, Elke; Franze, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells are key players in the primary immune response of the central nervous system. They are highly active and motile cells that chemically and mechanically interact with their environment. While the impact of chemical signaling on microglia function has been studied in much detail, the current understanding of mechanical signaling is very limited. When cultured on compliant substrates, primary microglial cells adapted their spread area, morphology, and actin cytoskeleton to the stiffness of their environment. Traction force microscopy revealed that forces exerted by microglia increase with substrate stiffness until reaching a plateau at a shear modulus of ~5 kPa. When cultured on substrates incorporating stiffness gradients, microglia preferentially migrated toward stiffer regions, a process termed durotaxis. Lipopolysaccharide-induced immune-activation of microglia led to changes in traction forces, increased migration velocities and an amplification of durotaxis. We finally developed a mathematical model connecting traction forces with the durotactic behavior of migrating microglial cells. Our results demonstrate that microglia are susceptible to mechanical signals, which could be important during central nervous system development and pathologies. Stiffness gradients in tissue surrounding neural implants such as electrodes, for example, could mechanically attract microglial cells, thus facilitating foreign body reactions detrimental to electrode functioning. PMID:26441534

  7. Cardiorespiratory effects of forced activity and digestion in toads.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Johnnie Bremholm; Wang, Tobias

    2003-01-01

    Digestion and physical activity are associated with large and sometimes opposite changes in several physiological parameters. Gastric acid secretion during digestion causes increased levels of plasma bicarbonate ([HCO-3](pl)), whereas activity leads to a metabolic acidosis with increased lactate and decrease in plasma bicarbonate. Here we describe the combined effects of feeding and activity in the toad Bufo marinus to investigate whether the increased bicarbonate buffering capacity during digestion (the so-called alkaline tide) protects the acid-base disturbance during activity and enhances the subsequent recovery. In addition, we describe the changes in arterial oxygen levels and plasma ion composition, as well as rates of gas exchange, heart rates, and blood pressures. Toads were equipped with catheters in the femoral artery and divided into four experimental regimes: control, digestion, forced activity, and forced activity during the postprandial period (N=6 in each). Digestion induced a significant metabolic alkalosis with increased [HCO-3](pl) that was completely balanced by a respiratory acidosis; that is, increased arterial Pco(2) (P(a)co(2)), so that arterial pH (pH(a)) did not change. Forced activity led to a substantial reduction in pH(a) by 0.43 units, an increase in plasma lactate concentration by 12.5 mmol L(-1), and a reduction in [HCO-3](pl) of similar magnitude. While digesting animals had higher P(a)co(2) and [HCO-3](pl) at rest, the magnitude and duration of the changes in arterial acid-base parameters were similar to those of fasting animals, although the reduction in pH(a) was somewhat lower (0.32 units). In conclusion, while recovery from the acidosis following exercise did not seem to be affected by digestion, the alkaline tide did slightly dampen the reduction in pH(a) during activity.

  8. Frequency spectra of magnetostrictive and Lorentz forces generated in ferromagnetic materials by a CW excited EMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouge, C.; Lhémery, A.; Aristégui, C.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetostriction arises in ferromagnetic materials subjected to magnetization, e.g., when an EMAT (Electro-Magnetic Acoustic Transducer) is used to generate ultrasonic waves. In such a case, the magnetostriction force must be taken into account as a transduction process that adds up to the Lorentz force. When the static magnetic field is high compared to the dynamic field, both forces are driven by the excitation frequency. For lower static relative values of the magnetic fields, the Lorentz force comprises both the excitation frequency and its first harmonic. In this work, a model is derived to predict the frequency content of the magnetostrictive force that comprises several harmonics. The discrete frequency spectrum strongly depends on both the static field and the relative amplitude of the dynamic field. The only material input data needed to predict it is the curve of macroscopic magnetostrictive strain that can be measured in the direction of an imposed magnetic field. Then, the various frequency-dependent distributions of Lorentz and magnetostriction body forces can be transformed into equivalent surface stresses. Examples of computation are given for different static and dynamic magnetic fields to study their influence on the frequency content of waves generated in ferromagnetic materials.

  9. A force-generating machinery maintains the spindle at the cell center during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos; Fantana, Horatiu A; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-27

    The position and orientation of the mitotic spindle is precisely regulated to ensure the accurate partition of the cytoplasm between daughter cells and the correct localization of the daughters within growing tissue. Using magnetic tweezers to perturb the position of the spindle in intact cells, we discovered a force-generating machinery that maintains the spindle at the cell center during metaphase and anaphase in one- and two-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The forces increase with the number of microtubules and are larger in smaller cells. The machinery is rigid enough to suppress thermal fluctuations to ensure precise localization of the mitotic spindle, yet compliant enough to allow molecular force generators to fine-tune the position of the mitotic spindle to facilitate asymmetric division. PMID:27230381

  10. A force-generating machinery maintains the spindle at the cell center during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos; Fantana, Horatiu A; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-27

    The position and orientation of the mitotic spindle is precisely regulated to ensure the accurate partition of the cytoplasm between daughter cells and the correct localization of the daughters within growing tissue. Using magnetic tweezers to perturb the position of the spindle in intact cells, we discovered a force-generating machinery that maintains the spindle at the cell center during metaphase and anaphase in one- and two-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The forces increase with the number of microtubules and are larger in smaller cells. The machinery is rigid enough to suppress thermal fluctuations to ensure precise localization of the mitotic spindle, yet compliant enough to allow molecular force generators to fine-tune the position of the mitotic spindle to facilitate asymmetric division.

  11. First Estimates of the Radiative Forcing of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chistopher, Sundar A.; Kliche, Donna V.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Collocated measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner are used to examine the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols generated from biomass burning for 13 images in South America. Using the AVHRR, Local Area Coverage (LAC) data, a new technique based on a combination of spectral and textural measures is developed for detecting these aerosols. Then, the instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing values are computed from the ERBE instantaneous scanner data. Results for the selected samples from 13 images show that the mean instantaneous net radiative forcing for areas with heavy aerosol loading is about -36 W/sq m and that for the optically thin aerosols are about -16 W/sq m. These results, although preliminary, provide the first estimates of radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning using satellite data.

  12. First Estimates of the Radiative Forcing of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning Using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Kliche, Donna A.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Collocated measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner are used to examine the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols generated from biomass burning for 13 images in South America. Using the AVHRR, Local Area Coverage (LAC) data, a new technique based on a combination of spectral and textural measures is developed for detecting these aerosols. Then, the instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing values are computed from the ERBE instantaneous scanner data. Results for the selected samples from 13 images show that the mean instantaneous net radiative forcing for areas with heavy aerosol loading is about -36 W/sq m and that for the optically thin aerosols are about -16 W/sq m. These results, although preliminary, provide the first estimates of radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning using satellite data.

  13. Molecular adaptations allow dynein to generate large collective forces inside cells.

    PubMed

    Rai, Arpan K; Rai, Ashim; Ramaiya, Avin J; Jha, Rupam; Mallik, Roop

    2013-01-17

    Many cellular processes require large forces that are generated collectively by multiple cytoskeletal motor proteins. Understanding how motors generate force as a team is therefore fundamentally important but is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate optical trapping at single-molecule resolution inside cells to quantify force generation by motor teams driving single phagosomes. In remarkable paradox, strong kinesins fail to work collectively, whereas weak and detachment-prone dyneins team up to generate large forces that tune linearly in strength and persistence with dynein number. Based on experimental evidence, we propose that leading dyneins in a load-carrying team take short steps, whereas trailing dyneins take larger steps. Dyneins in such a team bunch close together and therefore share load better to overcome low/intermediate loads. Up against higher load, dyneins "catch bond" tenaciously to the microtubule, but kinesins detach rapidly. Dynein therefore appears uniquely adapted to work in large teams, which may explain how this motor executes bewilderingly diverse cellular processes.

  14. The force generated by biological membranes on a polymer rod and its response: Statics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, D. R.; Turner, M. S.

    2004-10-01

    We propose a theory for the force exerted by a fluctuating membrane on a polymer rod tip. Using statistical mechanical methods, the expression for the generated force is written in terms of the distance of the rod tip from the membrane "frame." We apply the theory in calculating the stall force and membrane displacement required to cease the growth of a growing fiber induced by membrane fluctuations, as well as the membrane force and membrane displacement required for rod/fiber buckling. We also consider the dynamics of a growing fiber tip under the influence of a fluctuation-induced membrane force. We discuss the importance of our results in various biological contexts. Finally, we present a method to simultaneously extract both the rigidity of the semiflexible rod and the force applied by, e.g., the membrane from the measurements of the bending fluctuations of the rod. Such a measurement of the force would give information about the thermodynamics of the rod polymerization that involves the usual Brownian ratchet mechanism.

  15. Transient forces generated by projectiles on variable quality mouthguards monitored by instrumented impact testing

    PubMed Central

    Warnet, L; Greasley, A

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—(a) To determine the force-time trace that occurs when a spring mounted simulated upper jaw is impacted; (b) to examine if mouthguards of variable quality have significant influence on such force-time traces; (c) to attempt to relate physical events to the profile of the force-time traces recorded. Methods—A simulated jaw, consisting of ceramic teeth inserted into a hard rubber arch reinforced with a composite jawbone, was fitted with various mouthguards as part of a previous round robin study. A clinical assessment distinguished good, bad, and poor mouthguards, and these were each fitted to the jaw, which was then submitted to instrumental impact tests under conditions expected to produce tooth fractures. The force-time trace was recorded for such impact events. Results—The spring mounting method caused two distinct peaks in the force-time trace. The initial one was related to inertia effects and showed an increase in magnitude with impactor velocity as expected. The second peak showed features that were related to the differences in the mouthguards selected. Conclusions—The use of a force washer within a conical ended impactor enabled force-time traces to be recorded during the impact of a spring mounted simulated jaw fitted with mouthguards of variable quality. The spring mounting system causes an initial inertial peak followed by a second peak once the spring mount has fully compressed. Good fitting guards, which keep most teeth intact, result in high stiffness targets that in turn generate high reaction forces in the impactor. If the spring mounting is omitted, the two peaks are combined to give even higher reaction forces. The force-time trace offers some potential for assessing both overall mouthguard performance and individual events during the impact sequence. Mouthguards with good retention to the jaw remained attached during the impact event and helped to preserve the structural integrity of the target. This in turn developed high

  16. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Shota Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-07

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  17. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shota; Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-01

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  18. Generativity as a Route to Active Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Andreas; Schmitt, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We elucidate the significance of active ageing from an individual as well as from a societal perspective. Taking an individual perspective, maintaining activity in later years is linked to successful ageing because of empirical relationships to positive self-perception, satisfaction with life, and development of competences, whereas from a societal perspective, active ageing implies usage of older people's life competences as a human capital of society—a societal imperative, particularly in times of demographic change but also more basically substantiated in an ethics of responsibility, intergenerational solidarity, and generation equity. We focus on the psychological construct of generativity which is interpreted as an aspect of the philosophical-anthropological category of joint responsibility. Our own research in Mexico and the Baltic States supports the notion that maintaining access to the public sphere and active engagement for others is a more basic individual concern than a life-stages specific developmental task. We report background and results of a Dialogue Forum Project Funding, a research cooperation between our institute and the Foundation Remembrance, Responsibility, and Future aimed to improve generativity in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine by implementing and supporting local initiatives offering opportunities for intergenerational dialogue. PMID:22919378

  19. Automatic GROMACS topology generation and comparisons of force fields for solvation free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, Magnus; Lindahl, Erik

    2015-01-22

    Free energy calculation has long been an important goal for molecular dynamics simulation and force field development, but historically it has been challenged by limited performance, accuracy, and creation of topologies for arbitrary small molecules. This has made it difficult to systematically compare different sets of parameters to improve existing force fields, but in the past few years several authors have developed increasingly automated procedures to generate parameters for force fields such as Amber, CHARMM, and OPLS. Here, we present a new framework that enables fully automated generation of GROMACS topologies for any of these force fields and an automated setup for parallel adaptive optimization of high-throughput free energy calculation by adjusting lambda point placement on the fly. As a small example of this automated pipeline, we have calculated solvation free energies of 50 different small molecules using the GAFF, OPLS-AA, and CGenFF force fields and four different water models, and by including the often neglected polarization costs, we show that the common charge models are somewhat underpolarized.

  20. Coordinated integrin activation by actin-dependent force during T-cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Nordenfelt, Pontus; Elliott, Hunter L.; Springer, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    For a cell to move forward it must convert chemical energy into mechanical propulsion. Force produced by actin polymerization can generate traction across the plasma membrane by transmission through integrins to their ligands. However, the role this force plays in integrin activation is unknown. Here we show that integrin activity and cytoskeletal dynamics are reciprocally linked, where actin-dependent force itself appears to regulate integrin activity. We generated fluorescent tension-sensing constructs of integrin αLβ2 (LFA-1) to visualize intramolecular tension during cell migration. Using quantitative imaging of migrating T cells, we correlate tension in the αL or β2 subunit with cell and actin dynamics. We find that actin engagement produces tension within the β2 subunit to induce and stabilize an active integrin conformational state and that this requires intact talin and kindlin motifs. This supports a general mechanism where localized actin polymerization can coordinate activation of the complex machinery required for cell migration. PMID:27721490

  1. Forcing Open TRP channels: mechanical gating as a unifying activation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Montell, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins are cation channels that comprise a superfamily of molecular sensors that enable animals to detect a wide variety of environmental stimuli. This versatility enables vertebrate and invertebrate TRP channels to function in a diversity of senses, ranging from vision to taste, smell, touch, hearing, proprioception and thermosensation. Moreover, many individual TRP channels are activated through a surprising range of sensory stimuli. The multitasking nature of TRP channels raises the question as to whether seemingly disparate activators gate TRPs through common strategies. In this regard, a recent major advance is the discovery that a phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent signaling cascade activates the TRP channels in Drosophila photoreceptor cells through generation of force in the lipid-bilayer. The premise of this review is that mechanical force is a unifying, common strategy for gating TRP channels. In addition to several TRP channels that function in mechanosensation and are gated by force applied to the cells, changes in temperature and in the concentration of lipophilic second messengers through stimulation of signaling cascades, cause architectural modifications of the cell membrane, which in turn activate TRP channels through mechanical force. Consequently, TRPs are capable of functioning as stretch-activated channels, even in cases in which the stimuli that initiate the signaling cascades are not mechanical. We propose that most TRPs are actually mechanosensitive channels (MSCs), which undergo conformational changes in response to tension imposed on the lipid bilayer, resulting in channel gating. PMID:25998730

  2. Successive incorporation of force-generating units in the bacterial rotary motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Steven M.; Berg, Howard C.

    1984-05-01

    Mot mutants of Escherichia coli are paralysed: their flagella appear to be intact but do not rotate1 . The motA and motB gene products are found in the cytoplasmic membrane2; they do not co-purify with flagellar basal bodies isolated in neutral detergents1. Silverman et al. found that mot mutants could be `resurrected' through protein synthesis directed by λ transducing phages carrying the wild-type genes2. Here, we have studied this activation at the level of a single flagellar motor. Cells of a motB strain carrying plasmids in which transcription of the wild-type motB gene was controlled by the lac promoter were tethered to a glass surface by a single flagellum. These cells began to spin within several minutes after the addition of a lac inducer, and their rotational speed changed in a series of equally spaced steps. As many as 7 steps were seen in individual cells and, from the final speeds attained, as many as 16 steps could be inferred. These experiments show that each flagellar motor contains several independent force-generating units comprised, at least in part, of motB protein.

  3. Plastic media blasting activities at Hill Air Force Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, J. D.

    1993-03-01

    Hill Air Force Base in Utah developed plastic media blasting (PMB) paint removal process for removing paint from Air Force aircraft. The development of the process involved extensive testing of various abrasives and subsequent parameters to end up with an approved production process. Hill AFB has been using PMB in a production mode since 1985, and completely discontinued chemical stripping of airframes in 1989. We have recently installed and began operating a fully automated PMB facility that utilizes two nine-axis robots to strip an aircraft. This system has enabled us to further reduce the manhours required to strip an aircraft, and also allowed us to remove the employee from the blasting atmosphere into a control room. We have, and will continue to realize, significant environmental and economic savings by using PMB. Hill is also actively involved with the development of future paint stripping technologies.

  4. Effect of exhaustive incremental treadmill effort on force generation repeatability in biathletes.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska, Agnieszka D; Błacha, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined how force generation repeatability changes as the result of incremental maximal test to volitional exhaustion by well-trained (VO2/kg [mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)] 62.55 ± 5.27) individuals. 13 young biathletes (18.9 ± 1.7 years) performed isometric maximum voluntary contraction (IMVC) and submaximal targeted (98N) pushes against the force transducers by arms: elbow extension (EE), elbow flexion (EF) and legs: knee extensions (KE) in pre- and posttest conditions after incremental exhaustive test performed on treadmill. IMVC did not differ significantly between pre and posttest conditions for upper and statistically decrease in lower extremities measurements (p <.01). The mean force of 10 submaximal targeted force productions (F(mean); N) is similar for pre- and posttest measurements. Standard deviation of F(mean) (Fsd; N) and coefficient variation (CV;%) decrease statistically in elbows flexion p <.02 but not extension. The reduction of force repetition accuracy in left knee extension was noticed (p <.01). The fatigue induced by incremental running test decreases a magnitude of force production variability in specifically trained muscle groups in biathletes.

  5. Running on water: Three-dimensional force generation by basilisk lizards

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S. Tonia; Lauder, George V.

    2004-01-01

    Water provides a unique challenge for legged locomotion because it readily yields to any applied force. Previous studies have shown that static stability during locomotion is possible only when the center of mass remains within a theoretical region of stability. Running across a highly yielding surface could move the center of mass beyond the edges of the region of stability, potentially leading to tripping or falling. Yet basilisk lizards are proficient water runners, regularly dashing across bodies of water to evade predators. We present here direct measurements of time-averaged force produced by juvenile plumed basilisk lizards (Basiliscus plumifrons) while running across water. By using digital particle image velocimetry to visualize fluid flow induced by foot movement, we show that sufficient support force is generated for a lizard to run across water and that novel strategies are also required to run across a highly yielding surface. Juvenile basilisk lizards produce greatest support and propulsive forces during the first half of the step, when the foot moves primarily vertically downwards into the water; they also produce large transverse reaction forces that change from medial (79% body weight) to lateral (37% body weight) throughout the step. These forces may act to dynamically stabilize the lizards during water running. Our results give insight into the mechanics of how basilisk lizards run across water and, on a broader scale, provide a conceptual basis for how locomotor surface properties can challenge established rules for the mechanics of legged locomotion. PMID:15550546

  6. Endoplasmic filaments generate the motive force for rotational streaming in Nitella.

    PubMed

    Allen, N S

    1974-10-01

    The streaming endoplasm of characean cells has been shown to contain previously unreported endoplasmic filaments along which bending waves are observed under the light microscope using special techniques. The bending waves are similar to those propagated along sperm tails causing propulsion of sperm. In Nitella there is reason to believe that nearly all of the filaments are anchored in the cortex and that their beating propels the endoplasm in which they are suspended. This hypothesis is supported by calculations in which typical and average wave parameters have been inserted into the classical hydrodynamic equations derived for sperm tail bending waves. These calculations come within an order of magnitude of predicting the velocity of streaming and they show that waves of the character described, propagated along an estimated 52 m of endoplasmic filaments per cell, must generate a total motive force per cell within less than an order of magnitude of the forces measured experimentally by others. If we assume that undulating filaments produce the force driving the endoplasm, then the method described for measuring the motive force could lead to a lower than actual value for the motive force, since both centrifugation and vacuolar perfusion would reverse the orientation of some filaments. Observations of the initiation of particle translation in association with the filaments suggest that particle transport and wave propagation, which occur at the same velocity, may both be dependent on the same process. The possibility that some form of contractility provides the motive force for filament flection and particle transport is discussed.

  7. ENDOPLASMIC FILAMENTS GENERATE THE MOTIVE FORCE FOR ROTATIONAL STREAMING IN NITELLA

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Nina Strömgren

    1974-01-01

    The streaming endoplasm of characean cells has been shown to contain previously unreported endoplasmic filaments along which bending waves are observed under the light microscope using special techniques. The bending waves are similar to those propagated along sperm tails causing propulsion of sperm. In Nitella there is reason to believe that nearly all of the filaments are anchored in the cortex and that their beating propels the endoplasm in which they are suspended. This hypothesis is supported by calculations in which typical and average wave parameters have been inserted into the classical hydrodynamic equations derived for sperm tail bending waves. These calculations come within an order of magnitude of predicting the velocity of streaming and they show that waves of the character described, propagated along an estimated 52 m of endoplasmic filaments per cell, must generate a total motive force per cell within less than an order of magnitude of the forces measured experimentally by others. If we assume that undulating filaments produce the force driving the endoplasm, then the method described for measuring the motive force could lead to a lower than actual value for the motive force, since both centrifugation and vacuolar perfusion would reverse the orientation of some filaments. Observations of the initiation of particle translation in association with the filaments suggest that particle transport and wave propagation, which occur at the same velocity, may both be dependent on the same process. The possibility that some form of contractility provides the motive force for filament flection and particle transport is discussed. PMID:4608919

  8. The Effects of Force Inhibition by Sodium Vanadate on Cross-Bridge Binding, Force Redevelopment, and Ca2+ Activation in Cardiac Muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Martyn,D.; Smith, L.; Kreutziger, K.; Xu, S.; Yu, L.; Regnie, M.

    2007-01-01

    Strongly bound, force generating myosin crossbridges play an important role as allosteric activators of cardiac thin filaments. Sodium vanadate (Vi) is a phosphate analog that inhibits force by preventing crossbridge transition into force producing states. This study characterizes the mechanical state of crossbridges with bound Vi as a tool to examine the contribution of crossbridges to cardiac contractile activation. The K{sub i} of force inhibition by Vi was {approx} 40 {mu}M. Sinusoidal stiffness was inhibited with Vi, although to a lesser extent than force. We used chord stiffness measurements to monitor Vi induced changes in crossbridge attachment/detachment kinetics at saturating [Ca{sup 2+}]. Vi decreased chord stiffness at the fastest rates of stretch, while at slow rates chord stiffness actually increased. This suggests a shift in crossbridge population towards low force states with very slow attachment/detachment kinetics. Low angle X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that with Vi crossbridge mass shifted away from thin filaments, implying decreased crossbridge-thin filament interaction. The combined X-ray and mechanical data suggest at least two crossbridge populations with Vi; one characteristic of normal cycling crossbridges, and a population of weak-binding crossbridges with bound Vi and slow attachment/detachment kinetics. The Ca{sup 2+}-sensitivity of force (pCa{sub 50}) and force redevelopment kinetics (k{sub TR}) were measured to study the effects of Vi on contractile activation. When maximal force was inhibited by 40% with Vi pCa{sub 50} decreased, but greater force inhibition at higher [Vi] did not further alter pCa{sub 50}. In contrast, the Ca{sup 2+}-sensitivity of k{sub TR} was unaffected by Vi. Interestingly, when force was inhibited by Vi k{sub TR} increased at sub-maximal levels of CaS{sup 2+}-activated force. Additionally, kTR is faster at saturating Ca{sup 2+} at [Vi] that inhibit force by more than {approx}70%. The effects of Vi on

  9. Ion Channels Activated by Mechanical Forces in Bacterial and Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Sokabe, Masahiro; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Since the first discovery of mechanosensitive ion channel (MSC) in non-sensory cells in 1984, a variety of MSCs has been identified both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. One of the central issues concerning MSCs is to understand the molecular and biophysical mechanisms of how mechanical forces activate/open MSCs. It has been well established that prokaryotic (mostly bacterial) MSCs are activated exclusively by membrane tension. Thus the problem to be solved with prokaryotic MSCs is the mechanisms how the MSC proteins receive tensile forces from the lipid bilayer and utilize them for channel opening. On the other hand, the activation of many eukaryotic MSCs crucially depends on tension in the actin cytoskeleton. By using the actin cytoskeleton as a force sensing antenna, eukaryotic MSCs have obtained sophisticated functions such as remote force sensing and force-direction sensing, which bacterial MSCs do not have. Actin cytoskeletons also give eukaryotic MSCs an interesting and important function called "active touch sensing", by which cells can sense rigidity of their substrates. The contractile actin cytoskeleton stress fiber (SF) anchors its each end to a focal adhesion (FA) and pulls the substrate to generate substrate-rigidity-dependent stresses in the FA. It has been found that those stresses are sensed by some Ca2+-permeable MSCs existing in the vicinity of FAs, thus the MSCs work as a substrate rigidity sensor that can transduce the rigidity into intracellular Ca2+ levels. This short review, roughly constituting of two parts, deals with molecular and biophysical mechanisms underlying the MSC activation process mostly based on our recent studies; (1) structure-function in bacterial MSCs activation at the atomic level, and (2) roles of actin cytoskeletons in the activation of eukaryotic MSCs.

  10. Natural history and the formation of the human being: Kant on active forces.

    PubMed

    Waldow, Anik

    2016-08-01

    In his 1785-review of the Ideen zur Philosophie der Geschichte der Menschheit, Kant objects to Herder's conception of nature as being imbued with active forces. This attack is usually evaluated against the background of Kant's critical project and his epistemological concern to caution against the "metaphysical excess" of attributing immanent properties to matter. In this paper I explore a slightly different reading by investigating Kant's pre-critical account of creation and generation. The aim of this is to show that Kant's struggle with the forces of matter has a long history and revolves around one central problem: that of how to distinguish between the non-purposive forces of nature and the intentional powers of the mind. Given this history, the epistemic stricture that Kant's critical project imposes on him no longer appears to be the primary reason for his attack on Herder. It merely aggravates a problem that Kant has been battling with since his earliest writings. PMID:27474187

  11. Quantification of Cyclic Ground Reaction Force Histories During Daily Activity in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, G. A.; Whalen, R. T.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical models and experimental studies of bone remodeling suggest that bone density and structure are influenced by local cyclic skeletal tissue stress and strain histories. Estimation of long-term loading histories in humans is usually achieved by assessment of physical activity level by questionnaires, logbooks, and pedometers, since the majority of lower limb cyclic loading occurs during walking and running. These methods provide some indication of the mechanical loading history, but fail to consider the true magnitude of the lower limb skeletal forces generated by various daily activities. These techniques cannot account for individual gait characteristics, gait speed, and unpredictable high loading events that may influence bone mass significantly. We have developed portable instrumentation to measure and record the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRFz) during normal daily activity. This equipment allows long-term quantitative monitoring of musculoskeletal loads, which in conjunction with bone mineral density assessments, promises to elucidate the relationship between skeletal stresses and bone remodeling.

  12. Relationships Between Muscle Activity and Anteroposterior Ground Reaction Forces in Hemiparetic Walking

    PubMed Central

    Turns, Lindsey J.; Neptune, Richard R.; Kautz, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine relationships between muscle activity and propulsive impulse in hemiparetic walking. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Gait analysis laboratory. Participants Forty-nine poststroke patients with chronic hemiparesis, stratified into hemiparetic severity subgroups based on Brunnstrom stages of motor recovery, walking at their self-selected speed. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Percent of muscle activity in the paretic and nonparetic legs and net anteroposterior (AP) ground reaction force impulse (ie, the time integral of the AP ground reaction force) within 4 regions of the stance phase (first double support, first and second halves of single support, and second double support). Results Medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscle activity correlated positively with paretic propulsion in the second half of single support and double support across all subjects and subjects grouped by hemiparetic severity. Tibialis anterior correlated negatively with paretic propulsion during preswing across all subjects and for subjects with moderate and severe hemiparesis. Rectus femoris activity also correlated negatively with preswing propulsion for the severe group. Uniarticular knee extensor activity correlated only with increased paretic braking in the first double-support phase for the severe hemiparesis group. Nonparetic leg muscle activity correlated with propulsive impulses across all subjects, but not within the severe group exclusively. Conclusions Paretic propulsion is strongly associated with increased plantarflexor activity and also negatively associated with increased leg flexor activity, especially in the severe hemiparesis group. These results suggest that exaggerated flexor muscle activity may counteract the effects of the plantarflexors by offloading the leg and interfering with the limb’s ability to generate appropriate AP ground reaction forces. There is also evidence for specific relationships between paretic braking and

  13. External forces and torques generated by the brachiating white-handed gibbon (Hylobates lar).

    PubMed

    Chang, Y H; Bertram, J E; Lee, D V

    2000-10-01

    We compared the kinetics of brachiation to bipedal walking and running. Gibbons use pectoral limbs in continuous contact with their overhead support at slow speeds, but exhibit aerial phases (or ricochetal brachiation) at faster speeds. This basic interaction between limb and support suggests some analogy to walking and running. We quantified the forces in three axes and torque about the vertical axis generated by a brachiating White-handed gibbon (Hylobates lar) and compared them with bipedal locomotion. Handholds oriented perpendicular to the direction of travel (as in ladder rungs) were spaced 0.80, 1.20, 1.60, 1.72, 1.95, and 2.25 m apart. The gibbon proportionally matched forward velocity to stride length. Handhold reaction forces resembled ground reaction forces of running humans except that the order of horizontal braking and propulsion were reversed. Peak vertical forces in brachiation increased with speed as in bipedal locomotion. In contrast to bipedalism, however, peak horizontal forces changed little with speed. Gait transition occurred within the same relative velocity range as the walk-run transition in bipeds (Froude number = 0.3-0.6). We oriented handholds parallel to the direction of travel (as in a continuous pole) at 0.80 and 1.60 m spacings. In ricochetal brachiation, the gibbon generated greater torque with handholds oriented perpendicular as opposed to parallel to the direction of travel. Handhold orientation did not affect peak forces. The similarities and differences between brachiation and bipedalism offer insight into the ubiquity of mechanical principles guiding all limbed locomotion and the distinctiveness of brachiation as a unique mode of locomotion.

  14. Contractile forces generated by striae distensae fibroblasts embedded in collagen lattices.

    PubMed

    Viennet, Céline; Bride, Jacqueline; Armbruster, Vincent; Aubin, François; Gabiot, Anne-Claude; Gharbi, Tijani; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-07-01

    Striae distensae are characterized by linear, smooth bands of atrophic-appearing skin that are reddish at first and finally white. They are due to stretching of the skin, as in rapid weight gain, or mechanical stress, as in weight lifting. The pathogenesis of striae distensae is unknown but probably relates to changes in the fibroblast phenotype. In order to characterize striae distensae fibroblasts, alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and contractile forces were studied. Five healthy women with early erythematous striae and five healthy women with older striae were selected. Paired biopsies were taken from the center of lesional striae and adjacent normal skin. Fibroblasts were obtained by an explant technique and expanded in vitro in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. Contractile forces generated by fibroblasts in collagen lattices were measured with the Glasbox device developed in our laboratory. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression was studied by immunofluorescence labeling of cells and by flow cytometry. Fibroblasts from early striae distensae were the richest cells in alpha-smooth muscle actin filaments and generated the highest contractile forces. Their peak contractile force was 26% greater than normal fibroblasts. There was a 150% higher level of alpha-smooth muscle actin content in fibroblasts from early striae distensae compared with fibroblasts from normal skin. In contrast, there was no significant difference in force generation between old striae fibroblasts and normal fibroblasts with cells expressing no alpha-smooth muscle actin. The contractile properties of fibroblasts from striae distensae varies depending on the stage of the disease. In early striae distensae, fibroblasts acquire a more contractile phenotype, corresponding to that of myofibroblasts.

  15. Next Generation Active Buffet Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; White, Edward V.; Zimcik, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that is common to high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. This paper describes an international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States involving the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads. The research program is being co-ordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and is being conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). This truly unique collaborative program has been developed to enable each participating country to contribute resources toward a program that coalesces a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation. This collaborative program is directed toward a full-scale test of an F/A-18 empennage, which is an extension of an earlier initial test. The current program aims at applying advanced directional piezoactuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers and advanced control strategies on a full-scale structure to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration.

  16. Intermolecular forces between low generation PAMAM dendrimer condensed DNA helices: role of cation architecture.

    PubMed

    An, Min; Parkin, Sean R; DeRouchey, Jason E

    2014-01-28

    In recent years, dendriplexes, complexes of cationic dendrimers with DNA, have become attractive DNA delivery vehicles due to their well-defined chemistries. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing dendriplexes, we studied low generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-DNA complexes and compared them to comparably charged linear arginine peptides. Using osmotic stress coupled with X-ray scattering, we have investigated the effect of molecular chain architecture on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance within these polycation condensed DNA arrays. In order to compact DNA, linear cations are believed to bind in DNA grooves and to interact with the phosphate backbone of apposing helices. We have previously shown a length dependent attraction resulting in higher packaging densities with increasing charge for linear cations. Hyperbranched polycations, such as polycationic dendrimers, presumably would not be able to bind to DNA and correlate their charges in the same manner as linear cations. We show that attractive and repulsive force amplitudes in PAMAM-DNA assemblies display significantly different trends than comparably charged linear arginines resulting in lower DNA packaging densities with increasing PAMAM generation. The salt and pH dependencies of packaging in PAMAM dendrimer-DNA and linear arginine-DNA complexes were also investigated. Significant differences in the force curve behaviour and salt and pH sensitivities suggest that different binding modes may be present in DNA condensed by dendrimers when compared to linear polycations.

  17. APT a next generation QM-based reactive force field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappé, A. K.; Bormann-Rochotte, L. M.; Wiser, D. C.; Hart, J. R.; Pietsch, M. A.; Casewit, C. J.; Skiff, W. M.

    Modelling reactivity at the nanoscale is a major computational challenge. Both reactive force field and combined QM-MM methodologies have been and are being developed to study reactivity at this boundary between molecules and the solid state. There have been more than 1500 publications since the mid-1990s, on combined QM-MM methodologies. Limitations in current models include the distortional characteristics of force field potential terms, the smooth transit from one potential surface to another, rather than surface hopping, and the blending of electrostatics between QM and MM portions of a QM-MM model. Functional forms, potential surface coupling terms, and parameterization strategies for the Approximate Pair Theory (APT), a next generation reactive force field model, are described. The APT model has been developed to correct a number of limitations in current reactive force field models as well as providing a foundation for a next generation QM-MM model. Chemical bonding concepts are used to develop fully dissociative bond stretch, bend, torsion, and inversion valence terms. Quantum mechanics also provides functional forms for potential surface coupling terms that permit a general description of reactivity from hydrogen bonding, through non-classical carbocations and cracking, to olefin polymerization, oxidation, and metathesis. Van der Waals, electrostatic, and metallic bonding models also derive from quantum mechanical resonance. Finally, Pauli Principle-based orthogonality provides a way to electrostatically couple the QM and MM portions of a QM-MM model that will support arbitrarily large basis sets.

  18. NuSAP governs chromosome oscillation by facilitating the Kid-generated polar ejection force

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenyu; Xue, Chenyi; Yang, Qiaoyun; Low, Boon Chuan; Liou, Yih-Cherng

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrate cells, chromosomes oscillate to align precisely during metaphase. NuSAP, a microtubule-associated protein, plays a critical role in stabilizing spindle microtubules. In this study, we utilize 3D time-lapse live-cell imaging to monitor the role of NuSAP in chromosome oscillation and identify NuSAP as a novel regulator of the chromokinesin, Kid. Depletion of NuSAP significantly suppresses the amplitude and velocity of chromosome oscillation. We analyse the effects of NuSAP and Kid depletion in monopolar and bipolar cells with or without kinetochore microtubule depletion. Twelve postulated conditions are deciphered to reveal the contribution of NuSAP to the polar force generated at kinetochore microtubules and to the regulation of the polar ejection force generated by Kid, thus revealing a pivotal role of NuSAP in chromosome oscillation. PMID:26839278

  19. Swim Pressure: Stress Generation in Active Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatori, S. C.; Yan, W.; Brady, J. F.

    2014-07-01

    We discover a new contribution to the pressure (or stress) exerted by a suspension of self-propelled bodies. Through their self-motion, all active matter systems generate a unique swim pressure that is entirely athermal in origin. The origin of the swim pressure is based upon the notion that an active body would swim away in space unless confined by boundaries—this confinement pressure is precisely the swim pressure. Here we give the micromechanical basis for the swim stress and use this new perspective to study self-assembly and phase separation in active soft matter. The swim pressure gives rise to a nonequilibrium equation of state for active matter with pressure-volume phase diagrams that resemble a van der Waals loop from equilibrium gas-liquid coexistence. Theoretical predictions are corroborated by Brownian dynamics simulations. Our new swim stress perspective can help analyze and exploit a wide class of active soft matter, from swimming bacteria to catalytic nanobots to molecular motors that activate the cellular cytoskeleton.

  20. Swim pressure: stress generation in active matter.

    PubMed

    Takatori, S C; Yan, W; Brady, J F

    2014-07-11

    We discover a new contribution to the pressure (or stress) exerted by a suspension of self-propelled bodies. Through their self-motion, all active matter systems generate a unique swim pressure that is entirely athermal in origin. The origin of the swim pressure is based upon the notion that an active body would swim away in space unless confined by boundaries-this confinement pressure is precisely the swim pressure. Here we give the micromechanical basis for the swim stress and use this new perspective to study self-assembly and phase separation in active soft matter. The swim pressure gives rise to a nonequilibrium equation of state for active matter with pressure-volume phase diagrams that resemble a van der Waals loop from equilibrium gas-liquid coexistence. Theoretical predictions are corroborated by Brownian dynamics simulations. Our new swim stress perspective can help analyze and exploit a wide class of active soft matter, from swimming bacteria to catalytic nanobots to molecular motors that activate the cellular cytoskeleton.

  1. Force Generation by Microtubule Assembly/Disassembly in Mitosis and Related Movements

    PubMed Central

    Inoué, Shinya; Salmon, Edward D.

    1995-01-01

    In this article, we review the dynamic nature of the filaments (microtubules) that make up the labile fibers of the mitotic spindle and asters, we discuss the roles that assembly and disassembly of microtubules play in mitosis, and we consider how such assembling and disassembling polymer filaments can generate forces that are utilized by the living cell in mitosis and related movements. Images PMID:8590794

  2. Generation of a strong core-centering force in a submillimeter compound droplet system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.C.; Feng, I.; Elleman, D.D.; Wang, T.G.; Young, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    By amplitude-modulating the driving voltage of an acoustic levitating apparatus, a strong core-centering force can be generated in a submillimeter compound droplet system suspended by the radiation pressure in a gaseous medium. Depending on the acoustic characteristics of the droplet system, it has been found that the technique can be utilized advantageously in the multiple-layer coating of an inertial-confinement-fusion pellet.

  3. FtsZ in Bacterial Cytokinesis: Cytoskeleton and Force Generator All in One†

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Harold P.; Anderson, David E.; Osawa, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Summary: FtsZ, a bacterial homolog of tubulin, is well established as forming the cytoskeletal framework for the cytokinetic ring. Recent work has shown that purified FtsZ, in the absence of any other division proteins, can assemble Z rings when incorporated inside tubular liposomes. Moreover, these artificial Z rings can generate a constriction force, demonstrating that FtsZ is its own force generator. Here we review light microscope observations of how Z rings assemble in bacteria. Assembly begins with long-pitch helices that condense into the Z ring. Once formed, the Z ring can transition to short-pitch helices that are suggestive of its structure. FtsZ assembles in vitro into short protofilaments that are ∼30 subunits long. We present models for how these protofilaments might be further assembled into the Z ring. We discuss recent experiments on assembly dynamics of FtsZ in vitro, with particular attention to how two regulatory proteins, SulA and MinC, inhibit assembly. Recent efforts to develop antibacterial drugs that target FtsZ are reviewed. Finally, we discuss evidence of how FtsZ generates a constriction force: by protofilament bending into a curved conformation. PMID:21119015

  4. Notch Ligand Endocytosis Generates Mechanical Pulling Force Dependent on Dynamin, Epsins and Actin

    PubMed Central

    Meloty-Kapella, Laurence; Shergill, Bhupinder; Kuon, Jane; Botvinick, Elliot; Weinmaster, Gerry

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Notch signaling induced by cell surface ligands is critical to development and maintenance of many eukaryotic organisms. Notch and its ligands are integral membrane proteins that facilitate direct cell-cell interactions to activate Notch proteolysis and release the intracellular domain that directs Notch-specific cellular responses. Genetic studies suggest Notch ligands require endocytosis, ubiquitylation and epsin endocytic adaptors to activate signaling, yet the exact role ligand endocytosis serves remains unresolved. Here we characterize a molecularly distinct mode of clathrin-mediated endocytosis requiring ligand ubiquitylation, epsins and actin for ligand cells to activate signaling in Notch cells. Using a cell-bead optical tweezers system, we obtained evidence for cell-mediated mechanical force dependent on this distinct mode of ligand endocytosis. We propose mechanical pulling force produced by endocytosis of Notch-bound ligand drives conformational changes in Notch that permit activating proteolysis. PMID:22658936

  5. Dissolution study of active pharmaceutical ingredients using molecular dynamics simulations with classical force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Maximilian; Elts, Ekaterina; Schneider, Julian; Reuter, Karsten; Briesen, Heiko

    2014-11-01

    The CHARMM, general Amber and OPLS force fields are evaluated for their suitability in simulating the molecular dynamics of the dissolution of the hydrophobic, small-molecule active pharmaceutical ingredients aspirin, ibuprofen, and paracetamol in aqueous media. The force fields are evaluated by comparison with quantum chemical simulations or experimental references on the basis of the following capabilities: accurately representing intra- and intermolecular interactions, appropriately reproducing crystal lattice parameters, adequately describing thermodynamic properties, and the qualitative description of the dissolution behavior. To make this approach easily accessible for evaluating the dissolution properties of novel drug candidates in the early stage of drug development, the force field parameter files are generated using online resources such as the SWISS PARAM servers, and the software packages ACPYPE and Maestro. All force fields are found to reproduce the intermolecular interactions with a reasonable degree of accuracy, with the general Amber and CHARMM force fields showing the best agreement with quantum mechanical calculations. A stable crystal bulk structure is obtained for all model substances, except for ibuprofen, where the reproductions of the lattice parameters and observed crystal stability are considerably poor for all force fields. The heat of solution used to evaluate the solid-to-solution phase transitions is found to be in qualitative agreement with the experimental data for all combinations tested, with the results being quantitatively optimum for the general Amber and CHARMM force fields. For aspirin and paracetamol, stable crystal-water interfaces were obtained. The (100), (110), (011) and (001) interfaces of aspirin or paracetamol and water were simulated for each force field for 30 ns. Although generally expected as a rare event, in some of the simulations, dissolution is observed at 310 K and ambient pressure conditions.

  6. International Reference Ionosphere (IRI): Task Force Activity 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, D.

    2000-01-01

    The annual IRI Task Force Activity was held at the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy from July 10 to July 14. The participants included J. Adeniyi (University of Ilorin, Nigeria), D. Bilitza (NSSDC/RITSS, USA), D. Buresova (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Czech Republic), B. Forte (ICTP, Italy), R. Leitinger (University of Graz, Austria), B. Nava (ICTP, Italy), M. Mosert (University National Tucuman, Argentina), S. Pulinets (IZMIRAN, Russia), S. Radicella (ICTP, Italy), and B. Reinisch (University of Mass. Lowell, USA). The main topic of this Task Force Activity was the modeling of the topside ionosphere and the development of strategies for modeling of ionospheric variability. Each day during the workshop week the team debated a specific modeling problem in the morning during informal presentations and round table discussions of all participants. Ways of resolving the specific modeling problem were devised and tested in the afternoon in front of the computers of the ICTP Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory using ICTP s computer networks and internet access.

  7. Active Ageing: Intergenerational Relationships and Social Generativity.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giovanna; Boccacin, Lucia; Bramanti, Donatella; Meda, Stefania G

    2014-01-01

    This contribution is a reflection on the concept of active ageing from the perspective of relational sociology. At the same time, it offers practical implications and outlines possible future courses of action, in the face of demographic and relational scenarios rapidly changing, and the challenges that each day people of all generations are called to cope with. Active ageing is quite a recent concept and indicates an attitude towards ageing that enhances the quality of life as people become older. The goal of active ageing is to enable people to realise their potential for physical, social and mental well-being and to participate in social life also in the last stage of the life cycle. In this phase, the presence of a network of support, security and care adequate to the possible onset of problems and criticalities is crucial. Relational sociology frames the phenomenon of an ageing population in a dense network of social relations, primarily at the level of family and community. For this reason, as supported by the most recent sociological literature and evidence from studies conducted in Italy and abroad (cf. SHARE), it is extremely important to investigate the link between active ageing, intergenerational orientation (solidarity and exchanges) and practices of prosociality (i.e. engagement in third-sector activities and volunteering in later life).

  8. Force Generation by Molecular-Motor-Powered Microtubule Bundles; Implications for Neuronal Polarization and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Maximilian; Franze, Kristian; Zemel, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    The heavily cross-linked microtubule (MT) bundles found in neuronal processes play a central role in the initiation, growth and maturation of axons and dendrites; however, a quantitative understanding of their mechanical function is still lacking. We here developed computer simulations to investigate the dynamics of force generation in 1D bundles of MTs that are cross-linked and powered by molecular motors. The motion of filaments and the forces they exert are investigated as a function of the motor type (unipolar or bipolar), MT density and length, applied load, and motor connectivity. We demonstrate that only unipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-1) can provide the driving force for bundle expansion, while bipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-5) oppose it. The force generation capacity of the bundles is shown to depend sharply on the fraction of unipolar motors due to a percolation transition that must occur in the bundle. Scaling laws between bundle length, force, MT length and motor fraction are presented. In addition, we investigate the dynamics of growth in the presence of a constant influx of MTs. Beyond a short equilibration period, the bundles grow linearly in time. In this growth regime, the bundle extends as one mass forward with most filaments sliding with the growth velocity. The growth velocity is shown to be dictated by the inward flux of MTs, to inversely scale with the load and to be independent of the free velocity of the motors. These findings provide important molecular-level insights into the mechanical function of the MT cytoskeleton in normal axon growth and regeneration after injury. PMID:26617489

  9. Recent Developments in Grid Generation and Force Integration Technology for Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; VanDalsem, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Recent developments in algorithms and software tools for generating overset grids for complex configurations are described. These include the overset surface grid generation code SURGRD and version 2.0 of the hyperbolic volume grid generation code HYPGEN. The SURGRD code is in beta test mode where the new features include the capability to march over a collection of panel networks, a variety of ways to control the side boundaries and the marching step sizes and distance, a more robust projection scheme and an interpolation option. New features in version 2.0 of HYPGEN include a wider range of boundary condition types. The code also allows the user to specify different marching step sizes and distance for each point on the surface grid. A scheme that takes into account of the overlapped zones on the body surface for the purpose of forces and moments computation is also briefly described, The process involves the following two software modules: MIXSUR - a composite grid generation module to produce a collection of quadrilaterals and triangles on which pressure and viscous stresses are to be integrated, and OVERINT - a forces and moments integration module.

  10. Cyclic Fatigue Resistance and Force Generated by OneShape Instruments during Curved Canal Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cyclic fatigue resistance and the force generated by OneShape files during preparation of simulated curved canals. Methods Six OneShape files (the test) and six ProTaper F2 files (the control) were subject to the bending ability test. Another thirty files of each type were used to prepare artificial canals (n = 60), which were divided into 3 groups according to respective curvatures of the canals (30°, 60°, and 90°). The numbers of cycles to fatigue (NCF) as well as the positive and negative forces that were generated by files during canal preparation were recorded. The scanning electron microscopy was applied to detect the fracture surfaces. Results Compared with ProTaper F2 files, the bending loads of OneShape files were significantly lower at deflections of 45°(P < .05), 60° (P < .05) and 75° (P < .01). No significant difference was found at 30°. OneShape files presented a higher NCF in both 60° and 90° canals than the control (P < .01). No significant difference of NCF was found between OneShape and ProTaper files in 30° canals. During the preparation of 30° canals by both files, the negative forces were dominant. With the increase of the curvature, more positive forces were observed. When the OneShape Files were compared with the control, significant different forces were found at D3 and D2 (P < .05) in 30° canals, at D2 (P < .05), D1 (P < .01) and D0 (P < .01) in 60° canals, and at D4 and D3 (P < .01) in 90° canals. Conclusions OneShape files possessed a reliable flexibility and cyclic fatigue resistance. According to the assessments of the forces generated by files, OneShape instruments performed in a more fatigue-resistant way during curved canal preparation, compared with the ProTaper F2 files. PMID:27513666

  11. Forces Generated by High Velocity Impact of Ice on a Rigid Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Padula, Santo A., II; Revilock, Duane M.; Melis, Matthew E.

    2006-01-01

    Tests were conducted to measure the impact forces generated by cylindrical ice projectiles striking a relatively rigid target. Two types of ice projectiles were used, solid clear ice and lower density fabricated ice. Three forms of solid clear ice were tested: single crystal, poly-crystal, and "rejected" poly-crystal (poly-crystal ice in which defects were detected during inspection.) The solid ice had a density of approximately 56 lb/cu ft (0.9 gm/cu cm). A second set of test specimens, termed "low density ice" was manufactured by molding shaved ice into a cylindrical die to produce ice with a density of approximately 40 lb/cu ft (0.65 gm/cu cm). Both the static mechanical characteristics and the crystalline structure of the ice were found to have little effect on the observed transient response. The impact forces generated by low density ice projectiles, which had very low mechanical strength, were comparable to those of full density solid ice. This supports the hypothesis that at a velocity significantly greater than that required to produce fracture in the ice, the mechanical properties become relatively insignificant, and the impact forces are governed by the shape and mass of the projectile.

  12. Dynein's C-terminal Domain Plays a Novel Role in Regulating Force Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennerich, Arne; Nicholas, Matthew; Brenner, Sibylle; Lazar, Caitlin; Weil, Sarah; Vallee, Richard; Hook, Peter; Gennerich Lab Collaboration; Vallee Lab Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule motor involved in a wide range of low and high force requiring functions in metazoans. In contrast, yeast dynein is involved in a single, nonessential function, nuclear positioning. Interestingly, the single-molecule function of yeast dynein is also unique: whereas mammalian dyneins generate forces of 1-2 pN, S. cerevisiae dynein stalls at 5-7 pN. The basis for this functional difference is unknown. However, the major structural difference between mammalian and yeast dyneins is a ~30 kDa C-terminal extension (CT) present in higher eukaryotic dyneins, but missing in yeast. To test whether the CT accounts for the differences in function, we produced recombinant rat dynein motor domains (MD) with (WT-MD) and without (ΔCT-MD) the CT, using baculovirus expression. To define motor function, we performed single-molecule optical trapping studies. Dimerized WT-MD stalls at ~1 pN and detaches from microtubules after brief stalls, in agreement with previous studies on native mammalian dynein. In sharp contrast, but similar to yeast dynein, ΔCT-MD stalls at ~6 pN, with stall durations up to minutes. These results identify the CT as a new regulatory element for controlling dynein force generation. Supported by NIH GM094415 (A.G.) and GM102347 (R.B.V.)

  13. Effect of gust on force generation around a robotic hummingbird wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez, Eloy; Tian, Ruijun; Shu, Fangjun

    2012-11-01

    Among the computational, theoretical and experimental studies on the high efficiency flapping flight, many are focused on the mystery of hovering. Most of these studies were conducted under steady in flow conditions. However, real-life ornithopters in the field have to routinely tackle gust and directional changes of the wind. These sudden perturbations could produce significant effect on humming bird hovering due to the small Reynolds numbers. Our experimental work was performed in a water channel using a two degree-of-freedom humming bird model. The dynamic response of the hovering motion to gust from different directions was investigated. PIV was used to measure the effect of the gust on the surrounding flow field including vortex evolution. In addition, a six-component force/torque sensor was used to measure the real-time lift and drag forces generated by the wing with and without gust. Results show that gust changes the magnitude of lift force in one stroke. However, the time-averaged lift force keeps approximately constant. Supported by Army High Performance Computing Center.

  14. An efficient and numerically stable procedure for generating sextic force fields in normal mode coordinates.

    PubMed

    Sibaev, M; Crittenden, D L

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we outline a general, scalable, and black-box approach for calculating high-order strongly coupled force fields in rectilinear normal mode coordinates, based upon constructing low order expansions in curvilinear coordinates with naturally limited mode-mode coupling, and then transforming between coordinate sets analytically. The optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency is achieved by transforming from 3 mode representation quartic force fields in curvilinear normal mode coordinates to 4 mode representation sextic force fields in rectilinear normal modes. Using this reduced mode-representation strategy introduces an error of only 1 cm(-1) in fundamental frequencies, on average, across a sizable test set of molecules. We demonstrate that if it is feasible to generate an initial semi-quartic force field in curvilinear normal mode coordinates from ab initio data, then the subsequent coordinate transformation procedure will be relatively fast with modest memory demands. This procedure facilitates solving the nuclear vibrational problem, as all required integrals can be evaluated analytically. Our coordinate transformation code is implemented within the extensible PyPES library program package, at http://sourceforge.net/projects/pypes-lib-ext/. PMID:27276945

  15. An efficient and numerically stable procedure for generating sextic force fields in normal mode coordinates.

    PubMed

    Sibaev, M; Crittenden, D L

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we outline a general, scalable, and black-box approach for calculating high-order strongly coupled force fields in rectilinear normal mode coordinates, based upon constructing low order expansions in curvilinear coordinates with naturally limited mode-mode coupling, and then transforming between coordinate sets analytically. The optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency is achieved by transforming from 3 mode representation quartic force fields in curvilinear normal mode coordinates to 4 mode representation sextic force fields in rectilinear normal modes. Using this reduced mode-representation strategy introduces an error of only 1 cm(-1) in fundamental frequencies, on average, across a sizable test set of molecules. We demonstrate that if it is feasible to generate an initial semi-quartic force field in curvilinear normal mode coordinates from ab initio data, then the subsequent coordinate transformation procedure will be relatively fast with modest memory demands. This procedure facilitates solving the nuclear vibrational problem, as all required integrals can be evaluated analytically. Our coordinate transformation code is implemented within the extensible PyPES library program package, at http://sourceforge.net/projects/pypes-lib-ext/.

  16. Temperature jump induced force generation in rabbit muscle fibres gets faster with shortening and shows a biphasic dependence on velocity.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, K W; Roots, H; Offer, G W

    2010-02-01

    We examined the tension responses to ramp shortening and rapid temperature jump (<0.2 ms, 3-4 degrees C T-jump) in maximally Ca(2+)-activated rabbit psoas muscle fibres at 8-9 degrees C (the fibre length (L(0)) was approximately 1.5 mm and sarcomere length 2.5 microm). The aim was to investigate the strain sensitivity of crossbridge force generation in muscle. The T-jump induced tension rise was examined during steady shortening over a wide range of velocities (V) approaching the V(max) (V range approximately 0.01 to approximately 1.5 L(0) s(1)). In the isometric state, a T-jump induced a biphasic tension rise consisting of a fast (approximately 50 s(1), phase 2b) and a slow (approximately 10 s(1), phase 3) component, but if treated as monophasic the rate was approximately 20 s(1). During steady shortening the T-jump tension rise was monophasic; the rate of tension rise increased linearly with shortening velocity, and near V(max) it was approximately 200 s(1), approximately 10x faster than in the isometric state. Relative to the tension reached after the T-jump, the amplitude increased with shortening velocity, and near V(max) it was 4x larger than in the isometric state. Thus, the temperature sensitivity of muscle force is markedly increased with velocity during steady shortening, as found in steady state experiments. The rate of tension decline during ramp shortening also increased markedly with increase of velocity. The absolute amplitude of T-jump tension rise was larger than that in the isometric state at the low velocities (<0.5 L(0) s(1)) but decreased to below that of the isometric state at the higher velocities. Such a biphasic velocity dependence of the absolute amplitude of T-jump tension rise implies interplay between, at least, two processes that have opposing effects on the tension output as the shortening velocity is increased, probably enhancement of crossbridge force generation and faster (post-stroke) crossbridge detachment by negative strain

  17. Temperature jump induced force generation in rabbit muscle fibres gets faster with shortening and shows a biphasic dependence on velocity.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, K W; Roots, H; Offer, G W

    2010-02-01

    We examined the tension responses to ramp shortening and rapid temperature jump (<0.2 ms, 3-4 degrees C T-jump) in maximally Ca(2+)-activated rabbit psoas muscle fibres at 8-9 degrees C (the fibre length (L(0)) was approximately 1.5 mm and sarcomere length 2.5 microm). The aim was to investigate the strain sensitivity of crossbridge force generation in muscle. The T-jump induced tension rise was examined during steady shortening over a wide range of velocities (V) approaching the V(max) (V range approximately 0.01 to approximately 1.5 L(0) s(1)). In the isometric state, a T-jump induced a biphasic tension rise consisting of a fast (approximately 50 s(1), phase 2b) and a slow (approximately 10 s(1), phase 3) component, but if treated as monophasic the rate was approximately 20 s(1). During steady shortening the T-jump tension rise was monophasic; the rate of tension rise increased linearly with shortening velocity, and near V(max) it was approximately 200 s(1), approximately 10x faster than in the isometric state. Relative to the tension reached after the T-jump, the amplitude increased with shortening velocity, and near V(max) it was 4x larger than in the isometric state. Thus, the temperature sensitivity of muscle force is markedly increased with velocity during steady shortening, as found in steady state experiments. The rate of tension decline during ramp shortening also increased markedly with increase of velocity. The absolute amplitude of T-jump tension rise was larger than that in the isometric state at the low velocities (<0.5 L(0) s(1)) but decreased to below that of the isometric state at the higher velocities. Such a biphasic velocity dependence of the absolute amplitude of T-jump tension rise implies interplay between, at least, two processes that have opposing effects on the tension output as the shortening velocity is increased, probably enhancement of crossbridge force generation and faster (post-stroke) crossbridge detachment by negative strain

  18. Explicit polarization: a quantum mechanical framework for developing next generation force fields.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G; Wang, Yingjie; Mazack, Michael J M; Löffler, Patrick; Provorse, Makenzie R; Rehak, Pavel

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Molecular mechanical force fields have been successfully used to model condensed-phase and biological systems for a half century. By means of careful parametrization, such classical force fields can be used to provide useful interpretations of experimental findings and predictions of certain properties. Yet, there is a need to further improve computational accuracy for the quantitative prediction of biomolecular interactions and to model properties that depend on the wave functions and not just the energy terms. A new strategy called explicit polarization (X-Pol) has been developed to construct the potential energy surface and wave functions for macromolecular and liquid-phase simulations on the basis of quantum mechanics rather than only using quantum mechanical results to fit analytic force fields. In this spirit, this approach is called a quantum mechanical force field (QMFF). X-Pol is a general fragment method for electronic structure calculations based on the partition of a condensed-phase or macromolecular system into subsystems ("fragments") to achieve computational efficiency. Here, intrafragment energy and the mutual electronic polarization of interfragment interactions are treated explicitly using quantum mechanics. X-Pol can be used as a general, multilevel electronic structure model for macromolecular systems, and it can also serve as a new-generation force field. As a quantum chemical model, a variational many-body (VMB) expansion approach is used to systematically improve interfragment interactions, including exchange repulsion, charge delocalization, dispersion, and other correlation energies. As a quantum mechanical force field, these energy terms are approximated by empirical functions in the spirit of conventional molecular mechanics. This Account first reviews the formulation of X-Pol, in the full variationally correct version, in the faster embedded version, and with systematic many-body improvements. We discuss illustrative examples

  19. Explicit Polarization: A Quantum Mechanical Framework for Developing Next Generation Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Molecular mechanical force fields have been successfully used to model condensed-phase and biological systems for a half century. By means of careful parametrization, such classical force fields can be used to provide useful interpretations of experimental findings and predictions of certain properties. Yet, there is a need to further improve computational accuracy for the quantitative prediction of biomolecular interactions and to model properties that depend on the wave functions and not just the energy terms. A new strategy called explicit polarization (X-Pol) has been developed to construct the potential energy surface and wave functions for macromolecular and liquid-phase simulations on the basis of quantum mechanics rather than only using quantum mechanical results to fit analytic force fields. In this spirit, this approach is called a quantum mechanical force field (QMFF). X-Pol is a general fragment method for electronic structure calculations based on the partition of a condensed-phase or macromolecular system into subsystems (“fragments”) to achieve computational efficiency. Here, intrafragment energy and the mutual electronic polarization of interfragment interactions are treated explicitly using quantum mechanics. X-Pol can be used as a general, multilevel electronic structure model for macromolecular systems, and it can also serve as a new-generation force field. As a quantum chemical model, a variational many-body (VMB) expansion approach is used to systematically improve interfragment interactions, including exchange repulsion, charge delocalization, dispersion, and other correlation energies. As a quantum mechanical force field, these energy terms are approximated by empirical functions in the spirit of conventional molecular mechanics. This Account first reviews the formulation of X-Pol, in the full variationally correct version, in the faster embedded version, and with systematic many-body improvements. We discuss illustrative

  20. Explicit polarization: a quantum mechanical framework for developing next generation force fields.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G; Wang, Yingjie; Mazack, Michael J M; Löffler, Patrick; Provorse, Makenzie R; Rehak, Pavel

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Molecular mechanical force fields have been successfully used to model condensed-phase and biological systems for a half century. By means of careful parametrization, such classical force fields can be used to provide useful interpretations of experimental findings and predictions of certain properties. Yet, there is a need to further improve computational accuracy for the quantitative prediction of biomolecular interactions and to model properties that depend on the wave functions and not just the energy terms. A new strategy called explicit polarization (X-Pol) has been developed to construct the potential energy surface and wave functions for macromolecular and liquid-phase simulations on the basis of quantum mechanics rather than only using quantum mechanical results to fit analytic force fields. In this spirit, this approach is called a quantum mechanical force field (QMFF). X-Pol is a general fragment method for electronic structure calculations based on the partition of a condensed-phase or macromolecular system into subsystems ("fragments") to achieve computational efficiency. Here, intrafragment energy and the mutual electronic polarization of interfragment interactions are treated explicitly using quantum mechanics. X-Pol can be used as a general, multilevel electronic structure model for macromolecular systems, and it can also serve as a new-generation force field. As a quantum chemical model, a variational many-body (VMB) expansion approach is used to systematically improve interfragment interactions, including exchange repulsion, charge delocalization, dispersion, and other correlation energies. As a quantum mechanical force field, these energy terms are approximated by empirical functions in the spirit of conventional molecular mechanics. This Account first reviews the formulation of X-Pol, in the full variationally correct version, in the faster embedded version, and with systematic many-body improvements. We discuss illustrative examples

  1. Image-based synchronization of force and bead motion in active electromagnetic microrheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Young; Saleh, Omar A.

    2014-12-01

    In the past, electromagnetic tweezers have been used to make active microrheometers. An active microrheometer measures the dynamic mechanical properties of a material from the motion of embedded particles under external force, e.g. a sinusoidal magnetic force generated by a sinusoidal current on a coil. The oscillating amplitude and the phase lag of the motion are then used to estimate the material’s dynamic mechanical properties. The phase lag, in particular, requires precise synchronization of the particle motion with the external force. In previous works, synchronization difficulties have arisen from measuring two parameters with two instruments, one of them being a camera. We solved the synchronization issue by measuring two parameters with a single instrument, the camera alone. From captured images, particles can be tracked in three dimensions through an image-analysis algorithm while the current on the coil can be measured from the brightness of the image; this enables simultaneous synchronization of the phases of the driving current on the electromagnet coil and the motion of the magnetic probe particle. We calibrate the phase delay between the magnetic force and the particle’s motion in glycerol and confirm the calibration with a Hall probe. The technique is further tested by measuring the shear modulus of a polyacrylamide gel, and comparing the results to those obtained using a conventional rheometer.

  2. Phenazine redox cycling enhances anaerobic survival in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by facilitating generation of ATP and a proton-motive force

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, Nathaniel R.; Kern, Suzanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary While many studies have explored the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, comparatively few have focused on its survival. Previously, we reported that endogenous phenazines support the anaerobic survival of P. aeruginosa, yet the physiological mechanism underpinning survival was unknown. Here, we demonstrate that phenazine redox cycling enables P. aeruginosa to oxidize glucose and pyruvate into acetate, which promotes survival by coupling acetate and ATP synthesis through the activity of acetate kinase. By measuring intracellular NAD(H) and ATP concentrations, we show that survival is correlated with ATP synthesis, which is tightly coupled to redox homeostasis during pyruvate fermentation but not during arginine fermentation. We also show that ATP hydrolysis is required to generate a proton-motive force using the ATP synthase complex during fermentation. Together, our results suggest that phenazines enable maintenance of the proton-motive force by promoting redox homeostasis and ATP synthesis. This work demonstrates the more general principle that extracellular redox-active molecules, such as phenazines, can broaden the metabolic versatility of microorganisms by facilitating energy generation. PMID:24612454

  3. Large-Scale Magnetic Field Generation by Randomly Forced Shearing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, T.; McWilliams, J. C.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    A rigorous theory for the generation of a large-scale magnetic field by random nonhelically forced motions of a conducting fluid combined with a linear shear is presented in the analytically tractable limit of low magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) and weak shear. The dynamo is kinematic and due to fluctuations in the net (volume-averaged) electromotive force. This is a minimal proof-of-concept quasilinear calculation aiming to put the shear dynamo, a new effect recently found in numerical experiments, on a firm theoretical footing. Numerically observed scalings of the wave number and growth rate of the fastest-growing mode, previously not understood, are derived analytically. The simplicity of the model suggests that shear dynamo action may be a generic property of sheared magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  4. Clathrin-coat disassembly illuminates the mechanisms of Hsp70 force generation.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Cuéllar, Jorge; Jin, Suping; Valpuesta, José M; Jin, Albert J; Lafer, Eileen M

    2016-09-01

    Hsp70s use ATP hydrolysis to disrupt protein-protein associations and to move macromolecules. One example is the Hsc70- mediated disassembly of the clathrin coats that form on vesicles during endocytosis. Here, we exploited the exceptional features of these coats to test three models-Brownian ratchet, power-stroke and entropic pulling-proposed to explain how Hsp70s transform their substrates. Our data rule out the ratchet and power-stroke models and instead support a collision-pressure mechanism whereby collisions between clathrin-coat walls and Hsc70s drive coats apart. Collision pressure is the complement to the pulling force described in the entropic pulling model. We also found that self-association augments collision pressure, thereby allowing disassembly of clathrin lattices that have been predicted to be resistant to disassembly. These results illuminate how Hsp70s generate the forces that transform their substrates. PMID:27478930

  5. FtsZ protofilaments use a hinge-opening mechanism for constrictive force generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Hsin, Jen; Zhao, Lingyun; Cheng, Yiwen; Shang, Weina; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ye, Sheng

    2013-07-26

    The essential bacterial protein FtsZ is a guanosine triphosphatase that self-assembles into a structure at the division site termed the "Z ring". During cytokinesis, the Z ring exerts a constrictive force on the membrane by using the chemical energy of guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis. However, the structural basis of this constriction remains unresolved. Here, we present the crystal structure of a guanosine diphosphate-bound Mycobacterium tuberculosis FtsZ protofilament, which exhibits a curved conformational state. The structure reveals a longitudinal interface that is important for function. The protofilament curvature highlights a hydrolysis-dependent conformational switch at the T3 loop that leads to longitudinal bending between subunits, which could generate sufficient force to drive cytokinesis.

  6. Analysis of Dragonfly Take-off Mechanism: Initial Impulse Generated by Aerodynamic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruijie; Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Team

    2013-11-01

    Take-off is a critical part of insect flight due to not only that every single flight initiates from take-off, but also that the take-off period, despite its short duration, accounts for a relatively large fraction of the total energy consumption. Thus, studying the mechanism of insect take-off will help to improve the design of Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) in two major properties, the success rate and the energy efficiency of take-off. In this work, we study 20 cases in which dragonflies (species including Pachydiplax longipennis, Epitheca Cynosura, Epitheca princeps etc.) take off from designed platform. By high-speed photogrammetry, 3-d reconstruction and numerical simulation, we explore how dragonflies coordinate different body parts to help take-off. We evaluate how aerodynamic forces generated by wing flapping create the initial impulse, and how these forces help save energy consumption. Supported by NSF CBET-1343154.

  7. Satellite Dynamic Damping via Active Force Control Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2012-07-01

    An approach that incorporates the Active Force Control (AFC) technique into a conventional Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a satellite active dynamic damping towards a full attitude control. The AFC method has been established to facilitate a robust motion control of dynamical systems in the presence of disturbances, parametric uncertainties and changes that are commonly prevalent in the real-world environment. The usefulness of the method can be extended by introducing intelligent mechanisms to approximate the mass or inertia matrix of the dynamic system to trigger the compensation effect of the controller. AFC is a technique that relies on the appropriate estimation of the inertial or mass parameters of the dynamic system and the measurements of the acceleration and force signals induced by the system if practical implementation is ever considered. In AFC, it is shown that the system subjected to a number of disturbances remains stable and robust via the compensating action of the control strategy. We demonstrate that it is possible to design a spacecraft attitude feedback controller that will ensure the system dynamics set point remains unchanged even in the presence of the disturbances provided that the actual disturbances can be modeled effectively. In order to further facilitate this analysis, a combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is proposed as a model satellite attitude control actuator. All the governing equations are established and the proposed satellite attitude control architecture is made amenable to numerical treatments. The results show that the PD-AFC attitude damping performances are superiorly better than that of the solely PD type. It is also shown that the tunings of the AFC system gains are crucial to ensure a better attitude damping performance and this process is mandatory for AFC systems. Finally, the results demonstrate an important satellite dynamic damping enhancement capability using the AFC

  8. MRCK-1 Drives Apical Constriction in C. elegans by Linking Developmental Patterning to Force Generation.

    PubMed

    Marston, Daniel J; Higgins, Christopher D; Peters, Kimberly A; Cupp, Timothy D; Dickinson, Daniel J; Pani, Ariel M; Moore, Regan P; Cox, Amanda H; Kiehart, Daniel P; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-08-22

    Apical constriction is a change in cell shape that drives key morphogenetic events including gastrulation and neural tube formation. Apical force-producing actomyosin networks drive apical constriction by contracting while connected to cell-cell junctions. The mechanisms by which developmental patterning regulates these actomyosin networks and associated junctions with spatial precision are not fully understood. Here we identify a myosin light-chain kinase MRCK-1 as a key regulator of C. elegans gastrulation that integrates spatial and developmental patterning information. We show that MRCK-1 is required for activation of contractile actomyosin dynamics and elevated cortical tension in the apical cell cortex of endoderm precursor cells. MRCK-1 is apically localized by active Cdc42 at the external, cell-cell contact-free surfaces of apically constricting cells, downstream of cell fate determination mechanisms. We establish that the junctional components α-catenin, β-catenin, and cadherin become highly enriched at the apical junctions of apically constricting cells and that MRCK-1 and myosin activity are required in vivo for this enrichment. Taken together, our results define mechanisms that position a myosin activator to a specific cell surface where it both locally increases cortical tension and locally enriches junctional components to facilitate apical constriction. These results reveal crucial links that can tie spatial information to local force generation to drive morphogenesis. PMID:27451898

  9. Colony Rheology: Active Arthropods Generate Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Mann, Michael; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Hydrodynamic-like flows are observed in biological systems as varied as bacteria, insects, birds, fish, and mammals. Both the phenomenology (e.g. front instabilities, milling motions) and the interaction types (hydrodynamic, direct contact, psychological, excluded-volume) strongly vary between systems, but a question common to all of them is to understand the role of particle-scale fluctuations in controlling large-scale rheological behaviors. We will address these questions through experiments on a new system, Tyrolichus casei (cheese mites), which live in dense, self-mixing colonies composed of a mixture of living mites and inert flour/detritus. In experiments performed in a Hele-Shaw geometry, we observe that the rheology of a colony is strongly dependent on the relative concentration of active and inactive particles. In addition to spreading flows, we also observe that the system can generate convective circulation and auto-compaction.

  10. Generating passive NIR images from active LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrom, Shea; Broadwater, Joshua

    2016-05-01

    Many modern LIDAR platforms contain an integrated RGB camera for capturing contextual imagery. However, these RGB cameras do not collect a near-infrared (NIR) color channel, omitting information useful for many analytical purposes. This raises the question of whether LIDAR data, collected in the NIR, can be used as a substitute for an actual NIR image in this situation. Generating a LIDAR-based NIR image is potentially useful in situations where another source of NIR, such as satellite imagery, is not available. LIDAR is an active sensing system that operates very differently from a passive system, and thus requires additional processing and calibration to approximate the output of a passive instrument. We examine methods of approximating passive NIR images from LIDAR for real-world datasets, and assess differences with true NIR images.

  11. Altered force-generating capacity is well-perceived regardless of the pain presence.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Thibault; Magnard, Justine; Jubeau, Marc; Hug, François; Tucker, Kylie

    2016-09-01

    An inability to perceive changes in action capabilities may result in increased risk of injury and/or reduced performance. We investigated whether the perception of ability to perform a maximal single-leg hop was updated when the actual ability to perform the task was reduced due to experimentally altered force-generating capacity and associated pain. Twenty-five healthy volunteers performed a series of maximal isometric voluntary knee extensions (MVC), performance estimates and actual performances of a maximal single-leg hop. The motor tasks were completed for each leg, before (t), and immediately (t), 48 hr (t) and 1 month (t) after, a neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) protocol was used to decrease the force generating capacity of the quadriceps muscle of 1 leg. MVC torque decreased by ∼30% after the NMES protocol for the stimulated leg at t and t (p < .001). This reduction was associated with a significant decrease in estimation of performance and actual performance of the maximal single-leg hop at t and t for the test leg (p < .001). The reduction in performance ability was associated with low-level pain immediately after NMES, and moderate pain and an increase in the belief that everyday motor tasks would be harmful 48 hours after NMES. Participants accurately estimated their performance capabilities during each testing period. This study provides a critical step toward understanding the potential for decreased force-generating capacity and muscle pain to modify the relationship between motor performance and perceived abilities. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Analysis of radial and longitudinal force of plasma wakefield generated by a chirped pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, Leila; Afhami, Saeedeh; Eslami, Esmaeil

    2015-08-15

    In present paper, the chirp effect of an electromagnetic pulse via an analytical model of wakefield generation is studied. Different types of chirps are employed in this study. Our results show that by the use of nonlinear chirped pulse the longitudinal wakefield and focusing force is stronger than that of linear chirped pulse. It is indicated that quadratic nonlinear chirped pulses are globally much efficient than periodic nonlinear chirped pulses. Our calculations also predict that in nonlinear chirped pulse case, the overlap of focusing and accelerating regions is broader than that achieved in linear chirped pulse.

  13. Correlation of embryonic skeletal muscle myotube physical characteristics with contractile force generation on an atomic force microscope-based bio-microelectromechanical systems device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirozzi, K. L.; Long, C. J.; McAleer, C. W.; Smith, A. S. T.; Hickman, J. J.

    2013-08-01

    Rigorous analysis of muscle function in in vitro systems is needed for both acute and chronic biomedical applications. Forces generated by skeletal myotubes on bio-microelectromechanical cantilevers were calculated using a modified version of Stoney's thin-film equation and finite element analysis (FEA), then analyzed for regression to physical parameters. The Stoney's equation results closely matched the more intensive FEA and the force correlated to cross-sectional area (CSA). Normalizing force to measured CSA significantly improved the statistical sensitivity and now allows for close comparison of in vitro data to in vivo measurements for applications in exercise physiology, robotics, and modeling neuromuscular diseases.

  14. Correlation of embryonic skeletal muscle myotube physical characteristics with contractile force generation on an atomic force microscope-based bio-microelectromechanical systems device.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, K L; Long, C J; McAleer, C W; Smith, A S T; Hickman, J J

    2013-08-19

    Rigorous analysis of muscle function in in vitro systems is needed for both acute and chronic biomedical applications. Forces generated by skeletal myotubes on bio-microelectromechanical cantilevers were calculated using a modified version of Stoney's thin-film equation and finite element analysis (FEA), then analyzed for regression to physical parameters. The Stoney's equation results closely matched the more intensive FEA and the force correlated to cross-sectional area (CSA). Normalizing force to measured CSA significantly improved the statistical sensitivity and now allows for close comparison of in vitro data to in vivo measurements for applications in exercise physiology, robotics, and modeling neuromuscular diseases. PMID:24046483

  15. Transient Thermoelectric Generator: An Active Load Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockholm, J. G.; Goupil, C.; Maussion, P.; Ouerdane, H.

    2015-06-01

    Under stationary conditions, the optimization of maximum power output and efficiency of thermoelectric generators (TEG) is a well-known subject. Use of a finite-time thermodynamics (FTT) approach to the description of TEGs has demonstrated that there exists a closed feedback effect between the output electrical load value and the entering heat current. From the practical point of view, this effect is strongly evidenced by the use of direct current (DC-to-DC) converters as active loads. Both transient conditions and FTT contribute to a complex landscape of the optimization of the power and efficiencies of a TEG. It has been claimed that the use of inductive load may lead to a strong enhancement of the efficiency, and the frequency response of a TEG as a band-pass filter has also been recently reported. We consider these results using a classical linear Onsager approach of a TEG operating under transient conditions. We show that a trans-admittance may be defined as a coupling element between the input and the output, leading to the observed electric-to-thermal feedback. We discuss recent experiments on a TEG connected to an active load, which is reported to boast an efficiency exceeding the usual stationary DC thermoelectric efficiency.

  16. Radiative forcing due to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions from Finland: methods for estimating forcing of a country or an activity.

    PubMed

    Monni, Suvi; Korhonen, Riita; Savolainen, Ilkka

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the radiative forcing due to Finnish anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in three scenarios. All the Kyoto Protocol gases, i.e., CO(2), CH(4), N(2)O, and fluorinated gases, were included. The calculations showed that forcing due to Finnish emissions will increase in the case of all gases except methane by the year 2100. In 1990, radiative forcing due to Finland's emission history of all Kyoto Protocol gases was 3.2 mW/m(2), of which 71% was due to carbon dioxide, 17% to methane, and the rest to nitrous oxide. In 1990 the share of fluorinated gases was negligible. The share of methane in radiative forcing is decreasing, whereas the shares of carbon dioxide and of fluorinated gases are increasing and that of nitrous oxide remains nearly constant. The nonlinear features concerning additional concentrations in the atmosphere and radiative forcing due to emissions caused by a single country or activity are also considered. Radiative forcing due to Finnish emissions was assessed with two different approaches, the marginal forcing approach and the averaged forcing approach. The impact of the so-called background scenario, i.e., the scenario for concentration caused by global emissions, was also estimated. The difference between different forcing models at its highest was 40%, and the averaged forcing approach appeared to be the more recommendable. The effect of background concentrations in the studied cases was up to 11%. Hence, the choice of forcing model and background scenario should be given particular attention.

  17. Active transport of the Ca(2+)-pump: introduction of the temperature difference as a driving force.

    PubMed

    Lervik, Anders; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2013-05-01

    We analyse a kinetic cycle of the Ca(2+)-ATPase molecular pump using mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The pump is known to generate heat, and by analysing the operation on the mesoscopic level, we are able to introduce a temperature difference and the corresponding heat flux in the description. Integration over the internal coordinates then results in non-linear flux-force relations describing the operation of the pump on the macroscopic level. Specifically, we obtain an expression for the heat flux associated with the active transport and the coupling of heat effects to the transport of ions and the rate of the ATP-hydrolysis.

  18. Measurement of the impuslive force generated by colapsing bubble close to a solid boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Milos; Unger, Jiri; Holata, Jakub; Zima, Patrik

    2012-04-01

    The article presents experimental results of the acoustical and optical study of cavitation bubble collapse close to a solid boundary in water. The bubble was generated by discharge of low-voltage capacitor into a couple of wires closing a simple circuit. Different distances from the solid wall and different maximum bubble radii were studied. The bubble radius was studied using time-resolved photography and by PVDF film sensor glued on the solid boundary. The illumination was provided by high-power led diode. Synchronization of the system was provided by pulse generator connected to an oscilloscope. The impact power of the bubble to the wall was estimated from the time-resolved photography of the bubble and from the PVDF film sensor signal. The PVDF film sensor calibration was performed by a pendulum test to estimate the impact force.

  19. Mathematical model to generate near-periodic human jumping force signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racic, V.; Pavic, A.

    2010-01-01

    A mathematical modelling procedure has been developed to generate synthetic vertical force signals induced by a single person jumping. The ability to replicate much of the temporal and spectral features of real jumping loads give this model a definite advantage over the conventional half-sine models coupled with Fourier series analysis. This includes modelling of the omnipresent lack of symmetry of individual jumping pulses and jump-by-jump variations in amplitudes and timing. The model therefore belongs to a new generation of synthetic narrowband jumping loads that simulate reality better. The proposed mathematical concept for characterisation of irregular jumping pulses may be utilised in vibration serviceability assessment of civil engineering assembly structures, such as grandstands, footbridges and concert or gym floors, to estimate realistic dynamic structural response due to people jumping.

  20. Circadian force and EMG activity in hindlimb muscles of rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, J. A.; Wichayanuparp, S.; Recktenwald, M. R.; Roy, R. R.; McCall, G.; Day, M. K.; Washburn, D.; Fanton, J. W.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Edgerton, V. R.; Rumbaugh, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Continuous intramuscular electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from the soleus (Sol), medial gastrocnemius (MG), tibialis anterior (TA), and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of Rhesus during normal cage activity throughout 24-h periods and also during treadmill locomotion. Daily levels of MG tendon force and EMG activity were obtained from five monkeys with partial datasets from three other animals. Activity levels correlated with the light-dark cycle with peak activities in most muscles occurring between 08:00 and 10:00. The lowest levels of activity generally occurred between 22:00 and 02:00. Daily EMG integrals ranged from 19 mV/s in one TA muscle to 3339 mV/s in one Sol muscle: average values were 1245 (Sol), 90 (MG), 65 (TA), and 209 (VL) mV/s. The average Sol EMG amplitude per 24-h period was 14 microV, compared with 246 microV for a short burst of locomotion. Mean EMG amplitudes for the Sol, MG, TA, and VL during active periods were 102, 18, 20, and 33 microV, respectively. EMG amplitudes that approximated recruitment of all fibers within a muscle occurred for 5-40 s/day in all muscles. The duration of daily activation was greatest in the Sol [151 +/- 45 (SE) min] and shortest in the TA (61 +/- 19 min). The results show that even a "postural" muscle such as the Sol was active for only approximately 9% of the day, whereas less active muscles were active for approximately 4% of the day. MG tendon forces were generally very low, consistent with the MG EMG data but occasionally reached levels close to estimates of the maximum force generating potential of the muscle. The Sol and TA activities were mutually exclusive, except at very low levels, suggesting very little coactivation of these antagonistic muscles. In contrast, the MG activity usually accompanied Sol activity suggesting that the MG was rarely used in the absence of Sol activation. The results clearly demonstrate a wide range of activation levels among muscles of the same animal as well as among different

  1. Conserved mechanisms of microtubule-stimulated ADP release, ATP binding, and force generation in transport kinesins

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Joseph; Farabella, Irene; Yu, I-Mei; Rosenfeld, Steven S; Houdusse, Anne; Topf, Maya; Moores, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Kinesins are a superfamily of microtubule-based ATP-powered motors, important for multiple, essential cellular functions. How microtubule binding stimulates their ATPase and controls force generation is not understood. To address this fundamental question, we visualized microtubule-bound kinesin-1 and kinesin-3 motor domains at multiple steps in their ATPase cycles—including their nucleotide-free states—at ∼7 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy. In both motors, microtubule binding promotes ordered conformations of conserved loops that stimulate ADP release, enhance microtubule affinity and prime the catalytic site for ATP binding. ATP binding causes only small shifts of these nucleotide-coordinating loops but induces large conformational changes elsewhere that allow force generation and neck linker docking towards the microtubule plus end. Family-specific differences across the kinesin–microtubule interface account for the distinctive properties of each motor. Our data thus provide evidence for a conserved ATP-driven mechanism for kinesins and reveal the critical mechanistic contribution of the microtubule interface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03680.001 PMID:25209998

  2. The Structural Basis of Force Generation by the Mitotic Motor Kinesin-5*

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, Adeline; Behnke-Parks, William M.; Sindelar, Charles V.; Major, Jennifer; Rosenfeld, Steven S.; Moores, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Kinesin-5 is required for forming the bipolar spindle during mitosis. Its motor domain, which contains nucleotide and microtubule binding sites and mechanical elements to generate force, has evolved distinct properties for its spindle-based functions. In this study, we report subnanometer resolution cryoelectron microscopy reconstructions of microtubule-bound human kinesin-5 before and after nucleotide binding and combine this information with studies of the kinetics of nucleotide-induced neck linker and cover strand movement. These studies reveal coupled, nucleotide-dependent conformational changes that explain many of this motor's properties. We find that ATP binding induces a ratchet-like docking of the neck linker and simultaneous, parallel docking of the N-terminal cover strand. Loop L5, the binding site for allosteric inhibitors of kinesin-5, also undergoes a dramatic reorientation when ATP binds, suggesting that it is directly involved in controlling nucleotide binding. Our structures indicate that allosteric inhibitors of human kinesin-5, which are being developed as anti-cancer therapeutics, bind to a motor conformation that occurs in the course of normal function. However, due to evolutionarily defined sequence variations in L5, this conformation is not adopted by invertebrate kinesin-5s, explaining their resistance to drug inhibition. Together, our data reveal the precision with which the molecular mechanism of kinesin-5 motors has evolved for force generation. PMID:23135273

  3. Generation of ultrasound radiation force with the use of time reversal acoustics principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2005-09-01

    There are numerous medical applications of ultrasound radiation force (RF) which could be made more effective using the time reversal acoustics (TRA) principles. This paper gives an overview of research into physical and technical bases of RF generation in heterogeneous biological media using TRA focusing systems. A custom-designed compact multichannel TRA system for receiving, digitizing, storing, time reversing, and transmitting acoustic signals in a wide frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz has been developed and extensively tested in model systems and ex vivo tissues and bones. Shear strain and shear waves remotely induced in soft tissues and bones by radiation force were detected using various acoustical and optical means. Experimental studies fully confirmed the feasibility of TRA generation of RF and demonstrated several advantages over conventional means of remotely inducing shear stress in biological media. These advantages include a possibility to create highly localized (close to diffraction limit) shear stress in heterogeneous media stir focused ultrasound beam in 3-D volume using very simple hardware. [Work supported by NIH grant.

  4. The forces generated within the musculature of the left ventricular wall

    PubMed Central

    Lunkenheimer, P P; Redmann, K; Florek, J; Fassnacht, U; Cryer, C W; Wübbeling, F; Niederer, P; Anderson, R H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To test the hypothesis that two populations of myocardial fibres—fibres aligned parallel to the surfaces of the wall and an additional population of fibres that extend obliquely through the wall—when working in concert produce a dualistic, self stabilising arrangement. Methods: Assessment of tensile forces in the walls of seven porcine hearts by using needle probes. Ventricular diameter was measured with microsonometry and the intracavitary pressure through a fluid filled catheter. Positive inotropism was induced by dopamine, and negative inotropism by thiopental. The preload was raised by volume load and lowered by withdrawal of blood. Afterload was increased by inflation of a balloon in the aortic root. The anatomical orientation of the fibres was established subsequently in histological sections. Results: The forces in the fibres parallel to the surface decreased 20–35% during systolic shrinkage of the ventricle, during negative inotropism, and during ventricular unloading. They increased 10–30% on positive inotropic stimulation and with augmentation in preload and afterload. The forces in the oblique transmural fibres increased 8–65% during systole, on positive inotropic medication, with an increase in afterload and during ventricular shrinkage, and decreased 36% on negative inotropic medication. There was a delay of up to 147 ms in the drop in activity during relaxation in the oblique transmural fibres. Conclusion: Although the two populations of myocardial fibres are densely interwoven, it is possible to distinguish their functions with force probes. The delayed drop in force during relaxation in obliquely oriented fibres indicates that they are hindered in their shortening to an extent that parallels any increase in mural thickness. The transmural fibres, therefore, contribute to stiffening of the ventricular wall and hence to confining ventricular compliance. PMID:14729798

  5. Analysis of sitting forces on stationary chairs for daily activities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lingling; Tackett, Bob; Tor, Onder; Zhang, Jilei

    2016-04-01

    No literature related to the study of sitting forces on chairs sat on by people who weighed over 136 kg was found. The Business Institutional Furniture Manufactures Association needs force data for development of performance test standards to test chairs for users who weigh up to 181 kg. 20 participants who weighed from 136 to 186 kg completed 6 tasks on an instrumented chair in the sequence of sitting down, remaining seated and rising. Effects of sitting motion, armrest use and seat cushion thickness on vertical sitting forces and centre-of-force were investigated. Results indicated hard sitting down yielded the highest sitting force of 213% in terms of participants' body weights. Armrest use affected sitting forces of normal sitting down, but not of rising and hard sitting down. Cushion thickness affected sitting forces of normal and hard sitting down and shifting, but not of rising, static seating or stretching backward situations. Practitioner Summary: Results of the sitting force and centre-of-force data obtained for this research can help furniture manufacturers develop new product performance test standards for creating reliable engineering design and manufacturing quality and durable products to meet a niche market need. PMID:26257071

  6. Analysis of sitting forces on stationary chairs for daily activities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lingling; Tackett, Bob; Tor, Onder; Zhang, Jilei

    2016-04-01

    No literature related to the study of sitting forces on chairs sat on by people who weighed over 136 kg was found. The Business Institutional Furniture Manufactures Association needs force data for development of performance test standards to test chairs for users who weigh up to 181 kg. 20 participants who weighed from 136 to 186 kg completed 6 tasks on an instrumented chair in the sequence of sitting down, remaining seated and rising. Effects of sitting motion, armrest use and seat cushion thickness on vertical sitting forces and centre-of-force were investigated. Results indicated hard sitting down yielded the highest sitting force of 213% in terms of participants' body weights. Armrest use affected sitting forces of normal sitting down, but not of rising and hard sitting down. Cushion thickness affected sitting forces of normal and hard sitting down and shifting, but not of rising, static seating or stretching backward situations. Practitioner Summary: Results of the sitting force and centre-of-force data obtained for this research can help furniture manufacturers develop new product performance test standards for creating reliable engineering design and manufacturing quality and durable products to meet a niche market need.

  7. A New Multivariate Approach in Generating Ensemble Meteorological Forcings for Hydrological Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajehei, Sepideh; Moradkhani, Hamid

    2015-04-01

    Producing reliable and accurate hydrologic ensemble forecasts are subject to various sources of uncertainty, including meteorological forcing, initial conditions, model structure, and model parameters. Producing reliable and skillful precipitation ensemble forecasts is one approach to reduce the total uncertainty in hydrological applications. Currently, National Weather Prediction (NWP) models are developing ensemble forecasts for various temporal ranges. It is proven that raw products from NWP models are biased in mean and spread. Given the above state, there is a need for methods that are able to generate reliable ensemble forecasts for hydrological applications. One of the common techniques is to apply statistical procedures in order to generate ensemble forecast from NWP-generated single-value forecasts. The procedure is based on the bivariate probability distribution between the observation and single-value precipitation forecast. However, one of the assumptions of the current method is fitting Gaussian distribution to the marginal distributions of observed and modeled climate variable. Here, we have described and evaluated a Bayesian approach based on Copula functions to develop an ensemble precipitation forecast from the conditional distribution of single-value precipitation forecasts. Copula functions are known as the multivariate joint distribution of univariate marginal distributions, which are presented as an alternative procedure in capturing the uncertainties related to meteorological forcing. Copulas are capable of modeling the joint distribution of two variables with any level of correlation and dependency. This study is conducted over a sub-basin in the Columbia River Basin in USA using the monthly precipitation forecasts from Climate Forecast System (CFS) with 0.5x0.5 Deg. spatial resolution to reproduce the observations. The verification is conducted on a different period and the superiority of the procedure is compared with Ensemble Pre

  8. Integrated Simulation between Flexible Body of Catenary and Active Control Pantograph for Contact Force Variation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohd Azman; Michitsuji, Yohei; Nagai, Masao; Miyajima, Naoki

    Railway transport has been developed for a variety of requirements with a diversity of studies and technologies in recent years. In particular, the intercity railway transport that can be operated at speed of more than 350 km/h is the goal for the railway industry. Due to vibration and drag forces at high speed, contact force variation occurs between pantograph and catenary. This variation also causes instability in the pantograph and catenary interaction. In this study, multibody dynamics analysis is used to model the catenary. The integration of the catenary model and the pantograph model in the simulation flow produces contact force variations. A sinusoidal feed forward force and a simple feedback control force are applied to control the wave-like contact force fluctuations by means of active dampers. Evaluation of the combination of active control forces will produce optimized forces that may be able to maintain, thus improve the contact force variations.

  9. Vehicle active suspension system using skyhook adaptive neuro active force control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyandoko, G.; Mailah, M.; Jamaluddin, H.

    2009-04-01

    This paper aims to highlight the practical viability of a new and novel hybrid control technique applied to a vehicle active suspension system of a quarter car model using skyhook and adaptive neuro active force control (SANAFC). The overall control system essentially comprises four feedback control loops, namely the innermost proportional-integral (PI) control loop for the force tracking of the pneumatic actuator, the intermediate skyhook and active force control (AFC) control loops for the compensation of the disturbances and the outermost proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control loop for the computation of the optimum target/commanded force. A neural network (NN) with a modified adaptive Levenberg-Marquardt learning algorithm was used to approximate the estimated mass and inverse dynamics of the pneumatic actuator in the AFC loop. A number of experiments were carried out on a physical test rig using a hardware-in-the-loop configuration that fully incorporates the theoretical elements. The performance of the proposed control method was evaluated and compared to examine the effectiveness of the system in suppressing the vibration effect on the suspension system. It was found that the simulation and experimental results were in good agreement, particularly for the sprung mass displacement and acceleration behaviours in which the proposed SANAFC scheme is found to outperform the PID and passive counterparts.

  10. An automatic method to generate force-field parameters for hetero-compounds.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Kristina; Lecerof, David; Sigfridsson, Emma; Ryde, Ulf

    2003-02-01

    A program, Hess2FF, has been developed that automatically constructs parameter and topology files to be used in crystallographic refinement for any molecule, based on a Hessian (force-constant) matrix estimated by any method. The program is tested by redefining hetero-compounds in five different proteins: the inhibitor N-methylmesoporphyrin bound to ferrochelatase, the haem group and its axial ligands in cyctochrome c(553), the active-site metal ion in iron superoxide dismutase, the catalytic zinc ion in alcohol dehydrogenase with a bound trifluoroethanol molecule and the 5'-deoxyadenosyl group in methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase. It is shown that the resulting structures are improved in several aspects. In particular, the free R(free) factor always decreases and it is shown that a 1.70 A structure of cyctochrome c(553) becomes more similar to a high-resolution (0.97 A) structure of the same protein after re-refinement with Hess2FF. Thus, the force field used in crystallographic refinement significantly affects the final structure and therefore should be published together with the structure to ensure reproducibility. Various methods of obtaining the Hessian matrix employed by Hess2FF are discussed and some recommendations are given. Hess2FF allows the user to divide the atoms of the molecule into atom types that share the same force-field parameters. However, it seems to be favourable to assign a separate type to each atom, which can be performed automatically.

  11. Mean and fluctuating basal forces generated by granular flows: Laboratory observations in a large vertically rotating drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, L.; Dietrich, W. E.; Sklar, L. S.

    2014-06-01

    A flowing granular mass generates forces on the boundary that drive near-bed grain dynamics, bed surface erosion, and energy dissipation. Few quantitative analyses exist of the controls on the dynamically fluctuating force caused by granular flows with wide-grain-size distributions and a liquid phase in the pores. To study the mechanisms controlling the boundary forces, we used a 225 cm2 load plate to measure the bed-normal force from a suite of granular flows in a 4 m diameter, 80 cm wide vertically rotating drum. We analyzed the time series of bed forces generated in flows composed of granular material for both narrow (gravel-water) and wide (muddy, sand-gravel-cobble) grain-size distributions. The tail of the force distribution was captured more closely by a generalized Pareto distribution than an exponential distribution, suggesting a way to predict empirically the force distribution. We show that the impulse on the bed, related to kinetic energy transferred to the bed from the granular collisions, is quantified by the standard deviation of the force. The mean bulk force equaled the static weight of the flow, whereas the force fluctuations, represented by the standard deviation and the averaged top 1% of force, were a near-linear function of effective grain diameter and flow velocity, and a ˜0.5 power function of an inertial stress scaling term. The force fluctuations depend on both Savage and Bagnold numbers. The correlations revealed in this study suggest that it may be possible to estimate dynamic forces on the bed from gross properties of the flows.

  12. Numerical study of eigenmode forcing effects on jet flow development and noise generation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiderling, Felix; Kleiser, Leonhard; Bogey, Christophe

    2009-04-01

    The effect of nonlinear interaction of instability eigenmodes on jet flow transition and its near acoustic field for a high-subsonic round jet at a Reynolds number of Re=4.5×105 and a Mach number of Ma=0.9 is investigated using large-eddy simulations. At the inflow, helical perturbations of azimuthal wavenumbers |n|=4,…,8 determined from linear stability theory are superimposed on a laminar base flow in order to trigger transition to turbulence. The disturbance amplitude is varied parametrically in the range from 1.5% to 4.5% of the jet exit velocity Uj. Thereby we aim to characterize sources of noise generation and, in particular, underlying mode interactions. With increasing forcing amplitude, the transitional behavior of the jet changes which affects the mean flow and also the acoustic near-field, which are both analyzed in detail. As the forcing amplitude is increased, the axial root-mean-square peak levels along the jet centerline are reduced by approximately 7%. Simultaneously, pronounced dual-peak distributions are generated along the jet lip line which are related to the localization of vortex pairings of the jet column mode. For low-amplitude excitation the azimuthal turbulent kinetic energy spectra show that the unexcited, naturally least stable axisymmetric mode n =0 and the helical mode n =1 dominate the early nonlinear regimes between z ≈6r0 and 9r0 where r0 is the jet radius. An analysis of the Fourier mode amplitude clarifies that this energy rise is linked to the helical mode n =1. For higher forcing amplitudes, in addition to the varicose mode n =0 interactions between the excited even mode n =4 and higher azimuthal harmonics thereof dominate the azimuthal energy spectra. These differences in the early nonlinear development of the eigenmodes are found to alter the acoustic near-field. At small angles from the downstream jet axis, the peak acoustic frequency occurs at a Strouhal number based on the angular frequency ω and the jet diameter Dj

  13. A body-force based method to generate supersonic equilibrium turbulent boundary layer profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waindim, M.; Gaitonde, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    We further develop a simple counterflow body force-based approach to generate an equilibrium spatially developing turbulent boundary layer suitable for Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) or Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of viscous-inviscid interactions. The force essentially induces a small separated region in an incoming specified laminar boundary layer. The resulting unstable shear layer then transitions and breaks down to yield the desired unsteady profile. The effects of wall thermal conditions are explored to demonstrate the capability of the method for both fixed wall and adiabatic wall conditions. We then describe an efficient method to select parameters that ensure transition by examining precursor signatures using generalized stability variables. These precursors are shown to be evident in a computational domain spanning only a small region around the trip and can also be detected using 2D simulations. Finally, the method is tested for different Mach numbers ranging from 1.7 to 2.9, with emphasis on flow field surveys, Reynolds stresses, and energy spectra. These results provide guidance on boundary conditions for desired boundary layer thickness at each Mach number. The consequences of using a much lower Reynolds number in computation relative to experiment are evident at the higher Mach number, where a self sustaining turbulent boundary layer is more difficult to obtain.

  14. Group B streptococcus has no effect on piglet diaphragmatic force generation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, T D; Mayock, D E; Standaert, T A; Gibson, R L; Woodrum, D E

    1992-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that diaphragmatic contractility is adversely affected by bacterial infection. Using transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) with phrenic nerve stimulation, the effect of continuous Group B Streptococcus (GBS) infusion on diaphragmatic force output was studied in seven anesthetized, spontaneously breathing 1-month old piglets. Pdi was measured under baseline condition (50% O2/50% N2) and at 1, 2, and 4 h of GBS infusion. The GBS was infused at a level that caused a doubling of the pulmonary artery pressure and a 32% decrease in cardiac output but which avoided hypotension or acidosis--both of which can decrease diaphragmatic contractility. In addition, the piglets were kept hyperoxic (PaO2 greater than 100) and no piglet with hypercapnia (PaCO2 greater than 65) was studied, as hypoxia and hypercapnia also can cause respiratory muscle dysfunction. Pdi in response to phrenic nerve stimulation did not change during GBS infusion. We conclude that GBS infusion, in the absence of hypotension, hypercapnia, hypoxia, or acidosis, has no effect on diaphragmatic force generation in the piglet. PMID:1736760

  15. Spring constant calibration techniques for next-generation fast-scanning atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Ashley D; Blanch, Adam J; Ejov, Vladimir; Quinton, Jamie S; Gibson, Christopher T

    2014-08-22

    As a recent technological development, high-speed atomic force microscopy (AFM) has provided unprecedented insights into dynamic processes on the nanoscale, and is capable of measuring material property variation over short timescales. Miniaturized cantilevers developed specifically for high-speed AFM differ greatly from standard cantilevers both in size and dynamic properties, and calibration of the cantilever spring constant is critical for accurate, quantitative measurement. This work investigates specifically, the calibration of these new-generation cantilevers for the first time. Existing techniques are tested and the challenges encountered are reported and the most effective approaches for calibrating fast-scanning cantilevers with high accuracy are identified, providing a resource for microscopists in this rapidly developing field. Not only do these cantilevers offer faster acquisition of images and force data but due to their high resonant frequencies (up to 2 MHz) they are also excellent mass sensors. Accurate measurement of deposited mass requires accurate calibration of the cantilever spring constant, therefore the results of this work will also be useful for mass-sensing applications.

  16. The dependence of force enhancement on activation in human adductor pollicis.

    PubMed

    Oskouei, Ali E; Herzog, Walter

    2006-09-01

    It has been well recognized that the steady-state isometric force after active muscle/fiber stretch is greater than the corresponding isometric force for electrically stimulated muscles and maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). However, recent evidence obtained for sub-MVC suggests that force enhancement properties are different from those observed for electrically induced and MVC. Specifically, it appears that force enhancement is activation-dependent and that there is a subject-specific threshold for force enhancement in sub-MVC. To address these suggestions, the relationship between force enhancement and voluntary activation during stretch was investigated in 11 healthy subjects. Human adductor pollicis muscles were studied and force enhancement was measured while muscle activation during the steady-state isometric phase was controlled at a level of 30% of MVC. In order to study the effects of activation on force enhancement, subjects performed stretch contractions at 0, 10, 30, 60, and 100% of maximal voluntary effort while the steady-state isometric force after stretch, obtained at 30% of activation in all cases, was compared to the corresponding values measured in the isometric reference contractions. There was no force enhancement if muscle stretching occurred passively but all subjects showed force enhancement when muscle stretching occurred at maximal voluntary effort. When increasing the level of activation during the stretch phase, force enhancement increased, and the number of subjects who showed force enhancement increased as well. We conclude from these results that force enhancement during voluntary contractions is activation-dependent with a threshold that is subject-specific.

  17. New liquid aerosol generation devices: systems that force pressurized liquids through nozzles.

    PubMed

    Geller, David E

    2002-12-01

    Over the past few decades, aerosol delivery devices have been relatively inefficient, wasteful, and difficult for patients to use. These drawbacks have been tolerated because the drugs available for inhalation have wide therapeutic margins and steep dose-response curves at low doses. Recently several forces have converged to drive innovation in the aerosol device industry: the ban on chlorofluorocarbon propellants in metered-dose inhalers, the need for more user-friendly devices, and the invention of expensive inhalable therapies for topical and systemic lung delivery. Numerous devices are in development to improve the efficiency, ease of use, and reproducibility of aerosol delivery to the lung, including systems that force liquid through a nozzle to form the aerosol cloud. The Respimat is a novel, compact, propellant-free, multi-dose inhaler that employs a spring to push drug solution through a nozzle, which generates a slow-moving aerosol. Deposition studies show that the Respimat can deliver 39-44% of a dose to the lungs. Clinical asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease trials with bronchodilators show that the Respimat is 2-8 times as effective as a metered-dose inhaler. Respimat has been tested with bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroids. The AERx device uses sophisticated electronics to deliver aerosol from a single-dose blister, using an integral, disposable nozzle array. The electronics control dose expression and titration, timing of aerosol generation with the breath, and provide feedback for proper inhalation technique. Lung deposition ranges from 50 to 80% of the loaded dose, with remarkable reproducibility. AERx has been tested with a variety of drugs, for both topical and systemic delivery, including rhDNase (dornase alfa), insulin, and opioids. These novel devices face competition from other technologies as well as financial and regulatory hurdles, but they both offer a marked improvement in the efficiency of pulmonary drug delivery.

  18. Aerodynamic force generation, performance and control of body orientation during gliding in sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Kristin L

    2007-08-01

    Gliding has often been discussed in the literature as a possible precursor to powered flight in vertebrates, but few studies exist on the mechanics of gliding in living animals. In this study I analyzed the 3D kinematics of sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) during short glides in an enclosed space. Short segments of the glide were captured on video, and the positions of marked anatomical landmarks were used to compute linear distances and angles, as well as whole body velocities and accelerations. From the whole body accelerations I estimated the aerodynamic forces generated by the animals. I computed the correlations between movements of the limbs and body rotations to examine the control of orientation during flight. Finally, I compared these results to those of my earlier study on the similarly sized and distantly related southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans). The sugar gliders in this study accelerated downward slightly (1.0+/-0.5 m s(-2)), and also accelerated forward (2.1+/-0.6 m s(-2)) in all but one trial, indicating that the body weight was not fully supported by aerodynamic forces and that some of the lift produced forward acceleration rather than just balancing body weight. The gliders used high angles of attack (44.15+/-3.12 degrees ), far higher than the angles at which airplane wings would stall, yet generated higher lift coefficients (1.48+/-0.18) than would be expected for a stalled wing. Movements of the limbs were strongly correlated with body rotations, suggesting that sugar gliders make extensive use of limb movements to control their orientation during gliding flight. In addition, among individuals, different limb movements were associated with a given body rotation, suggesting that individual variation exists in the control of body rotations. Under similar conditions, flying squirrels generated higher lift coefficients and lower drag coefficients than sugar gliders, yet had only marginally shallower glides. Flying squirrels have a

  19. Aerodynamic force generation, performance and control of body orientation during gliding in sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Kristin L

    2007-08-01

    Gliding has often been discussed in the literature as a possible precursor to powered flight in vertebrates, but few studies exist on the mechanics of gliding in living animals. In this study I analyzed the 3D kinematics of sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) during short glides in an enclosed space. Short segments of the glide were captured on video, and the positions of marked anatomical landmarks were used to compute linear distances and angles, as well as whole body velocities and accelerations. From the whole body accelerations I estimated the aerodynamic forces generated by the animals. I computed the correlations between movements of the limbs and body rotations to examine the control of orientation during flight. Finally, I compared these results to those of my earlier study on the similarly sized and distantly related southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans). The sugar gliders in this study accelerated downward slightly (1.0+/-0.5 m s(-2)), and also accelerated forward (2.1+/-0.6 m s(-2)) in all but one trial, indicating that the body weight was not fully supported by aerodynamic forces and that some of the lift produced forward acceleration rather than just balancing body weight. The gliders used high angles of attack (44.15+/-3.12 degrees ), far higher than the angles at which airplane wings would stall, yet generated higher lift coefficients (1.48+/-0.18) than would be expected for a stalled wing. Movements of the limbs were strongly correlated with body rotations, suggesting that sugar gliders make extensive use of limb movements to control their orientation during gliding flight. In addition, among individuals, different limb movements were associated with a given body rotation, suggesting that individual variation exists in the control of body rotations. Under similar conditions, flying squirrels generated higher lift coefficients and lower drag coefficients than sugar gliders, yet had only marginally shallower glides. Flying squirrels have a

  20. Formate Metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis Generates Proton Motive Force and Prevents Growth without an Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Aunica L.; Brutinel, Evan D.; Joo, Heena; Maysonet, Rebecca; VanDrisse, Chelsey M.; Kotloski, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that thrives in redox-stratified environments due to its ability to utilize a wide array of terminal electron acceptors. Conversely, the electron donors utilized by S. oneidensis are more limited and include products of primary fermentation such as lactate, pyruvate, formate, and hydrogen. Lactate, pyruvate, and hydrogen metabolisms in S. oneidensis have been described previously, but little is known about the role of formate oxidation in the ecophysiology of these bacteria. Formate is produced by S. oneidensis through pyruvate formate lyase during anaerobic growth on carbon sources that enter metabolism at or above the level of pyruvate, and the genome contains three gene clusters predicted to encode three complete formate dehydrogenase complexes. To determine the contribution of each complex to formate metabolism, strains lacking one, two, or all three annotated formate dehydrogenase gene clusters were generated and examined for growth rates and yields on a variety of carbon sources. Here, we report that formate oxidation contributes to both the growth rate and yield of S. oneidensis through the generation of proton motive force. Exogenous formate also greatly accelerated growth on N-acetylglucosamine, a carbon source normally utilized very slowly by S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions. Surprisingly, deletion of all three formate dehydrogenase gene clusters enabled growth of S. oneidensis using pyruvate in the absence of a terminal electron acceptor, a mode of growth never before observed in these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that formate oxidation is a fundamental strategy under anaerobic conditions for energy conservation in S. oneidensis. IMPORTANCE Shewanella species have garnered interest in biotechnology applications for their ability to respire extracellular terminal electron acceptors, such as insoluble iron oxides and electrodes. While much effort has gone into studying the

  1. Amino acid mutations in the caldesmon COOH-terminal functional domain increase force generation in bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Maoxian; Boopathi, Ettickan; Hypolite, Joseph A; Raabe, Tobias; Chang, Shaohua; Zderic, Stephen; Wein, Alan J; Chacko, Samuel

    2013-11-15

    Caldesmon (CaD), a component of smooth muscle thin filaments, binds actin, tropomyosin, calmodulin, and myosin and inhibits actin-activated ATP hydrolysis by smooth muscle myosin. Internal deletions of the chicken CaD functional domain that spans from amino acids (aa) 718 to 731, which corresponds to aa 512-530 including the adjacent aa sequence in mouse CaD, lead to diminished CaD-induced inhibition of actin-activated ATP hydrolysis by myosin. Transgenic mice with mutations of five aa residues (Lys(523) to Gln, Val(524) to Leu, Ser(526) to Thr, Pro(527) to Cys, and Lys(529) to Ser), which encompass the ATPase inhibitory determinants located in exon 12, were generated by homologous recombination. Homozygous (-/-) animals did not develop, but heterozygous (+/-) mice carrying the expected mutations in the CaD ATPase inhibitory domain (CaD mutant) matured and reproduced normally. The peak force produced in response to KCl and electrical field stimulation by the detrusor smooth muscle from the CaD mutant was high compared with that of the wild type. CaD mutant mice revealed nonvoiding contractions during bladder filling on awake cystometry, suggesting that the CaD ATPase inhibitory domain suppresses force generation during the filling phase and this suppression is partially released by mutations in 50% of CaD in heterozygous. Our data show for the first time a functional phenotype, at the intact smooth muscle tissue and in vivo organ levels, following mutation of a functional domain at the COOH-terminal region of CaD.

  2. Phase Aberration and Attenuation Effects on Acoustic Radiation Force-Based Shear Wave Generation.

    PubMed

    Carrascal, Carolina Amador; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-02-01

    Elasticity is measured by shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) methods using acoustic radiation force to create the shear waves. Phase aberration and tissue attenuation can hamper the generation of shear waves for in vivo applications. In this study, the effects of phase aberration and attenuation in ultrasound focusing for creating shear waves were explored. This includes the effects of phase shifts and amplitude attenuation on shear wave characteristics such as shear wave amplitude, shear wave speed, shear wave center frequency, and bandwidth. Two samples of swine belly tissue were used to create phase aberration and attenuation experimentally. To explore the phase aberration and attenuation effects individually, tissue experiments were complemented with ultrasound beam simulations using fast object-oriented C++ ultrasound simulator (FOCUS) and shear wave simulations using finite-element-model (FEM) analysis. The ultrasound frequency used to generate shear waves was varied from 3.0 to 4.5 MHz. Results: The measured acoustic pressure and resulting shear wave amplitude decreased approximately 40%-90% with the introduction of the tissue samples. Acoustic intensity and shear wave displacement were correlated for both tissue samples, and the resulting Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.99 and 0.97. Analysis of shear wave generation with tissue samples (phase aberration and attenuation case), measured phase screen, (only phase aberration case), and FOCUS/FEM model (only attenuation case) showed that tissue attenuation affected the shear wave generation more than tissue aberration. Decreasing the ultrasound frequency helped maintain a focused beam for creation of shear waves in the presence of both phase aberration and attenuation.

  3. Removal of visual feedback alters muscle activity and reduces force variability during constant isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Harsimran S; Patel, Bhavini K; Martinkewiz, Julie D; Vu, Julie; Christou, Evangelos A

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare force accuracy, force variability and muscle activity during constant isometric contractions at different force levels with and without visual feedback and at different feedback gains. In experiment 1, subjects were instructed to accurately match the target force at 2, 15, 30, 50, and 70% of their maximal isometric force with abduction of the index finger and maintain their force even in the absence of visual feedback. Each trial lasted 22 s and visual feedback was removed from 8-12 to 16-20 s. Each subject performed 6 trials at each target force, half with visual gain of 51.2 pixels/N and the rest with a visual gain of 12.8 pixels/N. Force error was calculated as the root mean square error of the force trace from the target line. Force variability was quantified as the standard deviation and coefficient of variation (CVF) of the force trace. The EMG activity of the agonist (first dorsal interosseus; FDI) was measured with bipolar surface electrodes placed distal to the innervation zone. Independent of visual gain and force level, subjects exhibited lower force error with the visual feedback condition (2.53 +/- 2.95 vs. 2.71 +/- 2.97 N; P < 0.01); whereas, force variability was lower when visual feedback was removed (CVF: 4.06 +/- 3.11 vs. 4.47 +/- 3.14, P < 0.01). The EMG activity of the FDI muscle was higher during the visual feedback condition and this difference increased especially at higher force levels (70%: 370 +/- 149 vs. 350 +/- 143 microV, P < 0.01). Experiment 2 examined whether the findings of experiment 1 were driven by the higher force levels and proximity in the gain of visual feedback. Subjects performed constant isometric contractions with the abduction of the index finger at an absolute force of 2 N, with two distinct feedback gains of 15 and 3,000 pixels/N. In agreement with the findings of experiment 1, subjects exhibited lower force error in the presence of visual feedback especially when the feedback

  4. Changes in force associated with the amount of aligner activation and lingual bodily movement of the maxillary central incisor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaowei; Ren, Chaochao; Wang, Zheyao; Zhao, Pai; Wang, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to measure the orthodontic forces generated by thermoplastic aligners and investigate the possible influences of different activations for lingual bodily movements on orthodontic forces, and their attenuation. Methods Thermoplastic material of 1.0-mm in thickness was used to manufacture aligners for 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 mm activations for lingual bodily movements of the maxillary central incisor. The orthodontic force in the lingual direction delivered by the thermoplastic aligners was measured using a micro-stress sensor system for the invisible orthodontic technique, and was monitored for 2 weeks. Results Orthodontic force increased with the amount of activation of the aligner in the initial measurements. The attenuation speed in the 0.6 mm group was faster than that of the other groups (p < 0.05). All aligners demonstrated rapid relaxation in the first 8 hours, which then decreased slowly and plateaued on day 4 or 5. Conclusions The amount of activation had a substantial influence on the orthodontic force imparted by the aligners. The results suggest that the activation of lingual bodily movement of the maxillary central incisor should not exceed 0.5 mm. The initial 4 or 5 days is important with respect to orthodontic treatment incorporating an aligner. PMID:27019820

  5. Statistical analysis of mesoscale rainfall: Dependence of a random cascade generator on large-scale forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Over, Thomas, M.; Gupta, Vijay K.

    1994-01-01

    Under the theory of independent and identically distributed random cascades, the probability distribution of the cascade generator determines the spatial and the ensemble properties of spatial rainfall. Three sets of radar-derived rainfall data in space and time are analyzed to estimate the probability distribution of the generator. A detailed comparison between instantaneous scans of spatial rainfall and simulated cascades using the scaling properties of the marginal moments is carried out. This comparison highlights important similarities and differences between the data and the random cascade theory. Differences are quantified and measured for the three datasets. Evidence is presented to show that the scaling properties of the rainfall can be captured to the first order by a random cascade with a single parameter. The dependence of this parameter on forcing by the large-scale meteorological conditions, as measured by the large-scale spatial average rain rate, is investigated for these three datasets. The data show that this dependence can be captured by a one-to-one function. Since the large-scale average rain rate can be diagnosed from the large-scale dynamics, this relationship demonstrates an important linkage between the large-scale atmospheric dynamics and the statistical cascade theory of mesoscale rainfall. Potential application of this research to parameterization of runoff from the land surface and regional flood frequency analysis is briefly discussed, and open problems for further research are presented.

  6. Active Control of Transition Using the Lorentz Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosenchuck, Daniel; Brown, Garry

    2007-01-01

    A new concept and technique has been developed to directly control boundary-layer transition and turbulence. Near-wall vertical motions are directly suppressed through the application of Lorentz force. Current (j) and magnetic (b) fields are applied parallel to the boundary and normal to each other to produce a Lorentz force (j x B) normal to the boundary. This approach is called magnetic turbulence control (MTC). Experiments have been performed on flat-plate transitional and turbulent boundary layers in water seeded with a weak electrolyte.

  7. External work output and force generation during synchronized intermittent mechanical ventilation. Effect of machine assistance on breathing effort.

    PubMed

    Marini, J J; Smith, T C; Lamb, V J

    1988-11-01

    We measured the mechanical work performed by 12 acutely ill patients during synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation to determine the influence of volume-cycled machine assistance on inspiratory timing, respiratory muscle force development, and external work output. The frequency and tidal volume of spontaneous breaths increased at lower levels of mechanical ventilation, but inspiratory time fraction did not vary across the spectrum of machine support. As machine support was withdrawn, inspiratory work and pressure-time product increased progressively for both spontaneous and assisted breathing cycles. On a per cycle basis, work output was greater for assisted than for spontaneous breaths at all levels of comparison. Although the mean pressure developed by the patient during assisted cycles averaged approximately equal to 20% less than during adjacent unassisted cycles, contraction time averaged approximately equal to 20% longer, so that the pressure-time products were nearly equivalent for both types of cycle. Two indices of force reserve indicated that our patients taxed their maximal ventilatory capability at all but the highest levels of support. We conclude that under the conditions of this study the ventilatory pump continued to be active at all levels of machine assistance. Although work per liter related linearly to the proportion of minute ventilation borne by the patient, force generation differed little for spontaneous and machine-aided breaths at any specified level of support. Whether judged on the basis of mean developed pressure (work per liter of ventilation) or pressure-time product, little effort adaptation to volume-cycled machine assistance appears to occur on a breath-by-breath basis.

  8. Force Activation of a Multimeric Adhesive Protein through Domain Conformational Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijeratne Sithara S

    The force-induced activation of adhesive proteins such as von Willebrand factor (VWF), which experience high hydrodynamic forces, is essential in initiating platelet adhesion. The importance of the mechanical force induced functional change is manifested in the multimeric VWF's crucial role in blood coagulation, when high fluid shear stress activates pVWF multimers to bind platelets. Here we showed that a pathological level of high shear flow exposure of pVWF multimers results in domain conformational changes, and the subsequent shifts in the unfolding force allow us to use force as a marker to track the dynamic states of multimeric VWF. We found that shear-activated pVWF multimers (spVWF) are more resistant to mechanical unfolding than non-sheared pVWF multimers, as indicated in the higher peak unfolding force. These results provide insight into the mechanism of shear-induced activation of pVWF multimers.

  9. Validation and Verification of Operational Land Analysis Activities at the Air Force Weather Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Michael; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Cetola, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The NASA developed Land Information System (LIS) is the Air Force Weather Agency's (AFWA) operational Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) combining real time precipitation observations and analyses, global forecast model data, vegetation, terrain, and soil parameters with the community Noah land surface model, along with other hydrology module options, to generate profile analyses of global soil moisture, soil temperature, and other important land surface characteristics. (1) A range of satellite data products and surface observations used to generate the land analysis products (2) Global, 1/4 deg spatial resolution (3) Model analysis generated at 3 hours. AFWA recognizes the importance of operational benchmarking and uncertainty characterization for land surface modeling and is developing standard methods, software, and metrics to verify and/or validate LIS output products. To facilitate this and other needs for land analysis activities at AFWA, the Model Evaluation Toolkit (MET) -- a joint product of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Developmental Testbed Center (NCAR DTC), AFWA, and the user community -- and the Land surface Verification Toolkit (LVT), developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), have been adapted to operational benchmarking needs of AFWA's land characterization activities.

  10. Relationship between muscle fiber pennation and force generation capability in Olympic athletes.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Y; Kanehisa, H; Ito, M; Kawakami, Y; Fukunaga, T

    1998-11-01

    The thickness (TBmt) and fiber pennation angle (TBpen) of triceps brachii as well as isokinetic force developed during elbow extension were measured in Olympic athletes to investigate the relationship between muscle fiber pennation and force generation capability. The subjects were male members of the 1996 Japanese Olympic team who competed in seven different events; 9 wrestlers, 16 soccer players, 11 sprinters, 5 judo athletes, 7 gymnasts, 9 rowers and 18 baseball players. The TBmt and TBpen, measured by a B-mode ultrasound, ranged between 29 mm and 50 mm and between 11 degrees and 30 degrees, respectively, and on average were larger in the judo athletes, wrestlers and gymnasts compared to the other groups. A significant correlation (r=0.580, p < 0.05) was found between TPpen and TBmt per unit of the upper arm length, and so the observed event-related differences in TBpen tended to reflect the differences in TBmt. The isokinetic forces relative to the cross-sectional area (CSA) estimated from TBmt, measured at two constant velocities of 1.05 rad/s (F1.05/CSA) and 3.14 rad/s (F3.14/ CSA), were negatively correlated to the CSA; r=-0.617 (p < 0.05) for F1.05/CSA and r=-0.635 (p < 0.05) for F3.14/CSA. In addition, low but significant negative correlations existed between TBpen and both F1.05/CSA (r=-0.365, p < 0.05) and F3.14/ CSA (r=-0.336, p <0.05). Even when the effect of TBpen was statistically normalized, the F1.05/CSA and F3.14/CSA were still negatively correlated to the CSA, r=-0.530 (p < 0.05) for F1.05/ CSA and r=-0.561 (p < 0.05) for F3.14/CSA. Therefore, at least in the Olympic athletes tested in this study, the magnitude of the pennation angles reflects muscle size, but it does not seem to be a factor that explains extensively the lower F/CSA in athletes with large muscle size.

  11. Effect of streptomycin on the active force of bioengineered heart muscle in response to controlled stretch.

    PubMed

    Birla, R K; Huang, Y C; Dennis, R G

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we describe a bioreactor system to deliver controlled stretch protocols to bioengineered heart muscle (BEHMs) and test the system when streptomycin (an aminoglycoside antibiotic, which blocks stretch-activated channels) is either added to or excluded from the culture medium. Streptomycin is a very commonly used component of cell culture antibiotic-antimycotic media additives, so its effects on muscle development and functional response to mechanical signals in vitro is worthy of investigation. Our hypothesis is that BEHMs will not adapt to the applied mechanical stretch protocol when streptomycin is present in the culture medium, but will do so when streptomycin is excluded. Bioengineered heart muscles were formed by culturing primary neonatal cardiac myocytes in a fibrin gel using a method previously developed in our laboratory. A custom bioreactor system was designed using SolidWorks and structural components manufactured using fusion deposition modeling. We utilized a stretch protocol of 1 Hz, 10% strain for 7 d. BEHMs were stretched in the presence and absence of streptomycin. As controls, BEHMs were maintained in a cell culture incubator with and without streptomycin. The contractile properties of all BEHMs were evaluated to determine the active force. We were able to demonstrate compatibility of the bioreactor system with BEHMs and were able to stretch 58 constructs with zero incidence of failure. When the BEHMs were stretched in the absence of streptomycin, the active force increased from a mean value of 51.7 +/- 5.6 (N = 10) to 102.4 +/- 16.3 microN (N = 10), with p < 0.05. However, BEHMs that were stretched in the presence of streptomycin did not show any significant increase in active force generation. The average active force of BEHMs increased from a mean value of 57.6 +/- 10.2 (N = 10) to 91.4 +/- 19.8 microN (N = 10) when stretched in the presence of streptomycin. In this study, we demonstrate compatibility of the a bioreactor system

  12. Estimating evaporative vapor generation from automobiles based on parking activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinyi; Tschantz, Michael; Fu, Joshua S

    2015-07-01

    A new approach is proposed to quantify the evaporative vapor generation based on real parking activity data. As compared to the existing methods, two improvements are applied in this new approach to reduce the uncertainties: First, evaporative vapor generation from diurnal parking events is usually calculated based on estimated average parking duration for the whole fleet, while in this study, vapor generation rate is calculated based on parking activities distribution. Second, rather than using the daily temperature gradient, this study uses hourly temperature observations to derive the hourly incremental vapor generation rates. The parking distribution and hourly incremental vapor generation rates are then adopted with Wade-Reddy's equation to estimate the weighted average evaporative generation. We find that hourly incremental rates can better describe the temporal variations of vapor generation, and the weighted vapor generation rate is 5-8% less than calculation without considering parking activity.

  13. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sensors. 1211.13 Section 1211.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT... § 1211.13 Inherent force activated secondary door sensors. (a) Normal operation test. (1) A force activated door sensor of a door system installed according to the installation instructions shall...

  14. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... sensors. 1211.13 Section 1211.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT... § 1211.13 Inherent force activated secondary door sensors. (a) Normal operation test. (1) A force activated door sensor of a door system installed according to the installation instructions shall...

  15. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... sensors. 1211.13 Section 1211.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT... § 1211.13 Inherent force activated secondary door sensors. (a) Normal operation test. (1) A force activated door sensor of a door system installed according to the installation instructions shall...

  16. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... sensors. 1211.13 Section 1211.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT... § 1211.13 Inherent force activated secondary door sensors. (a) Normal operation test. (1) A force activated door sensor of a door system installed according to the installation instructions shall...

  17. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... sensors. 1211.13 Section 1211.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT... § 1211.13 Inherent force activated secondary door sensors. (a) Normal operation test. (1) A force activated door sensor of a door system installed according to the installation instructions shall...

  18. Fluidic Active Transducer for Electricity Generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, YoungJun; Park, Junwoo; Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-01-01

    Flows in small size channels have been studied for a long time over multidisciplinary field such as chemistry, biology and medical through the various topics. Recently, the attempts of electricity generation from the small flows as a new area for energy harvesting in microfluidics have been reported. Here, we propose for the first time a new fluidic electricity generator (FEG) by modulating the electric double layer (EDL) with two phase flows of water and air without external power sources. We find that an electric current flowed by the forming/deforming of the EDL with a simple separated phase flow of water and air at the surface of the FEG. Electric signals between two electrodes of the FEG are checked from various water/air passing conditions. Moreover, we verify the possibility of a self-powered air slug sensor by applying the FEG in the detection of an air slug.

  19. Fluidic Active Transducer for Electricity Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, YoungJun; Park, Junwoo; Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-01-01

    Flows in small size channels have been studied for a long time over multidisciplinary field such as chemistry, biology and medical through the various topics. Recently, the attempts of electricity generation from the small flows as a new area for energy harvesting in microfluidics have been reported. Here, we propose for the first time a new fluidic electricity generator (FEG) by modulating the electric double layer (EDL) with two phase flows of water and air without external power sources. We find that an electric current flowed by the forming/deforming of the EDL with a simple separated phase flow of water and air at the surface of the FEG. Electric signals between two electrodes of the FEG are checked from various water/air passing conditions. Moreover, we verify the possibility of a self-powered air slug sensor by applying the FEG in the detection of an air slug. PMID:26511626

  20. Fluidic Active Transducer for Electricity Generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, YoungJun; Park, Junwoo; Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-01-01

    Flows in small size channels have been studied for a long time over multidisciplinary field such as chemistry, biology and medical through the various topics. Recently, the attempts of electricity generation from the small flows as a new area for energy harvesting in microfluidics have been reported. Here, we propose for the first time a new fluidic electricity generator (FEG) by modulating the electric double layer (EDL) with two phase flows of water and air without external power sources. We find that an electric current flowed by the forming/deforming of the EDL with a simple separated phase flow of water and air at the surface of the FEG. Electric signals between two electrodes of the FEG are checked from various water/air passing conditions. Moreover, we verify the possibility of a self-powered air slug sensor by applying the FEG in the detection of an air slug. PMID:26511626

  1. Evaluation of Force Degradation Pattern of Elastomeric Ligatures and Elastomeric Separators in Active Tieback State.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Amir; Mahmoodi, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The purpose of this study was to evaluate initial force and force decay of commercially available elastomeric ligatures and elastomeric separators in active tieback state in a simulated oral environment. Materials and methods. A total of 288 elastomeric ligatures and elastomeric separators from three manufacturers (Dentaurum, RMO, 3M Unitek) were stretched to 100% and 150% of their original inner diameter. Force levels were measured initially and at 3-minute, 24-hour, and 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-week intervals. Data were analyzed by univariate analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey test. Results. The means of initial forces of elastomeric ligatures and separators from three above-mentioned companies, when stretched to 100% of their inner diameters, were 199, 305 and 284 g, and 330, 416, 330 g; when they were stretched to 150% of their inner diameters the values were 286, 422 and 375 g, and 433, 540 and 504 g, respectively. In active tieback state, 11-18% of the initial force of the specimens was lost within the first 3 minutes and 29-63% of the force decay occurred in the first 24 hours; then force decay rate decreased. 62-81% of the initial force was lost in 4 weeks. Although force decay pattern was identical in all the products, the initial force and force decay of Dentaurum elastomeric products were less than the similar products of other companies (P<0.05). Under the same conditions, the force of elastomeric separators was greater than elastomeric ligatures of the same company. Conclusion. Regarding the force pattern of elastomeric ligatures and separators and optimal force for tooth movement, many of these products can be selected for applying orthodontic forces in active tieback state.

  2. Evaluation of Force Degradation Pattern of Elastomeric Ligatures and Elastomeric Separators in Active Tieback State

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Amir; Mahmoodi, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The purpose of this study was to evaluate initial force and force decay of commercially available elastomeric ligatures and elastomeric separators in active tieback state in a simulated oral environment. Materials and methods. A total of 288 elastomeric ligatures and elastomeric separators from three manufacturers (Dentaurum, RMO, 3M Unitek) were stretched to 100% and 150% of their original inner diameter. Force levels were measured initially and at 3-minute, 24-hour, and 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-week intervals. Data were analyzed by univariate analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey test. Results. The means of initial forces of elastomeric ligatures and separators from three above-mentioned companies, when stretched to 100% of their inner diameters, were 199, 305 and 284 g, and 330, 416, 330 g; when they were stretched to 150% of their inner diameters the values were 286, 422 and 375 g, and 433, 540 and 504 g, respectively. In active tieback state, 11-18% of the initial force of the specimens was lost within the first 3 minutes and 29-63% of the force decay occurred in the first 24 hours; then force decay rate decreased. 62-81% of the initial force was lost in 4 weeks. Although force decay pattern was identical in all the products, the initial force and force decay of Dentaurum elastomeric products were less than the similar products of other companies (P<0.05). Under the same conditions, the force of elastomeric separators was greater than elastomeric ligatures of the same company. Conclusion. Regarding the force pattern of elastomeric ligatures and separators and optimal force for tooth movement, many of these products can be selected for applying orthodontic forces in active tieback state. PMID:26889363

  3. Achieving realistic performance and decison-making capabilities in computer-generated air forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.; Santos, Eugene, Jr.; Zurita, Vincent B.; Benslay, James L., Jr.

    1997-07-01

    For a computer-generated force (CGF) system to be useful in training environments, it must be able to operate at multiple skill levels, exhibit competency at assigned missions, and comply with current doctrine. Because of the rapid rate of change in distributed interactive simulation (DIS) and the expanding set of performance objectives for any computer- generated force, the system must also be modifiable at reasonable cost and incorporate mechanisms for learning. Therefore, CGF applications must have adaptable decision mechanisms and behaviors and perform automated incorporation of past reasoning and experience into its decision process. The CGF must also possess multiple skill levels for classes of entities, gracefully degrade its reasoning capability in response to system stress, possess an expandable modular knowledge structure, and perform adaptive mission planning. Furthermore, correctly performing individual entity behaviors is not sufficient. Issues related to complex inter-entity behavioral interactions, such as the need to maintain formation and share information, must also be considered. The CGF must also be able to acceptably respond to unforeseen circumstances and be able to make decisions in spite of uncertain information. Because of the need for increased complexity in the virtual battlespace, the CGF should exhibit complex, realistic behavior patterns within the battlespace. To achieve these necessary capabilities, an extensible software architecture, an expandable knowledge base, and an adaptable decision making mechanism are required. Our lab has addressed these issues in detail. The resulting DIS-compliant system is called the automated wingman (AW). The AW is based on fuzzy logic, the common object database (CODB) software architecture, and a hierarchical knowledge structure. We describe the techniques we used to enable us to make progress toward a CGF entity that satisfies the requirements presented above. We present our design and

  4. Titin stiffness modifies the force-generating region of muscle sarcomeres

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Lang, Patrick; Linke, Wolfgang A.

    2016-01-01

    The contractile units of striated muscle, the sarcomeres, comprise the thick (myosin) and thin (actin) filaments mediating active contraction and the titin filaments determining “passive” elasticity. We hypothesized that titin may be more active in muscle contraction by directly modulating thick-filament properties. We used single-myofibril mechanical measurements and atomic force microscopy of individual sarcomeres to quantify the effects of sarcomere strain and titin spring length on both the inter-filament lattice spacing and the lateral stiffness of the actin-myosin overlap zone (A-band). We found that strain reduced the lattice spacing similarly in sarcomeres with stiff (rabbit psoas) or compliant titin (rabbit diaphragm), but increased A-band lateral stiffness much more in psoas than in diaphragm. The strain-induced alterations in A-band stiffness that occur independently of lattice spacing effects may be due to titin stiffness-sensing by A-band proteins. This mechanosensitivity could play a role in the physiologically important phenomenon of length-dependent activation of striated muscle. PMID:27079135

  5. Aging related changes in determinants of muscle force generating capacity: a comparison of muscle aging in men and male rodents.

    PubMed

    Ballak, Sam B; Degens, Hans; de Haan, Arnold; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-03-01

    Human aging is associated with a progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and force generating capacity, however the exact mechanisms underlying these changes are not fully understood. Rodents models have often been used to enhance our understanding of mechanisms of age-related changes in human skeletal muscle. However, to what extent age-related alterations in determinants of muscle force generating capacity observed in rodents resemble those in humans has not been considered thoroughly. This review compares the effect of aging on muscle force generating determinants (muscle mass, fiber size, fiber number, fiber type distribution and muscle specific tension), in men and male rodents at similar relative age. It appears that muscle aging in male F344*BN rat resembles that in men most; 32-35-month-old rats exhibit similar signs of muscle weakness to those of 70-80-yr-old men, and the decline in 36-38-month-old rats is similar to that in men aged over 80 yrs. For male C57BL/6 mice, age-related decline in muscle force generating capacity seems to occur only at higher relative age than in men. We conclude that the effects on determinants of muscle force differ between species as well as within species, but qualitatively show the same pattern as that observed in men.

  6. Mechanosensitive channel activation by diffusio-osmotic force.

    PubMed

    Bonthuis, Douwe Jan; Golestanian, Ramin

    2014-10-01

    For ion channel gating, the appearance of two distinct conformational states and the discrete transitions between them are essential, and therefore of crucial importance to all living organisms. We show that the physical interplay between two structural elements that are commonly present in bacterial mechanosensitive channels--namely, a charged vestibule and a hydrophobic constriction--creates two distinct conformational states, open and closed, as well as the gating between them. We solve the nonequilibrium Stokes-Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations, extended to include a molecular potential of mean force, and show that a first order transition between the closed and open states arises naturally from the diffusio-osmotic stress caused by the ions and the water inside the channel and the elastic restoring force from the membrane. PMID:25325663

  7. Reduced Maximal Force during Acute Anterior Knee Pain Is Associated with Deficits in Voluntary Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Salomoni, Sauro; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François; McPhee, Megan; Hodges, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force is reduced during pain, studies using interpolated twitch show no consistent reduction of voluntary muscle drive. The present study aimed to test if the reduction in MVC force during acute experimental pain could be explained by increased activation of antagonist muscles, weak voluntary activation at baseline, or changes in force direction. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions before, during, and after the effects of hypertonic (pain) and isotonic (control) saline injections into the infrapatellar fat pad. The MVC force, voluntary activation, electromyographic (EMG) activity of agonist, antagonist, and auxiliary (hip) muscles, and pain cognition and anxiety scores were recorded. MVC force was 9.3% lower during pain than baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no systematic change in voluntary activation. Reduced MVC force during pain was variable between participants (SD: 14%), and was correlated with reduced voluntary activation (r = 0.90), baseline voluntary activation (r = − 0.62), and reduced EMG amplitude of agonist and antagonist muscles (all r > 0.52), but not with changes in force direction, pain or anxiety scores. Hence, reduced MVC force during acute pain was mainly explained by deficits in maximal voluntary drive. PMID:27559737

  8. Validation and Verification of the Operational Land Analysis Activities at the Air Force Weather Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M.; Kumar, S.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Cetola, J.

    2011-12-01

    The importance of operational benchmarking and uncertainty characterization of land surface modeling can be clear upon considering the wide range of performance characteristics of numerical land surface models realizable through various combinations of factors. Such factors might include model physics and numerics, resolution, and forcing datasets used in operational implementation versus those that might have been involved in any prior development benchmarking. Of course, decisions concerning operational implementation may be better informed through more effective benchmarking of performance under various blends of such aforementioned operational factors. To facilitate this and other needs for land analysis activities at the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), the Model Evaluation Toolkit (MET) - a joint product of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Developmental Testbed Center (NCAR DTC), AFWA, and the user community - and the land information system (LIS) Verification Toolkit (LVT) - developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) - have been adapted to the operational benchmarking needs of AFWA's land characterization activities in order to compare the performance of new land modeling and related activities with that of previous activities as well as observational or analyzed datasets. In this talk, three examples of adaptations of MET and LVT to evaluation of LIS-related operations at AFWA will be presented. One example will include comparisons of new surface rainfall analysis capabilities, towards forcing of AFWA's LIS, with previous capabilities. Comparisons will be relative to retrieval-, model-, and measurement-based precipitation fields. Results generated via MET's grid-stat, neighborhood, wavelet, and object based evaluation (MODE) utilities adapted to AFWA's needs will be discussed. This example will be framed in the context of better informing optimal blends of land surface model (LSM) forcing data sources - namely precipitation data- under

  9. Post-activation Potentiation in Propulsive Force after Specific Swimming Strength Training.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, A C; Barroso, R; Andries, O

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether a conditioning activity (8×12.5 m with 2.5 min-interval using both hand paddles and parachute) induced post-activation potentiation in swimming propulsive force and whether a swimmer's force level affected a post-activation potentiation response. 8 competitive swimmers (5 males and 3 females, age: 18.4±1.3 years; IPS=796±56) performed a 10 s maximum tethered swimming test 8 and 4 min before (the highest value was considered as PRE), and 2.5 and 6.5 min after (POST1 and POST2, respectively) the conditioning activity. Rate of force development was not affected, but peak force in POST1 (p=0.02) and impulse in both POST1 (p=0.007) and POST2 (p=0.004) were reduced. Possibly the conditioning activity induced greater fatigue than post-activation potentiation benefits. For instance, the number of repetitions might have been excessive, and rest intervals between the conditioning activity and POST1 and POST2 were possibly too short. There were positive correlations between PRE peak force and changes in peak force and rate of force development. Although conditioning activity was detrimental, positive correlations suggest that weaker swimmers experience a deterioration of performance more than the stronger ones. This conditioning activity is not recommended for swimmers with the current competitive level before a competitive event. PMID:26667922

  10. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Iglesias, Vanessa; Lewis, David; Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming; Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther; Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C; Lanza, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem. PMID:27587127

  11. A mathematical model for the thrust force generated by a flapping elastic wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Alexander E.; Sumbatyan, Mezhlum A.

    2012-11-01

    The physical nature of the thrust force generated by flapping wings is of a long-time interest of many researchers. The idea of the thrust effect came from the observation of birds' flight. Apparently, Leonardo da Vinci was first who tried to explain the mechanism of the flapping wing trust, for possible engineering applications. Nevertheless, the fundamental basics of a theoretical study of wing oscillations were laid only near the beginning of the 20th century. The thrust effect of the flapping wing was explained by Knoller in 1909 and Betz in 1912, independently. The principal problem in this theory is to define an optimal deformation law which provides the flapping wing to work with highest efficiency. In the present paper we study a rectangular elastic wing of finite span as a propulsion device. We propose an analytical approach, to study harmonic oscillations of a thin elastic rectangular wing at zero attack angle in a flow of inviscid incompressible fluid. The problem is reduced to an integro-differential equation, in frames of the "plane sections" hypothesis.

  12. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Iglesias, Vanessa; Lewis, David; Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming; Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther; Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C; Lanza, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem.

  13. Generating and characterizing the mechanical properties of cell-derived matrices using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tello, Marta; Spenlé, Caroline; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mercier, Luc; Fabre, Roxane; Allio, Guillaume; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Goetz, Jacky G

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical interaction between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) controls key processes such as proliferation, differentiation and motility. For many years, two-dimensional (2D) models were used to better understand the interactions between cells and their surrounding ECM. More recently, variation of the mechanical properties of tissues has been reported to play a major role in physiological and pathological scenarios such as cancer progression. The 3D architecture of the ECM finely tunes cellular behavior to perform physiologically relevant tasks. Technical limitations prevented scientists from obtaining accurate assessment of the mechanical properties of physiologically realistic matrices. There is therefore a need for combining the production of high-quality cell-derived 3D matrices (CDMs) and the characterization of their topographical and mechanical properties. Here, we describe methods that allow to accurately measure the young modulus of matrices produced by various cellular types. In the first part, we will describe and review several protocols for generating CDMs matrices from endothelial, epithelial, fibroblastic, muscle and mesenchymal stem cells. We will discuss tools allowing the characterization of the topographical details as well as of the protein content of such CDMs. In a second part, we will report the methodologies that can be used, based on atomic force microscopy, to accurately evaluate the stiffness properties of the CDMs through the quantification of their young modulus. Altogether, such methodologies allow characterizing the stiffness and topography of matrices deposited by the cells, which is key for the understanding of cellular behavior in physiological conditions.

  14. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Iglesias, Vanessa; Lewis, David; Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming; Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther; Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C.; Lanza, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem.

  15. Generating and characterizing the mechanical properties of cell-derived matrices using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tello, Marta; Spenlé, Caroline; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mercier, Luc; Fabre, Roxane; Allio, Guillaume; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Goetz, Jacky G

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical interaction between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) controls key processes such as proliferation, differentiation and motility. For many years, two-dimensional (2D) models were used to better understand the interactions between cells and their surrounding ECM. More recently, variation of the mechanical properties of tissues has been reported to play a major role in physiological and pathological scenarios such as cancer progression. The 3D architecture of the ECM finely tunes cellular behavior to perform physiologically relevant tasks. Technical limitations prevented scientists from obtaining accurate assessment of the mechanical properties of physiologically realistic matrices. There is therefore a need for combining the production of high-quality cell-derived 3D matrices (CDMs) and the characterization of their topographical and mechanical properties. Here, we describe methods that allow to accurately measure the young modulus of matrices produced by various cellular types. In the first part, we will describe and review several protocols for generating CDMs matrices from endothelial, epithelial, fibroblastic, muscle and mesenchymal stem cells. We will discuss tools allowing the characterization of the topographical details as well as of the protein content of such CDMs. In a second part, we will report the methodologies that can be used, based on atomic force microscopy, to accurately evaluate the stiffness properties of the CDMs through the quantification of their young modulus. Altogether, such methodologies allow characterizing the stiffness and topography of matrices deposited by the cells, which is key for the understanding of cellular behavior in physiological conditions. PMID:26439175

  16. Transport reversals of chiral active particles induced by a perpendicular constant force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-chun; Zhou, Jia-ning; Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-11-01

    Transport of chiral active particles in a symmetric periodic potential is investigated in the presence of a constant force. It is found that due to chirality of active particles the transversal constant force can break the symmetry of the system and induce a longitudinal net current. There exists an optimal constant force at which the rectification is maximal. Remarkably, longitudinal current reversals can occur by suitably tailoring the transversal constant force. Therefore, particles with different chiralities move to different directions and can be effectively separated.

  17. Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational force inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders is analytically and experimentally studied. The primary (noise) field in the cylinder model is generated by the coupled dynamic response of the shell under loading by a single exterior acoustic source. Control of the interior sound field is achieved by applying vibrational force inputs directly to the shell wall. Action of the point controllers serve to increase the input impedance of select structural modes of the shell which are well-coupled to the interior acoustic cavity, thus substantially reducing sound transmission into the cavity. Spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 30 dB are demonstrated for acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity. Twin controller configurations are presented which demonstrate the ability to independently control orthogonal modes of the interior acoustic space. Benefits and drawbacks of this new methodology for noise control are discussed and clearly demonstrated.

  18. Characterization of the passive component of force enhancement following active stretching of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Herzog, W; Schachar, R; Leonard, T R

    2003-10-01

    The mechanisms causing the steady-state force enhancement following active skeletal muscle stretching are not well understood. Recently, we found direct evidence that part of the force enhancement is associated with the engagement of a passive component. In this study, we reproduced the conditions that give consistent passive force enhancement and evaluated the mechanical properties of this passive force enhancement so as to gain insight into its source. The three primary results were that (1). the passive force enhancement is long lasting (>25 s), (2). passive force enhancement was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the amount of shortening preceding active muscle stretching, and (3). passive force enhancement could be abolished 'instantaneously' by shortening-stretching the passive muscle by an amount equivalent to the active stretch magnitude. Together with the remaining results, we conclude that the source of the passive force enhancement must be arranged in parallel with the contractile force, it must consist of a viscoelastic molecular spring whose stiffness characteristic can be reset by shortening, and it must have a characteristic length that is governed by the length of the contractile components, possibly the sarcomeres. Based on these results, the molecular spring titin emerges as a possible candidate for the passive component of the steady-state force enhancement observed in this and previous studies.

  19. The tropospheric response pattern to solar activity forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuurmans, C. J. E.

    1989-01-01

    It is tempting to speculate on the possibility that solar flares sometimes are the initial cause of and atmospheric disturbance, which cumulative effect may give rise to a correlation at the 11 year timescale. Reasons to reconsider the possible relevance of solar flare response studies are stated. The discovery of the apparently decisive role of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillations (QBO) in establishing the atmospheric response pattern to solar forcing may throw new light on some of the earlier published relations. Reanalysis of old data in some cases may be advisable. Data on solar flares and their effects on the earth's atmosphere might be a promising candidate for reexamination.

  20. Forced expression of Hnf4a induces hepatic gene activation through directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yahoo, Neda; Pournasr, Behshad; Rostamzadeh, Jalal; Fathi, Fardin

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of unlimited self-renewal and have a diverse differentiation potential. These unique features make ES cells as an attractive source for developmental biology studies. Having the mature hepatocyte in the lab with functional activities is valuable in drug discovery studies. Overexpression of hepatocyte lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs) becomes a promising approach in pluripotent cell differentiation toward liver cells. Many studies generate transgenic ES cell lines to examine the effects of specific TFs overexpression in cell differentiation. In the present report, we have addressed whether a suspension or adherent model of differentiation is an appropriate way to study the role of Hnf4a overexpression. We generated ES cells that carried a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Hnf4a using lentiviral vectors. The transduced cells were subjected to induced Hnf4a overexpression through both spontaneous and directed differentiation methods. Gene expression analysis showed substantially increased expression of hepatic gene markers, particularly Ttr and endogenous Hnf4a, in transduced cells differentiated by the directed approach. These results demonstrated that forced expression of TFs during directed differentiation would be an appropriate way to study relevant gene activation and the effects of overexpression in the context of hepatic differentiation. PMID:27233607

  1. Forces and moments generated by the human arm: Variability and control

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Terekhov, AV; Latash, ML; Zatsiorsky, VM

    2012-01-01

    This is an exploratory study of the accurate endpoint force vector production by the human arm in isometric conditions. We formulated three common-sense hypotheses and falsified them in the experiment. The subjects (n=10) exerted static forces on the handle in eight directions in a horizontal plane for 25 seconds. The forces were of 4 magnitude levels (10 %, 20%, 30% and 40% of individual MVC). The torsion moment on the handle (grasp moment) was not specified in the instruction. The two force components and the grasp moment were recorded, and the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joint torques were computed. The following main facts were observed: (a) While the grasp moment was not prescribed by the instruction, it was always produced. The moment magnitude and direction depended on the instructed force magnitude and direction. (b) The within-trial angular variability of the exerted force vector (angular precision) did not depend on the target force magnitude (a small negative correlation was observed). (c) Across the target force directions, the variability of the exerted force magnitude and directional variability exhibited opposite trends: In the directions where the variability of force magnitude was maximal, the directional variability was minimal and vice versa. (d) The time profiles of joint torques in the trials were always positively correlated, even for the force directions where flexion torque was produced at one joint and extension torque was produced at the other joint. (e) The correlations between the grasp moment and the wrist torque were negative across the tasks and positive within the individual trials. (f) In static serial kinematic chains, the pattern of the joint torques distribution could not be explained by an optimization cost function additive with respect to the torques. Plans for several future experiments have been suggested. PMID:23080084

  2. Forces and moments generated by the human arm: variability and control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Terekhov, A V; Latash, M L; Zatsiorsky, V M

    2012-11-01

    This is an exploratory study of the accurate endpoint force vector production by the human arm in isometric conditions. We formulated three common-sense hypotheses and falsified them in the experiment. The subjects (n = 10) exerted static forces on the handle in eight directions in a horizontal plane for 25 s. The forces were of 4 magnitude levels (10, 20, 30 and 40 % of individual maximal voluntary contractions). The torsion moment on the handle (grasp moment) was not specified in the instruction. The two force components and the grasp moment were recorded, and the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joint torques were computed. The following main facts were observed: (a) While the grasp moment was not prescribed by the instruction, it was always produced. The moment magnitude and direction depended on the instructed force magnitude and direction. (b) The within-trial angular variability of the exerted force vector (angular precision) did not depend on the target force magnitude (a small negative correlation was observed). (c) Across the target force directions, the variability of the exerted force magnitude and directional variability exhibited opposite trends: In the directions where the variability of force magnitude was maximal, the directional variability was minimal and vice versa. (d) The time profiles of joint torques in the trials were always positively correlated, even for the force directions where flexion torque was produced at one joint and extension torque was produced at the other joint. (e) The correlations between the grasp moment and the wrist torque were negative across the tasks and positive within the individual trials. (f) In static serial kinematic chains, the pattern of the joint torques distribution could not be explained by an optimization cost function additive with respect to the torques. Plans for several future experiments have been suggested. PMID:23080084

  3. Correlation of hierarchal Upper Silurian stacking patterns generated by Milankovitch orbital forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Mauriello, D.J.; Ketterer, M.W. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Upper Silurian Wills Creek Formation in Pennsylvania and Maryland is entirely divisible into meter-scale allocycles. Stacking patterns of these allocycles reveal a hierarchy consistent with predictions based on the Milankovitch model of orbital forcing. Asymmetrical Sixth-Order cycles (PACs), bounded by surfaces produced by precessional sea-level rises, are divisible into a lower highstand portion and an upper lowstand portion separated by a sharp sea-level fall surface produced by a rapid sea-level drop within the precessional cycle. Sixth-Order cycles may be genetically grouped into Fifth-Order (100 ky.) and subsequently, Fourth-Order (400 ky.) cycles, each of which exhibits a distinct internal symmetry. Fifth-Order cycles, on average three to four meters in thickness, are composed of a basal transgressive portion consisting of two PACs followed by two or three successively regressive PACs. Four Fifth-Order cycles constitute a complete Fourth-Order cycle, in which the second Fifth-Order cycle contains facies representing the deepest or least restricted paleoenvironments. In each case, the fundamental Sixth-Order cycles were generated by the precessional signal modulated by orbital eccentricity variations. Over distances in excess of 100 km, Wills Creek facies change laterally from nearshore marine to fluvial coastal plain. Stacking patterns in these distinct facies are identical, and thus correlative, indicating the basin-wide extent of the stratigraphic events which produced these patterns. These correlations demonstrate that Milankovitch-driven eustatic sea-level fluctuations were occurring during the Late Silurian.

  4. The Beginning of Kinesin's Force-Generating Cycle Visualized at 9Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, Charles V.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2007-06-20

    We have used cryo-electron microscopy of kinesin-decorated microtubules to resolve the structure of the motor protein kinesin's crucial nucleotide response elements, switch I and the switch II helix, in kinesin's poorly understood nucleotide-free state. Both of the switch elements undergo conformational change relative to the microtubule-free state. The changes in switch I suggest a role for it in ''ejecting'' adenosine diphosphate when kinesin initially binds to the microtubule. The switch II helix has an N-terminal extension, apparently stabilized by conserved microtubule contacts, implying a microtubule activation mechanism that could convey the state of the bound nucleotide to kinesin's putative force-delivering element (the ''neck linker''). In deriving this structure, we have adapted an image-processing technique, single-particle reconstruction, for analyzing decorated microtubules. The resulting reconstruction visualizes the asymmetric seam present in native, 13-protofilament microtubules, and this method will provide an avenue to higher-resolution characterization of a variety of microtubule- binding proteins, as well as the microtubule itself.

  5. Carbon fluxes forced by anticyclonic mesoscale eddies generated by islands at the subtropical NE Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasternas, S.; Piedeleu, M.; Sangrà, P.; Duarte, C. M.; Agustí, S.

    2012-08-01

    The carbon fluxes mediated by planktonic communities in two cyclonic eddies (CEs) and two anticyclonic eddies (AEs) at the Canary Eddy Corridor were studied and compared with the dynamics in two far-field (FF) stations located outside the eddies. We observed favorable conditions and signs for upwelling at the center of CEs and for downwelling and mixing at the centers of AEs. CEs were characterized by higher nutrients concentration and highest chlorophyll a concentration, associated with highest microphytoplankton and diatoms abundance. AEs displayed similar chlorophyll a values and nutrients concentration (except highest ammonium concentration) to those of the FF stations and were characterized by increasing abundance of picophytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria. While primary production was similar between the systems, the production of dissolved organic carbon (PDOC) was significantly higher at AEs. Phytoplankton cell mortality was lowest in CEs and we found higher cell mortality in AE than FF, despite similar chl a concentration. Environmental changes at the AEs presented significant prejudicial effects on the phytoplankton health as indicated by higher phytoplankton mortality (e.g. 60% of dead diatoms cells) and higher cell lysis rates observed at AEs than at two other systems. The adverse conditions associated to the early-stage anticyclonic systems, mainly triggered by active downwelling, resulted in higher consequent PDOC production, corresponding to forcing of the carbon flux to the dissolved pool and a weakness of the carbon pump.

  6. Standardization of Buckypaper composite actuator fabrication process and improvement of force generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraff, Joshua

    The Buckypaper/Nafion composite actuator (BCA) is promising for lightweight and micro-robotic system applications. Lightweight BCA provides an energy-efficient and flexible design to achieve muscle-like actuation for micro-actuator applications. The BCA encompasses of a solid Nafion electrolyte stacked between two conductive carbon nanotube thin thins or Buckypaper (BP) sheets. As an ionic electro-active polymer (iEAP), Nafion's response to an electrical signal is similar to the electrochemical response of biological muscles. The adhesion between the electrolyte film and the electrode materials is critical to the actuator performance. BCA manufacturing avoids the complexities of repetitive metallic plating, as BP supplies a high surface area film of conductive carbon nanotubes. Since the actuator's charging occurs where the constituent materials come in contact, a standard manufacturing process needs to be developed to ensure repeatability. This research includes two focuses. The first focus pertains to optimizing the ion-exchange processes that improve Nafion's ionic transport properties. The second focus is to strengthening the interaction between Nafion and Buckypaper, which will ensure effective charge accumulation at the interface and improve the BCA's mechanical properties relevant to force exertion. The research presents a novel BCA manufacturing approach to achieve excellent repeatability and significantly improves the BCA's mechanical properties.

  7. Entropic elasticity in the generation of muscle force--a theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2002-11-01

    A novel simplified structural model of sarcomeric force production in striate muscle is presented. Using some simple assumptions regarding the distribution of myosin spring lengths at different sliding velocities it is possible to derive a very simple expression showing the main components of the experimentally observed force-velocity relationship of muscle: nonlinearity during contraction (Hill, 1938), maximal force production during stretching equal to two times the isometric force (Katz, 1939), yielding at high stretching velocity, slightly concave force-extension relationship during sudden length changes (Ford et al., 1977; Lombardi & Piazzesi, 1990), accurate reproduction of the rate of ATP consumption (Shirakawa et al., 2000; He et al., 2000) and of the extra energy liberation rate (Hill, 1964a). Different assumptions regarding the force-length relationship of individual cross-bridges are explored [linear, power function and worm-like chain (WLC) model based], and it is shown that the best results are obtained if the individual myosin-spring forces are modelled using a WLC model, thus hinting that entropic elasticity could be the main source of force in myosin undergoing the conformational changes associated with the power stroke.

  8. Extraction of primitive representation from captured human movements and measured ground reaction force to generate physically consistent imitated behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ariki, Yuka; Hyon, Sang-Ho; Morimoto, Jun

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an imitation learning framework to generate physically consistent behaviors by estimating the ground reaction force from captured human behaviors. In the proposed framework, we first extract behavioral primitives, which are represented by linear dynamical models, from captured human movements and measured ground reaction force by using the Gaussian mixture of linear dynamical models. Therefore, our method has small dependence on classification criteria defined by an experimenter. By switching primitives with different combinations while estimating the ground reaction force, different physically consistent behaviors can be generated. We apply the proposed method to a four-link robot model to generate squat motion sequences. The four-link robot model successfully generated the squat movements by using our imitation learning framework. To show generalization performance, we also apply the proposed method to robot models that have different torso weights and lengths from a human demonstrator and evaluate the control performances. In addition, we show that the robot model is able to recognize and imitate demonstrator movements even when the observed movements are deviated from the movements that are used to construct the primitives. For further evaluation in higher-dimensional state space, we apply the proposed method to a seven-link robot model. The seven-link robot model was able to generate squat-and-sway motions by using the proposed framework.

  9. Activity cliffs and activity cliff generators based on chemotype-related activity landscapes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Villanueva, Jaime; Méndez-Lucio, Oscar; Soria-Arteche, Olivia; Medina-Franco, José L

    2015-11-01

    Activity cliffs have large impact in drug discovery; therefore, their detection and quantification are of major importance. This work introduces the metric activity cliff enrichment factor and expands the previously reported activity cliff generator concept by adding chemotype information to representations of the activity landscape. To exemplify these concepts, three molecular databases with multiple biological activities were characterized. Compounds in each database were grouped into chemotype classes. Then, pairwise comparisons of structure similarities and activity differences were calculated for each compound and used to construct chemotype-based structure-activity similarity (SAS) maps. Different landscape distributions among four major regions of the SAS maps were observed for different subsets of molecules grouped in chemotypes. Based on this observation, the activity cliff enrichment factor was calculated to numerically detect chemotypes enriched in activity cliffs. Several chemotype classes were detected having major proportion of activity cliffs than the entire database. In addition, some chemotype classes comprising compounds with smooth structure activity relationships (SAR) were detected. Finally, the activity cliff generator concept was applied to compounds grouped in chemotypes to extract valuable SAR information.

  10. Analysis of time-resolved interaction force mode AFM imaging using active and passive probes.

    PubMed

    Giray Oral, Hasan; Parlak, Zehra; Levent Degertekin, F

    2012-09-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of time-resolved interaction force (TRIF) mode imaging for atomic force microscopy (AFM). A nonlinear model of an active AFM probe, performing simultaneous topography and material property imaging on samples with varying elasticity and adhesion is implemented in Simulink®. The model is capable of simulating various imaging modes, probe structures, sample material properties, tip-sample interaction force models, and actuation and feedback schemes. For passive AFM cantilevers, the model is verified by comparing results from the literature. As an example of an active probe, the force sensing integrated readout and active tip (FIRAT) probe is used. Simulation results indicate that the active and damped nature of FIRAT provides a significant level of control over the force applied to the sample, minimizing sample indentation and topography error. Active tip control (ATC) preserves constant contact time during force control for stable contact while preventing the loss of material property information such as elasticity and adhesive force. Simulation results are verified by TRIF mode imaging of the samples with both soft and stiff regions. PMID:22813887

  11. Complex force history of a calving-generated glacial earthquake derived from broadband seismic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, Amandine; Mangeney, Anne; Stutzmann, Eléonore; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Walter, Fabian; Moretti, Laurent; Castelnau, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    The force applied to the Earth by the calving of two icebergs at Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland, has been quantified. The source force history was recovered by inversion of regional broadband seismograms without any a priori constraint on the source time function, in contrast with previous studies. For periods 10-100 s, the three-component force can be obtained from distant stations alone and is proportional to the closest station seismograms. This inversion makes it possible to quantify changes of the source force direction and amplitude as a function of time and frequency. A detailed comparison with a video of the event was used to identify four forces associated with collision, then bottom-out and top-out rotation of the first and second icebergs, and ice mélange motion. Only the two iceberg rotations were identified in previous studies. All four processes are found here to contribute to the force amplitude and variability. Such a complete time-frequency force history provides unique dynamical constraints for mechanical calving models.

  12. Initial forces generated by three types of thermoplastic appliances on an upper central incisor during tipping.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Wolfram; Fialka-Fricke, Julia; Dathe, Henning; Fricke-Zech, Susanne; Zapf, Antonia; Gruber, Rudolf; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Sadat-Khonsari, Reza

    2009-12-01

    The force properties of thermoformed appliances have not been systematically investigated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to quantify the forces delivered by thermoplastic appliances manufactured from three different materials, with the same thickness, on a central upper incisor, during tipping. Five identical appliances were manufactured from three different materials all with a thickness of 1.0 mm (Ideal Clear, Erkodur, and Biolon). For measuring the forces, an isolated measuring tooth, as part of a standardized resin model incorporated in a newly developed measuring device, was tipped in nine 2.7 arc minute (0.04629 degree) steps, from 0 to 0.416 degrees in the vestibular and palatal directions around a rotational axis through the virtual apex, after positioning an appliance on the model. For statistical analysis, the force components Fx/tipping and Fz/intrusion at a displacement of +/-0.151 mm from the incisor edge were determined. Means and standard deviations (SDs) were calculated. The Kruskal-Wallis test for overall effects and the Wilcoxon two-sample test for individual group pairings were used (P < 0.05 significance level). The mean Fx forces ranged from -2.82 N (SD 0.62) to 5.42 N (SD 0.56). The mean Fz forces were between -0.14 N (SD 0.52) and -2.3 N (SD 0.43). The highest intrusive forces were measured during vestibular displacement of the measuring tooth. The forces delivered by the Biolon appliance were found to be much greater (P < 0.01) than those of the other materials. The forces delivered by the materials investigated were mostly higher than those stated in the literature.

  13. An investigation of shoulder forces in active shoulder tackles in rugby union football.

    PubMed

    Usman, Juliana; McIntosh, Andrew S; Fréchède, Bertrand

    2011-11-01

    In rugby union football the tackle is the most frequently executed skill and one most associated with injury, including shoulder injury to the tackler. Despite the importance of the tackle, little is known about the magnitude of shoulder forces in the tackle and influencing factors. The objectives of the study were to measure the shoulder force in the tackle, as well as the effects of shoulder padding, skill level, side of body, player size, and experimental setting on shoulder force. Experiments were conducted in laboratory and field settings using a repeated measures design. Thirty-five participants were recruited to the laboratory and 98 to the field setting. All were male aged over 18 years with rugby experience. The maximum force applied to the shoulder in an active shoulder tackle was measured with a custom built forceplate incorporated into a 45 kg tackle bag. The overall average maximum shoulder force was 1660 N in the laboratory and 1997 N in the field. This difference was significant. The shoulder force for tackling without shoulder pads was 1684 N compared to 1635 N with shoulder pads. There was no difference between the shoulder forces on the dominant and non-dominant sides. Shoulder force reduced with tackle repetition. No relationship was observed between player skill level and size. A substantial force can be applied to the shoulder and to an opponent in the tackle. This force is within the shoulder's injury tolerance range and is unaffected by shoulder pads.

  14. Transferable next-generation force fields from simple liquids to complex materials.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J R; Yu, Kuang; McDaniel, Jesse G

    2015-03-17

    Molecular simulations have had a transformative impact on chemists' understanding of the structure and dynamics of molecular systems. Simulations can both explain and predict chemical phenomena, and they provide a unique bridge between the microscopic and macroscopic regimes. The input for such simulations is the intermolecular interactions, which then determine the forces on the constituent atoms and therefore the time evolution and equilibrium properties of the system. However, in practice, accuracy and reliability are often limited by the fidelity of the description of those very same interactions, most typically embodied approximately in mathematical form in what are known as force fields. Force fields most often utilize conceptually simple functional forms that have been parametrized to reproduce existing experimental gas phase or bulk data. Yet, reliance on empirical parametrization can sometimes introduce limitations with respect to novel chemical systems or uncontrolled errors when moving to temperatures, pressures, or environments that differ from those for which they were developed. Alternatively, it is possible to develop force fields entirely from first principles, using accurate electronic structure calculations to determine the intermolecular interactions. This introduces a new set of challenges, including the transferability of the resulting force field to related chemical systems. In response, we recently developed an alternative approach to develop force fields entirely from first-principles electronic structure calculations based on intermolecular perturbation theory. Making use of an energy decomposition analysis ensures, by construction, that the resulting force fields contain the correct balance of the various components of intermolecular interaction (exchange repulsion, electrostatics, induction, and dispersion), each treated by a functional form that reflects the underlying physics. We therefore refer to the resulting force fields as

  15. Transferable next-generation force fields from simple liquids to complex materials.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J R; Yu, Kuang; McDaniel, Jesse G

    2015-03-17

    Molecular simulations have had a transformative impact on chemists' understanding of the structure and dynamics of molecular systems. Simulations can both explain and predict chemical phenomena, and they provide a unique bridge between the microscopic and macroscopic regimes. The input for such simulations is the intermolecular interactions, which then determine the forces on the constituent atoms and therefore the time evolution and equilibrium properties of the system. However, in practice, accuracy and reliability are often limited by the fidelity of the description of those very same interactions, most typically embodied approximately in mathematical form in what are known as force fields. Force fields most often utilize conceptually simple functional forms that have been parametrized to reproduce existing experimental gas phase or bulk data. Yet, reliance on empirical parametrization can sometimes introduce limitations with respect to novel chemical systems or uncontrolled errors when moving to temperatures, pressures, or environments that differ from those for which they were developed. Alternatively, it is possible to develop force fields entirely from first principles, using accurate electronic structure calculations to determine the intermolecular interactions. This introduces a new set of challenges, including the transferability of the resulting force field to related chemical systems. In response, we recently developed an alternative approach to develop force fields entirely from first-principles electronic structure calculations based on intermolecular perturbation theory. Making use of an energy decomposition analysis ensures, by construction, that the resulting force fields contain the correct balance of the various components of intermolecular interaction (exchange repulsion, electrostatics, induction, and dispersion), each treated by a functional form that reflects the underlying physics. We therefore refer to the resulting force fields as

  16. Control of Human Generating Force by Use of Acoustic Information ─ Utilization of Onomatopoeic Utterance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Taichi; Oyama, Keiichi; Iimura, Miki; Kobayashi, Harumi; Tanaka, Kihachiro

    We have performed basic experiments for the purpose of applying onomatopoeia to engineering problems. In these experiments, test subjects were made to perform lifting actions while listening to onomatopoeic utterances. We thereby demonstrated that there is a relationship between the onomatopoeic utterances and the lifting forces exerted by the test subjects. We examined how the lifting forces are related to the envelope of onomatopoeic utterances. Furthermore, we investigated how the lifting force is affected depending on whether or not emotion is expressed when uttering the onomatopoeia.

  17. Design of a magnetic force exciter for a small-scale windmill using a piezo-composite generating element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Hung Truyen; Goo, Nam Seo

    2011-03-01

    We introduce a design for a magnetic force exciter that applies vibration to a piezo-composite generating element (PCGE) for a small-scale windmill to convert wind energy into electrical energy. The windmill can be used to harvest wind energy in urban regions. The magnetic force exciter consists of exciting magnets attached to the device's input rotor, and a secondary magnet that is fixed at the tip of the PCGE. Under an applied wind force, the input rotor rotates to create a magnetic force interaction to excite the PCGE. Deformation of the PCGE enables it to generate the electric power. Experiments were performed to test power generation and battery charging capabilities. In a battery charging test, the charging time for a 40 mAh battery is approximately 1.5 hours for a wind speed of 2.5 m/s. Our experimental results show that the prototype can harvest energy in urban areas with low wind speeds, and convert the wasted wind energy into electricity for city use.

  18. Mechanical unzipping and rezipping of a single SNARE complex reveals hysteresis as a force-generating mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Min, Duyoung; Kim, Kipom; Hyeon, Changbong; Hoon Cho, Yong; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yoon, Tae-Young

    2013-01-01

    Formation of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex provides mechanical thrust for membrane fusion, but its molecular mechanism is still unclear. Here using magnetic tweezers, we observe mechanical responses of a single neuronal SNARE complex under constant pulling force. Single SNARE complexes may be unzipped with 34 pN force. When rezipping is induced by lowering the force to 11 pN, only a partially assembled state results, with the C-terminal half of the SNARE complex remaining disassembled. Reassembly of the C-terminal half occurs only when the force is further lowered below 11 pN. Thus, mechanical hysteresis, characterized by the unzipping and rezipping cycle of a single SNARE complex, produces the partially assembled state. In this metastable state, unzipping toward the N-terminus is suppressed while zippering toward the C-terminus is initiated as a steep function of force. This ensures the directionality of SNARE-complex formation, making the SNARE complex a robust force-generating machine. PMID:23591872

  19. NASA/NREN: Next Generation Internet (NGI) Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    desJardins, Richard; Freeman, Ken

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with next generation internet (NGI) and the NREN (NASA Research and Education Network) activities are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) NREN architecture; 2) NREN applications; and 3) NREN applied research.

  20. 15. INTERIOR OVERVIEW TO SOUTHEAST. ACTIVE CONTROL PANEL AND GENERATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR OVERVIEW TO SOUTHEAST. ACTIVE CONTROL PANEL AND GENERATORS AT LEFT, HISTORIC CONTROL PANEL AT RIGHT. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  1. Emergent Public Spaces: Generative Activities on Function Interpolation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmona, Guadalupe; Dominguez, Angeles; Krause, Gladys; Duran, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    This study highlights ways in which generative activities may be coupled with network-based technologies in the context of teacher preparation to enhance preservice teachers' cognizance of how their own experience as students provides a blueprint for the learning environments they may need to generate in their future classrooms. In this study, the…

  2. Short-term effects of integrated motor imagery practice on muscle activation and force performance.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, F; Blache, Y; Kanthack, T F D; Monteil, K; Collet, C; Guillot, A

    2015-10-01

    The effect of motor imagery (MI) practice on isometric force development is well-documented. However, whether practicing MI during rest periods of physical training improves the forthcoming performance remains unexplored. We involved 18 athletes in a counterbalanced design including three physical training sessions scheduled over five consecutive days. Training involved 10 maximal isometric contractions against a force plate, with the elbow at 90°. During two sessions, we integrated MI practice (focusing on either muscle activation or relaxation) during the inter-trial rest periods. We measured muscle performance from force plate and electromyograms of the biceps brachii and anterior deltoideus. We continuously monitored electrodermal activity (EDA) to control sympathetic nervous system activity. MI of muscle activation resulted in higher isometric force as compared to both MI of muscle relaxation and passive recovery (respectively +2.1% and +3.5%). MI practice of muscle relaxation also outperformed the control condition (+1.9%). Increased activation of the biceps brachii was recorded under both MI practice conditions compared to control. Biceps brachii activation was similar between the two MI practice conditions, but electromyography revealed a marginal trend toward greater activation of the anterior deltoideus during MI practice of muscle activation. EDA and self-reports indicated that these effects were independent from physiological arousal and motivation. These results might account for priming effects of MI practice yielding to higher muscle activation and force performance. Present findings may be of interest for applications in sports training and neurologic rehabilitation. PMID:26241339

  3. Two-dimensional stick slip on a soft elastic polymer: pattern generation using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, J. A.; Brown, C. L.; Myhra, S.; Watson, G. S.

    2006-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that it is possible to create laterally differentiated frictional patterning and three-dimensional structures using an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe on the surface of a soft elastic polymer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The resulting effect of contact mode imaging at low loading forces (<100 nN), observed in the lateral force mode, revealed a homogeneous pattern on the PDMS surface exhibiting higher friction. With higher loading forces ({\\gg }100 nN) the effect is non-uniform, resulting in structures with depths on the nanometre scale. The topographic and frictional data revealed stick-slip responses in both the fast (orthogonal to the long axis of the lever) and slow (parallel to the long axis of the lever) directions of probe travel from scanning in a raster pattern. The stick-slip events are manifested in the form of a series of shallow channels spaced evenly apart on the polymer surface. Detailed friction loop analysis acquired during the manipulation process showed that the lateral force changed according to the strength of trapping of the tip with the polymer surface exhibiting significant in-plane deformation due to lateral forces being imposed. An incremental increase in the initial loading force resulted in an increase in in-plane displacement and a greater spacing between the stick lines/channels in the slow-scan direction. A decrease in channel length in the fast-scan direction is also observed as a result of an increase in static friction with normal force, resulting in greater surface deformation and shorter track length for sliding friction.

  4. Residual force depression in single sarcomeres is abolished by MgADP-induced activation

    PubMed Central

    Trecarten, Neal; Minozzo, Fabio C.; Leite, Felipe S.; Rassier, Dilson E.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the shortening-induced force depression commonly observed in skeletal muscles remain unclear, but have been associated with sarcomere length non-uniformity and/or crossbridge inhibition. The purpose of this study was twofold: (i) to evaluate if force depression is present in isolated single sarcomeres, a preparation that eliminates sarcomere length non-uniformities and (ii) to evaluate if force depression is inhibited when single sarcomeres are activated with MgADP, which biases crossbridges into a strongly-bound state. Single sarcomeres (n = 16) were isolated from rabbit psoas myofibrils using two micro-needles (one compliant, one rigid), piercing the sarcomere externally adjacent to the Z-lines. The sarcomeres were contracted isometrically and subsequently shortened, in both Ca2+- and MgADP-activating solutions. Shortening in Ca2+-activated samples resulted in a 27.44 ± 9.04% force depression when compared to isometric contractions produced at similar final sarcomere lengths (P < 0.001). There was no force depression in MgADP-activated sarcomeres (force depression = −1.79 ± 9.69%, P =  0.435). These results suggest that force depression is a sarcomeric property, and that is associated with an inhibition of myosin-actin interactions. PMID:26037312

  5. Optical trapping reveals propulsion forces, power generation and motility efficiency of the unicellular parasites Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    PubMed Central

    Stellamanns, Eric; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Hochstetter, Axel; Heddergott, Niko; Engstler, Markus; Pfohl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Unicellular parasites have developed sophisticated swimming mechanisms to survive in a wide range of environments. Cell motility of African trypanosomes, parasites responsible for fatal illness in humans and animals, is crucial both in the insect vector and the mammalian host. Using millisecond-scale imaging in a microfluidics platform along with a custom made optical trap, we are able to confine single cells to study trypanosome motility. From the trapping characteristics of the cells, we determine the propulsion force generated by cells with a single flagellum as well as of dividing trypanosomes with two fully developed flagella. Estimates of the dissipative energy and the power generation of single cells obtained from the motility patterns of the trypanosomes within the optical trap indicate that specific motility characteristics, in addition to locomotion, may be required for antibody clearance. Introducing a steerable second optical trap we could further measure the force, which is generated at the flagellar tip. Differences in the cellular structure of the trypanosomes are correlated with the trapping and motility characteristics and in consequence with their propulsion force, dissipative energy and power generation. PMID:25269514

  6. Optical trapping reveals propulsion forces, power generation and motility efficiency of the unicellular parasites Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellamanns, Eric; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Hochstetter, Axel; Heddergott, Niko; Engstler, Markus; Pfohl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Unicellular parasites have developed sophisticated swimming mechanisms to survive in a wide range of environments. Cell motility of African trypanosomes, parasites responsible for fatal illness in humans and animals, is crucial both in the insect vector and the mammalian host. Using millisecond-scale imaging in a microfluidics platform along with a custom made optical trap, we are able to confine single cells to study trypanosome motility. From the trapping characteristics of the cells, we determine the propulsion force generated by cells with a single flagellum as well as of dividing trypanosomes with two fully developed flagella. Estimates of the dissipative energy and the power generation of single cells obtained from the motility patterns of the trypanosomes within the optical trap indicate that specific motility characteristics, in addition to locomotion, may be required for antibody clearance. Introducing a steerable second optical trap we could further measure the force, which is generated at the flagellar tip. Differences in the cellular structure of the trypanosomes are correlated with the trapping and motility characteristics and in consequence with their propulsion force, dissipative energy and power generation.

  7. The Potential Radiative Forcing of Global Land Use and Land Cover Change Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Kloster, S.

    2014-12-01

    Given the expected increase in pressure on land resources over the next century, there is a need to understand the total impacts of activities associated with land use and land cover change (LULCC). Here we quantify these impacts using the radiative forcing metric, including forcings from changes in long-lived greenhouse gases, tropospheric ozone, aerosol effects, and land surface albedo. We estimate radiative forcings from the different agents for historical LULCC and for six future projections using simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model and Community Atmosphere Models and additional offline analyses. When all forcing agents are considered together we show that 45% (+30%, -20%) of the present-day (2010) anthropogenic radiative forcing can be attributed to LULCC. Changes in the emission of non-CO2 greenhouse gases and aerosols from LULCC enhance the total LULCC radiative forcing by a factor of 2 to 3 with respect to the forcing from CO2 alone. In contrast, the non-CO2 forcings from fossil fuel burning are roughly neutral, due largely to the negative (cooling) impact of aerosols from these sources. We partition the global LULCC radiative forcing into three major sources: direct modification of land cover (e.g. deforestation), agricultural activities, and fire regime changes. Contributions from deforestation and agriculture are roughly equal in the present day, while changes to wildfire activity impose a small negative forcing globally. In 2100, deforestation activities comprise the majority of the LULCC radiative forcing for all projections except one (Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5). This suggests that realistic scenarios of future forest area change are essential for projecting the contribution of LULCC to climate change. However, the commonly used RCP land cover change projections all include decreases in global deforestation rates over the next 85 years. To place an upper bound on the potential

  8. Thermal Noise Reduction of Mechanical Oscillators by Actively Controlled External Dissipative Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan; Medich, David; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Sheng, Sitong; Yuan, Jian-Yang; Shao, Zhifeng

    1999-01-01

    We show that the thermal fluctuations of very soft mechanical oscillators, such as the cantilever in an atomic force microscope (AFM), can be reduced without changing the stiffness of the spring or having to lower the environment temperature. We derive a theoretical relationship between the thermal fluctuations of an oscillator and an actively external-dissipative force. This relationship is verified by experiments with an AFM cantilever where the external active force is coupled through a magnetic field. With simple instrumentation, we have reduced the thermal noise amplitude of the cantilever by a factor of 3.4, achieving an apparent temperature of 25 K with the environment at 295K. This active noise reduction approach can significantly improve the accuracy of static position or static force measurements in a number of practical applications.

  9. Occlusal force, electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles and mandibular flexure of subjects with different facial types

    PubMed Central

    CUSTODIO, William; GOMES, Simone Guimarães Farias; FAOT, Fernanda; GARCIA, Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues; DEL BEL CURY, Altair Antoninha

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate whether vertical facial patterns influence maximal occlusal force (MOF), masticatory muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity, and medial mandibular flexure (MMF). Material and Methods Seventy-eight dentate subjects were divided into 3 groups by Ricketts's analysis: brachyfacial, mesofacial and dolychofacial. Maximum occlusal force in the molar region was bilaterally measured with a force transducer. The electromyographic activities of the masseter and anterior temporal muscles were recorded during maximal voluntary clenching. Medial mandibular flexure was calculated by subtracting the intermolar distance of maximum opening or protrusion from the distance in the rest position. The data were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD test. The significance level was set at 5%. Results Data on maximum occlusal force showed that shorter faces had higher occlusal forces (P<0.0001). Brachyfacial subjects presented higher levels of masseter electromyographic activity and medial mandibular flexure, followed by the mesofacial and dolychofacial groups. Additionally, dolychofacial subjects showed significantly lower electromyographic temporalis activities (P<0.05). Conclusion Within the limitations of the study, it may be concluded that maximum occlusal force, masticatory muscle activity and medial mandibular flexure were influenced by the vertical facial pattern. PMID:21655772

  10. Hilbert phase dynamometry (HPD) for real-time measurement of cell generated forces (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Li, Yanfen; Bhaduri, Basanta; Majeed, Hassaan; Dupenloup, Paul; Levine, Alex; Kilian, Kristopher A.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    Traction force microscopy is the most widely used technique for studying the forces exerted by cells on deformable substrates. However, the method is computationally intense and cells have to be detached from the substrate prior to measuring the displacement map. We have developed a new method, referred to as Hilbert phase dynamometry (HPD), which yields real-time force fields and, simultaneously, cell dry mass and growth information. HPD operates by imaging cells on a deformable substrate that is patterned with a grid of fluorescent proteins. A Hilbert transform is used to extract the phase map associated with the grid deformation, which provides the displacement field. By combining this information with substrate stiffness, an elasticity model was developed to measure forces exerted by cells with high spatial resolution. In our study, we prepared 10kPa gels and them with a 2-D grid of FITC-conjugated fibrinogen/fibronectin mixture, an extracellular matrix protein to which cells adhere. We cultured undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), and MSCs that were in the process of undergoing adipogenesis and osteogenesis. The cells were measured over the course of 24 hours using Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (SLIM) and wide-field epi-fluorescence microscopy allowing us to simultaneously measure cell growth and the forces exerted by the cells on the substrate.

  11. Physical Activity and Bone: May the Force be with You

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Jonathan H.; Gould, Virginia; Brunton, Luke; Deere, Kevin; Rittweger, Joern; Lipperts, Matthijs; Grimm, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is thought to play an important role in preventing bone loss and osteoporosis in older people. However, the type of activity that is most effective in this regard remains unclear. Objectively measured PA using accelerometers is an accurate method for studying relationships between PA and bone and other outcomes. We recently used this approach in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) to examine relationships between levels of vertical impacts associated with PA and hip bone mineral density (BMD). Interestingly, vertical impacts >4g, though rare, largely accounted for the relationship between habitual levels of PA and BMD in adolescents. However, in a subsequent pilot study where we used the same method to record PA levels in older people, no >4g impacts were observed. Therefore, to the extent that vertical impacts need to exceed a certain threshold in order to be bone protective, such a threshold is likely to be considerably lower in older people as compared with adolescents. Further studies aimed at identifying such a threshold in older people are planned, to provide a basis for selecting exercise regimes in older people which are most likely to be bone protective. PMID:24624117

  12. Active Traction Force Response to Long-Term Cyclic Stretch Is Dependent on Cell Pre-stress.

    PubMed

    Cirka, Heather; Monterosso, Melissa; Diamantides, Nicole; Favreau, John; Wen, Qi; Billiar, Kristen

    2016-04-26

    Mechanical stimulation is recognized as a potent modulator of cellular behaviors such as proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix assembly. However, the study of how cell-generated traction force changes in response to stretch is generally limited to short-term stimulation. The goal of this work is to determine how cells actively alter their traction force in response to long-term physiological cyclic stretch as a function of cell pre-stress. We have developed, to our knowledge, a novel method to assess traction force after long-term (24 h) uniaxial or biaxial cyclic stretch under conditions of high cell pre-stress with culture on stiff (7.5 kPa) polyacrylamide gels (with or without transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)) and low pre-stress by treating with blebbistatin or culture on soft gels (0.6 kPa). In response to equibiaxial stretch, valvular interstitial cells on stiff substrates decreased their traction force (from 300 nN to 100 nN) and spread area (from 3000 to 2100 μm(2)). With uniaxial stretch, the cells had similar decreases in traction force and area and reoriented perpendicular to the stretch. TGF-β1-treated valvular interstitial cells had higher pre-stress (1100 nN) and exhibited a larger drop in traction force with uniaxial stretch, but the percentage changes in force and area with stretch were similar to the non-TGF-β1-treated group. Cells with inhibited myosin II motors increased traction force (from 41 nN to 63 nN) and slightly reoriented toward the stretch direction. In contrast, cells cultured on soft gels increased their traction force significantly, from 15 nN to 45 nN, doubled their spread area, elongated from an initially rounded morphology, and reoriented perpendicular to the uniaxial stretch. Contractile-moment measurements provided results consistent with total traction force measurements. The combined results indicate that the change in traction force in response to external cyclic stretch is dependent upon the

  13. Force enhancement during and following muscle stretch of maximal voluntarily activated human quadriceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Daniel; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2007-08-01

    Force enhancement during and following muscle stretch has been observed for electrically and voluntarily activated human muscle. However, especially for voluntary contractions, the latter observation has only been made for adductor pollicis and the ankle joint muscles, but not for large muscles like quadriceps femoris. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of active muscle stretch on force production for maximal voluntary contractions of in vivo human quadriceps femoris (n = 15). Peak torques during and torques at the end of stretch, torques following stretch, and passive torques following muscle deactivation were compared to the isometric torques at corresponding muscle length. In addition, muscle activation of rectus femoris, vastus medialis and vastus lateralis was obtained using surface EMG. Stretches with different amplitudes (15, 25 and 35 degrees at a velocity of 60 degrees s(-1)) were performed on the plateau region and the descending limb of the force-length relation in a random order. Data analysis showed four main results: (1) peak torques did not occur at the end of the stretch, but torques at the end of the stretch exceeded the corresponding isometric torque; (2) there was no significant force enhancement following muscle stretch, but a small significant passive force enhancement persisted for all stretch conditions; (3) forces during and following stretch were independent of stretch amplitude; (4) muscle activation during and following muscle stretch was significantly reduced. In conclusion, although our results showed passive force enhancement, we could not provide direct evidence that there is active force enhancement in voluntarily activated human quadriceps femoris.

  14. Force generation in transient deployment of square or triangular flat panels in the presence of a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierides, Alexis; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2007-11-01

    We investigate the force generated by square or tringular flaps hinged at the wall beneath a flow during their transient deployment with an angular velocity between 10 and 100 rad/s. The objective of this study is to understand the mechanisms of unsteady flapping-wings motion and the system of vortices generated. The transient flow field has been simulated experimentally in a low speed wind tunnel and computationally by using CFD with moving boundaries capabilities. The results indicated that all lift and drag force coefficients during the transient deployment are different than the corresponding coefficients under stationary conditions at the same deployment angle after adjusting for inertial effects. These dynamic effects depend on the Strouhal number which can be considered as the ratio the Stokes to Reynolds number of the flow. It was found that these effects are augmented with increasing Strouhal number and decrease with increasing boundary layer thickness. Reasonable agreement has been found between computational and experimental data.

  15. Using PHM to measure equipment usable life on the Air Force's next generation reusable space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasdel, A.

    The U.S. Air Force procures many launch vehicles and launch vehicle services to place their satellites at their desired location in space. The equipment on-board these satellite and launch vehicle often suffer from premature failures that result in the total loss of the satellite or a shortened mission life sometimes requiring the purchase of a replacement satellite and launch vehicle. The Air Force uses its EELV to launch its high priority satellites. Due to a rise in the cost of purchasing a launch using the Air Force's EELV from 72M in 1997 to as high as 475M per launch today, the Air Force is working to replace the EELV with a reusable space booster (RSB). The RSB will be similar in design and operations to the recently cancelled NASA reusable space booster known as the Space Shuttle. If the Air Force uses the same process that procures the EELV and other launch vehicles and satellites, the RSB will also suffer from premature equipment failures thus putting the payloads at a similar high risk of mission failure. The RSB is expected to lower each launch cost by 50% compared to the EELV. The development of the RSB offers the Air Force an opportunity to use a new reliability paradigm that includes a prognostic and health management program and a condition-based maintenance program. These both require using intelligent, decision making self-prognostic equipment The prognostic and health management program and its condition-based maintenance program allows increases in RSB equipment usable life, lower logistics and maintenance costs, while increasing safety and mission assurance. The PHM removes many decisions from personnel that, in the past resulted in catastrophic failures and loss of life. Adding intelligent, decision-making self-prognostic equipment to the RSB will further decrease launch costs while decreasing risk and increasing safety and mission assurance.

  16. 20 CFR 627.225 - Employment generating activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of information on JTPA programs and activities; labor market surveys; and development of on-the-job... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Employment generating activities. 627.225 Section 627.225 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  17. 20 CFR 627.225 - Employment generating activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of information on JTPA programs and activities; labor market surveys; and development of on-the-job... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employment generating activities. 627.225 Section 627.225 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  18. Active Generations: An Intergenerational Approach to Preventing Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Danilea; Teufel, James; Holtgrave, Peter L.; Brown, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Over the last 3 decades, US obesity rates have increased dramatically as more children and more adults become obese. This study explores an innovative program, Active Generations, an intergenerational nutrition education and activity program implemented in out-of-school environments (after school and summer camps). It utilizes older…

  19. Magnetic Circuit Model of PM Motor-Generator to Predict Radial Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Kascak, Peter E.; Dever, Timothy P.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic circuit model is developed for a PM motor for flywheel applications. A sample motor is designed and modeled. Motor configuration and selection of materials is discussed, and the choice of winding configuration is described. A magnetic circuit model is described, which includes the stator back iron, rotor yoke, permanent magnets, air gaps and the stator teeth. Iterative solution of this model yields flux linkages, back EMF, torque, power, and radial force at the rotor caused by eccentricity. Calculated radial forces are then used to determine motor negative stiffness.

  20. Filopodial retraction force is generated by cortical actin dynamics and controlled by reversible tethering at the tip

    PubMed Central

    Bornschlögl, Thomas; Romero, Stéphane; Vestergaard, Christian L.; Joanny, Jean-François; Van Nhieu, Guy Tran; Bassereau, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Filopodia are dynamic, finger-like plasma membrane protrusions that sense the mechanical and chemical surroundings of the cell. Here, we show in epithelial cells that the dynamics of filopodial extension and retraction are determined by the difference between the actin polymerization rate at the tip and the retrograde flow at the base of the filopodium. Adhesion of a bead to the filopodial tip locally reduces actin polymerization and leads to retraction via retrograde flow, reminiscent of a process used by pathogens to invade cells. Using optical tweezers, we show that filopodial retraction occurs at a constant speed against counteracting forces up to 50 pN. Our measurements point toward retrograde flow in the cortex together with frictional coupling between the filopodial and cortical actin networks as the main retraction-force generator for filopodia. The force exerted by filopodial retraction, however, is limited by the connection between filopodial actin filaments and the membrane at the tip. Upon mechanical rupture of the tip connection, filopodia exert a passive retraction force of 15 pN via their plasma membrane. Transient reconnection at the tip allows filopodia to continuously probe their surroundings in a load-and-fail manner within a well-defined force range. PMID:24198333

  1. Centrifugal force induces human ligamentum flavum fibroblasts inflammation through activation of JNK and p38 pathways.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yuan-Hung; Tsuang, Yang-Hwei; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Sun, Man-Ger; Chen, Ming-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation has been proposed to be an important causative factor in ligamentum flavum hypertrophy. However, the mechanisms of mechanical load on inflammation of ligamentum flavum remain unclear. In this study, we used an in vitro model of human ligamentum flavum fibroblasts subjected to centrifugal force to elucidate the effects of mechanical load on cultured human ligamentum flavum fibroblasts; we further studied its molecular and biochemical mechanisms. Human ligamentum flavum fibroblasts were obtained from six patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Monolayer cultures of human ligamentum flavum fibroblasts were subjected to different magnitudes of centrifugal forces. Cell viability, cell death, biochemical response, and molecular response to centrifugal forces were analyzed. It was found that centrifugal stress significantly suppressed cell viability without inducing cell death. Centrifugal force at 67.1 g/cm(2) for 60 min significantly increases the production of prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide as well as gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β and IL-6, showed that centrifugal force-dependent induction of cyclooxygense-2 and inducible NO synthase required JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not ERK 1/2 activities. This study suggested that centrifugal force does induce inflammatory responses in human ligamentum flavum fibroblasts. The activation of both JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mechanotransduction cascades is a crucial intracellular mechanism that mediates cyclooxygense-2/prostaglandin E2 and inducible NO synthase/nitric oxide production.

  2. Analysis of ground reaction force and electromyographic activity of the gastrocnemius muscle during double support.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Andreia S P; Santos, Rubim; Oliveira, Francisco P M; Carvalho, Paulo; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2012-05-01

    Mechanisms associated with energy expenditure during gait have been extensively researched and studied. According to the double-inverted pendulum model energy expenditure is higher during double support, as lower limbs need to work to redirect the centre of mass velocity. This study looks into how the ground reaction force of one limb affects the muscle activity required by the medial gastrocnemius of the contralateral limb during step-to-step transition. Thirty-five subjects were monitored as to the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of one limb and the ground reaction force of the contralateral limb during double support. After determination of the Pearson correlation coefficient (r), a moderate correlation was observed between the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of the dominant leg and the vertical (Fz) and anteroposterior (Fy) components of ground reaction force of the non-dominant leg (r = 0.797, p < 0.000 1; r = -0.807, p < 0.000 1). A weak and moderate correlation was observed between the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of the non-dominant leg and the Fz and Fy of the dominant leg, respectively (r = 0.442, p = 0.018; r = -0.684 p < 0.000 1). The results obtained suggest that during double support, ground reaction force is associated with the electromyographic activity of the contralateral medial gastrocnemius and that there is an increased dependence between the ground reaction force of the non-dominant leg and the electromyographic activity of the dominant medial gastrocnemius. PMID:22720393

  3. Effects of Rate of Movement on Effective Maximal Force Generated by Elbow Extensors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updyke, Wynn F.; And Others

    This study investigated the effects of the velocity of muscular contraction on the effective force (torque) exerted by forty 18- to 21-year-old males. The dynomemeter lever arm, the fulcrum of which was aligned with the axis of elbow rotation, allowed extension and flexion for the subjects. All subjects were tested at three velocities (.10, .20,…

  4. Bioelectric activity of skeletal muscle under conditions of alternating action of g-Forces and weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuganov, Y. M.; Kasyan, I. I.; Asyamolov, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    The bioelectric activity of the musculature of animals and man was studied during alternating g-forces and weightlessness. The appropriate conditions were reproduced in flight along a parabolic curve; in this case, weightlessness lasting 25-30 sec alternated with g-forces of about 2 g magnitude. Quite regular changes in the bioelectric activity of various groups of muscles were disclosed under g-forces and in weightlessness. Thus, muscle biopotential amplitudes of 130-180 microvolt in horizontal flight, increased to 190-330 microvolt under g-forces. In the subsequent weightlessness, an abrupt reduction in oscillation voltage was observed and, in a number of cases, phenomena, similar to the picture of bioelectric silence were noted.

  5. Augmented force output in skeletal muscle fibres of Xenopus following a preceding bout of activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bruton, J D; Westerblad, H; Katz, A; Lännergren, J

    1996-01-01

    1. The effect of a brief period of activity on subsequent isometric tetanic force production was investigated in single muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis. 2. Following a train of ten tetani separated by 4 s intervals, tetanic force was significantly augmented by about 10%. The tetanic force augmentation persisted for at least 15 min and then slowly subsided. A similar potentiation was seen following trains of five and twenty tetani. 3. During the period of tetanic force potentiation, tetanic calcium was reduced by more than 30%, and intracellular pH was reduced from 7.15 +/- 0.07 to 7.03 +/- 0.11 (n = 4). 4. Fibre swelling was greatest at 1 min and then subsided over 15-20 min and possibly accounted for a small part of the observed force potentiation. 5. A reduction in the inorganic phosphate (P1) concentration of more than 40% was found in fibres frozen in liquid nitrogen at the peak of force potentiation compared with resting fibres. 6. It is concluded that the augmentation of tetanic force found after a brief preceding bout of activity is due to a reduction in inorganic phosphate. This mechanism may underlie the improved performance observed in athletes after warm-up. Images Figure 2 PMID:8735706

  6. Effects of non-gravitational forces on orbital evolution of active Centaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churyumov, Klim; Kovalenko, Nataliya

    2016-07-01

    Currently there are 26 active Centaurs known among 121 discovered .In the present study we have investigated the influence of cometary activity on their orbital evolution by using orbital evolution integrators. Since there is no information on exact values of non-gravitational forces for these cometary Centaurs, because of their large heliocentric distances, we assumed their non-gravitational forces as the one for comet Halley with coefficient of 1/r^{2}, where r is perihelion distance. As a result we got the differences in perihelion passage dates for active Centaurs and differences in their perihelion distances during one period around the Sun and longer time-span.

  7. Regional Quality Assurance Activity in Higher Education in Southeast Asia: Its Characteristics and Driving Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umemiya, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses the characteristics and driving forces of regional quality assurance activity in Southeast Asia, which has been actively promoted in recent years by the ASEAN University Network, an organisation for higher education under the auspices of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). There are now more collaborative…

  8. Validation and Verification of Operational Land Analysis Activities at the Air Force Weather Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Michael; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Cetola, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The NASA developed Land Information System (LIS) is the Air Force Weather Agency's (AFWA) operational Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) combining real time precipitation observations and analyses, global forecast model data, vegetation, terrain, and soil parameters with the community Noah land surface model, along with other hydrology module options, to generate profile analyses of global soil moisture, soil temperature, and other important land surface characteristics. (1) A range of satellite data products and surface observations used to generate the land analysis products (2) Global, 1/4 deg spatial resolution (3) Model analysis generated at 3 hours

  9. Use of a magnetic force exciter to vibrate a piezocomposite generating element in a small-scale windmill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truyen Luong, Hung; Goo, Nam Seo

    2012-02-01

    A piezocomposite generating element (PCGE) can be used to convert ambient vibrations into electrical energy that can be stored and used to power other devices. This paper introduces a design of a magnetic force exciter for a small-scale windmill that vibrates a PCGE to convert wind energy into electrical energy. A small-scale windmill was designed to be sensitive to low-speed wind in urban regions for the purpose of collecting wind energy. The magnetic force exciter consists of exciting magnets attached to the device’s input rotor and a secondary magnet fixed at the tip of the PCGE. The PCGE is fixed to a clamp that can be adjusted to slide on the windmill’s frame in order to change the gap between exciting and secondary magnets. Under an applied wind force, the input rotor rotates to create a magnetic force interaction that excites the PCGE. The deformation of the PCGE enables it to generate electric power. Experiments were performed with different numbers of exciting magnets and different gaps between the exciting and secondary magnets to determine the optimal configuration for generating the peak voltage and harvesting the maximum wind energy for the same range of wind speeds. In a battery-charging test, the charging time for a 40 mA h battery was approximately 3 h for natural wind in an urban region. The experimental results show that the prototype can harvest energy in urban regions with low wind speeds and convert the wasted wind energy into electricity for city use.

  10. Force generation and step-size fluctuations in a dynein motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bameta, Tripti; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Inamdar, Mandar M.

    2013-02-01

    Molecular motors such as dynein are known to move by taking steps of different sizes, depending on the load. Here, we develop a simple, discrete, minimal ratchet model for a motor that can take steps of sizes δ∘ and 2δ∘ in order to provide a bare-bones description of dynein. We obtain the force-velocity curves and diffusivity for this motor for different concentrations of ATP. We also study the mechano-chemical energy transduction and thermodynamic efficiency of the motor. Further, by investigating the statistics of step sizes for the motor, we show that the average step size and fluctuation in step sizes have a non-monotonic force dependence. We develop closed-form analytical expressions for all our results, which despite the simplicity of the model give a reasonable match with the known experiments and simulations on dynein.

  11. Effect of diamide on force generation and axial stiffness of the cochlear outer hair cell.

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, M; Iwasa, K H

    1997-01-01

    We found that diamide, which affects spectrin, reduces the axial stiffness of the cochlear outer hair cell, the cylindrically shaped mechanoreceptor cell with a unique voltage-sensitive motility. This effect thus provides a means of examining the relationship between the stiffness and the motility of the cell. For measuring axial stiffness and force production, we used an experimental configuration in which an elastic probe was attached to the cell near the cuticular plate and the other end of the cell was held with a patch pipette in the whole-cell recording mode. Diamide at concentrations of up to 5 mM reduced the axial stiffness in a dose-dependent manner to 165 nN per unit strain from 502 nN for untreated cells. The isometric force elicited by voltage pulses under whole-cell voltage clamp was also reduced to 35 pN/mV from 105 pN/mV for untreated cells. Thus the isometric force was approximately proportional to the axial stiffness. Our observations suggest a series connection between the motor and cytoskeletal elements and can be explained by the area motor model previously proposed for the outer hair cell. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 9 PMID:9370475

  12. Optical pulse shaper with integrated slab waveguide for arbitrary waveform generation using optical gradient force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Sha-Sha; Min, Shu-Cun; Dong, Jian-Ji

    2014-12-01

    Integrated optical pulse shaper opens up possibilities for realizing the ultra high-speed and ultra wide-band linear signal processing with compact size and low power consumption. We propose a silicon monolithic integrated optical pulse shaper using optical gradient force, which is based on the eight-path finite impulse response. A cantilever structure is fabricated in one arm of the Mach—Zehnder interferometer (MZI) to act as an amplitude modulator. The phase shift feature of waveguide is analyzed with the optical pump power, and five typical waveforms are demonstrated with the manipulation of optical force. Unlike other pulse shaper schemes based on thermo—optic effect or electro—optic effect, our scheme is based on a new degree of freedom manipulation, i.e., optical force, so no microelectrodes are required on the silicon chip, which can reduce the complexity of fabrication. Besides, the chip structure is suitable for commercial silicon on an insulator (SOI) wafer, which has a top silicon layer of about 220 nm in thickness.

  13. Quantifying internally generated and externally forced climate signals at regional scales in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Kewei; Zhang, Xuebin; Church, John A.; Hu, Jianyu

    2015-11-01

    The Earth's climate evolves because of both internal variability and external forcings. Using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models, here we quantify the ratio of externally forced variance to total variance on interannual and longer time scales for regional surface air temperature (SAT) and sea level, which depends on the relative strength of externally forced signal compared to internal variability. The highest ratios are found in tropical areas for SAT but at high latitudes for sea level over the historical period when ocean dynamics and global mean thermosteric contributions are considered. Averaged globally, the ratios over a fixed time interval (e.g., 30 years) are projected to increase during the 21st century under the business-as-usual scenario (RCP8.5). In contrast, under two mitigation scenarios (RCP2.6 and RCP4.5), the ratio declines sharply by the end of the 21st century for SAT, but only declines slightly or stabilizes for sea level, indicating a slower response of sea level to climate mitigation.

  14. Sustained α-catenin Activation at E-cadherin Junctions in the Absence of Mechanical Force.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kabir H; Hartman, Kevin L; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    Mechanotransduction at E-cadherin junctions has been postulated to be mediated in part by a force-dependent conformational activation of α-catenin. Activation of α-catenin allows it to interact with vinculin in addition to F-actin, resulting in a strengthening of junctions. Here, using E-cadherin adhesions reconstituted on synthetic, nanopatterned membranes, we show that activation of α-catenin is dependent on E-cadherin clustering, and is sustained in the absence of mechanical force or association with F-actin or vinculin. Adhesions were formed by filopodia-mediated nucleation and micron-scale assembly of E-cadherin clusters, which could be distinguished as either peripheral or central assemblies depending on their relative location at the cell-bilayer adhesion. Whereas F-actin, vinculin, and phosphorylated myosin light chain associated only with the peripheral assemblies, activated α-catenin was present in both peripheral and central assemblies, and persisted in the central assemblies in the absence of actomyosin tension. Impeding filopodia-mediated nucleation and micron-scale assembly of E-cadherin adhesion complexes by confining the movement of bilayer-bound E-cadherin on nanopatterned substrates reduced the levels of activated α-catenin. Taken together, these results indicate that although the initial activation of α-catenin requires micron-scale clustering that may allow the development of mechanical forces, sustained force is not required for maintaining α-catenin in the active state. PMID:27602732

  15. Ground reaction forces, kinematics, and muscle activations during the windmill softball pitch.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Plummer, Hillary

    2011-07-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine quantitatively ground reaction forces, kinematics, and muscle activations during the windmill softball pitch, and to determine relationships between knee valgus and muscle activations, ball velocity and muscle activation as well as ball velocity and ground reaction forces. It was hypothesized that there would be an inverse relationship between degree of knee valgus and muscle activation, a direct relationship between ground reaction forces and ball velocity, and non-stride leg muscle activations and ball velocity. Ten female windmill softball pitchers (age 17.6 ± 3.47 years, stature 1.67 ± 0.07 m, weight 67.4 ± 12.2 kg) participated. Dependent variables were ball velocity, surface electromyographic (sEMG), kinematic, and kinetic data while the participant was the independent variable. Stride foot contact reported peak vertical forces of 179% body weight. There were positive relationships between ball velocity and ground reaction force (r = 0.758, n = 10, P = 0.029) as well as ball velocity and non-stride leg gluteus maximus (r = 0.851, n = 10, P = 0.007) and medius (r = 0.760, n = 10, P = 0.029) muscle activity, while there was no notable relationship between knee valgus and muscle activation. As the windmill softball pitcher increased ball velocity, her vertical ground reaction forces also increased. Proper conditioning of the lumbopelvic-hip complex, including the gluteals, is essential for injury prevention. From the data presented, it is evident that bilateral strength and conditioning of the gluteal muscle group is salient in the windmill softball pitch as an attempt to decrease incidence of injury.

  16. How Force Might Activate Talin's Vinculin Binding Sites: SMD Reveals a Structural Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Vogel, Viola

    2008-01-01

    Upon cell adhesion, talin physically couples the cytoskeleton via integrins to the extracellular matrix, and subsequent vinculin recruitment is enhanced by locally applied tensile force. Since the vinculin binding (VB) sites are buried in the talin rod under equilibrium conditions, the structural mechanism of how vinculin binding to talin is force-activated remains unknown. Taken together with experimental data, a biphasic vinculin binding model, as derived from steered molecular dynamics, provides high resolution structural insights how tensile mechanical force applied to the talin rod fragment (residues 486–889 constituting helices H1–H12) might activate the VB sites. Fragmentation of the rod into three helix subbundles is prerequisite to the sequential exposure of VB helices to water. Finally, unfolding of a VB helix into a completely stretched polypeptide might inhibit further binding of vinculin. The first events in fracturing the H1–H12 rods of talin1 and talin2 in subbundles are similar. The proposed force-activated α-helix swapping mechanism by which vinculin binding sites in talin rods are exposed works distinctly different from that of other force-activated bonds, including catch bonds. PMID:18282082

  17. Effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and respiratory muscles activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Jintae; Park, Soojin; Kim, Youngju; Choi, Yeonsung; Lyu, Hyeonnam

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and deep breathing. [Subjects] Twenty-six subjects, divided into the two groups (normal and forward head posture groups), participated in this study. [Methods] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were measured using respiratory function instrumentation that met the American Thoracic Society's recommendation for diagnostic spirometry. Accessory respiratory muscle activity during deep breathing was measured by electromyography. A Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the measure variables between the normal and forward head posture group. [Results] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were significantly lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. Accessory respiratory muscle activity was also lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. In particular, the sternocleidomastoid and pectoralis major activity of the forward head posture group was significantly lower than that of normal group. Activities of the other muscles were generally decreased with forward head posture, but were not significantly different between the two groups. [Conclusion] These results indicate that forward head posture could reduce vital capacity, possibly because of weakness or disharmony of the accessory respiratory muscles.

  18. User satisfaction and forces generated during laryngoscopy using disposable Miller blades: a manikin study.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, G; Wilkes, A R; Clyburn, P; Aguilera, I; Hall, J E

    2007-10-01

    Increasing awareness of prion-related diseases has led to an increase in the number of disposable laryngoscope blades available. We compared 11 disposable and standard re-usable Miller size 1 blades. In this manikin-based study, we studied user satisfaction for field of view at laryngoscopy, build quality and users' willingness to use the blade in an emergency situation. These were found to be better with metal disposable blades (pforces developed during laryngoscopy were greater with plastic than with metal blades.

  19. Visualisation of nitric oxide generated by activated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Leone, A M; Furst, V W; Foxwell, N A; Cellek, S; Moncada, S

    1996-04-01

    We have visualised the release and approximate diffusion profile of nitric oxide (NO) from activated murine macrophages using a high transmission microscope coupled to a high sensitivity photon counting camera. The images generated by NO were cell-associated and spread over an area of approximately 175 micrometers from the activated macrophage. The signals obtained were dependent on the presence of exogenous L-arginine in the medium and followed a time course similar to that previously described for the generation of NO by the inducible form of NO synthase. The light signal was attenuated by the inhibitor of NO synthase, N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Studies using superoxide-deficient macrophages further confirmed that the signals detected were generated by NO rather than reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:8660339

  20. TRADEOFFs in climate effects through aircraft routing: forcing due to radiatively active gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stordal, F.; Gauss, M.; Myhre, G.; Mancini, E.; Hauglustaine, D. A.; Köhler, M. O.; Berntsen, T.; . G Stordal, E. J.; Iachetti, D.; Pitari, G.; Isaksen, I. S. A.

    2006-10-01

    We have estimated impacts of alternative aviation routings on the radiative forcing. Changes in ozone and OH have been estimated in four Chemistry Transport Models (CTMs) participating in the TRADEOFF project. Radiative forcings due to ozone and methane have been calculated accordingly. In addition radiative forcing due to CO2 is estimated based on fuel consumption. Three alternative routing cases are investigated; one scenario assuming additional polar routes and two scenarios assuming aircraft cruising at higher (+2000 ft) and lower (-6000 ft) altitudes. Results from the base case in year 2000 are included as a reference. Taking first a steady state backward looking approach, adding the changes in the forcing from ozone, CO2 and CH4, the ranges of the models used in this work are -0.8 to -1.8 and 0.3 to 0.6 m Wm-2 in the lower (-6000 ft) and higher (+2000 ft) cruise levels, respectively. In relative terms, flying 6000ft lower reduces the forcing by 5-10% compared to the current flight pattern, whereas flying higher, while saving fuel and presumably flying time, increases the forcing by about 2-3%. Taking next a forward looking approach we have estimated the integrated forcing (m Wm-2 yr) over 20 and 100 years time horizons. The relative contributions from each of the three climate gases are somewhat different from the backward looking approach. The differences are moderate adopting 100 year time horizon, whereas under the 20 year horizon CO2 naturally becomes less important relatively. Thus the forcing agents impact climate differently on various time scales. Also, we have found significant differences between the models for ozone and methane. We conclude that we are not yet at a point where we can include non-CO2 effects of aviation in emission trading schemes. Nevertheless, the rerouting cases that have been studied here yield relatively small changes in the radiative forcing due to the radiatively active gases.

  1. The generation effect: activating broad neural circuits during memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Zachary A; Elman, Jeremy A; Shimamura, Arthur P

    2013-01-01

    The generation effect is a robust memory phenomenon in which actively producing material during encoding acts to improve later memory performance. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis, we explored the neural basis of this effect. During encoding, participants generated synonyms from word-fragment cues (e.g., GARBAGE-W_ST_) or read other synonym pairs (e.g., GARBAGE-WASTE). Compared to simply reading target words, generating target words significantly improved later recognition memory performance. During encoding, this benefit was associated with a broad neural network that involved both prefrontal (inferior frontal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus) and posterior cortex (inferior temporal gyrus, lateral occipital cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, ventral posterior parietal cortex). These findings define the prefrontal-posterior cortical dynamics associated with the mnemonic benefits underlying the generation effect.

  2. Income Generation Activities among Academic Staffs at Malaysian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Abd Rahman; Soon, Ng Kim; Ting, Ngeoh Pei

    2015-01-01

    Income generation activities have been acquainted among public higher education institutions (HEIs) in Malaysia. Various factors that brought to insufficient of funding caused Higher Education Institutions(HEIs) to seek for additional income as to support the operation expenses. Financial sustainability issues made up the significant impact…

  3. Analysis of forces generated by n95 filtering facepiece respirator tethering devices: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Raymond; Niezgoda, George; Benson, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    The restorative forces of elasticized tethering devices on N95 filtering facepiece respirators (N95 FFR), that occur in response to the application of a load (applied force) during donning, create the requisite pressure to effectively seal the respirator against the face and prevent excessive inward migration of harmful elements. Many workers don and doff the same N95 FFR multiple times in the course of a single workday, yet little is known regarding the possible degradation of these restorative loads and, by implication, protection with multiple donnings. This laboratory pilot study evaluated the degradation in loads of tethering devices of three models of N95 FFRs subjected to the strain of five wear periods of 15 min interspersed with 15-min periods without wear. Data indicate that there were load degradations at each donning that differed significantly with the FFR model (p = <0.001), the greatest of which occurred with the first donning. The N95 FFR model with the lowest restorative loads was able to pass fit testing in a previous study, indicating that lower loads, perhaps coupled with FFR model-specific features, are sufficient to provide an adequate face/FFR interface seal. Tethering devices are importantly related to issues of comfort and protection afforded by N95 FFR and additional research is warranted. PMID:22746194

  4. Generation of waterfalls at intermittently alluviated fault scarps releases tectonic forcing on a climatic beat.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, Luca C.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2016-04-01

    Normal or reverse faults bonding mountain catchments typically mark the transition from the erosional to the depositional domain where bedrock channels flow into alluvial fans. We show here that interactions between the two fluvial domains can result in knickpoints that convolve tectonic and climatic signals. Changes in the ratio of sediment and water fluxes (Qs/Qw) modify the equilibrium geometry of the system and in particular of the reactive alluvial reaches so that a larger Qs/Qw forces steepening of the fan, backfilling of the bedrock reach and a heightened base level. Under these conditions, slip on the fault - covered and shielded by alluvium - can accumulate over several seismic cycles before being released at once by incision of the alluvial fan back to a shallow geometry. We demonstrate in this study that climate-driven aggradation and incision of alluvial fans in the Death Valley area can account for otherwise unexplained waterfalls at the base of catchments manyfold the height of coseismic throw. As a consequence, in this common configuration, tectonic slip can accumulate and be released at once on a tempo set by climatic fluctuations. Such that the faster denudation rate that might follow from increased precipitations is accompanied by an important retreating knickpoint. We propose that this mechanism can increase catchment reactivity and broaden the range of external forcings potentially recorded in the stratigraphy.

  5. Role of amygdala MAPK activation on immobility behavior of forced swim rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tung-Yi; Lin, Chih-Hung

    2006-10-01

    The role of amygdala mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in rats during a forced swim test was investigated. The variation of amygdala MAPK level was studied in control rats and early-life maternally deprived rats. A forced swim test was carried out to estimate the immobility level. The data showed that the immobility time of rats that received maternal deprivation in early life was longer than that of control rats and Western blot analysis also showed that the amygdala phospho-MAPK level in maternally deprived rats was almost two times higher than in control rats. Intra-amygdala infusion of PD098059 or U0126, MEK inhibitors, suppressed immobility behavior during the forced swim test in both rats. Western blot analysis also showed that the amygdala MAPK activities in both rats infused with MEK inhibitors were also suppressed in parallel with expression of immobility behavior. The suppressed MAPK activities as well as the restoration of immobility time returned to the original level 48 h later. These results suggest that amygdala MAPK activation might play a role in the regulation of immobility behavior in rats during the forced swim test. Moreover, it could provide a hint that amygdala MAPK activation might be involved in the formation of depression-like behavior.

  6. Muscle force output and electromyographic activity in squats with various unstable surfaces.

    PubMed

    Saeterbakken, Atle H; Fimland, Marius S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare force output and muscle activity of leg and trunk muscles in isometric squats executed on stable surface (i.e., floor), power board, BOSU ball, and balance cone. Fifteen healthy men (23.3 ± 2.7 years, mass: 80.5 ± 8.5 kg, height: 1.81 ± 0.09 m) volunteered. The force output and electromyographic (EMG) activities of the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, soleus, rectus abdominis, oblique external, and erector spinae were assessed. The order of the surfaces was randomized. One familiarization session was executed before the experimental test. Compared with stable surface (749 ± 222 N), the force output using power board was similar (-7%, p = 0.320) but lower for BOSU ball (-19%, p = 0.003) and balance cone (-24%, p ≤ 0.001). The force output using BOSU ball and balance cone was approximately 13% (p = 0.037) and approximately 18% (p = 0.001) less than the power board. There were similar EMG activities between the surfaces in all muscles except for rectus femoris, in which stable squat provided greater EMG activity than did the other exercises (p = 0.004-0.030). Lower EMG activity was observed in the rectus femoris using balance cone compared with the BOSU ball (p = 0.030). In conclusion, increasing the instability of the surface during maximum effort isometric squats usually maintains the muscle activity of lower-limb and superficial trunk muscles although the force output is reduced. This suggests that unstable surfaces in the squat may be beneficial in rehabilitation and as a part of periodized training programs, because similar muscle activity can be achieved with reduced loads.

  7. Measurement of Elastic Properties of Tissue by Shear Wave Propagation Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marie Tabaru,; Takashi Azuma,; Kunio Hashiba,

    2010-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) imaging has been developed as a novel elastography technology to diagnose hepatic disease and breast cancer. The accuracy of shear wave speed estimation, which is one of the applications of ARF elastography, is studied. The Young’s moduli of pig liver and foie gras samples estimated from the shear wave speed were compared with those measured the static Young’s modulus measurement. The difference in the two methods was 8%. Distance attenuation characteristics of the shear wave were also studied using finite element method (FEM) analysis. We found that the differences in the axial and lateral beam widths in pressure and ARF are 16 and 9% at F-number=0.9. We studied the relationship between two branch points in distance attenuation characteristics and the shape of ARF. We found that the maximum measurable length to estimate shear wave speed for one ARF excitation was 8 mm.

  8. Measurement of Elastic Properties of Tissue by Shear Wave Propagation Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabaru, Marie; Azuma, Takashi; Hashiba, Kunio

    2010-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) imaging has been developed as a novel elastography technology to diagnose hepatic disease and breast cancer. The accuracy of shear wave speed estimation, which is one of the applications of ARF elastography, is studied. The Young's moduli of pig liver and foie gras samples estimated from the shear wave speed were compared with those measured the static Young's modulus measurement. The difference in the two methods was 8%. Distance attenuation characteristics of the shear wave were also studied using finite element method (FEM) analysis. We found that the differences in the axial and lateral beam widths in pressure and ARF are 16 and 9% at F-number=0.9. We studied the relationship between two branch points in distance attenuation characteristics and the shape of ARF. We found that the maximum measurable length to estimate shear wave speed for one ARF excitation was 8 mm.

  9. Cortical Activity during a Highly-Trained Resistance Exercise Movement Emphasizing Force, Power or Volume.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Shawn D; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Comstock, Brett A; Maresh, Carl M; Volek, Jeff S; Denegar, Craig R; Kraemer, William J

    2012-11-20

    Cortical activity is thought to reflect the biomechanical properties of movement (e.g., force or velocity of movement), but fatigue and movement familiarity are important factors that require additional consideration in electrophysiological research. The purpose of this within-group quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) investigation was to examine changes in cortical activity amplitude and location during four resistance exercise movement protocols emphasizing rate (PWR), magnitude (FOR), or volume (VOL) of force production, while accounting for movement familiarity and fatigue. EEG signals were recorded during each complete repetition and were then grouped by functional region, processed to eliminate artifacts, and averaged to compare overall differences in the magnitude and location of cortical activity between protocols over the course of six sets. Biomechanical, biochemical, and exertional data were collected to contextualize electrophysiological data. The most fatiguing protocols were accompanied by the greatest increases in cortical activity. Furthermore, despite non-incremental loading and lower force levels, VOL displayed the largest increases in cortical activity over time and greatest motor and sensory activity overall. Our findings suggest that cortical activity is strongly related to aspects of fatigue during a high intensity resistance exercise movement.

  10. Cortical Activity during a Highly-Trained Resistance Exercise Movement Emphasizing Force, Power or Volume

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Shawn D.; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Comstock, Brett A.; Maresh, Carl M.; Volek, Jeff S.; Denegar, Craig R.; Kraemer, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Cortical activity is thought to reflect the biomechanical properties of movement (e.g., force or velocity of movement), but fatigue and movement familiarity are important factors that require additional consideration in electrophysiological research. The purpose of this within-group quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) investigation was to examine changes in cortical activity amplitude and location during four resistance exercise movement protocols emphasizing rate (PWR), magnitude (FOR), or volume (VOL) of force production, while accounting for movement familiarity and fatigue. EEG signals were recorded during each complete repetition and were then grouped by functional region, processed to eliminate artifacts, and averaged to compare overall differences in the magnitude and location of cortical activity between protocols over the course of six sets. Biomechanical, biochemical, and exertional data were collected to contextualize electrophysiological data. The most fatiguing protocols were accompanied by the greatest increases in cortical activity. Furthermore, despite non-incremental loading and lower force levels, VOL displayed the largest increases in cortical activity over time and greatest motor and sensory activity overall. Our findings suggest that cortical activity is strongly related to aspects of fatigue during a high intensity resistance exercise movement. PMID:24961265

  11. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media

    PubMed Central

    Aragones, J. L.; Steimel, J. P.; Alexander-Katz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium. PMID:27112961

  12. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media.

    PubMed

    Aragones, J L; Steimel, J P; Alexander-Katz, A

    2016-04-26

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium.

  13. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragones, J. L.; Steimel, J. P.; Alexander-Katz, A.

    2016-04-01

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium.

  14. Gravitational force modulates muscle activity during mechanical oscillation of the tibia in humans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Shields, Richard K

    2011-10-01

    Mechanical oscillation (vibration) is an osteogenic stimulus for bone in animal models and may hold promise as an anti-osteoporosis measure in humans with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the level of reflex induced muscle contractions associated with various loads (g force) during limb segment oscillation is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine whether certain gravitational loads (g forces) at a fixed oscillation frequency (30 Hz) increases muscle reflex activity in individuals with and without SCI. Nine healthy subjects and two individuals with SCI sat with their hip and knee joints at 90° and the foot secured on an oscillation platform. Vertical mechanical oscillations were introduced at 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, 3 and 5 g force for 20 s at 30 Hz. Non-SCI subjects received the oscillation with and without a 5% MVC background contraction. Peak soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) EMG were normalized to M-max. Soleus and TA EMG were <2.5% of M-max in both SCI and non-SCI subjects. The greatest EMG occurred at the highest acceleration (5 g). Low magnitude mechanical oscillation, shown to enhance bone anabolism in animal models, did not elicit high levels of reflex muscle activity in individuals with and without SCI. These findings support the g force modulated background muscle activity during fixed frequency vibration. The magnitude of muscle activity was low and likely does not influence the load during fixed frequency oscillation of the tibia.

  15. Variability in Measurement of Swimming Forces: A Meta-Analysis of Passive and Active Drag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havriluk, Rod

    2007-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to identify sources of true and error variance in measuring swimming drag force to draw valid conclusions about performance factor effects. Passive drag studies were grouped according to methodological differences: tow line in pool, tow line in flume, and carriage in tow tank. Active drag studies were grouped according to…

  16. Video: Animals; Electric Current; Force; Science Activities. Learning in Science Project. Working Papers 51-54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Beverley; And Others

    Four papers to be used in conjunction with video-tapes developed by the Learning in Science Project are presented. Topic areas of the papers focus on: (1) animals; (2) electric current; (3) force; and (4) science activities. The first paper presents transcripts of class discussions focusing on the scientific meaning of the word animal. The second…

  17. Prediction of ground reaction forces and moments during various activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Fluit, R; Andersen, M S; Kolk, S; Verdonschot, N; Koopman, H F J M

    2014-07-18

    Inverse dynamics based simulations on musculoskeletal models is a commonly used method for the analysis of human movement. Due to inaccuracies in the kinematic and force plate data, and a mismatch between the model and the subject, the equations of motion are violated when solving the inverse dynamics problem. As a result, dynamic inconsistency will exist and lead to residual forces and moments. In this study, we present and evaluate a computational method to perform inverse dynamics-based simulations without force plates, which both improves the dynamic consistency as well as removes the model׳s dependency on measured external forces. Using the equations of motion and a scaled musculoskeletal model, the ground reaction forces and moments (GRF&Ms) are derived from three-dimensional full-body motion. The method entails a dynamic contact model and optimization techniques to solve the indeterminacy problem during a double contact phase and, in contrast to previously proposed techniques, does not require training or empirical data. The method was applied to nine healthy subjects performing several Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and evaluated with simultaneously measured force plate data. Except for the transverse ground reaction moment, no significant differences (P>0.05) were found between the mean predicted and measured GRF&Ms for almost all ADLs. The mean residual forces and moments, however, were significantly reduced (P>0.05) in almost all ADLs using our method compared to conventional inverse dynamic simulations. Hence, the proposed method may be used instead of raw force plate data in human movement analysis using inverse dynamics.

  18. Clonidine as a sensitizing agent in the forced swimming test for revealing antidepressant activity.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Colombel, M C; Malinge, M; Bradwejn, J

    1991-11-01

    The forced swimming test (FST) in mice has failed to predict antidepressant activity for drugs having beta adrenoreceptor agonist activity and for serotonin uptake inhibitors. We investigated the potential for clonidine to render the FST sensitive to antidepressants by using a behaviorally inactive dose of this agent (0.1 mg/kg). All antidepressants studied (tricyclics, 5-HT uptake inhibitors, iprindole, mianserin, viloxazine, trazodone) showed either activity at lower doses or activity at previously inactive doses. The effect appeared specific because it did not appear with drugs other than antidepressants (diazepam, chlorpromazine, sulpiride, atropine), except for amphetamine and apomorphine which have a strong effect on the dopaminergic system. The use of behaviorally subactive doses of clonidine may thus provide an important means of increasing the sensitivity of the forced swimming test.

  19. Active open boundary forcing using dual relaxation time-scales in downscaled ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, M.; Gillibrand, P. A.

    2015-05-01

    Regional models actively forced with data from larger scale models at their open boundaries often contain motion at different time-scales (e.g. tidal and low frequency). These motions are not always individually well specified in the forcing data, and one may require a more active boundary forcing while the other exert less influence on the model interior. If a single relaxation time-scale is used to relax toward these data in the boundary equation, then this may be difficult. The method of fractional steps is used to introduce dual relaxation time-scales in an open boundary local flux adjustment scheme. This allows tidal and low frequency oscillations to be relaxed independently, resulting in a better overall solution than if a single relaxation parameter is optimized for tidal (short relaxation) or low frequency (long relaxation) boundary forcing. The dual method is compared to the single relaxation method for an idealized test case where a tidal signal is superimposed on a steady state low frequency solution, and a real application where the low frequency boundary forcing component is derived from a global circulation model for a region extending over the whole Great Barrier Reef, and a tidal signal subsequently superimposed.

  20. Quantifying surface albedo and other direct biogeophysical climate forcings of forestry activities.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Zhao, Kaiguang; Jackson, Robert B; Cherubini, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    By altering fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture exchanges between the land surface and atmosphere, forestry and other land-use activities affect climate. Although long recognized scientifically as being important, these so-called biogeophysical forcings are rarely included in climate policies for forestry and other land management projects due to the many challenges associated with their quantification. Here, we review the scientific literature in the fields of atmospheric science and terrestrial ecology in light of three main objectives: (i) to elucidate the challenges associated with quantifying biogeophysical climate forcings connected to land use and land management, with a focus on the forestry sector; (ii) to identify and describe scientific approaches and/or metrics facilitating the quantification and interpretation of direct biogeophysical climate forcings; and (iii) to identify and recommend research priorities that can help overcome the challenges of their attribution to specific land-use activities, bridging the knowledge gap between the climate modeling, forest ecology, and resource management communities. We find that ignoring surface biogeophysics may mislead climate mitigation policies, yet existing metrics are unlikely to be sufficient. Successful metrics ought to (i) include both radiative and nonradiative climate forcings; (ii) reconcile disparities between biogeophysical and biogeochemical forcings, and (iii) acknowledge trade-offs between global and local climate benefits. We call for more coordinated research among terrestrial ecologists, resource managers, and coupled climate modelers to harmonize datasets, refine analytical techniques, and corroborate and validate metrics that are more amenable to analyses at the scale of an individual site or region.

  1. Binding activity of patterned concanavalin A studied by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed, Kateryna; Pyka-Fosciak, Grazyna; Raczkowska, Joanna; Lekka, Malgorzata; Styczen, Jan

    2005-05-01

    The mode of protein immobilization plays a crucial role in the preparation of protein microarrays used for a wide spectrum of applications in analytical biochemistry. The microcontact printing technique was used to form a protein pattern using concanavalin A (Con A) since Con A belongs to a group of proteins widely used in analytical assays due to their selectivity as regards different kinds of carbohydrates. Atomic force microscopy was used to image surface topography, delivering information about the quality of the protein pattern. The force spectroscopy mode was used to verify the functional activity of deposited proteins via determination of the forces of interaction between Con A and carboxypeptidase Y bearing carbohydrate structure recognized by Con A. The calculated binding force between Con A and CaY was 105 ± 2 pN and it was compared with that measured for Con A deposited directly from the protein solution. The similarity of the value obtained for the interaction force was independent of the mode of protein deposition, thereby verifying that the microcontact printing technique did not influence the carbohydrate binding activity of Con A. The correlation between the surface topography of patterned samples and adhesion maps obtained showed the possible use of AFM for studying the chemical properties of different regions of the micropatterns produced.

  2. Vertically polarizing undulator with the dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for the next generation of light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Strelnikov, N.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Vasserman, I.; Xu, J.; Gluskin, E.

    2014-11-15

    A short prototype (847-mm-long) of an Insertion Device (ID) with the dynamic compensation of ID magnetic forces has been designed, built, and tested at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of the Argonne National Laboratory. The ID magnetic forces were compensated by the set of conical springs placed along the ID strongback. Well-controlled exponential characteristics of conical springs permitted a very close fit to the ID magnetic forces. Several effects related to the imperfections of actual springs, their mounting and tuning, and how these factors affect the prototype performance has been studied. Finally, series of tests to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of the ID magnetic gap settings have been carried out. Based on the magnetic measurements of the ID B{sub eff}, it has been demonstrated that the magnetic gaps within an operating range were controlled accurately and reproducibly within ±1 μm. Successful tests of this ID prototype led to the design of a 3-m long device based on the same concept. The 3-m long prototype is currently under construction. It represents R and D efforts by the APS toward APS Upgrade Project goals as well as the future generation of IDs for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

  3. Design of a MEMS-based motion stage based on a lever mechanism for generating large displacements and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Shi, Hongliang; Dagalakis, Nicholas G.; Gupta, Satyandra K.

    2016-09-01

    Conventional miniaturized motion stages have a volume of 50–60 cm3 and a range of motion around 100 μm. Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based motion stages have been good alternatives in some applications for small footprint, micron-level accuracy, and a lower cost. However, existing MEMS-based motion stages are able to provide a force of μN level, small displacements (less than tens of microns), and need additional features for practical applications like a probe or a stage. In this paper, a single degree of freedom motion stage is designed and analyzed for a larger displacement, a larger output force, a smaller out-of-plane deformation, and a bigger moving stage for further applications. For these purposes, the presented motion stage is designed with a thermal actuator, folded springs, and a lever, and it is experimentally characterized. Furthermore, three different types of flexure joints are investigated to characterize their capabilities and suitability to serve as the revolute joint of the lever: a beam, a cartwheel, and a butterfly flexure. The presented motion stage has a moving stage of 15 mm  ×  15 mm and shows a maximum displacement over 80 μm, and out-of-plane deformation under a weight of 120 μN less than 2 μm. The force generated by the actuator is estimated to be 68.6 mN.

  4. Design of a MEMS-based motion stage based on a lever mechanism for generating large displacements and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Shi, Hongliang; Dagalakis, Nicholas G.; Gupta, Satyandra K.

    2016-09-01

    Conventional miniaturized motion stages have a volume of 50-60 cm3 and a range of motion around 100 μm. Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based motion stages have been good alternatives in some applications for small footprint, micron-level accuracy, and a lower cost. However, existing MEMS-based motion stages are able to provide a force of μN level, small displacements (less than tens of microns), and need additional features for practical applications like a probe or a stage. In this paper, a single degree of freedom motion stage is designed and analyzed for a larger displacement, a larger output force, a smaller out-of-plane deformation, and a bigger moving stage for further applications. For these purposes, the presented motion stage is designed with a thermal actuator, folded springs, and a lever, and it is experimentally characterized. Furthermore, three different types of flexure joints are investigated to characterize their capabilities and suitability to serve as the revolute joint of the lever: a beam, a cartwheel, and a butterfly flexure. The presented motion stage has a moving stage of 15 mm  ×  15 mm and shows a maximum displacement over 80 μm, and out-of-plane deformation under a weight of 120 μN less than 2 μm. The force generated by the actuator is estimated to be 68.6 mN.

  5. The Influence of Vibration on Muscle Activation and Rate of Force Development during Maximal Isometric Contractions.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Brendan; Warman, Geoff; Purton, Jason; Doyle, Tim L A; Dugan, Eric

    2004-03-01

    At present there appears to be a need for research conducted on the effects of vibration on the contractile ability of skeletal muscle tissue. The aim of this study was to address this issue by examining the effects of a superimposed muscle/tendon vibration at 50.42±1.16 Hz (acceleration 13.24 ± 0.18ms(-2): displacement ≈5mm) on muscular activation and maximal isometric contraction. Sixteen participants with a mean age, body mass, and height of 22 ± 4.4 years, 73.2 ± 11.7 kg and 173.1 ± 9.7 cms, respectively, were recruited for this study. Electromyography and accelerometry from the rectus femoris, and maximal isometric force data characteristics were collected from the dominant limb under conditions of vibration, and no-vibration. A superimposed 50 Hz vibration was used during the contraction phase for the maximal isometric leg extension for the condition of vibration. A one-way ANOVA revealed no significant (p > 0.05) differences between the vibration and no-vibration conditions for peak normalized EMGRMS (84.74% Vs 88.1%) values. An ANOVA revealed significant (p > 0.05) differences between the peak fundamental frequencies of the FFT between the conditions vibration (27.1 ± 12.2 Hz) and no-vibration (9.8 ± 3.5 Hz). Peak isometric force, peak rate of force development, rate of force development at times 0.05, 0.01, 0.1, 0.5 seconds, and rate of force development at 50, 75, and 90% of peak force were not significantly different. The results of this study suggest that the application of vibration stimulation at 50 Hz during the contraction does not contribute to muscle activation, or enhance force production for maximal isometric contractions. Key PointsThe application of a vibratory stimulation to the human body increases the normal acceleration resulting in an increase in force and a change in performanceThis study was to address this issue by examining the effects of a direct superimposed muscle/tendon vibration at 50 Hz on isometric strength

  6. The vector of jaw muscle force as determined by computer-generated three dimensional simulation: a test of Greaves' model.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Philip; Wroe, Stephen; McHenry, Colin; Moreno, Karen; Bourke, Jason

    2008-11-14

    We present results from a detailed three-dimensional finite element analysis of the cranium and mandible of the Australian dingo (Canis lupus dingo) during a range of feeding activities and compare results with predictions based on two-dimensional methodology [Greaves, W.S., 2000. Location of the vector of jaw muscle force in mammals. Journal of Morphology 243, 293-299]. Greaves showed that the resultant muscle vector intersects the mandible line slightly posterior to the lower third molar (m3). Our work demonstrates that this is qualitatively correct, although the actual point is closer to the jaw joint. We show that it is theoretically possible for the biting side of the mandible to dislocate during unilateral biting; however, the bite point needs to be posterior to m3. Simulations show that reduced muscle activation on the non-biting side can considerably diminish the likelihood of dislocation with only a minor decrease in bite force during unilateral biting. By modulating muscle recruitment the animal may be able to maximise bite force whilst minimising the risk of dislocation. PMID:18838138

  7. cAMP controls the balance of the propulsive forces generated by the two flagella of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Yu; Yoshimura, Kenjiro

    2015-08-01

    The motility of cilia and flagella of eukaryotic cells is controlled by second messengers such as Ca(2+), cAMP, and cGMP. In this study, the cAMP-dependent control of flagellar bending of Chlamydomonas is investigated by applying cAMP through photolysis of 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl adenosine 3',5'-cyclicmonophosphate (caged cAMP). When cAMP is applied to demembranated and reactivated cells, cells begin to swim with a larger helical path. This change is due to a larger turn about the axis normal to the anterior-posterior axis, indicating an increased imbalance in the propulsive forces generated by the cis-flagellum (flagellum nearer to the eyespot) and trans-flagellum (flagellum farther from the eyespot). Consistently, when cAMP is applied to isolated axonemes, some axonemes show attenuated motility whereas others do not. Axonemes from uni1 mutants, which have only trans-flagella, do not respond to cAMP. These observations indicate that cAMP controls the balance of the forces generated by cis- and trans-flagella in Chlamydomonas.

  8. Spin force and the generation of sustained spin current in time-dependent Rashba and Dresselhaus systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Cong Son Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2014-05-14

    The generation of spin current and spin polarization in a two-dimensional electron gas structure is studied in the presence of Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit couplings (SOC), the strength of the latter being modulated in time by an ac gate voltage. By means of the non-Abelian gauge field approach, we established the relation between the Lorentz spin force and the spin current in the SOC system, and showed that the longitudinal component of the spin force induces a transverse spin current. For a constant (time-invariant) Rashba system, we recover the universal spin Hall conductivity of e/(8π) , derived previously via the Berry phase and semi-classical methods. In the case of a time-dependent SOC system, the spin current is sustained even under strong impurity scattering. We evaluated the ac spin current generated by a time-modulated Rashba SOC in the absence of any dc electric field. The magnitude of the spin current reaches a maximum when the modulation frequency matches the Larmor frequency of the electrons.

  9. Isometric and eccentric force generation assessment of skeletal muscles isolated from murine models of muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Moorwood, Catherine; Liu, Min; Tian, Zuozhen; Barton, Elisabeth R

    2013-01-31

    Critical to the evaluation of potential therapeutics for muscular disease are sensitive and reproducible physiological assessments of muscle function. Because many pre-clinical trials rely on mouse models for these diseases, isolated muscle function has become one of the standards for Go/NoGo decisions in moving drug candidates forward into patients. We will demonstrate the preparation of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and diaphragm muscles for functional testing, which are the predominant muscles utilized for these studies. The EDL muscle geometry is ideal for isolated muscle preparations, with two easily accessible tendons, and a small size that can be supported by superfusion in a bath. The diaphragm exhibits profound progressive pathology in dystrophic animals, and can serve as a platform for evaluating many potential therapies countering fibrosis, and promoting myofiber stability. Protocols for routine testing, including isometric and eccentric contractions, will be shown. Isometric force provides assessment of strength, and eccentric contractions help to evaluate sarcolemma stability, which is disrupted in many types of muscular dystrophies. Comparisons of the expected results between muscles from wildtype and dystrophic muscles will also be provided. These measures can complement morphological and biochemical measurements of tissue homeostasis, as well as whole animal assessments of muscle function.

  10. The first cellular bioenergetic process: primitive generation of a proton-motive force.

    PubMed

    Koch, A L; Schmidt, T M

    1991-10-01

    It is proposed that the energy-transducing system of the first cellular organism and its precursor was fueled by the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide and ferric sulfide to iron pyrites and two [H+] on the outside surface of a vesicle (the cell membrane), with the concomitant reduction of CO or CO2 on the interior. The resulting proton gradient across the cell membrane provides a proton-motive force, so that a variety of kinds of work can be done. It is envisioned as providing a selective advantage for cells capable of harvesting this potential. The proposed reactants for these reactions are consistent with the predicted composition of the Earth's early environment. Modern-day homologs of the ancestral components of the energy-transducing system are thought to be membrane-associated ferredoxins for the extracellular redox reaction, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase for the carbon fixation reaction, and ATPase for the harvesting of the proton gradient. With a source of consumable energy, the cell could drive chemical reactions and transport events in such a way as to be exploited by Darwinian evolution. PMID:1663558

  11. The first cellular bioenergetic process: primitive generation of a proton-motive force.

    PubMed

    Koch, A L; Schmidt, T M

    1991-10-01

    It is proposed that the energy-transducing system of the first cellular organism and its precursor was fueled by the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide and ferric sulfide to iron pyrites and two [H+] on the outside surface of a vesicle (the cell membrane), with the concomitant reduction of CO or CO2 on the interior. The resulting proton gradient across the cell membrane provides a proton-motive force, so that a variety of kinds of work can be done. It is envisioned as providing a selective advantage for cells capable of harvesting this potential. The proposed reactants for these reactions are consistent with the predicted composition of the Earth's early environment. Modern-day homologs of the ancestral components of the energy-transducing system are thought to be membrane-associated ferredoxins for the extracellular redox reaction, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase for the carbon fixation reaction, and ATPase for the harvesting of the proton gradient. With a source of consumable energy, the cell could drive chemical reactions and transport events in such a way as to be exploited by Darwinian evolution.

  12. Control logic to track the outputs of a command generator or randomly forced target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trankle, T. L.; Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for synthesizing time-invariant control logic to cause the outputs of a linear plant to track the outputs of an unforced (or randomly forced) linear dynamic system. The control logic uses feed-forward of the reference system state variables and feedback of the plant state variables. The feed-forward gains are obtained from the solution of a linear algebraic matrix equation of the Liapunov type. The feedback gains are the usual regulator gains, determined to stabilize (or augment the stability of) the plant, possibly including integral control. The method is applied here to the design of control logic for a second-order servomechanism to follow a linearly increasing (ramp) signal, an unstable third-order system with two controls to track two separate ramp signals, and a sixth-order system with two controls to track a constant signal and an exponentially decreasing signal (aircraft landing-flare or glide-slope-capture with constant velocity).

  13. Mental arithmetic activates analogic representations of internally generated sums.

    PubMed

    Kallai, Arava Y; Schunn, Christian D; Fiez, Julie A

    2012-08-01

    The internal representation of numbers generated during calculation has received little attention. Much of the mathematics learning literature focuses on symbolic retrieval of math facts; in contrast, we critically test the hypothesis that internally generated numbers are represented analogically, using an approximate number system. In an fMRI study, the spontaneous processing of arithmetical expressions was tested. Participants passively viewed a sequence of double-digit addition expressions that summed to the same number. Adaptation was found in number-related regions in a fronto-parietal network. Following adaptation, arrays of dots were introduced, differing in their numerical distance from the sum of the addition expressions. Activation in voxels that showed adaptation to a repeated sum was also sensitive to the distance of the dot quantity from the sum. We conclude that participants exhibited adaptation to an internally generated number, that adapted representations were analogic in nature, and that these analogic representations may undergird arithmetic calculation. PMID:22732492

  14. Development of a Polarizable Force Field For Proteins via Ab Initio Quantum Chemistry: First Generation Model and Gas Phase Tests

    PubMed Central

    KAMINSKI, GEORGE A.; STERN, HARRY A.; BERNE, B. J.; FRIESNER, RICHARD A.; CAO, YIXIANG X.; MURPHY, ROBERT B.; ZHOU, RUHONG; HALGREN, THOMAS A.

    2014-01-01

    We present results of developing a methodology suitable for producing molecular mechanics force fields with explicit treatment of electrostatic polarization for proteins and other molecular system of biological interest. The technique allows simulation of realistic-size systems. Employing high-level ab initio data as a target for fitting allows us to avoid the problem of the lack of detailed experimental data. Using the fast and reliable quantum mechanical methods supplies robust fitting data for the resulting parameter sets. As a result, gas-phase many-body effects for dipeptides are captured within the average RMSD of 0.22 kcal/mol from their ab initio values, and conformational energies for the di- and tetrapeptides are reproduced within the average RMSD of 0.43 kcal/mol from their quantum mechanical counterparts. The latter is achieved in part because of application of a novel torsional fitting technique recently developed in our group, which has already been used to greatly improve accuracy of the peptide conformational equilibrium prediction with the OPLS-AA force field.1 Finally, we have employed the newly developed first-generation model in computing gas-phase conformations of real proteins, as well as in molecular dynamics studies of the systems. The results show that, although the overall accuracy is no better than what can be achieved with a fixed-charges model, the methodology produces robust results, permits reasonably low computational cost, and avoids other computational problems typical for polarizable force fields. It can be considered as a solid basis for building a more accurate and complete second-generation model. PMID:12395421

  15. Physical activity does not account for the physiological response to forced swim testing.

    PubMed

    Abel, E L

    1994-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine physiological variables associated with the immobility response in the forced swim test. The first study compared the effects of water immersion, treadmill running, and foot shock, and showed that the time-related pattern of reactions to these three conditions, especially those involving lactate, glucose, anion gap (a measure of metabolic acidosis), and carbon dioxide differed significantly. The second study examined the role of food deprivation, and showed that this manipulation does not affect the behavior or physiological response of rats to testing. These results indicate that the physiological changes occurring during the forced swim are not simply due to increased physical activity or stress.

  16. Effects of boundary layer on flame propagation generated by forced ignition behind an incident shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, S.; Tamura, S.; Ishii, K.; Kataoka, H.

    2016-09-01

    To study the effects of the boundary layer on the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) process, the mixture behind an incident shock wave was ignited using laser breakdown. Ignition timing was controlled so that the interaction of the resulting flame with a laminar or turbulent boundary layer could be examined. In the case of the interaction with a laminar boundary layer, wrinkling of the flame was observed after the flame reached the corner of the channel. On the other hand, interaction with the turbulent boundary layer distorted the flame front and increased the spreading rate of the flame followed by prompt DDT. The inner structure of the turbulent boundary layer plays an important role in the DDT process. The region that distorted the flame within the turbulent boundary layer was found to be the intermediate region 0.01< y/δ < 0.4, where y is the distance from the wall and δ is the boundary layer thickness. The flame disturbance by the turbulent motions is followed by the flame interaction with the inner layer near the wall, which in turn generates a secondary-ignition kernel that produced a spherical accelerating flame, which ultimately led to the onset of detonation. After the flame reached the intermediate region, the time required for DDT was independent of the ignition position. The effect of the boundary layer on the propagating flame, thus, became relatively small after the accelerating flame was generated.

  17. Effects of boundary layer on flame propagation generated by forced ignition behind an incident shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, S.; Tamura, S.; Ishii, K.; Kataoka, H.

    2016-07-01

    To study the effects of the boundary layer on the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) process, the mixture behind an incident shock wave was ignited using laser breakdown. Ignition timing was controlled so that the interaction of the resulting flame with a laminar or turbulent boundary layer could be examined. In the case of the interaction with a laminar boundary layer, wrinkling of the flame was observed after the flame reached the corner of the channel. On the other hand, interaction with the turbulent boundary layer distorted the flame front and increased the spreading rate of the flame followed by prompt DDT. The inner structure of the turbulent boundary layer plays an important role in the DDT process. The region that distorted the flame within the turbulent boundary layer was found to be the intermediate region 0.01< y/δ < 0.4 , where y is the distance from the wall and δ is the boundary layer thickness. The flame disturbance by the turbulent motions is followed by the flame interaction with the inner layer near the wall, which in turn generates a secondary-ignition kernel that produced a spherical accelerating flame, which ultimately led to the onset of detonation. After the flame reached the intermediate region, the time required for DDT was independent of the ignition position. The effect of the boundary layer on the propagating flame, thus, became relatively small after the accelerating flame was generated.

  18. Endurance time, muscular activity and the hand/arm tremor for different exertion forces of holding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of exertion force on endurance time, muscular activity and hand/arm tremor during holding. Fifteen healthy young males were recruited as participants. The independent variable was exertion force (20%, 40%, 60% and 80% maximum holding capacity). The dependent variables were endurance time, muscular activity and hand/arm tremor. The results showed that endurance time decreased with exertion force while muscular activity and hand/arm tremor increased with exertion force. Hand/arm tremor increased with holding time. Endurance time of 40%, 60% and 80% maximum holding capacity was approximately 22.7%, 12.0% and 5.6% of that of 20% maximum holding capacity, respectively. The rms (root mean square) acceleration of hand/arm tremor of the final phase of holding was 2.27-, 1.33-, 1.20- and 1.73-fold of that of the initial phase of holding for 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% maximum holding capacity, respectively.

  19. Patterns of brain activity distinguishing free and forced actions: contribution from sensory cortices

    PubMed Central

    Kostelecki, Wojciech; Mei, Ye; Garcia Dominguez, Luis; Pérez Velázquez, José L.

    2012-01-01

    The neural basis of decision-making is extremely complex due to the large number of factors that contribute to the outcome of even the most basic actions as well as the range of appropriate responses within many behavioral contexts. To better understand the neural processes underlying basic forms of decision-making, this study utilized an experiment that required a choice about whether to press a button with the right or left hand. These instances of decision-making were compared to identical button presses that were experimentally specified rather than selected by the subject. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to record neural activity during these—what are being termed—free and forced actions and differences in the MEG signal between these two conditions were attributed to the distinct forms of neural activity required to carry out the two types of actions. To produce instances of free and forced behavior, cued button-pressing experiments were performed that use visual, aural, and memorized cues to instruct experimental subjects of the expected outcome of individual trials. Classification analysis of the trials revealed that cortical regions that allowed for the most accurate classification of free and forced actions primarily handle sensory input for the modality used to cue the trials: occipital cortex for visually cued trials, temporal cortex for aurally cued trials, and minor non-localized differences in MEG activity for trials initiated from memory. The differential roles of visual and auditory sensory cortices during free and forced actions provided insight into the neural processing steps that were engaged to initiate cued actions. Specifically, it suggested that detectable differences exist in the activity of sensory cortices and their target sites when subjects performed free and forced actions in response to sensory cues. PMID:23060760

  20. EMG activities and ground reaction forces during fatigued and nonfatigued sprinting.

    PubMed

    Nummela, A; Rusko, H; Mero, A

    1994-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate EMG activities and ground reaction forces during fatigued and nonfatigued running. Ten male sprint runners volunteered to run a maximal 20-m speed test, a 400-m time trial, and submaximal 20-m runs at the average speed of the first 100 m of the 400 m. During the latter stage of each run, ground reaction forces and EMG activity of four leg muscles were recorded. EMG activities were time averaged during three phases of running: preactivation, braking, and propulsion phase. The resultant ground reaction forces both in the braking (P < 0.001) and in the propulsion phase (P < 0.01) were greater in the maximal and submaximal 20 m than at the end of the 400 m. The averaged EMG during the braking phase (P < 0.01) and during the total ground phase (P < 0.05) was smaller in the submaximal 20 m than at the end of the 400 m. On the other hand the averaged EMG was greater during the maximal 20 m than at the end of the 400 m during the propulsion phase (P < 0.001) and during the total ground phase (P < 0.05). In addition, the more the preactivity increased the less the resultant ground reaction force decreased in the braking phase during the 400 m run (r = 0.77, P < 0.05). It was concluded that the role of the increased neural activation was to compensate for muscular fatigue and the preactivation had an important role in maintaining force production during the 400-m run. In addition, the fatigue was different in each working muscle. PMID:8007809

  1. Income-generating activities for family planning acceptors.

    PubMed

    1989-07-01

    The Income Generating Activities program for Family Planning Acceptors was introduced in Indonesia in 1979. Capital input by the Indonesian National Family Planning Coordination Board and the UN Fund for Population Activities was used to set up small businesses by family planning acceptors. In 2 years, when the businesses become self-sufficient, the loans are repaid, and the money is used to set up new family planning acceptors in business. The program strengthens family planning acceptance, improves the status of women, and enhances community self-reliance. The increase in household income generated by the program raises the standards of child nutrition, encourages reliance on the survival of children, and decreases the value of large families. Approximately 18,000 Family Planning-Income Generating Activities groups are now functioning all over Indonesia, with financial assistance from the central and local governments, the World Bank, the US Agency for International Development, the UN Population Fund, the Government of the Netherlands, and the Government of Australia through the Association of South East Asian Nations.

  2. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chichester, D. L.; Seabury, E. H.

    2009-03-10

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  3. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury

    2008-08-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  4. Active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders by multi-control forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    An unstiffened cylindrical model was used to study the control of sound transmission into aircraft cabins by the use of multi-control forces applied directly to the cylinder wall. External acoustic monopoles were located on each side of the cylinder to approximate the propeller noise source. This allowed the study of a dual control system utilizing multi-control forces in conjunction with synchrophasing of the twin acoustic monopole sources. For acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity, a spatially averaged noise reduction of approximately 30 dB was achieved using the active control system for both in-phase and out-of-phase monopoles; however, effective reduction of the sound field was dependent upon judiciously positioning the control forces for optimal control of the sound field.

  5. Induced Voltage Linear Extraction Method Using an Active Kelvin Bridge for Disturbing Force Self-Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lei; Tan, Jiubin; Zhao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an induced voltage linear extraction method for disturbing force self-sensing in the application of giant magnetostrictive actuators (GMAs). In this method, a Kelvin bridge combined with an active device is constructed instead of a conventional Wheatstone bridge for extraction of the induced voltage, and an additional GMA is adopted as a reference actuator in the self-sensing circuit in order to balance the circuit bridge. The linear fitting of the measurement data is done according to the linear relationship between the disturbing forces and the integral of the induced voltage. The experimental results confirm the good performance of the proposed method, and the self-sensitivity of the disturbing forces is better than 2.0 (mV·s)/N. PMID:27213399

  6. Force-endurance capabilities of extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves at different pressure levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishu, Ram R.; Klute, Glenn K.

    1993-01-01

    The human hand is a very useful multipurpose tool in all environments. However, performance capabilities are compromised considerably when gloves are donned. This is especially true to extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves. The primary intent was to answer the question of how long a person can perform tasks requiring certain levels of exertion. The objective was to develop grip force-endurance relations. Six subjects participated in a factorial experiment involving three hand conditions, three pressure differentials, and four levels of force exertion. The results indicate that, while the force that could be exerted depended on the glove, pressure differential, and the level of exertion, the endurance time at any exertion level depended just on the level of exertion expressed as a percentage of maximum exertion possible at that condition. The impact of these findings for practitioners as well as theoreticians is discussed.

  7. A Search for Coriolis Forces Acting on Tilt in Bipolar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, B. H.

    2013-12-01

    Bipolar active regions tend to be tilted with respect to the East - West equator of the Sun in accordance with Joy's law that describes the average tilt angle as a function of latitude. As individual bipolar active regions emerge, tilt angles vary with time. Data collected by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory at a higher cadence than previous data allow for a more continuous analysis of emerging regions over their lifetimes. It is theorized that rising magnetic flux-tubes, which emerge as active regions on the surface, are tilted by Coriolis forces acting on the retrograde flow inside the tubes. We will search for and measure any decrease in tilt near the end of emergence, as an indicator of Coriolis forces ending.

  8. Ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity during manual tracking of a moving visual target.

    PubMed

    Domkin, Dmitry; Forsman, Mikael; Richter, Hans O

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown an association of visual demands during near work and increased activity of the trapezius muscle. Those studies were conducted under stationary postural conditions with fixed gaze and artificial visual load. The present study investigated the relationship between ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity across individuals during performance of a natural dynamic motor task under free gaze conditions. Participants (N=11) tracked a moving visual target with a digital pen on a computer screen. Tracking performance, eye refraction and trapezius muscle activity were continuously measured. Ciliary muscle contraction force was computed from eye accommodative response. There was a significant Pearson correlation between ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity on the tracking side (0.78, p<0.01) and passive side (0.64, p<0.05). The study supports the hypothesis that high visual demands, leading to an increased ciliary muscle contraction during continuous eye-hand coordination, may increase trapezius muscle tension and thus contribute to the development of musculoskeletal complaints in the neck-shoulder area. Further experimental studies are required to clarify whether the relationship is valid within each individual or may represent a general personal trait, when individuals with higher eye accommodative response tend to have higher trapezius muscle activity. PMID:26746010

  9. Method of power generation and its apparatus utilizing gravitation force and buoyancy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.K.; Lee, S.E.

    1988-01-26

    An apparatus for the generation of power is described which comprises: at least first cylinder and at least second cylinder, at least first float member and at least second float member disposed in at least first and second cylinders, a lever arm pivotably disposed above the cylinder, the end portions of the arm lever being operatively connected to the respective float members, the lever arm containing weight members and defining a path for guiding the weight members to traverse the lever arm between the end portions, a crank member rotatably disposed on a crank shaft, the crank member connected to the center portion of the lever arm through connecting rods and guide-gears, a dam which provides a source of water, means for removing water from the dam and alternatively introducing and removing the water to and from at least first and second cylinders.

  10. Evaluation of the different forces brought into play during tube foot activities in sea stars.

    PubMed

    Hennebert, Elise; Haesaerts, Delphine; Dubois, Philippe; Flammang, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Sea star tube feet consist of an enlarged and flattened distal extremity (the disc), which makes contact with the substratum, and a proximal contractile cylinder (the stem), which acts as a tether. In this study, the different forces brought into play during tube foot functioning were investigated in two related species. The tube feet of Asterias rubens and Marthasterias glacialis attach to glass with a similar mean tenacity (0.24 and 0.43 MPa, respectively), corresponding to an estimated maximal attachment force of 0.15 and 0.35 N. The contraction force of their retractor muscle averages 0.017 N. The variation of the retractor muscle contraction with its extension ratio follows a typical bell-shaped length-tension curve in which a maximal contraction of approximately 0.04 N is obtained for an extension ratio of approximately 2.3 in both sea star species. The tensile strength of the tube foot stem was investigated considering the two tissues that could assume a load-bearing function, i.e. the retractor muscle and the connective tissue. The latter is a mutable collagenous tissue presenting a fivefold difference in tensile strength between its soft and stiff state. In our experiments, stiffening was induced by disrupting cell membranes or by modifying the ionic composition of the bathing solution. Finally, the force needed to break the tube foot retractor muscle was found to account for 18-25% of the tube foot total breaking force, showing that, although the connective tissue is the tissue layer that supports most of the load exerted on the stem, the contribution of the retractor muscle cannot be neglected in sea stars. All these forces appear well-balanced for proper functioning of the tube feet during the activities of the sea star. They are discussed in the context of two essential activities: the opening of bivalve shells and the maintenance of position in exposed habitats.

  11. Trunk Muscle Activation and Estimating Spinal Compressive Force in Rope and Harness Vertical Dance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Margaret; Dai, Boyi; Zhu, Qin; Humphrey, Neil

    2015-12-01

    Rope and harness vertical dance takes place off the floor with the dancer suspended from his or her center of mass in a harness attached to a rope from a point overhead. Vertical dance represents a novel environment for training and performing in which expected stresses on the dancer's body are different from those that take place during dance on the floor. Two male and eleven female dancers with training in vertical dance performed six typical vertical dance movements with electromyography (EMG) electrodes placed bilaterally on rectus abdominus, external oblique, erector spinae, and latissimus dorsi. EMG data were expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). A simplified musculoskeletal model based on muscle activation for these four muscle groups was used to estimate the compressive force on the spine. The greatest muscle activation for erector spinae and latissimus dorsi and the greatest trunk compressive forces were seen in vertical axis positions where the dancer was moving the trunk into a hyper-extended position. The greatest muscle activation for rectus abdominus and external oblique and the second highest compressive force were seen in a supine position with the arms and legs extended away from the center of mass (COM). The least muscle activation occurred in positions where the limbs were hanging below the torso. These movements also showed relatively low muscle activation compression forces. Post-test survey results revealed that dancers felt comfortable in these positions; however, observation of some positions indicated insufficient muscular control. Computing the relative contribution of muscles, expressed as muscle activation and estimated spinal compression, provided a measure of how much the muscle groups were working to support the spine and the rest of the dancer's body in the different movements tested. Additionally, identifying typical muscle recruitment patterns in each movement will help identify key exercises

  12. The Transient Aerodynamic Forces Effected by Trailing Edge Active Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Dan; Culp, John; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    The transient aerodynamic forces effected by trailing edge flow control are investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a 2-DOF traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the surface using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The time-histories of surface pressure and aerodynamic lift and pitching moment immediately following the application of flow control are measured using simultaneous pressure, force and velocity measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. Circulation time history that is estimated from a PIV wake survey shows that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within about 1 . 5TCONV , which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  13. Fly in Atmosphere by Drag Force - Easy Thrust Generation Aircraft Engine Based Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Celestin, Mwizerwa

    2013-11-01

    This paper aims to present to the science community another way to fly in atmosphere, a way which is much more cheaper, efficient, safe and easy. Over the years scientists have been trying to find a way to built the vertically taking off vehicles but there have been no satisfactory success(what have been found was very expensive), Even aircrafts we know now need very sophisticated and expensive engines and not efficient enough. This way of flying may help our governments to spend less money on technologies and will help people to travel at very low prices so that, it may be a solution to the crisis which the world faces nowadays. In other words, it is my proposal to the next generation technologies we was looking for for years because everything can fly from the car to the trucks, the spaceships and even the hotels maybe constructed and fly as we construct the ships which sail in the oceans. My way of flying will have many applications in all the aspect of travel as it is going to be explained.

  14. Single-molecule kinetics under force: probing protein folding and enzymatic activity with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley

    2010-03-01

    Weak non-covalent bonds between and within single molecules govern many aspects of biological structure and function (e.g. DNA base-paring, receptor-ligand binding, protein folding, etc.) In living systems, these interactions are often subject to mechanical forces, which can greatly alter their kinetics and activity. My group develops and applies novel single-molecule manipulation techniques to explore and quantify these force-dependent kinetics. Using optical tweezers, we have quantified the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of different proteins, including the cytoskeletal protein spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans's group [1], and the A2 domain of the von Willebrand factor blood clotting protein in collaboration with T. Springer's group [2]. Furthermore, we have studied the kinetics of the ADAMTS13 enzyme acting on a single A2 domain, and have shown that physiolgical forces in the circulation can act as a cofactor for enzymatic cleavage, regulating hemostatic activity [2]. References: 1. E. Evans, K. Halvorsen, K. Kinoshita, and W.P. Wong, Handbook of Single Molecule Biophysics, P. Hinterdorfer, ed., Springer (2009). 2. X. Zhang, K. Halvorsen, C.-Z. Zhang, W.P. Wong, and T.A. Springer, Science 324 (5932), 1330-1334 (2009).

  15. Active Path Selection of Fluid Microcapsules in Artificial Blood Vessel by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kohji; Muramatsu, Yusuke; Ueda, Sawami; Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakayashiki, Yusuke; Ishihara, Ken

    2009-07-01

    Micrometer-sized microcapsules collapse upon exposure to ultrasound. Use of this phenomenon for a drug delivery system (DDS), not only for local delivery of medication but also for gene therapy, should be possible. However, enhancing the efficiency of medication is limited because capsules in suspension diffuse in the human body after injection, since the motion of capsules in blood flow cannot be controlled. To control the behavior of microcapsules, acoustic radiation force was introduced. We detected local changes in microcapsule density by producing acoustic radiation force in an artificial blood vessel. Furthermore, we theoretically estimated the conditions required for active path selection of capsules at a bifurcation point in the artificial blood vessel. We observed the difference in capsule density at both in the bifurcation point and in alternative paths downstream of the bifurcation point for different acoustic radiation forces. Comparing the experimental results with those obtained theoretically, the conditions for active path selection were calculated from the acoustic radiation force and fluid resistance of the capsules. The possibility of controlling capsule flow towards a specific point in a blood vessel was demonstrated.

  16. Increase in Mechanical Resistance to Force in a Shear-Activated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botello, Eric; Harris, Nolan; Choi, Huiwan; Zhou, Zhou; Bergeron, Angela; Dong, Jing-Fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2009-03-01

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) is the largest multimeric adhesion ligand found in human blood. Plasma VWF (pVWF) must be exposed to shear stress, like at sites of vascular injury, to be activated to bind platelets to induce blood clotting. In addition, adhesion activity of VWF is related to its polymer size, with the ultra-large form of VWF (ULVWF) being hyper-active, and forming fibers even without exposure to shear stress. We used the AFM to stretch pVWF, sheared VWF (sVWF) and ULVWF, and monitor the forces as a function of molecular extension. We showed a similar increase in force resistance to unfolding for sVWF and ULVWF when compared to pVWF. The increase in force is reduced when other molecules that are known to disrupt their fibril formation are present. Our results provide evidence that the common higher order structure of sVWF and ULVWF may affect the domain structure that causes difference in their adhesion activity compared to pVWF.

  17. Differences in typing forces, muscle activity, comfort, and typing performance among virtual, notebook, and desktop keyboards.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Ho; Aulck, Lovenoor; Bartha, Michael C; Harper, Christy A; Johnson, Peter W

    2014-11-01

    The present study investigated whether there were physical exposure and typing productivity differences between a virtual keyboard with no tactile feedback and two conventional keyboards where key travel and tactile feedback are provided by mechanical switches under the keys. The key size and layout were same across all the keyboards. Typing forces; finger and shoulder muscle activity; self-reported comfort; and typing productivity were measured from 19 subjects while typing on a virtual (0 mm key travel), notebook (1.8 mm key travel), and desktop keyboard (4 mm key travel). When typing on the virtual keyboard, subjects typed with less force (p's < 0.0001) and had lower finger flexor/extensor muscle activity (p's < 0.05). However, the lower typing forces and finger muscle activity came at the expense of a 60% reduction in typing productivity (p < 0.0001), decreased self-reported comfort (p's < 0.0001), and a trend indicating an increase in shoulder muscle activity (p's < 0.10). Therefore, for long typing sessions or when typing productivity is at a premium, conventional keyboards with tactile feedback may be more suitable interface.

  18. Bioreductively Activated Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generators as MRSA Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khodade, Vinayak S; Sharath Chandra, Mallojjala; Banerjee, Ankita; Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulipeta, Mallikarjuna; Rangarajan, Radha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2014-07-10

    The number of cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections is on the rise globally and new strategies to identify drug candidates with novel mechanisms of action are in urgent need. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a series of benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-triones, which were designed based on redox-active natural products. We find that the in vitro inhibitory activity of 6-(prop-2-ynyl)benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-trione (1f) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including a panel of patient-derived strains, is comparable or better than vancomycin. We show that the lead compound generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell, contributing to its antibacterial activity. PMID:25050164

  19. Channel-wing System for Thrust Deflection and Force/Moment Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J. (Inventor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An aircraft comprising a Channel Wing having blown c h - ne1 circulation control wings (CCW) for various functions. The blown channel CCW includes a channel that has a rounded or near-round trailing edge. The channel further has a trailing-edge slot that is adjacent to the rounded trailing edge of the channel. The trailing-edge slot has an inlet connected to a source of pressurized air and is capable of tangentially discharging pressurized air over the rounded trailing edge. The aircraft further has a propeller that is located in the channel and ahead of the rounded trailing edge of the channel. The propeller provides a propeller thrust exhaust stream across the channel wing to propel the aircraft through the air and to provide high lift. The pressurized air being discharged over the rounded trailing edge provides a high lift that is obtained independent of an aircraft angle of attack, thus preventing the asymmetry. separated flow, and stall experienced by the CC wing at the high angle of attack it required for high lift generation. The aircraft can further include blown outboard circulation control wings (CCW) that are synergistically connected to the blown channel CCWs. The blown outboard CCWs provide additional high lift, control thrust/drag interchange, and can provide all three aerodynamic moments when differential blowing is applied front-to-rear or left-to-right. Both the blown channel CCW and the outboard CCW also have leading-edge blowing slots to prevent flow separation or to provide aerodynamic moments for control.

  20. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C.; Konger, Raymond L.; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  1. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Harrison, Kathleen A; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C; Konger, Raymond L; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-04-12

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  2. Observations of Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves forced by Extratropical Wave Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiladis, G. N.; Biello, J. A.; Straub, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    It is well established by observations that deep tropical convection can in certain situations be forced by extratropical Rossby wave activity. Such interactions are a well-known feature of regions of upper level westerly flow, and in particular where westerlies and equatorward wave guiding by the basic state occur at low enough latitudes to interact with tropical and subtropical moisture sources. In these regions convection is commonly initiated ahead of upper level troughs, characteristic of forcing by quasi-geostrophic dynamics. However, recent observational evidence indicates that extratropical wave activity is also associated with equatorial convection even in regions where there is a "critical line" to Rossby wave propagation at upper levels, that is, where the zonal phase speed of the wave is equal to the zonal flow speed. A common manifestation of this type of interaction involves the initiation of convectively coupled Kelvin waves, as well as mixed Rossby-gravity (MRG) waves. These waves are responsible for a large portion of the convective variability within the ITCZ over the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic sectors, as well as within the Amazon Basin of South America. For example, Kelvin waves originating within the western Pacific ITCZ are often triggered by Rossby wave activity propagating into the Australasian region from the South Indian Ocean extratropics. At other times, Kelvin waves are seen to originate along the eastern slope of the Andes. In the latter case the initial forcing is sometimes linked to a low-level "pressure surge," initiated by wave activity propagating equatorward from the South Pacific storm track. In yet other cases, such as over Africa, the forcing appears to be related to wave activity in the extratropics which is not necessarily propagating into low latitudes, but appears to "project" onto the Kelvin structure, in line with past theoretical and modeling studies. Observational evidence for extratropical forcing of Kelvin and MRG

  3. Aerodynamic force generation and power requirements in forward flight in a fruit fly with modeled wing motion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mao; Wu, Jiang Hao

    2003-09-01

    Aerodynamic force generation and power requirements in forward flight in a fruit fly with modeled wing motion were studied using the method of computational fluid dynamics. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved numerically. The solution provided the flow velocity and pressure fields, from which the vorticity wake structure and the unsteady aerodynamic forces and torques were obtained (the inertial torques due to the acceleration of the wing-mass were computed analytically). From the flow-structure and force information, insights were gained into the unsteady aerodynamic force generation. On the basis of the aerodynamic and inertial torques, the mechanical power was obtained, and its properties were investigated. The unsteady force mechanisms revealed previously for hovering (i.e. delayed stall, rapid acceleration at the beginning of the strokes and fast pitching-up rotation at the end of the strokes) apply to forward flight. Even at high advance ratios, e.g. J=0.53-0.66 (J is the advance ratio), the leading edge vortex does not shed (at such advance ratios, the wing travels approximately 6.5 chord lengths during the downstroke). At low speeds (J approximately equal to 0.13), the lift (vertical force) for weight support is produced during both the down- and upstrokes (the downstroke producing approximately 80% and the upstroke producing approximately 20% of the mean lift), and the lift is contributed mainly by the wing lift; the thrust that overcomes the body drag is produced during the upstroke, and it is contributed mainly by the wing drag. At medium speeds (J approximately equal to 0.27), the lift is mainly produced during the downstroke and the thrust mainly during the upstroke; both of them are contributed almost equally by the wing lift and wing drag. At high speeds (J approximately equal to 0.53), the lift is mainly produced during the downstroke and is mainly contributed by the wing drag; the thrust is produced during both the down- and upstrokes, and in

  4. Analysis of Handling Qualities Design Criteria for Active Inceptor Force-Feel Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malpica, Carlos A.; Lusardi, Jeff A.

    2013-01-01

    The force-feel system characteristics of the cyclic inceptors of most helicopters are set based on the characteristics of the mechanical components in the control system (mass, springs, friction dampers, etc.). For these helicopters, the force-feel characteristics typically remain constant over the entire flight envelope, with perhaps a trim release to minimize control forces while maneuvering. With the advent of fly-by-wire control systems and active inceptors in helicopters, the force-feel characteristics are now determined by the closed-loop response of the active inceptor itself as defined by the inertia, force/displacement gradient, damping, breakout force and detent shape configuration parameters in the inceptor control laws. These systems give the flexibility to dynamically prescribe different feel characteristics for different control modes or flight conditions, and the ability to provide tactile cueing to the pilot through the actively controlled side-stick or center-stick cyclic inceptor. For rotorcraft, a few studies have been conducted to assess the effects of cyclic force-feel characteristics on handling qualities in flight. An early study provided valuable insight into the static force-deflection characteristics (force gradient) and the number of axes controlled by the side-stick controller for the U.S. Army's Advanced Digital/Optical Control System (ADOCS) demonstrator aircraft [1]. The first of a series of studies providing insight on the inceptor dynamic force-feel characteristics was conducted on the NASA/Army CH-47B variable-stability helicopter [2]. This work led to a proposed requirement that set boundaries based on the cyclic natural frequency and inertia, with the stipulation of a lower damping ratio limit of 0.3 [3]. A second study was conducted by the Canadian Institute for Aerospace Research using their variable-stability Bell 205A helicopter [4]. This research suggested boundaries for stick dynamics based on natural frequency and damping

  5. [Unpredictable chronic mild stress effects on antidepressants activities in forced swim test].

    PubMed

    Kudryashov, N V; Kalinina, T S; Voronina, T A

    2015-02-01

    The experiments has been designed to study unpredictable chronic mild stress effect on anti-depressive activities of amitriptyline (10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) in forced swim test in male outbred mice. It is shown that acute treatment with fluoxetine does not produce any antidepressant effects in mice following stress of 14 days while the sub-chronic injections of fluoxetine result in more deep depressive-like behavior. In 28 daily stressed mice, antidepressant effect of fluoxetine is observed independently of the injection rates. Amitriptyline demonstrates the antidepressant activity regardless of the duration of stress or administration scheduling, but at the same time the severity of anti-immobilization effect of amitriptyline in stressed mice is weaker in compare to non-stressed trails. Thus, the injection rates and duration of unpredictable mild chronic stress are the parameters that determine the efficiency of antidepressants in the mouse forced swimming test.

  6. Periodic increases in force during sustained contraction reduce fatigue and facilitate spatial redistribution of trapezius muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Falla, Deborah; Farina, Dario

    2007-09-01

    This study compared fatigue and the spatial distribution of upper trapezius electromyographic (EMG) amplitude during a 6-min constant force shoulder elevation task at 20% of the maximal voluntary contraction force (MVC) (constant force) and during the same task interrupted by brief (2 s) periodic increases in force to 25% MVC every 30 s (variable force). Surface EMG signals were recorded with a 13 x 5 grid of electrodes from the upper trapezius muscle of nine healthy subjects. The centroid (center of activity) of the EMG root mean square map was computed to assess changes over time in the spatial distribution of EMG amplitude. MVC force decreased by (mean +/- SD) 9.0 +/- 3.9% after the constant force task (P < 0.05) but was unchanged following the variable force contraction. The centroid of EMG amplitude shifted in the cranial direction across the duration of the variable force contraction (P < 0.05) but not during the constant force contraction (shift of 2.9 +/- 2.3 mm and 1.4 +/- 1.1 mm, respectively). The results demonstrate that periodic increases in force during a sustained contraction enhance the modifications in spatial distribution of upper trapezius EMG amplitude and reduce fatigue compared to a constant force contraction performed at a lower average load. The change in spatial distribution of EMG amplitude over time during a sustained contraction may reflect a mechanism to counteract fatigue during prolonged muscle activity.

  7. An Analysis of the Pressures, Forces and Moments Induced by the Ground Vortex Generated by a Single Impinging Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    When a jet STOVL aircraft is in STOL operation the jets impinge on the ground and generate wall jets flowing radially outward from the points at which the jets impinge. When the forward flowing part of a wall jet meets the free stream flow it is rolled back on itself forming a parabolic shaped ground vortex. Positive pressures are induced on the lower surface of the configuration ahead of the ground vortex and suction pressures are induced over the ground vortex itself. In addition, the suction pressures induced aft of the jet out of ground effect are reduced and lifting pressures are induced on the upper surface. This study analyzes available pressure and force data and develops a method for estimating the forces and moments induced in ground effect. The method includes the effects of configuration variables, height and operating conditions, as well as the effects of the location, deflection and shape of the jet. However, it is limited to single jets at subcritical nozzle pressure ratios. An analysis of the effects of moving over the ground vs. tests over a fixed ground plane is included.

  8. Forced-exercise delays neuropathic pain in experimental diabetes: effects on voltage-activated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Shankarappa, Sahadev A; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S; Stubbs, Evan B

    2011-07-01

    Physical exercise produces a variety of psychophysical effects, including altered pain perception. Elevated levels of centrally produced endorphins or endocannabinoids are implicated as mediators of exercise-induced analgesia. The effect of exercise on the development and persistence of disease-associated acute/chronic pain remains unclear. In this study, we quantified the physiological consequence of forced-exercise on the development of diabetes-associated neuropathic pain. Euglycemic control or streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic adult male rats were subdivided into sedentary or forced-exercised (2-10 weeks, treadmill) subgroups and assessed for changes in tactile responsiveness. Two weeks following STZ-treatment, sedentary rats developed a marked and sustained hypersensitivity to von Frey tactile stimulation. By comparison, STZ-treated diabetic rats undergoing forced-exercise exhibited a 4-week delay in the onset of tactile hypersensitivity that was independent of glucose control. Exercise-facilitated analgesia in diabetic rats was reversed, in a dose-dependent manner, by naloxone. Small-diameter (< 30 μm) DRG neurons harvested from STZ-treated tactile hypersensitive diabetic rats exhibited an enhanced (2.5-fold) rightward (depolarizing) shift in peak high-voltage activated (HVA) Ca(2+) current density with a concomitant appearance of a low-voltage activated (LVA) Ca(2+) current component. LVA Ca(2+) currents present in DRG neurons from hypersensitive diabetic rats exhibited a marked depolarizing shift in steady-state inactivation. Forced-exercise attenuated diabetes-associated changes in HVA Ca(2+) current density while preventing the depolarizing shift in steady-state inactivation of LVA Ca(2+) currents. Forced-exercise markedly delays the onset of diabetes-associated neuropathic pain, in part, by attenuating associated changes in HVA and LVA Ca(2+) channel function within small-diameter DRG neurons possibly by altering opioidergic tone. PMID:21554321

  9. Iterative weighted average diffusion as a novel external force in the active contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirov, Ilya S.; Nakhmani, Arie

    2016-03-01

    The active contour model has good performance in boundary extraction for medical images; particularly, Gradient Vector Flow (GVF) active contour model shows good performance at concavity convergence and insensitivity to initialization, yet it is susceptible to edge leaking, deep and narrow concavities, and has some issues handling noisy images. This paper proposes a novel external force, called Iterative Weighted Average Diffusion (IWAD), which used in tandem with parametric active contours, provides superior performance in images with high values of concavity. The image gradient is first turned into an edge image, smoothed, and modified with enhanced corner detection, then the IWAD algorithm diffuses the force at a given pixel based on its 3x3 pixel neighborhood. A forgetting factor, φ, is employed to ensure that forces being spread away from the boundary of the image will attenuate. The experimental results show better behavior in high curvature regions, faster convergence, and less edge leaking than GVF when both are compared to expert manual segmentation of the images.

  10. Dynamic Allostery of the Catabolite Activator Protein Revealed by Interatomic Forces.

    PubMed

    Louet, Maxime; Seifert, Christian; Hensen, Ulf; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-08-01

    The Catabolite Activator Protein (CAP) is a showcase example for entropic allostery. For full activation and DNA binding, the homodimeric protein requires the binding of two cyclic AMP (cAMP) molecules in an anti-cooperative manner, the source of which appears to be largely of entropic nature according to previous experimental studies. We here study at atomic detail the allosteric regulation of CAP with Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We recover the experimentally observed entropic penalty for the second cAMP binding event with our recently developed force covariance entropy estimator and reveal allosteric communication pathways with Force Distribution Analyses (FDA). Our observations show that CAP binding results in characteristic changes in the interaction pathways connecting the two cAMP allosteric binding sites with each other, as well as with the DNA binding domains. We identified crucial relays in the mostly symmetric allosteric activation network, and suggest point mutants to test this mechanism. Our study suggests inter-residue forces, as opposed to coordinates, as a highly sensitive measure for structural adaptations that, even though minute, can very effectively propagate allosteric signals. PMID:26244893

  11. Influences of volitional and forced intentions on physical activity and effort within the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D; Frederick, Christina; Biddle, Stuart J H; Hagger, Martin S; Smith, Brett

    2007-04-01

    In the present study, we examined the utility of volitional and forced intentions in predicting participation in physical activities and effort within the theory of planned behaviour. Four hundred and forty-four participants (184 males, 260 females) aged 19.1 +/- 3.3 years (mean +/- s) completed self-report measures of intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, volitional intentions, forced intentions, and past behaviour in a physical activity context. Six weeks later, they completed self-report measures of physical activity behaviour and effort. Results indicated that volitional intentions and forced intentions contributed to the prediction of effort over and above intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, perceptions of control, past behaviour, and the product terms of attitudesxintentions and subjective normsxintentions. Volitional intentions and forced intentions did not predict participation in physical activities over and above effort. We concluded that volitional intentions and forced intentions assist in the explanation of effort in the context of physical activity behaviour.

  12. An active immunization approach to generate protective catalytic antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Han, Y; Wilkinson, M F

    2001-01-01

    We report that mice immunized with a phosphate immunogen produced polyclonal catalytic antibodies (PCAbs) that catalysed the hydrolysis of carbaryl, a widely used broad-spectrum carbamate insecticide that exerts toxic effects in animals and humans. The reaction catalysed by the PCAbs (IgGs) obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in vitro with the following values at pH 8.0 and 25 degrees C: K(m) approximately 8.0 microM, k(cat)=4.8x10(-3)-5.8x10(-1), k(cat)/k(non-cat)=5.6x10(1)-6.8x10(3) (where k(non-cat) is the rate constant of the reaction in the absence of added catalyst). The PCAbs were also active in whole sera under physiological conditions in vitro. The PCAbs induced in vivo were also active in vivo, as immunization with the phosphate immunogen decreased the mouse blood concentration of carbaryl. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that active immunization generates antibodies possessing therapeutic catalytic function in vivo. We propose that active immunization schemes that induce enzymically active antibodies may provide a highly specific therapeutic approach for degrading toxic substances. PMID:11696002

  13. Defence force activities in marine protected areas: environmental management of Shoalwater Bay Training Area, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen; Wang, Xiaohua; Paull, David; Kesby, Julie

    2010-05-01

    Environmental management of military activities is of growing global concern by defence forces. As one of the largest landholders in Australia, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) is increasingly concerned with sustainable environmental management. This paper focuses on how the ADF is maintaining effective environmental management, especially in environmentally sensitive marine protected areas. It uses Shoalwater Bay Training Area (SWBTA) as a research example to examine environmental management strategies conducted by the ADF. SWBTA is one of the most significant Defence training areas in Australia, with a large number of single, joint and combined military exercises conducted in the area. With its maritime component contained in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP), the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA), and abutting Queensland’s State Marine Parks, it has high protection values. It is therefore vital for the ADF to adopt environmentally responsible management while they are conducting military activities. As to various tools employed to manage environmental performance, the ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) is widely used by the ADF. This paper examines military activities and marine environmental management within SWBTA, using the Talisman Saber (TS) exercise series as an example. These are extensive joint exercises conducted by the ADF and the United States defence forces. The paper outlines relevant legislative framework and environmental policies, analyses how the EMS operates in environmental management of military activities, and how military activities comply with these regulations. It discusses the implementation of the ADF EMS, including risk reduction measures, environmental awareness training, consultation and communication with stakeholders. A number of environmental management actions used in the TS exercises are presented to demonstrate the EMS application. Our investigations to this point indicate that the ADF is

  14. Soleus Fiber Force and Maximal Shortening Velocity After Non-Weight Bearing with Intermittent Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Bangart, Jill J.; Karhanek, Miloslav; Fitts, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of intermittent weight bearing (IWB) as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing (NWB)-induced alterations in soleus type 1 fiber force (in mN), tension (P(sub o); force per fiber cross-sectional area in kN/sq m), and maximal unloaded shortening velocity (V(sub o), in fiber lengths/s). Adult rats were assigned to one of the following groups: normal weight bearing (WB), 14 days of hindlimb NWB (NWB group), and 14 days of hindlimb NWB with IWB treatments (IWB group). The IWB treatment consisted of four 10-min periods of standing WB each day. Single, chemically permeabilized soleus fiber segments were mounted between a force transducer and position motor and were studied at maximal Ca(2+) activation, after which type 1 fiber myosin heavy-chain composition was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. NWB resulted in a loss in relative soleus mass (-45%), with type 1 fibers displaying reductions in diameter (-28%) and peak isometric force (-55%) and an increase in V(sub o) (+33%). In addition, NWB induced a 16% reduction in type 1 fiber P., a 41% reduction in type 1 fiber peak elastic modulus [E(sub o), defined as ((delta)force/(delta)length x (fiber length/fiber cross-sectional area] and a significant increase in the P(sub o)/E(sub o) ratio. In contrast to NWB, IWB reduced the loss of relative soleus mass (by 22%) and attenuated alterations in type 1 fiber diameter (by 36%), peak force (by 29%), and V(sub o)(by 48%) but had no significant effect on P(sub o), E(sub o) or P(sub o)/E(sub o). These results indicate that a modest restoration of WB activity during 14 days of NWB is sufficient to attenuate type 1 fiber atrophy and to partially restore type 1 peak isometric force and V(sub o) to WB levels. However, the NWB-induced reductions in P(sub o) and E(sub o) which we hypothesize to be due to a decline in the number and stiffness of cross bridges, respectively, are considerably less responsive to this

  15. Estimation of muscle forces in gait using a simulation of the electromyographic activity and numerical optimization.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Emiliano Pablo; Crespo, Marcos José; Braidot, Ariel Andrés Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Clinical gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait patterns. However, a complete distribution of muscle forces throughout the gait cycle is a current challenge for many researchers. Two techniques are often used to estimate muscle forces: inverse dynamics with static optimization and computer muscle control that uses forward dynamics to minimize tracking. The first method often involves limitations due to changing muscle dynamics and possible signal artefacts that depend on day-to-day variation in the position of electromyographic (EMG) electrodes. Nevertheless, in clinical gait analysis, the method of inverse dynamics is a fundamental and commonly used computational procedure to calculate the force and torque reactions at various body joints. Our aim was to develop a generic musculoskeletal model that could be able to be applied in the clinical setting. The musculoskeletal model of the lower limb presents a simulation for the EMG data to address the common limitations of these techniques. This model presents a new point of view from the inverse dynamics used on clinical gait analysis, including the EMG information, and shows a similar performance to another model available in the OpenSim software. The main problem of these methods to achieve a correct muscle coordination is the lack of complete EMG data for all muscles modelled. We present a technique that simulates the EMG activity and presents a good correlation with the muscle forces throughout the gait cycle. Also, this method showed great similarities whit the real EMG data recorded from the subjects doing the same movement.

  16. Dose-dependent influence of buspirone on the activities of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Redrobe, J P; Bourin, M

    1998-07-01

    Recent clinical data suggest that buspirone may enhance the efficacy and/or reduce the latency to therapeutic effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in unipolar major depressive disorder. The present study, using the mouse forced swimming test, was performed to investigate further the mechanisms involved in the potential antidepressant-enhancing effects of buspirone. Prior administration of buspirone (0.06 mg kg(-1), i.p.) significantly enhanced the anti-immobility effects of subactive doses of fluvoxamine (4 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01), paroxetine (4 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01), citalopram (4 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01) and sertraline (2 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01) in the forced swimming test. However, pretreatment with buspirone did not induce antidepressant-like effects when tested in combination with fluoxetine (4 mg kg(-1), i.p.). Each antidepressant tested reduced immobility time in the forced swimming test [citalopram (16 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01), fluoxetine (32 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01), fluvoxamine (32 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01), paroxetine (16 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01) and sertraline (16 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01)]. Pretreatment with buspirone (0.5 mg kg(-1), i.p.), or its major metabolite 1-PP (0.5 mg kg(-1), i.p.), attenuated all SSRI-induced anti-immobility effects (P < 0.01). Concomitant studies of locomotor activity ruled out any stimulant or sedative effects of the interactions. The results of the present study suggested that low dose buspirone enhanced the activity of subactive doses of SSRIs in the mouse forced swimming test, probably via an action at 5-HT1A receptors. On the other hand, a high dose of buspirone attenuated the antidepressant-like effects of active doses of these drugs, possibly via the generation of an active metabolite (1-PP) acting at alpha2-adrenoreceptors.

  17. Omega-3 fatty acids have antidepressant activity in forced swimming test in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, Lalit; Tongia, Sudheer K; Pal, Veerendra S; Agrawal, Rajendra P; Nyati, Prem; Phadnis, Pradeep

    2007-01-01

    Forced swimming test is used to induce a characteristic behavior of immobility in rats, which resembles depression in humans to some extent. We evaluated the effect of omega-3 fatty acids alone as well as compared it with the standard antidepressant therapy with fluoxetine in both acute and chronic studies. In both the studies, rats were divided into 4 groups and subjected to the following drug interventions - Group 1- control: Group 2- fluoxetine in dose of 10 mg/kg subcutaneously 23.5, 5 and 1 h before the test: Group 3- omega-3 fatty acids in dose of 500 mg/kg orally; Group 4- fluoxetine plus omega-3 fatty acids both. In acute study, omega-3 fatty acids were given in single dose 2 h prior to the test while in chronic study omega-3 fatty acids were given daily for a period of 28 days. All animals were subjected to a 15-min pretest followed 24 h later by a 5-min test. A time sampling method was used to score the behavioral activity in each group. The results revealed that in acute study, omega-3 fatty acids do not have any significant effect in forced swimming test. However, in chronic study, omega-3 fatty acids affect the immobility and swimming behavior significantly when compared with control (p < 0.01) without any significant effect on climbing behavior and the efficacy of combination of omega-3 fatty acids and fluoxetine is significantly more than that of fluoxetine alone in changing the behavioral activity of rats in forced swimming test. It leads to the conclusion that omega-3 fatty acids have antidepressant activity per se, and the combination of fluoxetine and omega-3 fatty acids has more antidepressant efficacy than fluoxetine alone in forced swimming test in Wistar rats.

  18. Optimization of Muscle Activity for Task-Level Goals Predicts Complex Changes in Limb Forces across Biomechanical Contexts

    PubMed Central

    McKay, J. Lucas; Ting, Lena H.

    2012-01-01

    Optimality principles have been proposed as a general framework for understanding motor control in animals and humans largely based on their ability to predict general features movement in idealized motor tasks. However, generalizing these concepts past proof-of-principle to understand the neuromechanical transformation from task-level control to detailed execution-level muscle activity and forces during behaviorally-relevant motor tasks has proved difficult. In an unrestrained balance task in cats, we demonstrate that achieving task-level constraints center of mass forces and moments while minimizing control effort predicts detailed patterns of muscle activity and ground reaction forces in an anatomically-realistic musculoskeletal model. Whereas optimization is typically used to resolve redundancy at a single level of the motor hierarchy, we simultaneously resolved redundancy across both muscles and limbs and directly compared predictions to experimental measures across multiple perturbation directions that elicit different intra- and interlimb coordination patterns. Further, although some candidate task-level variables and cost functions generated indistinguishable predictions in a single biomechanical context, we identified a common optimization framework that could predict up to 48 experimental conditions per animal (n = 3) across both perturbation directions and different biomechanical contexts created by altering animals' postural configuration. Predictions were further improved by imposing experimentally-derived muscle synergy constraints, suggesting additional task variables or costs that may be relevant to the neural control of balance. These results suggested that reduced-dimension neural control mechanisms such as muscle synergies can achieve similar kinetics to the optimal solution, but with increased control effort (≈2×) compared to individual muscle control. Our results are consistent with the idea that hierarchical, task-level neural control

  19. Optimization of muscle activity for task-level goals predicts complex changes in limb forces across biomechanical contexts.

    PubMed

    McKay, J Lucas; Ting, Lena H

    2012-01-01

    Optimality principles have been proposed as a general framework for understanding motor control in animals and humans largely based on their ability to predict general features movement in idealized motor tasks. However, generalizing these concepts past proof-of-principle to understand the neuromechanical transformation from task-level control to detailed execution-level muscle activity and forces during behaviorally-relevant motor tasks has proved difficult. In an unrestrained balance task in cats, we demonstrate that achieving task-level constraints center of mass forces and moments while minimizing control effort predicts detailed patterns of muscle activity and ground reaction forces in an anatomically-realistic musculoskeletal model. Whereas optimization is typically used to resolve redundancy at a single level of the motor hierarchy, we simultaneously resolved redundancy across both muscles and limbs and directly compared predictions to experimental measures across multiple perturbation directions that elicit different intra- and interlimb coordination patterns. Further, although some candidate task-level variables and cost functions generated indistinguishable predictions in a single biomechanical context, we identified a common optimization framework that could predict up to 48 experimental conditions per animal (n = 3) across both perturbation directions and different biomechanical contexts created by altering animals' postural configuration. Predictions were further improved by imposing experimentally-derived muscle synergy constraints, suggesting additional task variables or costs that may be relevant to the neural control of balance. These results suggested that reduced-dimension neural control mechanisms such as muscle synergies can achieve similar kinetics to the optimal solution, but with increased control effort (≈2×) compared to individual muscle control. Our results are consistent with the idea that hierarchical, task-level neural control

  20. Dynamic control of aerodynamic forces on a moving platform using active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a two degree-of-freedom traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the trailing edge of the airfoil using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in both trajectory tracking and disturbance rejection maneuvers. The time-varying aerodynamic lift and pitching moment are estimated from a PIV wake survey using a reduced order model based on classical unsteady aerodynamic theory. These measurements suggest that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within 2--3 convective time scales, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  1. Generation of Nonlinear Force Driven Blocks from Skin Layer Interaction of Petawatt-Picosecond Laser Pulses for ICF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Hora; Cang, Yu; He, Xiantu; Zhang, Jie; F, Osman; J, Badziak; F, P. Boody; S, Gammino; R, Höpfl; K, Jungwirth; B, Kralikova; J, Kraska; L, Laska; Liu, Hong; G, H. Miley; P, Parys; Peng, Hansheng; M, Pfeifer; K, Rohlena; J, Skala; Z, Skladanowski; L, Torrisi; J, Ullschmied; J, Wolowski; Zhang, Weiyan

    2004-02-01

    The discovery of the essential difference of maximum ion energy for TW - ps laser plasma interaction compared with the 100 ns laser pulses [1] led to the theory of a skin layer model [2] where the control of prepulses suppressed the usual relativistic self-focusing. The subsequent generation of two nonlinear force driven blocks has been demonstrated experimentally and in extensive numerical studies where one block moves against the laser light and the other block into the irradiated target. These blocks of nearly solid state density DT plasma correspond to ion beam current densities [3] exceeding 1010 A/cm2 where the ion velocity can be chosen up to highly relativistic values. Using the results of the expected ignition of DT fuel by light ion beams, a self-sustained fusion reaction front may be generated even into uncompressed solid DT fuel similar to the Nuckolls-Wood [4] scheme where 10 kJ laser pulses produce 100 MJ fusion energy. This new and simplified scheme of laser-ICF needs and optimisation of the involved parameters.

  2. Beta 1 integrin binding plays a role in the constant traction force generation in response to varying stiffness for cells grown on mature cardiac extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Gershlak, Joshua R; Black, Lauren D

    2015-01-15

    We have previously reported a unique response of traction force generation for cells grown on mature cardiac ECM, where traction force was constant over a range of stiffnesses. In this study we sought to further investigate the role of the complex mixture of ECM on this response and assess the potential mechanism behind it. Using traction force microscopy, we measured cellular traction forces and stresses for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grown on polyacrylamide gels at a range of stiffnesses (9, 25, or 48 kPa) containing either adult rat heart ECM, different singular ECM proteins including collagen I, fibronectin, and laminin, or ECM mimics comprised of varying amounts of collagen I, fibronectin, and laminin. We also measured the expression of integrins on these different substrates as well as probed for β1 integrin binding. There was no significant change in traction force generation for cells grown on the adult ECM, as previously reported, whereas cells grown on singular ECM protein substrates had increased traction force generation with an increase in substrate stiffness. Cells grown on ECM mimics containing collagen I, fibronectin and laminin were found to be reminiscent of the traction forces generated by cells grown on native ECM. Integrin expression generally increased with increasing stiffness except for the β1 integrin, potentially implicating it as playing a role in the response to adult cardiac ECM. We inhibited binding through the β1 integrin on cells grown on the adult ECM and found that the inhibition of β1 binding led to a return to the typical response of increasing traction force generation with increasing stiffness. Our data demonstrates that cells grown on the mature cardiac ECM are able to circumvent typical stiffness related cellular behaviors, likely through β1 integrin binding to the complex composition.

  3. Fish Swimming: Patternsin the Mechanical Energy Generation, Transmission and Dissipation from Muscle Activation to Body Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Yu, Y. L.; Tong, B. G.

    2011-09-01

    The power consumption of the undulatory fish swimming is produced by active muscles. The mechanical energy generated by stimulated muscles is dissipated partly by the passive tissues of fish while it is being transmitted to the fluid medium. Furthermore, the effective energy, propelling fish movement, is a part of that delivered by the fish body. The process depends on the interactions of the active muscles, the passive tissues, and the water surrounding the fish body. In the previous works, the body-fluid interactions have been investigated widely, but it is rarely considered how the mechanical energy generates, transmits and dissipates in fish swimming. This paper addresses the regular patterns of energy transfer process from muscle activation to body movement for a cruising lamprey (LAMPREY), a kind of anguilliform swimmer. It is necessary to propose a global modelling of the kinematic chain, which is composed of active muscle force-moment model, fish-body dynamic model and hydrodynamic model in order. The present results show that there are traveling energy waves along the fish body from anterior to posterior, accompanied with energy storing and dissipating due to the viscoelastic property of internal tissues. This study is a preliminary research on the framework of kinematic chain coordination performance in fish swimming.

  4. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-08-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  5. Experimental generation of single photons via active multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiaosong; Zotter, Stefan; Kofler, Johannes; Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2011-04-15

    An on-demand single-photon source is a fundamental building block in quantum science and technology. We experimentally demonstrate the proof of concept for a scheme to generate on-demand single photons via actively multiplexing several heralded photons probabilistically produced from pulsed spontaneous parametric down-conversions (SPDCs). By utilizing a four-photon-pair source, an active feed-forward technique, and an ultrafast single-photon router, we show a fourfold enhancement of the output photon rate. Simultaneously, we maintain the quality of the output single-photon states, confirmed by correlation measurements. We also experimentally verify, via Hong-Ou-Mandel interference, that the router does not affect the indistinguishability of the single photons. Furthermore, we give numerical simulations, which indicate that photons based on multiplexing of four SPDC sources can outperform the heralding based on highly advanced photon-number-resolving detectors. Our results show a route for on-demand single-photon generation and the practical realization of scalable linear optical quantum-information processing.

  6. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  7. Coaxial Mono-Energetic Gamma Generator for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Antolak, A.J.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.; Kwan, J.W.

    2008-08-01

    Compact mono-energetic photon sources are sought for active interrogation systems to detect shielded special nuclear materials in, for example, cargo containers, trucks and other vehicles. A prototype gamma interrogation source has been designed and built that utilizes the 11B(p,gamma)12C reaction to produce 12 MeV gamma-rays which are near the peak of the photofission cross section. In particular, the 11B(p,gamma)12C resonance at 163 kV allows the production of gammas at low proton acceleration voltages, thus keeping the design of a gamma generator comparatively small and simple. A coaxial design has been adopted with a toroidal-shaped plasma chamber surrounding a cylindrical gamma production target. The plasma discharge is driven by a 2 MHz rf-power supply (capable up to 50 kW) using a circular rf-antenna. Permanent magnets embedded in the walls of the plasma chamber generate a multi-cusp field that confines the plasma and allows higher plasma densities and lower gas pressures. About 100 proton beamlets are extracted through a slotted plasma electrode towards the target at the center of the device that is at a negative 180 kV. The target consists of LaB6 tiles that are brazed to a water-cooled cylindrical structure. The generator is designed to operate at 500 Hz with 20 mu s long pulses, and a 1percent duty factor by pulsing the ion source rf-power. A first-generation coaxial gamma source has been built for low duty factor experiments and testing.

  8. DnaB Helicase Activity Is Modulated by DNA Geometry and Force

    PubMed Central

    Ribeck, Noah; Kaplan, Daniel L.; Bruck, Irina; Saleh, Omar A.

    2010-01-01

    The replicative helicase for Escherichia coli is DnaB, a hexameric, ring-shaped motor protein that encircles and translocates along ssDNA, unwinding dsDNA in advance of its motion. The microscopic mechanisms of DnaB are unknown; further, prior work has found that DnaB's activity is modified by other replication proteins, indicating some mechanistic flexibility. To investigate these issues, we quantified translocation and unwinding by single DnaB molecules in three tethered DNA geometries held under tension. Our data support the following conclusions: 1), Unwinding by DnaB is enhanced by force-induced destabilization of dsDNA. 2), The magnitude of this stimulation varies with the geometry of the tension applied to the DNA substrate, possibly due to interactions between the helicase and the occluded ssDNA strand. 3), DnaB unwinding and (to a lesser extent) translocation are interrupted by pauses, which are also dependent on force and DNA geometry. 4), DnaB moves slower when a large tension is applied to the helicase-bound strand, indicating that it must perform mechanical work to compact the strand against the applied force. Our results have implications for the molecular mechanisms of translocation and unwinding by DnaB and for the means of modulating DnaB activity. PMID:20923651

  9. Internal desynchronization in a model of night-work by forced activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Delgado, R; Angeles-Castellanos, M; Buijs, M R; Escobar, C

    2008-06-26

    Individuals engaged in shift- or night-work show disturbed diurnal rhythms, out of phase with temporal signals associated to the light/dark (LD) cycle, resulting in internal desynchronization. The mechanisms underlying internal desynchrony have been mainly investigated in experimental animals with protocols that induce phase shifts of the LD cycle and thus modify the activity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In this study we developed an animal model of night-work in which the light-day cycle remained stable and rats were required to be active in a rotating wheel for 8 h daily during their sleeping phase (W-SP). This group was compared with rats that were working in the wheel during their activity phase (W-AP) and with undisturbed rats (C). We provide evidence that forced activity during the sleeping phase (W-SP group) alters not only activity, but also the temporal pattern of food intake. In consequence W-SP rats showed a loss of glucose rhythmicity and a reversed rhythm of triacylglycerols. In contrast W-AP rats did not show such changes and exhibited metabolic rhythms similar to those of the controls. The three groups exhibited the nocturnal corticosterone increase, in addition the W-SP and W-AP groups showed increase of plasma corticosterone associated with the start of the working session. Forced activity during the sleep phase did not modify SCN activity characterized by the temporal patterns of PER1 and PER2 proteins, which remained in phase with the LD cycle. These observations indicate that a working regimen during the sleeping period elicits internal desynchronization in which activity combined with feeding uncouples metabolic functions from the biological clock which remains fixed to the LD cycle. The present data suggest that in the night worker the combination of work and eating during working hours may be the cause of internal desynchronization.

  10. The QBO and weak external forcing by solar activity: A three dimensional model study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dameris, M.; Ebel, A.

    1989-01-01

    A better understanding is attempted of the physical mechanisms leading to significant correlations between oscillations in the lower and middle stratosphere and solar variability associated with the sun's rotation. A global 3-d mechanistic model of the middle atmosphere is employed to investigate the effects of minor artificially induced perturbations. The aim is to explore the physical mechanisms of the dynamical response especially of the stratosphere to weak external forcing as it may result from UV flux changes due to solar rotation. First results of numerical experiments dealing about the external forcing of the middle atmosphere by solar activity were presented elsewhere. Different numerical studies regarding the excitation and propagation of weak perturbations have been continued since then. The model calculations presented are made to investigate the influence of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) on the dynamical response of the middle atmosphere to weak perturbations by employing different initial wind fields which represent the west and east phase of the QBO.

  11. Drag force as a tool to test the active mechanical response of PC12 neurites.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Roberto; Melo, Francisco; Pullarkat, Pramod A

    2010-02-17

    We investigate the mechanical response of PC12 neurites subjected to a drag force imposed by a laminar flow perpendicular to the neurite axis. The curvature of the catenary shape acquired by an initially straight neurite under the action of the drag force provides information on both elongation and tension of the neurite. This method allows us to measure the rest tension and viscoelastic parameters of PC12 neurites and active behavior of neurites. Measurement of oscillations in the strain rate of neurites at constant flow rate provides insight on the response of molecular motors and additional support for the presence of a negative strain-rate sensitivity region in the global mechanical response of PC12 neurites.

  12. Force-Based Puncture Detection and Active Position Holding for Assisted Retinal Vein Cannulation*

    PubMed Central

    Gonenc, Berk; Tran, Nhat; Riviere, Cameron N.; Gehlbach, Peter; Taylor, Russell H.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2016-01-01

    Retinal vein cannulation is a demanding procedure proposed to treat retinal vein occlusion by direct therapeutic agent delivery methods. Challenges in identifying the moment of venous puncture, achieving cannulation and maintaining cannulation during drug delivery currently limit the feasibility of the procedure. In this study, we respond to these problems with an assistive system combining a handheld micromanipulator, Micron, with a force-sensing microneedle. The integrated system senses the instant of vein puncture based on measured forces and the position of the needle tip. The system actively holds the cannulation device securely in the vein following cannulation and during drug delivery. Preliminary testing of the system in a dry phantom, stretched vinyl membranes, demonstrates a significant improvement in the total time the needle could be maintained stably inside of the vein. This was especially evident in smaller veins and is attributed to decreased movement of the positioned cannula following venous cannulation. PMID:27127804

  13. Evaluation of the force generated by gradual deflection of orthodontic wires in conventional metallic, esthetic, and self-ligating brackets

    PubMed Central

    Francisconi, Manoela Fávaro; Janson, Guilherme; Henriques, José Fernando Castanha; de Freitas, Karina Maria Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the deflection forces of Nitinol orthodontic wires placed in different types of brackets: metallic, reinforced polycarbonate with metallic slots, sapphire, passive and active self-ligating, by assessing strength values variation according to gradual increase in wire diameter and deflection and comparing different combinations in the different deflections. Material and Methods: Specimens were set in a clinical simulation model and evaluated in a Universal Testing Machine (INSTRON 3342), using the ISO 15841 protocol. Data were subjected to One-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey tests (p<0.05). Results: Self-ligating brackets presented the most similar behavior to each other. For conventional brackets there was no consistent behavior for any of the deflections studied. Conclusions: Self-ligating brackets presented the most consistent and predictable results while conventional brackets, as esthetic brackets, showed very different patterns of forces. Self-ligating brackets showed higher strength in all deflections when compared with the others, in 0.020-inch wires.

  14. Two generations of Canadian active imaging systems: ALBEDOS and ELVISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larochelle, Vincent; Mathieu, Pierre; Simard, Jean-Robert

    1999-07-01

    Search and rescue and general surveillance mission pose a serious challenge to conventional imaging systems used by actual aircraft crews. These systems must often work in low- light and low-visibility conditions to find the identify targets. A new airborne imaging technology has been developed to overcome several deficiencies encountered with common CCD cameras, image intensified system and thermal imaging sensors. The recent developments in laser diode arrays, laser diode beam collimation and gatable micro- channel plate intensifier have made possible the construction of a compact active imagin system, called the Airborne Laser-Based Enhanced Detection and Observation Systems (ALBEDOS). This system proved particularly efficient at night and in degraded weather conditions. In addition, it was demonstrated that range gating, besides eliminating most of the light backscattered by aerosols, provided to some extent immunity to blooming effects specific to highly sensitive cameras. The system was installed on a helicopter and tested in various scenarios in October 1995 to demonstrate its potential. To enhance the surveillance capability over large areas of coverage, to optimize detection of humans and small objects and to improve the effectiveness of the search aircraft, a second-generation payload is presently developed and combines the benefits of two complementary imaging sensors. The Enhanced Low-Light level Visible and IR Surveillance System (ELVISS) consists of an improved range-gated active imager and a high-quality thermal imager, installed in two separate airborne platforms slaved together and controlled by a single user interface. It is expected that such a sensor systems will have a direct impact on improving the response time in finding those in need of assistance or simply in increasing the performance, reliability and efficiency of crews involved in general surveillance operations. This paper explains the concept of range gating, details a preliminary

  15. Single-molecule imaging of DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) activity by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Zhang, P.; Wang, Q.; Wu, N.; Zhang, F.; Hu, J.; Fan, C. H.; Li, B.

    2016-03-01

    We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA.We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06544e

  16. Force irradiation effects during upper limb diagonal exercises on contralateral muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Rosa; Lopes, Alfredo Alexandre; Sousa, Andreia S P; Pereira, Soraia; Castro, Marcelo P

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the force irradiation effects of upper limb isometric diagonal exercises on shoulder muscle activities. Interactions among diagonal directions, contraction intensities (moderate and maximum) and sex were assessed. Thirty healthy subjects (11 males) performed isometric unilateral diagonal exercises based on proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation technique in an isokinetic dynamometer with their dominant upper limbs. The second diagonal for flexion and for extension were assessed while the participants performed their maximum isometric torque (MIT) and at 25% of their MIT. During the exercise the muscle activity of the medial deltoid, pectoralis major and upper trapezius in the non-dominant (non-exercised) upper limbs of the participants was recorded by surface electromyography. The highest muscle activity occurred in the upper trapezius during the diagonal for flexion (27% of maximum isometric voluntary contractions). Upper trapezius and pectoralis major were more active during the diagonal for flexion than diagonal for extension (p < 0.001), while similar values between both diagonals were observed for the medial deltoid (p > 0.05). In conclusion, we observed that force irradiation during upper limb diagonal exercises is affected by diagonal direction, contraction intensity and sex when performed by healthy participants.

  17. Control of a three-dimensional magnetic force generated from a magnetic navigation system to precisely manipulate the locomotion of a magnetic microrobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, J. K.; Jeon, S. M.; Lee, W. S.; Jang, G. H.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a method to generate a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic force to manipulate a magnetic microrobot in various environments by using a magnetic navigation system. The proposed method is based on the control of the magnetic force with respect to the change in the magnetization direction of the microrobot and an external magnetic flux gradient. We derived the nonlinear constraint equations which can determine the required direction of the uniform magnetic fields and magnetic gradients to generate the 3D magnetic force of a microrobot. The solutions of the equations were calculated using a geometrical analysis of the equations without any singular point. The proposed methodology was verified on 3D planar environments considering gravitational force, and we also conducted an experiment in a 3D water-filled tubular environment to verify the possibility of the clinical application in human blood vessels.

  18. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  19. A study of the cornering forces generated by aircraft tires on a tilted, free-swiveling nose gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, R. H.; Stubbs, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the effect of various parameters on the cornering forces produced by a rolling aircraft tire installed on a tilted, free-swiveling nose gear. The parameters studied included tilt angle, trial, tire inflation pressure, rake angle, vertical load, and whether or not a twin tire configuration corotates. These parameters were evaluated by measuring the cornering force produced by an aircraft tire installed on the nose gear of a modified vehicle as it was towed slowly. Cornering force coefficient increased with increasing tilt angle. Increasing trial or rake angle decreased the magnitude of the cornering force coefficient. Tire inflation pressure had no effect on the cornering force coefficient. Increasing vertical load decreased the cornering force coefficient. When the tires of a twin tire system rotated independently, the cornering force coefficients were the same as those for the single-tire configuration. When the twin tire system was made to corotate, however, the cornering force coefficients increased significantly.

  20. Variability in measurement of swimming forces: a meta-analysis of passive and active drag.

    PubMed

    Havriluk, Rod

    2007-03-01

    An analysis was conducted to identify sources of true and error variance in measuring swimming drag force to draw valid conclusions about performance factor effects. Passive drag studies were grouped according to methodological differences: tow line in pool, tow line in flume, and carriage in tow tank. Active drag studies were grouped according to the theoretical basis: added and/or subtracted drag (AAS), added drag with equal power assumption (AAE), and no added drag (ANA). Data from 36 studies were examined using frequency distributions and meta-analytic procedures. It was concluded that two active methods (AAE and ANA) had sources of systematic error and that one active method (AAS) measured an effect that was different from that measured by passive methods. Consistency in drag coefficient (Cd) values across all three passive methods made it possible to determine the effects of performance factors.

  1. The effects of biting and pulling on the forces generated during feeding in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis).

    PubMed

    D'Amore, Domenic C; Moreno, Karen; McHenry, Colin R; Wroe, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In addition to biting, it has been speculated that the forces resulting from pulling on food items may also contribute to feeding success in carnivorous vertebrates. We present an in vivo analysis of both bite and pulling forces in Varanus komodoensis, the Komodo dragon, to determine how they contribute to feeding behavior. Observations of cranial modeling and behavior suggest that V. komodoensis feeds using bite force supplemented by pulling in the caudal/ventrocaudal direction. We tested these observations using force gauges/transducers to measure biting and pulling forces. Maximum bite force correlates with both body mass and total body length, likely due to increased muscle mass. Individuals showed consistent behaviors when biting, including the typical medial-caudal head rotation. Pull force correlates best with total body length, longer limbs and larger postcranial motions. None of these forces correlated well with head dimensions. When pulling, V. komodoensis use neck and limb movements that are associated with increased caudal and ventral oriented force. Measured bite force in Varanus komodoensis is similar to several previous estimations based on 3D models, but is low for its body mass relative to other vertebrates. Pull force, especially in the ventrocaudal direction, would allow individuals to hunt and deflesh with high success without the need of strong jaw adductors. In future studies, pull forces need to be considered for a complete understanding of vertebrate carnivore feeding dynamics.

  2. The Effects of Biting and Pulling on the Forces Generated during Feeding in the Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis)

    PubMed Central

    D'Amore, Domenic C.; Moreno, Karen; McHenry, Colin R.; Wroe, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In addition to biting, it has been speculated that the forces resulting from pulling on food items may also contribute to feeding success in carnivorous vertebrates. We present an in vivo analysis of both bite and pulling forces in Varanus komodoensis, the Komodo dragon, to determine how they contribute to feeding behavior. Observations of cranial modeling and behavior suggest that V. komodoensis feeds using bite force supplemented by pulling in the caudal/ventrocaudal direction. We tested these observations using force gauges/transducers to measure biting and pulling forces. Maximum bite force correlates with both body mass and total body length, likely due to increased muscle mass. Individuals showed consistent behaviors when biting, including the typical medial-caudal head rotation. Pull force correlates best with total body length, longer limbs and larger postcranial motions. None of these forces correlated well with head dimensions. When pulling, V. komodoensis use neck and limb movements that are associated with increased caudal and ventral oriented force. Measured bite force in Varanus komodoensis is similar to several previous estimations based on 3D models, but is low for its body mass relative to other vertebrates. Pull force, especially in the ventrocaudal direction, would allow individuals to hunt and deflesh with high success without the need of strong jaw adductors. In future studies, pull forces need to be considered for a complete understanding of vertebrate carnivore feeding dynamics. PMID:22028837

  3. The effects of biting and pulling on the forces generated during feeding in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis).

    PubMed

    D'Amore, Domenic C; Moreno, Karen; McHenry, Colin R; Wroe, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In addition to biting, it has been speculated that the forces resulting from pulling on food items may also contribute to feeding success in carnivorous vertebrates. We present an in vivo analysis of both bite and pulling forces in Varanus komodoensis, the Komodo dragon, to determine how they contribute to feeding behavior. Observations of cranial modeling and behavior suggest that V. komodoensis feeds using bite force supplemented by pulling in the caudal/ventrocaudal direction. We tested these observations using force gauges/transducers to measure biting and pulling forces. Maximum bite force correlates with both body mass and total body length, likely due to increased muscle mass. Individuals showed consistent behaviors when biting, including the typical medial-caudal head rotation. Pull force correlates best with total body length, longer limbs and larger postcranial motions. None of these forces correlated well with head dimensions. When pulling, V. komodoensis use neck and limb movements that are associated with increased caudal and ventral oriented force. Measured bite force in Varanus komodoensis is similar to several previous estimations based on 3D models, but is low for its body mass relative to other vertebrates. Pull force, especially in the ventrocaudal direction, would allow individuals to hunt and deflesh with high success without the need of strong jaw adductors. In future studies, pull forces need to be considered for a complete understanding of vertebrate carnivore feeding dynamics. PMID:22028837

  4. Microfluidic Platform Generates Oxygen Landscapes for Localized Hypoxic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rexius, Megan L.; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T.

    2014-01-01

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes. PMID:25315003

  5. The antidepressant activity of inositol in the forced swim test involves 5-HT(2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Einat, H; Clenet, F; Shaldubina, A; Belmaker, R H; Bourin, M

    2001-01-01

    The effect of inositol as an antidepressant was previously demonstrated in both animal models of depression-like behavior and in clinical trials. Unlike most antidepressant drugs, inositol does not have a clear target in the synapse and was not demonstrated to alter monoamine levels in the brain. The present study attempted to draw a psychopharmacological profile of inositol's behavioral effects by exploring the interactions between the drug and specific receptor agonists and antagonists in the forced swim test. Rats received inositol treatment (or control) in combination with the serotonergic metabolism inhibitor PCPA or with the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4. Results indicated that PCPA but not DSP-4 abolished the ability of inositol to cause a reduction in immobility time in the forced swim test. In mice, the specific 5-HT(2A)/5-HT(2C) antagonist ritanserin, but not the 5-HT(1A)/5-HT(1B)/beta adrenergic antagonist pindolol, abolished inositol's effect in the forced swim test. The 5-HT(2A)/5-HT(2C) agonist DOI and the 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT did not have any significant effects on inositol's activity. The present data indicates that the antidepressant effect of inositol may involve 5-HT(2) receptors. It is thus possible that the effects of reuptake antidepressant drugs and the effects of inositol may have a common final pathway.

  6. Kank2 activates talin, reduces force transduction across integrins and induces central adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqi; Tseng, Hui-Yuan; Tan, Steven; Senger, Fabrice; Kurzawa, Laetitia; Dedden, Dirk; Mizuno, Naoko; Wasik, Anita A; Thery, Manuel; Dunn, Alexander R; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    Integrin-based adhesions play critical roles in cell migration. Talin activates integrins and flexibly connects integrins to the actomyosin cytoskeleton, thereby serving as a 'molecular clutch' that transmits forces to the extracellular matrix to drive cell migration. Here we identify the evolutionarily conserved Kank protein family as novel components of focal adhesions (FAs). Kank proteins accumulate at the lateral border of FAs, which we term the FA belt, and in central sliding adhesions, where they directly bind the talin rod domain through the Kank amino-terminal (KN) motif and induce talin and integrin activation. In addition, Kank proteins diminish the talin-actomyosin linkage, which curbs force transmission across integrins, leading to reduced integrin-ligand bond strength, slippage between integrin and ligand, central adhesion formation and sliding, and reduced cell migration speed. Our data identify Kank proteins as talin activators that decrease the grip between the integrin-talin complex and actomyosin to regulate cell migration velocity. PMID:27548916

  7. The influence of "C-factor" and light activation technique on polymerization contraction forces of resin composite

    PubMed Central

    ISHIKIRIAMA, Sérgio Kiyoshi; VALERETTO, Thiago Majolo; FRANCO, Eduardo Batista; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the influence of the cavity configuration factor ("C-Factor") and light activation technique on polymerization contraction forces of a Bis-GMA-based composite resin (Charisma, Heraeus Kulzer). Material and Methods Three different pairs of steel moving bases were connected to a universal testing machine (emic DL 500): groups A and B - 2x2 mm (CF=0.33), groups C and D - 3x2 mm (CF=0.66), groups e and F - 6x2 mm (CF=1.5). After adjustment of the height between the pair of bases so that the resin had a volume of 12 mm3 in all groups, the material was inserted and polymerized by two different methods: pulse delay (100 mW/cm2 for 5 s, 40 s interval, 600 mW/cm2 for 20 s) and continuous pulse (600 mW/cm2 for 20 s). Each configuration was light cured with both techniques. Tensions generated during polymerization were recorded by 120 s. The values were expressed in curves (Force(N) x Time(s)) and averages compared by statistical analysis (ANOVA and Tukey's test, p<0.05). Results: For the 2x2 and 3x2 bases, with a reduced C-Factor, significant differences were found between the light curing methods. For 6x2 base, with high C-Factor, the light curing method did not influence the contraction forces of the composite resin. Conclusions Pulse delay technique can determine less stress on tooth/restoration interface of adhesive restorations only when a reduced C-Factor is present. PMID:23329240

  8. The interaction of respiration and visual feedback on the control of force and neural activation of the agonist muscle.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Harsimran S; Patel, Bhavini K; Neto, Osmar P; Christou, Evangelos A

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare force variability and the neural activation of the agonist muscle during constant isometric contractions at different force levels when the amplitude of respiration and visual feedback were varied. Twenty young adults (20-32 years, 10 men and 10 women) were instructed to accurately match a target force at 15% and 50% of their maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) with abduction of the index finger while controlling their respiration at different amplitudes (85%, 100% and 125% normal) in the presence and absence of visual feedback. Each trial lasted 22s and visual feedback was removed from 8-12 and 16-20s. Each subject performed three trials with each respiratory condition at each force level. Force variability was quantified as the standard deviation of the detrended force data. The neural activation of the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) was measured with bipolar surface electrodes placed distal to the innervation zone. Relative to normal respiration, force variability increased significantly only during high-amplitude respiration (∼63%). The increase in force variability from normal- to high-amplitude respiration was strongly associated with amplified force oscillations from 0 to 3 Hz (R(2) ranged from .68 to .84, p< .001). Furthermore, the increase in force variability was exacerbated in the presence of visual feedback at 50% MVC (vision vs. no-vision: .97 vs. .87N) and was strongly associated with amplified force oscillations from 0 to 1 Hz (R(2)= .82) and weakly associated with greater power from 12 to 30 Hz (R(2)= .24) in the EMG of the agonist muscle. Our findings demonstrate that high-amplitude respiration and visual feedback of force interact and amplify force variability in young adults during moderate levels of effort.

  9. ActivitySim: large-scale agent based activity generation for infrastructure simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gali, Emmanuel; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Mniszewski, Sue; Cuellar, Leticia; Teuscher, Christof

    2008-01-01

    The United States' Department of Homeland Security aims to model, simulate, and analyze critical infrastructure and their interdependencies across multiple sectors such as electric power, telecommunications, water distribution, transportation, etc. We introduce ActivitySim, an activity simulator for a population of millions of individual agents each characterized by a set of demographic attributes that is based on US census data. ActivitySim generates daily schedules for each agent that consists of a sequence of activities, such as sleeping, shopping, working etc., each being scheduled at a geographic location, such as businesses or private residences that is appropriate for the activity type and for the personal situation of the agent. ActivitySim has been developed as part of a larger effort to understand the interdependencies among national infrastructure networks and their demand profiles that emerge from the different activities of individuals in baseline scenarios as well as emergency scenarios, such as hurricane evacuations. We present the scalable software engineering principles underlying ActivitySim, the socia-technical modeling paradigms that drive the activity generation, and proof-of-principle results for a scenario in the Twin Cities, MN area of 2.6 M agents.

  10. Air-coupled acoustic radiation force for non-contact generation of broadband mechanical waves in soft media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Pelivanov, Ivan; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Li, David; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    A non-contact method for efficient, non-invasive excitation of mechanical waves in soft media is proposed, in which we focus an ultrasound (US) signal through air onto the surface of a medium under study. The US wave reflected from the air/medium interface provides radiation force to the medium surface that launches a transient mechanical wave in the transverse (lateral) direction. The type of mechanical wave is determined by boundary conditions. To prove this concept, a home-made 1 MHz piezo-ceramic transducer with a matching layer to air sends a chirped US signal centered at 1 MHz to a 1.6 mm thick gelatin phantom mimicking soft biological tissue. A phase-sensitive (PhS)-optical coherence tomography system is used to track/image the mechanical wave. The reconstructed transient displacement of the mechanical wave in space and time demonstrates highly efficient generation, thus offering great promise for non-contact, non-invasive characterization of soft media, in general, and for elasticity measurements in delicate soft tissues and organs in bio-medicine, in particular.

  11. The structure of FtsZ filaments in vivo suggests a force-generating role in cell division

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuo; Trimble, Michael J; Brun, Yves V; Jensen, Grant J

    2007-01-01

    In prokaryotes, FtsZ (the filamentous temperature sensitive protein Z) is a nearly ubiquitous GTPase that localizes in a ring at the leading edge of constricting plasma membranes during cell division. Here we report electron cryotomographic reconstructions of dividing Caulobacter crescentus cells wherein individual arc-like filaments were resolved just underneath the inner membrane at constriction sites. The filaments' position, orientation, time of appearance, and resistance to A22 all suggested that they were FtsZ. Predictable changes in the number, length, and distribution of filaments in cells where the expression levels and stability of FtsZ were altered supported that conclusion. In contrast to the thick, closed-ring-like structure suggested by fluorescence light microscopy, throughout the constriction process the Z-ring was seen here to consist of just a few short (∼100 nm) filaments spaced erratically near the division site. Additional densities connecting filaments to the cell wall, occasional straight segments, and abrupt kinks were also seen. An ‘iterative pinching' model is proposed wherein FtsZ itself generates the force that constricts the membrane in a GTP-hydrolysis-driven cycle of polymerization, membrane attachment, conformational change, depolymerization, and nucleotide exchange. PMID:17948052

  12. Forced KLF4 expression increases the generation of mature plasma cells and uncovers a network linked with plasma cell stage.

    PubMed

    Schoenhals, Matthieu; Jourdan, Michel; Seckinger, Anja; Pantesco, Véronique; Hose, Dirk; Kassambara, Alboukadel; Moreaux, Jérôme; Klein, Bernard

    2016-07-17

    A role of the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) in the generation of mature plasma cells (PC) is unknown. Indeed, KLF4 is critical in controlling the differentiation of various cell linages, particularly monocytes and epithelial cells. KLF4 is expressed at low levels in pro-B cells and its expression increases as they mature into pre-B cells, resting naïve B cells and memory B cells. We show here that KLF4 is expressed in human bone marrow plasma cells and its function was studied using an in vitro model of differentiation of memory B cells into long lived plasma cells. KLF4 is rapidly lost when memory B cells differentiate into highly cell cycling plasmablasts, poorly cycling early plasma cells and then quiescent long-lived plasma cells. A forced expression of KLF4 in plasmablasts enhances the yield of their differentiation into early plasma cell and long lived plasma cells, by inhibiting apoptosis and upregulating previously unknown plasma cell pathways.

  13. Generation of dissipative solitons in an actively mode-locked ultralong fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Koliada, N A; Nyushkov, B N; Ivanenko, A V; Kobtsev, Sergey M; Harper, Paul; Turitsyn, Sergei K; Denisov, Vladimir I; Pivtsov, V S

    2013-02-28

    A single-pulse actively mode-locked fibre laser with a cavity length exceeding 1 km has been developed and investigated for the first time. This all-fibre erbium-doped laser has a normal intracavity dispersion and generates dissipative 8-ns solitons with a fundamental repetition rate of 163.8 kHz; the energy per pulse reaches 34 nJ. The implemented mode locking, based on the use of intracavity intensity modulator, provides self-triggering and high stability of pulsed lasing. A possibility of continuous tuning of the centre lasing wavelength in the range of 1558 - 1560 nm without any tunable spectral selective elements in the cavity is demonstrated. The tuning occurs when controlling the modulation signal frequency due to the forced change in the pulse repetition time (group delay) under the conditions of intracavity chromatic dispersion. (laser optics 2012)

  14. Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) critical technology pre-development activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminou, Donny M. A.; Bézy, Jean Loup; Meynart, Roland; Blythe, Paul; Kraft, S.; Zayer, I.; Linder, M.; Falkner, M.; Luhmann, H. J.

    2009-09-01

    ESA and EUMETSAT have initiated joint preparatory activities for the formulation and definition of the Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) geostationary system to ensure the future continuity, and enhancement, of the current Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) system. The MTG programmatics are being established to ensure a seamless transition between the conclusion of the successful MSG operational system and the start of the new MTG operational system, with particular emphasis on continuity of the imagery missions. The MTG phase A studies were successfully concluded in December 2008 an re-consolidation phase B1 activities continued from January to July 2009. They were devoted to the MTG concept definition and requirements consolidation for meeting the User needs in the field of Nowcasting and Very Short Term Weather Forecasting (NWC), Medium/Short Range global and regional Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), Climate, Air Quality and Composition Monitoring. The following missions have been analysed, measurement techniques studied and preliminary concepts established: - High Resolution Fast Imagery Mission (improved successor to MSG SEVIRI HRV mission) - Full Disk High Spectral Resolution Imagery Mission (improved successor to SEVIRI) - Lightning Imagery Mission - IR Sounding Mission - UV-VIS-NIR Sounding Mission Both space segment architecture and preliminary satellite and instrument concepts were investigated in the course of these studies, and a dual satellite configuration established comprising the Imaging satellite (MTG-I) and the sounding satellite (MTG-S). The study covered all elements to a level of detail allowing to establish a technical baseline, conclude on the feasibility of the system requirements and undertake preliminary programmatic evaluation. Riders to the Phase A studies (Phase B1 work) have been placed to further consolidate the satellite and payload definition and development, prior to the release of the Invitation To Tender (ITT) for the full space

  15. Calibration of an interfacial force microscope for MEMS metrology : FY08-09 activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Jack E.; Baker, Michael Sean; Crowson, Douglas A.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Moore, Nathan W.

    2009-10-01

    Progress in MEMS fabrication has enabled a wide variety of force and displacement sensing devices to be constructed. One device under intense development at Sandia is a passive shock switch, described elsewhere (Mitchell 2008). A goal of all MEMS devices, including the shock switch, is to achieve a high degree of reliability. This, in turn, requires systematic methods for validating device performance during each iteration of design. Once a design is finalized, suitable tools are needed to provide quality assurance for manufactured devices. To ensure device performance, measurements on these devices must be traceable to NIST standards. In addition, accurate metrology of MEMS components is needed to validate mechanical models that are used to design devices to accelerate development and meet emerging needs. Progress towards a NIST-traceable calibration method is described for a next-generation, 2D Interfacial Force Microscope (IFM) for applications in MEMS metrology and qualification. Discussed are the results of screening several suitable calibration methods and the known sources of uncertainty in each method.

  16. Physical methods for generating and decoding neural activity in Hirudo verbana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, Benjamin John

    The interface between living nervous systems and hardware is an excellent proving ground for precision experimental methods and information classification systems. Nervous systems are complex (104 -- 10 15(!) connections), fragile, and highly active in intricate, constantly evolving patterns. However, despite the conveniently electrical nature of neural transmission, the interface between nervous systems and hardware poses significant experimental difficulties. As the desire for direct interfaces with neural signals continues to expand, the need for methods of generating and measuring neural activity with high spatiotemporal precision has become increasingly critical. In this thesis, I describe advances I have made in the ability to modify, generate, measure, and understand neural signals both in- and ex-vivo. I focus on methods developed for transmitting and extracting signals in the intact nervous system of Hirudo verbana (the medicinal leech), an animal with a minimally complex nervous system (10000 neurons distributed in packets along a nerve cord) that exhibits a diverse array of behaviors. To introduce artificial activity patterns, I developed a photothermal activation system in which a highly focused laser is used to irradiate carbon microparticles in contact with target neurons. The resulting local temperature increase generates an electrical current that forces the target neuron to fire neural signals, thereby providing a unique neural input mechanism. These neural signals can potentially be used to alter behavioral choice or generate specific behavioral output, and can be used endogenously in many animal models. I also describe new tools developed to expand the application of this method. In complement to this input system, I describe a new method of analyzing neural output signals involved in long-range coordination of behaviors. Leech behavioral signals are propagated between neural packets as electrical pulses in the nerve connective, a bundle of

  17. Separable solutions of force-free spheres and applications to solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, A.; Mangalam, A.; Ravindra, B. E-mail: mangalam@iiap.res.in

    2014-05-10

    We present a systematic study of the force-free field equation for simple axisymmetric configurations in spherical geometry and apply it to the solar active regions. The condition of separability of solutions in the radial and angular variables leads to two classes of solutions: linear and nonlinear force-free fields (NLFF). We have studied these linear solutions and extended the nonlinear solutions for the radial power law index to the irreducible rational form n = p/q, which is allowed for all cases of odd p and cases of q > p for even p, where the poloidal flux ψ∝1/r{sup n} and the field B∝1/r {sup n+2}. We apply these solutions to simulate photospheric vector magnetograms obtained using the spectropolarimeter on board Hinode. The effectiveness of our search strategy is first demonstrated on test inputs of dipolar, axisymmetric, and nonaxisymmetric linear force-free fields. Using the best fit, we build three-dimensional axisymmetric field configurations and calculate the energy and relative helicity with two independent methods, which are in agreement. We have analyzed five magnetograms for AR 10930 spanning a period of three days during which two X-class flares occurred and found the free energy and relative helicity of the active region before and after the flare; our analysis indicates a peak in these quantities before the flare events, which is consistent with the other results. We also analyzed single-polarity regions AR 10923 and 10933, which showed very good fits to potential fields. This method provides useful reconstruction of NLFF and input fields for other numerical techniques.

  18. Effect of seat positions on discomfort, muscle activation, pressure distribution and pedal force during cycling.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rachita; Hansen, Ernst A; de Zee, Mark; Madeleine, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to measure and analyse discomfort and biomechanics of cycling, i.e., muscle activation, centre of pressure of seat pressure profiles and pedal forces as a function of seat position. Twenty-one recreationally active individuals cycled for 10min at 100W on an ergometer cycle using five different seat positions. The neutral position was considered as basic seat position and was compared with upward, downward, forward and backward seat positions. The initial bout was repeated at the end of the recording session. Discomfort increased for upward and backward condition compared with neutral (P<0.05). Normalized surface electromyography from gastrocnemius decreased in the downward and forward position but increased in the upward and backward position. The minimum force became less negative for forward position compared with neutral seat position (P<0.05). The degree of variability of centre of pressure increased in the upward and backward position and the entropy of the centre of pressure of sitting posture for backward position decreased compared with neutral seat position (P<0.05). The present study revealed that consecutive changes of seat position over time lead to increase in discomfort as well as alterations of the biomechanics of cycling. PMID:26938676

  19. Using the rat forced swim test to assess antidepressant-like activity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Slattery, David A; Cryan, John F

    2012-05-03

    The forced swim test (FST) is one of the most commonly used animal models for assessing antidepressant-like behavior. This protocol details using the FST in rats, which takes place over 48 h and is followed by the video analysis of the behavior. The swim test involves the scoring of active (swimming and climbing) or passive (immobility) behavior when rodents are forced to swim in a cylinder from which there is no escape. There are two versions that are used, namely the traditional and modified FSTs, which differ in their experimental setup. For both versions, a pretest of 15 min (although a number of laboratories have used a 10-min pretest with success) is included, as this accentuates the different behaviors in the 5-min swim test following drug treatment. Reduction in passive behavior is interpreted as an antidepressant-like effect of the manipulation, provided it does not increase general locomotor activity, which could provide a false positive result in the FST.

  20. Solar forcing over the last 1500 years and Australian tropical cyclone activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haig, Jordahna Ellan-Ann; Nott, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Accurate seasonal and decadal predictions of tropical cyclone activity are essential for the development of mitigation strategies for the 2.7 billion residents living within cyclone prone regions. The traditional indices (Southern Oscillation Index and various sea surface temperature indices) have fallen short in recent years as seasonal predictors within the Australian region. The short length of these records (i.e., <50 years) has meant that our current knowledge of larger-scale drivers at interdecadal, centennial, and millennial scales is limited. The development of a new tropical cyclone activity index spanning the last 1500 years has enabled the examination of tropical cyclone climatology at higher temporal resolution than was previously possible. Here we show that in addition to other well-known climate indices, solar forcing largely drives decadal, interdecadal, and centennial cycles within the tropical cyclone record.

  1. Estimating Youth Locomotion Ground Reaction Forces Using an Accelerometer-Based Activity Monitor

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Jennifer M.; Hawkins, David A.; Beckett, Laurel

    2012-01-01

    To address a variety of questions pertaining to the interactions between physical activity, musculoskeletal loading and musculoskeletal health/injury/adaptation, simple methods are needed to quantify, outside a laboratory setting, the forces acting on the human body during daily activities. The purpose of this study was to develop a statistically based model to estimate peak vertical ground reaction force (pVGRF) during youth gait. 20 girls (10.9±0.9 years) and 15 boys (12.5±0.6 years) wore a Biotrainer AM over their right hip. Six walking and six running trials were completed after a standard warm-up. Average AM intensity (g) and pVGRF (N) during stance were determined. Repeated measures mixed effects regression models to estimate pVGRF from Biotrainer activity monitor acceleration in youth (girls 10–12, boys 12–14 years) while walking and running were developed. Log transformed pVGRF had a statistically significant relationship with activity monitor acceleration, centered mass, sex (girl), type of locomotion (run), and locomotion type-acceleration interaction controlling for subject as a random effect. A generalized regression model without subject specific random effects was also developed. The average absolute differences between the actual and predicted pVGRF were 5.2% (1.6% standard deviation) and 9% (4.2% standard deviation) using the mixed and generalized models, respectively. The results of this study support the use of estimating pVGRF from hip acceleration using a mixed model regression equation. PMID:23133564

  2. Regionalizing muscle activity causes changes to the magnitude and direction of the force from whole muscles—a modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Rahemi, Hadi; Nigam, Nilima; Wakeling, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can contain neuromuscular compartments that are spatially distinct regions that can receive relatively independent levels of activation. This study tested how the magnitude and direction of the force developed by a whole muscle would change when the muscle activity was regionalized within the muscle. A 3D finite element model of a muscle with its bounding aponeurosis was developed for the lateral gastrocnemius, and isometric contractions were simulated for a series of conditions with either a uniform activation pattern, or regionally distinct activation patterns: in all cases the mean activation from all fibers within the muscle reached 10%. The models showed emergent features of the fiber geometry that matched physiological characteristics: with fibers shortening, rotating to greater pennation, adopting curved trajectories in 3D and changes in the thickness and width of the muscle belly. Simulations were repeated for muscle with compliant, normal and stiff aponeurosis and the aponeurosis stiffness affected the changes to the fiber geometry and the resultant muscle force. Changing the regionalization of the activity resulted to changes in the magnitude, direction and center of the force vector from the whole muscle. Regionalizing the muscle activity resulted in greater muscle force than the simulation with uniform activity across the muscle belly. The study shows how the force from a muscle depends on the complex interactions between the muscle fibers and connective tissues and the region of muscle that is active. PMID:25232341

  3. Women's income generation activities in Merowe Province, Northern State, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Pitamber, S; Osama, S

    1994-06-01

    Merowe province in rural northern Sudan has been divided into three local government council areas: Merowe, Karima, and Ed Debba. A government program was instituted to increase the welfare of residents and food production. A baseline survey of 490 respondents was conducted in order to ascertain how illiterate women viewed development in the area and to provide useful information for program design and implementation. Women from 24 villages were administered questionnaires, observed in their daily activities, and engaged in discussion in a local meeting place. Discussions were also held with members of the local Popular Committee. Demographic information was very sketchy about age, and 48% had no formal education in writing and reading. General reading and writing skills of the remainder were very poor. There were 500 female children and 502 male children, and the sex ratio varied among the 3 council areas. 52% were married and 14% were divorced or widowed and living with relatives. The average monthly income was from Ls. 700 to Ls. 3000 based on reports from only 59.3% of respondents. Most of the women had skills in food processing and 25.7% were skilled in handicrafts. Water was obtained primarily from local wells and not decontaminated before use. Pit latrines were the standard. One bathing facility was available in the compound for the entire council area. Health units were either in each village or within 20-30 minutes walk. Child mortality was 4.3% in Merowe province. 77 children 0-5 years old died out of a total of 1002 live births. Life expectancy was 41-50 years for women and 61-70 years for men. Cleanliness and healthful eating were observed. 58% owned no land; plots were under 5 feddans and usually half a feddan. 92.1% had no bank account and 90% had no experience with loans. 70.2% were indifferent about involvement in an income generation program. 26% were interested in part-time participation. Only 3.9% desired full-time participation. 8.6% said they

  4. Abdominal expiratory activity in the rat brainstem-spinal cord in situ: patterns, origins and implications for respiratory rhythm generation.

    PubMed

    Abdala, A P L; Rybak, I A; Smith, J C; Paton, J F R

    2009-07-15

    We studied respiratory neural activity generated during expiration. Motoneuronal activity was recorded simultaneously from abdominal (AbN), phrenic (PN), hypoglossal (HN) and central vagus nerves from neonatal and juvenile rats in situ. During eupnoeic activity, low-amplitude post-inspiratory (post-I) discharge was only present in AbN motor outflow. Expression of AbN late-expiratory (late-E) activity, preceding PN bursts, occurred during hypercapnia. Biphasic expiratory (biphasic-E) activity with pre-inspiratory (pre-I) and post-I discharges occurred only during eucapnic anoxia or hypercapnic anoxia. Late-E activity generated during hypercapnia (7-10% CO(2)) was abolished with pontine transections or chemical suppression of retrotrapezoid nucleus/ventrolateral parafacial (RTN/vlPF). AbN late-E activity during hypercapnia is coupled with augmented pre-I discharge in HN, truncated PN burst, and was quiescent during inspiration. Our data suggest that the pons provides a necessary excitatory drive to an additional neural oscillatory mechanism that is only activated under conditions of high respiratory drive to generate late-E activity destined for AbN motoneurones. This mechanism may arise from neurons located in the RTN/vlPF or the latter may relay late-E activity generated elsewhere. We hypothesize that this oscillatory mechanism is not a necessary component of the respiratory central pattern generator but constitutes a defensive mechanism activated under critical metabolic conditions to provide forced expiration and reduced upper airway resistance simultaneously. Possible interactions of this oscillator with components of the brainstem respiratory network are discussed.

  5. Introducing a new semi-active engine mount using force controlled variable stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Mojtaba; Behzadipour, Saeed; Faulkner, Gary

    2013-05-01

    This work introduces a new concept in designing semi-active engine mounts. Engine mounts are under continuous development to provide better and more cost-effective engine vibration control. Passive engine mounts do not provide satisfactory solution. Available semi-active and active mounts provide better solutions but they are more complex and expensive. The variable stiffness engine mount (VSEM) is a semi-active engine mount with a simple ON-OFF control strategy. However, unlike available semi-active engine mounts that work based on damping change, the VSEM works based on the static stiffness change by using a new fast response force controlled variable spring. The VSEM is an improved version of the vibration mount introduced by the authors in their previous work. The results showed significant performance improvements over a passive rubber mount. The VSEM also provides better vibration control than a hydromount at idle speed. Low hysteresis and the ability to be modelled by a linear model in low-frequency are the advantages of the VSEM over the vibration isolator introduced earlier and available hydromounts. These specifications facilitate the use of VSEM in the automotive industry, however, further evaluation and developments are needed for this purpose.

  6. Myostatin dysfunction impairs force generation in extensor digitorum longus muscle and increases exercise-induced protein efflux from extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles.

    PubMed

    Baltusnikas, Juozas; Kilikevicius, Audrius; Venckunas, Tomas; Fokin, Andrej; Bünger, Lutz; Lionikas, Arimantas; Ratkevicius, Aivaras

    2015-08-01

    Myostatin dysfunction promotes muscle hypertrophy, which can complicate assessment of muscle properties. We examined force generating capacity and creatine kinase (CK) efflux from skeletal muscles of young mice before they reach adult body and muscle size. Isolated soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of Berlin high (BEH) mice with dysfunctional myostatin, i.e., homozygous for inactivating myostatin mutation, and with a wild-type myostatin (BEH+/+) were studied. The muscles of BEH mice showed faster (P < 0.01) twitch and tetanus contraction times compared with BEH+/+ mice, but only EDL displayed lower (P < 0.05) specific force. SOL and EDL of age-matched but not younger BEH mice showed greater exercise-induced CK efflux compared with BEH+/+ mice. In summary, myostatin dysfunction leads to impairment in muscle force generating capacity in EDL and increases susceptibility of SOL and EDL to protein loss after exercise.

  7. Active Control of Fan-Generated Tone Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment to control the noise radiated from the inlet of a ducted fan using a time domain active adaptive system. The control ,sound source consists of loudspeakers arranged in a ring around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same, when the dominant wave in the duct is a plane wave. The presence of higher order modes in the duct reduces the noise reduction efficiency, particularly near the mode cut-on where the standing wave component is strong, but the control system converges stably. The control system is stable and converges when the first circumferential mode is generated in the duct. The control system is found to reduce the fan noise in the far field on an arc around the fan inlet by as much as 20 dB with none of the sound amplification associated with mode spillover.

  8. Frequency of climbing behavior as a predictor of altered motor activity in rat forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Cíntia; De Lima, Thereza C M; Carobrez, Antonio de Pádua; Lino-de-Oliveira, Cilene

    2008-11-14

    Previous work has shown that the frequency of climbing behavior in rats submitted to the forced swimming test (FST) correlated to the section's crosses in the open field test, which suggest it might be taken as a predictor of motor activity in rat FST. To investigate this proposal, the frequency, duration, as well as the ratio duration/frequency for each behavior expressed in the FST (immobility, swimming and climbing) were compared in animals treated with a motor stimulant, caffeine (CAF), and the antidepressant, clomipramine (CLM). Male Wistar rats were submitted to 15min of forced swimming (pre-test) and 24h later received saline (SAL, 1ml/kg, i.p.) or CAF (6.5mg/kg, i.p.) 30min prior a 5-min session (test) of FST. To validate experimental procedures, an additional group of rats received three injections of SAL (1ml/kg, i.p.) or clomipramine (CLM, 10mg/kg, i.p.) between the pre-test and test sessions. The results of the present study showed that both drugs, CLM and CAF, significantly reduced the duration of immobility and significantly increased the duration of swimming. In addition, CAF significantly decreased the ratio of immobility, and CLM significantly increased the ratio of swimming and climbing. Moreover, CLM significantly increased the duration of climbing but only CAF increased the frequency of climbing. Thus, it seems that the frequency of climbing could be a predictor of altered motor activity scored directly in the FST. Further, we believe that this parameter could be useful for fast and reliable discrimination between antidepressant drugs and stimulants of motor activity.

  9. A forced damped oscillation framework for undulatory swimming provides new insights into how propulsion arises in active and passive swimming.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce E; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental issue in locomotion is to understand how muscle forcing produces apparently complex deformation kinematics leading to movement of animals like undulatory swimmers. The question of whether complicated muscle forcing is required to create the observed deformation kinematics is central to the understanding of how animals control movement. In this work, a forced damped oscillation framework is applied to a chain-link model for undulatory swimming to understand how forcing leads to deformation and movement. A unified understanding of swimming, caused by muscle contractions ("active" swimming) or by forces imparted by the surrounding fluid ("passive" swimming), is obtained. We show that the forcing triggers the first few deformation modes of the body, which in turn cause the translational motion. We show that relatively simple forcing patterns can trigger seemingly complex deformation kinematics that lead to movement. For given muscle activation, the forcing frequency relative to the natural frequency of the damped oscillator is important for the emergent deformation characteristics of the body. The proposed approach also leads to a qualitative understanding of optimal deformation kinematics for fast swimming. These results, based on a chain-link model of swimming, are confirmed by fully resolved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Prior results from the literature on the optimal value of stiffness for maximum speed are explained. PMID:23785272

  10. From Forced Tolerance to Forced Busing: Wartime Intercultural Education and the Rise of Black Educational Activism in Boston

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkholder, Zoe

    2010-01-01

    In this article, Zoe Burkholder explores the historical interplay of the emergence of tolerance education in the United States and the rise of black educational activism in Boston. By uncovering a pointed lack of tolerance education in Boston and a widespread promotion of tolerance education in other cities in the early half of the twentieth…

  11. Activation Energies and Potentials of Mean Force for Water Cluster Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn M.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Garrett, Bruce C.

    2008-02-11

    Activation energies for water cluster evaporation are of interest in many areas of chemical physics. We present the first computation of activation energies for small waters clusters using the formalism of Dynamical Nucleation Theory (DNT). To this end, individual evaporation rate constants are computed for water clusters (H2O)i, where i = 2 to 10 for temperatures ranging from 243 to 333K. These calculations employ a parallel sampling technique utilizing the Global Arrays Toolkit developed at PNNL. The resulting evaporation rate constants for each cluster are then fit to Arrhenius equations to obtain activation energies. We discuss DNT evaporation rate constants and their relation to potentials of mean force, activation energies, and how to account for non-separability of the reaction coordinate in the reactant state partition function. This work was supported by the PNNL Computational Science and Engineering LDRD Program and the Chemical and Material Sciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Department of Energy. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  12. Marital status, labour force activity and mortality: A study of the United States and 6 European countries

    PubMed Central

    van Hedel, Karen; van Lenthe, Frank J; Avendano, Mauricio; Bopp, Matthias; Esnaola, Santiago; Kovács, Katalin; Martikainen, Pekka; Regidor, Enrique; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2015-01-01

    Aims Labour force activity and marriage share some of the pathways through which they potentially influence health. In this paper, we examine whether marriage and labour force participation interact in the way they influence mortality in the United States and six European countries. Methods We used data from the US National Health Interview Survey linked to the National Death Index, and national mortality registry data for Austria, England/Wales, Finland, Hungary, Norway and Spain (Basque country) during 1999-2007 for men and women aged 30-59 at baseline. Poisson regression was used to estimate both additive (the relative excess risk due to interaction) and multiplicative interactions between marriage and labour force activity on mortality. Results Labour force inactivity was associated with higher mortality, but this association was stronger for unmarried than married individuals. Likewise, being unmarried was associated with higher mortality, but this association was stronger for inactive than for active individuals. To illustrate, among US women out of the labour force, being unmarried was associated with a 3.98 (95%CI:3.28-4.82) times higher risk of dying than being married, whereas the relative risk was 2.49 (95%CI:2.10-2.94) for women active in the labour market. Although this interaction between marriage and labour force activity was only significant for women on a multiplicative scale, there was a significant additive interaction for both men and women. The pattern was similar across all countries. Conclusions Marriage attenuates the increased mortality risk associated with labour force inactivity, while labour force activity attenuates the mortality risk associated with being unmarried. Our study emphasizes the importance of public health and social policies that improve the health and well-being of men and women who are both unmarried and inactive. PMID:25868643

  13. Active disturbance rejection control for output force creep characteristics of ionic polymer metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yan; Chen, Yang; Sun, Zhiyong; Hao, Lina; Dong, Jie

    2014-07-01

    Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) are a type of electroactive polymer (EAP) that can be used as both sensors and actuators. An IPMC has enormous potential application in the field of biomimetic robotics, medical devices, and so on. However, an IPMC actuator has a great number of disadvantages, such as creep and time-variation, making it vulnerable to external disturbances. In addition, the complex actuation mechanism makes it difficult to model and the demand of the control algorithm is laborious to implement. In this paper, we obtain a creep model of the IPMC by means of model identification based on the method of creep operator linear superposition. Although the mathematical model is not approximate to the IPMC accurate model, it is accurate enough to be used in MATLAB to prove the control algorithm. A controller based on the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) method is designed to solve the drawbacks previously given. Because the ADRC controller is separate from the mathematical model of the controlled plant, the control algorithm has the ability to complete disturbance estimation and compensation. Some factors, such as all external disturbances, uncertainty factors, the inaccuracy of the identification model and different kinds of IPMCs, have little effect on controlling the output block force of the IPMC. Furthermore, we use the particle swarm optimization algorithm to adjust ADRC parameters so that the IPMC actuator can approach the desired block force with unknown external disturbances. Simulations and experimental examples validate the effectiveness of the ADRC controller.

  14. Comparison of muscle force, muscle endurance, and electromyogram activity during an expedition at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Sakai, A.; Yanagidaira, N.; Asano, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Kashimura, N.; Ueda, G.; Wu, T.; Zhang, Y.

    1996-09-01

    Handgrip force (HF), maximal pinch force (MF), muscle endurance (ME), and the median power frequency (MdPF) of the activity shown in the electromyogram (EMG) were studied at various altitudes in eight normal healthy subjects. MF and ME were measured between the index finger and thumb, and all measurements were obtained at altitudes ranging from 610 to 4860 m during an expedition in the Qinghai Plateau in China. With the change in altitude HF, ME, and MF showed no significant change. Compared to the MdPF at 2260 m on ascent, the MdPF at other altitudes showed a significant decrease ( P<0.01). Thus, we conclude that muscle performance (HF, MF, and ME) was not affected by the environment at high altitude. However, MdPF was affected and the mean MdPF at 610 m after the expedition did not recover to initial values of MdPF. We suggest these results may have been affected by fatigue and chronic exposure to the hypobaric hypoxic environment, since the members of the expedition party expressed feelings of sluggishness and fatigue after the expedition.

  15. Encoding of movement dynamics by Purkinje cell simple spike activity during fast arm movements under resistive and assistive force fields.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenji; Kawato, Mitsuo; Kotosaka, Shinya; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2007-02-01

    It is controversial whether simple-spike activity of cerebellar Purkinje cells during arm movements encodes movement kinematics like velocity or dynamics like muscle activities. To examine this issue, we trained monkeys to flex or extend the elbow by 45 degrees in 400 ms under resistive and assistive force fields but without altering kinematics. During the task movements after training, simple-spike discharges were recorded in the intermediate part of the cerebellum in lobules V-VI, and electromyographic activity was recorded from arm muscles. Velocity profiles (kinematics) in the two force fields were almost identical to each other, whereas not only the electromyographic activities (dynamics) but also simple-spike activities in many Purkinje cells differed distinctly depending on the type of force field. Simple-spike activities encoded much larger mutual information with the type of force field than that with the residual small difference in the height of peak velocity. The difference in simple-spike activities averaged over the recorded Purkinje-cells increased approximately 40 ms before the appearance of the difference in electromyographic activities between the two force fields, suggesting that the difference of simple-spike activities could be the origin of the difference of muscle activities. Simple-spike activity of many Purkinje cells correlated with electromyographic activity with a lead of approximately 80 ms, and these neurons had little overlap with another group of neurons the simple-spike activity of which correlated with velocity profiles. These results show that simple-spike activity of at least a group of Purkinje cells in the intermediate part of cerebellar lobules V-VI encodes movement dynamics.

  16. Synchronous fire activity in the tropical high Andes: an indication of regional climate forcing.

    PubMed

    Román-Cuesta, R M; Carmona-Moreno, C; Lizcano, G; New, M; Silman, M; Knoke, T; Malhi, Y; Oliveras, I; Asbjornsen, H; Vuille, M

    2014-06-01

    Global climate models suggest enhanced warming of the tropical mid and upper troposphere, with larger temperature rise rates at higher elevations. Changes in fire activity are amongst the most significant ecological consequences of rising temperatures and changing hydrological properties in mountainous ecosystems, and there is a global evidence of increased fire activity with elevation. Whilst fire research has become popular in the tropical lowlands, much less is known of the tropical high Andean region (>2000 masl, from Colombia to Bolivia). This study examines fire trends in the high Andes for three ecosystems, the Puna, the Paramo and the Yungas, for the period 1982-2006. We pose three questions: (i) is there an increased fire response with elevation? (ii) does the El Niño- Southern Oscillation control fire activity in this region? (iii) are the observed fire trends human driven (e.g., human practices and their effects on fuel build-up) or climate driven? We did not find evidence of increased fire activity with elevation but, instead, a quasicyclic and synchronous fire response in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia, suggesting the influence of high-frequency climate forcing on fire responses on a subcontinental scale, in the high Andes. ENSO variability did not show a significant relation to fire activity for these three countries, partly because ENSO variability did not significantly relate to precipitation extremes, although it strongly did to temperature extremes. Whilst ENSO did not individually lead the observed regional fire trends, our results suggest a climate influence on fire activity, mainly through a sawtooth pattern of precipitation (increased rainfall before fire-peak seasons (t-1) followed by drought spells and unusual low temperatures (t0), which is particularly common where fire is carried by low fuel loads (e.g., grasslands and fine fuel). This climatic sawtooth appeared as the main driver of fire trends, above local human influences and fuel build

  17. Synchronous fire activity in the tropical high Andes: an indication of regional climate forcing.

    PubMed

    Román-Cuesta, R M; Carmona-Moreno, C; Lizcano, G; New, M; Silman, M; Knoke, T; Malhi, Y; Oliveras, I; Asbjornsen, H; Vuille, M

    2014-06-01

    Global climate models suggest enhanced warming of the tropical mid and upper troposphere, with larger temperature rise rates at higher elevations. Changes in fire activity are amongst the most significant ecological consequences of rising temperatures and changing hydrological properties in mountainous ecosystems, and there is a global evidence of increased fire activity with elevation. Whilst fire research has become popular in the tropical lowlands, much less is known of the tropical high Andean region (>2000 masl, from Colombia to Bolivia). This study examines fire trends in the high Andes for three ecosystems, the Puna, the Paramo and the Yungas, for the period 1982-2006. We pose three questions: (i) is there an increased fire response with elevation? (ii) does the El Niño- Southern Oscillation control fire activity in this region? (iii) are the observed fire trends human driven (e.g., human practices and their effects on fuel build-up) or climate driven? We did not find evidence of increased fire activity with elevation but, instead, a quasicyclic and synchronous fire response in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia, suggesting the influence of high-frequency climate forcing on fire responses on a subcontinental scale, in the high Andes. ENSO variability did not show a significant relation to fire activity for these three countries, partly because ENSO variability did not significantly relate to precipitation extremes, although it strongly did to temperature extremes. Whilst ENSO did not individually lead the observed regional fire trends, our results suggest a climate influence on fire activity, mainly through a sawtooth pattern of precipitation (increased rainfall before fire-peak seasons (t-1) followed by drought spells and unusual low temperatures (t0), which is particularly common where fire is carried by low fuel loads (e.g., grasslands and fine fuel). This climatic sawtooth appeared as the main driver of fire trends, above local human influences and fuel build

  18. Active Nozzle Control and Integrated Design Optimization of a Beam Subject to Fluid-Dynamic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borglund, D.

    1999-02-01

    Active nozzle control is used to improve the stability of a beam subject to forces induced by fluid flow through attached pipes. The control system has a significant effect on the structural stability, making both flutter and divergence type of instabilities possible. The stability analysis is carried out using a state-variable approach based on a finite element formulation of the structural dynamics. The simultaneous design of the control system and the beam shape minimizing structural mass is performed using numerical optimization. The inclusion of the control system in the optimization gives a considerable reduction of the structural mass but results in an optimal design which is very sensitive to imperfections. Using a simple model of the control system uncertainties, a more robust design is obtained by solving a modified optimization problem. Throughout the study, the theoretical findings are verified by experiments.

  19. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ∼95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes. PMID:27251117

  20. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ∼95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes. PMID:27251117

  1. Incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Denise O; Oh, Gi-Taik; O'Donnell, Francis L; Clark, Leslie L

    2015-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition among adults that can cause symptoms such as frequent heartburn, substernal chest pain, and regurgitation of food. During 2005-2014, a total of 137,081 active component service members had an incident (first-ever) diagnosis of GERD (incidence rate: 101.3 per 10,000 person-years). Incidence rates were higher than their respective counterparts among females, black and white non-Hispanics, service members in the Coast Guard and Air Force, officers, and those in healthcare occupations. Rates increased monotonically with increasing age groups. Most GERD cases (79.2%) were uncomplicated GERD; however, 20.8% were identified as having a symptom or complication linked to their GERD diagnosis. Lifestyle changes, medication, and prevention of serious complications should be emphasized among individuals diagnosed with GERD, particularly those at risk for severe disease.

  2. Nanoelectrodes integrated in atomic force microscopy cantilevers for imaging of in situ enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Kueng, Angelika; Kranz, Christine; Lugstein, Alois; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2005-01-01

    For investigation of laterally resolved information on biological activity, techniques for simultaneously obtaining complementary information correlated in time and space are required. In this context, recent developments in scanning probe microscopy are aimed at information on the sample topography and simultaneously on the physical and chemical properties at the nanometer scale. With the integration of submicro- and nanoelectrodes into atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes using microfabrication techniques, an elegant approach combining scanning electrochemical microscopy with AFM is demonstrated. This instrumentation enables simultaneous imaging of topography and obtainment of laterally resolved electrochemical information in AFM tapping mode. Hence, topographical and electrochemical information on soft surfaces (e.g., biological species) and polymers can be obtained. The functionality of tip-integrated electrodes is demonstrated by simultaneous electrochemical and topographical studies of an enzyme-modified micropattern.

  3. An intelligent active force control algorithm to control an upper extremity exoskeleton for motor recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbullah Mohd Isa, Wan; Taha, Zahari; Mohd Khairuddin, Ismail; Majeed, Anwar P. P. Abdul; Fikri Muhammad, Khairul; Abdo Hashem, Mohammed; Mahmud, Jamaluddin; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the modelling and control of a two degree of freedom upper extremity exoskeleton by means of an intelligent active force control (AFC) mechanism. The Newton-Euler formulation was used in deriving the dynamic modelling of both the anthropometry based human upper extremity as well as the exoskeleton that consists of the upper arm and the forearm. A proportional-derivative (PD) architecture is employed in this study to investigate its efficacy performing joint-space control objectives. An intelligent AFC algorithm is also incorporated into the PD to investigate the effectiveness of this hybrid system in compensating disturbances. The Mamdani Fuzzy based rule is employed to approximate the estimated inertial properties of the system to ensure the AFC loop responds efficiently. It is found that the IAFC-PD performed well against the disturbances introduced into the system as compared to the conventional PD control architecture in performing the desired trajectory tracking.

  4. An Activation Force-based Affinity Measure for Analyzing Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Guo, Hanliang; Wang, Zhanyi

    2011-01-01

    Affinity measure is a key factor that determines the quality of the analysis of a complex network. Here, we introduce a type of statistics, activation forces, to weight the links of a complex network and thereby develop a desired affinity measure. We show that the approach is superior in facilitating the analysis through experiments on a large-scale word network and a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network consisting of ∼5,000 human proteins. The experiment on the word network verifies that the measured word affinities are highly consistent with human knowledge. Further, the experiment on the PPI network verifies the measure and presents a general method for the identification of functionally similar proteins based on PPIs. Most strikingly, we find an affinity network that compactly connects the cancer-associated proteins to each other, which may reveal novel information for cancer study; this includes likely protein interactions and key proteins in cancer-related signal transduction pathways. PMID:22355630

  5. Incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Denise O; Oh, Gi-Taik; O'Donnell, Francis L; Clark, Leslie L

    2015-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition among adults that can cause symptoms such as frequent heartburn, substernal chest pain, and regurgitation of food. During 2005-2014, a total of 137,081 active component service members had an incident (first-ever) diagnosis of GERD (incidence rate: 101.3 per 10,000 person-years). Incidence rates were higher than their respective counterparts among females, black and white non-Hispanics, service members in the Coast Guard and Air Force, officers, and those in healthcare occupations. Rates increased monotonically with increasing age groups. Most GERD cases (79.2%) were uncomplicated GERD; however, 20.8% were identified as having a symptom or complication linked to their GERD diagnosis. Lifestyle changes, medication, and prevention of serious complications should be emphasized among individuals diagnosed with GERD, particularly those at risk for severe disease. PMID:26207411

  6. Chemical activity induces dynamical force with global structure in a reaction-diffusion-convection system.

    PubMed

    Mahara, Hitoshi; Okada, Koichi; Nomura, Atsushi; Miike, Hidetoshi; Sakurai, Tatsunari

    2009-07-01

    We found a rotating global structure induced by the dynamical force of local chemical activity in a thin solution layer of excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction coupled with diffusion. The surface flow and deformation associated with chemical spiral waves (wavelength about 1 mm) represents a global unidirectional structure and a global tilt in the entire Petri dish (100 mm in diameter), respectively. For these observations, we scanned the condition of hierarchal pattern selection. From this result, the bromomalonic acid has an important role to induce the rotating global structure. An interaction between a reaction-diffusion process and a surface-tension-driven effect leads to such hierarchal pattern with different scales. PMID:19658764

  7. Sexually transmitted infections, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    2013-02-01

    This report summarizes incidence rates of the five most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among active component service members of the U.S. Armed Forces during 2000 to 2012. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections were the most common, followed in decreasing order of frequency by infections associated with chlamydia, herpes simplex virus, gonorrhea, and syphilis. Compared to their counterparts, women, younger service members, soldiers, and enlisted members had higher incidence rates of each STI. Rates tended to be lower among married personnel. Rates of chlamydia, HPV, and gonorrhea diagnoses were notably higher among women during 2006 to 2008 but rates of the latter two infections have since declined sharply. The relatively recent introduction of STI screening among young service women and the HPV vaccine are discussed.

  8. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-06-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ~95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes.

  9. A force transducer and a length-ramp generator for mechanical investigations of frog-heart myocytes.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, G; Colomo, F; Poggesi, C; Tesi, C

    1993-04-01

    An apparatus for studying the mechanics of isolated frog heart myocytes is described. The cells are held horizontal in a through of Ringer solution by means of two suction micropipettes. Myocyte force is measured with an opto-electronic system recording the deflection of the tip of one micropipette, which acts as a cantilever force probe. The force probes are selected for compliance according to the force a myocyte is expected to develop in a given condition, so as to limit myocyte shortening during force development to no more than 1% of the slack cellular length (l0). The other micropipette, which is stiff relative to the forces measured, is mounted on an electromagnetic-loudspeaker motor by which controlled-velocity length changes, of preset size and in either direction, are imposed on myocytes. The force transducer has a sensitivity of 5-10 mV/nN, with a frequency response of 700-900 Hz in Ringer solution and a resolution of 0.5-1 nN. The motor with a suction micropipette can complete controlled-velocity length ramps within 1.5-2.0 ms, across a range of +/- 100 microns at a resolution of 8.0 nm. These values correspond, for frog-heart myocytes 200 microns and 400 microns long, to 25%-50% l0 and 0.002%-0.004% l0 respectively. PMID:8488085

  10. One-dimensional potential of mean force underestimates activation barrier for transport across flexible lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelevich, Dmitry I.

    2013-10-01

    Transport of a fullerene-like nanoparticle across a lipid bilayer is investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force (PMF) acting on the nanoparticle in a flexible bilayer suspended in water and a bilayer restrained to a flat surface are computed by constrained MD simulations. The rate of the nanoparticle transport into the bilayer interior is predicted using one-dimensional Langevin models based on these PMFs. The predictions are compared with the transport rates obtained from a series of direct (unconstrained) MD simulations of the solute transport into the flexible bilayer. It is observed that the PMF acting on the solute in the flexible membrane underestimates the transport rate by more than an order of magnitude while the PMF acting on the solute in the restrained membrane yields an accurate estimate of the activation energy for transport into the flexible membrane. This paradox is explained by a coexistence of metastable membrane configurations for a range of the solute positions inside and near the flexible membrane. This leads to a significant reduction of the contribution of the transition state to the mean force acting on the solute. Restraining the membrane shape ensures that there is only one stable membrane configuration corresponding to each solute position and thus the transition state is adequately represented in the PMF. This mechanism is quite general and thus this phenomenon is expected to occur in a wide range of interfacial systems. A simple model for the free energy landscape of the coupled solute-membrane system is proposed and validated. This model explicitly accounts for effects of the membrane deformations on the solute transport and yields an accurate prediction of the activation energy for the solute transport.

  11. Force and twist dependence of RepC nicking activity on torsionally-constrained DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Pastrana, Cesar L.; Carrasco, Carolina; Akhtar, Parvez; Leuba, Sanford H.; Khan, Saleem A.; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial plasmids replicate by an asymmetric rolling-circle mechanism that requires sequence-specific recognition for initiation, nicking of one of the template DNA strands and unwinding of the duplex prior to subsequent leading strand DNA synthesis. Nicking is performed by a replication-initiation protein (Rep) that directly binds to the plasmid double-stranded origin and remains covalently bound to its substrate 5′-end via a phosphotyrosine linkage. It has been proposed that the inverted DNA sequences at the nick site form a cruciform structure that facilitates DNA cleavage. However, the role of Rep proteins in the formation of this cruciform and the implication for its nicking and religation functions is unclear. Here, we have used magnetic tweezers to directly measure the DNA nicking and religation activities of RepC, the replication initiator protein of plasmid pT181, in plasmid sized and torsionally-constrained linear DNA molecules. Nicking by RepC occurred only in negatively supercoiled DNA and was force- and twist-dependent. Comparison with a type IB topoisomerase in similar experiments highlighted a relatively inefficient religation activity of RepC. Based on the structural modeling of RepC and on our experimental evidence, we propose a model where RepC nicking activity is passive and dependent upon the supercoiling degree of the DNA substrate. PMID:27488190

  12. Single Molecule Characterization of UV-Activated Antibodies on Gold by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Funari, R; Della Ventura, B; Altucci, C; Offenhäusser, A; Mayer, D; Velotta, R

    2016-08-16

    The interaction between proteins and solid surfaces can influence their conformation and therefore also their activity and affinity. These interactions are highly specific for the respective combination of proteins and solids. Consequently, it is desirable to investigate the conformation of proteins on technical surfaces, ideally at single molecule level, and to correlate the results with their activity. This is in particular true for biosensors where the conformation-dependent target affinity of an immobilized receptor determines the sensitivity of the sensor. Here, we investigate for the first time the immobilization and orientation of antibodies (Abs) photoactivated by a photonic immobilization technique (PIT), which has previously demonstrated to enhance binding capabilities of antibody receptors. The photoactivated immunoglobulins are immobilized on ultrasmooth template stripped gold films and investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the level of individual molecules. The observed protein orientations are compared with results of nonactivated antibodies adsorbed on similar gold films and mica reference samples. We find that the behavior of Abs is similar for mica and gold when the protein are not treated (physisorption), whereas smaller contact area and larger heights are measured when Abs are treated (PIT). This is explained by assuming that the activated antibodies tend to be more upright compared with nonirradiated ones, thereby providing a better exposure of the binding sites. This finding matches the observed enhancement of Abs binding efficiency when PIT is used to functionalize gold surface of QCM-based biosensors.

  13. Oxygen uptake, muscle activity and ground reaction force during water aerobic exercises.

    PubMed

    Alberton, C L; Pinto, S S; Cadore, E L; Tartaruga, M P; Kanitz, A C; Antunes, A H; Finatto, P; Kruel, L F M

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to compare the oxygen uptake (VO2), the muscle activity of lower limbs, and the vertical ground reaction force (V-GRF) of women performing water aerobic exercises at different intensities. 12 young women performed the experimental protocol, which consisted of 3 water exercises (stationary running [SR], frontal kick [FK] and cross country skiing [CCS]) at 3 intensities (first and second ventilatory thresholds and maximum effort). A two-way repeated measures ANOVA was used. Regarding VO2, different responses between intensities (p<0.001) were found, and values between exercises were similar. For electromyographic activity (EMG), differences between intensities for all muscles (p<0.001) were found. Greater EMG signals were observed in the FK compared to SR for rectus femoris, semitendinosus, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris muscles (p<0.05). Regarding V-GRF, there was an increase in the V-GRF at greater intensities compared to the first ventilatory threshold (p=0.001). In addition, lower values were found during CCS compared to the SR and FK exercises (p<0.001). Thus, greater cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular responses were observed with increasing intensity. Exercises such as CCS could be used to attenuate the V-GRF; if the purpose is to reduce the muscular activity of lower limbs at a specific intensity, SR could be recommended.

  14. Single Molecule Characterization of UV-Activated Antibodies on Gold by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Funari, R; Della Ventura, B; Altucci, C; Offenhäusser, A; Mayer, D; Velotta, R

    2016-08-16

    The interaction between proteins and solid surfaces can influence their conformation and therefore also their activity and affinity. These interactions are highly specific for the respective combination of proteins and solids. Consequently, it is desirable to investigate the conformation of proteins on technical surfaces, ideally at single molecule level, and to correlate the results with their activity. This is in particular true for biosensors where the conformation-dependent target affinity of an immobilized receptor determines the sensitivity of the sensor. Here, we investigate for the first time the immobilization and orientation of antibodies (Abs) photoactivated by a photonic immobilization technique (PIT), which has previously demonstrated to enhance binding capabilities of antibody receptors. The photoactivated immunoglobulins are immobilized on ultrasmooth template stripped gold films and investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the level of individual molecules. The observed protein orientations are compared with results of nonactivated antibodies adsorbed on similar gold films and mica reference samples. We find that the behavior of Abs is similar for mica and gold when the protein are not treated (physisorption), whereas smaller contact area and larger heights are measured when Abs are treated (PIT). This is explained by assuming that the activated antibodies tend to be more upright compared with nonirradiated ones, thereby providing a better exposure of the binding sites. This finding matches the observed enhancement of Abs binding efficiency when PIT is used to functionalize gold surface of QCM-based biosensors. PMID:27444884

  15. Activating Generative Learning in Organizations through Optimizing Relational Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Mary Kay

    2010-01-01

    Using a grounded theory method, this dissertation seeks to discover how relationships impact organizational generative learning. An organization is a socially constructed reality and organizational learning is situated in the process of co-participation. To discover the link between relationships and generative learning this study considers the…

  16. Mental Arithmetic Activates Analogic Representations of Internally Generated Sums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallai, Arava Y.; Schunn, Christian D.; Fiez, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    The internal representation of numbers generated during calculation has received little attention. Much of the mathematics learning literature focuses on symbolic retrieval of math facts; in contrast, we critically test the hypothesis that internally generated numbers are represented analogically, using an approximate number system. In an fMRI…

  17. Functional Brain Activity Relates to 0-3 and 3-8 Hz Force Oscillations in Essential Tremor.

    PubMed

    Neely, Kristina A; Kurani, Ajay S; Shukla, Priyank; Planetta, Peggy J; Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Goldman, Jennifer G; Corcos, Daniel M; Okun, Michael S; Vaillancourt, David E

    2015-11-01

    It is well-established that during goal-directed motor tasks, patients with essential tremor have increased oscillations in the 0-3 and 3-8 Hz bands. It remains unclear if these increased oscillations relate to activity in specific brain regions. This study used task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare the brain activity associated with oscillations in grip force output between patients with essential tremor, patients with Parkinson's disease who had clinically evident tremor, and healthy controls. The findings demonstrate that patients with essential tremor have increased brain activity in the motor cortex and supplementary motor area compared with controls, and this activity correlated positively with 3-8 Hz force oscillations. Brain activity in cerebellar lobules I-V was reduced in essential tremor compared with controls and correlated negatively with 0-3 Hz force oscillations. Widespread differences in brain activity were observed between essential tremor and Parkinson's disease. Using functional connectivity analyses during the task evidenced reduced cerebellar-cortical functional connectivity in patients with essential tremor compared with controls and Parkinson's disease. This study provides new evidence that in essential tremor 3-8 Hz force oscillations relate to hyperactivity in motor cortex, 0-3 Hz force oscillations relate to the hypoactivity in the cerebellum, and cerebellar-cortical functional connectivity is impaired.

  18. North Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Activity over the last 2000 years: Patterns, Consequences and Potential Climatic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, J. P.; Lane, P.; Hawkes, A.; van Hengstum, P. J.; Ranasinghe, P. N.; Toomey, M.; MacDonald, D.

    2011-12-01

    1300 years ago. A reconstruction of intense hurricane landfalls from the Gulf coast documents some similar patterns that likely point to large scale climate forcing; however, some significant differences are evident. For example, the Gulf frequently experienced intense hurricanes during the 13th and 14th centuries, but a subsequent decline in activity has persisted through the historic period. This antiphasing of intense hurricane activity between the East and Gulf coasts may point to basin-wide changes in hurricane tracks, but regional controls on the frequency of intense hurricanes (e.g., loop current penetration in the Gulf of Mexico) may also have driven spatial variability in Atlantic paleohurricane records.

  19. Characterization of dominant hydrologic events: the role of spatial, temporal and climatic forces in generating the greatest sediment loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, A. L.; Boll, J.; Brooks, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Soil erosion and the ensuing elevated sediment loads in surface water bodies result in impaired water quality and unsuitable habitat for salmonid species and other cold water biota. Increased sediment loads also relate to high nutrient levels in streams at downstream locations. Identification of the most sensitive factors leading to major sediment loads is useful in selection and placement of agricultural best management practices (BMPs), especially those that are management oriented such as nutrient management plans and the timing of tillage. Many BMPs work well for average storms but do not achieve desired results during the large storms, when hydrologically sensitive areas contribute the greatest amount of runoff and erosion. Research has shown that the majority of sediment loads in streams and rivers occur during a small proportion of the year, specifically during a few large storm events. In this research, we look beyond the conclusion that large events contribute the majority of sediment loads by investigating the driving forces behind each event. Long-term monitoring data were used from two monitoring stations in a small, mixed land use watershed in northern Idaho. The upper monitoring station is below mostly agricultural land use, and the lower monitoring station is below mostly urban land use. The watershed in question, Paradise Creek in Idaho, is the subject of a sediment TMDL which has not yet been consistently achieved and is currently up for review by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. We statistically analyzed the influence of multiple interacting variables on the magnitude of sediment loads during hydrologic events from 2002 to 2012. Spatial (i.e., above and below monitoring station data), temporal (i.e., seasonality), and climatic effects (i.e., precipitation, snowfall and snow melt) were examined, as well as the presence of frozen soils and the timing of events relative to each other. We hypothesized that (1) the events with the

  20. Emotion at Work: A Contribution to Third-Generation Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-01-01

    Second-generation cultural-historical activity theory, which drew its inspiration from Leont'ev's work, constituted an advance over Vygotsky's first-generation theory by explicitly articulating the dialectical relation between individual and collective. As part of an effort to develop third-generation-historical activity theory, I propose in this…